Sample records for apply laser printers

  1. Laser Safety Laser-emitting tools and equipment are common to many work situations. Lasers in printers, grocery store

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Peter

    Laser Safety Laser-emitting tools and equipment are common to many work situations. Lasers in printers, grocery store scanners, construction tools, and laser pointers are generally lower powered lasers emit high-intensity, directional light beams that vary in strength, they are a particular hazard

  2. Photonics and Laser Applications in Engineering ENSC 460-4 (Undergraduate) (3-0-2) 894-3 (Graduate) (3-0-0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Glenn H.

    (building 3D objects with lasers), Medical applications, laser pantography. Lasers in Microelectronics Applications compact disk operation/mastering, Applications in laser light shows, laser printers, holography

  3. A low diffraction laser beam as applied to polymer ablation Xuanhui Lu,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    2 laser, laser drilling I. INTRODUCTION Laser beam quality plays an important role in quality-established process and examples are found in Refs. 7 and 8. Factors of laser beams likely to affect drillingA low diffraction laser beam as applied to polymer ablation Xuanhui Lu,a) Y. Lawrence Yao

  4. V-039: Samsung and Dell printers Firmware Backdoor Unauthorized Access Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Samsung has issued a security advisory and an optional firmware update for all current Samsung networked laser printers and multifunction devices to enhance Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) security.

  5. LASER SCANNING AND NOISE REDUCTION APPLIED TO 3D ROAD SURFACE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    LASER SCANNING AND NOISE REDUCTION APPLIED TO 3D ROAD SURFACE ANALYSIS Thorsten Schulz and Hilmar, EAWAG Email: michele.steiner@eawag.ch Abstract: Terrestrial laser scanning was applied to acquire 3D the catchment area of a road with respect to a pilot plant. As laser scanning requires only a few minutes

  6. Journal of Applied Physics 104,093504 (2008) Picosecond laser structuration under high pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research on ultra-short laser modification of materials has been a subject of numerous studies last two. The main effect is specific to the ambient gas and laser pulse duration in the ablation regime: whenJournal of Applied Physics 104,093504 (2008) Picosecond laser structuration under high pressures

  7. Ames Lab 101: 3D Metals Printer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, Ryan

    2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet one of the biggest energy challenges of the 21st century - finding alternatives to rare-earth elements and other critical materials - scientists will need new and advanced tools. The Critical Materials Institute at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has a new one: a 3D printer for metals research. 3D printing technology, which has captured the imagination of both industry and consumers, enables ideas to move quickly from the initial design phase to final form using materials including polymers, ceramics, paper and even food. But the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) will apply the advantages of the 3D printing process in a unique way: for materials discovery.

  8. Mode-locked Lasers Applied to Deflecting a Near Earth Object on Collision Course with Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fork, Richard; Burgess, Luke; Bergstue, Grant

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider synchronized trains of sub-picosecond pulses generated by mode-locked lasers applied to deflection of near Earth objects (NEO) on collision course with Earth. Our method is designed to avoid a predicted collision of the NEO with Earth by at least the diameter of Earth. We estimate deflecting a 10,000 MT NEO, such as the asteroid which struck Earth near Chelyabinsk, Russia to be feasible within several months using average power in the ten kilowatt range. We see this deflection method as scalable to larger NEO to a degree not possible using continuous laser systems.

  9. Guneafinal-for laser printer.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN551 - g 7 s %GrandD11900

  10. A Desktop 3D Printer in Safety-Critical Java

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Desktop 3D Printer in Safety-Critical Java Tórur Biskopstø Strøm Kongens Lyngby 2012 IMM-MSc-2012-critical use cases implemented according to the specification. This thesis presents a RepRap 3D desktop printer

  11. Apply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta3Appliance andApplicationBerkeleyAppliedApply

  12. Genetic algorithm applied to the optimization of quantum cascade lasers with second harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaji?, A. [School of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar kralja Aleksandra 73, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Telekom Srbija, a.d., Takovska 2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Radovanovi?, J., E-mail: radovanovic@etf.bg.ac.rs; Milanovi?, V. [School of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar kralja Aleksandra 73, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Indjin, D.; Ikoni?, Z. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational model for the optimization of the second order optical nonlinearities in GaInAs/AlInAs quantum cascade laser structures is presented. The set of structure parameters that lead to improved device performance was obtained through the implementation of the Genetic Algorithm. In the following step, the linear and second harmonic generation power were calculated by self-consistently solving the system of rate equations for carriers and photons. This rate equation system included both stimulated and simultaneous double photon absorption processes that occur between the levels relevant for second harmonic generation, and material-dependent effective mass, as well as band nonparabolicity, were taken into account. The developed method is general, in the sense that it can be applied to any higher order effect, which requires the photon density equation to be included. Specifically, we have addressed the optimization of the active region of a double quantum well In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/Al{sub 0.48}In{sub 0.52}As structure and presented its output characteristics.

  13. Method and design for externally applied laser welding of internal connections in a high power electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Charles E; Fontaine, Lucien; Gardner, William H

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell includes components that are welded from an external source after the components are assembled in a cell canister. The cell canister houses electrode tabs and a core insert. An end cap insert is disposed opposite the core insert. An external weld source, such as a laser beam, is applied to the end cap insert, such that the end cap insert, the electrode tabs, and the core insert are electrically coupled by a weld which extends from the end cap insert to the core insert.

  14. Study on space charge effect in an electrostatic ion analyzer applied to measure laser produced ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Q. Y.; Li, Zh. M.; Liu, W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China) [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, H. Y., E-mail: zhaohy@impcas.ac.cn; Sha, S.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, X. Zh.; Sun, L. T.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)] [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The abundance of different ions produced by laser ion sources is usually analyzed by an electrostatic ion analyzer (EIA). Ion current intensities in the range of several mA/cm{sup 2} at the position of the EIA have been achieved from the laser ion source developed by the Institute of Modern Physics; this indicates that a noticeable influence of space charge effect during the ion transmission will occur. Hence, while the parameters of the EIA or the beams are changed, such as ion species, current intensity, the ions’ transmission efficiency through the EIA is different, which will result in an uncertainty in the estimation of the ions’ yields. Special attention is focused on this issue in this paper. Ion's transmissions through the EIA under different circumstances are studied with simulations and experiments, the results of which are consistent with each other.

  15. Design and fabrication of a modular multi-material 3D printer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lan, Justin (Justin T.)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents 3DP-0, a modular, multi-material 3D printer. Currently, 3D printers available on the market are typically expensive and difficult to develop. In addition, the simultaneous use of multiple materials in ...

  16. A Desktop 3D Printer in Safety-Critical Java Trur Biskopst Strm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoeberl, Martin

    A Desktop 3D Printer in Safety-Critical Java Tórur Biskopstø Strøm Department of Informatics according to the specification. In this paper we present a 3D printer and its safety-critical Java level 1 evaluate the specification by implementing a RepRap 3D desktop printer as a use case. A RepRap is a desktop

  17. Feasibility Study For Teaching Geometry and Other Topics Using Three-Dimensional Printers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knill, Oliver

    Arts in Extension Studies Harvard University October 2012 #12;#12;Abstract Since 2003, 3D printer and more available. 3D printers at a hobbyist level are available for as little game design, and countless other fields. Because of this, the 3D printer has

  18. ADVANCES IN APPLIED PLASMA SCIENCE, Vol.9, 2013 ISAPS '13, Istanbul Design and Optimization of Laser Produced Plasma Devices for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    of optimization included simulation and benchmarking of LPP devices with single and dual-beam pulses, producing efficient sources showing the highest rate of laser energy conversion to EUV photons output. Several by an initial pre-pulse laser for the following subsequent heating and ionization by the main laser pulse

  19. Create PDF files without this message by purchasing novaPDF printer (http://www.novapdf.com) Create PDF files without this message by purchasing novaPDF printer (http://www.novapdf.com)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Create PDF files without this message by purchasing novaPDF printer (http://www.novapdf.com) #12; Create PDF files without this message without this message by purchasing novaPDF printer (http://www.novapdf.com) #12

  20. Spectral-phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction applied to seeded extreme-ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahieu, Benoît; De Ninno, Giovanni; Dacasa, Hugo; Lozano, Magali; Rousseau, Jean-Philippe; Zeitoun, Philippe; Garzella, David; Merdji, Hamed

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a setup for complete characterization of femtosecond pulses generated by seeded free-electron lasers (FEL's) in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral region. Two delayed and spectrally shifted replicas are produced and used for spectral phase interferometry for direct electric field reconstruction (SPIDER). We show that it can be achieved by a simple arrangement of the seed laser. Temporal shape and phase obtained in FEL simulations are well retrieved by the SPIDER reconstruction, allowing to foresee the implementation of this diagnostic on existing and future sources. This will be a significant step towards an experimental investigation and control of FEL spectral phase.

  1. How to Use the Dimension Elite 3D Printer (in the Carnegie Mellon MechE Machine Shop)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    How to Use the Dimension Elite 3D Printer (in the Carnegie Mellon MechE Machine Shop) The 3D printer is in the undergraduate area of the shop, by the safety glasses, lasercutters, etc. 2) Login to the computer beside the 3D printer using your Andrew username and password (Note: at the time

  2. AIC Colour 05 -10th Congress of the International Colour Association The 3D Color Printer Explorer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schettini, Raimondo

    AIC Colour 05 - 10th Congress of the International Colour Association 1175 The 3D Color Printer describe here the main features of the 3D Color Printer Explorer, an interactive visual evaluation system have designed and implemented a new software tool, which we have called the 3D Color Printer Explorer

  3. Printing 3D Models to the Genisys Xs 3D Printer By Sotiri Koyonos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Printing 3D Models to the Genisys Xs 3D Printer By Sotiri Koyonos VMIL Consultant 28 February 2003's Genisys Xs 3D printer. This document assumes that you have created a stereo lithography file (*.stl Abstract This document outlines the process for manufacturing three dimensional (3D) models on the ITG

  4. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercPrinters | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BVSPElectrtyUsePercPrinters Jump to: navigation, search This is a

  5. Design of electronics for a high-resolution, multi-material, and modular 3D printer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, Joyce G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronics for a high-resolution, multi-material, and modular 3D printer were designed and implemented. The driver for a piezoelectric inkjet print head can fire its nozzles with one of three droplet sizes ranging from 6 ...

  6. Send to Printer Back to Story This page has been printed from the following URL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menzel, Suzanne

    Send to Printer Back to Story This page has been printed from the following URL: http at the basics of computer programming at a Game Programming for Girls event held this month at the Seacoast

  7. ccsd-00001265(version1):10Mar2004 Applied Physics A (2004) accepted Silicon clusters produced by femtosecond laser ablation: Non-thermal emission and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    by using high-energy (6.4 eV) photons [9]. Multiple-charged cluster ions were formed in ps-laser stimulated and investigated using time-of- flight mass spectrometry. Two populations of the Si+ n clusters with different@crmcn.univ-mrs.fr etition rate, up to 30 mJ energy per pulse) operating at 800 nm. A part of the laser beam was selected

  8. ILLUSTRATING MATHEMATICS USING 3D PRINTERS OLIVER KNILL AND ELIZABETH SLAVKOVSKY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knill, Oliver

    printing technology can help to visualize proofs in mathematics. This talk aims to illustrate how 3D Greece, models allows to make mathematics more accessible. The new 3D printing technology makes unmatched. 3D printers allow us to do that with relative little effort. 2. 3D printing The industry of rapid

  9. Electron Spectrometer: XPS with Laser Interface | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Laser Interface Electron Spectrometer: XPS with Laser Interface This ultrahigh vacuum machine can be applied as a routine means for analyzing the structure and chemical...

  10. P1: OTA/XYZ P2: ABC c04 JWBK288-Cyganek December 5, 2008 1:36 Printer Name: Yet to Come

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Cyganek December 5, 2008 1:36 Printer Name: Yet to Come 116 An Introduction to 3D Computer VisionP1: OTA/XYZ P2: ABC c04 JWBK288-Cyganek December 5, 2008 1:36 Printer Name: Yet to Come Low (4.49) #12;P1: OTA/XYZ P2: ABC c04 JWBK288-Cyganek December 5, 2008 1:36 Printer Name: Yet to Come

  11. New Technique for Developing a Proton Range Compensator With Use of a 3-Dimensional Printer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Sang Gyu, E-mail: sg.ju@samsung.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Kyu; Hong, Chae-Seon; Kim, Jin Sung; Han, Youngyih; Choi, Doo Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A new system for manufacturing a proton range compensator (RC) was developed by using a 3-dimensional printer (3DP). The physical accuracy and dosimetric characteristics of the new RC manufactured by 3DP (RC{sub 3}DP) were compared with those of a conventional RC (RC{sub C}MM) manufactured by a computerized milling machine (CMM). Methods and Materials: An RC for brain tumor treatment with a scattered proton beam was calculated with a treatment planning system, and the resulting data were converted into a new format for 3DP using in-house software. The RC{sub 3}DP was printed with ultraviolet curable acrylic plastic, and an RC{sub C}MM was milled into polymethylmethacrylate using a CMM. The inner shape of both RCs was scanned by using a 3D scanner and compared with TPS data by applying composite analysis (CA; with 1-mm depth difference and 1 mm distance-to-agreement criteria) to verify their geometric accuracy. The position and distal penumbra of distal dose falloff at the central axis and field width of the dose profile at the midline depth of spread-out Bragg peak were measured for the 2 RCs to evaluate their dosimetric characteristics. Both RCs were imaged on a computed tomography scanner to evaluate uniformity of internal density. The manufacturing times for both RCs were compared to evaluate the production efficiency. Results: The pass rates for the CA test were 99.5% and 92.5% for RC{sub 3}DP and RC{sub C}MM, respectively. There was no significant difference in dosimetric characteristics and uniformity of internal density between the 2 RCs. The net fabrication times of RC{sub 3}DP and RC{sub C}MM were about 18 and 3 hours, respectively. Conclusions: The physical accuracy and dosimetric characteristics of RC{sub 3}DP were comparable with those of the conventional RC{sub C}MM, and significant system minimization was provided.

  12. Quantum electrodynamics in a laser and the electron laser collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi-Ren Zhang

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum electrodynamics in a laser is formulated, in which the electron-laser interaction is exactly considered, while the interaction of an electron and a single photon is considered by perturbation. The formulation is applied to the electron-laser collisions. The effect of coherence between photons in the laser is therefore fully considered in these collisions. The possibility of $\\gamma-$ray laser generation by use of this kind of collision is discussed.

  13. Laser Safety Manual Scope and Applicability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Laser Safety Manual Scope and Applicability This manual applies to all personnel working at or visiting ASU who procure or utilize Class III and Class IV lasers and laser systems. Procurement and user of Class I and Class II laser equipment, such as laser pointers and compact disk players, do not normally

  14. U-048: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    No solution was available at the time of this entry. Addthis Related Articles T-699: EMC AutoStart Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-047: Siemens...

  15. U-048: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopeeTechnologyfactTuscarora Phase IIDOE OGainService or

  16. V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of Energy Microsoft Security BulletinDepartmentDepartment of

  17. lea esto primero LaserJet 4200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user or an experienced radio/TV technician. Note: Any changes or modifications to the printer that are not expressly lift and move the printer. Prepare the location. Place the printer in a well-ventilated room

  18. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Printers | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to:InformationCaseTypeOpenInformation Printers Jump

  19. Published on Africa EU (http://www.africa-eu-partnership.org) Home > News > Cameroon axes illegal logging > Printer-friendly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Published on Africa EU (http://www.africa-eu-partnership.org) Home > News > Cameroon axes illegal logging > Printer-friendly Cameroon axes illegal logging 14/05/2010 Cameroon axes illegal logging Illegal and trade of illegal logging. The latest country to sign up to the programme is Cameroon, which completed

  20. Accelerator Research Department B Dept. of Applied Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    1 Accelerator Research Department B Dept. of Applied Physics E163: Laser Acceleration at the NLCTA March 11, 2002 * Spokesman. #12;2 Accelerator Research Department B Dept. of Applied PhysicsTechnical Roadmap LEAPLEAP 1. Demonstrate the physics of laser acceleration in dielectric structures 2. Develop

  1. Page 1Laser Safety Training Laser Institute of America Laser Safety Laser Institute of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Page 1Laser Safety Training © Laser Institute of America 1 Laser Safety © Laser Institute of America Laser Safety: Hazards, Bioeffects, and Control Measures Laser Institute of America Gus Anibarro Education Manager 2Laser Safety © Laser Institute of America Laser Safety Overview Laser Safety Accidents

  2. Laser Telecommunication timeLaser beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Laser Telecommunication Experiment Laser time Laser beam intensity timeLaser beam Laser battery Laser connected to a circuit without a modulator. Bottom graph illustrates what happen when a modulating signal is superimposed to the DC voltage driving the laser Laser beam intensity DC Input voltage DC

  3. Laser microphone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2000-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  4. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  5. Laser correcting mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawicki, Richard H. (Danville, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved laser correction mirror (10) for correcting aberrations in a laser beam wavefront having a rectangular mirror body (12) with a plurality of legs (14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28) arranged into opposing pairs (34, 36, 38, 40) along the long sides (30, 32) of the mirror body (12). Vector force pairs (49, 50, 52, 54) are applied by adjustment mechanisms (42, 44, 46, 48) between members of the opposing pairs (34, 36, 38, 40) for bending a reflective surface 13 of the mirror body 12 into a shape defining a function which can be used to correct for comatic aberrations.

  6. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R., E-mail: agrt@umich.edu [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  7. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  8. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  9. Ross-FollowU Printing The following will install "Ross-FollowU" as an available printer. When you print to Ross-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    , skip to the next step. To create or change this password, go to: https://accounts.itcs. Configuring Windows 7, Vista, and XP Click START and enter the following into run/search: \\\\bus-print1.adsroot.itcs "Print & Fax" Click on the "+" to add a printer #12;Hold the Control key while clicking the toolbar

  10. Free-Electron Laser FLASH Injector Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FLASH. Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg FLASH Injector Laser Laser 1 Laser 2 Next steps Siegfried | FLASH Meeting | 16-Nov-2009 FLASH. Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg Laser 1 System Overview fround trip A 541 (2005) 467­477 #12;Siegfried Schreiber | FLASH Meeting | 16-Nov-2009 FLASH. Free-Electron Laser

  11. Laser pulse detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, Douglas N. (Knoxville, TN); Akerman, M. Alfred (Knoxville, TN)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser pulse detector is provided which is small and inexpensive and has the capability of detecting laser light of any wavelength with fast response (less than 5 nanoseconds rise time). The laser beam is focused onto the receiving end of a graphite rod coaxially mounted within a close-fitting conductive, open-end cylindrical housing so that ablation and electric field breakdown of the resulting plasma occurs due to a bias potential applied between the graphite rod and housing. The pulse produced by the breakdown is transmitted through a matched impedance coaxial cable to a recording device. The cable is connected with its central lead to the graphite rod and its outer conductor to the housing.

  12. Laser isotope separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cotter, Theodore P. (Munich, DE); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM); Greiner, Norman R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

  13. XML Template (2010) [19.7.20105:09pm] [97141] K:/tandf/TAOL/TAOL_I_1_01/TAOL_A_474906.3d (TAOL) [PRINTER STAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .7.2010­5:09pm] [97­141] K:/tandf/TAOL/TAOL_I_1_01/TAOL_A_474906.3d (TAOL) [PRINTER STAGE] Introduction VirusesXML Template (2010) [19.7.2010­5:09pm] [97­141] K:/tandf/TAOL/TAOL_I_1_01/TAOL_A_474906.3d (TAOL) [PRINTER STAGE] Advances in Oceanography and Limnology Vol. 1, No. 1, June 2010, 97­141 Viruses in aquatic

  14. XML Template (2011) [20.10.20116:37pm] [267272] K:/tandf/CEPE/CEPE_I_14_03/CEPE_A_605851.3d (CEPE) [PRINTER STAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrader-Frechette, Kristin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .10.2011­6:37pm] [267­272] K:/tandf/CEPE/CEPE_I_14_03/CEPE_A_605851.3d (CEPE) [PRINTER STAGE] insufficientXML Template (2011) [20.10.2011­6:37pm] [267­272] K:/tandf/CEPE/CEPE_I_14_03/CEPE_A_605851.3d (CEPE) [PRINTER STAGE] Ethics, Policy and Environment Vol. 14, No. 3, October 2011, 267­272 OPEN PEER COMMENTARY

  15. Biocavity Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser technology has advanced dramatically and is an integral part of today's healthcare delivery system. Lasers are used in the laboratory analysis of human blood samples and serve as surgical tools that kill, burn or cut tissue. Recent semiconductor microtechnology has reduced the size o f a laser to the size of a biological cell or even a virus particle. By integrating these ultra small lasers with biological systems, it is possible to create micro-electrical mechanical systems that may revolutionize health care delivery.

  16. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  17. 530-752-7456 sustainability.ucdavis.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ; washers; water heaters; AC units; ovens; dish washers; dryers; microwaves. Laser scanners; printers

  18. Applied Physics A Materials Science & Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    1 23 Applied Physics A Materials Science & Processing ISSN 0947-8396 Volume 117 Number 1 Appl. Phys. A (2014) 117:319-326 DOI 10.1007/s00339-014-8268-8 Background gas collisional effects on expanding fs at link.springer.com". #12;Background gas collisional effects on expanding fs and ns laser ablation plumes

  19. Beam current controller for laser ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the design and use of an ion source with a rapid beam current controller for experimental and medicinal purposes. More particularly, the present invention relates to the design and use of a laser ion source with a magnetic field applied to confine a plasma flux caused by laser ablation.

  20. Expansion dynamics of laser produced plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doggett, B.; Lunney, J. G. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the applicability of the isentropic, adiabatic gas dynamical model of plume expansion for laser ablation in vacuum. We show that the model can be applied to ionized plumes and estimate the upper electron temperature limit on the applicability of the isentropic approximation. The model predictions are compared with Langmuir ion probe measurements and deposition profiles obtained for excimer laser ablation of silver.

  1. Probing the quantum vacuum with ultra intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Manuel Hegelich; Gerard Mourou; Johann Rafelski

    2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents: 1) The theoretical background of strong field physics and vacuum structure and stability; 2) The instrumental developments in the area of pulse lasers and considers the physics case for ultra intense laser facilities; and 3) Discussion of the applied and fundamental uses of ultra-intense lasers.

  2. Probing the quantum vacuum with ultra intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hegelich, B Manuel; Rafelski, Johann

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents: 1) The theoretical background of strong field physics and vacuum structure and stability; 2) The instrumental developments in the area of pulse lasers and considers the physics case for ultra intense laser facilities; and 3) Discussion of the applied and fundamental uses of ultra-intense lasers.

  3. Laser goniometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fairer, George M. (Boulder, CO); Boernge, James M. (Lakewood, CO); Harris, David W. (Lakewood, CO); Campbell, DeWayne A. (Littleton, CO); Tuttle, Gene E. (Littleton, CO); McKeown, Mark H. (Golden, CO); Beason, Steven C. (Lakewood, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser goniometer is an apparatus which permits an operator to sight along a geologic feature and orient a collimated lamer beam to match the attitude of the feature directly. The horizontal orientation (strike) and the angle from horizontal (dip), are detected by rotary incremental encoders attached to the laser goniometer which provide a digital readout of the azimuth and tilt of the collimated laser beam. A microprocessor then translates the square wave signal encoder outputs into an ASCII signal for use by data recording equipment.

  4. Laser Optomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Weijian; Ng, Kar Wei; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cavity optomechanics explores the coupling between the optical field and the mechanical oscillation to induce cooling and regenerative oscillation in a mechanical oscillator. So far, optomechanics relies on the detuning between the cavity and an external pump laser, where the laser acts only as a power supply. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator that supports a mirror of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and the optical field, greatly enhancing the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we used an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror in a VCSEL, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity with > 550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micro-mechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical. This new scheme not only offers an efficient approach for high-...

  5. Laser barometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, K.R.; Shiels, D.; Rash, T.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an invention of a pressure measuring instrument which uses laser radiation to sense the pressure in an enclosed environment by means of measuring the change in refractive index of a gas - which is pressure dependent.

  6. Inductive gas line for pulsed lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas laser having a metal inlet gas feed line assembly shaped as a coil, to function as an electrical inductance and therefore high impedance to pulses of electric current applied to electrodes at opposite ends of a discharge tube of a laser, for example. This eliminates a discharge path for the laser through the inlet gas feed line. A ferrite core extends through the coil to increase the inductance of the coil and provide better electric isolation. By elimination of any discharge breakdown through the gas supply, efficiency is increased and a significantly longer operating lifetime of the laser is provided.

  7. Inductive gas line for pulsed lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, W.J.; Alger, T.W.

    1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas laser having a metal inlet gas feed line assembly shaped as a coil, to function as an electrical inductance and therefore high impedance to pulses of electric current applied to electrodes at opposite ends of a discharge tube of a laser, for example. This eliminates a discharge path for the laser through the inlet gas feed line. A ferrite core extends through the coil to increase the inductance of the coil and provide better electric isolation. By elimination of any discharge breakdown through the gas supply, efficiency is increased and a significantly longer operating lifetime of the laser is provided.

  8. Sailing Before the Light: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    at focus Andrea Macchi CNR/INO Sailing Before the Light: Laser-Plasma AccelerationDriven by RadiationSailing Before the Light: Laser-Plasma Acceleration Driven by Radiation Pressure Andrea Macchi 1 "Enrico Fermi", University of Pisa, Italy Plasma Physics Colloquium, Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied

  9. FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colson, W.B.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1984). Colson, W. B. , "Free electron laser theory," Ph.D.aspects of the free electron laser," Laser Handbook i,Quant. Elect. Bendor Free Electron Laser Conference, Journal

  10. Appl. Phys. A 68, 379385 (1999) / DOI 10.1007/s003399900012 Applied Physics A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krahe, Rüdiger

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    & Processing © Springer-Verlag 1999 Invited paper UV-laser ablation of sensory cells in living insects G. Fuhr1. An experimental set-up for applying pulsed UV- laser ablation to the integument of insects and the high preci of UV-laser ablation are discussed. PACS: 43; 89; 42.55.Gp; 42.62.Be; 43.64.+r; 81.15.Fg Lasers have

  11. Visible light surface emitting semiconductor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olbright, Gregory R. (Boulder, CO); Jewell, Jack L. (Bridgewater, NJ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser is disclosed comprising a laser cavity sandwiched between two distributed Bragg reflectors. The laser cavity comprises a pair of spacer layers surrounding one or more active, optically emitting quantum-well layers having a bandgap in the visible which serve as the active optically emitting material of the device. The thickness of the laser cavity is m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer, .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the laser radiation and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the cavity. Electrical pumping of the laser is achieved by heavily doping the bottom mirror and substrate to one conductivity-type and heavily doping regions of the upper mirror with the opposite conductivity type to form a diode structure and applying a suitable voltage to the diode structure. Specific embodiments of the invention for generating red, green, and blue radiation are described.

  12. Laser barometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abercrombie, Kevin R. (Westminster, CO); Shiels, David (Thornton, CO); Rash, Tim (Aurora, CO)

    2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure measuring instrument that utilizes the change of the refractive index of a gas as a function of pressure and the coherent nature of a laser light to determine the barometric pressure within an environment. As the gas pressure in a closed environment varies, the index of refraction of the gas changes. The amount of change is a function of the gas pressure. By illuminating the gas with a laser light source, causing the wavelength of the light to change, pressure can be quantified by measuring the shift in fringes (alternating light and dark bands produced when coherent light is mixed) in an interferometer.

  13. Fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) sensor using vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyung-Woo

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research represents the first effort to apply vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) to the monitoring of interferometric fiber optic sensors. Modulation of the drive current causes thermal tuning of the laser light frequency...

  14. Phase diagram for injection locking a superradiant laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin C. Cox; Joshua M. Weiner; James K. Thompson

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally and theoretically study the response of a superradiant or bad-cavity laser to an applied coherent drive. We observe two forms of synchronization (injection locking) between the superradiant ensemble and the applied drive: one attractive and one repulsive in nature. We explain the region of repulsion as arising from the higher three-dimensional description of the atomic spin state that stores the laser coherence in a superradiant laser, as opposed to a two-parameter description of the electric field in a traditional good-cavity laser. We derive a phase diagram of predicted behavior and experimentally measure the response of the system across various trajectories therein.

  15. Specific energy for pulsed laser rock drilling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Reed, C. B.; Kornecki, G.; Gahan, B. C.; Parker, R. A.; Batarseh, S.; Graves, R. M.; Figueroa, H.; Skinner, N.; Technology Development

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of advanced high power laser technology to oil and gas well drilling has been attracting significant research interests recently among research institutes, petroleum industries, and universities. Potential laser or laser-aided oil and gas well drilling has many advantages over the conventional rotary drilling, such as high penetration rate, reduction or elimination of tripping, casing, and bit costs, and enhanced well control, perforating and side-tracking capabilities. The energy required to remove a unit volume of rock, namely the specific energy (SE), is a critical rock property data that can be used to determine both the technical and economic feasibility of laser oil and gas well drilling. When a high power laser beam is applied on a rock, it can remove the rock by thermal spallation, melting, or vaporization depending on the applied laser energy and the way the energy is applied. The most efficient rock removal mechanism would be the one that requires the minimum energy to remove a unit volume of rock. Samples of sandstone, shale, and limestone were prepared for laser beam interaction with a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser beam to determine how the beam size, power, repetition rate, pulse width, exposure time and energy can affect the amount of energy transferred to the rock for the purposes of spallation, melting, and vaporization. The purpose of the laser rock interaction experiment was to determine the optimal parameters required to remove a maximum rock volume from the samples while minimizing energy input. Absorption of radiant energy from the laser beam gives rise to the thermal energy transfer required for the destruction and removal of the rock matrix. Results from the tests indicate that each rock type has a set of optimal laser parameters to minimize specific energy (SE) values as observed in a set of linear track and spot tests. As absorbed energy outpaces heat diffusion by the rock matrix, local temperatures can rise to the melting points of the minerals and quickly increase observed SE values. Tests also clearly identified the spallation and melting zones for shale samples while changing the laser power. The lowest SE values are obtained in the spalling zone just prior to the onset of mineral melt. The laser thermally spalled and saw mechanically cut rocks show similarity of surface microstructure. The study also found that increasing beam repetition rate within the same material removal mechanism would increase the material removal rate, which is believed due to an increase of maximum temperature, thermal cycling frequency, and intensity of laser-driven shock wave within the rock.

  16. Isotope separation by laser means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cotter, Theodore P. (Los Alamos, NM); Greiner, Norman R. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

  17. Target isolation system, high power laser and laser peening method and system using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz (Rocklin, CA)

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for applying a laser beam to work pieces, includes a laser system producing a high power output beam. Target delivery optics are arranged to deliver the output beam to a target work piece. A relay telescope having a telescope focal point is placed in the beam path between the laser system and the target delivery optics. The relay telescope relays an image between an image location near the output of the laser system and an image location near the target delivery optics. A baffle is placed at the telescope focal point between the target delivery optics and the laser system to block reflections from the target in the target delivery optics from returning to the laser system and causing damage.

  18. Injection locking of a high power ultraviolet laser diode for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toshiyuki Hosoya; Martin Miranda; Ryotaro Inoue; Mikio Kozuma

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a high-power laser system at a wavelength of 399 nm for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms with ultraviolet laser diodes. The system is composed of an external cavity laser diode providing frequency stabilized output at a power of 40 mW and another laser diode for amplifying the laser power up to 220 mW by injection locking. The systematic method for optimization of our injection locking can also be applied to high power light sources at any other wavelengths. Our system, which does not depend on complex nonlinear frequency-doubling, has great importance for implementing transportable optical lattice clocks, and is also useful for investigations on condensed matter physics or quantum information processing using cold atoms.

  19. HOUSING GUARANTEE Apply Online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    THE UCI HOUSING GUARANTEE Apply Online 1 Log in to your MyAdmission account via the tab of Admission fee. 3 Complete the Online Housing Application and pay the $20 non-refundable fee. Freshmen apply for the residence halls. Transfer students apply for Arroyo Vista theme houses and on-campus apartments. Students 25

  20. Electro-optic harmonic conversion to switch a laser beam out of a cavity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Roger A. (Pleasanton, CA); Henesian, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a switch to permit a laser beam to escape a laser cavity through the use of an externally applied electric field across a harmonic conversion crystal. Amplification takes place in the laser cavity, and then the laser beam is switched out by the laser light being harmonically converted with dichroic or polarization sensitive elements present to alter the optical path of the harmonically converted laser light. Modulation of the laser beam can also be accomplished by varying the external electric field.

  1. BNL | CO2 Laser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CO2 Laser The ATF is one of the only two facilities worldwide operating picosecond, terawatt-class CO2 lasers. Our laser system consists of a picoseconds pulse-injector based on...

  2. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variable-Wiggler Free-Electron-Laser Oscillat.ion. Phys. :_.The Los Alamos Free Electron Laser: Accelerator Perfoemance.First Operation of a Free-Electron Laser. Phys . __ Rev~.

  3. Dual Chamber Laser Ion Source at Lisol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. Kudryavtsev; T. E. Cocolios; J. Gentens; M. Huyse; O. Ivanov; D. Pauwels; T. Sonoda; P. Van den Bergh; P. Van Duppen

    2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of the gas cell for the resonance ionization laser ion source at the Leuven Isotope Separator On Line (LISOL) has been developed and tested at off-line and on-line conditions. Two-step selective laser ionization is applied to produce purified beams of radioactive isotopes. The selectivity of the ion source has been increased by more than one order of magnitude by separation of the stopping and laser ionization regions. This allows to use electrical fields for further ion purification.

  4. Laser Safety Management Policy Statement ............................................................................................................1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Fordyce A.

    Laser Safety Management Policy Statement...........................................................2 Laser Users.............................................................................................................2 Unit Laser Safety Officer (ULSO

  5. Laser programs highlights 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides highlights of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` laser programs. Laser uses and technology assessment and utilization are provided.

  6. BNL | ATF Laser Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be continuously escorted by someone who has such training: The training consists of an eye exam, BNL general laser safety lecture, and formal ATF laser familiarization. Untrained...

  7. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  8. University of California, Irvine Updated 3.5.13 Help keep batteries and printer cartridges out of the trash by recycling your used batteries at one of the locations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    of the trash by recycling your used batteries at one of the locations listed below. Used batteries & cartridgesUniversity of California, Irvine Updated 3.5.13 Help keep batteries and printer cartridges out are collected weekly by Facilities Management Recycling Team. Building Location Detail Academy 101 1st Floor 1

  9. 1/28/09 3:40 PMBloomberg Printer-Friendly Page Page 1 of 2http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20670001&refer=science&sid=atoTqDydLoWA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1/28/09 3:40 PMBloomberg Printer-Friendly Page Page 1 of 2http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pidhttp://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20670001&refer=science&sid=atoTqDydLoWA list of genes that may

  10. Applied Computer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Innovation Computing CCS Division CCS-7 Applied Computer Science Innovative co-design of applications, algorithms, and architectures in order to enable...

  11. Apply early! Limited enrollment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volcano. Experience the culture and history of Hawaii, and the impact of human activitiesApply early! Limited enrollment. Environmental Science in the Hawaiian Islands Observe, research

  12. Selecting and Applying Interfacings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selecting and using interfacing correctly is an important component of garment construction. The various types of interfacing are described and methods of applying them are discussed in detail....

  13. Fiber Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs and EventsFiber Lasers NIF

  14. Laser Faraday

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sandLaser Decontamination ofFaraday

  15. INTRODUCTION APPLIED GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merriam, James

    GEOL 384.3 INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED GEOPHYSICS OUTLINE INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED GEOPHYSICS GEOL 384 unknowns; the ones we don't know we don't know. And if one looks throughout the history of geophysics he didn't really say geophysics. He said, " ... our country and other free countries ...". But I am

  16. Induced Current Characteristics Due to Laser Induced Plasma and Its Application to Laser Processing Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madjid, Syahrun Nur; Idris, Nasrullah [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh (Indonesia); Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40/80 Srengseng Raya, Jakarta 11630 (Indonesia); Kagawa, Kiichiro [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education and Regional Studies, University of Fukui, 9-1 Bunkyo 3-chome, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In laser processing, suitable conditions for laser and gas play important role in ensuring a high quality of processing. To determine suitable conditions, we employed the electromagnetic phenomena associated with laser plasma generation. An electrode circuit was utilised to detect induced current due to the fast electrons propelled from the material during laser material processing. The characteristics of induced current were examined by changing parameters such as supplied voltage, laser pulse energy, number of laser shots, and type of ambient gas. These characteristics were compared with the optical emission characteristics. It was shown that the induced current technique proposed in this study is much more sensitive than the optical method in monitoring laser processing, that is to determine the precise focusing condition, and to accurately determine the moment of completion of laser beam penetration. In this study it was also shown that the induced current technique induced by CW CO{sub 2} laser can be applied in industrial material processing for monitoring the penetration completion in a stainless steel plate drilling process.

  17. Levitated droplet dye laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azzouz, H; Balslev, S; Johansson, J; Mortensen, N A; Nilsson, S; Kristensen, A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first observation, to our knowledge, of lasing from a levitated, dye droplet. The levitated droplets are created by computer controlled pico-liter dispensing into one of the nodes of a standing ultrasonic wave (100 kHz), where the droplet is trapped. The free hanging droplet forms a high quality optical resonator. Our 750 nL lasing droplets consist of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethylene glycol, at a concentration of 0.02 M. The droplets are optically pumped at 532 nm light from a pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, and the dye laser emission is analyzed by a fixed grating spectrometer. With this setup we have achieved reproducible lasing spectra in the visible wavelength range from 610 nm to 650 nm. The levitated droplet technique has previously successfully been applied for a variety of bio-analytical applications at single cell level. In combination with the lasing droplets, the capability of this high precision setup has potential applications within highly sensitive intra-cavity absorban...

  18. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam. 1 fig.

  19. Short wavelength laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  20. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, John O. (Santa Fe, NM); Sklar, Edward (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  1. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  2. Effects of Low Level Laser Therapy on Orthodontic Pain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchwald, Bradley

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of low level laser therapy applied extra orally on the reduction of orthodontic pain. Materials and Methods: Sixty dental students were voluntarily recruited for this randomized, double-blinded, placebo...

  3. Laser and Photonic Systems Integration: Emerging Innovations and Framework for Research and Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    : Advanced manufacturing; Laser processing; Healthcare; Optical communication; Preci- sion collaboration in Manufacturing & Service Industries 23 (6) 483­516 (2013) c 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. 483 #12;Laser years since its invention, laser technology has been applied to over- come obstacles in manufacturing

  4. Rapid three-dimensional manufacturing of microfluidic structures using a scanning laser system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapid three-dimensional manufacturing of microfluidic structures using a scanning laser system Biao-dimensional manufacturing approach to the rapid processing of microfluidic structures using a scanning laser system. The scanning laser manufacturing technique could be potentially applied to a wide range of materials,10

  5. Ion Crystals Produced by Laser and Sympathetic Cooling in a Linear RF Ion Trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Feng

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed investigation of ion crystals produced by laser and sympathetic cooling in a linear RF trap has been conducted. The laser cooling methods were examined and applied to the trapped ^24Mg^(positive) ions. The crystals produced by the laser...

  6. Ion Crystals Produced by Laser and Sympathetic Cooling in a Linear RF Ion Trap 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Feng

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed investigation of ion crystals produced by laser and sympathetic cooling in a linear RF trap has been conducted. The laser cooling methods were examined and applied to the trapped ^24Mg^(positive) ions. The crystals produced by the laser...

  7. Nonlinear laser energy depletion in laser-plasma accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadwick, B.A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear laser energydepletion in laser-plasma accelerators ? B. A. Shadwick,of intense, short-pulse lasers via excitation of plasma

  8. Essays in applied microeconomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aron-Dine, Aviva

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation consists of three chapters on topics in applied microeconomics. In the first chapter. I investigate whether voters are more likely to support additional spending on local public services when they perceive ...

  9. Engineering and Applied

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    > Computer Science > Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering > Mechanical Engineering 11, Computational Science and Engineering, Energy Systems and Environmental Sustainability, Materials ScienceCollege of Engineering and Applied Science Contact Robert H. Davis, Engineering Dean 303

  10. Applying for Research Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... 53.22 KB APPLYING FOR RESEARCH AWARDS The Eastern Bird Banding Association seeks applicants for its annual $500 research awards in aid of research using banding techniques or bird banding data. ...

  11. Electrical laser frequency tuning by three terminal terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohtani, K., E-mail: otanik@phys.ethz.ch; Beck, M.; Faist, J., E-mail: jerome.faist@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli Str. 16, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical laser emission frequency tuning of a three terminal THz quantum cascade laser is demonstrated. A high electron mobility transistor structure is used in a surface plasmon waveguide to modulate the electron density in a channel, controlling the effective refractive index of the waveguide. The threshold current density was modulated by 28% via applying voltage from ?3 to 2?V. The observed laser emission frequency shift by electric field was 2?GHz. By using the three terminal devices, pure frequency modulation of the output light is, in principle, achievable.

  12. Z .Applied Surface Science 109r110 1997 110 Lasersolid interaction in the femtosecond time regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    D. von der Linde ) , K. Sokolowski-Tinten, J. Bialkowski Institut fur Laser und Plasmaphysik, Uni-3 #12;( )D. Õon der Linde et al.rApplied Surface Science 109r110 1997 1­102 Fig. 1. Primary electronic

  13. Three-Dimensional Laser Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okamato, H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-Dimensional Laser Cooling H. Okamoto, A.M. Sessler,effective transverse laser cooling simultaneously withlongitudinal laser cooling, two possibilities are

  14. PALM - Laser Capture Microdissection | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PALM - Laser Capture Microdissection PALM - Laser Capture Microdissection This Laser Capture Microdissection system is equipped with 100 x objective lens for enriching distinct...

  15. Final Report: Cooling Molecules with Laser Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Rosa, Michael D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain diatomic molecules are disposed to laser cooling in the way successfully applied to certain atoms and that ushered in a revolution in ultracold atomic physics, an identification first made at Los Alamos and which took root during this program. Despite their manipulation into numerous achievements, atoms are nonetheless mundane denizens of the quantum world. Molecules, on the other hand, with their internal degrees of freedom and rich dynamical interplay, provide considerably more complexity. Two main goals of this program were to demonstrate the feasibility of laser-cooling molecules to the same temperatures as laser-cooled atoms and introduce a means for collecting laser-cooled molecules into dense ensembles, a foundational start of studies and applications of ultracold matter without equivalence in atomic systems.

  16. Contour forming of metals by laser peening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz (Rocklin, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for forming shapes and contours in metal sections by generating laser induced compressive stress on the surface of the metal workpiece. The laser process can generate deep compressive stresses to shape even thick components without inducing unwanted tensile stress at the metal surface. The precision of the laser-induced stress enables exact prediction and subsequent contouring of parts. A light beam of 10 to 100 J/pulse is imaged to create an energy fluence of 60 to 200 J/cm.sup.2 on an absorptive layer applied over a metal surface. A tamping layer of water is flowed over the absorptive layer. The absorption of laser light causes a plasma to form and consequently creates a shock wave that induces a deep residual compressive stress into the metal. The metal responds to this residual stress by bending.

  17. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 ?s which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided bymore »a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.« less

  18. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kanesue, Takeshi [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Kondo, Kotaro [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 ?s which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  19. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanesue, Takeshi [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Kondo, Kotaro [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 ?s which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  20. Process for laser machining and surface treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.

    2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method and apparatus increasing the accuracy and reducing the time required to machine materials, surface treat materials, and allow better control of defects such as particulates in pulsed laser deposition. The speed and quality of machining is improved by combining an ultrashort pulsed laser at high average power with a continuous wave laser. The ultrashort pulsed laser provides an initial ultrashort pulse, on the order of several hundred femtoseconds, to stimulate an electron avalanche in the target material. Coincident with the ultrashort pulse or shortly after it, a pulse from a continuous wave laser is applied to the target. The micromachining method and apparatus creates an initial ultrashort laser pulse to ignite the ablation followed by a longer laser pulse to sustain and enlarge on the ablation effect launched in the initial pulse. The pulse pairs are repeated at a high pulse repetition frequency and as often as desired to produce the desired micromachining effect. The micromachining method enables a lower threshold for ablation, provides more deterministic damage, minimizes the heat affected zone, minimizes cracking or melting, and reduces the time involved to create the desired machining effect.

  1. Broadband tunability of gain-flattened quantum well semiconductor lasers with an external grating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittelstein, M.; Mehuys, D.; Yariv, A.; Ungar, J.E.; Sarfaty, R.

    1989-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum well lasers are shown to exhibit flattened broadband gain spectra at a particular pumping condition. The gain requirement for a grating-tuned external cavity configuration is examined and applied to a semiconductor quantum well laser with an optimized length of gain region. The predicted very broadband tunability of quantum well lasers is confirmed experimentally by grating-tuning of uncoated lasers over 85 nm, with single longitudinal mode output power exceeding 200 mW.

  2. Information Science, Computing, Applied Math

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science, Computing, Applied Math science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Information Science, Computing, Applied Math National security depends on science and...

  3. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clouthier, D.J. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

  4. UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    microdevices, piezoelectrics--and multiple 3-D printers. Objet Connex 500 3D Printer Among the laboratories Printing Systems, SLA 3D Printer Viper Si2 Objet Connex 500 3D Printer M9 Flip Chip Bonder FEI SEM H Rapidx 250 Excimer Laser Machining System Atometric CNC Milling Machine Model G4 Micromill 3D Resin

  5. Have you been by the corner of Gil-manDriveandOslerLanelately? The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    . Students will find a 3D modeling template for this protein sequence using a Conserved Domain Database to any ACS laser printer using the campus wire- less network. ACS printer locations in the libraries to print to an ACS printer: $.05 per page as opposed to $.10 per page for libraries' printers. Stu- dents

  6. SUSTAINABILITY WHO CAN APPLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUNDED BY CALL FOR SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH STUDENT WHO CAN APPLY Undergraduate and graduate Participate in the Global Change & Sustainability Center's Research Symposium; attend workshops with faculty or publish in the U's student-run sustainability publication to be released in May 2014. Are you conducting

  7. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    1 23 Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology ISSN 0175-7598 Appl Microbiol Biotechnol DOI 10.1007/s-Cohen #12;1 23 Your article is protected by copyright and all rights are held exclusively by Springer in electronic repositories. If you wish to self-archive your article, please use the accepted manuscript version

  8. Characterization of the Structure and Function of the Normal Human Fovea Using Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putnam, Nicole Marie

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    targeted stimulus delivery. Optics express, 15(21), 13731–tomographic scanner. Applied Optics, 28(4), 804. Enoch, J.with the adaptive optics scanning laser Ophthalmoscope.

  9. Laser preheat enhanced ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided.

  10. Laser-assisted electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, D.F.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of laser irradiation on electrodeposition processes has been investigated. These studies demonstrated that the addition of laser irradiation to an electroplating process can dramatically enhance plating rates and current efficiencies, as well as improve the morphology of the resultant electrodeposit. During the course of these investigations, the mechanism for the laser enhancement of electrodeposition processes was determined. Experimental evidence was obtained to show that laser irradiation of the substrate results in increased metal ion concentrations at the surface of the electrode due to a laser-induced Soret effect. The laser-induced Soret effect has important implications for laser-assisted electrochemical processing. The increase in the surface concentration of ions allows efficient electrodeposition from dilute solutions. As such, laser- assisted electrodeposition may develop into an environmentally conscious manufacturing process by reducing waste and limiting worker exposure to toxic chemicals.

  11. Short wavelength laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagelstein, Peter L. (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  12. Laser EYE SURGERY LASIK and Excimer Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    Laser EYE SURGERY LASIK and Excimer Lasers Michael Hutchins #12;The PROBLEM opia - near sightedness. ically corrected with concave #12;THE PROBLEM eropia - far sightedness sed by a flat cornea or ort eye from different focal points in different nes of the eye. used by non-uniform curvature of the cornea

  13. Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization Max Wiedmann #12;What is TMR? · TMR is used to improve blood flow to heart muscle tissue (myocardial tissue). · This is done using a laser to create small with bypass surgery so no additional opening is required. · The surgeon uses the laser to create 20 to 40 1mm

  14. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  15. LaserFest Celebration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

    2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

  16. XML Template (2012) [28.4.201210:33am] [10531054] K:/tandf/GAPA/GAPA_I_91_06/GAPA_A_689094.3d (GAPA) [PRINTER STAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Template (2012) [28.4.2012­10:33am] [1053­1054] K:/tandf/GAPA/GAPA_I_91_06/GAPA_A_689094.3d (GAPA) [PRINTERXML Template (2012) [28.4.2012­10:33am] [1053­1054] K:/tandf/GAPA/GAPA_I_91_06/GAPA_A_689094.3d (GAPA) [PRINTER STAGE] Applicable Analysis Vol. 91, No. 6, June 2012, 1053­1054 PREFACE Analysis

  17. Laser Processing of Metals and Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senthilraja Singaravelu

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser offers a unique set of opportunities for precise delivery of high quality coherent energy. This energy can be tailored to alter the properties of material allowing a very flexible adjustment of the interaction that can lead to melting, vaporization, or just surface modification. Nowadays laser systems can be found in nearly all branches of research and industry for numerous applications. Sufficient evidence exists in the literature to suggest that further advancements in the field of laser material processing will rely significantly on the development of new process schemes. As a result they can be applied in various applications starting from fundamental research on systems, materials and processes performed on a scientific and technical basis for the industrial needs. The interaction of intense laser radiation with solid surfaces has extensively been studied for many years, in part, for development of possible applications. In this thesis, I present several applications of laser processing of metals and polymers including polishing niobium surface, producing a superconducting phase niobium nitride and depositing thin films of niobium nitride and organic material (cyclic olefin copolymer). The treated materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), high resolution optical microscopy, surface profilometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Power spectral density (PSD) spectra computed from AFM data gives further insight into the effect of laser melting on the topography of the treated niobium.

  18. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  19. Applied ALARA techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work.

  20. Laser Safety Training Notes for URI Laser Users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    ;URI Radiation Safety Office 11 Laser Output · Continuous Wave (steady output) · Pulsed (short time extremely short laser pulses (typically a few nanoseconds in duration). The Q-switch may use a rotatingLaser Safety Training Notes for URI Laser Users #12;URI Radiation Safety Office 2 Laser The word

  1. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dantus, Marcos (Okemos, MI); Lozovoy, Vadim V. (Okemos, MI); Comstock, Matthew (Milford, MI)

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  2. The Theta Laser A Low Noise Chirped Pulse Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    · Increased laser coherence · Ultra-low noise lasersOC ISO SOA #12;8 Approach Semiconductor-Based FrequencyThe Theta Laser A Low Noise Chirped Pulse Laser Dimitrios Mandridis dmandrid@creol.ucf.edu April 29, 2011 CREOL Affiliates Day 2011 #12;2 Objective: Frequency Swept (FM) Mode-locked Laser · Develop

  3. Optical pumped neodymium miniature laser transmitter. Final report, October 1978

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geckeler, S.; Kruehler, W.; Mahlein, H.F.; Plaettner, R.; Schiffner, G.; Vite, L.; Winzer, G.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The preparation and the properties of the most important stoichiometric Nd laser materials and miniature lasers made from them are considered as well as calculations for pumping these lasers with LEDs and for coupling them to the modulator. Both optical communication systems and the rival merits of neodym solid-state lasers and semiconductor lasers are considered. The following results are of particular interest: miniature lasers for 1.06 micrometer and in some cases for 1.32 micrometer fabricated from NdP/sup 5/O/sup 14/, NdAl/sup 3/(BO/sup 3/)/sup 4/ and LiNd(PO/sup 3/)/sup 4/ with mirrors directly applied to their endfaces allowing CW operation at room temperature. The LNP laser with 1 mW threshold, 6% differential efficiency and a threshold pump power density of 4 kW/cu cm offers the best performance. The electrooptical coefficient expected for NdAl/sup 3/(BO/sup 3/)/sup 4/ on the basis of lattice symmetry was found to be 0.6 x 10 to the -12 power m/V. The Nd laser transmitter can be expected to cost considerably more than the future INGAP semiconductor laser transmitter.

  4. Laser frequency stabilization to highly excited state transitions using electromagnetically induced transparency in a cascade system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. P. Abel; A. K. Mohapatra; M. G. Bason; J. D. Pritchard; K. J. Weatherill; U. Raitzsch; C. S. Adams

    2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate laser frequency stabilization to excited state transitions using cascade electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Using a room temperature Rb vapor cell as a reference, we stabilize a first diode laser to the D2 transition and a second laser to a transition from the intermediate state to a Rydberg state with principal quantum number n=19 - 70. A combined laser linewidth of 280 kHz over a 0.1 ms time period is achieved. This method may be applied generally to any cascade system and allows laser stabilization to an atomic reference in the absence of strong optical transitions.

  5. Laser Heater and seeded Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dattoli, G; Sabia, E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider the effect of laser heater on a seeded Free Electron Laser. We develop a model embedding the effect of the energy modulation induced by the heater with those due to the seeding. The present analysis is compatible with the experimental results obtained at FERMI displaying secondary maxima with increasing heater intensity. The treatment developed in the paper confirms and extends previous analyses and put in evidence further effects which can be tested in future experiments.

  6. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, C.G.R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider,"E.Esarey, and W.P.Leemans, "Free-electron laser driven bythe LBNL laser-plasma accelerator," in Proc. Adv. Acc. Con.

  7. Nonlinear laser energy depletion in laser-plasma accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadwick, B.A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    k p k 0 and assume a short laser pulse, k p L ? 2. WithE 0 = mc? p /q. For a short laser pulse, ? ? ? short-pulse lasers via excitation of

  8. Broadband laser polarization control with aligned carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, He; Lia, Diao; Chen, Ya; Mattila, Marco; Tian, Ying; Yong, Zhenzhong; Yang, Changxi; Tittonen, Ilkka; Ren, Zhaoyu; Bai, Jingtao; Li, Qingwen; Kauppinen, Esko I; Lipsanen, Harri; Sun, Zhipei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a simple approach to fabricate aligned carbon nanotube (ACNT) device for broadband polarization control in fiber laser systems. The ACNT device was fabricated by pulling from as-fabricated vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays. Their anisotropic property is confirmed with optical and scanning electron microscopy, and with polarized Raman and absorption spectroscopy. The device was then integrated into fiber laser systems (at two technologically important wavelengths of 1 and 1.5 um) for polarization control. We obtained a linearly-polarized light output with the maximum extinction ratio of ~12 dB. The output polarization direction could be fully controlled by the ACNT alignment direction in both lasers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that ACNT device is applied to polarization control in laser systems. Our results exhibit that the ACNT device is a simple, low-cost, and broadband polarizer to control laser polarization dynamics, for various photonic applications (such as ...

  9. Parameter Optimization for Laser Polishing of Niobium for SRF Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Liang [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Klopf, John Michael [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Kelley, Michael J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface smoothness is critical to the performance of SRF cavities. As laser technology has been widely applied to metal machining and surface treatment, we are encouraged to use it on niobium as an alternative to the traditional wet polishing process where aggressive chemicals are involved. In this study, we describe progress toward smoothing by optimizing laser parameters on BCP treated niobium surfaces. Results shows that microsmoothing of the surface without ablation is achievable.

  10. Precision laser aiming system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrens, Brandon R. (Albuquerque, NM); Todd, Steven N. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A precision laser aiming system comprises a disrupter tool, a reflector, and a laser fixture. The disrupter tool, the reflector and the laser fixture are configurable for iterative alignment and aiming toward an explosive device threat. The invention enables a disrupter to be quickly and accurately set up, aligned, and aimed in order to render safe or to disrupt a target from a standoff position.

  11. Excimer laser chemical problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant, R.; Peterson, N.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques need to be developed to maintain XeF and XeCl laser performance over long periods of time without degradation resulting from chemical processes occurring within the laser. The dominant chemical issues include optical damage, corrosions of laser materials, gas contamination, and control of halogen concentration. Each of these issues are discussed and summarized. The methods of minimizing or controlling the chemical processes involved are presented.

  12. Novel fluorinated laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R. (Livermore, CA); Feeman, James F. (Wyomissing, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel class of dye is disclosed which is particularly efficient and stable for dye laser applications, lasing between 540 and 570 nm.

  13. Laser Desorption Analysis | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mounted on standardized EMSL platens and attached to a vacuum manipulator. Several excitation, or pump, nanosecond and femtosecond lasers are available in the laboratory for...

  14. ATF CO2 LASER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    *Operate at low pressure <<1 atm *Bandwidth P (10 atm supports a picosecond pulse) 4 Ultrafast gas lasers require high pressure Inverse Fourier Transform for discrete spectrum...

  15. Laser Desorption Analysis | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and TOF mass spectrometers; neutral particle detection using a second multiphoton ionization or REMPI laser system; and UHV surface diagnostic equipment (AES, LEED, XPS)....

  16. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  17. BNL | Nd:YAG Laser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nd:YAG Laser The Nd:YAG laser is located in a class 1000 clean room (the YAG Room) near the electron gun end of the ATF accelerator. The clean area also includes a separate laser...

  18. BNL | CFN Laser System Qualifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lasers. This standard requires each Class 3B and 4 laser user to have a pre-assignment eye examination by an ophthalmologist, which is recorded on Part B of the Laser Medical...

  19. Laser Program annual report 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neal, E.M.; Murphy, P.W.; Canada, J.A.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.; Price, M.E.; Prono, J.K.; Reid, S.G.; Wallerstein, L.; Wright, T.W. (eds.)

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: target design and experiments; target materials development; laboratory x-ray lasers; laser science and technology; high-average-power solid state lasers; and ICF applications studies.

  20. Some Remarks on Quantum Tomography in Laser Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artur Czerwi?ski

    2015-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we take into consideration the evolution model of 3-level quantum systems known as \\textit{laser cooling}. The evolution in this model is given by an equation which is a special case of the general Kossakowski-Lindblad master equation. The explicit knowledge about the evolution makes it possible to apply the stroboscopic tomography to laser cooling. In this article we present some remarks concerning the minimal number of observables and moments of measurement for quantum tomography in laser cooling.

  1. Loading atom lasers by collectivity-enhanced optical pumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macovei, Mihai A.; Evers, Joerg [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of collectivity on the loading of an atom laser via optical pumping is discussed. In our model, atoms in a beam are laser-excited and subsequently spontaneously decay into a trapping state. We consider the case of sufficiently high particle density in the beam such that the spontaneous emission is modified by the particle interaction. We show that the collective effects lead to a better population of the trapping state over a wide range of system parameters, and that the second-order correlation function of the atoms can be controlled by the applied laser field.

  2. Numerical simulations in laser controlled fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afanas'ev, Y.V.; Busurina, L.N.; Volosevich, P.P.; Galiguzova, I.I.; Gamalii, E.G.; Gus'kov, S.Y.; Danilova, G.V.; Krokhin, O.N.; Kurdyumov, S.P.; Levanov, E.I.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various theoretical models for the events which occur in laser targets are discussed. Difference methods are used to solve the corresponding problems. The results calculated by the LUCH program at the Institute of Applied Mathematics are compared with experiments carried out in the Kal'mar device (Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow) and in the USA (at the KMS Fusion laboratory) in the Argus and Shiva devices. The theoretical and experimental results are in satisfactory agreement over broad ranges of the laser power density. It is also shown that the results calculated by the code of the Institute of Applied Mathematics and by the code of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LASNEX) under identical physical assumptions are approximately the same.

  3. School of Applied Technology School of Applied Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    School of Applied Technology School of Applied Technology Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Campus Illinois Institute of Technology 201 E. Loop Road Wheaton, IL 60187 630.682.6000 www.iit.edu/applied tech/ Dean and Academic Director, Information Technology and Management Programs: C. Robert Carlson Director of Operations

  4. School of Applied Technology School of Applied Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    School of Applied Technology School of Applied Technology Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Campus Illinois Institute of Technology 201 E. Loop Road Wheaton, IL 60187 630.682.6000 www.iit.edu/applied tech/ Dean Technology and Management Programs: Mazin Safar Director, Marketing & Development: Scott Pfeiffer Director

  5. Inverse free-electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, C.; Campisi, R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We first describe the basic physical properties of an inverse free-electron laser and make an estimate of the order of magnitude of the accelerating field obtainable with such a system; then apply the general ideas to the design of an actual device and through this example we give a more accurate evaluation of the fundamental as well as the technical limitations that this acceleration scheme imposes.

  6. Laser Micromachining: Advantages of Liquid Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Laser Micromachining: Advantages of Liquid Environments Marc J. Palmeri Princeton University Arnold Lab #12;Outline · Motivation ­ Applications of laser micromachining ­ Problems with laser micromachining · How do lasers work? · What is laser micromachining? · Micromachining assembly · Methods

  7. LANL | Physics | Trident Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery science at Trident Laser Facility Several important discoveries and first observations have been made at the Trident Laser Facility, a unique three-beam neodymium-glass...

  8. Applied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    problems 20 2.3.1 Classes 20 2.3.2 Types of classi cation problems 20 2.3.3 Learning and test sets 21 2Applied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel University of Li`ege Faculty of Applied Sciences Course;#12;APPLIED INDUCTIVE LEARNING COURSE NOTES : OCTOBER 2000 LOUIS A. WEHENKEL University of Li#12;ege

  9. Applied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    .3.2 Types of classification problems 20 2.3.3 Learning and test sets 21 2.3.4 Decision or classificationApplied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel University of Liâ??ege Faculty of Applied Sciences Courseâ??e'' #12; #12; APPLIED INDUCTIVE LEARNING COURSE NOTES : OCTOBER 2000 LOUIS A. WEHENKEL University of Li

  10. Journal of Applied Ecology 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2004 41, 922­933 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing-scale, Sacramento River, succession, vegetation Journal of Applied Ecology (2004) 41, 922­933 Introduction More than@ucsc.edu). #12;923 Riparian forest restoration © 2004 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied Ecology, 41

  11. Journal of Applied Ecology 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2002 39, 960­970 © 2002 British Ecological Society Blackwell Science- tion, succession. Journal of Applied Ecology (2002) 39, 960­970 Introduction Efforts to reclaim@ucsc.edu). #12;961 Vegetation on reclaimed mines © 2002 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied Ecology

  12. Applying Mathematics.... ... to catch criminals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Michael

    Applying Mathematics.... ... to catch criminals Mike O'Leary Department of Mathematics Towson University Stevenson University Kappa Mu Epsion 2008 Mike O'Leary (Towson University) Applying mathematics Department Mike O'Leary (Towson University) Applying mathematics to catch criminals September 10, 2008 2 / 42

  13. Titan Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Titan Titan is a two-beam laser platform. The nanosecond "long-pulse" beam is one of the Janus lasers, up to 1 kJ at 1.053 m. The "short-pulse" beam is 1-to-10 ps and energies up...

  14. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  15. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Miller, J.L.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window. 2 figs.

  16. Dye laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved dye laser amplifier is disclosed. The efficiency of the dye laser amplifier is increased significantly by increasing the power of a dye beam as it passes from an input window to an output window within the dye chamber, while maintaining the intensity of the dye beam constant. 3 figs.

  17. Drive laser Photocathode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Drive laser Gun cavity Scale 2" 3"0 1" Photocathode Schematic Overview of a Free Electron Laser Steel Sleeve Compressed Cs2CrO4:Ti Pellet (0.725g) 1.27 cm Nickel-Assisted Hermetic Braze #12;Foundation

  18. Laser Programs Highlight 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, R.R.

    1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Our contributions to laser science and technology and corresponding applications range from concept to design of the National Ignition Facility, transfer of Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation technology to the private sector, and from new initiatives in industry and defense to micro-optics for improving human vision.

  19. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  20. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  1. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  2. Laser controlled flame stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Thomas, Matthew E. (Huntsville, AL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus is provided for initiating and stabilizing fuel combustion in applications such as gas turbine electrical power generating engines and jet turbine engines where it is desired to burn lean fuel/air mixtures which produce lower amounts of NO.sub.x. A laser induced spark is propagated at a distance from the fuel nozzle with the laser ignitor being remotely located from the high temperature environment of the combustion chamber. A laser initiating spark generated by focusing high peak power laser light to a sufficiently tight laser spot within the fuel to cause the ionization of air and fuel into a plasma is unobtrusive to the flow dynamics of the combustion chamber of a fuel injector, thereby facilitating whatever advantage can be taken of flow dynamics in the design of the fuel injector.

  3. Laser dividing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    English, Jr., R. Edward (Tracy, CA); Johnson, Steve A. (Tracy, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser beam dividing apparatus (10) having a first beam splitter (14) with an aperture (16) therein positioned in the path of a laser beam (12) such that a portion of the laser beam (12) passes through the aperture (16) onto a second beam splitter (20) and a portion of the laser beam (12) impinges upon the first beam splitter (14). Both the first beam splitter (14) and the second beam splitter (20) are, optionally, made from a dichroic material such that a green component (24) of the laser beam (12) is reflected therefrom and a yellow component (26) is refracted therethrough. The first beam splitter (14) and the second beam splitter (20) further each have a plurality of facets (22) such that the components (24, 26) are reflected and refracted in a number equaling the number of facets (22).

  4. Catalac free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  5. Hollow screw like drill in plasma using an intense Laguerre Gaussian laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wenpeng; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Lingang; Shi, Yin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the development of ultra intense laser technology, MeV ions from the laser foil interaction have been obtained by different mechanisms, such as target normal sheath acceleration, radiation pressure acceleration, collisionless shock acceleration, breakout afterburner, and a combination of different mechanisms. These energetic ion beams can be applied in fast ignition for inertial confinement fusion, medical therapy, and proton imaging. However, these ions are mainly accelerated in the laser propagation direction, and the ion acceleration in an azimuthal orientation is scarcely mentioned. Here, a doughnut Laguerre Gaussian LG laser is used for the first time to study the laser plasma interaction in the relativistic intensity regime in three dimensional particle in cell simulations. Studies have shown that a novel rotation of the plasma is produced from the hollow screw like drill of a LG mode laser. The angular momentum of the protons in the longitudinal direction produced by the LG laser is remarkably enh...

  6. Free electron laser designs for laser amplification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prosnitz, Donald (Walnut Creek, CA); Szoke, Abraham (Fremont, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for laser beam amplification by means of free electron laser techniques. With wiggler magnetic field strength B.sub.w and wavelength .lambda..sub.w =2.pi./k.sub.w regarded as variable parameters, the method(s) impose conditions such as substantial constancy of B.sub.w /k.sub.w or k.sub.w or B.sub.w and k.sub.w (alternating), coupled with a choice of either constant resonant phase angle or programmed phase space "bucket" area.

  7. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control G. R. Plateau, , C. G. R acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA) [1, 2]. In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy

  8. Erbium-doped fiber ring laser tuning using an intra-cavity Fabry-Perot filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malik, Bilal Hameed

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable erbium-doped fiber ring laser using an intra-cavity Fabry-Perot filter as the tuning element is investigated. Tuning is achieved by varying the applied voltage which controls the FP cavity length. The laser's wavelength is monitored using...

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling Backus

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

  10. Plasma channel diagnostic based on laser centroid oscillationsa... A. J. Gonsalves,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    , and will be determined by the laser damage threshold of the optic used to couple the laser energy into the stage. Plasma radiation source and high energy physics appli- cations, precise control over electron beam pointing on on-axis spontaneous radia- tion of an electron beam passing through an undulator, the radiation

  11. Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

    2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a recently acquired 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). The HPFL represents a potentially disruptive technology that, when compared to its competitors, is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on completion and perforation applications, although the results and techniques apply to well construction and other rock cutting applications. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation prototype tool. In the past, several combinations of laser and rock variables were investigated at standard conditions and reported in the literature. More recent experiments determined the technical feasibility of laser perforation on multiple samples of rock, cement and steel. The fiber laser was capable of penetrating these materials under a variety of conditions, to an appropriate depth, and with reasonable energy requirements. It was determined that fiber lasers are capable of cutting rock without causing damage to flow properties. Furthermore, the laser perforation resulted in permeability improvements on the exposed rock surface. This report discusses the design and development of a customized laser pressure cell; experimental design and procedures, and the resulting data on pressure-charged samples exposed to the laser beam. An analysis provides the resulting effect of downhole pressure conditions on the laser/rock interaction process.

  12. Laser Direct Drive: Scientific Advances,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Laser Direct Drive: Scientific Advances, Technical Achievements, and the Road To Fusion Energy energy gain ( 40) at 1 MJ laser energy · Advanced lasers/ target designs overcome uniformity requirements, medical applications) Gas laser medium is easy to cool (tough to break gas) Nike single beam focus #12

  13. Coupled parallel waveguide semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukai, S.; Kapon, E.; Katz, J.; Lindsey, C.; Rav-Noy, Z.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The operation of a new type of tunable laser, where the two separately controlled individual lasers are placed vertically in parallel, has been demonstrated. One of the cavities (''control'' cavity) is operated below threshold and assists the longitudinal mode selection and tuning of the other laser. With a minor modification, the same device can operate as an independent two-wavelength laser source.

  14. Ultra-fast laser system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system is provided which selectively excites Raman active vibrations in molecules. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and remote sensing.

  15. 1982 laser program annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Grow, G.R. (eds.)

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report covers the following eight sections: (1) laser program review, (2) laser systems and operation, (3) target design, (4) target fabrication, (5) fusion experiments program, (6) Zeus laser project, (7) laser research and development, and (8) energy applications. (MOW)

  16. LASER SAFETY POLICY Policy Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    LASER SAFETY POLICY Policy Statement Each department that acquires or operates lasers for use in the university's Laser Safety Manual. Reason for Policy/Purpose If improperly used or controlled, lasers can produce multiple injuries, including burns, blindness, and electrocution. This policy and the university

  17. A Ge-on-Si laser for electronic-photonic integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xiaochen

    We demonstrate room temperature photoluminescence and optical gain from the direct band gap transition of tensile strained n-type Ge-on-Si around 1600 nm, which can be applied to a Si-based laser for optical interconnects ...

  18. Laser damage testing of small optics for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, Robert; Runkel, Mike; Taylor, John R

    2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A damage test procedure was established for optical components that have large incident beam footprints. The procedure was applied on coated samples for a high-powered 1053-nm, 3-ns pulse-length laser system.

  19. Femtosecond laser-drilled capillary integrated into a microfluidic device Tyson N. Kim, Kyle Campbell, Alex Groisman, David Kleinfeld, and Chris B. Schaffera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Femtosecond laser-drilled capillary integrated into a microfluidic device Tyson N. Kim, Kyle micromachining to add unmoldable features to the microfluidic devices. We apply laser ablation to drill channels. Finally, we use a laser-drilled microcapillary to trap a polystyrene bead by suction and hold

  20. Laser Plasma Material Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaaf, Peter; Carpene, Ettore [Universitaet Goettingen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface treatment by means of pulsed laser beams in reactive atmospheres is an attractive technique to enhance the surface features, such as corrosion and wear resistance or the hardness. Many carbides and nitrides play an important role for technological applications, requiring the mentioned property improvements. Here we present a new promising fast, flexible and clean technique for a direct laser synthesis of carbide and nitride surface films by short pulsed laser irradiation in reactive atmospheres (e.g. methane, nitrogen). The corresponding material is treated by short intense laser pulses involving plasma formation just above the irradiated surface. Gas-Plasma-Surface reactions lead to a fast incorporation of the gas species into the material and subsequently the desired coating formation if the treatment parameters are chosen properly. A number of laser types have been used for that (Excimer Laser, Nd:YAG, Ti:sapphire, Free Electron Laser) and a number of different nitride and carbide films have been successfully produced. The mechanisms and some examples will be presented for Fe treated in nitrogen and Si irradiated in methane.

  1. Lateral coupled cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salzman, J.; Lang, R.J.; Yariv, A.

    1987-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a monolithic lateral-coupled laser array comprised of at least two stripe laser cavities of different effective length in close parallel proximity to each other for coupling of radiation. The longer of the stripe laser cavities is cleaved to provide separate parts, and the parts are cleaved coupled to form one strip laser cavity lateral coupled to the shorter laser cavity. A separate stripe contact varies the relative currents supplied to each laser cavity, including the cleaved coupled cavities of the longer of the stripe laser cavities.

  2. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  3. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on niobium by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, A.; Dias, A.; Gomez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S. M. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); CEIT-IK4 and Tecnun, University of Navarra, Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Rodriguez, A. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface morphology of a Niobium sample, irradiated in air by a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 800?nm and pulse duration of 100 fs, was examined. The period of the micro/nanostructures, parallel and perpendicularly oriented to the linearly polarized fs-laser beam, was studied by means of 2D Fast Fourier Transform analysis. The observed Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) were classified as Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (periods about 600?nm) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS, showing a periodicity around 300?nm, both of them perpendicularly oriented to the polarization of the incident laser wave. Moreover, parallel high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed with periods around 100?nm located at the peripheral areas of the laser fingerprint and overwritten on the perpendicular periodic gratings. The results indicate that this method of micro/nanostructuring allows controlling the Niobium grating period by the number of pulses applied, so the scan speed and not the fluence is the key parameter of control. A discussion on the mechanism of the surface topology evolution was also introduced.

  4. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

    1991-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

  5. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansfield, Dennis K. (E. Windsor, NJ); Vocaturo, Michael (Columbus, NJ); Guttadora, Lawrence J. (Iselin, NJ)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

  6. EA-1655: Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development

  7. Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUMBER 5 MAY 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser acceleratedand millimeter wave radiation from laser acceleratedNo. 5, May 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated

  8. Janus Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Janus Janus is a dual beam Nd:glass laser. Each beam is independent and capable of 1 kJ at 1.053 m with pulse lengths from about 1 ns to 20 ns, Frequency doubling is available,...

  9. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jassby, D.L.

    1987-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

  10. Terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Benjamin S. (Benjamin Stanford), 1974-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of the terahertz frequency range has long been impeded by the relative dearth of compact, coherent radiation sources of reasonable power. This thesis details the development of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) ...

  11. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the electric field of the radiation, this energy-exchangewhere the electric field of the radiation would The energydue to the electric field of the laser radiation, but in

  12. Pulsed Laser Deposition | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is composed of the following: An electro-polished stainless-steel chamber pumped via a turbo molecular pump and backed by a rotary scroll dry pump An excimer laser (KrF) for...

  13. Laser Plasma Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processes. A typical configuration uses a low intensity laser beam (2nd, 3rd, or 4th harmonic of 1054-nm) to probe a plasma volume. The Thomson scattered light is collected by a...

  14. Genetic algorithms applied to nonlinear and complex domains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barash, D; Woodin, A E

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissertation, titled ''Genetic Algorithms Applied to Nonlinear and Complex Domains'', describes and then applies a new class of powerful search algorithms (GAS) to certain domains. GAS are capable of solving complex and nonlinear problems where many parameters interact to produce a final result such as the optimization of the laser pulse in the interaction of an atom with an intense laser field. GAS can very efficiently locate the global maximum by searching parameter space in problems which are unsuitable for a search using traditional methods. In particular, the dissertation contains new scientific findings in two areas. First, the dissertation examines the interaction of an ultra-intense short laser pulse with atoms. GAS are used to find the optimal frequency for stabilizing atoms in the ionization process. This leads to a new theoretical formulation, to explain what is happening during the ionization process and how the electron is responding to finite (real-life) laser pulse shapes. It is shown that the dynamics of the process can be very sensitive to the ramp of the pulse at high frequencies. The new theory which is formulated, also uses a novel concept (known as the (t,t') method) to numerically solve the time-dependent Schrodinger equation Second, the dissertation also examines the use of GAS in modeling decision making problems. It compares GAS with traditional techniques to solve a class of problems known as Markov Decision Processes. The conclusion of the dissertation should give a clear idea of where GAS are applicable, especially in the physical sciences, in problems which are nonlinear and complex, i.e. difficult to analyze by other means.

  15. Genetic algorithms applied to nonlinear and complex domains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barash, D; Woodin, A E

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissertation, titled ''Genetic Algorithms Applied to Nonlinear and Complex Domains'', describes and then applies a new class of powerful search algorithms (GAS) to certain domains. GAS are capable of solving complex and nonlinear problems where many parameters interact to produce a ''final'' result such as the optimization of the laser pulse in the interaction of an atom with an intense laser field. GAS can very efficiently locate the global maximum by searching parameter space in problems which are unsuitable for a search using traditional methods. In particular, the dissertation contains new scientific findings in two areas. First, the dissertation examines the interaction of an ultra-intense short laser pulse with atoms. GAS are used to find the optimal frequency for stabilizing atoms in the ionization process. This leads to a new theoretical formulation, to explain what is happening during the ionization process and how the electron is responding to finite (real-life) laser pulse shapes. It is shown that the dynamics of the process can be very sensitive to the ramp of the pulse at high frequencies. The new theory which is formulated, also uses a novel concept (known as the (t,t') method) to numerically solve the time-dependent Schrodinger equation Second, the dissertation also examines the use of GAS in modeling decision making problems. It compares GAS with traditional techniques to solve a class of problems known as Markov Decision Processes. The conclusion of the dissertation should give a clear idea of where GAS are applicable, especially in the physical sciences, in problems which are nonlinear and complex, i.e. difficult to analyze by other means.

  16. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  17. Insulator for laser housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member.

  18. Laser surface cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crivella, E.C.; Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination of contaminated metal and material recycle, two of 31 priority needs identified by the D&D focus group, are the most promising applications for laser ablation within the DOE complex. F2 Associates has developed a robotic laser ablation system that is capable of high contamination rates, waste volume reduction, surface pore cleaning, and real-time characterization of materials. It is being demonstrated that this system will be the most cost-effective technology for metal decontamination and material recycle.

  19. Dark Soliton Fiber Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Zhang; D. Y. Tang; L. M. Zhao; X. Wu; Q. L. Bao; K. P. Loh

    2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the experimental observation of stable dark solitons in an all normal dispersion fiber laser. We found experimentally that dark soliton formation is a generic feature of the fiber laser under strong continuous wave (CW) emission. However, only under appropriate pump strength and negative cavity feedback, stable single or multiple dark soliton could be achieved. Furthermore, we show that the features of the observed dark solitons could be well understood based on the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLSE).

  20. Fundamentals of Laser Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dapeng Oliver

    ) Helium neon (NIR) Erbium (NIR) Helium neon (NIR) Hydrogen fluoride (NIR) Carbon dioxide (FIR) Carbon. These three properties of laser light are what can make it more hazardous than ordinary light. Laser light can dioxide (FIR) 0.594 0.610 0.627 0.633 0.647 0.570-0.650 0.694 0.840 1.064 1.

  1. APPLIED TECHNOLOGY Strategic Plan Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    and collaborative technology-based support for the proposed Innovation Center and the Entrepreneurship Academy. We research centers­CNR, CPI, and CSP. Establish a food safety and processing technology hub/incubator/innovationSCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY Strategic Plan Summary #12;School of Applied Technology Strategic Plan

  2. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasmaA design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generatingare considered. Keywords: Free-electron laser, laser-plasma

  3. Molecular dynamics of liquid benzene via femtosecond pulses laser excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1749 Molecular dynamics of liquid benzene via femtosecond pulses laser excitation J. Etchepare, G moléculaires. Abstract. 2014 We analyse the complex response of liquid benzene to the applied 45 fs FHWM new results obtained by the transient grating temporal behaviour analysis of benzene, a molecule

  4. Department of Applied Mathematics Department of Applied Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    , computational mathematics, discrete applied mathematics, and stochas- tics. More detailed descriptions of Philosophy in Collegiate Mathematics Education (joint program with the Department of Mathematics and Science Education) Research Facilities The department provides students with office space equipped with computers

  5. 2003 Laser Diagnostic in Combustion Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark G. Allen

    2004-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRC Laser Diagnostics in Combustion aims at bringing together scientists and engineers working in the front edge of research and development to discuss and find new ways to solve problems connected to combustion diagnostics. Laser-based techniques have proven to be very efficient tools for studying combustion processes thanks to features as non-intrusiveness in combination with high spatial and temporal resolution. Major tasks for the community are to develop and apply techniques for quantitative measurements with high precision e.g of species concentrations, temperatures, velocities and particles characteristics (size and concentration). These issues are of global interest, considering that the major part of the World's energy conversion comes from combustion sources and the influence combustion processes have on the environment and society.

  6. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM); Faulkner, George E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A blue-green laser (450-550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm.sup.3+. The Tm.sup.+ is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP.

  7. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, D.C.; Faulkner, G.E.

    1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A blue-green laser (450--550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm[sup 3+]. The Tm[sup 3+] is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP. 3 figs.

  8. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  9. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milner, Joseph R. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall mperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser.

  10. Controlling molecules with lasers and lasers with molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jason Matthew, 1977-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I investigate quantum control of spin in molecules using shaped ultrafast lasers and the dynamics of those lasers when their cavities are modified to include programmable molecular masks. The ability to control quantum ...

  11. Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

    2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a recently acquired 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). The HPFL represents a potentially disruptive technology that, when compared to its competitors, is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. To determine how this promising laser compares with other lasers used in past experimental work, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on completion and perforation applications, although the results and techniques apply to well construction and other rock cutting applications. Variables investigated include laser power, beam intensity, external purging of cut materials, sample orientation, beam duration, beam shape, and beam frequency. The investigation also studied the thermal effects on the two sample rock types and their methods of destruction: spallation for sandstone, and thermal dissociation for limestone. Optimal operating conditions were identified for each rock type and condition. As a result of this experimental work, the HPFL has demonstrated a better capability of cutting and drilling limestone and sandstone when compared with other military and industrial lasers previously tested. Consideration should be given to the HPFL as the leading candidate for near term remote high power laser applications for well construction and completion.

  12. Application of high powered lasers to drilling and completing deep walls.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, C. B.; Xu, Z.; Parker, R. A.; Gahan, B. C.; Batarseh, S.; Graves, R. M.; Figueroa, H.; Deeg, W.

    2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    High powered laser rock drilling was studied as a revolutionary method for drilling and completing deep gas and oil wells. The objectives of this 2002 to 2003 fiscal year research were to study the concept that large diameter holes can be created by multiple overlapping small beam spots, to determine the ability of lasers to drill rock submerged to some depth in water, to demonstrate the possibilities of lasers for perforating application, and to determine the wavelength effects on rock removal. Laser technology applied to well drilling and completion operations is attractive because it has the potential to reduce drilling time, create a ceramic lining that may eliminate the need for steel casing, provide additional monitor-on-drilling laser sensors and improve well performance through improved perforation. The results from this research will help engineering design on a laser-based well drilling system.

  13. Modeling applied to problem solving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawl, Andrew

    We describe a modeling approach to help students learn expert problem solving. Models are used to present and hierarchically organize the syllabus content and apply it to problem solving, but students do not develop and ...

  14. IIT SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT IIT SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY PREPARING SKILLED INDIVIDUALS, INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES, SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT, SUSTAINABILITY AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY. #12;BE ONE to assess, implement, and utilize current technologies, and to learn how to manage industrial operations

  15. Sustainable FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelson, David G.

    Working Together Towards a Sustainable Energy Future FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE Clean Energy aspects of sustainable energy solutions, and is committed to using its extensive expertise to serve, Electrical & Computer, Materials, Mechanical, Mining), the School of Architecture & Landscape Architecture

  16. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Sciencewww.ictas.vt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Sciencewww.ictas.vt.edu NEW HORIZONS ICTAS SEMINAR to advance technologies from laser drilling to power electronics, from natural gas storage to transgenic exists to support high-risk high-reward transformation- al technologies across the entire energy

  17. Insulative laser shell coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, P.A.; Anderson, A.T.; Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A segmented coaxial laser shell assembly having at least two water jacket sections, two pairs of interconnection half rings, a dielectric break ring, and a pair of threaded ring sections is disclosed. Each water jacket section with an inner tubular section that defines an inner laser cavity with water paths adjacent to at least a portion of the exterior of the inner tubular section, and mating faces at the end of the water jacket section through which the inner laser cavity opens and which defines at least one water port therethrough in communication with the water jackets. The water paths also define in their external surface a circumferential notch set back from and in close proximity to the mating face. The dielectric break ring has selected thickness and is placed between, and in coaxial alignment with, the mating faces of two of the adjacent water jacket sections. The break ring also defines an inner laser cavity of the same size and shape as the inner laser cavity of the water jacket sections and at least one water passage through the break ring to communicate with at least one water port through the mating faces of the water jacket sections. 4 figs.

  18. RF laser plasma measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollen, W.M.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major difficulties with excimer lasers has been the presence of impurities, introduced, for example, by the electrodes present in the D.C. discharge approach. Use of microwave excitation makes possible an electrodeless discharge, thereby reducing the risk of introducing impurities into the laser mix. In this approach a tube containing the laser mix is inserted in a waveguide or microwave cavity; the microwaves then break down the laser mix to form a discharge and further interact to heat that discharge. In such microwave discharges, strong fluorescence seems limited to approximately 100 ns. In the same time frame, the fluorescence has also been observed to collapse to the wall. The wall collapse may be related to the reduced fluorescence (reduced radiation area), although burn-up of the lasing components seems more likely. The collapse to the wall reduces the ability to lase by decreasing the active volume. A better understanding of this effect needs to be obtained before a microwave-driven laser can be further developed. This research effort was directed towards obtaining a fundamental understanding of the collapse of the fluorescence to the tube walls. The ultimate goal is to understand the collapse sufficiently to prevent or reduce its effects; to this end, a number of basic plasma physics experiments have been carried out. A complete understanding has not yet been reached.

  19. LASER SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    LASER SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR LASER SAFETY AT TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY LUBBOCK, TEXAS September 2002 #12;V-1 TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY LASER SAFETY MANUAL TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION I ­ MANAGEMENT OF LASER LICENSE Introduction A. Laser Safety Program I - 1 B. Radiation Laser Safety Committee I

  20. Hybrid laser with CMOS photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chong, Johanna S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, an interesting approach for a photonic laser source is presented. By using integrated photonic resonators with an external gain medium, we are able to build a laser that offers a number of advantages including ...

  1. TUFTS UNIVERSITY LASER SAFETY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    with laser safety regulations promulgated by state, federal, and local agencies. The LSO administers and Maximum Permissible Exposures 12 X. Electrical Hazards 12 XI. General Safety Procedures 13 XII. Laser

  2. 2009 Laser Diagnostics in Combustion GRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volker Sick

    2009-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-intrusive laser diagnostics for the spatially and temporally resolved measurement of temperature, chemical composition, and flow parameters have emerged over the last few decades as major tools for the study of both fundamental and applied combustion science. Many of the important advances in the field can be attributed to the discussions and ideas emanating from this meeting. This conference, originating in 1981 and held biennially, focuses on laser-based methods for measurement of both macroscopic parameters and the underlying microscale physical and chemical processes. Applications are discussed primarily to elucidate new chemical and physical issues and/or interferences that need to be addressed to improve the accuracy and precision of the various diagnostic approaches or to challenge the community of diagnosticians to invent new measurement techniques. Combustion environments present special challenges to the optical diagnostics community as they address measurements relevant to turbulence, spray and mixture formation, or turbulence/chemistry interactions important in practical combustion systems as well as fundamental chemical reactions in stationary laminar flames. The diagnostics considered may be generally classed as being incoherent, where the signals are radiated isotropically, or coherent, where the signals are generated in a directed, beam-like fashion. Both of the foregoing may employ either electronic or Raman resonance enhancement or a combination of both. Prominent incoherent approaches include laser induced fluorescence (LIF), spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, laser induced incandescence, molecular flow tagging, and Mie scattering and their two- and three-dimensional imaging variants. Coherent approaches include coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM), polarization spectroscopy (PS), laser induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) and laser-based absorption spectroscopy. Spectroscopic modelling and validation are key elements to extract accurate parameter measurements and discussions focusing on key energy transfer processes, collisional models, and lineshapes. The properties and behaviour of lasers, optical arrangements and techniques, spectrally-selective and dispersive instruments and detectors are also important determinants of successful measurements and are discussed in detail. Recent developments in the conference have highlighted the application of techniques developed for combustion research that find application in other areas such as biological, atmospheric, chemical engineering or plasma processes.

  3. Laser Assisted Emittance Exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe here the laser assisted emittance exchange (LAEE) technique. A laser operating in the transverse mode (TEM10 or TEM01) is used to interact with the electron beam in a dispersive region and to initiate the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange. It is shown that with the LAEE one can generate an electron beam with ultralow transverse emittance, which allows one to significantly bring down the size of an X-ray free electron laser (FEL) and greatly extend the availability of these light sources. The technique can also be used to enhance the performances of X-ray FELs in storage rings. The timing and energy jitter problems for the standard emittance exchange and LAEE techniques are also discussed.

  4. Laser cooling of infrared sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasselbeck, M. P. (Michael P.); Sheik-Bahae, M (Mansoor); Thiede, J. (Jared); Distel, J. R. (James R.); Greenfield, S. R. (Scott R.); Patterson, Wendy M.; Bigotta, S.; Imangholi, B.; Seletskiy, D. (Denis); Bender, D.; Vankipuram, V.; Vadiee, N.; Epstein, Richard I.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of laser cooling of solids. In this all-solid-state approach to refrigeration, heat is removed radiatively when an engineered material is exposed to high power laser light. We report a record amount of net cooling (88 K below ambient) that has been achieved with a sample made from doped fluoride glass. Issues involved in the design of a practical laser cooler are presented. The possibility of laser cooling of semiconductor sensors is discussed.

  5. Influence of uniaxial pressure on the critical temperature for long delays in GaAs junction lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morosini, M.B.Z.; Patel, N.B.; Nunes, F.D.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we report on the influence of uniaxial pressure applied perpendicularly to junction laser on the behavior of the critical temperature for the onset of long delays in GaAs junction lasers. Experimental data showing this influence for lasers operating in a TE or TM polarization are presented and explained on the basis of a thermal theory of long delays and related phenomena.

  6. Laser Cooling of Matter INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Robin

    - velopment of techniques that have allowed the ion motion to be cooled into the ground state of the confiningLaser Cooling of Matter INTRODUCTION Laser cooling of neutral atoms in the past decades has been a breakthrough in the understanding of their dy- namics and led to the seminal proposals of laser cooling

  7. Novel Applications of Ultrafast Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dantus, Marcos

    21 Novel Applications of Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopy Professor of chemistry and Adjunct Professor LASER PULSESare considered photonic reagents that can be used to study and control chemistry by our group. We are engaged in developing the laser technology as well as the novel applications that become

  8. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  9. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    LIBS-1 Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy LIBS ANALYSIS OF METAL SURFACES Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;LIBS-2 Laser­Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) LIBS ANALYSIS OF METAL SURFACES of species at a distance or in hard­to­reach or hazardous environments. Laser­Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

  10. Le laser : une brve introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    Le laser : une brève introduction Christian Chardonnet Directeur du Laboratoire Charles Fabry (CNRS Lasers (CNRS/Université Paris 13) Le 9 avril 2010 #12;Les sources de lumière l'ampoule électrique Les;Zoom : x1000 x1000 x1000 x1000 x100 Le spectre du soleil I.R. U.V. Comparaison du rayonnement laser et

  11. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  12. Applied Mathematics & Research Experience January 29, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mark A.

    Assessment · Developing an Assessment Framework For APEX Goodyear Tire & Rubber · Tire Sales Forecasting Kent Displays Inc. · Using Lasers to Cut

  13. Multistable monochromatic laser solitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genevet, P.; Columbo, L.; Barland, S.; Giudici, M.; Gil, L.; Tredicce, J. R. [Universite de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Institut Non-Lineaire de Nice, UMR 6618, F-06560 Valbonne (France)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spectral properties of stationary laser solitons (LSs) generated in two broad-area vertical cavity surface emitting lasers coupled to each other in face-to-face configuration [P. Genevet et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 123905 (2008)]. We demonstrate experimentally that LS emission occurs on a single longitudinal mode frequency of the compound cavity. Multistability is reported among differently 'colored' LSs. We also develop a theoretical model beyond the single longitudinal mode approximation whose numerical simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  14. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  15. Applied Science Division annual report, Environmental Research Program FY 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, E.J.; Novakov, T.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary concern of the Environmental Research Program is the understanding of pollutant formation, transport, and transformation and the impacts of pollutants on the environment. These impacts include global, regional, and local effects on the atmosphere and hydrosphere, and on certain aspects of human health. This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. During FY 1983, research concentrated on atmospheric physics and chemistry, applied physics and laser spectroscopy, combustion theory and phenomena, environmental effects of oil shale processing, freshwater ecology and acid precipitation, trace element analysis for the investigation of present and historical environmental impacts, and a continuing survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring.

  16. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention as a method for producing transform-limited pulses in the soft x-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality and impede production of transform-limited pulses. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  17. "Defense-in-Depth" Laser Safety and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J J

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the largest and most energetic laser in the world contained in a complex the size of a football stadium. From the initial laser pulse, provided by telecommunication style infrared nanoJoule pulsed lasers, to the final 192 laser beams (1.8 Mega Joules total energy in the ultraviolet) converging on a target the size of a pencil eraser, laser safety is of paramount concern. In addition to this, there are numerous high-powered (Class 3B and 4) diagnostic lasers in use that can potentially send their laser radiation travelling throughout the facility. With individual beam paths of up to 1500 meters and a workforce of more than one thousand, the potential for exposure is significant. Simple laser safety practices utilized in typical laser labs just don't apply. To mitigate these hazards, NIF incorporates a multi layered approach to laser safety or 'Defense in Depth.' Most typical high-powered laser operations are contained and controlled within a single room using relatively simplistic controls to protect both the worker and the public. Laser workers are trained, use a standard operating procedure, and are required to wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as Laser Protective Eyewear (LPE) if the system is not fully enclosed. Non-workers are protected by means of posting the room with a warning sign and a flashing light. In the best of cases, a Safety Interlock System (SIS) will be employed which will 'safe' the laser in the case of unauthorized access. This type of laser operation is relatively easy to employ and manage. As the operation becomes more complex, higher levels of control are required to ensure personnel safety. Examples requiring enhanced controls are outdoor and multi-room laser operations. At the NIF there are 192 beam lines and numerous other Class 4 diagnostic lasers that can potentially deliver their hazardous energy to locations far from the laser source. This presents a serious and complex potential hazard to personnel. Because of this, a multilayered approach to safety is taken. This paper presents the philosophy and approach taken at the NIF in the multi-layered 'defense-in-depth' approach to laser safety.

  18. A laser-based solution to industrial decontamination problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelson, M.C.; Pang, Ho-ming [Ames Lab., IA (United States); Ferguson, R.L. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of lasers to deposit significant amounts of energy on surfaces located at large distances from the laser can be exploited to solve very difficult industrial problems. The Ames Laboratory has been working in partnership with Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies (LMIT) to apply laser technologies to the decontamination of radioactively contaminated surfaces located in hostile environments. Many such applications exist within former USDOE and nuclear industry facilities. As opposed to laser coating removal systems, which are designed to ``strip`` relatively soft coatings from a substrate without damage to the substrate, the system being developed by Ames - LMIT is designed to remove contaminants that are embedded within the metal surface itself. The system generates irradiance levels sufficient to remove microns of metal from a surface and an off-gas system that prevents the redeposition of materials removed from the surface. Process control is assisted by monitoring the laser-generated plasma produced during laser surface ablation. Results achieved using this apparatus for various metal types will be presented along with a discussion of other potential industrial applications.

  19. Octahedral spherical hohlraum and its laser arrangement for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan, Ke; He, Xian-Tu; Liu, Jie [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zheng, Wudi; Lai, Dongxian [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent publication [K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010704 (2014)] proposed a spherical hohlraum with six laser entrance holes of octahedral symmetry at a specific hohlraum-to-capsule radius ratio of 5.14 for inertial fusion study, which has robust high symmetry during the capsule implosion and superiority on low backscatter without supplementary technology. This paper extends the previous one by studying the laser arrangement and constraints of octahedral hohlraum in detail. As a result, it has serious beam crossing at ?{sub L}?45°, and ?{sub L}=50° to 60° is proposed as the optimum candidate range for the golden octahedral hohlraum, here ?{sub L} is the opening angle that the laser quad beam makes with the Laser Entrance Hole (LEH) normal direction. In addition, the design of the LEH azimuthal angle should avoid laser spot overlapping on hohlraum wall and laser beam transferring outside hohlraum from a neighbor LEH. The octahedral hohlraums are flexible and can be applicable to diverse inertial fusion drive approaches. This paper also applies the octahedral hohlraum to the recent proposed hybrid indirect-direct drive approach.

  20. Laser-Material Interactions: A Study of Laser Energy Coupling with Solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shannon, M.A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1971) Effects of High-Power Laser Radiation, Academic Presin Effects of High-Power Laser Radiation, (Academic Press,for modeling gas discharge lasers", Boulder, Colo. : Univ.

  1. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generated. The ultra-short laser-plasma accelerated beamsbetween the short- pulse laser generating the electron beamscale laser-plasma accelerator that produces ultra-short (

  2. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS facility”, in: Proc.electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator ?National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose

  3. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    XPLOTGIN, Technical Report LBNL-49625, Lawrence BerkeleyLASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR AT THE LBNL LOASIS FACILITY,” inelectron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

  4. Laser-Generated Shockwaves for the Disruption of Bacterial Biofilms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro, Artemio

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization by modified Laser Spallation Technique (The Basic Laser Spallation Technique (Modified Laser Spallation Technique: “Top-Down”

  5. Optical waves in crystal propagation and control of laser radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yariv, A.; Yeh, P.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a text for a course in electro-optics for electrical engineering and applied physics students, it presents the propagation of laser radiation in various optical media and instructs in the analysis and design of electro-optical devices. The content of the book presupposes an introduction to Maxwell's equations in an intermediate course in electricity and magnetism as well as some mathematical background in Fourier integrals, matrix algebra, and differential equations. Contents, abridged: Electromagnetic fields. Propagation of laser beams. Jones calculus and its application to birefringent optical systems. Electromagnetic propagation in periodic media. Electro-optic devices. Acousto-optics. Indexes.

  6. Laser Program annual report 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laser Program Annual Report is part of the continuing series of reports documenting the progress of the unclassified Laser Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). As in previous years, the report is organized programmatically. The first section is an overview of the basic goals and directions of the LLNL Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, and highlights the year's important accomplishments. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various program elements: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Laser Experiments and Advanced Diagnostics, Advanced Laser Development, and Applications of Inertial Confinement Fusion. Individual sections will be indexed separately. 589 refs., 333 figs., 25 tabs.

  7. Oxazine laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R. (Livermore, CA); Field, George F. (Danville, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New oxazine compounds useful as dye laser media in solution, are superiior to prior art materials. The oxazine dyes useful when pumped by the 578.2 nm copper line to operate in the 700-800 nm range are described by formula I ##STR1##

  8. Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Kevin James

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pathway for li6 isotope enrichment. Applied Physics B, 87(explored various enrichment schemes including laser isotopeisotope production con- tinues past the point of full power, but is controlled via 6 Li coolant enrichment

  9. Transcranial Low-Level Laser Therapy Improves Neurological Performance in Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice: Effect of Treatment Repetition Regimen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamblin, Michael R.

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been clinically applied around the world for a spectrum of disorders requiring healing, regeneration and prevention of tissue death. One area that is attracting growing interest ...

  10. Imagination Made Tangible Aspiring designers at NJSOA are no longer limited to two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    and heavy paper, 3D printers that build objects from layers of plaster, and a CNC Router that can mill of their digital work. Above, Garber displays a detailed model made with the 3D printer. the challenge: Establish the FABLAB's laser cutter, CNC Router and 3D printer to build a model of Atlantic City circa 1952

  11. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    manufacturing companies. Toner, the dry ink used in laser printers and copiers, can be blended in to asphalt specifications for use in copiers or printers and consequently becomes a waste product of the manufacturing process. This manufacturing waste along with the spent toner from copiers and printers is dumped

  12. 2 micron femtosecond fiber laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Jian; Wan, Peng; Yang, Lihmei

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for generating femtosecond fiber laser pulses are disclose, including generating a signal laser pulse from a seed laser oscillator; using a first amplifier stage comprising an input and an output, wherein the signal laser pulse is coupled into the input of the first stage amplifier and the output of the first amplifier stage emits an amplified and stretched signal laser pulse; using an amplifier chain comprising an input and an output, wherein the amplified and stretched signal laser pulse from the output of the first amplifier stage is coupled into the input of the amplifier chain and the output of the amplifier chain emits a further amplified, stretched signal laser pulse. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  13. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dasilva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Colston, Jr., Bill W. (Livermore, CA); James, Dale L. (Tracy, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  14. Speckle-free laser imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many imaging applications require increasingly bright illumination sources, motivating the replacement of conventional thermal light sources with light emitting diodes (LEDs), superluminescent diodes (SLDs) and lasers. Despite their brightness, lasers and SLDs are poorly suited for full-field imaging applications because their high spatial coherence leads to coherent artifacts known as speckle that corrupt image formation. We recently demonstrated that random lasers can be engineered to provide low spatial coherence. Here, we exploit the low spatial coherence of specifically-designed random lasers to perform speckle-free full-field imaging in the setting of significant optical scattering. We quantitatively demonstrate that images generated with random laser illumination exhibit higher resolution than images generated with spatially coherent illumination. By providing intense laser illumination without the drawback of coherent artifacts, random lasers are well suited for a host of full-field imaging applicatio...

  15. Journal of Applied Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Len

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2006 43, 377­384 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd METHODOLOGICAL INSIGHTS Point transect sampling with traps, Etive House, Beechwood Park, Inverness IV2 3BW, UK Summary 1. The ability to monitor abundance of animal

  16. APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogina, Mladen

    APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING Brijuni, Croatia June 23{27, 2003. y x Runge's example; Organized by: Department of Mathematics, Unversity of Zagreb, Croatia. Miljenko Maru#20;si#19;c, chairman;simir Veseli#19;c Andro Mikeli#19;c Sponsors: Ministry of Science and Technology, Croatia, CV Sistemi d

  17. Applied Sustainability Political Science 319

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    1 Applied Sustainability Political Science 319 College of Charleston Spring 2013 Day/Time: TH 1 Address: fisherb@cofc.edu Office: 284 King Street, #206 (Office of Sustainability) Office Hours: by appt sustainability. It will focus on the development of semester-long sustainability projects, from conception

  18. California Energy Commission Apply Today!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    including HVAC and thermal energy storage system upgrades, stadium light conversion and a microturbineCalifornia Energy Commission Apply Today! "The College implemented all of the recommended projects Programs Office (916) 654-4147 pubprog@energy.state.ca.us "CEC financing allowed us to install many

  19. implementing bioenergy applied research & development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    1 A Northern Centre for Renewable Energy implementing bioenergy applied research & development to develop local solutions to these challenges by integrating campus operations, education, and research will help the University meet its current and future energy needs, reduce or eliminate our greenhouse gas

  20. Laser cooling with ultrafast pulse trains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Kielpinski

    2003-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new laser cooling method for atomic species whose level structure makes traditional laser cooling difficult. For instance, laser cooling of hydrogen requires vacuum-ultraviolet laser light, while multielectron atoms need laser light at many widely separated frequencies. These restrictions can be eased by laser cooling on two-photon transitions with ultrafast pulse trains. Laser cooling of hydrogen, antihydrogen, and carbon appears feasible, and extension of the technique to molecules may be possible.

  1. General Laser Control Measures Operating instructions for a specific laser are found in the manual for that laser.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huennekens, John

    General Laser Control Measures Operating instructions for a specific laser are found in the manual for that laser. There are several procedures that will reduce the potential for exposure to laser beams. 1. The beam from Class IIIB and Class IV lasers should be terminated in highly absorbent, non specular

  2. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, John L. (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, Clifford B. (Dublin, CA); Zapata, Luis E. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse.

  3. Demodulator electronics for laser vibrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudzik, G.; Waz, A. T.; Kaczmarek, P. R.; Antonczak, A. J.; Sotor, J. Z.; Krzempek, K.; Sobon, G.; Abramski, K. M. [Laser and Fibre Electronics Group, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important parts of a fiber-laser vibrometer is demodulation electronic section. The distortion, nonlinearity, offset and added noise of measured signal come from electronic circuits and they have direct influence on finale measuring results. Two main parameters of an investigated vibrating object: velocity V(t) and displacement s(t), influence of detected beat signals. They are: the Doppler frequency deviation f(t) and phase shift {phi}(t), respectively. Because of wide range of deviations it is difficult to use just one demodulator. That is the reason why we use three different types of demodulators. The first one is the IQ demodulator, which is the most sensitive one and its output is proportional to the displacement. Each IQ channel is sampled simultaneously by an analog to digital converter (ADC) integrated in a digital signal processor (DSP). The output signals from the two FM demodulators are proportional to the frequency deviation of heterodyne signals. They are sensitive directly to the velocity of the object. The main disadvantage of scattered light interferometry system is a ''speckle effect'', appearing in relatively large amplitude fluctuation of a heterodyne signal. To minimize ''speckle effect'' influence on quality of beat signals we applied the automatic gain control (AGC) system. Data acquisition, further signal processing (e.g. vibration frequency spectra) and presentation of results is realized by PC via USB interface.

  4. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, J.L.; Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.; Zapata, L.E.

    1994-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse. 7 figures.

  5. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the visible free- electron laser oscillator experiment”,based VUV and X-ray free electron lasers”, Appl. Phys. BDesign of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-

  6. Laser trapping of {sup 21}Na atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive {sup 21}Na (t{sub l/2} = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped {sup 21}Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of {sup 21}Na {yields} {sup 21}Ne + {Beta}{sup +} + v{sub e}, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, {sup 21}Na atoms were produced by bombarding {sup 24}Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The {sup 21}Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

  7. Laser beam apparatus and method for analyzing solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staebler, David L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser beam apparatus and method for analyzing, inter alia, the current versus voltage curve at the point of illumination on a solar cell and the open circuit voltage of a solar cell. The apparatus incorporates a lock-in amplifier, and a laser beam light chopper which permits the measurement of the AC current of the solar cell at an applied DC voltage at the position on the solar cell where the cell is illuminated and a feedback scheme which permits the direct scanning measurements of the open circuit voltage. The accuracy of the measurement is a function of the intensity and wavelength of the laser light with respect to the intensity and wavelength distribution of sunlight and the percentage the dark current is at the open circuit voltage to the short circuit current of the solar cell.

  8. Laser beam temporal and spatial tailoring for laser shock processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques are provided for formatting laser pulse spatial shape and for effectively and efficiently delivering the laser energy to a work surface in the laser shock process. An appropriately formatted pulse helps to eliminate breakdown and generate uniform shocks. The invention uses a high power laser technology capable of meeting the laser requirements for a high throughput process, that is, a laser which can treat many square centimeters of surface area per second. The shock process has a broad range of applications, especially in the aerospace industry, where treating parts to reduce or eliminate corrosion failure is very important. The invention may be used for treating metal components to improve strength and corrosion resistance. The invention has a broad range of applications for parts that are currently shot peened and/or require peening by means other than shot peening. Major applications for the invention are in the automotive and aerospace industries for components such as turbine blades, compressor components, gears, etc.

  9. Laser pulse sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, C.

    1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera. 5 figs.

  10. Laser pulse sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles (Fremont, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera.

  11. Fusion pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, D.S.

    1987-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Fusion pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of laser radiation. A tokamak fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The tokamak design provides a temperature and a magnetic field which is effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10.sup.15 neutrons/cm.sup.2.s. A conversion medium receives neutrons from the tokamak and converts the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and an energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. The energy source typically comprises fission fragments, alpha particles, and radiation from a fission event. A lasing medium is provided which is responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion which is effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation.

  13. Laser multiplexing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Steve A. (Tracy, CA); English, Jr., Ronald Edward (Tracy, CA); White, Ronald K. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plurality of copper lasers, as radiant power sources, emits a beam of power carrying radiation. A plurality of fiber injection assemblies receives power from the plurality of copper lasers and injects such power into a plurality of fibers for individually transmitting the received power to a plurality of power-receiving devices. The power-transmitting fibers of the system are so arranged that power is delivered therethrough to each of the power-receiving devices such that, even if a few of the radiant power sources and/or fibers fail, the power supply to any of the power receiving devices will not completely drop to zero but will drop by the same proportionate amount.

  14. Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marjoribanks, Robin S.

    Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra- intense laser pulses S;Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-intense laser pulses S. Fourmaux,1,a metallic foils irradiated by ultra-intense ultra-short laser pulses.8­10 Laser-driven ion beams take

  15. Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    history of laser-plasma accelerators is reviewed. The excitation of plasma waves by ultra-short laser Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator 692220024 #12; Tomography of a laser wakefield accelerator i #12; Tomography of a laser

  16. Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Hayden, Joseph S. (Clarks Summit, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P.sub.2 O.sub.5, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules.

  17. Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules. 7 figs.

  18. Laser fusion neutron source employing compression with short pulse lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sefcik, Joseph A; Wilks, Scott C

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for achieving fusion is provided. The method includes providing laser source that generates a laser beam and a target that includes a capsule embedded in the target and filled with DT gas. The laser beam is directed at the target. The laser beam helps create an electron beam within the target. The electron beam heats the capsule, the DT gas, and the area surrounding the capsule. At a certain point equilibrium is reached. At the equilibrium point, the capsule implodes and generates enough pressure on the DT gas to ignite the DT gas and fuse the DT gas nuclei.

  19. Laser irradiation of carbon nanotube films: Effects and heat dissipation probed by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mialichi, J. R.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Iikawa, F. [Instituto de Fisica 'Gleb Wataghin,' Unicamp, Campinas, 13083-859 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Verissimo, C.; Moshkalev, S. A. [Centro de Componentes Semicondutores, Unicamp, Campinas, 13083-870 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermal properties of thin films formed by single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes submitted to laser irradiation using Raman scattering as a probe of both the tube morphology and the local temperature. The nanotubes were submitted to heating/cooling cycles attaining high laser intensities ({approx}1.4 MW/cm{sup 2}) under vacuum and in the presence of an atmosphere, with and without oxygen. We investigate the heat diffusion of the irradiated nanotubes to their surroundings and the effect of laser annealing on their properties. The presence of oxygen during laser irradiation gives rise to an irreversible increase of the Raman efficiency of the carbon nanotubes and to a remarkable increase of the thermal conductivity of multi-walled films. The second effect can be applied to design thermal conductive channels in devices based on carbon nanotube films using laser beams.

  20. LCLS Laser (in Polish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most powerful now in the world, American X-ray laser LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source), has been working as a research and user facility since 2009. It is further developed to LCLSII machine at the Stanford National Accelerator Laboratory SLAC in Menlo Park CA. In a certain sense, LCLS is a response to the EXFEL machine and a logical extension of LCLS. All these machines are light sources of the fifth generation. EXFELis expected to open user facility in 2016, at a cost of over 1 bil Euro. LCLS II, which design started in 2010, will be operational in 2017. The lasers LCLS, LCLS II and EXFEL use SASE and SEED methods to generate light and are powered by electron liniacs, LCLS by a wrm one, and EXFEL by a cold one. The liniacs have energies approaching 20 GeV, and are around 2 - 3 km in length. EXFEL liniac uses SRF TESLA cavity technology at 1,3GHz. A prototype of EXFEL was FLASH laser. SLAC Laboratory uses effectively over 50 years experience in research, building and exploitation of linear electron acce...

  1. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  2. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  3. Laser Atmospheric Studies with VERITAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. M. Hui; for the VERITAS collaboration

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As a calibrated laser pulse propagates through the atmosphere, the amount of Rayleigh-scattered light arriving at the VERITAS telescopes can be calculated precisely. This technique was originally developed for the absolute calibration of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray fluorescence telescopes but is also applicable to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper, we present two nights of laser data taken with the laser at various distances away from the VERITAS telescopes and compare it to Rayleigh scattering simulations.

  4. Unstable resonator cavity semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salzman, J.; Venkatesan, T.; Lang, R.; Mittelstein, M.; Yariv, A.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GaAs heterostructure lasers with unstable resonator cavities were demonstrated for the first time with both curved mirrors fabricated by etching. Typical output powers of 0.35 W were observed in a stable, highly coherent lateral mode. The laser operated stably in a single longitudinal mode over a large range of injection currents. The external quantum efficiency was 70% of that of a similar laser with both mirror facets cleaved implying good output coupling of the energy from the entire region.

  5. Lateral coupled cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salzman, J.; Lang, R.; Yariv, A.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the fabrication and operation of a lateral coupled cavity semiconductor laser that consists of two phase-locked parallel lasers of different lengths and with separate electrical contacts. Mode selectivity that results from the interaction between the two supermodes is investigated experimentally. Frequency selectivity and tunability are obtained by controlling the current to each laser separately. Highly stable single mode operation is also demonstrated.

  6. Hybrid fiber-rod laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Messerly, Michael J.; Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Single, or near single transverse mode waveguide definition is produced using a single homogeneous medium to transport both the pump excitation light and generated laser light. By properly configuring the pump deposition and resulting thermal power generation in the waveguide device, a thermal focusing power is established that supports perturbation-stable guided wave propagation of an appropriately configured single or near single transverse mode laser beam and/or laser pulse.

  7. Progress on laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several laser plasma accelerator schemes are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA). Theory indicates that a very high acceleration gradient, of order 1 GeV/m, can exist in the plasma wave driven by the beating lasers. Experimental results obtained on the PBWA experiment at UCLA confirms this. Parameters related to the PBWA as an accelerator system are derived, among them issues concerning the efficiency and the laser power and energy requirements are discussed.

  8. 199/07/Tuesday 17h37Oasis, The Online Abstract Submission System Page 1 sur 2https://www.abstractsonline.com/submit/SubmitPrinterFriendly...%7D&MKey=%7B66F0352A%2D30DC%2D4B9F%2DB0CC%2DE851495B78DC%7D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demoulin, Pascal

    199/07/Tuesday 17h37Oasis, The Online Abstract Submission System Page 1 sur 2https):  Oral Preferred Additional Information (Complete): Status: Complete #12;199/07/Tuesday 17h37Oasis://www.abstractsonline.com/submit/SubmitPrinterFriendly...%7D&MKey=%7B66F0352A%2D30DC%2D4B9F%2DB0CC%2DE851495B78DC%7D Washington, DC 20009 Powered by OASIS

  9. Applying to Teacher Education Program at Purdue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Drasin

    2012-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Apply to the Teacher Education Program (TEP). Please remember to apply to the TEP(Gate A) if you wish to officially enroll in the. Professional Education ...

  10. Fluid dynamic issues in continuous wave short wavelength chemical lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikatarian, R.R.; Jumper, E.J.; Woolhiser, C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses fluid dynamic issues of concern in the design and development of Continuous Wave (CW) Short Wavelength Chemical Lasers (SWCLs). Short Wavelength Chemical Laser technology is in its research stage and SWCL concepts are in their evolving mode. Researchers are presently addressing candidate chemical systems and activation concepts. Since these lasers will be flowing systems, it is necessary to discuss both the probable fluid dynamics issues, because of the inherent complexities fluid dynamicist can support this activity. In addition to addressing the SWCL fluid dynamic issues, this paper will review past fluid dynamic activities in high energy lasers and discuss additional research still required. This paper will also address the various levels of fluid dynamic modeling and how these models can be applied in studying the fluid dynamics of Short Wavelength Chemical Lasers. Where it is felt that specific fluid methodologies are not available, but are required in order to conduct specific analyses, they will be defined. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Applied Materials | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources JumpAnaconda,Anza ElectricInc Jump to:Applied

  12. Single-exciton nanocrystal laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Ivanov, Sergei A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system employing amplification via a single exciton regime and to optical gain media having single exciton amplification is provided.

  13. Coherent instabilities in random lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreasen, Jonathan; Sebbah, Patrick; Vanneste, Christian [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, CNRS UMR 6622, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, F-06108, Nice Cedex 02 (France)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical study is presented of random lasers as a function of the pumping rate above the threshold for lasing. Depending on the leakiness of the system resonances, which is typically larger in random lasers compared to conventional lasers, we observe that the stationary lasing regime becomes unstable above a second threshold. Coherent instabilities are observed as self pulsation at a single frequency of the output intensity, population inversion, as well as the atomic polarization. We find these Rabi oscillations have the same frequency everywhere in the random laser despite the fact that the field intensity strongly depends on the spatial location.

  14. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruhn, Charles R. (Martinez, CA); Hammond, Robert B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  15. Femtosecond laser-assisted lamellar keratoplasty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soong, Hunson Kaz; Malta, João Baptista Nigro Santiago; Mian, Shahzad Ihsan; Juhasz, Tibor

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    601-6 606 Femtosecond laser-assisted lamellar keratoplastyRN, Suarez C, Juhasz T, Kurtz R. Femtose- cond laser flapcreation for laser in situ keratomileusis: six-month follow-

  16. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability. 6 figs.

  17. Isochronous Beamlines for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berz, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the los alamos free- electron laser. IEEE Journal of1: A schematic layout of a free electron laser. Figure 2: ABeamIines for Free Electron Lasers M. Berz July 1990

  18. Hole Coupling Resonator for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a Highly Stable Infrared Free Electron Laser at LBL", theseTwelfth International Free Electron Laser Conference, Paris,Coupling Resonator for Free Electron Lasers M. Xie and K. -

  19. Metal Photocathodes for Free Electron Laser Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greaves, Corin Michael Ricardo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an Undulator of a Free Electron Laser. Electrons tra- verseand et al. “X-ray free-electron lasers”. In: Journal ofiii List of Tables iv 1 The Free Electron Laser (FEL)

  20. Unveiling temporal correlations characteristic to phase transition in the intensity of a fibre laser radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andres Aragoneses; Laura Carpi; Nikita Tarasov; Dmitry V. Churkin; M. C. Torrent; Cristina Masoller; Sergei K. Turitsyn

    2015-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We use advanced statistical tools of time-series analysis to characterize the dynamical complexity of the transition to optical wave turbulence in a fibre laser. Ordinal analysis and the horizontal visibility graph applied to the experimentally measured laser output intensity reveal the presence of temporal correlations during the transition from the laminar to the turbulent lasing regimes. Both methods unveil coherent structures with well defined time-scales and strong correlations both, in the timing of the laser pulses and in their peak intensities. Our approach is generic and may be used in other complex systems that undergo similar transitions involving the generation of extreme fluctuations.

  1. Performance of volume phase gratings manufactured using ultrafast laser inscription

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, David; Cunningham, Colin R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast laser inscription (ULI) is a rapidly maturing technique which uses focused ultrashort laser pulses to locally modify the refractive index of dielectric materials in three-dimensions (3D). Recently, ULI has been applied to the fabrication of astrophotonic devices such as integrated beam combiners, 3D integrated waveguide fan-outs and multimode-to-single mode convertors (photonic lanterns). Here, we outline our work on applying ULI to the fabrication of volume phase gratings (VPGs) in fused silica and gallium lanthanum sulphide (GLS) glasses. The VPGs we fabricated had a spatial frequency of 333 lines/mm. The optimum fused silica grating was found to exhibit a first order diffraction efficiency of 40 % at 633 nm, but exhibited approximately 40 % integrated scattered light. The optimum GLS grating was found to exhibit a first order diffraction efficiency of 71 % at 633 nm and less than 5 % integrated scattered light. Importantly for future astronomy applications, both gratings survived cooling to 20 K....

  2. Laser-induced nonresonant nuclear excitation in muonic atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Shahbaz; C. Müller; T. J. Buervenich; C. H. Keitel

    2008-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent nuclear excitation in strongly laser-driven muonic atoms is calculated. The nuclear transition is caused by the time-dependent Coulomb field of the oscillating charge density of the bound muon. A closed-form analytical expression for electric multipole transitions is derived and applied to various isotopes; the excitation probabilities are in general very small. We compare the process with other nuclear excitation mechanisms through coupling with atomic shells and discuss the prospects to observe it in experiment.

  3. Laser isotope separation of erbium and other isotopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynam, Christopher A. (3035 Ferdale Ct., Pleasanton, CA 94566); Worden, Earl F. (117 Vereda del Ciervo, Diablo, CA 94528)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser isotope separation is accomplished using at least two photoionization pathways of an isotope simultaneously, where each pathway comprises two or more transition steps. This separation method has been applied to the selective photoionization of erbium isotopes, particularly for the enrichment of .sup.167 Er. The hyperfine structure of .sup.167 Er was used to find two three-step photoionization pathways having a common upper energy level.

  4. Development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavez, Isaac; Huang Rongxin; Henderson, Kevin; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig; Raizen, Mark G. [Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector. The detector uses a fiber-optic bundle that spatially splits the incident beam, followed by a fast balanced photodetector. The detector is applied to the study of Brownian motion of particles on fast time scales with 1 A spatial resolution. Future applications include the study of molecule motors, protein folding, as well as cellular processes.

  5. Laser isotope separation of erbium and other isotopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynam, C.A.; Worden, E.F.

    1995-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser isotope separation is accomplished using at least two photoionization pathways of an isotope simultaneously, where each pathway comprises two or more transition steps. This separation method has been applied to the selective photoionization of erbium isotopes, particularly for the enrichment of {sup 167}Er. The hyperfine structure of {sup 167}Er was used to find two three-step photoionization pathways having a common upper energy level. 3 figs.

  6. Fast diagnostics of laser ablation used for pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geohegan, D B

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanisms of the laser ablation process for pulsed laser deposition thin film growth will be discussed by describing results from several implementable in situ diagnostic techniques, including gated ICCD photography, optical emission and absorption spectroscopy, ion probes and gate photon counting.

  7. aluminium laser ablation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiation, FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) provides ultra-intense femtosecond radiation and laser optics: UV, XUV, and X-ray lasers; (140.2600) Lasers and laser optics:...

  8. Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Advanced diagnostics of experiments covering many orders of magnitude in strain...

  9. Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    laser spark from a single low power pulse. The system has ap- plications in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives, and laser induced...

  10. Ytterbium-doped borate fluoride laser crystals and lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffers, Kathleen I. (Pleasanton, CA); DeLoach, Laura D. (Manteca, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Keszler, Douglas A. (Corvallis, OK)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed from Yb-doped borate fluoride host crystals. The general formula for the host crystals is MM'(BO.sub.3)F, where M, M' are monovalent, divalent aria trivalent metal cations. A particular embodiment of the invention is Yb-doped BaCaBO.sub.3 F (Yb:BCBF). BCBF and some of the related derivative crystals are capable of nonlinear frequency conversion, whereby the fundamental of the laser is converted to a longer or shorter wavelength. In this way, these new crystals can simultaneously serve as self-frequency doubling crystals and laser materials within the laser resonator.

  11. Ytterbium-doped borate fluoride laser crystals and lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffers, K.I.; DeLoach, L.D.; Payne, S.A.; Keszler, D.A.

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed from Yb-doped borate fluoride host crystals. The general formula for the host crystals is MM{prime}(BO{sub 3})F, where M, M{prime} are monovalent, divalent aria trivalent metal cations. A particular embodiment of the invention is Yb-doped BaCaBO{sub 3}F (Yb:BCBF). BCBF and some of the related derivative crystals are capable of nonlinear frequency conversion, whereby the fundamental of the laser is converted to a longer or shorter wavelength. In this way, these new crystals can simultaneously serve as self-frequency doubling crystals and laser materials within the laser resonator. 6 figs.

  12. Article Tools Printer-friendly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    University, Industry & Government Research Facilities Design Posted: November 20, 2008 Electronics that twist be stretched in one direction without altering its electrical properties; the results were published

  13. Article Tools Printer-friendly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    5th, 2012 Using UV light to write on a DNA information-storage device Posted: Jan 5th, 2012 Graphene nanostructures Posted: Jan 6th, 2012 nanoCAGE reveals transcriptional landscape of the mouse main olfactory-dimensional view of 1-dimensional nanostructures (Nanowerk News) Just 100 nanometers in diameter, nanowires

  14. Article Tools Printer-friendly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    disease detection combines Nature's diagnostic tools with nanotechnology and electronics Posted: Nov 7th nanomaterials design and production Posted: Nov 6th, 2008 New research fuels continued growth of San Diego Clean-Tech cluster Posted: Nov 6th, 2008 Tiny solar cells power carbon nanotube sensor Posted: Nov 6th, 2008 Thailand

  15. Article Tools Printer-friendly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Nanoscale 'stealth' probe slides into cell walls seamlessly Posted: Apr 1st, 2010 UAlbany Nano, materials scientists, and bioengineers have created and tested a new type of implantable device

  16. Article Tools Printer-friendly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    th, 2010 Hot embossing glass - to the nearest micrometer Posted: Dec 15th, 2010 BUND erstellt its own energy Posted: Dec 14th, 2010 Syntactic and Composite Foams III Conference Posted: Dec 14th

  17. printer_friendly_org_chart

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total per Square

  18. Towards Real Time Diagnostics of Hybrid Welding Laser/GMAW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Mcjunkin; Dennis C. Kunerth; Corrie Nichol; Evgueni Todorov; Steve Levesque; Feng Yu; Robert Danna Couch

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  19. Towards real time diagnostics of Hybrid Welding Laser/GMAW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McJunkin, T. R.; Kunerth, D. C.; Nichol, C. I. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3570 (United States); Todorov, E.; Levesque, S. [Edison Welding Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  20. Approaching attometer laser vibrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rembe, Christian; Kadner, Lisa; Giesen, Moritz [Research and Development, Polytec GmbH, Polytec Platz 1-7, 76337 Waldbronn (Germany)

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The heterodyne two-beam interferometer has been proven to be the optimal solution for laser-Doppler vibrometry regarding accuracy and signal robustness. The theoretical resolution limit for a two-beam interferometer of laser class 3R (up to 5 mW visible measurement-light) is in the regime of a few femtometer per square-root Hertz and well suited to study vibrations in microstructures. However, some new applications of RF-MEM resonators, nanostructures, and surface-nano-defect detection require resolutions beyond that limit. The resolution depends only on the noise and the sensor sensitivity to specimen displacements. The noise is already defined in nowadays systems by the quantum nature of light for a properly designed optical sensor and more light would lead to an inacceptable influence like heating of a very tiny structure. Thus, noise can only be improved by squeezed-light techniques which require a negligible loss of measurement light which is impossible for almost all technical measurement tasks. Thus, improving the sensitivity is the only possible path which could make attometer laser vibrometry possible. Decreasing the measurement wavelength would increase the sensitivity but would also increase the photon shot noise. In this paper, we discuss an approach to increase the sensitivity by assembling an additional mirror between interferometer and specimen to form an optical cavity. A detailed theoretical analysis of this setup is presented and we derive the resolution limit, discuss the main contributions to the uncertainty budget, and show a first experiment proving the sensitivity amplification of our approach.

  1. Drive laser system for the DC-SRF photoinjector at Peking University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhiwen; Lin, Lin; Zhao, Gang; Quan, Shengwen; Liu, Kexin; Chen, Jiaer

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoinjectors are widely used for linear accelerators as electron sources to generate high-brightness electron beam. Drive laser, which determines the timing structure and quality of the electron beam, is a crucial device of photoinjector. A new drive laser system has been designed and constructed for the upgraded 3.5-cell DC-SRF photoinjector at Peking University. The drive laser system consists of a 1064 nm laser oscillator, a four- stage amplifier, the second and fourth harmonic generators, the optical system to transfer the UV pulses to the photocathode, and the synchronization system. The drive laser system has been successfully applied in the stable operation of DC-SRF photoinjector and its performance meets the requirements. 266 nm laser with an average power close to 1W can be delivered to illuminate the Cs2Te photocathode and the instability is less than 5% for long time operation. The design consideration for improving the UV laser quality, a detailed description of laser system, and its performanc...

  2. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, J.P.; Craft, D.C.

    1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity is disclosed. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction. 21 figs.

  3. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials CenterTechnologies |Technologies |Jupiter Laser

  4. Laser Plasma Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratoryRowlandRevolutionizing theLaser

  5. Tilted-mirror semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salzman, J.; Lang, R.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad-area GaAs heterostructure lasers with a tilted mirror were demonstrated for the first time, with the tilted mirror fabricated by etching. These lasers operate in a smooth and stable single lateral mode with a high degree of spatial coherence. The suppression of filamentation manifests itself in a high degree of reproducibility in the near-field pattern.

  6. Engineering Light: Quantum Cascade Lasers

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Claire Gmachl

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum cascade lasers are ideal for environmental sensing and medical diagnostic applications. Gmachl discusses how these lasers work, and their applications, including their use as chemical trace gas sensors. As examples of these applications, she briefly presents results from her field campaign at the Beijing Olympics, and ongoing campaigns in Texas, Maryland, and Ghana.

  7. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a requirement for 1 each Selective Laser Sintering 3D Printer System P/N: 1201-7001 includes: 1 each Laser to this date you will not be able to access this solicitation. Selective Laser Sintering 3D Printer System

  8. Fiber laser development for LISA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Numata; Jeffrey R. Chen; Jordan Camp

    2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a linearly-polarized Ytterbium-doped fiber ring laser with single longitudinal-mode output at 1064nm for LISA and other space applications. Single longitudinal-mode selection was achieved by using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP). The FFP also serves as a frequency-reference within our ring laser. Our laser exhibits comparable low frequency and intensity noise to Non-Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO). By using a fiber-coupled phase modulator as a frequency actuator, the laser frequency can be electro-optically tuned at a rate of 100kHz. It appears that our fiber ring laser is promising for space applications where robustness of fiber optics is desirable.

  9. Laser fusion experiments at LLL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1980-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLL. Two other chapters, one authored by K.A. Brueckner and the other by C. Max, present the theoretical implosion physics and laser plasma interaction physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first is an introductory section which provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

  10. Laser program annual report 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the 1983 Laser Program Annual Report we present the accomplishments and unclassified activities of the Laser Program at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the year 1983. It should be noted that the report, of necessity, is a summary, and more detailed expositions of the research can be found in the many publications and reports authored by staff members in the Laser Program. The purpose of this report is to present our work in a brief form, but with sufficient depth to provide an overview of the analytical and experimental aspects of the LLNL Inertial-Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. The format of this report is basically the same as that of previous years. Section 1 is an overview and highlights the important accomplishments and directions of the Program. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various major parts of the Program: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Fusion Experiments, Laser Research and Development, and Energy Applications.

  11. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  12. Polarization methods for diode laser excitation of solid state lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holtom, Gary R. (Richland, WA)

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. A Yb-doped gain medium can be used that absorbs light having a first polarization and emits light having a second polarization. Using such pumping with laser cavity dispersion control, pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved.

  13. Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirthlin, Michael J.

    Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to detect and avoid obstacles. Principle Investigators: Randy Beard, Tim McLain Laser Range Finder Opti-Logic RS400 Laser path, laser detects object. 2. Upon detection, insert cylindrical object into world map and plan path

  14. High energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in inter- action processes of short and ultra-short laser pulses with matter. Ion generation from laserHigh energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from the NHELIX laser system at GSI G. SCHAUMANN,1 M.S. SCHOLLMEIER,1 G. RODRIGUEZ-PRIETO,2 A. BLAZEVIC,2 E

  15. LASER SAFETY POLICY MANUAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    LASER SAFETY POLICY MANUAL ISSUED BY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY OFFICE OF RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY and GEORGIA TECH LASER SAFETY COMMITTEE July 1, 2010 Revised July 31, 2012 #12;Laser Safety Program 1-1 #12;Laser Safety Policy Manual TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. POLICY AND SCOPE

  16. LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1 Rice University Laser Safety Manual Environmental Health and Safety MS 123 P.O. Box 1892 Houston, TX 77251-1892 January 2014 #12;LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 2 Introduction The objective of the Rice University Laser Safety program is to assist all levels

  17. Laser Centre Vrije Universiteit visitors guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fall 2005 Laser Centre Vrije Universiteit visitors guide #12;Laser Centre Vrije Universiteit De.de.Gijsel@few.vu.nl Website: www.nat.vu.nl/~laser Printing: Drukkerij Ponsen en Looijen, Wageningen © LCVU, Amsterdam great pleasure to present you the Visitors Guide 2005 of the Laser Centre Vrije Universiteit (LCVU

  18. LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2012 RICE UNIVERSITY 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2012 RICE UNIVERSITY 1 Rice University Laser Safety Manual Environmental Health and Safety MS 123 P.O. Box 1892 Houston, TX 77251-1892 December 2012 #12;LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2012 RICE, and general procedures to aid those individuals working in the laser laboratory environment. It is intended

  19. Laser Worker Registration Form (LWRF) Surname: Forenames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    ABCDEFGHI Laser Worker Registration Form (LWRF) Surname: Forenames: School of: Ext No.: Email YY Class of Laser to be Used 1 1M 1E 2 2M 3R 3B 4 Work Location(s) Lab No. Laser Work Currently Undertaken Elsewhere Are you currently engaged in work elsewhere involving laser radiation? YES

  20. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  1. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milner, J.R.

    1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall temperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser. 8 figs.

  2. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  3. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  4. A Roadmap to Laser Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the radioactive environment, for easier maintenance. · No ultra-high vacuum or superconducting magnets. LaserA Roadmap to Laser Fusion Energy Stephen E. Bodner Retired (former head of the NRL laser fusion Energy Systems January 30, 2011 #12;In 1971-1972 LLNL announced that they had an idea for laser fusion

  5. Tuning The Laser Heater Undulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Zackary

    2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser heater undulator for the LCLS requires different tuning techniques than the main undulators. It is a pure permanent magnet (PPM) undulator, rather than the hybrid design of the main undulators. The PPM design allows analytic calculation of the undulator fields. The calculations let errors be introduced and correction techniques be derived. This note describes how the undulator was modelled, and the methods which were found to correct potential errors in the undulator. The laser heater undulator for the LCLS is a pure permanent magnet device requiring different tuning techniques than the main undulators. In this note, the laser heater undulator is modelled and tuning techniques to compensate various errors are derived.

  6. Laser-assisted nuclear photoeffect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anis Dadi; Carsten Müller

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton emission from nuclei via the nuclear photoeffect in the combined electromagnetic fields of a gamma-ray photon and an intense laser wave is studied. An S-matrix approach to the process is developed by utilizing methods known from the theory of nonperturbative laser-atom interactions. As a specific example, photo-proton ejection from halo nuclei is considered. We show that, due to the presence of the laser field, rich sideband structures arise in the photo-proton energy spectra. Their dependence on the parameters and relative orientation of the photon fields is discussed.

  7. Wick for metal vapor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, David B. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved wick for a metal vapor laser is made of a refractory metal cylinder, preferably molybdenum or tungsten for a copper laser, which provides the wicking surface. Alternately, the inside surface of the ceramic laser tube can be metalized to form the wicking surface. Capillary action is enhanced by using wire screen, porous foam metal, or grooved surfaces. Graphite or carbon, in the form of chunks, strips, fibers or particles, is placed on the inside surface of the wick to reduce water, reduce metal oxides and form metal carbides.

  8. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brannon, Paul J. (Albuquerque, NM); Cowgill, Donald F. (Danville, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable.

  9. Circular free-electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM); Cooper, Richard K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high efficiency, free electron laser utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

  10. Protective laser beam viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, George R.; Jordan, Kevin Carl

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A protective laser beam viewing system or device including a camera selectively sensitive to laser light wavelengths and a viewing screen receiving images from the laser sensitive camera. According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the camera is worn on the head of the user or incorporated into a goggle-type viewing display so that it is always aimed at the area of viewing interest to the user and the viewing screen is incorporated into a video display worn as goggles over the eyes of the user.

  11. Laser Noise Reduction in Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Bejot; Jerome Kasparian; Estelle Salmon; Roland Ackermann; Nicolas Gisin; Jean-Pierre Wolf

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluctuations of the white-light supercontinuum produced by ultrashort laser pulses in selfguided filaments (spatio-temporal solitons) in air are investigated. We demonstrate that correlations exist within the white-light supercontinuum, and that they can be used to significantly reduce the laser intensity noise by filtering the spectrum. More precisely, the fundamental wavelength is anticorrelated with the wings of the continuum, while conjugated wavelength pairs on both sides of the continuum are strongly correlated. Spectral filtering of the continuum reduces the laser intensity noise by 1.2 dB, showing that fluctuations are rejected to the edges of the spectrum.

  12. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  13. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  14. Laser-Based Nondestructive Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sandLaserLaserSecurityLaser

  15. High-performance laser processing using manipulated ultrafast laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugioka, Koji; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan; Hanada, Yasutaka; Midorikawa, Katsumi [RIKEN - Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); RIKEN - Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ manipulated ultrafast laser pulses to realize microprocessing with high-performance. Efficient microwelding of glass substrates by irradiation by a double-pulse train of ultrafast laser pulses is demonstrated. The bonding strength of two photostructurable glass substrates welded by double-pulse irradiation was evaluated to be 22.9 MPa, which is approximately 22% greater than that of a sample prepared by conventional irradiation by a single pulse train. Additionally, the fabrication of hollow microfluidic channels with a circular cross-sectional shape embedded in fused silica is realized by spatiotemporally focusing the ultrafast laser beam. We show both theoretically and experimentally that the spatiotemporal focusing of ultrafast laser beam allows for the creation of a three-dimensionally symmetric spherical peak intensity distribution at the focal spot.

  16. Laser photon merging in proton-laser collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Di Piazza; K. Z. Hatsagortsyan; C. H. Keitel

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum electrodynamical vacuum polarization effects arising in the collision of a high-energy proton beam and a strong, linearly polarized laser field are investigated. The probability that laser photons merge into one photon by interacting with the proton`s electromagnetic field is calculated taking into account the laser field exactly. Asymptotics of the probability are then derived according to different experimental setups suitable for detecting perturbative and nonperturbative vacuum polarization effects. The experimentally most feasible setup involves the use of a strong optical laser field. It is shown that in this case measurements of the polarization of the outgoing photon and and of its angular distribution provide promising tools to detect these effects for the first time.

  17. How to Apply for the ENERGY STAR®

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join us to learn about applying for ENERGY STAR Certification in Portfolio Manager. Understand the value of the ENERGY STAR certification, see the step-by-step process of applying, and gain tips to...

  18. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R. (Livermore, CA); Feeman, James F. (Wyomissing, PA); Field, George F. (Santa Ana, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula I are provided ##STR1## wherein R.sup.1 and R.sup.4 are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R.sup.1 -R.sup.2 or R.sup.2 -R.sup.4 form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R.sup.2 is hydrogen or joined with R.sup.1 or R.sup.4 as described above; R.sup.3 is --(CH.sub.2).sub.m --SO.sub.3.sup.-, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or ##STR2## where Y is 2 --SO.sub.3.sup.- ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO.sub.3.sup.-. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  19. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, P.R.; Feeman, J.F.; Field, G.F.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula 1 are provided by the formula described in the paper wherein R{sup 1} and R{sup 4} are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R{sup 1}--R{sup 2} or R{sup 2}--R{sup 4} form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R{sup 2} is hydrogen or joined with R{sup 1} or R{sup 4} as described above; R{sup 3} is --(CH{sub 2}){sub m}--SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or formula 2 given in paper where Y is 2 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  20. High-speed Laser Micromachining with Copper Bromide Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balchev, I I; Minkovski, N I; Sabotinov, N V; Balchev, Ivaylo I.; Kostadinov, Ivan K.; Minkovski, Nikolai I.; Sabotinov, Nikola V.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the copper bromide (CuBr) laser as an attractive tool in the micro-machining of different materials has been demonstrated. High-quality drilling by trepanning and precision cutting was established on several materials with a negligible heat-affected zone (HAZ). That good performance was a result of the combination of high power visible radiation, short pulses, and close to the diffraction-limited laser beam quality with high-speed galvo scanner beam steering.

  1. SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCES THE POSITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tchumper, Gregory S.

    DEAN SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCES THE POSITION The University of Mississippi (www.olemiss.edu) seeks applications and nominations for the position of Dean of the School of Applied Sciences. The School of Applied Sciences is a free-standing academic unit whose Dean reports directly to the Vice

  2. Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohner, Martin

    Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics Most downloaded articles January - August 2004 1: a survey Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 141 (2002) 1-26 2. M. Z. Liu, M. H. Song and Z([t])*1 Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 166 (2004) 361-370 3. S. Kutluay, A. Esen and I

  3. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kA are generated. The ultra-short laser-plasma acceleratedfree-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-For the ultra-high currents of the laser plasma accelerated

  4. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fastto the laser driver, making such a source ideal for ultra-

  5. Optical emission in magnetically confined laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, X. K.; Lu, Y. F.; Gebre, T.; Ling, H.; Han, Y. X. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0511 (United States)

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetically confined laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was investigated by studying the optical emission from laser-induced plasma plumes expanding across an external transverse magnetic field. KrF excimer laser pulses with a pulse duration of 23 ns and a wavelength of 248 nm were used to produce plasmas from Al, Cu, and Co targets. Various optical emission lines obtained from Al and Cu targets show an obvious enhancement in the intensity of optical emission when a magnetic field of {approx}0.8 T is applied, while the optical emission lines from Co targets show a decrease in the optical emission intensity. The enhancement factors of optical emission lines were measured to be around 2 for the Al and Mn (impurity) lines from Al targets, and 6-8 for Cu lines from Cu targets. Temporal evolution of the optical emission lines from the Al samples shows a maximum enhancement in emission intensity at time delays of 8-20 {mu}s after the incident laser pulse, while from the Cu targets it shows a continuous enhancement at time delays of 3-20 {mu}s after the pulse. The enhancement in the optical emission from the Al and Cu plasmas was presumably due to the increase in the effective plasma density as a result of magnetic confinement. The decrease in the emission intensity from the Co plasmas was suggested to be due to the decrease of effective plasma density as a result of the magnetic force.

  6. Laser Programs, the first 25 years, 1972-1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, E.M.

    1998-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Welcome to Laser Programs. I am pleased that you can share in the excitement of 25 years of history since we began as a small program of 125 people to our current status as a world premier laser and applied science research team of over 1700 members. It is fitting that this program, which was founded on the dream of developing inertial confinement fusion technology, should celebrate this anniversary the same year that the ground is broken for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Also at the same time, we are feeling the excitement of moving forward the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) technology toward private sector use and developing many alternate scientific applications and technologies derived from our core programs. It is through the hard work of many dedicated scientists, engineers, technicians, and administrative team members that we have been able to accomplish the remarkable internationally recognized achievements highlighted here. I hope this brochure will help you enjoy the opportunity to share in the celebration and pride of our scientific accomplishments; state-of-the-art facilities; and diligent, dedicated people that together make our Laser Programs and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory the best in the world.

  7. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Daehak-ro 291, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701) (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  8. LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED ?? COLLIDERS ? C. B.linear col- lider based on laser-plasma-accelerators arediscussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-

  9. Laser Assisted Direct Local Synthesis of Semiconducting Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RYU, SANG GIL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrically driven lasers," Nature 421 (6920), 241-245 (Hsu, A. Bushmaker et al. , "Laser Directed Growth of Carbon-al. , "Scanning focused laser activation of carbon nanotube

  10. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of high- gradient, laser plasma particle accelerators.accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. Theseleft) showing the laser (red), plasma wake density (purple-

  11. Short Wavelength Seeding through Compression for Fee Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tunable short wavelength free electron lasers (FELs) providereduces the laser power needed for the generation of shortbetween the laser ?eld and the electron beam inside a short

  12. Methodology for assessing coastal change using terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Michael James

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for terrestrial laser scanning of long cliff sections inPress). Terrestrial laser scanning based structural damageresolution 3d laser scanning to slope stability studies. ”

  13. Achromatic and Isochronous Electron Beam Transport for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengtsson, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beamlines for Free Electron Lasers," LBL-28880 Preprint (Thirteenth mtemational Free Electron Laser Conference, SantaTransport for Tunable Free Electron Lasers 1. Bengtsson and

  14. STELLA-II Experiment Update on Monoenergetic Laser Acceleration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    during Staged Electron Laser Acceleration (STELLA) Experiment* - Used inverse free electron laser (IFEL) as laser acceleration mechanism - IFEL buncher (IFEL1) creates...

  15. Three Dimensioanl Free Electron Laser Dispersion Relation Including Betatron Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Y.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-Dimensional Free Electron Laser Dispersion RelationInternational Free Electron Laser Conference, Santa Fe, NM,International Free Electron Laser Conference, held in Santa

  16. Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795 nm rubidium laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Sheldon Shao Quan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal management in high power solid state lasers usuallyelectrically powered high power solid state lasers with verylight down the cell. In power-scaled solid state lasers, the

  17. Femtosecond laser processing of photovoltaic and transparent materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Sanghoon

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and  picosecond  laser  drilling  of  metals  at  high  et   al.   Femtosecond   laser   drilling   of   alumina  ultrashort  pulse  laser  drilling.  Optics  Express.  2010;

  18. Enhanced vbasis laser diode package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deri, Robert J.; Chen, Diana; Bayramian, Andy; Freitas, Barry; Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A substrate having an upper surface and a lower surface is provided. The substrate includes a plurality of v-grooves formed in the upper surface. Each v-groove includes a first side and a second side perpendicular to the first side. A laser diode bar assembly is disposed within each of the v-grooves and attached to the first side. The laser diode bar assembly includes a first adhesion layer disposed on the first side of the v-groove, a metal plate attached to the first adhesion layer, a second adhesion layer disposed over the metal plate, and a laser diode bar attached to the second adhesion layer. The laser diode bar has a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) substantially similar to that of the metal plate.

  19. Laser sealed vacuum insulation window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the glass panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  20. The beauty of laser lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sue-Mie

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A line, the simplest way to express an artist's feelings or interpretation of an object, has its own emotions that an artist can employ for her purpose. Laser light, the most self-concentrated, self-sustained and directed, ...

  1. Laser sealed vacuum insulating window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1985-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the galss panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  2. High repetition rate fiber lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jian, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reports work in high repetition rate femtosecond fiber lasers. Driven by the applications including optical arbitrary waveform generation, high speed optical sampling, frequency metrology, and timing and frequency ...

  3. Electron beam transport in gas-loaded free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yariv, S.; Friedland, L. (Center for Plasma Physics, Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel (IL))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of the presence of helical wiggler and axial guide magnetic fields on the quality of the electron beam in a gas-loaded free-electron laser are investigated. The electron velocity space diffusion theory in the free-electron laser is developed and tested in Monte Carlo simulations. The theory is applied in estimating the collisional limitations on the interaction length of the laser. It is shown that two competing effects related to collisions cause the gain loss in gas-loaded free-electron lasers, i.e., (a) the growing phase mismatch between the electrons and the wave and (b) the destruction of the coherent transverse helical beam motion. The second effect dominates in the absence of the guide field, provided the wiggler field strength is sufficiently small.

  4. Metallic nanoparticles grown in the core of femtosecond laser micromachined waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almeida, J. M. P.; Ferreira, P. H. D.; Mendonça, C. R., E-mail: crmendon@ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo—USP, CP 369, São Carlos, Sao Paulo 13560-970 Brazil (Brazil); Manzani, D.; Napoli, M.; Ribeiro, S. J. L. [Institute of Chemistry—São Paulo State University—UNESP, CP 355, Araraquara, Sao Paulo 14801-970 (Brazil)

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    3D-waveguides containing silver nanoparticles have been fabricated in tungsten lead–pyrophosphate glass by femtosecond laser micromachining. Nucleation and growth of nanoparticles occur in a single step process when high repetition rate laser (MHz) is employed, while an additional annealing is required for the irradiation using kHz laser system. The presence of nanoparticles locally changes the refractive index, and, therefore, the elliptical structures produced by direct laser writing were able to guide light. By increasing the pulse energy applied during the micromachining, the waveguide size increased from 2 to 30??m, while their propagation loss decrease from 1.4 to 0.5?dB/mm at 632.8?nm.

  5. Laser pulse propagation in inhomogeneous magnetoplasma channels and wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, B. S., E-mail: bs-phy@yahoo.com; Jain, Archana [Government College Kota, Kota 324001 (India)] [Government College Kota, Kota 324001 (India); Jaiman, N. K. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, University of Kota, Kota 324010 (India)] [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, University of Kota, Kota 324010 (India); Gupta, D. N. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)] [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Jang, D. G.; Suk, H. [Department of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kulagin, V. V. [Sternberg Astronomical Institute of Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)] [Sternberg Astronomical Institute of Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Wakefield excitation in a preformed inhomogeneous parabolic plasma channel by an intense relativistic (?10{sup 19}?W/cm{sup 2}) circularly polarized Gaussian laser pulse is investigated analytically and numerically in the presence of an external longitudinal magnetic field. A three dimensional envelope equation for the evolution of the laser pulse is derived, which includes the effect of the nonparaxial and applied external magnetic field. A relation for the channel radius with the laser spot size is derived and examines numerically to see the external magnetic field effect. It is observed that the channel radius depends on the applied external magnetic field. An analytical expression for the wakefield is derived and validated with the help of a two dimensional particle in cell (2D PIC) simulation code. It is shown that the electromagnetic nature of the wakes in an inhomogeneous plasma channel makes their excitation nonlocal, which results in change of fields with time and external magnetic field due to phase mixing of the plasma oscillations with spatially varying frequencies. The magnetic field effect on perturbation of the plasma density and decreasing length is also analyzed numerically. In addition, it has been shown that the electron energy gain in the inhomogeneous parabolic magnetoplasma channel can be increased significantly compared with the homogeneous plasma channel.

  6. X-ray laser system, x-ray laser and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    London, Richard A. (Oakland, CA); Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA); Strauss, Moshe (Omer, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an x-ray laser system comprising a laser containing generating means for emitting short wave length radiation, and means external to said laser for energizing said generating means, wherein when the laser is in an operative mode emitting radiation, the radiation has a transverse coherence length to width ratio of from about 0.05 to 1. Also disclosed is a method of adjusting the parameters of the laser to achieve the desired coherence length to laser width ratio.

  7. Laser program annual report, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, L.W.; Krupke, W.F.; Strack, J.R. (eds.) [eds.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 3 is comprised of three sections, beginning with Section 8 on Advanced Lasers. Both theoretical and experimental research and development activities on advanced laser systems are presented here. Section 9 contains the results of studies in areas of energy and military applications, including those relating to electrical energy production by inertial confinement fusion systems. Finally, Section 10 presents results from selected activities in the Advanced Isotope Separation Program.

  8. Laser program annual report, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, L.W.; Krupke, W.F.; Strack, J.R. (eds.)

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 1 provides a Program Overview, presenting highlights of the technical accomplishments of the elements of the Program, a summary of activities carried out under the Glass Laser Experiments Lead Laboratory Program, as well as discussions of Program resources and facilities. Section 2, also in the first volume, covers the work on solid state Nd:glass lasers, including systems operations, Nova and Novette system development, and supporting research and development activities.

  9. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  10. applied sciences branch: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Master of Science Program in Applied Science Education Department 3 & APPLIED SCIENCE SPLIKER ENGINEERING Biotechnology Websites Summary: & APPLIED SCIENCE SPLIKER...

  11. Laser Micromachining and Information Discovery Using a Dual Beam Interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senthil P. Theppakuttaikomaraswamy

    2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Lasers have proven to be among the most promising tools for micromachining because they can process features down to the size of the laser wavelength (smaller than 1 micrometer) and they provide a non-contact technology for machining. The demand for incorporating in-situ diagnostics technology into the micromachining environment is driven by the increasing need for producing micro-parts of high quality and accuracy. Laser interferometry can be used as an on-line monitoring tool and it is the aim of this work to enhance the understanding and application of Michelson interferometry principle for the in-situ diagnostics of the machining depth on the sub-micron and micron scales. micromachining is done on two different materials and a comprehensive investigation is done to control the width and depth of the machined feature. To control the width of the feature, laser micromachining is done on copper and a detailed analysis is performed. The objective of this experiment is to make a precision mask for sputtering with an array of holes on it using an Nd:YAG laser of 532 nm wavelength. The diameter of the hole is 50 {micro}m and the spacing between holes (the distance between the centers) is 100 {micro}m. Michelson interferometer is integrated with a laser machining system to control the depth of machining. An excimer laser of 308 nm wavelength is used for micromachining. A He-Ne laser of 632.8 nm wavelength is used as the light source for the interferometer. Interference patterns are created due to the change in the path length between the two interferometer arms. The machined depth information is obtained from the interference patterns on an oscilloscope detected by a photodiode. To compare the predicted depth by the interferometer with the true machining depth, a surface profilometer is used to measure the actual machining depth on the silicon. It is observed that the depths of machining obtained by the surface profile measurement are in accordance with the interferometer measurements with a very high accuracy. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of applying this system in industries that require precise measurements where cost of making as well as accuracy both cannot be compromised.

  12. Development and Application of Laser Peening System for PWR Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masaki Yoda; Itaru Chida; Satoshi Okada; Makoto Ochiai; Yuji Sano; Naruhiko Mukai; Gaku Komotori; Ryoichi Saeki [Toshiba Corporation (Japan); Toshimitsu Takagi; Masanori Sugihara; Hirokata Yoriki [Shikoku Electric Co., Inc. (Japan)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser peening is a process to improve residual stress from tensile to compressive in surface layer of materials by irradiating high-power laser pulses on the material in water. Toshiba has developed a laser peening system composed of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser oscillators, laser delivery equipment and underwater remote handling equipment. We have applied the system for Japanese operating BWR power plants as a preventive maintenance measure for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on reactor internals like core shrouds or control rod drive (CRD) penetrations since 1999. As for PWRs, alloy 600 or 182 can be susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), and some cracks or leakages caused by the PWSCC have been discovered on penetrations of reactor vessel heads (RVHs), reactor bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) nozzles, and others. Taking measures to meet the unconformity of the RVH penetrations, RVHs themselves have been replaced in many PWRs. On the other hand, it's too time-consuming and expensive to replace BMI nozzles, therefore, any other convenient and less expensive measures are required instead of the replacement. In Toshiba, we carried out various tests for laser-peened nickel base alloys and confirmed the effectiveness of laser peening as a preventive maintenance measure for PWSCC. We have developed a laser peening system for PWRs as well after the one for BWRs, and applied it for BMI nozzles, core deluge line nozzles and primary water inlet nozzles of Ikata Unit 1 and 2 of Shikoku Electric Power Company since 2004, which are Japanese operating PWR power plants. In this system, laser oscillators and control devices were packed into two containers placed on the operating floor inside the reactor containment vessel. Laser pulses were delivered through twin optical fibers and irradiated on two portions in parallel to reduce operation time. For BMI nozzles, we developed a tiny irradiation head for small tubes and we peened the inner surface around J-groove welds after laser ultrasonic testing (LUT) as the remote inspection, and we peened the outer surface and the weld for Ikata Unit 2 supplementary. For core deluge line nozzles and primary water inlet nozzles, we peened the inner surface of the dissimilar metal welding, which is of nickel base alloy, joining a safe end and a low alloy metal nozzle. In this paper, the development and the actual application of the laser peening system for PWR power plants will be described. (authors)

  13. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND APPLIED MECHANICS (EG) {MEAM}

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang-Yen, Christopher

    design process, from needfinding and brainstorming to the basics of computerized manufacturing and rapid and analysis; and rapid prototyping (laser cutter, 3-D fused-deposition modeling, and an introduction such numbers. L/L 201. Machine Design and Manufacturing. (B) Prerequisite(s): MEAM 101 recommended,

  14. ccsd00001265 Applied Physics A (2004) accepted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    surfaces was induced by using high-energy (6.4 eV) photons [9]. Multiple-charged cluster ions were formed of bulk silicon in vacuum and investigated using time-of- ight mass spectrometry. Two populationsJ energy per pulse) operating at 800 nm. A part of the laser beam was selected by an aperture to provide

  15. Laser Program annual report, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume presents the unclassified activities and accomplishments of the Inertial Confinement Fusion and Advanced Laser Development elements of the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the calendar year 1985. This report has been organized into major sections that correspond to our principal technical activities. Section 1 provides an overview. Section 2 comprises work in target theory, design, and code development. Target development and fabrication and the related topics in materials science are contained in Section 3. Section 4 presents work in experiments and diagnostics and includes developments in data acquisition and management capabilities. In Section 5 laser system (Nova) operation and maintenance are discussed. Activities related to supporting laser and optical technologies are described in Section 6. Basic laser research and development is reported in Section 7. Section 8 contains the results of studies in ICF applications where the work reported deals principally with the production of electric power with ICF. Finally, Section 9 is a comprehensive discussion of work to date on solid state lasers for average power applications. Individual sections, two through nine, have been cataloged separately.

  16. Possible generation of $?$-ray laser by electrons wiggling in a background laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi-Ren Zhang

    2015-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of $\\gamma-$ray laser generation by the radiation of wiggling electrons in an usual background laser is discussed.

  17. Possible generation of $?$-ray laser by electrons wiggling in a background laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi-Ren Zhang

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of $\\gamma-$ray laser generation by the radiation of wiggling electrons in an usual background laser is discussed.

  18. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kA are generated. The ultra-short laser-plasma acceleratedscale laser-plasma accelerator that produces ultra-short (

  19. Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yalin, Azer (Fort Collins, CO); Willson, Bryan (Fort Collins, CO); Defoort, Morgan (Fort Collins, CO); Joshi, Sachin (Fort Collins, CO); Reynolds, Adam (Fort Collins, CO)

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  20. Coupled-wave theory of multiple-stripe semiconductor injection lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehuys, D.; Yariv, A.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply coupled-wave theory to describe the lateral modes of semiconductor lasers with a periodic gain and refractive-index variation across their widths. The model is relevant to devices whose complex index of refraction is determined by current injection from closely spaced parallel electrodes. Good agreement is observed between the analytical modes and those computed numerically for comparison.

  1. Fourier analysis of X-ray micro-diffraction profiles to characterize laser shock peened metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    .L., 1950. The effect of cold-work distortion on X-ray pat- terns. Journal of Applied Physics 21, 595LSP need to be further studied from the measured X-ray micro-diffraction profile. Broadening of X-rayFourier analysis of X-ray micro-diffraction profiles to characterize laser shock peened metals

  2. Modelling dynamics of samples exposed to free-electron-laser radiation with Boltzmann equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beata Ziaja; Antonio R. B. de Castro; Edgar Weckert; Thomas Moeller

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply Boltzmann equations for modelling the radiation damage in samples irradiated by photons from free electron laser (FEL). We test this method in a study case of a spherically symmetric xenon cluster irradiated with VUV FEL photons. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of the Boltzmann method for describing the complex and non-equilibrium dynamics of samples exposed to FEL radiation.

  3. Dual wavelength laser damage testing for high energy lasers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atherton, Briggs W.; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Kimmel, Mark W.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As high energy laser systems evolve towards higher energies, fundamental material properties such as the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the optics limit the overall system performance. The Z-Backlighter Laser Facility at Sandia National Laboratories uses a pair of such kiljoule-class Nd:Phosphate Glass lasers for x-ray radiography of high energy density physics events on the Z-Accelerator. These two systems, the Z-Beamlet system operating at 527nm/ 1ns and the Z-Petawatt system operating at 1054nm/ 0.5ps, can be combined for some experimental applications. In these scenarios, dichroic beam combining optics and subsequent dual wavelength high reflectors will see a high fluence from combined simultaneous laser exposure and may even see lingering effects when used for pump-probe configurations. Only recently have researchers begun to explore such concerns, looking at individual and simultaneous exposures of optics to 1064 and third harmonic 355nm light from Nd:YAG [1]. However, to our knowledge, measurements of simultaneous and delayed dual wavelength damage thresholds on such optics have not been performed for exposure to 1054nm and its second harmonic light, especially when the pulses are of disparate pulse duration. The Z-Backlighter Facility has an instrumented damage tester setup to examine the issues of laser-induced damage thresholds in a variety of such situations [2] . Using this damage tester, we have measured the LIDT of dual wavelength high reflectors at 1054nm/0.5ps and 532nm/7ns, separately and spatially combined, both co-temporal and delayed, with single and multiple exposures. We found that the LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps can be significantly lowered, from 1.32J/cm{sup 2} damage fluence with 1054/0.5ps only to 1.05 J/cm{sup 2} with the simultaneous presence of 532nm/7ns laser light at a fluence of 8.1 J/cm{sup 2}. This reduction of LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps continues as the fluence of 532nm/7ns laser light simultaneously present increases. The reduction of LIDT does not occur when the 2 pulses are temporally separated. This paper will also present dual wavelength LIDT results of commercial dichroic beam-combining optics simultaneously exposed with laser light at 1054nm/2.5ns and 532nm/7ns.

  4. Laser machining of explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Fremont, CA); Banks, Paul S. (Livermore, CA); Myers, Booth R. (Livermore, CA); Sefcik, Joseph A. (Tracy, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention consists of a method for machining (cutting, drilling, sculpting) of explosives (e.g., TNT, TATB, PETN, RDX, etc.). By using pulses of a duration in the range of 5 femtoseconds to 50 picoseconds, extremely precise and rapid machining can be achieved with essentially no heat or shock affected zone. In this method, material is removed by a nonthermal mechanism. A combination of multiphoton and collisional ionization creates a critical density plasma in a time scale much shorter than electron kinetic energy is transferred to the lattice. The resulting plasma is far from thermal equilibrium. The material is in essence converted from its initial solid-state directly into a fully ionized plasma on a time scale too short for thermal equilibrium to be established with the lattice. As a result, there is negligible heat conduction beyond the region removed resulting in negligible thermal stress or shock to the material beyond a few microns from the laser machined surface. Hydrodynamic expansion of the plasma eliminates the need for any ancillary techniques to remove material and produces extremely high quality machined surfaces. There is no detonation or deflagration of the explosive in the process and the material which is removed is rendered inert.

  5. Electrodeless short pulse laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Proud, J.M.; Baird, D.H.; Kramer, J.M.; Lester, J.E.

    1986-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for the generation of coherent beams of radiation, which consists of: a tube defining a resonant cavity containing a discharge plasma capable of producing coherent radiation, the tube having an elongated shape along an optical axis along the longitudinal axis of the tube, the tube having end portions and an elongated constricted portion connecting the end portions, and the tube having laser windows sealing the end portions to form a closed envelope containing the discharge plasma, a mirror on the optical axis near at least one end of the tube, first and second external electrode means on the outside surfaces of the tube adjacent the opposite ends of the tube, the external electrode means being capacitively coupled to the discharge plasma, and means for providing a source of short pulses electrically to the first external electrode means and means for coupling the second external electrode means to a point of reference potential, further characterized by first and second internal electrode means respectively adjacent the first and second external electrode means and capacitively coupled thereto, the tube having end portions sealed to form a closed envelope containing the discharge plasma and the internal electrode means.

  6. Free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high gain, single-pass free electron laser formed of a high brilliance electron injector source, a linear accelerator which imparts high energy to the electron beam, and an undulator capable of extremely high magnetic fields, yet with a very short period. The electron injector source is the first stage (gap) of the linear accelerator or a radial line transformer driven by fast circular switch. The linear accelerator is formed of a plurality of accelerating gaps arranged in series. These gaps are energized in sequence by releasing a single pulse of energy which propagates simultaneously along a plurality of transmission lines, each of which feeds the gaps. The transmission lines are graduated in length so that pulse power is present at each gap as the accelerated electrons pass therethrough. The transmission lines for each gap are open circuited at their ends. The undualtor has a structure similar to the accelerator, except that the transmission lines for each gap are substantially short circuited at their ends, thus converting the electric field into magnetic field. A small amount of resistance is retained in order to generate a small electric field for replenishing the electron bunch with the energy lost as it traverses through the undulator structure.

  7. Optical coatings for laser fusion applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowdermilk, W.H.; Milam, D.; Rainer, F.

    1980-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Lasers for fusion experiments use thin-film dielectric coatings for reflecting, antireflecting and polarizing surface elements. Coatings are most important to the Nd:glass laser application. The most important requirements of these coatings are accuracy of the average value of reflectance and transmission, uniformity of amplitude and phase front of the reflected or transmitted light, and laser damage threshold. Damage resistance strongly affects the laser's design and performance. The success of advanced lasers for future experiments and for reactor applications requires significant developments in damage resistant coatings for ultraviolet laser radiation.

  8. Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hadley, G. Ronald (Albuquerque, NM); Hohimer, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); Owyoung, Adelbert (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet.

  9. Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hadley, G.R.; Hohimer, J.P.; Owyoung, A.

    1991-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet. 18 figures.

  10. Combination free electron and gaseous laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  11. Free-Electron Laser Targets Fat | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser Targets Fat April 10, 2006 Free-Electron Laser Scientists Rox Anderson, right, and Free-Electron Laser Scientist Steve Benson, left, discuss laser beam...

  12. Light Wars: The Bright Future of Laser Weapons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mistry, Hemma

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    currently the highest power solid-state laser in the world,funding the Joint High Power Solid-State Laser (JHPSSL)Solid-state lasers and chemical lasers have certain limitations on the power

  13. Experimental nonlinear laser systems: Bigger data for better science?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D. M.; Toomey, J. P.; McMahon, C.; Noblet, Y. [MQ Photonics Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University ~ Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Argyris, A.; Syvridis, D. [Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Ilisia, 15784 (Greece)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Bigger data is supporting knowledge discovery in nonlinear laser systems as will be demonstrated with examples from three semiconductor laser based systems – one with optical feedback, a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) chaotic laser and a frequency shifted feedback laser system.

  14. ALL ABOUT THE M.A. IN APPLIED LEGAL STUDIES The Applied Legal Studies Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ALL ABOUT THE M.A. IN APPLIED LEGAL STUDIES The Applied Legal Studies Program This professional. In the case of aspiring Notaries, the degree will prepare students for admission to practice, subject for admission to the applied legal studies program. #12;2 The M.A. in Applied Legal Studies: The Program

  15. Apparatus for advancing a wellbore using high power laser energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zediker, Mark S.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F.

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Delivering high power laser energy to form a borehole deep into the earth using laser energy. Down hole laser tools, laser systems and laser delivery techniques for advancement, workover and completion activities. A laser bottom hole assembly (LBHA) for the delivery of high power laser energy to the surfaces of a borehole, which assembly may have laser optics, a fluid path for debris removal and a mechanical means to remove earth.

  16. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) is a unique program designated to introduce geophysics students to geophysical exploration and research. SAGE's purpose is to enhance a...

  17. Building America Expert Meeting: Recommendations for Applying...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Expert Meeting: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems Building America Expert Meeting: Recommendations...

  18. Mode-locked solid state lasers using diode laser excitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holtom, Gary R. (Boston, MA)

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. An asymmetric cavity provides relatively large beam spot sizes in gain medium to permit efficient coupling to a volume pumped by a laser diode bar. The cavity can include a collimation region with a controlled beam spot size for insertion of a saturable absorber and dispersion components. Beam spot size is selected to provide stable mode locking based on Kerr lensing. Pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved in Yb:KGW.

  19. Linewidth-tunable laser diode array for rubidium laser pumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhiyong; Tan Rongqing; Xu Cheng; Li Lin

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    To optimise the pump source for a high-power diodepumped rubidium vapour laser, we have designed a laser diode array (LDA) with a narrowed and tunable linewidth and an external cavity formed by two volume Bragg gratings (VBGs). Through controlling the temperature differences between the two VBGs, the LDA linewidth, which was 1.8 nm before mounting the two VBGs, was tunable from 100 pm to 0.2 nm, while the output power changed by no more than 4 %. By changing simultaneously the temperature in both VBGs, the centre wavelength in air of the linewidth-tunable LDA was tunable from 779.40 nm to 780.05 nm. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  20. 1981 laser program annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is published in sections that correspond to the division of technical activity in the Program. Section 1 provides a Program Overview, presenting highlights of the technical accomplishments of the elements of the Program, a summary of activities carried out under the Glass Laser Experiments Lead Laboratory Program, as well as discussions of Program resources and facilities. Section 2 covers the work on solid-state Nd:glass lasers, including systems operations and Nova and Novette systems development. Section 3 reports on target-design activities, plasma theory and simulation, code development, and atomic theory. Section 4 presents the accomplishments of the Target Fabrication group, Section 5 contains the results of our diagnostics development, and Section 6 reports the results of laser-target experiments conducted during the year, along with supporting research and development activities. Section 7 presents the results from laser research and development, including solid-state R and D and the theoretical and experimental research on advanced lasers. Section 8 contains the results of studies in areas of energy and military applications, including those relating to electrical energy production by inertial-confinement fusion systems.

  1. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, M.A.

    1983-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a method and apparatus for providing a reflex ring laser system for amplifying an input laser pulse. The invention is particularly useful in laser fusion experiments where efficient production of high-energy and high power laser pulses is required. The invention comprises a large aperture laser amplifier in an unstable ring resonator which includes a combination spatial filter and beam expander having a magnification greater than unity. An input pulse is injected into the resonator, e.g., through an aperture in an input mirror. The injected pulse passes through the amplifier and spatial filter/expander components on each pass around the ring. The unstable resonator is designed to permit only a predetermined number of passes before the amplified pulse exits the resonator. On the first pass through the amplifier, the beam fills only a small central region of the gain medium. On each successive pass, the beam has been expanded to fill the next concentric non-overlapping region of the gain medium.

  2. Laser/matter interactions by laser-launched plates and direct laser shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, Dennis L.; Swift, D. C. (Damian C.); Kopp, R. A. (Roger A.); Montgomery, D. S. (David S.); Johnson, R. P. (Randall P.); Munson, C. P. (Carter P.); Letzring, S. A. (Samuel A.); Niemczura, J. G. (Johnathan G.)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosives, gas guns, laser-launched flyer plates, and direct laser-irradiation can be used to generate shocks and high-stress in materials. Each method has a unique diameter and thickness of shock that can be generated. In past years, small laboratory lasers have been used to launch flyer plates 2 - 200-pm thick to terminal velocities 0.1 to 5 k d s . Over the past few years we have been using our TRIDENT laser facility (1kJ in 0.2 to 2ps) to accelerate larger diameter (8 mm) and thicker (0.1 - 1.5 mm) flyer plates. These larger diameters and thicker one-dimensional plates more closely compliment traditional experimental methods such as gas guns. The 8-mm diameter and 1-mm thick flyer plates can impart shocks in metals for constitutive dynamic property measurements. The versatility of laser-driven plates permits spatial and temporal profiles of the flyer plate impact on sample targets. LASNEX models and parameters of the laser drive can be used to optimize optical coupling efficiency. The flyer plate launch, acceleration, terminal velocity, and, depending on the experiment, flyer plate impact on to target materials are recorded using point-interferometry (VISAR), and line-imaging interferometry. These high speed optical and laser experimental methods will be described along with ancillary methods, and material data. Constitutive properties of bulk materials, rate effects, and grain size and/or orientation have been studied for several metals including copper, beryllium, gold, and some alloys.

  3. RESONANCE LASER ABLATION WITH AN OPTICAL PARAMETRIC OSCILLATOR LASER AND DETECTION BY A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Robert G.

    RESONANCE LASER ABLATION WITH AN OPTICAL PARAMETRIC OSCILLATOR LASER AND DETECTION BY A MICROWAVE, University of Connecticut, 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT, 06269- 3060, U.S.A. Abstract: Laser ablation of solid samples was used for the determination of trace metals by use of either a pulsed excimer laser (20

  4. Application of laser simulation method for the analysis of crater formation experiment on PALS laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpouch, Jiri

    Application of laser simulation method for the analysis of crater formation experiment on PALS laser S. Borodziuk, A. Kasperczuk, T. Pisarczyk Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, 23; final version 17 June 2003 The crater formation process is studied in the "laser ­ Al solid target

  5. Development of a nanosecond-laser-pumped Raman amplifier for short laser pulses in plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of a nanosecond-laser-pumped Raman amplifier for short laser pulses in plasma Y. Ping,1 Raman amplification of short laser pulses in a plasma was proposed a decade ago in order to reach of solid-state optics. The amplifica- tion of short laser pulses is achieved by energy transfer from a long

  6. Lee, C-T A Laser Ablation Data Reduction 2006 LASER ABLATION ICP-MS: DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    Lee, C-T A Laser Ablation Data Reduction 2006 1 LASER ABLATION ICP-MS: DATA REDUCTION Cin-Ty A. Lee 24 September 2006 Analysis and calculation of concentrations Laser ablation analyses are done in time by turning on the laser and ablating the sample, generating a time-dependent signal (Fig. 1). Measurements

  7. ULTRAINTENSE AND ULTRASHORT LASER PULSES FROM RAMAN AMPLIFICATION IN PLASMA FOR LASER-PLASMA ACCELERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    to be a promising alternative for obtaining ultra-powerful peta-watt laser pulses. Issues in the system are the kiULTRAINTENSE AND ULTRASHORT LASER PULSES FROM RAMAN AMPLIFICATION IN PLASMA FOR LASER trapping effect in the Raman pulse amplification in plasma. An ultraintense and ultrashort laser pulse

  8. A controllable laser projector for diverting traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Brian Xiuken

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For this Master's thesis, I designed and implemented a combined laser and controller system that can receive and convert commands from a computer into useful laser projections. In the last 10 years, on average, one police ...

  9. Compact and highly efficient laser pump cavity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J. (Dublin, CA); Bass, Isaac L. (Castro Valley, CA); Zapata, Luis E. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, compact, side-pumped laser pump cavity design which uses non-conventional optics for injection of laser-diode light into a laser pump chamber includes a plurality of elongated light concentration channels. In one embodiment, the light concentration channels are compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) which have very small exit apertures so that light will not escape from the pumping chamber and will be multiply reflected through the laser rod. This new design effectively traps the pump radiation inside the pump chamber that encloses the laser rod. It enables more uniform laser pumping and highly effective recycle of pump radiation, leading to significantly improved laser performance. This new design also effectively widens the acceptable radiation wavelength of the diodes, resulting in a more reliable laser performance with lower cost.

  10. Atomic physics: An almost lightless laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuletic, Vladan

    Lasers are often described in terms of a light field circulating in an optical resonator system. Now a laser has been demonstrated in which the field resides primarily in the atomic medium that is used to generate the light.

  11. Preparing reflective substrate surfaces for laser treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flick, F.F.

    1984-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A coating of either copper oxide or felt tip pen ink is used on reflective copper or gold substrates to enhance laser beam coupling when the substrates are cut or welded with a laser.

  12. A laser speckle based position sensing technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shilpiekandula, Vijay, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and development of a novel laser-speckle-based position sensing technique. In our prototype implementation, a He-Ne laser beam is directed at the surface of an air-bearing spindle. An imaging ...

  13. Noise and synamics in semiconductor lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rana, Farhan, 1971-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, theoretical and experimental work on the noise and dynamics in continuous wave and mode-locked semiconductor lasers is presented. The main focus is on semiconductor cascade lasers and semiconductor mode-locked ...

  14. Corrosion Resistant Cladding by YAG Laser Welding in Underwater Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsutomi Kochi; Toshio Kojima; Suemi Hirata; Ichiro Morita; Katsura Ohwaki [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Company Ltd., 1 Shin-Nakaharacho, Isogoku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in nickel-base alloys used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Internals of nuclear power plants. A SCC sensitivity has been evaluated by IHI in each part of RPV and Internals. There are several water level instrumentation nozzles installed in domestic BWR RPV. In water level instrumentation nozzles, 182 type nickel-base alloys were used for the welding joint to RPV. It is estimated the SCC potential is high in this joint because of a higher residual stress than the yield strength (about 400 MPa). This report will describe a preventive maintenance method to these nozzles Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and welds by a corrosion resistant cladding (CRC) by YAG Laser in underwater environment (without draining a reactor water). There are many kinds of countermeasures for SCC, for example, Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP) and so on. A YAG laser CRC is one of them. In this technology a laser beam is used for heat source and irradiated through an optical fiber to a base metal and SCC resistant material is used for welding wires. After cladding the HAZ and welds are coated by the corrosion resistant materials so their surfaces are improved. A CRC by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in an air environment had been developed and already applied to a couple of operating plants (16 Nozzles). This method was of course good but it spent much time to perform because of an installation of some water-proof working boxes to make a TIG-weldability environment. CRC by YAG laser welding in underwater environment has superior features comparing to this conventional TIG method as follows. At the viewpoint of underwater environment, (1) an outage term reduction (no drainage water). (2) a radioactive exposure dose reduction for personnel. At that of YAG laser welding, (1) A narrower HAZ. (2) A smaller distortion. (3) A few cladding layers. A YAG laser CRC test in underwater environment was carried out in the different welding position, horizontal, vertical upward and downward. The soundness of cladding layers (about 3 mm) is confirmed in visual and penetration test, and cross section observation. In the application to the actual plants, it is preferable to reduce the start and end point numbers of beads with which a defect is easy to cause. Therefore a special welding equipment for a YAG laser CRC that could weld continuously was developed. (authors)

  15. Cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kireev, Vassili [Sunnyvale, CA; Liu, Yun; Protopopescu, Vladimir [Knoxville, TN; Braiman, Yehuda [Oak Ridge, TN

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays. The resonator comprises a plurality of laser emitters arranged along at least one plane and a beam sampler for reflecting at least a portion of each laser beam that impinges on the beam sampler, the portion of each laser beam from one of the laser emitters being reflected back to another one of the laser emitters to cause a beam to be generated from the other one of the laser emitters to the beam reflector. The beam sampler also transmits a portion of each laser beam to produce a laser output beam such that a plurality of laser output beams of the same frequency are produced. An injection laser beam is directed to a first laser emitter to begin a process of generating and reflecting a laser beam from one laser emitter to another laser emitter in the plurality. A method of practicing the invention is also disclosed.

  16. Thermally nonlinear laser photoacoustic tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oshurko, Vadim B [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of a laser photoacoustic response in an inhomogeneous medium is considered taking into account the temperature dependence of the coefficient of thermal expansion. It is shown that in the one-dimensional or three-dimensional cases in the presence of individual absorbing centres (spherical particles), the shape of the photoacoustic response is the wavelet transform of the spatial distribution of heat sources. The parameters (level) of the wavelet expansion are determined by the characteristics of the laser pulse. The possibility of multiscale wavelet analysis of the medium structure is demonstrated by the example of a numerical model. The possibility of direct visualisation of individual cells in biological tissues is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  17. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  18. Applied knowledge to meet society's needs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Applied knowledge to meet society's needs. Applied Physics covers phenomena ranging from knowledge and hands-on experience in experimental techniques, theoretical analysis, simulation and modelling of radiation. The focus of the research is on energy and health. While the topics addressed ­ covering

  19. Four Faculty Positions Applied Statistics & Computational Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepp, Larry

    Four Faculty Positions Applied Statistics & Computational Statistics The Department of Statistics at the Assistant Professor rank. Two positions are open in the area of Applied Statistics, with a focus on the development of statistical methodology and statistical consulting. The other two positions are open

  20. UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

  1. Nuclear Facilities and Applied Technologies at Sandia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, Dave; Kaiser, Krista; Martin, Lonnie; Hanson, Don; Harms, Gary; Quirk, Tom

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Facilities and Applied Technologies organization at Sandia National Laboratories’ Technical Area Five (TA-V) is the leader in advancing nuclear technologies through applied radiation science and unique nuclear environments. This video describes the organization’s capabilities, facilities, and culture.

  2. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kare, Jordin T. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shockwaves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment.

  3. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kare, J.T.

    1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shock waves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment. 10 figs.

  4. Laser Diode Setup and Operation Eric Lochbrunner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Control Out (Laser Current Monitor) 3 Ventilation Fan 4 Connector for chassis ground 5 Connector "LD OUT

  5. Laser removal of sludge from steam generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

  6. Laser patterning of laminated structures for electroplating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Evans, Leland B. (Antioch, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for laser patterning of a substrate so that it can be subsequently electroplated or electrolessly plated. The process utilizes a laser to treat an inactive (inert) layer formed over an active layer to either combine or remove the inactive layer to produce a patterned active layer on which electrodeposition can occur. The process is carried out by utilizing laser alloying and laser etching, and involves only a few relatively high yield steps and can be performed on a very small scale.

  7. Ultrafast imaging interferometry at femtosecond-laser-excited surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temnov, Vasily V.; Sokolowski-Tinten, Klaus; Zhou Ping; Linde, Dietrich von der [Experimentelle Physik IIb, Universitaet Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany)

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple and robust setup for femtosecond time-resolved imaging interferometry of surfaces is described. The apparatus is capable of measuring both very small phase shifts ({approx}3x10{sup -2} rad) and amplitude changes ({approx}1%) with micrometer spatial resolution ({approx}1 {mu}m). Interferograms are processed using a 2D-Fourier transform algorithm. We discuss the image formation and the physical interpretation of the measured interferograms. The technique is applied to measure transient changes of a GaAs surface irradiated with intense femtosecond laser pulses with fluences near the ablation threshold.

  8. Temporal pulse tailoring in laser manufacturing technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    5 Temporal pulse tailoring in laser manufacturing technologies Razvan Stoian1 , Matthias. Ultrafast lasers have gained momentum in material processing technolo- gies in response to requirements for quality material processing. 5.1 Introduction The demand for precision in laser material processing

  9. Laser Power Meter Large, bright, backlit LCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    Laser Power Meter FEATURES · Large, bright, backlit LCD display · Digital accuracy with analog-like movement for laser tuning · Works with thermopile and optical sensors · Intuitive button-driven user COMPATIBILITY · PowerMax® thermal sensors · Optical sensors FieldMaxII-TO Coherent Laser Measurement and Control

  10. LASER SAFETY COMMITTEE CHARTER November, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    LASER SAFETY COMMITTEE CHARTER November, 2005 Function The Safety Review Committee (SRC) performs-committees to address specific health and safety matters. The Laser Safety Committee (LSC) is one of the SRC expert sub-committees. The Laser SafetyCommittee recommends policies and practices regarding the conduct and regulatory compliance

  11. LASER SAFETY GUIDELINES July 26, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    LASER SAFETY GUIDELINES July 26, 2006 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION PAGE PREFACE 3 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO LASER SAFETY AT PURDUE UNIVERSITY 4 CHAPTER 2: CONTROL MEASURES I. Introduction6 II. Engineering Controls 6 III. Administrative and Procedural Controls 7 IV. Class 3b and 4 Laser Controlled Area

  12. Laser transmissionbackscattering through inhomogeneous cirrus clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takano, Yoshihide

    of the transmission and backscattering of high-energy laser beams. The 2D extinction-coefficient and mean effective of cirrus clouds by use of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on board National Oceanic and backscattering of high-energy laser beams in realistic atmospheres. The results of laser direct transmission

  13. Automatic building modeling from terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Shi

    Automatic building modeling from terrestrial laser scanning Shi Pu International Institute for Geo hard to recover 3D building structures from 2D image. Recent studies ([2] [6]) show that laser scanning imagery, airborne and terrestrial laser scanning give explicit 3D information, which enables the rapid

  14. Theory of longitudinal modes in semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, K.Y.; Yariv, A.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A theory of longitudinal mode lasing spectrum of semiconductor lasers is developed which takes into account the nonuniform carrier and photon distributions and local gain spectrum shifts inside lasers with low end mirror reflectivities. The theory gives results consistent with observed longitudinal mode behavior in lasers with reduced facet reflectivity.

  15. Ultra-high speed semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, K.Y.; Yariv, A.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress on semiconductor lasers having a very high direct modulation bandwidth of beyond 10 GHz are described. Issues related to application of these lasers in actual systems are addressed. Possibilities of further extending the bandwidth of semiconductor lasers are examined.

  16. A study on Raman Injection Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Debin

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Raman Injection Laser is a new type of laser which is based on triply resonant stimulated Raman scattering between quantum confined states within the active region of a Quantum Cascade Laser that serves as an internal optical pump. The Raman...

  17. Intense Femtosecond Laser Interactions with Ions in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ), ultra-short laser light with atoms and molecules has led to the discovery of new phenomena such as bondIntense Femtosecond Laser Interactions with Ions in Beams and Traps A thesis presented through a re-scattering process where an electron is ionized, propagated in the laser field and is driven

  18. Laser spark distribution and ignition system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodruff, Steven (Morgantown, WV); McIntyre, Dustin L. (Morgantown, WV)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser spark distribution and ignition system that reduces the high power optical requirements for use in a laser ignition and distribution system allowing for the use of optical fibers for delivering the low peak energy pumping pulses to a laser amplifier or laser oscillator. An optical distributor distributes and delivers optical pumping energy from an optical pumping source to multiple combustion chambers incorporating laser oscillators or laser amplifiers for inducing a laser spark within a combustion chamber. The optical distributor preferably includes a single rotating mirror or lens which deflects the optical pumping energy from the axis of rotation and into a plurality of distinct optical fibers each connected to a respective laser media or amplifier coupled to an associated combustion chamber. The laser spark generators preferably produce a high peak power laser spark, from a single low power pulse. The laser spark distribution and ignition system has application in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic sensors.

  19. High Power Lasers... Another approach to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Average Power Laser (HAPL) Program #12;4 Electricity Generator Reaction chamber The laser fusion energy drive targets Can lead to an attractive electricity generating power plant Developing Laser Fusion Attributes : Beam uniformity, wavelength, cost, scaling to large systems Technologies for rep

  20. High power laser perforating tools and systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    ystems devices and methods for the transmission of 1 kW or more of laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser perforation of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perforate such boreholes.

  1. Entropy evolution law in a laser process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun-hua Chen; Hong-yi Fan

    2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time, we obtain the entropy variation law in a laser process after finding the Kraus operator of the master equation describing the laser process with the use of the entangled state representation. The behavior of entropy is determined by the competition of the gain and damping in the laser process. The photon number evolution formula is also obtained.

  2. Laser photodeposition of refractory metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solanki, R.; Boyer, P.K.; Mahan, J.E.; Collins, G.J.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the deposition of the refractory metals chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten through the laser-induced gas-phase photolysis of their respective hexacarbonyls. A copper, hollow cathode laser was used at ultraviolet wavelengths matched to peaks in the absorption spectra of the carbonyl molecules. Localized room-temperature metal deposition was achieved by focusing the beam into a cell containing the carbonyl gas and helium as a buffer. No major differences were noted for deposition on a polished silicon wafer, a thermally oxidized silicon wafer, and a quartz flat.

  3. High-brightness electron beam evolution following laser-based cleaning of a photocathode

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, F.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F-J.; Emma, P.; Gilevich, S.; Iverson, R.; Stefan, P.; Turner, J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-based techniques have been widely used for cleaning metal photocathodes to increase quantum efficiency (QE). However, the impact of laser cleaning on cathode uniformity and thereby on electron beam quality are less understood. We are evaluating whether this technique can be applied to revive photocathodes used for high-brightness electron sources in advanced x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The laser-based cleaning was applied to two separate areas of the current LCLS photocathode on July 4 and July 26, 2011, respectively. The QE was increased by 8–10 times upon the laser cleaning. Since the cleaning, routine operation has exhibited a slow evolution of the QE improvement and comparatively rapid improvement of transverse emittance, with a factor of 3 QE enhancement over five months, and a significant emittance improvement over the initial 2–3 weeks following the cleaning. Currently, the QE of the LCLS photocathode is holding constant at about 1.2×10?4 , with a normalized injector emittance of about 0.3???m for a 150-pC bunch charge. With the proper procedures, the laser-cleaning technique appears to be a viable tool to revive the LCLS photocathode. We present observations and analyses for the QE and emittance evolution in time following the laser-based cleaning of the LCLS photocathode, and comparison to the previous studies, the measured thermal emittance versus the QE and comparison to the theoretical model.

  4. Short pulse laser train for laser plasma interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, J. L.; Shimada, T.; Johnson, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Hegelich, B. M.; Esquibel, D. M.; Flippo, K. A.; Gonzales, R. P.; Hurry, T. R.; Reid, S. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiframe, high-time resolution pump-probe diagnostic consisting of a consecutive train of ultrashort laser pulses ({approx}ps) has been developed for use with a chirped pulse amplification (CPA) system. A system of high quality windows is used to create a series of 1054 nm picosecond-laser pulses which are injected into the CPA system before the pulse stretcher and amplifiers. By adding or removing windows in the pulse train forming optics, the number of pulses can be varied. By varying the distance and thickness of the respective optical elements, the time in between the pulses, i.e., the time in between frames, can be set. In our example application, the CPA pulse train is converted to 527 nm using a KDP crystal and focused into a preformed plasma and the reflected laser light due to stimulated Raman scattering is measured. Each pulse samples different plasma conditions as the plasma evolves in time, producing more data on each laser shot than with a single short pulse probe. This novel technique could potentially be implemented to obtain multiple high-time resolution measurements of the dynamics of physical processes over hundreds of picoseconds or even nanoseconds with picosecond resolution on a single shot.

  5. Standardization of Laser Methods and Techniques for Vibration Measurements and Calibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martens, Hans-Juergen von [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (retired), Abbestrasse 2-12, 12587 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The realization and dissemination of the SI units of motion quantities (vibration and shock) have been based on laser interferometer methods specified in international documentary standards. New and refined laser methods and techniques developed by national metrology institutes and by leading manufacturers in the past two decades have been swiftly specified as standard methods for inclusion into in the series ISO 16063 of international documentary standards. A survey of ISO Standards for the calibration of vibration and shock transducers demonstrates the extended ranges and improved accuracy (measurement uncertainty) of laser methods and techniques for vibration and shock measurements and calibrations. The first standard for the calibration of laser vibrometers by laser interferometry or by a reference accelerometer calibrated by laser interferometry (ISO 16063-41) is on the stage of a Draft International Standard (DIS) and may be issued by the end of 2010. The standard methods with refined techniques proved to achieve wider measurement ranges and smaller measurement uncertainties than that specified in the ISO Standards. The applicability of different standardized interferometer methods to vibrations at high frequencies was recently demonstrated up to 347 kHz (acceleration amplitudes up to 350 km/s{sup 2}). The relative deviations between the amplitude measurement results of the different interferometer methods that were applied simultaneously, differed by less than 1% in all cases.

  6. Laser acceleration of protons using multi-ion plasma gaseous targets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Tung-Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; Hill, W T; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical and numerical study of a novel acceleration scheme by applying a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion in laser acceleration of protons in multi-species gaseous targets. By using a circularly polarized CO2 laser pulse with a wavelength of 10 ?m—much greater than that of a Ti: Sapphire laser—the critical density is significantly reduced, and a high-pressure gaseous target can be used to achieve an overdense plasma. This gives us a larger degree of freedom in selecting the target compounds or mixtures, as well as their density and thickness profiles. By impinging such amore »laser beam on a carbon–hydrogen target, the gaseous target is first compressed and accelerated by radiation pressure until the electron layer disrupts, after which the protons are further accelerated by the electron-shielded carbon ion layer. An 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam can be generated using a half-sine shaped laser beam with a peak power of 70 TW and a pulse duration of 150 wave periods.« less

  7. Reversing the Pump-Dependence of a Laser at an Exceptional Point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Brandstetter; M. Liertzer; C. Deutsch; P. Klang; J. Schöberl; H. E. Türeci; G. Strasser; K. Unterrainer; S. Rotter

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    When two resonant modes in a system with gain or loss coalesce in both their resonance position and their width, a so-called "Exceptional Point" occurs which acts as a source of non-trivial physics in a diverse range of systems. Lasers provide a natural setting to study such "non-Hermitian degeneracies", since they feature resonant modes and a gain material as their basic constituents. Here we show that Exceptional Points can be conveniently induced in a photonic molecule laser by a suitable variation of the applied pump. Using a pair of coupled micro-disk quantum cascade lasers, we demonstrate that in the vicinity of these Exceptional Points the laser shows a characteristic reversal of its pump-dependence, including a strongly decreasing intensity of the emitted laser light for increasing pump power. This result establishes photonic molecule lasers as promising tools for exploring many further fascinating aspects of Exceptional Points, like a strong line-width enhancement and the coherent perfect absorption of light in their vicinity as well as non-trivial mode-switching and the accumulation of a geometric phase when encircling an Exceptional Point parametrically.

  8. SUBJECT: Laser Safety Program Purpose: The purpose of this Laser Safety Manual is to insure the safe use of lasers in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUBJECT: Laser Safety Program Purpose: The purpose of this Laser Safety Manual is to insure the safe use of lasers in research activities at the Colorado School of Mines (Mines or the School). This Laser Safety Manual outlines laser registration requirements, identifies hazards associated with using

  9. University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics annual report, 1 October 1990--30 September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCrory, Robert L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses: progress in laser fusion; advanced technology developments; national laser users facility news; and laser system report.

  10. Thermal input control and enhancement for laser based residual stress measurements using liquid temperature indicating coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pechersky, M.J.

    1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for measuring residual stress in a material is disclosed comprising the steps of applying a spot of temperature indicating coating to the surface to be studied, establishing a speckle pattern surrounds the spot of coating with a first laser then heating the spot of coating with a far infrared laser until the surface plastically deforms. Comparing the speckle patterns before and after deformation by subtracting one pattern from the other will produce a fringe pattern that serves as a visual and quantitative indication of the degree to which the plasticized surface responded to the stress during heating and enables calculation of the stress. 3 figs.

  11. Thermal input control and enhancement for laser based residual stress measurements using liquid temperature indicating coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pechersky, Martin J. (Aiken, SC)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for measuring residual stress in a material comprising the steps of applying a spot of temperature indicating coating to the surface to be studied, establishing a speckle pattern surrounds the spot of coating with a first laser then heating the spot of coating with a far infrared laser until the surface plastically deforms. Comparing the speckle patterns before and after deformation by subtracting one pattern from the other will produce a fringe pattern that serves as a visual and quantitative indication of the degree to which the plasticized surface responded to the stress during heating and enables calculation of the stress.

  12. Quantum statistics effect in Schwinger pair production in short laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Hebenstreit; Reinhard Alkofer; Gerald V. Dunne; Holger Gies

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate non-perturbative pair production from vacuum (the Schwinger effect) in the focal region of two counter-propagating, ultra-short laser pulses with sub-cycle structure. We use the quantum kinetic formulation to calculate the momentum spectrum of created particles and show the extreme sensitivity to the laser frequency $\\omega$, the pulse length $\\tau$ and the carrier-envelope absolute phase $\\phi$. We apply this formalism to both fermions and bosons to illustrate the influence of quantum statistics in this type of electric background field.

  13. Terahertz generation by two cross focused laser beams in collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R. P., E-mail: rpsharma@ces.iitd.ernet.in; Singh, Ram Kishor, E-mail: ram007kishor@gmail.com [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of two cross-focused spatial-Gaussian laser beams has been studied for the high power and efficient terahertz (THz) radiation generation in the collisional plasma. The nonlinear current at THz frequency arises on account of temperature dependent collision frequency of electrons with ions in the plasma and the presence of a static electric field (applied externally in the plasma) and density ripple. Optimisation of laser-plasma parameters gives the radiated THz power of the order of 0.23??MW.

  14. Laser cutting with chemical reaction assist

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gettemy, D.J.

    1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for cutting with a laser beam where an oxygen-hydrocarbon reaction is used to provide auxiliary energy to a metal workpiece to supplement the energy supplied by the laser. Oxygen is supplied to the laser focus point on the workpiece by a nozzle through which the laser beam also passes. A liquid hydrocarbon is supplied by coating the workpiece along the cutting path with the hydrocarbon prior to laser irradiation or by spraying a stream of hydrocarbon through a nozzle aimed at a point on the cutting path which is just ahead of the focus point during irradiation. 1 figure.

  15. Laser cutting with chemical reaction assist

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gettemy, Donald J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for cutting with a laser beam where an oxygen-hydrocarbon reaction is used to provide auxiliary energy to a metal workpiece to supplement the energy supplied by the laser. Oxygen is supplied to the laser focus point on the workpiece by a nozzle through which the laser beam also passes. A liquid hydrocarbon is supplied by coating the workpiece along the cutting path with the hydrocarbon prior to laser irradiation or by spraying a stream of hydrocarbon through a nozzle aimed at a point on the cutting path which is just ahead of the focus point during irradiation.

  16. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded FELs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention from the promise of transform-limited pulses in the soft X-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  17. Laser polishing of niobium for SRF applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Liang; Klopf, J. Michael [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Kelley, Michael [W& M

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Smooth interior surfaces are desired for niobium SRF cavities, now obtained by buffered chemical polish (BCP) and/or electropolish (EP). Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from chemistry and in-process inspection. Here we show that laser polishing can produce smooth topography with Power Spectral Density (PSD) measurements similar to that obtained by EP. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damaging it. Computational modeling was used to simulate the surface temperature and explain the mechanism of laser polishing.

  18. Copper vapor laser acoustic thermometry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galkowski, Joseph J. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A copper vapor laser (CVL) acoustic thermometry system is disclosed. The invention couples an acoustic pulse a predetermined distance into a laser tube by means of a transducer and an alumina rod such that an echo pulse is returned along the alumina rod to the point of entry. The time differential between the point of entry of the acoustic pulse into the laser tube and the exit of the echo pulse is related to the temperature at the predetermined distance within the laser tube. This information is processed and can provide an accurate indication of the average temperature within the laser tube.

  19. High energy laser beam dump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, John (Tracy, CA)

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser beam dump is positioned in a housing. An absorbing glass plate means is operatively connected to the housing. A heat sync means for extracting heat from the absorbing glass plate means is operatively connected to the housing and operatively connected to the absorbing glass plate means.

  20. XI UV Laser Trigger System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brickeen, B.K.; Morelli, G.L.; Paiva, R.A.; Powell, C.A.; Sundvold, P.D.

    1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The X1 accelerator project at Sandia National Laboratory/New Mexico utilizes SF6 insulated, multi-stage, UV laser triggered gas switches. A 265 nm UV laser system was designed and built to generate eight simultaneous output pulses of 10 mJ each with a 13 nsec pulse width. A 1061 nm solid-state Nd:Cr:GSGG laser was frequency quadrupled using a two-stage doubling process. The 1061 nm fundamental laser energy was frequency doubled with a KTP crystal to 530 nm, achieving 65% conversion efficiency. The 530 nm output was frequency doubled with KD*P crystal to 265 nm, achieving conversion efficiency of 31%. The 265 nm beam pulse was split into eight parallel channels with a system of partially reflecting mirrors. Low timing jitter and stable energy output were achieved. The entire optical system was packaged into a rugged, o-ring sealed, aluminum structure 10''x19''x2.75''. The size of the electronics was 12''x8''x8''. Subsequent accelerator system requirements dictated a redesign of the triggering system for an output beam with less angular divergence. An unstable, crossed porro prism resonator was designed and incorporated into the system. The beam divergence of the redesigned system was successfully decreased to 0.97 mrad in the UV. The resulting frequency doubling efficiencies were 55% to 530 nm and 25% to 265 nm. The optical output remained at 10 mJ in each channel with an 11 nsec pulse width.