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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Expert Meeting Report: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The topic of this meeting was 'Recommendations For Applying Water Heaters In Combination Space And Domestic Water Heating Systems.' Presentations and discussions centered on the design, performance, and maintenance of these combination systems, with the goal of developing foundational information toward the development of a Building America Measure Guideline on this topic. The meeting was held at the Westford Regency Hotel, in Westford, Massachusetts on 7/31/2011.

Rudd, A.; Ueno, K.; Bergey, D.; Osser, R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Expert Meeting Report: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recommendations for Applying Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems A. Rudd, K. Ueno, D. Bergey, R. Osser Building Science Corporation June 2012 i This report received minimal editorial review at NREL. NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, subcontractors, or affiliated partners makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

3

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 222 194 17...

4

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,100...

5

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,928 1,316...

6

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

7

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

8

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

9

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

10

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

11

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

12

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

13

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

14

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

15

Section D: SPACE HEATING  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Form EIA-457A (2005)--Household Questionnaire OMB No.: 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 33 Section D: SPACE HEATING

16

Passive solar space heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of passive solar space heating is presented indicating trends in design, new developments, performance measures, analytical design aids, and monitored building results.

Balcomb, J.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Applied heat transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat transfer principles are discussed with emphasis on the practical aspects of the problems. Correlations for heat transfer and pressure drop from several worldwide sources for flow inside and outside of tubes, including finned tubes are presented, along with design and performance calculations of heat exchangers economizers, air heaters, condensers, waste-heat boilers, fired heaters, superheaters, and boiler furnaces. Vibration analysis for tube bundles and heat exchangers are also discussed, as are estimating gas-mixture properties at atmospheric and elevated pressures and life-cycle costing techniques. (JMT)

Ganapathy, V.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

19

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

20

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Section D: SPACE HEATING  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Central warm-air furnace with ducts to individual rooms other than a heat pump ..... 03 Steam/Hot water ... REVERSE Heat pump ... Don't have a separate water heater ...

22

Space Heating and Cooling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A wide variety of technologies are available for heating and cooling homes and other buildings. In addition, many heating and cooling systems have certain supporting equipment in common, such as...

23

Passive Solar Space Heat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Space Heat Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Passive Solar Space Heat Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titlePassive...

24

Solar Space Heat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Solar Space Heat Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Solar Space Heat Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSolarS...

25

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ........................... 1,870 1,276 322 138 133 43.0 29.4 7.4 3.2 3.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 243 151 34 40 18 78.7 48.9 11.1 13.0 5.7 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 202 139 31 29 Q 54.8 37.6 8.5 7.9 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 300 240 31 21 7 42.5 34.1 4.4 3.0 1.1 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 250 182 40 11 Q 41.5 30.2 6.6 1.9 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 236 169 41 8 19 35.4 25.2 6.2 1.2 2.8 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 241 165 54 7 16 36.3 24.8 8.1 1.0 2.4 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 199 130 42 11 16 35.0 22.8 7.5 1.9 2.8 Over 500,000 ............................. 198

26

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ............................. 2,037 1,378 338 159 163 42.0 28.4 7.0 3.3 3.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 249 156 35 41 18 78.6 49.1 11.0 12.9 5.6 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 218 147 32 31 7 54.8 37.1 8.1 7.9 1.7 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 343 265 34 25 18 43.8 33.9 4.4 3.2 2.3 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 270 196 41 13 Q 40.9 29.7 6.3 2.0 2.9 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 269 186 45 13 24 35.8 24.8 6.0 1.8 3.2 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 267 182 56 10 19 35.4 24.1 7.4 1.3 2.6 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 204 134 43 11 17 34.7 22.7 7.3 1.8 2.9 Over 500,000 .............................

27

Geothermal Energy: Residential Space Heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study, which was carried out under the auspices of the DGRST, was to determine the best way to use geothermal hot water for residential space heating. It quickly became apparent that the type of heating apparatus used in the housing units was most important and that heat pumps could be a valuable asset, making it possible to extract even more geothermal heat and thus substantially improve the cost benefit of the systems. Many factors play a significant role in this problem. Therefore, after a first stage devoted to analyzing the problem through a manual method which proved quite useful, the systematic consideration of all important aspects led us to use a computer to optimize solutions and process a large number of cases. The software used for this general study can also be used to work out particular cases: it is now available to any interested party through DGRST. This program makes it possible to: (1) take climatic conditions into account in a very detailed manner, including temperatures as well as insolation. 864 cases corresponding to 36 typical days divided into 24 hours each were chosen to represent the heating season. They make it possible to define the heating needs of any type of housing unit. (2) simulate and analyze the behavior in practice of a geothermal heating system when heat is extracted from the well by a simple heat exchanger. This simulation makes it possible to evaluate the respective qualities of various types of heating apparatus which can be used in homes. It also makes it possible to define the best control systems for the central system and substations and to assess quite accurately the presence of terminal controls, such as radiators with thermostatically controlled valves. (3) determine to what extent the addition of a heat pump makes it possible to improve the cost benefit of geothermal heating. When its average characteristics and heating use conditions (price, coefficient of performance, length of utilization, electrical rates, etc.) are taken into account, the heat pump should not be scaled for maximum heating power. Consequently, the program considers several possible sizes, with different installation schemes, and selects for each case the value which corresponds to the lowest cost of heating.

None

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Solar space heating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heating heating Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from the United States Department of Energy's description of solar space heating technology.)[1] Contents 1 Space Heating 2 Passive Solar Space Heating 3 Active Solar Space Heating 4 References Space Heating A solar space-heating system can consist of a passive system, an active system, or a combination of both. Passive systems are typically less costly and less complex than active systems. However, when retrofitting a building, active systems might be the only option for obtaining solar energy. Passive Solar Space Heating Passive solar space heating takes advantage of warmth from the sun through design features, such as large south-facing windows, and materials in the floors or walls that absorb warmth during the day and release that warmth

29

Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating solar air collector PV-panel fannon-return valve DHW tank mantle cold waterhot water roof Solar Energy Centre Denmark Danish Technological Institute SEC-R-29 #12;Solar air heating system for combined DHW and space heating Søren ?stergaard Jensen

30

Solar space heating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Solar space heating (Redirected from - Solar Ventilation Preheat) Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from the United States Department of Energy's description of solar space heating technology.)[1] Contents 1 Space Heating 2 Passive Solar Space Heating 3 Active Solar Space Heating 4 References Space Heating A solar space-heating system can consist of a passive system, an active system, or a combination of both. Passive systems are typically less costly and less complex than active systems. However, when retrofitting a building, active systems might be the only option for obtaining solar

31

Section D: SPACE HEATING - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Form EIA-457A (2001)--Household Questionnaire OMB No.: 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 19 Section D: SPACE HEATING

32

Residential space heating cost: geothermal vs conventional systems  

SciTech Connect

The operating characteristics and economies of several representative space heating systems are analyzed. The analysis techniques used may be applied to a larger variety of systems than considered herein, thereby making this document more useful to the residential developer, heating and ventilating contractor, or homeowner considering geothermal space heating. These analyses are based on the use of geothermal water at temperatures as low as 120/sup 0/F in forced air systems and 140/sup 0/F in baseboard convection and radiant floor panel systems. This investigation indicates the baseboard convection system is likely to be the most economical type of geothermal space heating system when geothermal water of at least 140/sup 0/F is available. Heat pumps utilizing water near 70/sup 0/F, with negligible water costs, are economically feasible and they are particularly attractive when space cooling is included in system designs. Generally, procurement and installation costs for similar geothermal and conventional space heating systems are about equal, so geothermal space heating is cost competitive when the unit cost of geothermal energy is less than or equal to the unit cost of conventional energy. Guides are provided for estimating the unit cost of geothermal energy for cases where a geothermal resource is known to exist but has not been developed for use in residential space heating.

Engen, I.A.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Buildings","All Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" 0. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Othera" "All Buildings ................",4657,4016,1880,2380,377,96,307,94 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1982,926,1082,214,"Q",162,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,946,379,624,73,"Q",88,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,629,324,389,52,19,42,"Q"

34

Vibration test plan for a space station heat pipe subassembly  

SciTech Connect

This test plan describes the Sundstrand portion of task two of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contract 9-x6H-8102L-1. Sundstrand Energy Systems was awarded a contract to investigate the performance capabilities of a potassium liquid metal heat pipe as applied to the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) solar dynamic power system for the Space Station. The test objective is to expose the heat pipe subassembly to the random vibration environment which simulates the space shuttle launch condition. The results of the test will then be used to modify as required future designs of the heat pipe.

Parekh, M.B. [Sundstrand Energy Systems, Rockford, IL (United States)

1987-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

35

ISHED1: Applying the LEM Methodology to Heat Exchanger Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISHED1: Applying the LEM Methodology to Heat Exchanger Design Kenneth A. Kaufman Ryszard S. Michalski MLI 00-2 #12;2 ISHED1: APPLYING THE LEM METHODOLOGY TO HEAT EXCHANGER DESIGN Kenneth A. Kaufman-2 January 2000 #12;ISHED1: APPLYING THE LEM METHODOLOGY TO HEAT EXCHANGER DESIGN Abstract Evolutionary

Michalski, Ryszard S.

36

Heat pump system with selective space cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve.

Pendergrass, Joseph C. (Gainesville, GA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Heat pump system with selective space cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

Pendergrass, J.C.

1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

38

Thulium heat sources for space power applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reliable power supplies for use in transportation and remote systems will be an important part of space exploration terrestrial activities. A potential power source is available in the rare earth metal, thulium. Fuel sources can be produced by activating Tm-169 targets in the space station reactor. The resulting Tm-170 heat sources can be used in thermoelectric generators to power instrumentation and telecommunications located at remote sites such as weather stations. As the heat source in a dynamic Sterling or Brayton cycle system, the heat source can provide a lightweight power source for rovers or other terrestrial transportation systems.

Alderman, C.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

40

Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Klamath Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Klamath Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature...

42

List of Solar Space Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heat Incentives Space Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 499 Solar Space Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 499) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat

43

Heating Degree Day Data Applied to Residential Heating Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-specific total electric energy and heating oil consumption for individual residences show a very high correlation with National Weather Service airport temperature data when transformed to heating degree days. Correlations of regional total ...

Robert G. Quayle; Henry F. Diaz

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

BIODIESEL BLENDS IN SPACE HEATING EQUIPMENT.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biodiesel is a diesel-like fuel that is derived from processing vegetable oils from various sources, such as soy oil, rapeseed or canola oil, and also waste vegetable oils resulting from cooking use. Brookhaven National laboratory initiated an evaluation of the performance of blends of biodiesel and home heating oil in space heating applications under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This report is a result of this work performed in the laboratory. A number of blends of varying amounts of a biodiesel in home heating fuel were tested in both a residential heating system and a commercial size boiler. The results demonstrate that blends of biodiesel and heating oil can be used with few or no modifications to the equipment or operating practices in space heating. The results also showed that there were environmental benefits from the biodiesel addition in terms of reductions in smoke and in Nitrogen Oxides (NOx). The latter result was particularly surprising and of course welcome, in view of the previous results in diesel engines where no changes had been seen. Residential size combustion equipment is presently not subject to NOx regulation. If reductions in NOx similar to those observed here hold up in larger size (commercial and industrial) boilers, a significant increase in the use of biodiesel-like fuel blends could become possible.

KRISHNA,C.R.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

List of Passive Solar Space Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heat Incentives Space Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 278 Passive Solar Space Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 278) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alternative Energy and Energy Conservation Patent Exemption (Corporate) (Massachusetts) Industry Recruitment/Support Massachusetts Commercial Biomass Fuel Cells Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Municipal Solid Waste Passive Solar Space Heat Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy and Energy Conservation Patent Exemption (Personal) (Massachusetts) Industry Recruitment/Support Massachusetts General Public/Consumer Biomass

46

Analysis and numerical optimization of gas turbine space power systems with nuclear fission reactor heat sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new three objective optimization technique is developed and applied to find the operating conditions for fission reactor heated Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) space power systems at which maximum efficiency, minimum radiator area, and minimum total ...

Albert J. Juhasz / Jerzy Sawicki

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Table SH7. Average Consumption for Space Heating by Main Space ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil (gallons) Main Space Heating Fuel Used (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel as a main heating source) Table SH7.

48

Table SH8. Average Consumption for Space Heating by Main Space ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil Main Space Heating Fuel Used (million Btu of consumption per household using the fuel as a main heating source) Any Major Fuel 4 Table SH8.

49

Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa...

50

Building Technologies Office: Space Heating and Cooling Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(HVAC) and refrigeration. DOE is conducting research into integration of optimized heat exchanger designs into new products and space conditioning systems. DOE projects...

51

Heat pipe technology development for high temperature space radiator applications  

SciTech Connect

Technology requirements for heat pipe radiators, potentially among the lightest weight systems for space power applications, include flexible elements, and improved specific radiator performance(kg/kW). For these applications a flexible heat pipe capable of continuous operation through an angle of 180/sup 0/ has been demonstrated. The effect of bend angle on the heat pipe temperature distribution is reviewed. An analysis of lightweight membrane heat pipe radiators that use surface tension forces for fluid containment has been conducted. The design analysis of these lightweight heat pipes is described and a potential application in heat rejection systems for space nuclear power plants outlined.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.; Elder, M.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Space Heating & Cooling Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Space Heating & Cooling Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Space Heating & Cooling Research The Emerging Technology team conducts research in space heating and cooling technologies, with a goal of realizing aggregate energy savings of 20% relative to a 2010 baseline. In addition to work involving the development of products, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), along with industry partners and researchers, develops best practices, tests, and guides designed to reduce market barriers and increase public awareness of these energy saving technologies. Research is currently focusing on: Geothermal Heat Pumps Photo of a home with a geothermal heat pump, showing how it can regulate the temperature of a home using the temperature underground to cool warm air or heat cold air.

53

Infrared Thermography applied to measurement of Heat transfer coefficient of water in a pipe heated by Joule effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Internal sources of heat are due to convection from flow of the heat transfer fluid through the pipes. Heat (material, diameter, spacing, and burial depth), (4) system flow rates, (5) heat transfer fluid properties · heat transfer fluid = 42% propylene glycol @ a flow rate of 350 gpm · heat pump model = Water Furnace

54

Applying Learnable Evolution Model to Heat Exchanger Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new approach to evolutionary computation, called Learnable Evolution Model (LEM), has been applied to the problem of optimizing tube structures of heat exchangers. In contrast to conventional Darwiniantype evolutionary computation algorithms that use various forms of mutation and/or recombination operators, LEM employs machine learning to guide the process of generating new individuals. A system, ISHED1, based on LEM, automatically searches for the highest capacity heat exchangers under given technical and environmental constraints. The results of experiments have been highly promising, often producing solutions exceeding the best human designs.

Kenneth A. Kaufman; Ryszard S. Michalski

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

"Table B21. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" 1. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Othera" "All Buildings ................",67338,61612,32291,37902,5611,5534,2728,945 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,2651,3250,598,"Q",469,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,2808,4613,573,"Q",688,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,5079,6069,773,307,682,"Q"

56

Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services June 24, 2012 - 2:50pm Addthis Get tips on heating and cooling product information and services. | Photo courtesy of Flickr user ActiveSteve. Get tips on heating and cooling product information and services. | Photo courtesy of Flickr user ActiveSteve. Use the following links to get product information and locate professional services for space heating and cooling. Product Information Boilers ENERGY STAR® Information on the benefits of ENERGY STAR boilers, as well as resources to calculate savings and find products. Ceiling Fans ENERGY STAR® Describes the benefits of choosing ENERGY STAR ceiling fans, as well as

57

Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services June 24, 2012 - 2:50pm Addthis Get tips on heating and cooling product information and services. | Photo courtesy of Flickr user ActiveSteve. Get tips on heating and cooling product information and services. | Photo courtesy of Flickr user ActiveSteve. Use the following links to get product information and locate professional services for space heating and cooling. Product Information Boilers ENERGY STAR® Information on the benefits of ENERGY STAR boilers, as well as resources to calculate savings and find products. Ceiling Fans ENERGY STAR® Describes the benefits of choosing ENERGY STAR ceiling fans, as well as

58

Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services Space Heating and Cooling Products and Services June 24, 2012 - 2:50pm Addthis Get tips on heating and cooling product information and services. | Photo courtesy of Flickr user ActiveSteve. Get tips on heating and cooling product information and services. | Photo courtesy of Flickr user ActiveSteve. Use the following links to get product information and locate professional services for space heating and cooling. Product Information Boilers ENERGY STAR® Information on the benefits of ENERGY STAR boilers, as well as resources to calculate savings and find products. Ceiling Fans ENERGY STAR® Describes the benefits of choosing ENERGY STAR ceiling fans, as well as

59

Heat pipe nuclear reactor for space power  

SciTech Connect

A heat-pipe cooled nuclear reactor has been designed to provide 3.2 MW(t) to an out-of-core thermionic conversion system. The reactor is a fast reactor designed to operate at a nominal heat pipe temperature of 1675/sup 0/K. Each reactor fuel element consists of a hexagonal molybdenum block which is bonded along its axis to one end of a molybdenum, lithium vapor, heat pipe. The block is perforated with an array of longitudinal holes which are loaded with UO/sub 2/ pellets. The heat pipe transfers heat directly to a string of six thermionic converters which are bonded along the other end of the heat pipe. An assembly of 90 such fuel elements forms a hexagonal core. The core is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield, a thin thermal neutron absorber and a BeO reflector containing boron loaded control drums.

Koenig, D.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Heat pipe reactors for space power applications  

SciTech Connect

A family of heat pipe reactors design concepts has been developed to provide heat to a variety of electrical conversion systems. Three power plants are described that span the power range 1-500 kW(e) and operate in the temperature range 1200 to 1700/sup 0/K. The reactors are fast, compact, heat-pipe cooled, high-temperature nuclear reactors fueled with fully enriched refractory fuels, UC-ZrC or UO/sub 2/. Each fuel element is cooled by an axially located molybdenum heat pipe containing either sodium or lithium vapor.

Koenig, D.R.; Ranken, W.A.; Salmi, E.W.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Energy Basics: Space Heating and Cooling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in common, such as thermostats and ducts, which provide opportunities for saving energy. Learn how these technologies and systems work. Learn about: Cooling Systems Heating...

62

Burgdorf Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Burgdorf Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Burgdorf, Idaho Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

63

Thermal Solar Energy Systems for Space Heating of Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, the simulation and the analysis of a solar flat plate collectors combined with a compression heat pump is carried out. The system suggested must ensure the heating of a building without the recourse to an auxiliary energy source in complement of this heating system. The system is used to heat a building using heating floor. The building considered is located in Constantine-East of Algeria (Latitude 36.28 N, Longitude 6.62 E, Altitude 689m). For the calculation, the month of February was chosen, which is considered as the coldest month according to the weather data of Constantine. The performances of this system were compared to the performances of the traditional solar heating system using solar collectors and an auxiliary heating load to compensate the deficit. In this case a traditional solar heating system having the same characteristics with regard to the solar collecting area and the volume of storage tank is used. It can be concluded that the space heating system using a solar energy combined with heat pump improve the thermal performance of the heat pump and the global system. The performances of the heating system combining heat pump and solar collectors are higher than that of solar heating system with solar collectors and storage tank. The heat pump assisted by solar energy can contribute to the conservation of conventional energy and can be competitive with the traditional systems of heating.

Gomri, R.; Boulkamh, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Maywood Industries of Oregon Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maywood Industries of Oregon Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Maywood Industries of Oregon Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Maywood Industries of Oregon Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Maywood Industries of Oregon Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

65

Bozeman Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bozeman Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Bozeman Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bozeman Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Bozeman Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Bozeman, Montana Coordinates 45.68346°, -111.050499° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

66

Radium Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radium Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Radium Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Radium Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Radium Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Union County, Oregon Coordinates 45.2334122°, -118.0410627° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

67

Cedarville Elementary & High School Space Heating Low Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cedarville Elementary & High School Space Heating Low Temperature Cedarville Elementary & High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cedarville Elementary & High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cedarville Elementary & High School Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Cedarville, California Coordinates 41.5290606°, -120.1732781° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

68

Miracle Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miracle Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Miracle Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Miracle Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Miracle Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Bakersfield, California Coordinates 35.3732921°, -119.0187125° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

69

Hot Springs National Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Springs National Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hot Springs National Park Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Hot Springs, Arkansas Coordinates 34.5037004°, -93.0551795° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

70

Lolo Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lolo Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Lolo Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lolo Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Lolo Hot Springs Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Missoula County, Montana Coordinates 47.0240503°, -113.6869923° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

71

Klamath Schools (7) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schools (7) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Schools (7) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Klamath Schools (7) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Klamath Schools (7) Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

72

Shoshone Motel & Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shoshone Motel & Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Shoshone Motel & Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Shoshone Motel & Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Shoshone Motel & Trailer Park Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Death Valley, California Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

73

Olene Gap Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olene Gap Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Olene Gap Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Olene Gap Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Olene Gap Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath County, Oregon Coordinates 42.6952767°, -121.6142133° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

74

Surprise Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Surprise Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Surprise Valley Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Cedarville, California Coordinates 41.5290606°, -120.1732781° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

75

Wiesbaden Motel & Health Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wiesbaden Motel & Health Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Wiesbaden Motel & Health Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wiesbaden Motel & Health Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Wiesbaden Motel & Health Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ouray, Colorado Coordinates 38.0227716°, -107.6714487° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

76

Marlin Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marlin Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Marlin Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Marlin Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Marlin Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Marlin, Texas Coordinates 31.3062874°, -96.8980439° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

77

White Sulphur Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sulphur Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Sulphur Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name White Sulphur Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility White Sulphur Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location White Sulphur Springs, Montana Coordinates 46.548277°, -110.9021561° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

78

Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hillbrook Nursing Home Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Clancy, Montana Coordinates 46.4652096°, -111.9863826° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

79

Miracle Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Miracle Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Miracle Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Buhl, Idaho Coordinates 42.5990714°, -114.7594946° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

80

LDS Wardhouse Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LDS Wardhouse Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility LDS Wardhouse Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name LDS Wardhouse Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility LDS Wardhouse Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Newcastle, Utah Coordinates 37.6666413°, -113.549406° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

LDS Church Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LDS Church Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility LDS Church Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name LDS Church Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility LDS Church Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Almo, Idaho Coordinates 42.1001924°, -113.6336192° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

82

The Wilderness Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Wilderness Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility The Wilderness Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name The Wilderness Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility The Wilderness Lodge Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Gila Hot Springs, New Mexico Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

83

Senior Citizens' Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Senior Citizens' Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Senior Citizens' Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Senior Citizens' Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Senior Citizens' Center Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Truth or Consequences, New Mexico Coordinates 33.1284047°, -107.2528069° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

84

Schutz's Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schutz's Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Schutz's Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Schutz's Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Schutz's Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Crouch, Idaho Coordinates 44.1151717°, -115.970954° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

85

Mount Princeton Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mount Princeton Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Mount Princeton Area Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Mount Princeton, Colorado Coordinates 38.749167°, -106.2425° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

86

Baranof Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Baranof Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Baranof Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Sitka, Alaska Coordinates 57.0530556°, -135.33° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

87

Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warm Springs State Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Warm Springs State Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Warm Springs, Montana Coordinates 46.1813145°, -112.78476° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

88

Vale Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Vale Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Vale Residences Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Vale, Oregon Coordinates 43.9821055°, -117.2382311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

89

Cotulla High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cotulla High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Cotulla High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cotulla High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cotulla High School Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Cotulla, Texas Coordinates 28.436934°, -99.2350322° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

90

Melozi Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Melozi Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Melozi Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Yukon, Alaska Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

91

Indian Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Valley Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Indian Valley Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Greenville, California Coordinates 40.1396126°, -120.9510675° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

92

Lakeview Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lakeview Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Lakeview Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lakeview Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Lakeview Residences Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Lakeview, Oregon Coordinates 42.1887721°, -120.345792° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

93

Boulder Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Boulder Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Boulder Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Boulder, Montana Coordinates 46.2365947°, -112.1208336° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

94

Langel Valley Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Langel Valley Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Langel Valley Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Langel Valley Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Langel Valley Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Bonanza, Oregon Coordinates 42.1987607°, -121.4061076° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

95

Henley High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Henley High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Henley High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Henley High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Henley High School Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

96

Homestead Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Homestead Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Homestead Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Hot Springs, Virginia Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

97

Cottonwood Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cottonwood Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cottonwood Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Buena Vista, Colorado Coordinates 38.8422178°, -106.1311288° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

98

Jackson Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jackson Hot Springs Lodge Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Jackson, Montana Coordinates 45.3679793°, -113.4089438° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

99

Box Canyon Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Box Canyon Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Box Canyon Motel Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ouray, Colorado Coordinates 38.0227716°, -107.6714487° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

100

Ophir Creek Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ophir Creek Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Ophir Creek Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ophir Creek Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ophir Creek Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location SW, Alaska Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Modoc High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modoc High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Modoc High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Modoc High School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Modoc High School Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Alturas, California Coordinates 41.4871146°, -120.5424555° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

102

East Middle School and Cayuga Community College Space Heating Low  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Middle School and Cayuga Community College Space Heating Low Middle School and Cayuga Community College Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name East Middle School and Cayuga Community College Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility East Middle School and Cayuga Community College Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Auburn, New York Coordinates 42.9317335°, -76.5660529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

103

Indian Springs School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Springs School Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Indian Springs School Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Big Bend, California Coordinates 39.6982182°, -121.4608015° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

104

Manley Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Manley Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Manley Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Manley Hot Springs, Alaska Coordinates 65.0011111°, -150.6338889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

105

Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ft Bidwell Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ft. Bidwell, California Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

106

Medical Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Medical Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Medical Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Union County, Oregon Coordinates 45.2334122°, -118.0410627° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

107

Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Space Heating Low Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehab. Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Warm Springs, Georgia Coordinates 32.8904081°, -84.6810381° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

108

Vichy Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vichy Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Vichy Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Vichy Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Vichy Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ukiah, California Coordinates 39.1501709°, -123.2077831° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

109

Jump Steady Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump Steady Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump Steady Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jump Steady Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jump Steady Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Buena Vista, Colorado Coordinates 38.8422178°, -106.1311288° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

110

Summer Lake Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summer Lake Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Summer Lake Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Summer Lake Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Summer Lake Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Summer Lake, Oregon Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

111

Stroppel Hotel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Stroppel Hotel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Stroppel Hotel Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Midland, South Dakota Coordinates 44.0716539°, -101.1554178° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

112

Van Norman Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Norman Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Norman Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Van Norman Residences Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Van Norman Residences Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Thermopolis, Wyoming Coordinates 43.6460672°, -108.2120432° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

113

Desert Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Desert Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Desert Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Desert Hot Springs, California Coordinates 33.961124°, -116.5016784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

114

Ouray Municipal Pool Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ouray Municipal Pool Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Ouray Municipal Pool Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ouray Municipal Pool Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ouray Municipal Pool Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ouray, Colorado Coordinates 38.0227716°, -107.6714487° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

115

Canon City Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canon City Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Canon City Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Canon City Area Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Canon City Area Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Canon City, Colorado Coordinates 38.439949°, -105.226097° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

116

Chena Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chena Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Chena Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Fairbanks, Alaska Coordinates 64.8377778°, -147.7163889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

117

Salida Hot Springs (Poncha Spring) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Poncha Spring) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal (Poncha Spring) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Salida Hot Springs (Poncha Spring) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Salida Hot Springs (Poncha Spring) Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Salida, Colorado Coordinates 38.5347193°, -105.9989022° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

118

Modesto Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Modesto Memorial Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Modesto Memorial Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Modesto, California Coordinates 37.6390972°, -120.9968782° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

119

Peppermill Hotel Casino Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peppermill Hotel Casino Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Peppermill Hotel Casino Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Peppermill Hotel Casino Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Peppermill Hotel Casino Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Reno, Nevada Coordinates 39.5296329°, -119.8138027° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

120

Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Hot Springs Lodge Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado Coordinates 39.5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

St. Mary's Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mary's Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Mary's Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name St. Mary's Hospital Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility St. Mary's Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Pierre, South Dakota Coordinates 44.3683156°, -100.3509665° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

122

Steamboat Villa Hot Springs Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Steamboat Villa Hot Springs Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Steamboat Villa Hot Springs Spa Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Reno, Nevada Coordinates 39.5296329°, -119.8138027° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

123

YMCA Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

YMCA Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility YMCA Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name YMCA Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility YMCA Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

124

Vale Slaughter House Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vale Slaughter House Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Vale Slaughter House Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Vale Slaughter House Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Vale Slaughter House Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Vale, Oregon Coordinates 43.9821055°, -117.2382311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

125

Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Pagosa Springs Private Wells Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Pagosa Springs, Colorado Coordinates 37.26945°, -107.0097617° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

126

Avila Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Avila Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Avila Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location San Luis Obispo, California Coordinates 35.2827524°, -120.6596156° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

127

Hunters Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hunters Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hunters Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hunters Hot Spring Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hunters Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Lakeview, Oregon Coordinates 42.1887721°, -120.345792° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

128

Klamath Residence (500) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residence (500) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Residence (500) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Klamath Residence (500) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Klamath Residence (500) Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

129

Klamath Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Klamath Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Klamath Apartment Buildings (13) Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

130

Klamath Churches (5) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Churches (5) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Churches (5) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Klamath Churches (5) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Klamath Churches (5) Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

131

Klamath County Jail Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Jail Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility County Jail Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Klamath County Jail Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Klamath County Jail Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

132

Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Merle West Medical Center Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

133

Lava Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lava Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Lava Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Lava Hot Springs, Idaho Coordinates 42.6193625°, -112.0110712° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

134

Del Rio Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rio Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Rio Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Del Rio Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Del Rio Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Preston, Idaho Coordinates 42.0963133°, -111.8766173° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

135

Walley's Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walley's Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Walley's Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Walley's Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Walley's Hot Springs Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Genoa, Nevada Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

136

Utah State Prison Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prison Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Prison Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Utah State Prison Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Utah State Prison Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Salt Lake City, Utah Coordinates 40.7607793°, -111.8910474° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

137

Twin Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Twin Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Twin Springs Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Boise, Idaho Coordinates 43.6135002°, -116.2034505° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

138

Twin Peaks Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peaks Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Peaks Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Twin Peaks Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Twin Peaks Motel Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ouray, Colorado Coordinates 38.0227716°, -107.6714487° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

139

Health Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Health Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Health Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Health Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Glenwood Springs Health Spa Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Glenwood Springs, Colorado Coordinates 39.5505376°, -107.3247762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

140

Geronimo Springs Museum Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geronimo Springs Museum Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Geronimo Springs Museum Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geronimo Springs Museum Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Geronimo Springs Museum Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Truth or Consequences, New Mexico Coordinates 33.1284047°, -107.2528069° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Arrowhead Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Arrowhead Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Arrowhead Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location San Bernardino, California Coordinates 34.1083449°, -117.2897652° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

142

Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Medical Center Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Caliente, Nevada Coordinates 37.6149648°, -114.5119378° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

143

Broadwater Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Broadwater Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Broadwater Athletic Club & Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Helena, Montana Coordinates 46.6002123°, -112.0147188° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

144

Hot Sulphur Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Sulphur Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hot Sulphur Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Hot Sulphur Springs, Colorado Coordinates 40.0730411°, -106.1027991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

145

Tecopa Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tecopa Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Tecopa Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tecopa Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Tecopa Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Inyo County, California Coordinates 36.3091865°, -117.5495846° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

146

Saratoga Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Saratoga Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Saratoga Springs Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Lehi, Utah Coordinates 40.3916172°, -111.8507662° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

147

Bell Island Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bell Island Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Bell Island Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ketchikan, Alaska Coordinates 55.3422222°, -131.6461111° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

148

Warner Springs Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warner Springs Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Warner Springs Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warner Springs Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Warner Springs Ranch Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location San Diego, California Coordinates 32.7153292°, -117.1572551° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

149

Jackson Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson Well Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jackson Well Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ashland, Oregon Coordinates 42.1853257°, -122.6980457° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

150

Banbury Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Banbury Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Banbury Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Buhl, Idaho Coordinates 42.5990714°, -114.7594946° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

151

Long titanium heat pipes for high-temperature space radiators  

SciTech Connect

Titanium heat pipes are being developed to provide light weight, reliable heat rejection devices as an alternate radiator design for the Space Reactor Power System (SP-100). The radiator design includes 360 heat pipes, each of which is 5.2 m long and dissipates 3 kW of power at 775 K. The radiator heat pipes use potassium as the working fluid, have two screen arteries for fluid return, a roughened surface distributive wicking system, and a D-shaped cross-section container configuration. A prototype titanium heat pipe, 5.5-m long, has been fabricated and tested in space-simulating conditions. Results from startup and isothermal operation tests are presented. These results are also compared to theoretical performance predictions that were used to design the heat pipe initially.

Girrens, S.P.; Ernst, D.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Biodiesel Blends in Space Heating Equipment: January 31, 2001 -- September 28, 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents an evaluation of the performance of blends of biodiesel and home heating oil in space heating applications.

Krishna, C. R.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Table HC3-1a. Space Heating by Climate Zone, Million U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table HC3-1a. Space Heating by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone1 RSE

154

Table CE2-3c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household4,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,3 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

155

Table CE2-7c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household3,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

156

Table CE2-12c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household3,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

157

Table CE2-4c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household3,a Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

158

Table CE2-7c. Space-Heating Energy Consumption in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Physical Units (PU) per Household3 Physical Units of Space-Heating Consumption per Household,2 Where the Main Space-Heating Fuel Is:

159

Table CE2-5.1u. Space-Heating Energy Consumption and Expenditures ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Space-Heating Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Household Member and Demographics, 2001 Household ... Total Households Using a Major Space-Heating

160

Table SH1. Total Households Using a Space Heating Fuel, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Households Using a Space Heating Fuel, 2005 Million U.S. Households Using a Non-Major Fuel 5 ... Space Heating (millions) Energy Information Administration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems: Laboratory Tests  

SciTech Connect

Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olson, R.; Hewitt, M.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Determining the temperature field for cylinder symmetrical heat conduction problems in unsteady heat conduction in finite space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes to present a new method to calculate unsteady heat conduction for cylinder symmetrical geometry. We will investigate the situation where the temperature field and heat flux created around a heat source placed in finite space are determined. ... Keywords: Garbai's integral equation, Laplace transformation, determining the temperate field, district heating pipes, geothermal producing pipe, heat flux density, heat loss, heat pump

Lszl Garbai; Szabolcs Mhes

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Total U.S. Main Space Heating Fuel Used U.S. Using Any Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Heating Degree Days by Main Space Heating Fuel Used, ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: ... Any Fuel Natural Gas Fuel Oil Age of Main Heating ...

164

Membrane heat pipe development for space radiator applications  

SciTech Connect

A self-deploying membrane heat pipe (SMHP) is being designed and fabricated to operate in an in-cabin experiment aboard a STS flight. The heat pipe comprises a mylar membrane with a woven fabric arterial wick and R-11 as the working fluid. Preliminary results indicate that this SMHP design will successfully expand and retract in response to an applied heat load; the retraction force is provided by a constant force spring.

Woloshun, K.; Merrigan, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems  

SciTech Connect

To develop a strategy for incorporating and demonstrating safety, it is necessary to enumerate the unique aspects of space power reactor systems from a safety standpoint. These features must be differentiated from terrestrial nuclear power plants so that our experience can be applied properly. Some ideas can then be developed on how safe designs can be achieved so that they are safe and perceived to be safe by the public. These ideas include operating only after achieving a stable orbit, developing an inherently safe design, ''designing'' in safety from the start and managing the system development (design) so that it is perceived safe. These and other ideas are explored further in this paper.

Cummings, G.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Chico Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Chico Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Pray, Montana Coordinates 45.3802143°, -110.6815999° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

167

Circle Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Circle Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Fairbanks, Alaska Coordinates 64.8377778°, -147.7163889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

168

Buckhorn Mineral Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Buckhorn Mineral Wells Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Mesa, Arizona Coordinates 33.4222685°, -111.8226402° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

169

Jemez Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jemez Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Jemez Springs, New Mexico Coordinates 35.7686356°, -106.692258° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

170

Breitenbush Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Breitenbush Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Marion County, Oregon Coordinates 44.8446393°, -122.5927411° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

171

Fairmont Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facility Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fairmont Hot Springs Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Fairmont Hot Springs Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Fairmont, Montana Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

172

Low Temperature Direct Use Space Heating Geothermal Facilities | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Temperature Direct Use Space Heating Geothermal Facilities Low Temperature Direct Use Space Heating Geothermal Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":800,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":"Geothermal

173

Passive space heating with a self-pumping vapor system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this system, which should be useful for space or water heating, a refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector and condensed within thermal storage located in the building below the collector. The vapor pressure generated in the collector periodically forces the condensed liquid upward to the location of the collector. This paper reports results of an operational test, in which this system provided passive space heating for an outdoor test cell during a winter season. The daily average energy yield and the elevation of collector temperature caused by self-pumping are reported, as well as observations on failure modes, system reliability, and suggestions for a practical configuration.

Hedstrom, J.C.; Neeper, D.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Ground-source Heat Pumps Applied to Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ground-source heat pumps can provide an energy-efficient, cost-effective way to heat and cool commercial facilities. While ground-source heat pumps are well established in the residential sector, their application in larger, commercial-style, facilities is lagging, in part because of a lack of experience with the technology by those in decision-making positions. Through the use of a ground-coupling system, a conventional water-source heat pump design is transformed to a unique means of utilizing thermodynamic properties of earth and groundwater for efficient operation throughout the year in most climates. In essence, the ground (or groundwater) serves as a heat source during winter operation and a heat sink for summer cooling. Many varieties in design are available, so the technology can be adapted to almost any site. Ground-source heat pump systems can be used widely in commercial-building applications and, with proper installation, offer great potential for the commercial sector, where increased efficiency and reduced heating and cooling costs are important. Ground-source heat pump systems require less refrigerant than conventional air-source heat pumps or air-conditioning systems, with the exception of direct-expansion-type ground-source heat pump systems. This chapter provides information and procedures that an energy manager can use to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. Ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits are explained. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application and installation. Two case studies are presented to give the reader a sense of the actual costs and energy savings. A list of manufacturers and references for further reading are included for prospective users who have specific or highly technical questions not fully addressed in this chapter. Sample case spreadsheets are provided in Appendix A. Additional appendixes provide other information on the ground-source heat pump technology.

Parker, Steven A.; Hadley, Donald L.

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

175

Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ground-source heat pumps can provide an energy-efficient, cost-effective way to heat and cool commercial facilities. While ground-source heat pumps are well established in the residential sector, their application in larger, commercial-style, facilities is lagging, in part because of a lack of experience with the technology by those in decision-making positions. Through the use of a ground-coupling system, a conventional water-source heat pump design is transformed to a unique means of utilizing thermodynamic properties of earth and groundwater for efficient operation throughout the year in most climates. In essence, the ground (or groundwater) serves as a heat source during winter operation and a heat sink for summer cooling. Many varieties in design are available, so the technology can be adapted to almost any site. Ground-source heat pump systems can be used widely in commercial-building applications and, with proper installation, offer great potential for the commercial sector, where increased efficiency and reduced heating and cooling costs are important. Ground-source heat pump systems require less refrigerant than conventional air-source heat pumps or air-conditioning systems, with the exception of direct-expansion-type ground-source heat pump systems. This chapter provides information and procedures that an energy manager can use to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. Ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits are explained. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application and installation. Two case studies are presented to give the reader a sense of the actual costs and energy savings. A list of manufacturers and references for further reading are included for prospective users who have specific or highly technical questions not fully addressed in this chapter. Sample case spreadsheets are provided in Appendix A. Additional appendixes provide other information on the ground-source heat pump technology.

Parker, Steven A.; Hadley, Donald L.

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Applying Learnable Evolution Model to Heat Exchanger Design Kenneth A. Kaufman and Ryszard S. Michalski*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applying Learnable Evolution Model to Heat Exchanger Design Kenneth A. Kaufman and Ryszard S), has been applied to the problem of optimizing tube structures of heat exchangers. In contrast. A system, ISHED1, based on LEM, automatically searches for the highest capacity heat exchangers under given

Michalski, Ryszard S.

177

Feasibility study for aquaculture and space heating, Ft. Bidwell, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Expansion of the aquaculture facilities and geothermal space heating at Ft. Bidwell, California were investigated. The lack of cold water is the limiting factor for aquaculture expansion and is also a problem for the town domestic water supply. A new cold water well approximately 1200 feet deep would provide for the aquaculture expansion and additional domestic water. A 2900 foot test well can be completed to provide additional hot water at approximately 200/sup 0/F and an estimated artesian flow of 500 gpm. If these wells are completed, the aquaculture facility could be expanded to produce 6000 two pound catfish per month on a continuous basis and provide space heating of at least 20 homes. The design provided allows for heating 11 homes initially with possible future expansion. 9 figs.

Culver, G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Brain emotional learning based intelligent controller applied to neurofuzzy model of micro-heat exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an intelligent controller is applied to govern the dynamics of electrically heated micro-heat exchanger plant. First, the dynamics of the micro-heat exchanger, which acts as a nonlinear plant, is identified using a neurofuzzy network. ... Keywords: Emotion based learning, Heat exchanger, Intelligent control, Locally linear models, Neurofuzzy models, Nonlinear system identification

Hossein Rouhani; Mahdi Jalili; Babak N. Araabi; Wolfgang Eppler; Caro Lucas

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Transient performance investigation of a space power system heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

Start-up, shut-down, and peak power tests have been conducted with a molybdenum-lithium heat pipe at temperatures to 1500 K. The heat pipe was radiation coupled to a water cooled calorimeter for the tests with rf induction heating used for the input to the evaporator region. Maximum power throughput in the tests was 36.8 kw corresponding to a power density of 23 kw/cm/sup 2/ for the 1.4 cm diameter vapor space of the annular wick heat pipe. The corresponding evaporator flux density was approximately 150 w/cm/sup 2/ over an evaporator length of 40 cm at peak power. Condenser length for the tests was approximately 3.0 m. A variable geometry radiation shield was used to vary the load on the heat pipe during the tests. Results of the tests showed that liquid depletion in the evaporator region of the heat pipe could occur in shut-down and prevent restart of the heat pipe. Changes in surface emissivity of the heat pipe condenser surface were shown to affect the shut-down and re-start limits. 12 figs.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Interaction of a solar space heating system with the thermal behavior of a building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal behavior of a building in response to heat input from an active solar space heating system is analyzed to determine the effect of the variable storage tank temperature on the cycling rate, on-time, and off-time of a heating cycle and on the comfort characteristics of room air temperature swing and of offset of the average air temperature from the setpoint (droop). A simple model of a residential building, a fan coil heat-delivery system, and a bimetal thermostat are used to describe the system. A computer simulation of the system behavior has been developed and verified by comparisons with predictions from previous studies. The system model and simulation are then applied to determine the building response to a typical hydronic solar heating system for different solar storage temperatures, outdoor temperatures, and fan coil sizes. The simulations were run only for those cases where there was sufficient energy from storage to meet the building load requirements.

Vilmer, C.; Warren, M.L.; Auslander, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Transient heat pipe investigations for space power systems  

SciTech Connect

A 4-meter long, high temperature, high power, molybdenum-lithium heat pipe has been fabricated and tested in transient and steady state operation at temperatures to 1500 K. Maximum power throughput during the tests was approximately 37 kW/cm/sup 2/ for the 1.4 cm diameter vapor space of the annular wick heat pipe. The evaporator flux density for the tests was 150.0 W/cm/sup 2/ over a length of 40 cm. Condenser length was approximately 3.0 m with radiant heat rejection from the condenser to a coaxial, water cooled radiation calorimeter. A variable radiation shield, controllable from the outside of the vacuum enclosure, was used to vary the load on the heat pipe during the tests. 1 ref., 9 figs.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

"Table B27. Space Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Space Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 7. Space Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,28600,36959,5988,5198,3204,842 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,2367,2829,557,"Q",665,183 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,2560,3358,626,"Q",529,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,4872,6407,730,289,597,"Q"

183

Active space heating and hot water supply with solar energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical and economic assessments are given of solar water heaters, both circulating, and of air-based and liquid-based solar space heating systems. Both new and retrofit systems are considered. The technical status of flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors and of thermal storage is also covered. Non-technical factors are also briefly discussed, including the participants in the use of solar heat, incentives and deterrents. Policy implications are considered as regards acceleration of solar use, goals for solar use, means for achieving goals, and interaction of governments, suppliers, and users. Government actions are recommended. (LEW)

Karaki, S.; Loef, G. O.G.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Consumer thermal energy storage costs for residential hot water, space heating and space cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cost of household thermal energy storage (TES) in four utility service areas that are representative for hot water, space heating, and space cooling systems in the United States is presented. There are two major sections of the report: Section 2.0 is a technology characterization of commercially available and developmental/conceptual TES systems; Section 3.0 is an evaluation of the consumer cost of the three TES systems based on typical designs in four utility service areas.

None

1976-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

On Variations of Space-heating Energy Use in Office Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On Variations of Space-heating Energy Use in Office Buildings Title On Variations of Space-heating Energy Use in Office Buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report...

186

Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems  

SciTech Connect

Current space nuclear power reactor safety issues are discussed with respect to the unique characteristics of these reactors. An approach to achieving adequate safety and a perception of safety is outlined. This approach calls for a carefully conceived safety program which makes uses of lessons learned from previous terrestrial power reactor development programs. This approach includes use of risk analyses, passive safety design features, and analyses/experiments to understand and control off-design conditions. The point is made that some recent accidents concerning terrestrial power reactors do not imply that space power reactors cannot be operated safety.

Cummings, G.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Solar energy collector for mounting over windows of buildings for space heating thereof  

SciTech Connect

The ornamental design for a solar energy collector for mounting over windows of buildings for space heating thereof, as shown.

Arrington, P.M.

1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

Space Heating Trends in Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia1 Mandeep Dhaliwal and Larry Hughes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in energy intensity. The residential sector uses energy for space heating, water heating, appliances Heating 60% Water Heating 21% Appliances 13% Lighting 5% Space Cooling 1% Figure 1: Residential Sector Scotia's energy policy goes one step further and supports R-2000 and Energuide for new houses (NSDOE

Hughes, Larry

189

IRP applied to district heating in Eastern Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cities of Plzen, Czech Republic, and Handlova, Republic of Slovakia, are examining options for meeting the thermal energy requirements of their citizens with consideration of both economics and the environment. Major energy related issues faced by the cities are: the frequent need to replace and/or implement a major rehabilitation of the central heating plants and the transmission and distribution systems that supply the consumers; and the need to reduce emissions in order to comply with more stringent environmental regulations and improve air quality; and the need to minimize consumer energy bills, particularly to accommodate the upcoming decontrol of energy prices and to minimize non-payment problems. The intent of the integrated resource planning (IRP) projects is to present analyses of options to support the cities` decision-making processes, not to provide specific recommendations or guidance for the cities to follow.

Bull, M. [USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States); Secrest, T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Zeman, J. [Czech Energy Efficiency Center (SEVEn) (Czech Republic); Popelka, A. [TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Study of the Heating Load of a Manufactured Space with a Gas-fired Radiant Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermal balance mathematics model of a manufactured space with a gas-fired radiant heating system is established to calculate the heating load. Computer programs are used to solve the model. Envelope internal surface temperatures under different outdoor temperatures are obtained, and the heating load of the manufactured space is analyzed. The relationship between the envelope internal surface temperature and the workspace temperature is also analyzed in this paper. CFD simulation software is used to simulate the temperature field and the envelope's internal surface temperature of the manufacture space with hot-air heating system. Comparison and analysis of heating loads are done between the manufactured spaces with convection heating and radiant heating systems.

Zheng, X.; Dong, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Space Heating and Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Supporting Equipment for Heating and Cooling Systems Addthis Related Articles Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Water Heating Basics Heating and Cooling System Support...

192

"Table HC12.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Space Heating Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","N" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use It",0.8,"N","N","N" "Main Heating Fuel and Equipment"

193

"Table HC14.4 Space Heating Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Space Heating Characteristics",,,"Mountain","Pacific" "Total",111.1,24.2,7.6,16.6 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.7,"Q",0.7 "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,23.4,7.5,16 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,22.9,7.4,15.4 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use It",0.8,0.6,"Q",0.5 "Main Heating Fuel and Equipment" "Natural Gas",58.2,14.7,4.6,10.1 "Central Warm-Air Furnace",44.7,11.4,4,7.4

194

Survey of advanced-heat-pump developments for space conditioning  

SciTech Connect

A survey of heat pump projects with special emphasis on those supported by DOE, EPRI, and the Gas Research Institute is presented. Some historical notes on heat pump development are discussed. Market and equipment trends, well water and ground-coupled heat pumps, heat-actuated heat pump development, and international interest in heat pumps are also discussed. 30 references.

Fairchild, P.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

"Table HC13.4 Space Heating Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Space Heating Characteristics",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","N","Q" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,40.3,21.4,6.9,12 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,40.1,21.2,6.9,12 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use It",0.8,"Q","Q","N","N"

196

Air-Source Heat Pumps for Residential and Light Commercial Space Conditioning Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technology brief provides the latest information on current and emerging air-source heat pump technologies for space heating and space cooling of residential and light commercial buildings. Air-source heat pumps provide important options that can reduce ownership costs while reducing noise and enhancing reliability and customer comfort. The tech brief also describes new air-source heat pumps with an important load shaping and demand response option.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Focus on Energy - Commercial Solar Space-Heating Grant (WPS Customers...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summary Focus on Energy (FOE) and Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) are partnering to offer solar space-heating grants for feasibility studies and installations. Commercial projects...

198

Modeling Space Heating Demand in Massachusetts Housing Stock and the Implications for Climate Change Mitigation Policy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research examines variation in average household energy consumption for space heating in municipalities in Massachusetts in order to explore the magnitude of variation among (more)

Robinson, Nathan H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Table SH2. Total Households by Space Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Households by Space Heating Fuels Used, 2005 ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: ... Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG Other

200

Table SH5. Total Expenditures for Space Heating by Major Fuels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Space Heating Fuel 4 (millions) Fuel Oil U.S. Households ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Natural Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

"Table HC4.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption Survey. " " Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables" "Table HC4.4 Space Heating...

202

Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas (billion cf) Major Fuels Used 4 (physical units) Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units

203

"Table HC11.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Northeast Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption Survey. " " Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables" "Table HC11.4 Space Heating...

204

Measure Guideline: Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

Rudd, A.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Economizer refrigeration cycle space heating and cooling system and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to heating and cooling systems and more particularly to an improved system utilizing a Stirling Cycle engine heat pump in a refrigeration cycle. 18 figs.

Jardine, D.M.

1983-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

206

Economizer refrigeration cycle space heating and cooling system and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to heating and cooling systems and more particularly to an improved system utilizing a Stirling Cycle engine heat pump in a refrigeration cycle.

Jardine, Douglas M. (Colorado Springs, CO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Hybrid space heating/cooling system with Trombe wall, underground venting, and assisted heat pump  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our goal was to design and monitor a hybrid solar system/ground loop which automatically assists the standard, thermostatically controlled home heating/cooling system. The input from the homeowner was limited to normal thermostat operations. During the course of the project it was determined that to effectively gather data and control the various component interactions, a micro-computer based control system would also allow the HVAC system to be optimized by simple changes to software. This flexibility in an untested concept helped us to achieve optimum system performance. Control ranged from direct solar heating and direct ground loop cooling modes, to assistance of the heat pump by both solar space and ground loop. Sensors were strategically placed to provide data on response of the Trombe wall (surface, 4 in. deep, 8 in. deep), and the ground loop (inlet, 3/4 length, outlet). Micro-computer hardware and computer programs were developed to make cost effective decisions between the various modes of operation. Although recent advances in micro-computer hardware make similar control systems more readily achievable utilizing standard components, attention to the decision making criteria will always be required.

Shirley, J.W.; James, L.C.; Stevens, S.; Autry, A.N.; Nussbaum, M.; MacQueen, S.V.

1983-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

208

"Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.5,0.3,0.2,"Q",0.2,0.3,0.6 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,26.2,28.5,20.4,13,21.8,16.3,37.9 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.9,28.1,20.3,12.9,21.8,16,37.3

209

Space heating systems in the Northwest: energy usage and cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The question of energy usage and cost of providing space heat in the Northwest is discussed. Though space heating needs represents only 18% of the U.S.'s total energy consumption, it nevertheless appears to offer the greatest potential for conservation and near term applications of alternate energy sources. Efficiency and economic feasibility factors are considered in providing for space heating demands. These criteria are presented to establish energy usage, cost effectiveness and beneficial conservation practices for space heating of residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. Four Northwestern cities have been chosen whose wide range of climate conditions are used to formulate the seasonal fuel and capital cost and hence the annual heating cost covering a broad spectrum of heating applications, both the traditional methods, the newer alternate forms of energy, and various methods to achieve more efficient utilization of all types.

Keller, J.G.; Kunze, J.F.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Space heating systems in the Northwest: energy usage and cost analysis  

SciTech Connect

The question of energy usage and cost of providing space heat in the Northwest is discussed. Though space heating needs represents only 18% of the U.S.'s total energy consumption, it nevertheless appears to offer the greatest potential for conservation and near term applications of alternate energy sources. Efficiency and economic feasibility factors are considered in providing for space heating demands. These criteria are presented to establish energy usage, cost effectiveness and beneficial conservation practices for space heating of residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. Four Northwestern cities have been chosen whose wide range of climate conditions are used to formulate the seasonal fuel and capital cost and hence the annual heating cost covering a broad spectrum of heating applications, both the traditional methods, the newer alternate forms of energy, and various methods to achieve more efficient utilization of all types.

Keller, J.G.; Kunze, J.F.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Irregular spacing of heat sources for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

SciTech Connect

A method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes providing heat input to a first section of the formation from one or more heat sources located in the first section. Fluids are produced from the first section through a production well located at or near the center of the first section. The heat sources are configured such that the average heat input per volume of formation in the first section increases with distance from the production well.

Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX); Uwechue, Uzo Philip (Houston, TX)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

212

Marketing research for EE G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research conducted by ITI to evaluate the commercialization potential of EG G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials. The remainder of the report describes the nature of demand for maraging steel, extent of demand, competitors, environmental trends, technology life cycle, industry structure, and conclusion. (JL)

Shackson, R.H.

1991-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

213

Analysis of the performance and space-conditioning impacts of dedicated heat-pump water heaters  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the development and testing of the newly-marketed dedicated heat pump water heater (HPWH), and an analysis is presented of its performance and space conditioning impacts. This system utilizes an air-to-water heat pump, costs about $1000 installed, and obtains a coefficient of performance (COP) of about 2.0 in laboratory and field tests. Since a HPWH is usually installed indoors and extracts heat from the air, its operation is a space conditioning benefit if an air conditioning load exists and a penalty if a space heating load exists. To investigate HPWH performance and a space conditioning impacts, a simulation has been developed to model the thermal performance of a residence with resistance baseboard heat, air conditioning, and either heat pump or resistance water heating. The building characteristics are adapted for three US geographical areas (Madison, Wisconsin; Washington, DC; and Ft. Worth, Texas), and the system is simulated for a year with typical weather data. For each city, HPWH COPs are calculated monthly and yearly. In addition, the water heating and space conditioning energy requirements of HPWH operation are compared with those of resistance water heater operation to determine the relative performance ratio (RPR) of the HPWH. The annual simulated RPRs range from 1.5 to 1.7, which indicate a substantial space heating penalty of HPWH operation in these cities.

Morrison, L.; Swisher, J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Space heating for office building at Glenwood Springs, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical assistance in a preliminary design and economic evaluation of a geothermal heating system was provided. The use of a downhole heat exchanger was evaluated, with the objective of reducing costs in this first stage of the project, but was abandoned. The low resource temperature and lack of sufficient aquifer data were the reasons for abandonment of the downhole heat exchanger concept. The use of surface plate heat exchangers was selected as the preferred approach for utilizing the geothermal resource. Brine will be passed through three plate heat exchangers in the building basement. Separate loops of clean circulating fluid will be used to extract heat from the brine in three heat exchangers, with the loops providing heat to the building, a hot tub, and a deicing system. The cooled geothermal fluid from the heat exchangers will be injected to an isolated injection zone at the bottom of the production well. Aquifer tests are required to develop final pump sizes and process flows. The information developed from the work tasks of this project is presented.

Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

"Table B23. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" 3. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Useda" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings ................",67338,61602,17627,32729,3719,5077 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,1567,3080,482,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,1496,4292,557,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,3035,5320,597,232 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",9311,8565,2866,4416,486,577

216

Design and development of a titanium heat-pipe space radiator  

SciTech Connect

A titanium heat-pipe radiator has been designed for use in a 100-kW/sub e/ nuclear-thermoelectric (TE) space power plant. The radiator is required to have a 99% probability of remaining functional at full power at the end of a seven-year mission. The radiator has a conical-cylindrical shape and is compatible for launch in the space shuttle. The radiator heat pipes are arranged into panel segments and each reactor-core thermoelectric heat-pipe unit has four radiator heat pipes for redundancy. Radiator mass was minimized was based on acceptable losses due to micrometeoroid impact. Results of studies on various design parameters are presented in terms of radiator mass. Developments on the design and testing of the radiator heat pipes are also presented. Prototype titanium (potassium working fluid) heat pipes were fabricated and tested in space-simulating conditions. Testing results are compared to analytical performance predictions.

Girrens, S.P.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Analysis of space heating and domestic hot water systems for energy-efficient residential buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis of the best ways of meeting the space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) needs of new energy-efficient houses with very low requirements for space heat is provided. The DHW load is about equal to the space heating load in such houses in northern climates. The equipment options which should be considered are discussed, including new equipment recently introduced in the market. It is concluded that the first consideration in selecting systems for energy-efficient houses should be identification of the air moving needs of the house for heat distribution, heat storage, ventilation, and ventilative cooling. This is followed, in order, by selection of the most appropriate distribution system, the heating appliances and controls, and the preferred energy source, gas, oil, or electricity.

Dennehy, G

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Federal Facilities, Second Edition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E E N E R G Y M A N A G E M E N T P R O G R A M and exterior to the facility, are typically less than those for conventional systems. Potential Application The technology has been shown to be techni- cally valid and economically attractive in many applications. It is efficient and effective. This Federal Technology Alert reports on the collec- tive experience of heat pump users and evalua- tors and provides application guidance. An estimated 400,000 ground-source heat pumps are operating in the private and public sector, although most of these systems operate in resi- dential applications. A ground-source heat pump system can be applied in virtually any category of climate or building. The large num- ber of installations testifies to the stability of this technology. The reported problems can

219

Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Federal Facilities, Second Edition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and exterior to the facility, are typically less and exterior to the facility, are typically less than those for conventional systems. Potential Application The technology has been shown to be techni- cally valid and economically attractive in many applications. It is efficient and effective. This Federal Technology Alert reports on the collec- tive experience of heat pump users and evalua- tors and provides application guidance. An estimated 400,000 ground-source heat pumps are operating in the private and public sector, although most of these systems operate in resi- dential applications. A ground-source heat pump system can be applied in virtually any category of climate or building. The large num- ber of installations testifies to the stability of this technology. The reported problems can usually be attributed to faulty design or

220

Maryvale Terrace: geothermal residential district space heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study of the technical and economic feasibility of installing a geothermal district heating and cooling system is analyzed for the Maryvale Terrace residential subdevelopment in Phoenix, Arizona, consisting of 557 residential houses. The design heating load was estimated to be 16.77 million Btu/h and the design cooling load was estimated to be 14.65 million Btu/h. Average annual energy use for the development was estimated to be 5870 million Btu/y and 14,650 million Btu/y for heating and cooling, respectively. Competing fuels are natural gas for heating and electricity for cooling. A geothermal resource is assumed to exist beneath the site at a depth of 6000 feet. Five production wells producing 1000 gpm each of 220/sup 0/F geothermal fluid are required. Total estimated cost for installing the system is $5,079,300. First year system operations cost (including debt service) is $974,361. The average annual geothermal heating and cooling cost per home is estimated to be $1750 as compared to a conventional system annual cost of $1145. Further, the cost of geothermal heating and cooling is estimated to be $47.50 per million Btu when debt service is included and $6.14 per million Btu when only operating costs are included. Operating (or fuel) costs for conventional heating and cooling are estimated to be $15.55 per million Btu.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Utah State Prison Space Heating with Geothermal Heat - Resource Assessment Report Crystal Hot Springs Geothermal Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reported herein is a summary of work conducted under the Resource Assessment Program-Task 2, for the Utah State Prison Geothermal Space Heating Project at Crystal Hot Springs, Draper, Utah. Assessment of the geothermal resource in and around the Utah State Prison property began in october of 1979 with an aeromagnetic and gravity survey. These tasks were designed to provide detailed subsurface structural information in the vicinity of the thermal springs so that an informed decision as to the locations of test and production holes could be made. The geophysical reconnaissance program provided the structural details needed to focus the test drilling program on the most promising production targets available to the State Prison. The subsequent drilling and well testing program was conducted to provide information to aid fin the siting and design of a production well and preliminary design activities. As part of the resource assessment portion of the Utah State Prison Geothermal Project, a program for periodic geophysical monitoring of the Crystal Hot Springs resource was developed. The program was designed to enable determination of baseline thermal, hydraulic, and chemical characteristics in the vicinity of Crystal Hot Springs prior to production and to provide a history of these characteristics during resource development.

None

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Heat-pipe development for the SPAR space-power system. [100 kW(e)  

SciTech Connect

The SPAR space power system design is based on a high temperature fast spectrum nuclear reactor that furnishes heat to a thermoelectric conversion system to generate an electrical power output of 100 kW/sub (e)/. An important feature of this design is the use of alkali metal heat pipes to provide redundant, reliable, and low-loss heat transfer at high temperature. Three sets of heat pipes are used in the system. These include sodium/molybdenum heat pipes to transfer heat from the reactor core to the conversion system, potassium/niobium heat pipes to couple the conversion system to the radiator in a redundant manner, and potassium/titanium heat pipes to distribute rejected heat throughout the radiator surface. The designs of these units are discussed and fabrication methods and testing results are described. 12 figures.

Ranken, W.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Lodging Industry Solutions: Heating and Cooling Space Conditioning Technology Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidebook provides utility representatives with a tool to help understand the lodging industry and its space conditioning needs and options. It also provides information to help build and maintain customer loyalty. The guidebook will enable utility personnel to provide additional services to their lodging clients by informing them of space conditioning choices and solutions for their facilities.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

224

A transient heat pipe model for a multimegawatt space power application  

SciTech Connect

The Argonne ''Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell'' power generation system has been described previously. In a ''burst power'' generation mode, hundreds of megawatts of DC power would be generated for a finite time interval. An accompanying nuclear power generation system would be used to regenerate the spent reactants (hydrogen and oxygen) in this closed system for subsequent re-use. Although the Argonne space power supply was designed to be a closed system in terms of material effluents, it had to reject the waste heat from the fuel cells (which operate with approximately 70% conversion efficiency). The heat rejection method included multiple heat pipes operated in parallel to convey thermal energy from the fuel cell coolant for ultimate radiation-rejection to space. These individual heat pipes featured a convectively heated evaporator section, an adiabatic section leading out from the fuel cell chamber to space, and the condenser section radiating to space. The transient behavior of these heat rejection heat pipes was not considered previously. This paper addresses the problem, showing that the heat pipes as conceptually designed also satisfy the stringent transient power generation---heat rejection requirements of the multimegawatt power generation system. 4 refs., 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

City of Twenty-Nine Palms Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Twenty-Nine Palms Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility City of Twenty-Nine Palms Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Twenty-Nine Palms, California Coordinates 34.1355582°, -116.0541689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

226

Hot Lake RV Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Lake RV Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hot Lake RV Park Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Union County, Oregon Coordinates 45.2334122°, -118.0410627° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

227

Reno-Moana Area (300) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reno-Moana Area (300) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Reno-Moana Area (300) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Reno-Moana Area (300) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Reno-Moana Area (300) Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Reno, Nevada Coordinates 39.5296329°, -119.8138027° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

228

Hi-Tech Fisheries Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hi-Tech Fisheries Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hi-Tech Fisheries Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hi-Tech Fisheries Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hi-Tech Fisheries Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Bluffdale, Utah Coordinates 40.4896711°, -111.9388244° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

229

Table CE2-3e. Space-Heating Energy Expenditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE2-3e. Space-Heating Energy Expenditures in U.S. Households by Household Income, 2001 RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty

230

Table CE2-7e. Space-Heating Energy Expenditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE2-7e. Space-Heating Energy Expenditures in U.S. Households by Four Most Populated States, 2001 RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States

231

Table HC6.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total U.S. Housing Units.................................. 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Do Not Have Heating Equipment..................... 1.2 0.3 0.3 Q 0.2 0.2 Have Space Heating Equipment....................... 109.8 29.7 34.5 18.2 15.6 11.8 Use Space Heating Equipment........................ 109.1 29.5 34.4 18.1 15.5 11.6 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.................... 0.8 Q Q Q Q Q Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None............................................................ 3.6 1.0 0.8 0.5 0.5 0.7 1 to 499........................................................ 6.1 3.0 1.6 0.6 0.6 0.3 500 to 999.................................................... 27.7 11.6 8.3 3.6 2.7 1.6 1,000 to 1,499..............................................

232

Electric equipment providing space conditioning, water heating, and refrigeration consumes 12.5% of the nation's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-acceptable refrigerants. Whether involving design of specific new products or refriger- ants to which the entire industryElectric equipment providing space conditioning, water heating, and refrigeration consumes 12 are the heart of air conditioners, heat pumps, chillers, supermarket refrigeration systems, and more. Global use

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

233

Performance predictions and measurements for space-power-system heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

High temperature liquid metal heat pipes designed for space power systems have been analyzed and tested. Three wick designs are discussed and a design rationale for the heat pipe is provided. Test results on a molybdenum, annular wick heat pipe are presented. Performance limitations due to boiling and capillary limits are presented. There is evidence that the vapor flow in the adiabatic section is turbulent and that the transition Reynolds number is 4000.

Prenger, F.C. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

"Table HC15.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","Q",0.2 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,7.1,6.8,7.9,11.9 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,7.1,6.6,7.9,11.4 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"N","Q","N",0.5 "Space Heating Usage During 2005" "Heated Floorspace (Square Feet)"

235

"Table HC10.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","Q",0.7 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,20.5,25.6,40.3,23.4 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,20.5,25.6,40.1,22.9 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"N","N","Q",0.6 "Space Heating Usage During 2005" "Heated Floorspace (Square Feet)"

236

"Table HC8.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.7,"Q",0.2,"Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,46.3,18.9,22.5,22.1 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,45.6,18.8,22.5,22.1 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,0.7,"Q","N","N" "Space Heating Usage During 2005" "Heated Floorspace (Square Feet)"

237

Table HC4.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 .4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................ 111.1 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.6 Q Q Q 0.3 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 32.3 8.0 3.3 5.8 14.1 1.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 31.8 8.0 3.2 5.6 13.9 1.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.5 N Q Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 16.4 4.5 2.1 3.2 6.2 0.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 10.0 3.3 1.4 1.6 3.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 8.6 3.3 1.2 1.4 2.4 0.3 For Two Housing Units..........................

238

Table HC6.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total..................................................................... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............ 1.2 0.3 0.3 Q 0.2 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment............... 109.8 29.7 34.5 18.2 15.6 11.8 Use Main Space Heating Equipment................. 109.1 29.5 34.4 18.1 15.5 11.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It................... 0.8 Q Q Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas....................................................... 58.2 15.6 18.0 9.5 8.4 6.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace............................. 44.7 10.7 14.3 7.6 6.9 5.2 For One Housing Unit................................ 42.9 10.1 13.8 7.3 6.5 5.2 For Two Housing Units...............................

239

Table HC3.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 .4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................ 111.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.6 0.3 N Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 77.5 63.7 4.2 1.8 2.2 5.6 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 77.2 63.6 4.2 1.8 2.1 5.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 Q N Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 41.8 35.3 2.8 1.2 1.0 1.6 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 34.8 29.7 2.3 0.7 0.6 1.4 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 34.3 29.5 2.3 0.6 0.6 1.4 For Two Housing Units..........................

240

Estimation of heat load in waste tanks using average vapor space temperatures  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a method for estimating the total heat load in a high-level waste tank with passive ventilation. This method relates the total heat load in the tank to the vapor space temperature and the depth of waste in the tank. Q{sub total} = C{sub f} (T{sub vapor space {minus}} T{sub air}) where: C{sub f} = Conversion factor = (R{sub o}k{sub soil}{sup *}area)/(z{sub tank} {minus} z{sub surface}); R{sub o} = Ratio of total heat load to heat out the top of the tank (function of waste height); Area = cross sectional area of the tank; k{sub soil} = thermal conductivity of soil; (z{sub tank} {minus} z{sub surface}) = effective depth of soil covering the top of tank; and (T{sub vapor space} {minus} T{sub air}) = mean temperature difference between vapor space and the ambient air at the surface. Three terms -- depth, area and ratio -- can be developed from geometrical considerations. The temperature difference is measured for each individual tank. The remaining term, the thermal conductivity, is estimated from the time-dependent component of the temperature signals coming from the periodic oscillations in the vapor space temperatures. Finally, using this equation, the total heat load for each of the ferrocyanide Watch List tanks is estimated. This provides a consistent way to rank ferrocyanide tanks according to heat load.

Crowe, R.D.; Kummerer, M.; Postma, A.K.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

System for thermal energy storage, space heating and cooling and power conversion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated system for storing thermal energy, for space heating and cong and for power conversion is described which utilizes the reversible thermal decomposition characteristics of two hydrides having different decomposition pressures at the same temperature for energy storage and space conditioning and the expansion of high-pressure hydrogen for power conversion. The system consists of a plurality of reaction vessels, at least one containing each of the different hydrides, three loops of circulating heat transfer fluid which can be selectively coupled to the vessels for supplying the heat of decomposition from any appropriate source of thermal energy from the outside ambient environment or from the spaces to be cooled and for removing the heat of reaction to the outside ambient environment or to the spaces to be heated, and a hydrogen loop for directing the flow of hydrogen gas between the vessels. When used for power conversion, at least two vessels contain the same hydride and the hydrogen loop contains an expansion engine. The system is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators, but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Fields, Paul R. (Chicago, IL)

1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

242

"Table HC15.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Space Heating Characteristics",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","Q",0.2 "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,7.1,6.8,7.9,11.9 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,7.1,6.6,7.9,11.4 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use It",0.8,"N","Q","N",0.5 "Main Heating Fuel and Equipment" "Natural Gas",58.2,3.8,0.4,3.8,8.4

243

"Table HC11.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,20.5,15.1,5.4 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,20.5,15.1,5.4 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"N","N","N" "Space Heating Usage During 2005"

244

"Table HC12.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","N" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"N","N","N" "Space Heating Usage During 2005"

245

"Table HC10.4 Space Heating Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Space Heating Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","Q",0.7 "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,20.5,25.6,40.3,23.4 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,20.5,25.6,40.1,22.9 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use It",0.8,"N","N","Q",0.6 "Main Heating Fuel and Equipment" "Natural Gas",58.2,11.4,18.4,13.6,14.7

246

Solar-assisted heat pump system for cost-effective space heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of heat pumps for the utilization of solar energy is studied. Two requirements for a cost-effective system are identified: (1) a special heat pump whose coefficient of performance continues to rise with source temperature over the entire range appropriate for solar assist, and (2) a low-cost collection and storage subsystem able to supply solar energy to the heat pump efficiently at low temperatures. Programs leading to the development of these components are discussed. A solar assisted heat pump system using these components is simulated via a computer, and the results of the simulation are used as the basis for a cost comparison of the proposed system with other solar and conventional systems.

Andrews, J W; Kush, E A; Metz, P D

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Solar space and water heating system at Stanford University Central Food Services Building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This active hydronic domestic hot water and space heating system was 840 ft/sup 2/ of single-glazed, liquid, flat plate collectors and 1550 gal heat storage tanks. The following are discussed: energy conservation, design philosophy, operation, acceptance testing, performance data, collector selection, bidding, costs, economics, problems, and recommendations. An operation and maintenance manual and as-built drawings are included in appendices. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Performance of active solar space-heating systems, 1980-1981 heating season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data are provided on 32 solar heating sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). Of these, comprehensive data are included for 14 sites which cover a range of system types and solar applications. A brief description of the remaining sites is included along with system problems experienced which prevented comprehensive seasonal analyses. Tables and discussions of individual site parameters such as collector areas, storage tank sizes, manufacturers, building dimensions, etc. are provided. Tables and summaries of 1980-1981 heating season data are also provided. Analysis results are presented in graphic form to highlight key summary information. Performance indices are graphed for two major groups of collectors - liquid and air. Comparative results of multiple NSDN systems' operation for the 1980-1981 heating season are summarized with discussions of specific cases and conclusions which may be drawn from the data. (LEW)

Welch, K.; Kendall, P.; Pakkala, P.; Cramer, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Modeling principles applied to the simulation of a joule-heated glass melter  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional conservation equations applicable to the operation of a joule-heated glass melter were rigorously examined and used to develop scaling relationships for modeling purposes. By rigorous application of the conservation equations governing transfer of mass, momentum, energy, and electrical charge in three-dimensional cylindrical coordinates, scaling relationships were derived between a glass melter and a physical model for the following independent and dependent variables: geometrical size (scale), velocity, temperature, pressure, mass input rate, energy input rate, voltage, electrode current, electrode current flux, total power, and electrical resistance. The scaling relationships were then applied to the design and construction of a physical model of the semiworks glass melter for the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The design and construction of such a model using glycerine plus LiCl as a model fluid in a one-half-scale Plexiglas tank is described.

Routt, K.R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Heat conductivity in small quantum systems: Kubo formula in Liouville space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider chains consisting of several identical subsystems weakly coupled by various types of next neighbor interactions. At both ends the chain is coupled to a respective heat bath with different temperature modeled by a Lindblad formalism. The temperature gradient introduced by this environment is then treated as an external perturbation. We propose a method to evaluate the heat current and the local temperature profile of the resulting stationary state as well as the heat conductivity in such systems. This method is similar to Kubo techniques used e.g. for electrical transport but extended here to the Liouville space.

Mathias Michel; Jochen Gemmer; Guenter Mahler

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

251

Heat pipe cooled reactors for multi-kilowatt space power supplies  

SciTech Connect

Three nuclear reactor space power system designs are described that demonstrate how the use of high temperature heat pipes for reactor heat transport, combined with direct conversion of heat to electricity, can result in eliminating pumped heat transport loops for both primary reactor cooling and heat rejection. The result is a significant reduction in system complexity that leads to very low mass systems with high reliability, especially in the power range of 1 to 20 kWe. In addition to removing heat exchangers, electromagnetic pumps, and coolant expansion chambers, the heat pipe/direct conversion combination provides such capabilities as startup from the frozen state, automatic rejection of reactor decay heat in the event of emergency or accidental reactor shutdown, and the elimination of single point failures in the reactor cooling system. The power system designs described include a thermoelectric system that can produce 1 to 2 kWe, a bimodal modification of this system to increase its power level to 5 kWe and incorporate high temperature hydrogen propulsion capability, and a moderated thermionic reactor concept with 5 to 20 kWe power output that is based on beryllium modules that thermally couple cylindrical thermionic fuel elements (TFEs) to radiator heat pipes.

Ranken, W.A.; Houts, M.G.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Characterization of Multicrystalline Silicon Modules with System Bias Voltage Applied in Damp Heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As it is considered economically favorable to serially connect modules to build arrays with high system voltage, it is necessary to explore potential long-term degradation mechanisms the modules may incur under such electrical potential. We performed accelerated lifetime testing of multicrystalline silicon PV modules in 85 degrees C/ 85% relative humidity and 45 degrees C/ 30% relative humidity while placing the active layer in either positive or negative 600 V bias with respect to the grounded module frame. Negative bias applied to the active layer in some cases leads to more rapid and catastrophic module power degradation. This is associated with significant shunting of individual cells as indicated by electroluminescence, thermal imaging, and I-V curves. Mass spectroscopy results support ion migration as one of the causes. Electrolytic corrosion is seen occurring with the silicon nitride antireflective coating and silver gridlines, and there is ionic transport of metallization at the encapsulant interface observed with damp heat and applied bias. Leakage current and module degradation is found to be highly dependent upon the module construction, with factors such as encapsulant and front glass resistivity affecting performance. Measured leakage currents range from about the same seen in published reports of modules deployed in Florida (USA) and is accelerated to up to 100 times higher in the environmental chamber testing.

Hacke, P.; Kempe, M.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S.; Call, N.; Johnston, S.; Kurtz, S.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Analysis of selected surface characteristics and latent heat storage for passive solar space heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an analysis of the value of various technical improvements in the solar collector and thermal storage subsystems of passive solar residential, agricultural, and industrial systems for two regions of the country. The evaluated improvements are: decreased emissivity and increased absorptivity of absorbing surfaces, decreased reflectivity, and decreased emissivity of glazing surface, and the substitution of sensible heat storage media with phase change materials. The value of each improvement is estimated by the additional energy savings resulting from the improvement.

Fthenakis, V.; Leigh, R.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Review of hardware cost estimation methods, models and tools applied to early phases of space mission planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equipment; AHP, Analytic Hierarchy Process; AMCM, Advanced Missions Cost Model; ASPE, American SocietyReview of hardware cost estimation methods, models and tools applied to early phases of space Cost estimation Cost model Parametrics Space hardware Early mission phase a b s t r a c t The primary

Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

255

Optimization of design and control strategies for geothermal space heating systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The efficient design and operation of geothermal space heating systems requires careful analysis and departure from normal design practices. Since geothermal source temperatures are much lower than either fossil fuel or electrical source temperatures, the temperature of the delivered energy becomes more critical. Also, since the geothermal water is rejected after heat exchange, it is necessary to extract all of the energy that is practical in one pass; there is no second change for energy recovery. The present work examines several heating system configurations and describes the desired design and control characteristics for operation on geothermal sources. Specific design methods are outlined as well as several generalized guidelines that should significantly improve the operation of any geothermally heated system.

Batdorf, J.A.; Simmons, G.M.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Procedure for Applying an Open-Cycle Heat Pump to An Existing Evaporator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An open-cycle heat pump, or mechanical vapor compression (MVC) system, is often an attractive technique for increasing the energy efficiency of an evaporator. With proper design, an MVC system is capable of dramatic cost savings when retrofitted to an existing evaporator. This is especially true if the evaporator is a single or double effect design. Many such evaporators were built when energy was cheap, or because a particular process is not amenable to modern designs incorporating many effects. Advances in compressor design have made MVC applicable to a broader range of processes than ever before. This paper discusses the basic steps required to apply MVC as a retrofit to an existing evaporator. Because of their importance to identification of candidate applications, this paper emphasizes the preliminary analysis and premonitoring steps. For illustration purposes the authors refer to an MVC retrofit in progress at a plant operated by Kraft, Inc. The project is cofunded by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Albany, NY), and will serve as a demonstration site to facilitate increased adoption of MVC by other industrial firms.

Wagner, J. R.; Brush, F. C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

"Table HC3.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,0.3,"N","Q","Q","Q" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,77.5,63.7,4.2,1.8,2.2,5.6

258

Effects of Pin Detached Space on Heat Transfer and Pin-Fin Arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat transfer and pressure characteristics in a rectangular channel with pin-fin arrays of partial detachment from one of the endwalls have been experimentally studied. The overall channel geometry (W?=?76.2 mm, E?=?25.4 mm) simulates an internal cooling passage of wide aspect ratio (3:1) in a gas turbine airfoil. With a given pin diameter, D?=?6.35 mm?=?E, three different pin-fin height-to-diameter ratios, H/D?=?4, 3, and 2, were examined. Each of these three cases corresponds to a specific pin array geometry of detachment spacing (C) between the pin tip and one of the endwalls, i.e., C/D?=?0, 1, 2, respectively. The Reynolds number, based on the hydraulic diameter of the unobstructed cross-section and the mean bulk velocity, ranges from 10,000 to 25,000. The experiment employs a hybrid technique based on transient liquid crystal imaging to obtain the distributions of the local heat transfer coefficient over all of the participating surfaces, including the endwalls and all the pin elements. Experimental results reveal that the presence of a detached space between the pin tip and the endwall has a significant effect on the convective heat transfer and pressure loss in the channel. The presence of pin-to-endwall spacing promotes wall-flow interaction, generates additional separated shear layers, and augments turbulent transport. In general, an increase in detached spacing, or C/D, leads to lower heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop. However, C/D?=?1, i.e., H/D?=?3, of a staggered array configuration exhibits the highest heat transfer enhancement, followed by the cases of C/D?=?0 and C/D?=?2, i.e., H/D?=?4 or 2, respectively.

Siw, Sin C.; Chyu, Minking K.; Shih, Tom I-P.; Alvin, Mary Anne

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Potential of thermal insulation and solar thermal energy in domestic hot water and space heating and cooling sectors in Lebanon in the period 2010 - 2030.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The potential of thermal insulation and solar thermal energy in domestic water heating, space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings Lebanon is studied (more)

Zaatari, Z.A.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Use of hot-dry-rock geothermal resources for space heating: a case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study shows that a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal space heat system proposed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations's Wallops Flight Center (WFC) will cost $10.9 million, saving $4.1 million over the existing oil heating system over a 30-yr lifetime. The minimal, economically feasible plan for HDR at WFC is shown to be the design of a single-fracture reservoir using a combined HDR preheat and a final oil burner after the first 4 years of operation. The WFC cost savings generalize and range from $3.1 million to $7.2 million for other HDR sites having geothermal temperature gradients ranging from 25/sup 0/C/km to 40/sup 0/C/km and depths to basement rock of 2400 ft or 5700 ft compared to the 30/sup 0/C/km and 9000 ft to basement rock at WFC.

Cummings, R.G.; Arundale, C.J.; Bivins, R.L.; Burness, H.S.; Drake, R.H.; Norton, R.D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Simplified solar fraction estimation for space and water heating at DOD installations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A set of nomographs is provided which can be used to estimate the average annual solar fraction for solar space and water heating at a large number of DOD facilities. The solar fraction estimated from the nomograph is in close agreement with F-Chart 3.0 and allows for variation of the following parameters: annual load, collector area, collector transmittance-absorption coefficient, and collector overall loss coefficient.

Pacheco, N.S.; Kniola, D.G.; Sheedy, J.F.; Scari, R.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Econometric model of the joint production and consumption of residential space heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study models the production and comsumption of residential space heat, a nonmarket good. Production reflects capital investment decisions of households; consumption reflects final demand decisions given the existing capital stock. In the model, the production relationship is represented by a translog cost equation and an anergy factor share equation. Consumption is represented by a log-linear demand equation. This system of three equations - cost, fuel share, and final demand - is estimated simultaneously. Results are presented for two cross-sections of households surveyed in 1973 and 1981. Estimates of own-price and cross-price elasticities of factor demand are of the correct sign, and less than one in magnitude. The price elasticity of final demand is about -0.4; the income elasticity of final demand is less than 0.1. Short-run and long-run elasticities of demand for energy are about -0.3 and -0.6, respectively. These results suggest that price-induced decreases in the use of energy for space heat are attributable equally to changes in final demand and to energy conservation, the substitution of capital for energy in the production of space heat. The model is used to simulate the behavior of poor and nonpoor households during a period of rising energy prices. This simulation illustrates the greater impact of rising prices on poor households.

Klein, Y.L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

"Table HC4.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,"Q","Q","Q",0.3,"Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,32.3,8,3.3,5.8,14.1,1.1

264

"Table HC3.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,0.3,"N","Q","Q","Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,77.5,63.7,4.2,1.8,2.2,5.6

265

"Table B29. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,15996,32970,3818,4907 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,1779,2672,484,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,1686,3068,428,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,3366,5807,536,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,8060,2264,4974,300,325

266

Performance Analysis of Potassium Heat Pipes Radiator for HP-STMCs Space Reactor Power System  

SciTech Connect

A detailed design and performance results of C-C finned, and armored potassium heat pipes radiator for a 110 kWe Heat Pipes-Segmented Thermoelectric Module Converters (HP-STMCs) Space Reactor Power system (SRPS) are presented. The radiator consists of two sections; each serves an equal number of STMCs and has 162 longitudinal potassium heat pipes with 0.508 mm thick C-C fins. The width of the C-C fins at the minor diameter of the radiator is almost zero, but increases with distance along the radiator to reach 3.7 cm at the radiator's major diameter. The radiator's heat pipes (OD = 2.42 cm in front and 3.03 cm in rear) have thin titanium (0.0762 mm thick) liners and wicks (0.20 mm thick with an effective pore radius of 12-16 {mu}m) and a 1.016 mm thick C-C wall. The wick is separated from the titanium liner by a 0.4 mm annulus filled with liquid potassium to increase the capillary limit. The outer surfaces of the heat pipes in the front and rear sections of the radiator are protected with a C-C armor that is 2.17 mm and 1.70 mm thick, respectively. The inside surface of the heat pipes in the front radiator is thermally insulated while the C-C finned condensers of the rear heat pipes are exposed, radiating into space through the rear opening of the radiator cavity. The heat pipes in both the front and the rear radiators have a 1.5 m long evaporator section and each dissipates 4.47 kW while operating at 43.6% of the prevailing sonic limit. The front and rear radiator sections are 5.29 m and 2.61 m long with outer surface area and mass of 47.1 m2 and 314.3 kg, and 39.9 m2 and 243.2 kg, respectively. The total radiator is 7.63 m long and has minor and major diameters of 1.48 m and 5.57 m, respectively, and a total surface area of 87 m2; however, the effective radiator area, after accounting for heat rejection through the rear of the radiator cavity, is 98.8 m2. The radiator's total mass including the C-C armor is 557.5 kg and the specific area and specific mass are 6.41 kg/m2 and 5.07 kg/kWe, respectively.

El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Dept., University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131 (United States)

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

267

Utah State Prison Space Heating with Geothermal Heat Third Semi-Annual Report for the Period January 1981 - July 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Facing certain cost overruns and lacking information about the long term productivity of the Crystal Hot Springs geothermal resource, costs of construction for the geothermal retrofit, and the method of disposal of geothermal waste water, the Energy Office embarked on a strategy that would enable the project participants to develop accurate cost information on the State Prison Space Heating Program through the completion of Task 5-Construction. The strategy called for: (1) Completion of the resource assessment to determine whether test well USP/TH-1 could be used as a production well. If well USP/TH-1 was found to have sufficient production capacity, money would not have to be expended on drilling another production well. (2) Evaluation of disposal alternatives and estimation of the cost of each alternative. There was no contingency in the original budget to provide for a reinjection disposal system. Cooperative agreement DE EC07-ET27027 indicated that if a disposal system requiring reinjection was selected for funding that task would be negotiated with DOE and the budget amended accordingly. (3) Completion of the preliminary engineering and design work. Included in this task was a thorough net present value cash flow analysis and an assessment of the technical feasibility of a system retrofit given the production characteristics of well USP/TH-1 . In addition, completion of the preliminary design would provide cost estimates for the construction and commissioning of the minimum security geothermal space heating system. With this information accurate costs for each task would be available, allowing the Energy Office to develop strategies to optimize the use of money in the existing budget to ensure completion of the program. Reported herein is a summary of the work towards the completion of these three objectives conducted during the period of January 1981 through June 1981.

None

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Heat pipes applied to flat-plate solar collectors. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to analytically and experimentally investigate the use of heat pipes in flat-plate solar collectors. Heat pipes are passive heat transport devices which utilize a closed evaporation-condensation cycle. Because of their high equivalent conductance, they appear to be well suited to transport heat from the solar absorber to an air or liquid distribution system. The program consisted of the following tasks: (I) Configuration Studies, (II) Parametric Performance Studies, (III) Economic Analysis, (IV) System Integration Studies, (V) Submodule Fabrication and Testing (in the laboratory), and (VI) Full-Scale Module Fabrication and Testing (using solar input). An additional Task VII, Feasibility Study of a Stationary Concentrator, was identified during the program and was also completed. In performing Tasks I through IV, various aspects of integrating heat pipes into flat-palte solar collectors were investigated. The results of these tasks were reported in the Annual Progress Report (Ref. 2) dated January 31, 1975. A summary of that program effort is included in the present report. The results of the experimental work conducted under Tasks V and VI are presented in this report. Under Task V, breadboard heat pipes were fabricated from sections of Roll-Bond panels and their heat transfer performance was evaluated in the laboratory. Three complete solar panels, two of which were heat pipe absorbers and one was a Roll-Bond control panel, were fabricated and solar tested during Task VI. Finally, under the new Task VII, a feasibility study of a stationary concentrator using heat pipes as thermal diodes was conducted. Results are presented and discussed.

Bienert, W.B.; Wolf, D.A.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Federal Technology Alert: Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Federal Facilities--Second Edition  

SciTech Connect

This Federal Technology Alert, which was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs, provides the detailed information and procedures that a Federal energy manager needs to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. This report updates an earlier report on ground-source heat pumps that was published in September 1995. In the current report, general benefits of this technology to the Federal sector are described, as are ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits. In addition, information on current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are provided.

Hadley, Donald L.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Development and test of a space-reactor-core heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A heat pipe designed to meet the heat transfer requirements of a 100-kW/sub e/ space nuclear power system has been developed and tested. General design requirements for the device included an operating temperature of 1500/sup 0/K with an evaporator radial flux density of 100 w/cm/sup 2/. The total heat-pipe length of 2 m comprised an evaporator length of 0.3 m, a 1.2-m adiabatic section, and a condenser length of 0.5 m. A four-artery design employing screen arteries and distribution wicks was used with lithium serving as the working fluid. Molybdenum alloys were used for the screen materials and tube shell. Hafnium and zirconium gettering materials were used in connection with a pre-purified distilled lithium charge to ensure internal chemical compatibility. After initial performance verification, the 14.1-mm i.d. heat pipe was operated at 15 kW throughput at 1500/sup 0/K for 100 hours. No performance degradation was observed during the test.

Merrigan, M.A.; Runyan, J.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Keddy, E.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Application Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps in Building Space Conditioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application Analysis of Ground Source Heat Application Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps in Building Space Conditioning Hua Qian 1,2 , Yungang Wang 2 1 School of Energy and Environment Southeast University Nanjing, 210096, China 2 Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720, USA July 2013 The project was supported by National Key Technology Supported Program of China (2011BAJ03B10-1) and by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the

272

Feasibility of geothermal space/water heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Final report, September 1976--September 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a study to determine the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of geothermal district heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California are reported. The geothermal district heating system selected is technically feasible and will use existing technology in its design and operation. District heating can provide space and water heating energy for typical customers at lower cost than alternative sources of energy. If the district heating system is investor owned, lower costs are realized after five to six years of operation, and if owned by a nonprofit organization, after zero to three years. District heating offers lower costs than alternatives much sooner in time if co-generation and/or DOE participation in system construction are included in the analysis. During a preliminary environmental assessment, no potential adverse environmental impacts could be identified of sufficient consequence to preclude the construction and operation of the proposed district heating system. A follow-on program aimed at implementing district heating in Mammoth is outlined.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Status of not-in-kind refrigeration technologies for household space conditioning, water heating and food refrigeration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a review of the next generation not-in-kind technologies to replace conventional vapor compression refrigeration technology for household applications. Such technologies are sought to provide energy savings or other environmental benefits for space conditioning, water heating and refrigeration for domestic use. These alternative technologies include: thermoacoustic refrigeration, thermoelectric refrigeration, thermotunneling, magnetic refrigeration, Stirling cycle refrigeration, pulse tube refrigeration, Malone cycle refrigeration, absorption refrigeration, adsorption refrigeration, and compressor driven metal hydride heat pumps. Furthermore, heat pump water heating and integrated heat pump systems are also discussed due to their significant energy saving potential for water heating and space conditioning in households. The paper provides a snapshot of the future R&D needs for each of the technologies along with the associated barriers. Both thermoelectric and magnetic technologies look relatively attractive due to recent developments in the materials and prototypes being manufactured.

Bansal, Pradeep [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Solar energy applied to dehumidification and water heating in an integrated system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project involved the demonstration of a desiccant dryer assist for use with residential air conditioning systems and designed for retrofitting to in-place equipment. The dryer is part of an integrated package including solar regeneration of the desiccant, water heating, and winter time humidification. Some of the key features and results of the project are summarized in this report.

Fago, E.T. Jr.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

275

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the existence of the principal-agent (PA) problem in non-government, non-mall commercial buildings in the U.S. in 2003. The analysis concentrates on space heating and cooling energy consumed by centrally installed equipment in order to verify whether a market failure caused by the PA problem might have prevented the installation of energy-efficient devices in non-owner-occupied buildings (efficiency problem) and/or the efficient operation of space-conditioning equipment in these buildings (usage problem). Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 2003 data for single-owner, single-tenant and multi-tenant occupied buildings were used for conducting this evaluation. These are the building subsets with the appropriate conditions for assessing both the efficiency and the usage problems. Together, these three building types represent 51.9percent of the total floor space of all buildings with space heating and 59.4percent of the total end-use energy consumption of such buildings; similarly, for space cooling, they represent 52.7percent of floor space and 51.6percent of energy consumption. Our statistical analysis shows that there is a usage PA problem. In space heating it applies only to buildings with a small floor area (<_50,000 sq. ft.). We estimate that in 2003 it accounts for additional site energy consumption of 12.3 (+ 10.5 ) TBtu (primary energy consumption of 14.6 [+- 12.4] TBtu), corresponding to 24.0percent (+- 20.5percent) of space heating and 10.2percent (+- 8.7percent) of total site energy consumed in those buildings. In space cooling, however, the analysis shows that the PA market failure affects the complete set of studied buildings. We estimate that it accounts for a higher site energy consumption of 8.3 (+-4.0) TBtu (primary energy consumption of 25.5 [+- 12.2]TBtu), which corresponds to 26.5percent (+- 12.7percent) of space cooling and 2.7percent (+- 1.3percent) of total site energy consumed in those buildings.

Blum, Helcio; Sathaye, Jayant

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

276

Development of a coal fired pulse combustor for residential space heating. Phase I, Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the first phase of a program for the development of a coal-fired residential combustion system. This phase consisted of the design, fabrication, testing, and evaluation of an advanced pulse combustor sized for residential space heating requirements. The objective was to develop an advanced pulse coal combustor at the {approximately} 100,000 Btu/hr scale that can be integrated into a packaged space heating system for small residential applications. The strategy for the development effort included the scale down of the feasibility unit from 1-2 MMBtu/hr to 100,000 Btu/hr to establish a baseline for isolating the effect of scale-down and new chamber configurations separately. Initial focus at the residential scale was concentrated on methods of fuel injection and atomization in a bare metal unit. This was followed by incorporating changes to the advanced chamber designs and testing of refractory-lined units. Multi-fuel capability for firing oil or gas as a secondary fuel was also established. Upon completion of the configuration and component testing, an optimum configuration would be selected for integrated testing of the pulse combustor unit. The strategy also defined the use of Dry Ultrafine Coal (DUC) for Phases 1 and 2 of the development program with CWM firing to be a product improvement activity for a later phase of the program.

NONE

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

District space heating potential of low temperature hydrothermal geothermal resources in the southwestern United States. Technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer simulation model (GIRORA-Nonelectric) is developed to study the economics of district space heating using geothermal energy. GIRORA-Nonelectric is a discounted cashflow investment model which evaluates the financial return on investment for space heating. This model consists of two major submodels: the exploration for and development of a geothermal anomaly by a geothermal producer, and the purchase of geothermal fluid by a district heating unit. The primary output of the model is a calculated rate of return on investment earned by the geothermal producer. The results of the sensitivity analysis of the model subject to changes in physical and economic parameters are given in this report. Using the results of the economic analysis and technological screening criteria, all the low temperature geothermal sites in Southwestern United States are examined for economic viability for space heating application. The methodology adopted and the results are given.

McDevitt, P.K.; Rao, C.R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The feasibility of retrieving nuclear heat sources from orbit with the space shuttle  

SciTech Connect

Spacecraft launched for orbital missions have a finite orbital lifetime. Current estimates for the lifetime of the nine nuclear powered U.S. satellites now in orbit range from 150 years to 10{sup 6} years. Orbital lifetime is determined primarily by altitude, solar activity, and the satellite ballistic coefficient. There is also the potential of collision with other satellites or space debris, which would reduce the lifetime in orbit. These orbiting power sources contain primarily Pu-238 and Pu-239 as the fuel material. Pu-238 has an approximate 87-year half life and so considerable amounts of daughter products are present after a few tens of years. In addition, there are minor but possibly significant amounts of impurity isotopes present with their own decay chains. Radioisotopic heat sources have been designed to evolving criteria since the first launches. Early models were designed to burn up upon reentry. Later designs were designed to reenter intact. After tens or hundreds of years in orbit, the ability of any orbiting heat source to reenter intact and impact while maintaining containment integrity is in doubt. Such ability could only be verified by design to provide protection in the case of early mission failures such as launch aborts, failure to achieve orbit, or the attainment of only a short orbit. With the development of the Space Shuttle there exists the potential ability to recover heat sources in orbit after their missions are completed. Such retrieval could allow the risk of eventual reentry burnup or impact with atmospheric dispersion and subsequent radiation doses to the public to be avoided.

Pyatt, D.W.; Englehart, R.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Direct utilization of geothermal energy for space and water heating at Marlin, Texas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Torbett-Hutchings-Smith Memorial Hospital geothermal heating project, which is one of nineteen direct-use geothermal projects funded principally by DOE, is documented. The five-year project encompassed a broad range of technical, institutional, and economic activities including: resource and environmental assessments; well drilling and completion; system design, construction, and monitoring; economic analyses; public awareness programs; materials testing; and environmental monitoring. Some of the project conclusions are that: (1) the 155/sup 0/F Central Texas geothermal resource can support additional geothermal development; (2) private-sector economic incentives currently exist, especially for profit-making organizations, to develop and use this geothermal resource; (3) potential uses for this geothermal resource include water and space heating, poultry dressing, natural cheese making, fruit and vegetable dehydrating, soft-drink bottling, synthetic-rubber manufacturing, and furniture manufacturing; (4) high maintenance costs arising from the geofluid's scaling and corrosion tendencies can be avoided through proper analysis and design; (5) a production system which uses a variable-frequency drive system to control production rate is an attractive means of conserving parasitic pumping power, controlling production rate to match heating demand, conserving the geothermal resource, and minimizing environmental impacts.

Conover, M.F.; Green, T.F.; Keeney, R.C.; Ellis, P.F. II; Davis, R.J.; Wallace, R.C.; Blood, F.B.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Optimal design of seasonal storage for 100% solar space heating in buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis is presented of seasonal solar systems that contain water as the sensible heat storage medium. A concise model is developed under the assumption of a fully mixed, uniform temperature, storage tank that permits efficient simulation of long-term (multi-day) system performance over the course of the year. The approach explicitly neglects the effects of short-term (sub-daily) fluctuations in insolation and load, effects that will be extremely small for seasonal solar systems. This approach is useful for examining the major design tradeoffs of concern here. The application considered is winter space heating. The thermal performance of seasonal solar systems that are designed to supply 100% of load without any backup is solved for, under ''reference year'' monthly normal ground temperature and insolation conditions. Unit break-even costs of seasonal storage are estimated by comparing the capital and fuel costs of conventional heating technologies against those of a seasonal solar system. A rough comparison between the alternatives for more severe winters was made by examining statistical variations in winter season conditions over the past several decades. (MHR)

Mueller, R.O.; Asbury, J.G.; Caruso, J.V.; Connor, D.W.; Giese, R.F.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Operator splitting approach applied to oscillatory flow and heat transfer in a tube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The method of operator splitting is applied to an advection-diffusion model as it occurs in a pulse tube. Firstly, the governing equations of the simplified model are studied and the mathematical description is derived. Then the splitting approach is ... Keywords: 35L65, 65M06, 80A20, Domain decomposition, Operator splitting, Pulse tube, Recuperator, Taylor dispersion

R. Widura; M. Lehn; K. Muralidhar; R. Scherer

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water Heater Approaches to Combination Water and Space Heating  

SciTech Connect

Homebuilders are exploring more cost effective combined space and water heating systems (combo systems) with major water heater manufacturers that are offering pre-engineered forced air space heating combo systems. In this project, unlike standardized tests, laboratory tests were conducted that subjected condensing tankless and storage water heater based combo systems to realistic, coincidental space and domestic hot water loads with the following key findings: 1) The tankless combo system maintained more stable DHW and space heating temperatures than the storage combo system. 2) The tankless combo system consistently achieved better daily efficiencies (i.e. 84%-93%) than the storage combo system (i.e. 81%- 91%) when the air handler was sized adequately and adjusted properly to achieve significant condensing operation. When condensing operation was not achieved, both systems performed with lower (i.e. 75%-88%), but similar efficiencies. 3) Air handlers currently packaged with combo systems are not designed to optimize condensing operation. More research is needed to develop air handlers specifically designed for condensing water heaters. 4) System efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved only on days where continual and steady space heating loads were required with significant condensing operation. For days where heating was more intermittent, the system efficiencies fell below 90%.

Kingston, T.; Scott, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Electricity displacement by wood used for space heating in PNWRES (Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey) (1983) households  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates the amount of electricity for residential space heating displaced by the use of wood in a sample of single-family households that completed the 1983 Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey. Using electricity bills and daily weather data from the period of July 1981 to July 1982, it was determined that the average household used 21,800 kWh per year, normalized with respect to weather. If no households had used any wood, electricity use would have increased 9%, to 23,700 kWh; space heating electricity use would also have increased, by 21%, to 47% of total electricity use. In the unlikely event that all households had used a great deal of wood for space heating, electricity use could have dropped by 23.5% from the average use, to 16,700 kWh; space heating electricity use would have dropped by 56%, to 24% of total electricity use. Indications concerning future trends regarding the displacement of electricity by wood use are mixed. On one hand, continuing to weatherize homes in the Pacific Northwest may result in less wood use as households find using electricity more economical. On the other hand, historical trends in replacement decisions regarding old space heating systems show a decided preference for wood. 11 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

White, D.L.; Tonn, B.E.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Measured Impact on Space Conditioning Energy Use in a Residence Due to Operating a Heat Pump Water Heater inside the Conditioned Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact on space conditioning energy use due to operating a heat pump water heater (HPWH) inside the conditioned space is analyzed based on 2010-2011 data from a research house with simulated occupancy and hot water use controls. The 2700 ft2 (345 m2) house is located in Oak Ridge, TN (mixed-humid climate) and is equipped with a 50 gallon (189 l) HPWH that provided approximately 55 gallons/d (208 l/d) of hot water at 120 F (46 C) to the house during the test period. The HPWH has been operated every other week from December 2010 through November 2011 in two modes; a heat pump only mode, and a standard mode that utilizes 15355 Btu/hr (4500 W) resistance heating elements. The energy consumption of the air-source heat pump (ASHP) that provides space conditioning for the house is compared for the two HPWH operating modes with weather effects taken into account. Impacts during the heating and cooling seasons are compared.

Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Solar space- and water-heating system at Stanford University. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Application of an active hydronic domestic hot water and space heating solar system for the Central Food Services Building is discussed. The closed-loop drain-back system is described as offering dependability of gravity drain-back freeze protection, low maintenance, minimal costs, and simplicity. The system features an 840 square-foot collector and storage capacity of 1550 gallons. The acceptance testing and the predicted system performance data are briefly described. Solar performance calculations were performed using a computer design program (FCHART). Bidding, costs, and economics of the system are reviewed. Problems are discussed and solutions and recommendations given. An operation and maintenance manual is given in Appendix A, and Appendix B presents As-built Drawings. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Evaluation and demonstration of decentralized space and water heating versus centralized services for new and rehabilitated multifamily buildings. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The general objective of this research was aimed at developing sufficient technical and economic know-how to convince the building and design communities of the appropriateness and energy advantages of decentralized space and water heating for multifamily buildings. Two main goals were established to guide this research. First, the research sought to determine the cost-benefit advantages of decentralized space and water heating versus centralized systems for multifamily applications based on innovative gas piping and appliance technologies. The second goal was to ensure that this information is made available to the design community.

Belkus, P. [Foster-Miller, Inc., Waltham, MA (US); Tuluca, A. [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Geothermal space/water heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Quarterly technical progress report, September 13-December 12, 1976  

SciTech Connect

During the first three months of this one-year study to determine the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of heating the town of Mammoth Lakes, California using geothermal energy, the following work was completed. Literature concerning both geothermal and conventional hydronic heating systems was reviewed and put on file. Estimates were prepared for the monthly electrical energy consumption and peak electrical demand for space and water heating in Mammoth Lakes Village in 1980. An analysis of the energy potential of the Casa Diablo geothermal reservoir was completed. Discussions were held with US Forest Service and Mammoth County Water District employees, to obtain their input to the feasibility study.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1976-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

288

INTERACTION OF A SOLAR SPACE HEATING SYSTEM WITH THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a typical h"ydronic solar heating system for differentlarger by the active solar heating system. its, Schiller,Klein, and J, A. Duffie, "Solar Heating Design", (New York:

Vilmer, Christian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

INTERACTION OF A SOLAR SPACE HEATING SYSTEM WITH THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determine the building response to the solar heating system.on building comfort of an active solar heating system wherethe building response to a typical h"ydronic solar heating

Vilmer, Christian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

INTERACTION OF A SOLAR SPACE HEATING SYSTEM WITH THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pant Rfict Fan coil heat exchanger effectiveness. c min Fanis modeled as a fan-coil heat exchanger. The fan coil outputsystem with a fan-coil heat exchanger sized for a solar

Vilmer, Christian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Annual fuel usage charts for oil-fired boilers. [Building space heating and hot water supplies  

SciTech Connect

On the basis of laboratory-determined boiler efficiency data, one may calculate the annual fuel usage (AFU) for any oil-fired boiler, serving a structure of a given design heat load, for any specified hourly weather pattern. Further, where data are available regarding the energy recapture rates of the strucutre due to direct gain solar energy (windows), lighting, cooking, electrical appliances, metabolic processes, etc., the annual fuel usage savings due to such (re) capture are straightforwardly determinable. Employing the Brookhaven National Laboratory annual fuel usage formulation, along with efficiency data determined in the BNL Boiler Laboratory, computer-drawn annual fuel usage charts can be generated for any selected boiler for a wide range of operating conditions. For two selected boilers operating in any one of the hour-by-hour weather patterns which characterize each of six cities over a wide range of firing rates, domestic hot water consumption rates, design heat loads, and energy (re) capture rates, annual fuel usages are determined and graphically presented. Figures 1 to 98, inclusive, relate to installations for which energy recapture rates are taken to be zero. Figures 97 to 130, inclusive, apply to a range of cases for which energy recapture rates are nonzero and determinable. In all cases, simple, direct and reliable annual fuel usage values can be determined by use of charts and methods such as those illustrated.

Berlad, A.L.; Yeh, Y.J.; Salzano, F.J.; Hoppe, R.J.; Batey, J.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

"Table B22. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.....",894,894,213,498,79,5 "District Heat ...",96,96,"Q",2,"Q",77 "Boilers ...",581,581,40,364,136,"Q" "Packaged Heating Units...

293

A neural-fuzzy based inferential sensor for improving the control of boilers in space heating systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventionally the boilers in space heating systems are controlled by open-loop control systems due to the absence of a practical method for measuring the overall thermal comfort level in the building. This paper describes a neural-fuzzy based inferential ...

Zaiyi Liao

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The influence of indoor temperature on the difference between actual and theoretical energy consumption for space heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Advice procedure (EAP) is developed to evaluate the energetic performance of "existing" dwellings to generate a useful advice for the occupants of the dwelling to invest in rational energy measures. The EAP is based on a theoretical calculation ... Keywords: actual energy consumption, consumer behaviour, indoor temperature, space heating, theoretical energy consumption

Amaryllis Audenaert; Katleen Briffaerts; Dries De Boeck

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Heat Pump Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Like a refrigerator, heat pumps use electricity to move heat from a cool space into a warm space, making the cool space cooler and the warm space warmer. Because they move heat rather than generate...

297

Simulation and Analysis for Applying the Double-Stage Coupled Heat Pump System in the Villa of Cold Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conventional heating mode is a one-way circulation in cold areas, which causes abatement in the reserves of energy source and increases environmental pollution. An ecological cycle heating system, an air-to-water + apartment water-to-water double-stage coupled heat pump system, is presented in this paper based on analyzing the characteristics of the villa district heating. Prediction and analysis of the feasibility of the double-stage coupled heat pump system in cold areas were carried after the components and characteristics of the system are introduced. The lumped parameter method was used to establish a mathematical model of the whole system, and the system control methods and the volume of the heat storage tank were decided to get the best value of the heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF). Furthermore, the application of the double-stage coupled heat pump system in some representative cities of cold areas in China was analyzed. The results show that the novel heat pump system can be used for heating the villa district in cold areas. To make the HSPF of the system much better, the water circulations of the double-stage coupled heat pump system also were analyzed in this paper; some improvements are put forward, and single-double stages mixed heat pumps system for the villa districts heating are introduced.

Yang, L.; Yao, Y.; Ma, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Impact of the national energy plan on solar economics. [Economic analysis of solar space heating and solar water heating by state  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Plan (NEP) sets as a goal the use of solar energy in two and a half million homes in 1985. A key provision of the NEP (as well as congressional alternatives) provides for the subsidization of solar equipment. The extent to which these subsidies (income tax credits) might offset the impact of continued energy price control is examined. Regional prices and availability of conventional energy sources (oil, gas, and electricity) were compiled to obtain a current and consistent set of energy prices by state and energy type. These prices are converted into equivalent terms ($/10/sup 6/ Btu) which account for combustion and heat generation efficiencies. Projections of conventional fuel price increases (or decreases) are made under both the NEP scenario and a projected scenario where all wellhead price controls are removed on natural gas and crude oil production. The economic feasibility (life-cycle cost basis) of solar energy for residential space heating and domestic hot water is examined on a state-by-state basis. Solar system costs are developed for each state by fraction of Btu heating load provided. The total number of homes, projected energy savings, and sensitivity to heating loads, alternative energy costs and prices are included in the analysis.

Ben-David, S.; Noll, S.; Roach, F.; Schulze, W.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FEMP case study overview of the geothermal/ground source heat pump project at the U.S. Army Fort Knox Disney Barracks.

Not Available

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Geothermal space/water heating for City of Mammoth Lakes, California. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study to determine the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of geothermal district heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California are presented. The geothermal district heating system selected is technically feasible and uses existing technology in its design and operation. During a preliminary environmental assessment, no potential adverse environmental impacts could be identified of sufficient consequence to preclude the construction and operation of the proposed district heating system. A follow-on program aimed at implementing district heating in Mammoth is outlined.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet covers the FEMP case study overview of the geothermal/ground source heat pump project at the U.S. Army Fort Knox Disney barracks.

302

Industrial food processing and space heating with geothermal heat. Final report, February 16, 1979-August 31, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A competitive aware for a cost sharing program was made to Madison County, Idaho to share in a program to develop moderate-to-low temperature geothermal energy for the heating of a large junior college, business building, public shcools and other large buildings in Rexburg, Idaho. A 3943 ft deep well was drilled at the edge of Rexburg in a region that had been probed by some shallower test holes. Temperatures measured near the 4000 ft depth were far below what was expected or needed, and drilling was abandoned at that depth. In 1981 attempts were made to restrict downward circulation into the well, but the results of this effort yielded no higher temperatures. The well is a prolific producer of 70/sup 0/F water, and could be used as a domestic water well.

Kunze, J.F.; Marlor, J.K.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

INTERACTION OF A SOLAR SPACE HEATING SYSTEM WITH THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Duffie [17], the fan give 185 % of the design heat loadfan coil heating system sized at 130 % of design load tofan coil output power of 32 kW (110 kBtu/hr), or about three times the design

Vilmer, Christian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Thermal Transport and Heat Exchanger Design for the Space Molten Salt Reactor Concept.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Surface power and nuclear electric propulsion in space necessitate the development of high energy density, long term continuous power sources. Research at The Ohio State (more)

Flanders, Justin M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Modeling and analysis of a heat transport transient test facility for space nuclear systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis is to design a robust test facility for a small space nuclear power system and model its physical behavior under (more)

[No author

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Evacuated-Tube Heat-Pipe Solar Collectors Applied to the Recirculation Loop in a Federal Building: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, simulation, construction, and initial performance of a solar water heating system (a 360-tube evacuated-tube heat-pipe solar collector, 54 m2 in gross area, 36 m2 in net absorber area) installed at the top of the hot water recirculation loop in the Social Security Administration's Mid-Atlantic Center in Philadelphia. When solar energy is available, water returning to the hot water storage tank is heated by the solar array. This new approach, in contrast to the more conventional approach of preheating incoming water, is made possible by the thermal diode effect of heat pipes and low heat loss from evacuated-tube solar collectors. The simplicity of this approach and its low installation costs support the deployment of solar energy in existing commercial buildings, especially where the roof is some distance away from the water heating system, which is often in the basement. Initial performance measurements of the system are reported.

Walker, A.; Mahjouri, F.; Stiteler, R.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Non-Space Heating Electrical Consumption in Manufactured Homes: Residential Construction Demonstration Project Cycle II : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes submeter data of the non-space heating electrical energy use in a sample of manufactured homes. These homes were built to Super Good Cents insulation standards in 1988 and 1989 under the auspices of RCDP Cycle 2 of the Bonneville Power Administration. They were designed to incorporate innovations in insulation and manufacturing techniques developed to encourage energy conservation in this important housing type. Domestic water heating (DWH) and other non-space heat energy consumption, however, were not generally affected by RCDP specifications. The purpose of this study is to establish a baseline for energy conservation in these areas and to present a method for estimating total energy saving benefits associated with these end uses. The information used in this summary was drawn from occupant-read submeters and manufacturersupplied specifications of building shell components, appliances and water heaters. Information was also drawn from a field review of ventilation systems and building characteristics. The occupant survey included a census of appliances and occupant behavior in these manufactured homes. A total of 150 manufactured homes were built under this program by eight manufacturers. An additional 35 homes were recruited as a control group. Of the original 185 houses, approximately 150 had some usable submeter data for domestic hot water and 126 had usable submeter data for all other nonheating consumption. These samples were used as the basis for all consumption analysis. The energy use characteristics of these manufactured homes were compared with that of a similar sample of RCDP site-built homes. In general, the manufactured homes were somewhat smaller and had fewer occupants than the site-built homes. The degree to which seasonal variations were present in non-space heat uses was reviewed.

Onisko, Stephen A.; Roos, Carolyn; Baylon, David

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

An in-depth Analysis of Space Heating Energy Use in Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experimental data, Energy and Buildings 36, 543-555. O.G.consumption for heating, Energy and Buildings 43, 2662-2672.reduction for a net zero energy building, ACEEE Summer Study

Lin, Hung-Wen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Table HC9.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

310

"Table HC9.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Climate Zone...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

311

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy costs during the cooling season as well as the heating season. To achieve air conditioning savings, the system separates dehumidification from sensible cooling; dehumidifies by desiccant absorption, using heat from storage to dry the desiccant; and then cools at an elevated temperature improving overall system efficiency. Efficient heat for desiccant regeneration is provided by a selective-energy system coupled with thermal storage. The selective-energy system incorporates diesel cogeneration, solar energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility energy for refrigeration; 10 to 20% in refrigeration equipment; and space savings due to smaller ductwork and equipment.

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Analysis of community solar systems for combined space and domestic hot water heating using annual cycle thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simplified design procedure is examined for estimating the storage capacity and collector area for annual-cycle-storage, community solar heating systems in which 100% of the annual space heating energy demand is provided from the solar source for the typical meteorological year. Hourly computer simulations of the performance of these systems were carried out for 10 cities in the United States for 3 different building types and 4 community sizes. These permitted the use of design values for evaluation of a more simplified system sizing method. Results of this study show a strong correlation between annual collector efficiency and two major, location-specific, annual weather parameters: the mean air temperature during daylignt hours and the total global insolation on the collector surface. Storage capacity correlates well with the net winter load, which is a measure of the seasonal variation in the total load, a correlation which appears to be independent of collector type.

Hooper, F.C.; McClenahan, J.D.; Cook, J.D.; Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Geothermal space heating for the Senior Citizens Center at Truth or Consequences, New Mexico. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A demonstration project to heat the Senior Citizens Center at Truth or Consequences, New Mexico with geothermal waters is described. There were three phases to the project: Phase I - design and permitting; Phase II - installation of the heating system and well drilling; and Phase III - operation of the system. All three phases went well and there was only one major problem encountered. This was that the well which was drilled to serve as the geothermal source was dry. This could not have been anticipated and there was, as a contingency plan, the option of using an existing sump in the Teen Center adjacent to the Senior Citizens Center as the geothermal source. The system was made operational in August of 1981 and has virtually supplied all of the heat to the Senior Citizens Center during this winter.

Mancini, T.R.; Chaturvedi, L.N.; Gebhard, T.G.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Operating space of a bidirectional PWM ac-to-dc converter applied in active line-conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the operating space of a bidirectional PWM ac-to-dc converter which can act also as a line conditioner. This analysis of the operating space will prove the secondary line conditioning functionality of the PWM dc converters. Starting ...

R. Paku; R. Marschalko

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Pulse-echo ultrasonic inspection system for in-situ nondestructive inspection of Space Shuttle RCC heat shields.  

SciTech Connect

The reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) heat shield components on the Space Shuttle's wings must withstand harsh atmospheric reentry environments where the wing leading edge can reach temperatures of 3,000 F. Potential damage includes impact damage, micro cracks, oxidation in the silicon carbide-to-carbon-carbon layers, and interlaminar disbonds. Since accumulated damage in the thick, carbon-carbon and silicon-carbide layers of the heat shields can lead to catastrophic failure of the Shuttle's heat protection system, it was essential for NASA to institute an accurate health monitoring program. NASA's goal was to obtain turnkey inspection systems that could certify the integrity of the Shuttle heat shields prior to each mission. Because of the possibility of damaging the heat shields during removal, the NDI devices must be deployed without removing the leading edge panels from the wing. Recently, NASA selected a multi-method approach for inspecting the wing leading edge which includes eddy current, thermography, and ultrasonics. The complementary superposition of these three inspection techniques produces a rigorous Orbiter certification process that can reliably detect the array of flaws expected in the Shuttle's heat shields. Sandia Labs produced an in-situ ultrasonic inspection method while NASA Langley developed the eddy current and thermographic techniques. An extensive validation process, including blind inspections monitored by NASA officials, demonstrated the ability of these inspection systems to meet the accuracy, sensitivity, and reliability requirements. This report presents the ultrasonic NDI development process and the final hardware configuration. The work included the use of flight hardware and scrap heat shield panels to discover and overcome the obstacles associated with damage detection in the RCC material. Optimum combinations of custom ultrasonic probes and data analyses were merged with the inspection procedures needed to properly survey the heat shield panels. System features were introduced to minimize the potential for human factors errors in identifying and locating the flaws. The in-situ NDI team completed the transfer of this technology to NASA and USA employees so that they can complete 'Return-to-Flight' certification inspections on all Shuttle Orbiters prior to each launch.

Roach, Dennis Patrick; Walkington, Phillip D.; Rackow, Kirk A.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Performance demonstration of a high-power space-reactor heat-pipe design  

SciTech Connect

Performance of a 15.9-mm diam, 2-m long, artery heat pipe has been demonstrated at power levels to 22.6 kW and temperatures to 1500/sup 0/K. The heat pipe employed lithium as a working fluid with distribution wicks and arteries fabricated from 400 mesh Mo-41 wt % Re screen. Molybdenum alloy (TZM) was used for the container. Peak axial power density attained in the testing was 19 kW/cm/sup 2/ at 1465/sup 0/K. The corresponding radial flux density in the evaporator region of the heat pipe was 150 W/cm/sup 2/. The extrapolated limit for the heat pipe at its 1500/sup 0/K design point is 30 kW, corresponding to an axial flux density of 25 kW/cm/sup 2/. Sonic and capillary limits for the design were investigated in the 1100 to 1500/sup 0/K temperature range. Excellent agreement of measured and predicted temperature and power levels was observed.

Merrigan, M.A.; Martinez, E.H.; Keddy, E.S.; Runyan, J.; Kemme, J.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Switchable heat pipe assembly  

SciTech Connect

The heat pipe assembly is formed into an H-shape or a Y-shape. The H-shaped configuration comprises two heat pipes, each having condenser and evaporator sections with wicking therein coupled by a tube with wick at their evaporator sections. The Y-shaped configuration utilizes a common evaporator section in place of the two evaporator sections of the H-shaped configuration. In both configurations, the connection between the vapor spaces of the two heat pipes equalizes vapor pressure within the heat pipes. Although both heat pipes have wicks, they have sufficient fluid only to saturate a single pipe. If heat is applied to the condenser section of one of the pipes, this heat pipe becomes inoperative since all the fluid is transferred to the second pipe which can operate with a lower thermal load.

Sun, T.H.; Basiulis, A.

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

High Efficiency Integrated Space Conditioning, Water Heating and Air Distribution System for HUD-Code Manufactured Housing  

SciTech Connect

Recognizing the need for new space conditioning and water heating systems for manufactured housing, DeLima Associates assembled a team to develop a space conditioning system that would enhance comfort conditions while also reducing energy usage at the systems level. The product, Comboflair® was defined as a result of a needs analysis of project sponsors and industry stakeholders. An integrated system would be developed that would combine a packaged airconditioning system with a small-duct, high-velocity air distribution system. In its basic configuration, the source for space heating would be a gas water heater. The complete system would be installed at the manufactured home factory and would require no site installation work at the homesite as is now required with conventional split-system air conditioners. Several prototypes were fabricated and tested before a field test unit was completed in October 2005. The Comboflair® system, complete with ductwork, was installed in a 1,984 square feet, double-wide manufactured home built by Palm Harbor Homes in Austin, TX. After the home was transported and installed at a Palm Harbor dealer lot in Austin, TX, a data acquisition system was installed for remote data collection. Over 60 parameters were continuously monitored and measurements were transmitted to a remote site every 15 minutes for performance analysis. The Comboflair® system was field tested from February 2006 until April 2007. The cooling system performed in accordance with the design specifications. The heating system initially could not provide the needed capacity at peak heating conditions until the water heater was replaced with a higher capacity standard water heater. All system comfort goals were then met. As a result of field testing, we have identified improvements to be made to specific components for incorporation into production models. The Comboflair® system will be manufactured by Unico, Inc. at their new production facility in St. Louis, MO. The product will be initially launched in the hot-humid climates of the southern U.S.

Henry DeLima; Joe Akin; Joseph Pietsch

2008-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Lightning dock geothermal space heating project, Lightning Dock KGRA, New Mexico. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed project was to take the existing geothermal greenhouse and home heating systems, which consisted of pumping geothermal water and steam through passive steam heaters, and convert the systems to one using modern heat exchange units. It was proposed to complete the existing unfinished, re-inforced glass side wall, wood framed structure, as a nursery lath house, the purpose of which would be to use geothermal water in implementing university concepts on the advantages of bottom heat to establish hardy root systems in nursery and bedding plants. The use of this framework was abandoned in favor of erecting new structures for the proposed purpose. The final project of the proposal was the establishment of a drip irrigation system, to an area just west of the existing greenhouse and within feet of the geothermal well. Through this drip irrigation system geothermal water would be pumped, to prevent killing spring frosts. The purpose of this area of the proposal is to increase the potential use of existing geothermal waters of the Lightning Dock KGRA, in opening a new geothermal agri-industry which is economically feasible for the area and would be extremely energy efficient.

McCants, T.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Thermal analysis of heat storage canisters for a solar dynamic, space power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermal analysis was performed of a thermal energy storage canister of a type suggested for use in a solar receiver for an orbiting Brayton cycle power system. Energy storage for the eclipse portion of the cycle is provided by the latent heat of a eutectic mixture of LiF and CaF/sub 2/ contained in the canister. The chief motivation for the study is the prediction of vapor void effects on temperature profiles and the identification of possible differences between ground test data and projected behavior in microgravity. The first phase of this study is based on a two-dimensional, cylindrical coordinates model using an interim procedure for describing void behavior in 1/minus/g and microgravity. The thermal anaylsis includes the effects of solidification front behavior, conduction in liquid/solid salt and canister materials, void growth and shrinkage, radiant heat transfer across the void, and convection in the melt due to Marangoni-induced flow and, in 1/minus/g, flow due to density gradients. A number of significant differences between 1/minus/g and 0/minus/g behavior were found. These resulted from differences in void location relative to the maximum heat flux and a significantly smaller effective conductance in 0/minus/g due to the absence of gravity-induced convection.

Wichner, R.P.; Solomon, A.D.; Drake, J.B.; Williams, P.T.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation; Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate-temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. The project resource assessment, based on a thorough review of existing data, indicates that a substantial resource likely exists in the Baca Grande region capable of supporting residential and light industrial activity. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The feasibility evaluation indicates the economics of the residential areas are dependent on the continued rate of housing construction. If essentially complete development could occur over a 30-year period, the economics are favorable as compared to existing alternatives. For the commercial area, the economics are good as compared to existing conventional energy sources. This is especially true as related to proposed greenhouse operations. The institutional and environmental analyses indicates that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

Goering, S.W.; Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.; Fritzler, E.A.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Transient thermal analysis of three fast-charging latent heat storage configurations for a space-based power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A space-based thermal storage application must accept large quantities of heat in a short period of time at an elevated temperature. A model of a lithium hydride phase change energy storage system was used to estimate reasonable physical dimensions for this application which included the use of a liquid metal heat transfer fluid. A finite difference computer code was developed and used to evaluate three methods of enhancing heat transfer in the PCM energy storage system. None of these three methods, inserting thin fins, reticulated nickel, or liquid lithium, significantly improved the system performance. The use of a 95% void fraction reticulated nickel insert was found to increase the storage capacity (total energy stored) of the system slightly with only a small decrease in the system energy density (energy storage/system mass). The addition of 10% liquid lithium was found to cause minor increases in both storage density and storage capacity with the added benefit of reducing the hydrogen pressure of the lithium hydride. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Stovall, T.K.; Arimilli, R.V.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Thermal performance and economics of solar space and hot water heating system on Long Island, New York. [F-chart method  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A practical method for designing solar space and water heating systems, called the ''f-chart'' method, is described with the results calculated for Long Island, New York. The solar heating systems to be considered consist of a solar collector which uses either liquid or air, an energy storage which can be either a water tank or a pebble bed, and an auxiliary energy source which supplies heat when solar energy is not available. Solar heated water from storage can be used either for space heating or for preheating the domestic hot water. The results of the ''f-chart'' analysis can simply be expressed as follows. For the thermal performance, Annual Load Fraction Supplied by Solar Energy versus Collector Area, and for the economic performance, Life Cycle Cost Savings versus Collector Area.

Auh, P C

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Geothermal heat pump analysis article  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

heat pump transfers heat from the ground or ground water to provide space heating. In the summer, the heat transfer process is reversed; the ground or groundwater

325

Initial Evaluation of the Heat-Affected Zone, Local Embrittlement Phenomenon as it Applies to Nuclear Reactor Vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine if the local brittle zone (LBZ) problem, encountered in the testing of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) part of welds in offshore platform construction, can also be found in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) welds. Both structures have multipass welds and grain coarsening along the fusion line. Literature was obtained that described the metallurgical evidence and the type of research work performed on offshore structure welds.

McCabe, D.E.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

SciTech Connect

Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

Faletti, D.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

Faletti, D.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Heat resistant materials and their feasibility issues for a space nuclear transportation system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of nuclear propulsion concepts based on solid-core nuclear propulsion are being evaluated for a nuclear propulsion transportation system to support the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) involving the reestablishment of a manned lunar base and the subsequent exploration of Mars. These systems will require high-temperature materials to meet the operating conditions with appropriate reliability and safety built into these systems through the selection and testing of appropriate materials. The application of materials for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) and nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems and the feasibility issues identified for their use will be discussed. Some mechanical property measurements have been obtained, and compatibility tests were conducted to help identify feasibility issues. 3 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Olsen, C.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Comparative economics of passive and active systems: residential space heating applications  

SciTech Connect

The economic performance of alternative designs are evaluated. One passive design is emphasized, the thermal mass storage wall. The economic performance of this design is examined and subsequently contrasted with one active design, the air collector/rock storage system. Architectural design criteria, solar performance characteristics, and the incremental solar cost of each design is briefly reviewed. Projections of conventional energy prices are discussed, along with the optimal sizing/feasibility criterion employed in the economic performance analysis. In addition, the effects of two incentive proposals, income tax credits and low interest loans, upon each design are examined. Results are reported on a state-by-state basis, with major conclusions summarized for each design. It is generally the case that incentives greatly enhance the economics of both system designs, although the contrast is greater for the passive design. Also, against the less expensive conventional fuels (natural gas and heating oil) the passive design was shown to offer a more cost effective alternative than the active system for most states.

Roach, F.; Noll, S.; Ben-David, S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Performance test plan for a space station toluene heater tube  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sundstrand Energy Systems was awarded a contract to investigate the performance capabilities of a toluene heater tube integral to a heat pipe as applied to the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) solar dynamic power system for the Space Station. This heat pipe is a subassembly of the heat receiver. The heat receiver, the heat absorption component of the ORC solar dynamic power system, consists of forty liquid metal heat pipes located circumferentially around the heat receiver`s outside diameter. Each heat pipe contains a toluene heater, two thermal energy storage (TES) canisters and potassium. The function of the heater tube is to heat the supercritical toluene to the required turbine inlet temperature. During the orbit of the space station, the heat receiver and thereby the heat pipe and heater tube will be subjected to variable heat input. The design of the heater must be such that it can accommodate the thermal and hydraulic variations that will be imposed upon it.

Parekh, M.B. [Sundstrand Energy Systems, Rockford, IL (United States)

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

PREDICTING THE TIME RESPONSE OF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar space heating system with heat input and building loadBUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATINGBUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,043 ,043 49 141 128 26 393 7 112 20 46 122 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 115 6 13 5 3 28 2 40 2 3 11 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 86 5 11 5 2 28 1 17 2 3 11 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 142 8 16 15 4 54 1 17 3 6 19 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 116 5 18 16 3 41 (*) 11 2 5 14 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 153 8 22 23 4 59 1 10 2 6 17 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 172 7 24 27 3 68 (*) 9 4 10 20 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 112 3 16 16 2 50 (*) 3 2 6 13 Over 500,000 ............................. 147 7 20 20 3 64 1 5 3 7 16 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 109 4 22 24 3 33 (*) 5 1 9 6 Food Sales ................................ 61 2 4 2 Q 14 1 35 1 1 3 Food Service ............................. 63 3 8 7 3 12 4 20 (*) 1 4 Health Care ...............................

333

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,559 3,559 167 481 436 88 1,340 24 381 69 156 418 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 392 19 44 18 11 96 7 138 8 12 39 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 293 18 38 18 8 95 4 57 6 10 39 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 485 26 55 52 14 184 3 57 10 20 63 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 397 18 62 55 12 140 2 37 7 17 48 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 523 28 77 78 15 202 3 35 7 20 59 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 587 23 82 91 11 234 1 30 14 33 68 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 381 11 55 56 6 170 2 10 8 20 46 Over 500,000 ............................. 501 23 69 67 12 220 2 19 9 25 56 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 371 15 74 83 11 113 2 16 4 32 21 Food Sales ................................ 208 6 12 7 Q 46 2 119 2 2 10 Food Service .............................

334

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,037 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 371 15 74 83 11 113 2 16 4 32 21 Food Sales ................................ 208 6 12 7 Q 46 2 119 2 2 10 Food Service .............................

335

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

50.7 50.7 2.4 6.9 6.2 1.3 19.1 0.3 5.4 1.0 2.2 6.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 60.6 2.9 6.8 2.8 1.7 14.8 1.1 21.2 1.2 1.8 6.0 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 44.0 2.6 5.7 2.8 1.1 14.3 0.7 8.6 0.9 1.4 5.8 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 38.8 2.1 4.4 4.1 1.1 14.7 0.2 4.5 0.8 1.6 5.1 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 43.7 2.0 6.8 6.1 1.3 15.4 0.2 4.0 0.8 1.9 5.3 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 50.9 2.7 7.5 7.6 1.4 19.6 0.3 3.4 0.7 2.0 5.8 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 57.7 2.3 8.0 8.9 1.1 23.0 0.1 2.9 1.3 3.2 6.7 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 51.8 1.5 7.4 7.5 0.8 23.0 0.2 1.3 1.1 2.7 6.2 Over 500,000 ............................. 65.4 3.0 9.0 8.8 1.5 28.7 0.3 2.4 1.2 3.2 7.3 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 37.6 1.5

336

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

48.0 48.0 1.8 6.3 6.1 0.8 18.1 0.3 5.6 1.0 2.3 5.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 60.8 2.9 6.8 2.9 1.7 14.6 1.1 21.6 1.2 1.9 6.0 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 42.2 2.0 5.6 2.8 0.9 13.3 0.7 9.0 0.9 1.5 5.7 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 35.8 1.7 4.1 3.9 0.7 13.3 0.3 4.6 0.8 1.7 4.7 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 41.8 1.8 6.6 6.0 1.0 14.4 0.2 4.1 0.8 1.9 5.0 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 44.8 1.8 6.4 7.2 0.8 17.5 0.3 3.3 0.7 2.0 5.0 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 53.5 1.8 6.9 8.8 0.5 21.7 0.1 2.7 Q 3.5 6.2 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 51.2 1.2 7.2 7.6 0.7 23.0 0.2 1.2 1.1 2.7 6.1 Over 500,000 ............................. 64.9 1.4 7.9 9.5 0.5 30.6 0.3 2.1 1.4 3.9 7.3 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 37.6 1.5 7.5

337

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

89.8 89.8 34.0 6.7 5.9 6.9 17.6 2.6 5.5 1.0 2.3 7.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 98.9 30.5 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.7 7.1 20.2 1.2 1.7 8.1 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 78.3 30.0 5.4 2.6 6.1 12.5 5.2 8.4 0.8 1.4 5.9 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 67.3 28.1 4.1 3.9 3.7 13.1 2.1 4.6 0.8 1.6 5.3 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 77.6 30.2 6.6 5.8 6.3 13.9 1.6 3.9 0.8 1.9 6.7 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 83.8 32.4 6.5 7.2 6.0 17.4 1.2 3.3 0.7 2.0 7.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 103.0 41.3 7.1 8.8 7.9 21.5 0.9 2.7 Q 3.4 8.0 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 101.0 39.0 7.6 7.5 9.4 22.6 1.9 1.2 1.1 2.7 8.1 Over 500,000 ............................. 129.7 44.9 11.5 9.5 11.7 30.6 2.2 2.1 Q 3.9 11.9 Principal Building Activity Education ..................................

338

Heat reclaimer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A heat reclaimer for the exhaust flue of a heating unit comprises a housing having an air input space, an air output space, and an exhaust space, with a plurality of tubes connected between and communicating the air input space with the air output space and extending through the exhaust space. The exhaust flue of the heating unit is connected into the exhaust space of the housing and an exhaust output is connected to the housing extending from the exhaust space for venting exhaust coming from the heater into the exhaust space to a chimney, for example. A float or level switch is connected to the housing near the bottom of the exhaust space for switching, for example, an alarm if water accumulates in the exhaust space from condensed water vapor in the exhaust. At least one hole is also provided in the housing above the level of the float switch to permit condensed water to leave the exhaust space. The hole is provided in case the float switch clogs with soot. A wiping device may also be provided in the exhaust space for wiping the exterior surfaces of the tubes and removing films of water and soot which might accumulate thereon and reduce their heat transfer capacity.

Bellaff, L.

1981-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

339

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

Daman, Ernest L. (Westfield, NJ); McCallister, Robert A. (Mountain Lakes, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Energy Basics: Heating Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of energy sources, including electricity, boilers, solar energy, and wood and pellet-fuel heating. Small Space Heaters Used when the main heating system is inadequate or when...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

temperature heat pumps applied to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are thermal requirements in the industrial plant Treq requirement in the industrial plant Look for outside thermal requirements Neighbor industrial plant, thermal à 55 m3/h Thermal power >700 kW Able to reproduce industrial conditions Supervisory control

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

342

Geothermal space/water heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Quarterly technical progress report, 13 December 1976-12 March 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the second three months of this feasibility study to determine the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of heating Mammoth Lakes Village, California using geothermal energy, the following work was accomplished. A saturation survey of the number and types of space and water heaters currently in use in the Village was completed. Electric energy and ambient temperature metering equipment was installed. Peak heating demand for Mammoth Lakes was estimated for the years 1985, 1990 and 2000. Buildings were selected which are considered typical of Mammoth Lakes in terms of their heating systems to be used in estimating the cost of installing hydronic heating systems in Mammoth. Block diagrams and an order of magnitude cost comparison were prepared for high-temperature and low-temperature geothermal district heating systems. Models depicting a geothermal district heating system and a geothermal-electric power plant were designed, built and delivered to ERDA in Washington. Local input to the feasibility study was obtained from representatives of the State of California Departments of Transportation and Fish and Game, US Forest Service, and Mono County Planning Department.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Geothermal Energy Development in the Eastern United States: Technical assistance report No. 6 geothermal space heating and airconditioning -- McGuire Air Force Base, New Jersey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of utilizing the geothermal (66 F) water resource for space heating and cooling of 200 of the 1452 housing units at McGuire AFB is suggested. Using projections of future costs of gas, coal and electricity made by DOD and by industry (Westinghouse), the relative costs of the geothermal-water-plus-heat-pump system and the otherwise-planned central gas heating (to be converted to coal in 1984) and air-conditioning (using individual electric units) system are compared. For heating with the geothermal/heat-pump system, an outlet temperature of 130 F is selected, requiring a longer running time than the conventional system (at 180 F) but permitting a COP (coefficient of performance) of the heat pump of about 3.4. For cooling (obtained in this study by changing directions of water flow, not refrigerant cycles), the change in temperature is less, and a COP near 4.5 is obtained. The cost of cooling in the summer months would be significantly less than the cost of using individual electric air-conditioners. Thus, by using nonreversible heat pumps, geothermal water is used to heat and to cool a section of the housing compound, minimizing operating expenditures. It is estimated that, to drill 1000 ft deep production and reinjection wells and to install ten heat pumps, heat exchangers and piping, would require a capital outlay of $643 K. This cost would replace the capital cost of purchasing and installing 200 air-conditioning units and 14% of the cost of the future coal-fired central heating system (which would otherwise serve all 1452 housing units at McGuire). The net additional capital outlay would be $299 K, which could be amortized in 10 years by the lower operating cost of the geothermal system if electricity and coal prices escalate as industry suggests. If the coal and electricity costs rise at the more modest rates that DOD projects, the capital costs would be amortized in a 15 year period.

Hill, F.K.; Briesen R. von

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Small Space Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Small space heaters, also called portable heaters, are typically used when the main heating system is inadequate or when central heating is too costly to install or operate. Space heater capacities...

345

Projecting Monthly Natural Gas Sales for Space Heating Using a Monthly Updated Model and Degree-days from Monthly Outlooks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of projecting monthly residential natural gas sales and evaluating interannual changes in demand is investigated using a linear regression model adjusted monthly. with lagged monthly heating degree-days as the independent variable. ...

Richard L. Lehman; Henry E. Warren

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Applied Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science Applied Science Correlation of predicted and measured iron oxidation states in mixed iron oxides H. D. Rosenfeld and W. L. Holstein Development of a quantitative measurement of a diesel spray core using synchrotron x-rays C.F. Powell, Y. Yue, S. Gupta, A. McPherson, R. Poola, and J. Wang Localized phase transformations by x-ray-induced heating R.A. Rosenberg, Q. Ma, W. Farrell, E.D. Crozier, G.J. Soerensen, R.A. Gordon, and D.-T. Jiang Resonant x-ray scattering at the Se edge in ferroelectric liquid crystal materials L. Matkin, H. Gleeson, R. Pindak, P. Mach, C. Huang, G. Srajer, and J. Pollmann Synchrotron-radiation-induced anisotropic wet etching of GaAs Q. Ma, D.C. Mancini, and R.A. Rosenberg Synchrotron-radiation-induced, selective-area deposition of gold on

347

Finite element modeling of borehole heat exchanger systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single borehole heat exchanger (BHE) and arrays of BHE are modeled by using the finite element method. Applying BHE in regional discretizations optimal conditions of mesh spacing around singular BHE nodes are derived. Optimal meshes have shown superior ... Keywords: Borehole heat exchanger, Borehole thermal energy store, FEFLOW, TRNSYS

H. -J. G. Diersch; D. Bauer; W. Heidemann; W. Rhaak; P. Schtzl

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Geothermal space heating applications for the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in the vicinity of Poplar, Montana. Final report, August 20, 1979-May 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a first-stage evaluation of the overall feasibility of utilizing geothermal waters from the Madison aquifer in the vicinity of Poplar, Montana for space heating are reported. A preliminary assessment of the resource characteristics, a preliminary design and economic evaluation of a geothermal heating district and an analysis of environmental and institutional issues are included. Preliminary investigations were also made into possible additional uses of the geothermal resource, including ethanol production. The results of the resource analysis showed that the depth to the top of the Madison occurs at approximately 5,500 feet at Poplar, and the Madison Group is characterized by low average porosity (about 5 percent) and permeability (about 0.004 gal/day-ft), and by hot water production rates of a few tens of gallons per minute from intervals a few feet thick. The preliminary heating district system effort for the town of Poplar included design heat load estimates, a field development concept, and preliminary design of heat extraction and hot water distribution systems. The environmental analysis, based on current data, indicated that resource development is not expected to result in undue impacts. The institutional analysis concluded that a Tribal geothermal utility could be established, but no clear-cut procedure can be identified without a more comprehensive evaluation of legal and jurisdistional issues. The economic evaluation found that, if the current trend of rapidly increasing prices for fossil fuels continues, a geothermal heating district within Poplar could be a long-term, economically attractive alternative to current energy sources.

Birman, J.H.; Cohen, J.; Spencer, G.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Solar heat collector  

SciTech Connect

A solar heat collector comprises an evacuated transparent pipe; a solar heat collection plate disposed in the transparent pipe; a heat pipe, disposed in the transparent pipe so as to contact with the solar heat collection plate, and containing an evaporable working liquid therein; a heat medium pipe containing a heat medium to be heated; a heat releasing member extending along the axis of the heat medium pipe and having thin fin portions extending from the axis to the inner surface of the heat medium pipe; and a cylindrical casing surrounding coaxially the heat medium pipe to provide an annular space which communicates with the heat pipe. The evaporable working liquid evaporates, receiving solar heat collected by the heat collection plate. The resultant vapor heats the heat medium through the heat medium pipe and the heat releasing member.

Yamamoto, T.; Imani, K.; Sumida, I.; Tsukamoto, M.; Watahiki, N.

1984-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

350

Buildings","All Heated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings, 1999" 2. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Heated Buildings","Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Heat Pumps","Furnaces","Individual Space Heaters","District Heat","Boilers","Packaged Heating Units","Other" "All Buildings ................",4657,4016,492,1460,894,96,581,1347,185 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1982,240,783,397,"Q",146,589,98 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,946,100,387,183,"Q",144,302,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,629,81,206,191,19,128,253,22

351

Buildings","All Heated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Heating Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" 3. Heating Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Heated Buildings","Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Heat Pumps","Furnaces","Individual Space Heaters","District Heat","Boilers","Packaged Heating Units","Other" "All Buildings ................",67338,61602,8923,14449,17349,5534,19522,25743,4073 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,679,2271,1183,"Q",463,1779,250 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,745,2848,1350,"Q",1040,2301,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,1288,3047,3021,307,2047,3994,401

352

Effect of rib spacing on heat transfer and friction in a rotating two-pass rectangular (AR=1:2) channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research focuses on testing the heat transfer enhancement in a channel for different spacing of the rib turbulators. Those ribs are put on the surface in the two pass rectangular channel with an aspect ratio of AR=1:2. The cross section of the rib is 1.59 x 1.59 mm. Those ribs are put on the leading and trailing walls of the channel with the angle of flow attack to the mainstream of 45?°. The rotating speed is fixed at 550-RPM with the channel orientation at ?²=90?°. Air is used as the coolant through the cooling passage with the coolant-to-wall density ratio ( ρ ρ â?? ) maintained around 0.115 in the first pass and 0.08 in the second pass. The Reynolds numbers are controlled at 5000, 10000, 25000, and 40000. The rib spacing-to-height ratios (P/e) are 3, 5, 7.5, and 10. The heat transfer coefficient and friction factor are measured to determine the effect of the different rib distributions. Stationary cases and rotational cases are examined and compared. The result shows that the highest thermal performance is P/e=5 for the stationary case and P/e=7.5 for the rotating case.

Liu, Yao-Hsien

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Indentation of a Punch with Chemical or Heat Distribution at Its Base into Transversely Isotropic Half-Space: Application to Local Thermal and Electrochemical Probes  

SciTech Connect

The exact solution to the coupled problem of indentation of the punch, subjected to either heat or chemical substance distribution at its base, into three-dimensional semi-infinite transversely isotropic material is presented. The entire set of field components are derived in terms of integrals of elementary functions using methods of the potential theory and recently obtained, by the authors, results for the general solution of the field equations in terms of four harmonic potential functions. The exact solution for the stiffness relations that relate applied force, total chemical diffusion/heat flux in the domain of the contact, with indenter displacement, temperature, or chemical substance distribution of diffusing species at the base, and materials' chemo/thermo-elastic properties are obtained in closed form and in terms of elementary functions. These results can be used to understand the image formation mechanisms in techniques such as thermal scanning probe microscopy and electrochemical strain microscopy

Karapetian, E. [Suffolk University, Boston; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Space and Time Resolved Measurements of the Heating of Solids to Ten Million Kelvin by a Petawatt Laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heating of plane solid targets by the Vulcan petawatt laser at powers of 0.32-0.73 PW and intensities of up to 4 x 10^20 W cm^-2 has been diagnosed with a temporal resolution of 17 ps and a spatial resolution of 30 um, by measuring optical emission from the opposite side of the target to the laser with a streak camera. Second harmonic emission was filtered out and the target viewed at an angle to eliminate optical transition radiation. Spatial resolution was obtained by imaging the emission onto a bundle of fibre optics, arranged into a one-dimensional array at the camera entrance. The results show that a region 160 um in diameter can be heated to a temperature of ~10^7 K (kT/e ~ keV) in solid targets from 10 to 20 um thick and that this temperature is maintained for at least 20 ps, confirming the utility of PW lasers in the study of high energy density physics. Hybrid code modelling shows that magnetic field generation prevents increased target heating by electron refluxing above a certain target thickness and that the absorption of laser energy into electrons entering the solid target was between 15-30%, and tends to increase with laser energy.

Nakatsutsumi, M.; Davies, J.R.; Kodama, R.; Green, J.S.; Lancaster, K.L.; Akli, K.U.; Beg, F.N.; Chen, S.N.; Clark, D.; Freeman, R.R.; Gregory, C.D.; Habara, H.; Heathcote, R.; Hey, D.S.; Highbarger, K.; Jaanimagi, P.; Key, M.H.; Krushelnick, K.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; MacKinnon, A.J.; Nakamura, H.; Stephens, R.B.; Storm, M.; Tampo, M.; Theobald, W.; Van Woerkom, L.; Weber, R.L.; Wei, M.S.; Woolsey, N.C.; Norreys, P.A.

2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

355

Geothermal Energy Market Study on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. A Review of Recent Energy Price Projections for Traditional Space Heating Fuel 1985-2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to develop an initial estimate of the potential competitiveness of low temperature (45 degrees C to 100 degrees C) geothermal resources on the Eastern Coastal Plain, the Center for Metropolitant Planning and Research of The Johns Hopkins University reviewed and compared available energy price projections. Series of projections covering the post-1985 period have been made by the Energy Information Administration, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and by private research firms. Since low temperature geothermal energy will compete primarily for the space and process heating markets currently held by petroleum, natural gas, and electricity, projected trends in the real prices for these fuels were examined. The spread in the current and in projected future prices for these fuels, which often serve identical end uses, underscores the influence of specific attributes for each type of fuel, such as cleanliness, security of supply, and governmental regulation. Geothermal energy possesses several important attributes in common with electricity (e.g., ease of maintenance and perceived security of supply), and thus the price of electric space heating is likely to be an upper bound on a competitive price for geothermal energy. Competitiveness would, of course, be increased if geothermal heat could be delivered for prices closer to those for oil and natural gas. The projections reviewed suggest that oil and gas prices will rise significantly in real terms over the next few decades, while electricity prices are projected to be more stable. Electricity prices will, however, remain above those for the other two fuels. The significance of this work rests on the fact that, in market economies, prices provide the fundamental signals needed for efficient resource allocation. Although market prices often fail to fully account for factors such as environmental impacts and long-term scarcity value, they nevertheless embody a considerable amount of information and are the primary guideposts for suppliers and consumers.

Weissbrod, Richard; Barron, William

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Preliminary conceptual design for geothermal space heating conversion of school district 50 joint facilities at Pagosa Springs, Colorado. GTA Report No. 6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This feasibility study and preliminary conceptual design effort assesses the conversion of Colorado School District 50 facilities - a high school and gym, and a middle school building - at Pagosa Springs, Colorado to geothermal space heating. A preliminary cost-benefit assessment made on the basis of estimated costs for conversion, system maintenance, debt service, resource development, electricity to power pumps, and savings from reduced natural gas consumption concluded that an economic conversion depended on development of an adequate geothermal resource (approximately 150/sup 0/F, 400 gpm). Material selection assumed that the geothermal water to the main supply system was isolated to minimize effects of corrosion and deposition, and that system-compatible components would be used for the building modifications. Asbestos-cement distribution pipe, a stainless steel heat exchanger, and stainless steel lined valves were recommended for the supply, heat transfer, and disposal mechanisms, respectively. A comparison of the calculated average gas consumption cost, escalated at 10% per year, with conversion project cost, both in 1977 dollars, showed that the project could be amortized over less than 20 years at current interest rates. In view of the favorable economics and the uncertain future availability and escalating cost of natural gas, the conversion appears economicaly feasible and desirable.

Engen, I.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Energy Basics: Solar Air Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Homes & Buildings Printable Version Share this resource Lighting & Daylighting Passive Solar Design Space Heating & Cooling Cooling Systems Heating Systems Furnaces & Boilers Wood...

358

Energy Basics: Solar Liquid Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Homes & Buildings Printable Version Share this resource Lighting & Daylighting Passive Solar Design Space Heating & Cooling Cooling Systems Heating Systems Furnaces & Boilers Wood...

359

Electrically heated liquid tank employing heat pipe heat transfer means  

SciTech Connect

The heating apparatus for applying heat to the interior of a chamber includes a modular, removable, electrical, heat-producing unit and a heat pipe mountable in a wall of the chamber with one end of the pipe arranged to receive heat from the electrical heat producing unit exterior of the housing and with another end of the pipe constructed and arranged to apply heat to the medium within the chamber. The heat pipe has high conductivity with a low temperature differential between the ends thereof and the heat producing unit includes an electric coil positioned about and removably secured to the one end of the heat pipe. The electric coil is embedded in a high thermal conducitivity, low electrical conductivity filler material which is surrounded by a low thermal conductivity insulating jacket and which is received around a metal core member which is removably secured to the one end of the heat pipe.

Shutt, J.R.

1978-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

360

Qualitative choice modeling of energy-conservation decisions: a micro-economic analysis of the determinants of residential space-heating energy demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study develops an economic model of household decisions to install major conservation measures such as storm windows, attic insulation, and wall insulation. The structural core of the model is the neoclassical economic paradigm of constrained discounted expected utility maximization. Household choices are modeled as being determined by household preferences across space-heating comfort levels and a composite of all other goods and services. These preferences interact with alternative household budget constraints which are determined by the household's conservation decisions. Nested Logit estimation techniques, using the observed discrete choices of a representative sample of households (in owner-occupied, single-family dwellings), are shown to be superior to simple Multinomial Logit estimation. This superiority arises from the importance of correlation among the error terms associated with indirect utility derived from certain subsets of available conservation alternatives.

Cameron, T.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

28 28 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 34 32 Q (*) Q 56.9 52.2 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 36 33 Q (*) Q 49.4 44.7 Q 0.1 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 28 25 1 (*) Q 26.7 23.8 1.4 0.1 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 17 16 Q (*) 1 19.1 17.8 Q (*) 0.6 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 29 26 1 Q 1 15.6 14.1 0.7 Q 0.5 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 37 35 Q Q 1 12.5 11.5 Q Q 0.5 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 36 25 Q Q 2 10.5 7.4 2.4 Q 0.5 Over 500,000 ............................. 10 Q Q Q 2 2.1 Q Q Q 0.4 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 47 45 2 Q Q 25.4 23.9 0.8 Q 0.3 Food Sales ................................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Food Service ............................. Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q

362

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

634 634 578 46 1 Q 116.4 106.3 8.4 0.2 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 165 154 10 Q Q 118.1 109.9 Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 123 112 11 Q Q 121.2 110.2 10.5 Q Q Over 500,000 ............................. 169 146 16 Q Q 99.9 86.2 9.5 Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 134 122 8 Q Q 116.6 106.6 6.9 Q Q Food Service ............................. N N N N N N N N N N Health Care ............................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Inpatient ..................................

363

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings.............................. Buildings.............................. 1,644 1,429 131 Q 72 0.10 0.09 0.01 Q (*) Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 249 228 Q (*) Q 0.41 0.38 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 237 Q 1 Q 0.36 0.32 Q (*) Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 201 179 11 (*) Q 0.19 0.17 0.01 (*) Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 124 115 Q (*) 4 0.14 0.13 Q (*) (*) 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 209 188 10 Q 7 0.11 0.10 0.01 Q (*) 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 270 250 Q Q 10 0.09 0.08 Q Q (*) 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 258 183 Q Q 11 0.08 0.05 0.02 Q (*) Over 500,000 ............................. 72 Q Q Q 15 0.02 Q Q Q (*) Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 342 322 11 Q Q 0.18 0.17 0.01 Q (*) Food Sales ................................

364

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

636 636 580 46 1 Q 114.0 103.9 8.3 0.2 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 165 154 10 Q Q 118.1 109.9 Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 123 112 11 Q Q 121.2 110.2 10.5 Q Q Over 500,000 ............................. 171 147 16 Q Q 93.6 80.6 8.9 Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 134 122 8 Q Q 116.6 106.6 6.9 Q Q Food Service ............................. N N N N N N N N N N Health Care ............................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Inpatient ..................................

365

Solar home heating in Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This booklet presents the fundamentals of solar heating for both new and existing homes. A variety of systems for space heating and household water heating are explained, and examples are shown of solar homes and installations in Michigan.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems May 30, 2012 - 3:40pm Addthis Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Solar water heating systems use heat exchangers to transfer solar energy absorbed in solar collectors to the liquid or air used to heat water or a space. Heat exchangers can be made of steel, copper, bronze, stainless steel, aluminum, or cast iron. Solar heating systems usually use copper, because it is a good thermal conductor and has greater resistance to corrosion. Types of Heat Exchangers Solar water heating systems use three types of heat exchangers: Liquid-to-liquid A liquid-to-liquid heat exchanger uses a heat-transfer fluid that

367

Geothermal Space Heating Applications for the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in the Vicinity of Poplar, Montana. Phase I Report, August 20, 1979--December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This engineering and economic study is concerned with the question of using the natural heat of the earth, or geothermal energy, as an alternative to other energy sources such as oil and natural gas which are increasing in cost. This document represents a quarterly progress report on the effort directed to determine the availability of geothermal energy within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana (Figure 1), and the feasibility of beneficial use of this resource including engineering, economic and environmental considerations. The project is being carried out by the Tribal Research office, Assinboine and Sioux Tribes, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Poplar, Montana under a contract to the United States Department of Energy. PRC TOUPS, the major subcontractor, is responsible for engineering and economic studies and the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) is providing support in the areas of environment and finance, the results of which will appear in the Final Report. The existence of potentially valuable geothermal resource within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation was first detected from an analysis of temperatures encountered in oil wells drilled in the area. This data, produced by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, pointed to a possible moderate to high temperature source near the town of Poplar, Montana, which is the location of the Tribal Headquarters for the Fort Peck Reservation. During the first phase of this project, additional data was collected to better characterize the nature of this geothermal resource and to analyze means of gaining access to it. As a result of this investigation, it has been learned that not only is there a potential geothermal resource in the region but that the producing oil wells north of the town of Poplar bring to the surface nearly 20,000 barrels a day (589 gal/min) of geothermal fluid in a temperature range of 185-200 F. Following oil separation, these fluids are disposed of by pumping into a deep groundwater aquifer. While beneficial uses may be found for these geothermal fluids, even higher temperatures (in excess of 260 F) may be found directly beneath the town of Poplar and the new residential development which is being planned in the area. This project is primarily concerned with the use of geothermal energy for space heating and domestic hot water for the town of Poplar (Figure 2 and Photograph 1) and a new residential development of 250 homes which is planned for an area approximately 4 miles east of Poplar along U.S. Route 2 (Figure 2 and Photograph 2). A number of alternative engineering design approaches have been evaluated, and the cost of these systems has been compared to existing and expected heating costs.

Spencer, Glenn J.; Cohen, M. Jane

1980-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

368

Heat Stroke  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stress, from exertion or hot environments, places stress, from exertion or hot environments, places workers at risk for illnesses such as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, or heat cramps. Heat Stroke A condition that occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature, and can cause death or permanent disability. Symptoms ■ High body temperature ■ Confusion ■ Loss of coordination ■ Hot, dry skin or profuse sweating ■ Throbbing headache ■ Seizures, coma First Aid ■ Request immediate medical assistance. ■ Move the worker to a cool, shaded area. ■ Remove excess clothing and apply cool water to their body. Heat Exhaustion The body's response to an excessive loss of water and salt, usually through sweating. Symptoms ■ Rapid heart beat ■ Heavy sweating ■ Extreme weakness or fatigue ■

369

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficient operation of space-conditioning equipment in thesethe PA Problem for Space Conditioning in U.S. Commercial9 Figure 2: Higher space conditioning end-use energy

Blum, Helcio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Heat Pump System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pump System Basics Heat Pump System Basics Heat Pump System Basics August 19, 2013 - 11:02am Addthis Like a refrigerator, heat pumps use electricity to move heat from a cool space into a warm space, making the cool space cooler and the warm space warmer. Because they move heat rather than generate heat, heat pumps can provide up to four times the amount of energy they consume. Air-Source Heat Pump Transfers heat between the inside of a building and the outside air. Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pump Ductless versions of air-source heat pumps. Absorption Heat Pump Uses heat as its energy source. Geothermal Heat Pumps Use the constant temperature of the earth as the exchange medium instead of the outside air temperature. Addthis Related Articles A heat pump can provide an alternative to using your air conditioner. | Photo courtesy of iStockPhoto/LordRunar.

371

Heat pipes and use of heat pipes in furnace exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of a plurality of heat pipe are mounted in spaced relationship to one another with the hot end of the heat pipes in a heated environment, e.g. the exhaust flue of a furnace, and the cold end outside the furnace. Heat conversion equipment is connected to the cold end of the heat pipes.

Polcyn, Adam D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Own-Elasticities for Space Conditioning Equipment Equipmentthe choice of a space heat/air conditioning combination. Theutility from air conditioning and space heating alternative

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Facility HVAC System Conversion to Ground Source Heat Pump Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ventilators will utilize the hot water to "temper" outdoor air ventilation. Although the heat pump modules can provide both heating and cooling, the space requires heating only....

374

PREDICTING THE TIME RESPONSE OF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS Mashuri L.CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS * Mashuri L.consists of a hydronic solar space heating system with heat

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

Not Available

1980-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Assessment of turbine generator technology for district heating applications  

SciTech Connect

Steam turbines for cogeneration plants may carry a combination of industrial, space heating, cooling and domestic hot water loads. These loads are hourly, weekly, and seasonally irregular and require turbines of special design to meet the load duration curve, while generating electric power. Design features and performance characteristics of large cogeneration turbine units for combined electric generation and district heat supply are presented. Different modes of operation of the cogeneration turbine under variable load conditions are discussed in conjunction with a heat load duration curve for urban heat supply. The performance of the 250 MW district heating turbine as applied to meet the heat load duration curve for Minneapolis--St. Paul area is analyzed, and associated fuel savings are estimated.

Oliker, I.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Heat Pump Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pump Systems Pump Systems Heat Pump Systems May 16, 2013 - 5:33pm Addthis A heat pump can provide an alternative to using your air conditioner. | Photo courtesy of iStockPhoto/LordRunar. A heat pump can provide an alternative to using your air conditioner. | Photo courtesy of iStockPhoto/LordRunar. What does this mean for me? Heat pumps can supply heat, cooling, and hot water. Your climate and site will determine the type of heat pump most appropriate for your home. For climates with moderate heating and cooling needs, heat pumps offer an energy-efficient alternative to furnaces and air conditioners. Like your refrigerator, heat pumps use electricity to move heat from a cool space to a warm space, making the cool space cooler and the warm space warmer. During the heating season, heat pumps move heat from the cool outdoors into

379

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 13th National Energy Services Conference Proceedings,Association of Energy Service Professionals. Jupiter, FL,space-conditioning energy service (end-use energy intensity,

Blum, Helcio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Enhancement of heat transfer for ground source heat pump systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Uptake of geothermal heat pump (GSHP) systems has been slow in some parts of the world due to the unpredictable operational performance, large installation space (more)

Mori, Hiromi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For almost a decade now, heat pipes with secondary finned surfaces have been utilized in counter flow heat exchangers to recover sensible energy from industrial exhaust gases. Over 3,000 such heat exchangers are now in service, recovering an estimated energy equivalent of nearly 1.1 million barrels of oil annually. Energy recovered by these units has been used to either preheat process supply air or to heat plant comfort make-up air. Heat pipe heat exchangers have been applied to an ever-expanding variety of industrial processes. One notable application in recent years has been for combustion airs preheat of fired heaters in petroleum refineries and petrochemical plants. Another recent development has been a waste heat recovery boiler using heat pipes. This device has a number of advantageous features. Field operational experience of several units in service has been excellent.

Ruch, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Active Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Active Solar Heating Active Solar Heating June 24, 2012 - 5:58pm Addthis This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the solar...

383

Heat pipe array heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

384

Definition: District heat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

District heat District heat Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png District heat A heating system that uses steam or hot water produced outside of a building (usually in a central plant) and piped into the building as an energy source for space heating, hot water or another end use.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition District heating (less commonly called teleheating) is a system for distributing heat generated in a centralized location for residential and commercial heating requirements such as space heating and water heating. The heat is often obtained from a cogeneration plant burning fossil fuels but increasingly biomass, although heat-only boiler stations, geothermal heating and central solar heating are also used, as well as nuclear power. District heating plants can provide higher efficiencies and better

385

Heat pipe technology issues  

SciTech Connect

Critical high temperature, high power applications in space nuclear power designs are near the current state of the art of heat pipe technology in terms of power density, operating temperature, and lifetime. Recent heat pipe development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has involved performance testing of typical space reactor heat pipe designs to power levels in excess of 19 kW/cm/sup 2/ axially and 300 W/cm/sup 2/ radially at temperatures in the 1400 to 1500 K range. Operation at conditions in the 10 kW/cm/sup 2/ range has been sustained for periods of up to 1000 hours without evidence of performance degradation. The effective length for heat transport in these heat pipes was from 1.0 to 1.5 M. Materials used were molybdenum alloys with lithium employed as the heat pipe operating fluid. Shorter, somewhat lower power, molybdenum heat pipes have been life tested at Los Alamos for periods of greater than 25,000 hours at 1700 K with lithium and 20,000 hours at 1500/sup 0/K with sodium. These life test demonstrations and the attendant performance limit investigations provide an experimental basis for heat pipe application in space reactor design and represent the current state-of-the-art of high temperature heat pipe technology.

Merrigan, M.A.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Application of district heating system to U. S. urban areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the last few decades district-heating systems have been widely used in a number of European countries using waste heat from electric generation or refuse incineration, as well as energy from primary sources such as geothermal wells or fossil-fired boilers. The current world status of district-heat utilization is summarized. Cost and implementation projections for district-heating systems in the U. S. are discussed in comparison with existing modes of space conditioning and domestic water heating. A substantial fraction, i.e., up to approximately one-half of the U.S. population could employ district-heating systems using waste heat, with present population-distribution patterns. U.S. energy usage would be reduced by an equivalent of approximately 30 percent of current oil imports. Detailed analyses of a number of urban areas are used to formulate conceptual district energy-supply systems, potential implementation levels, and projected energy costs. Important national ancillary economic and social benefits are described, and potential difficulties relating to the implementation of district-heating systems in the U.S. are discussed. District-heating systems appear very attractive for meeting future U.S. energy needs. The technology is well established. The cost/benefit yield is favorable, and the conservation potential is significant. District heating can be applied in urban and densely populated suburban areas. The remaining demand, in rural and low-population-density communities, appears to be better suited to other forms of system substitution.

Karkheck, J.; Powell, J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Tips: Heat Pumps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pumps Heat Pumps Tips: Heat Pumps June 24, 2013 - 5:48pm Addthis Heat pumps can be a cost-effective choice in moderate climates, especially if you heat your home with electricity. Heat pumps can be a cost-effective choice in moderate climates, especially if you heat your home with electricity. Heat pumps are the most efficient form of electric heating in moderate climates. Because they move heat rather than generate heat, heat pumps can provide equivalent space conditioning at as little as one quarter of the cost of operating conventional heating or cooling appliances. A heat pump does double duty as a central air conditioner by collecting the heat inside your house and pumping it outside. There are three types of heat pumps: air-to-air, water source, and geothermal. They collect heat from the air, water, or ground outside your

388

Thermochemical correlation of material transport in an alkali metal heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

The use of high-power heat pipes in space power systems requires a means of life prediction. The design lifetimes required make experimental determination of life impractical. Thermochemical modeling of heat pipe corrosive failure modes has been investigated as a means of making such prediction. Results have been applied to tests of molybdenum-lithium heat pipes operating from 1400 to 1500/sup 0/K. A free energy minimization routine coupled to a hydrodynamic model of the operating heat pipe has been used to give local equilibrium values of reaction products as a function of operating time. The predicted reactions for critical regions of the heat pipe were compared with limited results of post-test examinations. Corrosive damage to the heat pipe wick structure was correlated with high oxygen and nitrogen activity in the evaporator region of the heat pipe.

Merrigan, M.A.; Feber, R.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Strongly exponential symmetric spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the exponential map of connected symmetric spaces and characterize, in terms of midpoints and of infinitesimal conditions, when it is a diffeomorphism, generalizing the Dixmier-Saito theorem for solvable Lie groups. We then give a geometric characterization of the (strongly) exponential solvable symmetric spaces as those spaces for which every triangle admits a unique double triangle. This work is motivated by Weinstein's quantization by groupoids program applied to symmetric spaces.

Yannick Voglaire

2013-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

390

Heat pipe heat amplifier  

SciTech Connect

In a heat pipe combination consisting of a common condenser section with evaporator sections at either end, two working fluids of different vapor pressures are employed to effectively form two heat pipe sections within the same cavity to support an amplifier mode of operation.

Arcella, F.G.

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Geothermal heat pumps in Pierre  

SciTech Connect

There are two municipal connected heat pumps in Pierre, South Dakota: the South Dakota Discovery Center and Pierre City Hall.Both systems now utilize plate heat exchanger between the city water loop and the building loop. This article describes the geothermal system used in Pierre for both space heating and cooling of municipal buildings.

Wegman, S. [South Dakota Public Utilities Commission, Pierre, SD (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Heating Research Water Heating Research to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research Sensors & Controls Research Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

393

Radiant Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Radiant heating systems involve supplying heat directly to the floor or to panels in the walls or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer: the delivery of heat...

394

Assessment of Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems - Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cool- ing needs of the building and offers general guidelines Assessment of Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems Geothermal heat pumps offer attractive choice for space...

395

Heat pump apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pump apparatus including a compact arrangement of individual tubular reactors containing hydride-dehydride beds in opposite end sections, each pair of beds in each reactor being operable by sequential and coordinated treatment with a plurality of heat transfer fluids in a plurality of processing stages, and first and second valves located adjacent the reactor end sections with rotatable members having multiple ports and associated portions for separating the hydride beds at each of the end sections into groups and for simultaneously directing a plurality of heat transfer fluids to the different groups. As heat is being generated by a group of beds, others are being regenerated so that heat is continuously available for space heating. As each of the processing stages is completed for a hydride bed or group of beds, each valve member is rotated causing the heat transfer fluid for the heat processing stage to be directed to that bed or group of beds. Each of the end sections are arranged to form a closed perimeter and the valve member may be rotated repeatedly about the perimeter to provide a continuous operation. Both valves are driven by a common motor to provide a coordinated treatment of beds in the same reactors. The heat pump apparatus is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Horowitz, Jeffrey S. (Woodridge, IL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid geothermal heat pump systems offer many of the benefits of full geothermal systems but at lower installed costs. A hybrid geothermal system combines elements of a conventional water loop heat pump system in order to reduce the geothermal loop heat exchanger costs, which are probably the largest cost element of a geothermal system. These hybrid systems have been used successfully where sufficient ground space to install large heat exchangers for full geothermal options was unavailable, or where the...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

Commissioning Tools for Heating/Cooling System in Residence - Verification of Floor Heating System and Room Air Conditioning System Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tools of evaluating the performance of floor heating and room air conditioner are examined as a commissioning tool. Simple method is needed to check these performance while in use by residents, because evaluation currently requires significant time and effort. Therefore, this paper proposes a) two methods of evaluating the floor heating efficiency from the room / crawl space temperature and the energy consumption and b) method of evaluating COP of the room air conditioner from the data measured at the external unit. Case studies in which these tools were applied to actual residences are presented to demonstrate their effectiveness.

Miura, H.; Hokoi, S.; Iwamae, A.; Umeno, T.; Kondo, S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Energy resource alternatives competition. Progress report for the period February 1, 1975--December 31, 1975. [Space heating and cooling, hot water, and electricity for homes, farms, and light industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report describes the objectives and results of the intercollegiate Energy Resource Alternatives competition. The one-year program concluded in August 1975, with a final testing program of forty student-built alternative energy projects at the Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The goal of the competition was to design and build prototype hardware which could provide space heating and cooling, hot water, and electricity at a level appropriate to the needs of homes, farms, and light industry. The hardware projects were powered by such nonconventional energy sources as solar energy, wind, biologically produced gas, coal, and ocean waves. The competition rules emphasized design innovation, economic feasibility, practicality, and marketability. (auth)

Matzke, D.J.; Osowski, D.M.; Radtke, M.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Active Solar Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active Solar Heating Basics Active Solar Heating Basics Active Solar Heating Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:23pm Addthis There are two basic types of active solar heating systems based on the type of fluid-either liquid or air-that is heated in the solar energy collectors. The collector is the device in which a fluid is heated by the sun. Liquid-based systems heat water or an antifreeze solution in a "hydronic" collector, whereas air-based systems heat air in an "air collector." Both of these systems collect and absorb solar radiation, then transfer the solar heat directly to the interior space or to a storage system, from which the heat is distributed. If the system cannot provide adequate space heating, an auxiliary or back-up system provides the additional heat. Liquid systems are more often used when storage is included, and are well

400

Definition: Heat pump | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pump pump Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Heat pump Heating and/or cooling equipment that, during the heating season, draws heat into a building from outside and, during the cooling season, ejects heat from the building to the outside[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A heat pump is a device that transfers heat energy from a heat source to a heat sink against a temperature gradient. Heat pumps are designed to move thermal energy opposite the direction of spontaneous heat flow. A heat pump uses some amount of external high-grade energy to accomplish the desired transfer of thermal energy from heat source to heat sink. While compressor-driven air conditioners and freezers are familiar examples of heat pumps, the term "heat pump" is more general and applies to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Program Management Program (FEMP) facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. Located near Louisville, Kentucky, Fort Knox is home to the U.S. Army's Armor Center, Armor School, Recruiting Command, and numerous other facilities. The post has a daytime population of more than 30,000 people and more than 3,000 family housing units. In total, Fort Knox encompasses 11 million square feet of conditioned space across more than 109,000 acres. A military post of this size consumes a significant amount of energy. Fort Knox is acutely aware of the need for sustainability to ensure continuous operations and meet Federal energy goals and requirements.

402

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Program Management Program (FEMP) facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. Located near Louisville, Kentucky, Fort Knox is home to the U.S. Army's Armor Center, Armor School, Recruiting Command, and numerous other facilities. The post has a daytime population of more than 30,000 people and more than 3,000 family housing units. In total, Fort Knox encompasses 11 million square feet of conditioned space across more than 109,000 acres. A military post of this size consumes a significant amount of energy. Fort Knox is acutely aware of the need for sustainability to ensure continuous operations and meet Federal energy goals and requirements.

403

Fundamental heat transfer experiments of heat pipes for turbine cooling  

SciTech Connect

Fundamental heat transfer experiments were carried out for three kinds of heat pipes that may be applied to turbine cooling in future aero-engines. In the turbine cooling system with a heat pipe, heat transfer rate and start-up time of the heat pipe are the most important performance criteria to evaluate and compare with conventional cooling methods. Three heat pipes are considered, called heat pipe A, B, and C, respectively. All heat pipes have a stainless steel shell and nickel sintered powder metal wick. Sodium (Na) was the working fluid for heat pipes A and B; heat pipe C used eutectic sodium-potassium (NaK). Heat pipes B and C included noncondensible gas for rapid start-up. There were fins on the cooling section of heat pipes. In the experiments, an infrared image furnace supplied heat to the heat pipe simulating turbine blade surface conditions. In the results, heat pipe B demonstrated the highest heat flux of 17 to 20 W/cm{sup 2}. The start-up time was about 6 minutes for heat pipe B and about 6 minutes for heat pipe A. Thus, adding noncondensible gas effectively reduced start-up time. Although NaK is a liquid phase at room temperature, the start-up time of heat pipe C (about 7 to 8 minutes) was not shorter than the heat pipe B. The effect of a gravitational force on heat pipe performance was also estimated by inclining the heat pipe at an angle of 90 deg. There was no significant gravitational dependence on heat transport for heat pipes including noncondensible gas.

Yamawaki, S. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yoshida, T.; Taki, M.; Mimura, F. [National Aerospace Lab., Tokyo (Japan)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Geothermal Energy Market Study on the Atlantic Coastal Plain: a review of recent energy price projections for traditional space and process heating fuels in the post-1985 period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most recent price projections that have been published for distillate heating fuels, natural gas, and electricity are reviewed. The projections include those made by EIA, DOE, BNL, Foster Associates, and SRI International. Projected distillate prices for 1990 range from Brookhaven's worst case real price of $8.80 per million Btu's to EIA's most optimistic case of $4.10 for that year compared to $6.10 prevailing in September 1979. Natural gas prices projected for 1990 fall within a more narrow band ranging up to $4.50 (Brookhaven's basecase) compared to $4.20 in September 1979. Electricity prices projected for 1990 range to $17.00 per million Btu's compared to the September 1979 average price of $15.50. Regional price differentials show the Northeast paying above national average prices for oil, natural gas, and electricity. The West enjoys the lowest energy price levels overall. Oil prices are relatively uniform across the country, while natural gas and electricity prices may vary by more than 50% from one region to another.

Barron, W.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Efficient numerical modeling of borehole heat exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a finite element modeling technique for double U-tube borehole heat exchangers (BHE) and the surrounding soil mass. Focus is placed on presenting numerical analyses describing the capability of a BHE model, previously reported, to ... Keywords: BHE, Geothermal heat pumps, Geothermic, Heat transfer, Space heating

R. Al-Khoury; T. Klbel; R. Schramedei

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

NREL: Learning - Solar Process Heat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Heat Process Heat Photo of part of one side of a warehouse wall, where a perforated metal exterior skin is spaced about a foot out from the main building wall to form part of the transpired solar collector system. A transpired collector is installed at a FedEx facility in Denver, Colorado. Commercial and industrial buildings may use the same solar technologies-photovoltaics, passive heating, daylighting, and water heating-that are used for residential buildings. These nonresidential buildings can also use solar energy technologies that would be impractical for a home. These technologies include ventilation air preheating, solar process heating, and solar cooling. Space Heating Many large buildings need ventilated air to maintain indoor air quality. In cold climates, heating this air can use large amounts of energy. But a

407

Bio-Heating Oil Tax Credit (Personal)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Maryland allows individuals and corporations to take an income tax credit of $0.03/gallon for purchases of biodiesel used for space heating or water heating. The maximum credit is $500 per year. It...

408

Heat Pump Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heaters Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters May 4, 2012 - 5:21pm Addthis A diagram of a heat pump water heater. A diagram of a heat pump water heater. What does this mean for me? Heat pump water heaters can be two to three times more energy efficient than conventional electric storage water heaters. Heat pump water heaters work in locations that remain in the 40º-90ºF range year-round. Most homeowners who have heat pumps use them to heat and cool their homes. But a heat pump also can be used to heat water -- either as stand-alone water heating system, or as combination water heating and space conditioning system. How They Work Heat pump water heaters use electricity to move heat from one place to another instead of generating heat directly. Therefore, they can be two to

409

List of Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Process Heat Incentives Process Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 204 Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 204) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat

410

Simplified Space Conditioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simplified Space Conditioning Simplified Space Conditioning Duncan Prahl, RA IBACOS, Inc. Building America Technical Update April 29, 2013 Simplified Space Conditioning Rethinking HVAC Design * Traditional Method - Assume envelope losses dictate the load - Room by room load analysis - Pick Equipment and distribute to meet the load in each room * New Method - Consider how the occupants live in the building - Seriously consider internal gains in both heating and cooling - Consider ventilation strategy - Design system Simplified Space Conditioning If you are: * A production builder * Participating in "above code" programs * Following ACCA Manual RS or ASHRAE 55 * Need to prove "delivering heat to each habitable room" * Concerned about litigation * Play it safe, Use Manual J, S & D and condition every

411

Heating Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are used in many varied applications--from small household appliances to large industrial process heating systems and furnaces. In appliances or industrial process heating, the heating elements are usually either open

412

Apparatus for in situ heating and vitrification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for decontaminating ground areas where toxic chemicals are buried includes a plurality of spaced electrodes located in the ground and to which a voltage is applied for bringing about current flow. Power delivered to the ground volatilizes the chemicals that are then collected and directed to a gas treatment system. A preferred form of the invention employs high voltage arc discharge between the electrodes for heating a ground region to relatively high temperatures at relatively low power levels. Electrodes according to the present invention are provided with preferentially active lower portions between which current flows for the purpose of soil heating or for soil melting and vitrification. Promoting current flow below ground level avoids predominantly superficial treatment and increases electrode life. 15 figs.

Buelt, J.L.; Oma, K.H.; Eschbach, E.A.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Experimental Research on Solar Assisted Heat Pump Heating System with Latent Heat Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the status quo that conventional energy sources are more and more reduced and environmental pollution is increasingly serious, this paper presents a new model system of conserving energy and environmental protection, namely, a Solar Assisted Heat Pump Heating System with Latent Heat Storage. In this system, solar energy is the major heat source for a heat pump, and the supplementary heat source is soil. The disagreement in time between the space heat load and heat collected by solar heat collector is solved by latent heat storage. In order to obtain such system running conditions and effects in different heating periods, an experiment has been carried out during the whole heating period in Harbin, China. The experimental results show that this system is much better for heating in initial and late periods than that in middle periods. The average heating coefficient is 6.13 for heating in initial and late periods and 2.94 for heating in middle periods. At the same time, this paper also predicts system running properties in other regions.

Han, Z.; Zheng, M.; Liu, W.; Wang, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A variety of heating technologies are available today. In addition to heat pumps, which are discussed separately, many homes and buildings use the following approaches:

415

Small Space Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Space Heater Basics Small Space Heater Basics Small Space Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 10:38am Addthis Small space heaters, also called portable heaters, are typically used when the main heating system is inadequate or when central heating is too costly to install or operate. Space heater capacities generally range between 10,000 Btu to 40,000 Btu per hour. Common fuels used for this purpose are electricity, propane, natural gas, and kerosene. Although most space heaters rely on convection (the circulation of air in a room), some rely on radiant heating; that is, they emit infrared radiation that directly heats up objects and people that are within their line of sight. Combustion Space Heaters Space heaters are classified as vented and unvented, or "vent free." Unvented combustion units are not recommended for inside use, as they

416

Geothermal Heat Pumps Tech Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal heat pumps (GHPs; a.k.a. Ground Source Heat Pumps or GHPSM) can successfully compete with air source heat pump in performance due to their use of the ground or groundwater as a heat source or heat sink. In 1993, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency labeled GHPs as the most energy efficient, cost-effective and environmentally clean space conditioning technology available. The U.S. Department of Energy, Federal Energy Management Program attested that GHPs are a highly efficient method of ...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

417

Low temperature barriers with heat interceptor wells for in situ processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for reducing heat load applied to a frozen barrier by a heated formation is described. The system includes heat interceptor wells positioned between the heated formation and the frozen barrier. Fluid is positioned in the heat interceptor wells. Heat transfers from the formation to the fluid to reduce the heat load applied to the frozen barrier.

McKinzie, II, Billy John (Houston, TX)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

418

Variable conductance heat pipe enhancement  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a heat pipe. It comprises a tubular hollow heat pipe having an evaporator end and an opposite condenser end, the heat pipe having a cross-sectional area and having a condenser length extending from the condenser end the condenser length including an active length where evaporated fluid condenses; an evaporatable and condensable fluid in the heat pipe for evaporating when receiving heat near the evaporation end and for condensing when giving up heat in the active length; a noncondensable gas near the condenser end and in the condenser length of the heat pipe; a restriction member fixed in the heat pipe near the condenser end, the restriction member extending only along a portion of the condenser length and being spaced away from the evaporation end of the heat pipe, the restriction member having a varied cross-sectional area along the length of the restriction member which is less than the cross-sectional area of the heat pipe for confining the gas and a portion of the fluid in the active condenser length, to an area around the restriction member and in the heat pipe; and a fixed ligament connected between the restriction member and the heat pipe for fixing the restriction member in the heat pipe, the ligament being fixed between the condenser end of the heat pipe end and an end of the restriction member which is closest to the condenser end.

Kneidel, K.E.

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

419

Atoms for space  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear technology offers many advantages in an expanded solar system space exploration program. These cover a range of possible applications such as power for spacecraft, lunar and planetary surfaces, and electric propulsion; rocket propulsion for lunar and Mars vehicles; space radiation protection; water and sewage treatment; space mining; process heat; medical isotopes; and self-luminous systems. In addition, space offers opportunities to perform scientific research and develop systems that can solve problems here on Earth. These might include fusion and antimatter research, using the Moon as a source of helium-3 fusion fuel, and manufacturing perfect fusion targets. In addition, nuclear technologies can be used to reduce risk and costs of the Space Exploration Initiative. 1 fig.

Buden, D.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Solar heat gain through a skylight in a light well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed heat flow measurements on a skylight mounted on a light well of significant depth are presented. It is shown that during the day much of the solar energy that strikes the walls of the well does not reach the space below. Instead, this energy is trapped in the stratified air of the light well and eventually either conducted through the walls of the well or back out through the skylight. The standard model for predicting fenestration heat transfer does not agree with the measurements when it is applied to the skylight/well combination as a whole (the usual practice), but does agree reasonably well when it is applied to the skylight alone, using the well air temperature near the skylight. A more detailed model gives good agreement. Design implications and future research directions are discussed.

Klems, J.H.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Heat Pipe Integrated Microsystems  

SciTech Connect

The trend in commercial electronics packaging to deliver ever smaller component packaging has enabled the development of new highly integrated modules meeting the demands of the next generation nano satellites. At under ten kilograms, these nano satellites will require both a greater density electronics and a melding of satellite structure and function. Better techniques must be developed to remove the subsequent heat generated by the active components required to-meet future computing requirements. Integration of commercially available electronics must be achieved without the increased costs normally associated with current generation multi chip modules. In this paper we present a method of component integration that uses silicon heat pipe technology and advanced flexible laminate circuit board technology to achieve thermal control and satellite structure. The' electronics/heat pipe stack then becomes an integral component of the spacecraft structure. Thermal management on satellites has always been a problem. The shrinking size of electronics and voltage requirements and the accompanying reduction in power dissipation has helped the situation somewhat. Nevertheless, the demands for increased onboard processing power have resulted in an ever increasing power density within the satellite body. With the introduction of nano satellites, small satellites under ten kilograms and under 1000 cubic inches, the area available on which to place hot components for proper heat dissipation has dwindled dramatically. The resulting satellite has become nearly a solid mass of electronics with nowhere to dissipate heat to space. The silicon heat pipe is attached to an aluminum frame using a thermally conductive epoxy or solder preform. The frame serves three purposes. First, the aluminum frame provides a heat conduction path from the edge of the heat pipe to radiators on the surface of the satellite. Secondly, it serves as an attachment point for extended structures attached to the satellite such as solar panels, radiators, antenna and.telescopes (for communications or sensors). Finally, the packages make thermal contact to the surface of the silicon heat pipe through soft thermal pads. Electronic components can be placed on both sides of the flexible circuit interconnect. Silicon heat pipes have a number of advantages over heat pipe constructed from other materials. Silicon heat pipes offer the ability to put the heat pipe structure beneath the active components of a processed silicon wafer. This would be one way of efficiently cooling the heat generated by wafer scale integrated systems. Using this technique, all the functions of a satellite could be reduced to a few silicon wafers. The integration of the heat pipe and the electronics would further reduce the size and weight of the satellite.

Gass, K.; Robertson, P.J.; Shul, R.; Tigges, C.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Heat Conduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Differential equations for heat conduction in solids...conduction in solids General form with variable thermal properties General form with constant thermal properties General form, constant properties, without heat

423

The Evaluation of the Heat Loading from Steady, Transient, and Off-Normal Conditions in ARIES Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heat loading on plasma facing components (PFCs) provides a critical limitation for design and operation of the first wall, divertor, and other special components. Power plants will have high power entering the scrape-off layer and transporting to the first wall and divertor. Although the design for steady heat loads is understood, the approach for transient and offnormal loading is not. The characterization of heat loads developed for ITER1 can be applied to power plants to better develop the operating space of viable solutions and point to research focus areas.

C.E. Kessel, M.S. Tillack and J. Blanchard

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

424

Active Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active Solar Heating Active Solar Heating Active Solar Heating June 24, 2012 - 5:58pm Addthis This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the solar thermal system supplies both domestic hot water and a secondary radiant floor heating system. | Photo courtesy of Jim Schmid Photography, NREL This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the solar thermal system supplies both domestic hot water and a secondary radiant floor heating system. | Photo courtesy of Jim Schmid Photography, NREL What does this mean for me? If you live in a cold climate and have unobstructed access to the sun during the heating season, an active solar heating system might make sense for you. You can buy a manufactured active solar system or build your own.

425

Thermally activated heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

This article describes research to develop efficient gas-fired heat pumps heat and cool buildings without CFCs. Space heating and cooling use 46% of all energy consumed in US buildings. Air-conditioning is the single leading cause of peak demand for electricity and is a major user of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Advanced energy conversion technology can save 50% of this energy and eliminate CFCs completely. Besides saving energy, advanced systems substantially reduce emissions of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas), sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides, which contribute to smog and acid rain. These emissions result from the burning of fossil fuels used to generate electricity. The Office of Building Technologies (OBT) of the US Department of Energy supports private industry`s efforts to improve energy efficiency and increase the use of renewable energy in buildings. To help industry, OBT, through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is currently working on thermally activated heat pumps. OBT has selected the following absorption heat pump systems to develop: generator-absorber heat-exchange (GAX) cycle for heating-dominated applications in residential and light commercial buildings; double-condenser-coupled (DCC) cycle for commercial buildings. In addition, OBT is developing computer-aided design software for investigating the absorption cycle.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

Huebotter, P.R.; McLennan, G.A.

1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

Huebotter, Paul R. (Western Springs, IL); McLennan, George A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Platek Spaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to axiomatize and enhance the recursion theory on monotonic hierarchies of operative spaces developed in [1]. This is to be accomplished by employing a special new variety of operative spaces called Platek spaces. The original ... Keywords: Platek spaces, combinatory algebra, computability, generalised recursion theory, lightface recursion

Lyubomir Ivanov

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Platek Spaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to axiomatize and enhance the recursion theory on monotonic hierarchies of operative spaces developed in [1]. This is to be accomplished by employing a special new variety of operative spaces called Platek spaces. The original ... Keywords: Platek spaces, combinatory algebra, computability, generalised recursion theory, lightface recursion

Lyubomir Ivanov

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Acoustical heat pumping engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

Acoustical heat pumping engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

432

Testing of a sodium heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

The operation of a heat pipe with both thermal radiation and convection heat rejection has been experimentally examined. The thermal radiation heat rejection conditions are similar to those which would be experienced in a space environment. The experimental results show good agreement with the analytical model. 3 refs., 2 figs.

Holtz, R.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Heating Facilities, Stepping Stones Rehabilitation Center, Klamath Falls, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Stepping Stones Rehabilitation Center is leased from Klamath County and operated by the Klamath Council on Alcohol and Drugs. Buildings consist of interconnected and adjoining buildings laid out in a U configuration, with a total floor plan area of about 13,000 square feet. Construction is conventional single story, with tile roofs, masonry facing on the walls, and single glazed windows. Heating is by room wall convectors using low pressure steam. Steam is generated in an oil fired boiler. It is economically feasible to heat Stepping Stones using a water to water heat pump. Low temperature geothermal water from a relatively shallow well would be boosted from 80/sup 0/F to a 150/sup 0/F in the heat pump. This hot water would supply space heating requirements and potable hot water. The existing boiler, steam and condensate piping, and room convectors would be removed. The water to water heat pump, new piping, and room convectors would be installed. Estimated capital cost is $140,000. Annual energy savings in fuel oil purchases is about 26,000 gallons with a first year value of about $19,000. This savings, less operating costs, when applied with escalation considerations over a period of twenty years, results in a present worth of $91,778 when discounted at 10%. This is the amount of surplus generated after the payment of all obligations, when the project is financed with 10% bonds.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

435

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involved, supplemental absorption cooling allows downsizingwater heating and for absorption cooling) in a day SHPricedisplaced by absorption cooling. The same principle applies

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

BNL | Accelerators for Applied Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerators for Applied Research Accelerators for Applied Research Brookhaven National Lab operates several accelerator facilities dedicated to applied research. These facilities directly address questions and concerns on a tremendous range of fields, including medical imaging, cancer therapy, computation, and space exploration. Leading scientists lend their expertise to these accelerators and offer crucial assistant to collaborating researchers, pushing the limits of science and technology. Interested in gaining access to these facilities for research? See the contact number listed for each facility. RHIC tunnel Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer The Brookhaven Linac Isoptope Producer (BLIP)-positioned at the forefront of research into radioisotopes used in cancer treatment and diagnosis-produces commercially unavailable radioisotopes for use by the

437

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat pipe support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Futhermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swages end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe, and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

438

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat pipe support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Furthermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swaged end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe, and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

439

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat pipe support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Furthermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swaged end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

440

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Furthermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swaged end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe, and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply space heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.