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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ground-source heat pumps can provide an energy-efficient, cost-effective way to heat and cool commercial facilities. While ground-source heat pumps are well established in the residential sector, their application in larger, commercial-style, facilities is lagging, in part because of a lack of experience with the technology by those in decision-making positions. Through the use of a ground-coupling system, a conventional water-source heat pump design is transformed to a unique means of utilizing thermodynamic properties of earth and groundwater for efficient operation throughout the year in most climates. In essence, the ground (or groundwater) serves as a heat source during winter operation and a heat sink for summer cooling. Many varieties in design are available, so the technology can be adapted to almost any site. Ground-source heat pump systems can be used widely in commercial-building applications and, with proper installation, offer great potential for the commercial sector, where increased efficiency and reduced heating and cooling costs are important. Ground-source heat pump systems require less refrigerant than conventional air-source heat pumps or air-conditioning systems, with the exception of direct-expansion-type ground-source heat pump systems. This chapter provides information and procedures that an energy manager can use to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. Ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits are explained. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application and installation. Two case studies are presented to give the reader a sense of the actual costs and energy savings. A list of manufacturers and references for further reading are included for prospective users who have specific or highly technical questions not fully addressed in this chapter. Sample case spreadsheets are provided in Appendix A. Additional appendixes provide other information on the ground-source heat pump technology.

Parker, Steven A.; Hadley, Donald L.

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Ground-source Heat Pumps Applied to Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ground-source heat pumps can provide an energy-efficient, cost-effective way to heat and cool commercial facilities. While ground-source heat pumps are well established in the residential sector, their application in larger, commercial-style, facilities is lagging, in part because of a lack of experience with the technology by those in decision-making positions. Through the use of a ground-coupling system, a conventional water-source heat pump design is transformed to a unique means of utilizing thermodynamic properties of earth and groundwater for efficient operation throughout the year in most climates. In essence, the ground (or groundwater) serves as a heat source during winter operation and a heat sink for summer cooling. Many varieties in design are available, so the technology can be adapted to almost any site. Ground-source heat pump systems can be used widely in commercial-building applications and, with proper installation, offer great potential for the commercial sector, where increased efficiency and reduced heating and cooling costs are important. Ground-source heat pump systems require less refrigerant than conventional air-source heat pumps or air-conditioning systems, with the exception of direct-expansion-type ground-source heat pump systems. This chapter provides information and procedures that an energy manager can use to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. Ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits are explained. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application and installation. Two case studies are presented to give the reader a sense of the actual costs and energy savings. A list of manufacturers and references for further reading are included for prospective users who have specific or highly technical questions not fully addressed in this chapter. Sample case spreadsheets are provided in Appendix A. Additional appendixes provide other information on the ground-source heat pump technology.

Parker, Steven A.; Hadley, Donald L.

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

3

Evacuated-Tube Heat-Pipe Solar Collectors Applied to the Recirculation Loop in a Federal Building: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, simulation, construction, and initial performance of a solar water heating system (a 360-tube evacuated-tube heat-pipe solar collector, 54 m2 in gross area, 36 m2 in net absorber area) installed at the top of the hot water recirculation loop in the Social Security Administration's Mid-Atlantic Center in Philadelphia. When solar energy is available, water returning to the hot water storage tank is heated by the solar array. This new approach, in contrast to the more conventional approach of preheating incoming water, is made possible by the thermal diode effect of heat pipes and low heat loss from evacuated-tube solar collectors. The simplicity of this approach and its low installation costs support the deployment of solar energy in existing commercial buildings, especially where the roof is some distance away from the water heating system, which is often in the basement. Initial performance measurements of the system are reported.

Walker, A.; Mahjouri, F.; Stiteler, R.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Solar heated building structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar heated building structure comprises an exterior shell including side walls and a roof section with the major portion of the roof section comprised of light transmitting panels or panes of material to permit passage of sunlight into the attic section of the building structure. The structure is provided with a central vertical hollow support column containing liquid storage tanks for the circulation and collection of heated water from a flexible conduit system located on the floor of the attic compartment. The central column serves as a heating core for the structure and communicates by way of air conduits or ducts with the living areas of the structure. Fan means are provided for continuously or intermittently circulating air over the hot water storage tanks in the core to transfer heat therefrom and distribute the heated air into the living areas.

Rugenstein, R.W.

1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

5

Buildings","All Heated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings, 1999" 2. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Heated Buildings","Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Heat Pumps","Furnaces","Individual Space Heaters","District Heat","Boilers","Packaged Heating Units","Other" "All Buildings ................",4657,4016,492,1460,894,96,581,1347,185 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1982,240,783,397,"Q",146,589,98 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,946,100,387,183,"Q",144,302,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,629,81,206,191,19,128,253,22

6

Applied heat transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat transfer principles are discussed with emphasis on the practical aspects of the problems. Correlations for heat transfer and pressure drop from several worldwide sources for flow inside and outside of tubes, including finned tubes are presented, along with design and performance calculations of heat exchangers economizers, air heaters, condensers, waste-heat boilers, fired heaters, superheaters, and boiler furnaces. Vibration analysis for tube bundles and heat exchangers are also discussed, as are estimating gas-mixture properties at atmospheric and elevated pressures and life-cycle costing techniques. (JMT)

Ganapathy, V.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Convolution OPrinciple as Applied to the Heat Transfer Problems of Buildings and Fundamentals of Its Efficient Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Problems Of Buildings And Fundamentals Of Its Efficient UsePROBLEMS OF BUILDINGS AND FUNDAMENTALS OF ITS EFFICIENT USE*The explanation o f the fundamentals o f t h i s e f f i c i

Lokmanhekim, Metin

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Buildings","All Heated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Heating Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" 3. Heating Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Heated Buildings","Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Heat Pumps","Furnaces","Individual Space Heaters","District Heat","Boilers","Packaged Heating Units","Other" "All Buildings ................",67338,61602,8923,14449,17349,5534,19522,25743,4073 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,679,2271,1183,"Q",463,1779,250 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,745,2848,1350,"Q",1040,2301,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,1288,3047,3021,307,2047,3994,401

9

Building Technologies Office: Hydronic Heating in Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydronic Heating in Multifamily Buildings Expert Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Hydronic Heating in Multifamily Buildings Expert Meeting on...

10

Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Heating Research Water Heating Research to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research Sensors & Controls Research Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

11

Heat Recovery in Building Envelopes  

SciTech Connect

Infiltration has traditionally been assumed to contribute to the energy load of a building by an amount equal to the product of the infiltration flow rate and the enthalpy difference between inside and outside. Application of such a simple formula may produce an unreasonably high contribution because of heat recovery within the building envelope. Previous laboratory and simulation research has indicated that such heat transfer between the infiltrating air and walls may be substantial. In this study, Computational Fluid Dynamics was used to simulate sensible heat transfer in typical envelope constructions. The results show that the traditional method may over-predict the infiltration energy load by up to 95 percent at low leakage rates. A simplified physical model has been developed and used to predict the infiltration heat recovery based on the Peclet number of the flow and the fraction of the building envelope active in infiltration heat recovery.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Heat recovery in building envelopes  

SciTech Connect

Infiltration has traditionally been assumed to contribute to the energy load of a building by an amount equal to the product of the infiltration flow rate and the enthalpy difference between inside and outside. Some studies have indicated that application of such a simple formula may produce an unreasonably high contribution because of heat recovery within the building envelope. The major objective of this study was to provide an improved prediction of the energy load due to infiltration by introducing a correction factor that multiplies the expression for the conventional load. This paper discusses simplified analytical modeling and CFD simulations that examine infiltration heat recovery (IHR) in an attempt to quantify the magnitude of this effect for typical building envelopes. For comparison, we will also briefly examine the results of some full-scale field measurements of IHR based on infiltration rates and energy use in real buildings. The results of this work showed that for houses with insulated walls the heat recovery is negligible due to the small fraction of the envelope that participates in heat exchange with the infiltrating air. However; there is the potential for IHR to have a significant effect for higher participation dynamic walls/ceilings or uninsulated walls. This result implies that the existing methods for evaluating infiltration related building loads provide adequate results for typical buildings.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Use advisability of heat pumps for building heating and cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the actual economic and energetic juncture, the reduction of thermal energy consumption in buildings became a major, necessary and opportune problem, general significance. The heat pumps are alternative heating installations more energy efficiency ... Keywords: "Geoterm" system, building heating/cooling, energy and economic analysis, heat pump performances, heat pumps, renewable energy sources

Ioan Sârbu; C?lin Sebarchievici

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Buildings","All Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" 0. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Othera" "All Buildings ................",4657,4016,1880,2380,377,96,307,94 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1982,926,1082,214,"Q",162,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,946,379,624,73,"Q",88,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,629,324,389,52,19,42,"Q"

15

Buildings","All Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" 5. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings ................",4657,3239,1546,1520,110,62,130 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1456,795,574,"Q","Q","Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,778,317,429,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,574,265,274,14,9,31

16

PREDICTING THE TIME RESPONSE OF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar space heating system with heat input and building loadBUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATINGBUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Innovative Miniaturized Heat Pumps for Buildings: Modular Thermal Hub for Building Heating, Cooling and Water Heating  

SciTech Connect

BEETIT Project: Georgia Tech is using innovative components and system design to develop a new type of absorption heat pump. Georgia Tech’s new heat pumps are energy efficient, use refrigerants that do not emit greenhouse gases, and can run on energy from combustion, waste heat, or solar energy. Georgia Tech is leveraging enhancements to heat and mass transfer technology possible in microscale passages and removing hurdles to the use of heat-activated heat pumps that have existed for more than a century. Use of microscale passages allows for miniaturization of systems that can be packed as monolithic full-system packages or discrete, distributed components enabling integration into a variety of residential and commercial buildings. Compared to conventional heat pumps, Georgia Tech’s design innovations will create an absorption heat pump that is much smaller, has higher energy efficiency, and can also be mass produced at a lower cost and assembly time.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Heat recovery in building envelopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating Research Facility (AHHRF) located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The house is of standard wood

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Klamath Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Klamath Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature...

20

Direct Use for Building Heat and Hot Water Presentation Slides...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Direct Use for Building Heat and Hot Water Presentation Slides and Text Version Direct Use for Building Heat and Hot Water Presentation Slides and Text Version Download...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Building Blocks of Tropical Diabatic Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rotated EOF analyses are used to study the composition and variability of large-scale tropical diabatic heating profiles estimated from eight field campaigns. The results show that the profiles are composed of a pair of building blocks. These are ...

Samson Hagos

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Virtual building environments (VBE) - Applying information modeling to buildings  

SciTech Connect

A Virtual Building Environment (VBE) is a ''place'' where building industry project staffs can get help in creating Building Information Models (BIM) and in the use of virtual buildings. It consists of a group of industry software that is operated by industry experts who are also experts in the use of that software. The purpose of a VBE is to facilitate expert use of appropriate software applications in conjunction with each other to efficiently support multidisciplinary work. This paper defines BIM and virtual buildings, and describes VBE objectives, set-up and characteristics of operation. It informs about the VBE Initiative and the benefits from a couple of early VBE projects.

Bazjanac, Vladimir

2004-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures Webinar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2011 1, 2011 Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 2:00 PM Eastern Time Be sure that you are also dialed into the telephone conference call: Dial-in number: 888-950-6757; Pass code: 6420234 1 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Building America: Introduction November 11, 2011 Chuck Booten Chuck.Booten@nrel.gov Building Technologies Program 2 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov * Reduce energy use in new and existing residential buildings * Promote building science and systems engineering / integration approach * "Do no harm": Ensure safety, health and durability are maintained or improved

24

Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimized Heat Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research

25

Active and passive solar heating of buildings  

SciTech Connect

An overview of both active and passive solar heating approaches for buildings is presented. Passive solar heating concepts--in which the thermal energy flow is by natural means--are described according to five classifications: direct gain, thermal storage wall, solar greenhouses, roof ponds, and convective loops. Results of simulation analyses are presented for a variety of climates. Active systems utilizing both liquid-heating collectors and air-heating collectors are described. Trends in the recent development of solar heating are discussed.

Balcomb, J.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Building America Expert Meeting Report: Hydronic Heating in Multifamily Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The topic of this expert meeting was cost-effective controls and distribution retrofit options for hot water and steam space heating systems in multi-family buildings with the goals of reducing energy waste and improving occupant comfort. The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program develops technologies with the goal of reducing energy use by 30% to 50% in residential buildings. Toward this goal, the program sponsors 'Expert Meetings' focused on specific building technology topics. The meetings are intended to sharpen Building America research priorities, create a forum for sharing information among industry leaders and build partnerships with professionals and others that can help support the program's research needs and objectives. The topic of this expert meeting was cost-effective controls and distribution retrofit options for hot water and steam space heating systems in multifamily buildings with the goals of reducing energy waste and improving occupant comfort. The objectives of the meeting were to: (1) Share knowledge and experience on new and existing solutions: what works, what doesn't and why, and what's new; (2) Understand the market barriers to currently offered solutions: what disconnects exist in the market and what is needed to overcome or bridge these gaps; and (3) Identify research needs.

Dentz, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Building America Expert Meeting Report: Hydronic Heating in Multifamily Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The topic of this expert meeting was cost-effective controls and distribution retrofit options for hot water and steam space heating systems in multi-family buildings with the goals of reducing energy waste and improving occupant comfort. The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program develops technologies with the goal of reducing energy use by 30% to 50% in residential buildings. Toward this goal, the program sponsors 'Expert Meetings' focused on specific building technology topics. The meetings are intended to sharpen Building America research priorities, create a forum for sharing information among industry leaders and build partnerships with professionals and others that can help support the program's research needs and objectives. The topic of this expert meeting was cost-effective controls and distribution retrofit options for hot water and steam space heating systems in multifamily buildings with the goals of reducing energy waste and improving occupant comfort. The objectives of the meeting were to: (1) Share knowledge and experience on new and existing solutions: what works, what doesn't and why, and what's new; (2) Understand the market barriers to currently offered solutions: what disconnects exist in the market and what is needed to overcome or bridge these gaps; and (3) Identify research needs.

Dentz, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Building Technologies Office: Utility Solar Water Heating Initiative  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Utility Solar Water Heating Initiative Search Search Help Utility Solar Water Heating Initiative EERE Building Technologies Office Utility Solar Water Heating Initiative...

29

Passive solar heating of buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive solar heating concepts--in which the thermal energy flow is by natural means--are described according to five general classifications: direct gain, thermal storage wall, solar greenhouses, roof ponds, and convective loops. Examples of each are discussed. Passive test rooms built at Los Alamos are described and results are presented. Mathematical simulation techniques based on thermal network analysis are given together with validation comparisons against test room data. Systems analysis results for 29 climates are presented showing that the concepts should have wide applicability for solar heating.

Balcomb, J.D.; Hedstrom, J.C.; McFarland, R.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Passive solar heating for buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A passive solar energy system is one in which the thermal energy flow is by natural means, that is by radiation, conduction, or natural convection. A survey of passive solar heating experience, especially in the U.S., is provided. Design approaches are reviewed and examples shown. Misconceptions are discussed. Advantages are listed. The Los Alamos program of performance simulation and evaluation is described and a simplified method of performance estimation is outlined.

Balcomb, J.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Heat Pump Water Heaters for Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reviews the technology of heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) for commercial building applications. The report discusses the technical and conceptual background of heat pump water heaters, laboratory testing as performed at EPRI's laboratory, and implications of the test results. It provides analysis of the climactic applicability, financial scenarios, the air-cooling benefit or detriment of HPWH technology.

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

32

Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Heated garages (> 10 °C) Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages" Showing 15 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 900 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 400 + Sweden Building 05K0020 + 300 + Sweden Building 05K0022 + 3,300 + Sweden Building 05K0031 + 2,331 + Sweden Building 05K0033 + 465 + Sweden Building 05K0035 + 1,276 + Sweden Building 05K0037 + 130 + Sweden Building 05K0039 + 580 + Sweden Building 05K0047 + 1,076 + Sweden Building 05K0048 + 340 + Sweden Building 05K0061 + 90 + Sweden Building 05K0067 + 856 + Sweden Building 05K0093 + 2,880 +

33

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Chapter 9: Heating and Cooling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

care resources Small business resources State and local government resources ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Chapter 9: Heating and Cooling Upgrades The Building Upgrade...

34

Energy Efficiency in Buildings in Switzerland - Applied Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency in Buildings in Switzerland - Applied Research on Vacuum Insulation, Passive Houses etc. Speaker(s): Armin Binz Date: January 21, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg....

35

Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reducing the heating energy in buildings using a combination of low temperature boilers, heat recovery strategies and a new approach to geo-thermal systems. His data from...

36

Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cold Climate Heat Pump Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Cold Climate Heat Pump Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research

37

ISHED1: Applying the LEM Methodology to Heat Exchanger Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISHED1: Applying the LEM Methodology to Heat Exchanger Design Kenneth A. Kaufman Ryszard S. Michalski MLI 00-2 #12;2 ISHED1: APPLYING THE LEM METHODOLOGY TO HEAT EXCHANGER DESIGN Kenneth A. Kaufman-2 January 2000 #12;ISHED1: APPLYING THE LEM METHODOLOGY TO HEAT EXCHANGER DESIGN Abstract Evolutionary

Michalski, Ryszard S.

38

Building America Standing Technical Committee - Water Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heating Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan, v2012a Revised: January 2012 Committee Chair: 2011, 2012 Marc Hoeschele mhoesch@davisenergy.com 530-753-1100 x23 ARBI Page 2 Background on Residential Water Heating According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), annual residential water heating totals 2.11 quads of energy annually, or 20% of the energy delivered to residential buildings 1 . Over the past 70 years, gas and electric storage water heaters have been the predominant water heater type in the United States 2 . Recently, gas tankless water heaters have made inroads in market share with current industry projected gas tankless sales estimated at 400,000+ annually, and an

39

Generative Design Systems Applied to Low-Energy Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generative Design Systems Applied to Low-Energy Buildings Generative Design Systems Applied to Low-Energy Buildings Speaker(s): Maria Luisa de Oliveira Gama Caldas Date: March 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Paul Mathew Generative Design Systems (GDS) represent a step beyond parametric models, integrating design goals, building simulations and shape generation. In this seminar, present and future research projects on the application of different GDS to low-energy buildings are discussed. The software GENE_ARCH integrates energy simulations with multicriteria search methods such as pareto genetic algorithms, to locate acceptable alternatives that move the current design towards performance goals set by the user. DIVA, a system that integrates parametric geometrical modeling with Radiance, Daysim and

40

How to Apply the ENERGY STAR Certified Building Decal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Apply the ENERGY STAR How to Apply the ENERGY STAR Certified Building Decal Page Cyan-and-White Decal Instructions Application Instructions 2 How to Make a Glass Plaque 4 Cyan-and-White Paper Templates 5 "Etched-Look" Decal Instructions Application Instructions 7 How to Make a Glass Plaque 9 "Etched-Look" Paper Templates 10 How to Apply the ENERGY STAR Cyan and White Certified Building Decal What's in this package: Two sets of: ENERGY STAR logo decal 1. "Certified Building" lettering decal, with thick white paper on 2. one side and thin, semi-translucent paper on the other side. Paper templates of logo and lettering What you'll need: Level 1. Masking tape 2. Rubbing alcohol and a clean, soft cloth 3. Drivers license, credit card, or other rigid

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Buildings","Heated Buildings",,"Cooled Buildings",,"Lit Buildingsc"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Heated, Cooled, and Lit Buildings, Floorspace, 1999" 1. Heated, Cooled, and Lit Buildings, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Heated Buildings",,"Cooled Buildings",,"Lit Buildingsc" ,,"Total Floorspacea","Heated Floorspaceb","Total Floorspacea","Cooled Floorspaceb","Total Floorspacea","Lit Floorspaceb" "All Buildings ................",67338,61602,53812,58474,42420,64085,54696 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,5055,4879,3958,5859,4877 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,5744,6212,4333,7421,5583 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,8196,9530,6195,10358,8251

42

Building Technologies Office: Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air-Source Integrated Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research

43

Building Technologies Office: HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radial Air Bearing Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: HVAC Radial Air Bearing Heat Exchanger Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE

44

Heating Degree Day Data Applied to Residential Heating Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-specific total electric energy and heating oil consumption for individual residences show a very high correlation with National Weather Service airport temperature data when transformed to heating degree days. Correlations of regional total ...

Robert G. Quayle; Henry F. Diaz

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Oakland University Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Oakland University Human Health Science Building Geothermal Heat Pump Systems Project Type Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal...

46

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems June 24, 2012 - 1:50pm Addthis Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo...

47

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems June 24, 2012 - 1:50pm Addthis Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo Credit: iStockphoto Before installing a solar water heating system, you should investigate local building codes, zoning ordinances, and subdivision covenants, as well as any special regulations pertaining to the site. You will probably need a building permit to install a solar energy system onto an existing building. Not every community or municipality initially welcomes residential renewable energy installations. Although this is often due to ignorance or the comparative novelty of renewable energy systems, you must comply with existing building and permit procedures to install your system.

48

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems June 24, 2012 - 1:50pm Addthis Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo Credit: iStockphoto Before installing a solar water heating system, you should investigate local building codes, zoning ordinances, and subdivision covenants, as well as any special regulations pertaining to the site. You will probably need a building permit to install a solar energy system onto an existing building. Not every community or municipality initially welcomes residential renewable energy installations. Although this is often due to ignorance or the comparative novelty of renewable energy systems, you must comply with existing building and permit procedures to install your system.

49

Table B37. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings...

50

Retrocommissioning Case Study - Applying Building Selection Criteria for Maximum Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commissioning of existing buildings, or “retrocommissioning” is a systematic process to identify operational and maintenance (O&M) improvements that optimize building performance and ensure that building systems function together efficiently and effectively (Haasl, Sharp 1999). This paper presents a case study of a utility-funded retrocommissioning evaluation on a 125,000 SF office facility in La Mesa, California. The commissioning process consisted of site visits, interviews with facility staff, data collection and analysis, recommendation of energy conservation measures, and verification of savings. The study identified 13 deficiencies and recommended a suite of three O&M measures, one capital improvement measure and five other measures. The measures selected and implemented by the owner resulted in annual projected savings of 238,000 kWh (9.9%) and utility cost savings of $20,000 (6.9%)1, with a simple payback of 0.7 years. The project also demonstrated the value of applying rigorous building selection criteria to obtain cost-effective results. This paper profiles the project and discusses lesson learned.

Luskay, L.; Haasl, T.; Irvine, L.; Frey, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Interaction of a solar space heating system with the thermal behavior of a building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal behavior of a building in response to heat input from an active solar space heating system is analyzed to determine the effect of the variable storage tank temperature on the cycling rate, on-time, and off-time of a heating cycle and on the comfort characteristics of room air temperature swing and of offset of the average air temperature from the setpoint (droop). A simple model of a residential building, a fan coil heat-delivery system, and a bimetal thermostat are used to describe the system. A computer simulation of the system behavior has been developed and verified by comparisons with predictions from previous studies. The system model and simulation are then applied to determine the building response to a typical hydronic solar heating system for different solar storage temperatures, outdoor temperatures, and fan coil sizes. The simulations were run only for those cases where there was sufficient energy from storage to meet the building load requirements.

Vilmer, C.; Warren, M.L.; Auslander, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings Modern Heating Options for Commercial/Institutional Buildings Speaker(s): Thomas Durkin Date: February 23, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Moira Howard-Jeweler This seminar presentation will be video-conferenced from our Washington, DC Projects office.) According to USGBC, LBNL, and CBECS data, commercial/institutional buildings use one quarter of all the energy consumed in the US. Depending on the geographic area of the country, heating can be as little as 30% (Houston), or as much as 68% (Minneapolis) of the building total. Mr. Durkin will share his experience in dramatically reducing the heating energy in buildings using a combination of low temperature boilers, heat recovery strategies and a new approach to geo-thermal systems. His data from completed projects shows 50 to 60%

53

Thermal Solar Energy Systems for Space Heating of Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, the simulation and the analysis of a solar flat plate collectors combined with a compression heat pump is carried out. The system suggested must ensure the heating of a building without the recourse to an auxiliary energy source in complement of this heating system. The system is used to heat a building using heating floor. The building considered is located in Constantine-East of Algeria (Latitude 36.28 N, Longitude 6.62 E, Altitude 689m). For the calculation, the month of February was chosen, which is considered as the coldest month according to the weather data of Constantine. The performances of this system were compared to the performances of the traditional solar heating system using solar collectors and an auxiliary heating load to compensate the deficit. In this case a traditional solar heating system having the same characteristics with regard to the solar collecting area and the volume of storage tank is used. It can be concluded that the space heating system using a solar energy combined with heat pump improve the thermal performance of the heat pump and the global system. The performances of the heating system combining heat pump and solar collectors are higher than that of solar heating system with solar collectors and storage tank. The heat pump assisted by solar energy can contribute to the conservation of conventional energy and can be competitive with the traditional systems of heating.

Gomri, R.; Boulkamh, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: HEAT3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be described in a rectangular grid. HEAT3 can be used for analyses of thermal bridges, heat transfer through corners of a window, heat loss from a house to the ground, to...

55

Overheating in Hot Water- and Steam-Heated Multifamily Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apartment temperature data have been collected from the archives of companies that provide energy management systems (EMS) to multifamily buildings in the Northeast U.S. The data have been analyzed from more than 100 apartments in eighteen buildings where EMS systems were already installed to quantify the degree of overheating. This research attempts to answer the question, 'What is the magnitude of apartment overheating in multifamily buildings with central hot water or steam heat?' This report provides valuable information to researchers, utility program managers and building owners interested in controlling heating energy waste and improving resident comfort. Apartment temperature data were analyzed for deviation from a 70 degrees F desired setpoint and for variation by heating system type, apartment floor level and ambient conditions. The data shows that overheating is significant in these multifamily buildings with both hot water and steam heating systems.

Dentz, J.; Varshney, K.; Henderson, H.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Heat storage and distribution inside passive-solar buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive-solar buildings are investigated from the viewpoint of the storage of solar heat in materials of the building: walls, floors, ceilings, and furniture. The effects of the location, material, thickness, and orientation of each internal building surface are investigated. The concept of diurnal heat capacity is introduced and a method of using this parameter to estimate clear-day temperature swings is developed. Convective coupling to remote rooms within a building is discussed, including both convection through single doorways and convective loops that may exist involving a sunspace. Design guidelines are given.

Balcomb, J.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

INTERACTION OF A SOLAR SPACE HEATING SYSTEM WITH THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determine the building response to the solar heating system.on building comfort of an active solar heating system wherethe building response to a typical h"ydronic solar heating

Vilmer, Christian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Klamath Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Klamath Apartment Buildings (13) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Klamath Apartment Buildings (13) Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

59

New and Existing Buildings Heating and Cooling Opportunities: Dedicated Heat Recovery Chiller  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Langfitt Langfitt U S Department of State Overseas Buildings Operations Mechanical Engineering Division *Engineers are working Harder AND Smarter *New Energy Economy *Heating Is Where The Opportunity Is  39% of total US energy goes into non-residential buildings.  Gas for heating is about 60% of energy used in a building  Gas for heating is at least 25% of total energy used in the US. Heat Generation System Heat Disposal System What's Wrong With This Picture? Keep the heat IN the system Don't run main plant equipment until necessary ! Less rejected heat Less gas consumption High Temp >160F with conventional boilers Hydronic heating... condensing style modular boilers. The entire heating system... designed for low temperature water, recommend maximum temperature of 135ºF.

60

Energy Star Building Upgrade Manual Heating and Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9. Heating and 9. Heating and Cooling Revised January 2008 9.1 Overview 2 9.2 Central Cooling Systems 3 Chiller Plant Operations and Maintenance 4 Chiller Plant Retrofits 6 9.3 Central Heating Systems 10 Boiler System Operations and Maintenance 11 Boiler System Retrofits 11 Improving Furnace Efficiency 13 9.4 Unitary Systems 14 Packaged Rooftop Units 16 Split-System Packaged Units 18 Air-Source Heat Pumps 18 Ground-Source, Closed-Loop Heat Pumps 19 9.5 Additional Strategies 20 Air-Side Economizer 20 Energy Recovery 20 Desiccant Dehumidification 20 Night Precooling 21 Cool Storage 22 Evaporative Cooling 22 9.6 Summary 22 Bibliography 23 Glossary G-1 1 ENERGY STAR ® Building Manual ENERGY STAR ® Building Manual 9. Heating and Cooling 9.1 Overview Although heating and cooling systems provide a useful service by keeping occupants comfort-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

"Table B32. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 2. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,56478,27490,28820,1880,3088,1422 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,4759,2847,1699,116,"N",169 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5348,2821,2296,"Q","Q",205 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,9562,4809,4470,265,"Q",430

62

"Table B27. Space Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Space Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 7. Space Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,28600,36959,5988,5198,3204,842 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,2367,2829,557,"Q",665,183 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,2560,3358,626,"Q",529,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,4872,6407,730,289,597,"Q"

63

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: HEAT2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

internal modifications is 100 (one application is analysis of floor heating with many pipes). Conductances and capacities may be written to file. Temperature field may be...

64

FS: heat pump water heaters | The Better Buildings Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Service » Install a heat pump Food Service » Install a heat pump water heaterand reduce water heating energy up to 70% using the commercial heat pump water heater specificat Activities Technology Solutions Teams Lighting & Electrical Space Conditioning Plug & Process Loads Food Service Refrigeration Laboratories Energy Management & Information Systems Public Sector Teams Market Solutions Teams Install a heat pump water heaterand reduce water heating energy up to 70% using the commercial heat pump water heater specification The Food Service team developed a Commercial Heat Pump Water Heater Specification that can be used to reduce water heating energy by 70%. An older, electric resistance water heater (operated in a building with a hot water demand of 500 gallons a day) can cost more than $3,500 each year

65

THERM: Two-Dimensional Building Heat-Transfer Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 THERM: Two-Dimensional Building Heat-Transfer Modeling For more information and to download THERM, please visit our website: http://windows.lbl.gov/software/therm The Windows and Daylighting Group's two-year-old computer program THERM 1.0 is a state-of-the-art tool for modeling two-dimensional heat-transfer effects in building components. The thermal property information THERM provides is important for the design and application of building components such as windows, walls, foundations, roofs and doors. This Microsoft Windows-based program has great potential to users such as building component manufacturers, educators, students, architects, engineers and others who are interested in assessing the heat-transfer properties of single products, product interactions, or integrated systems. THERM

66

Expert Meeting Report: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The topic of this meeting was 'Recommendations For Applying Water Heaters In Combination Space And Domestic Water Heating Systems.' Presentations and discussions centered on the design, performance, and maintenance of these combination systems, with the goal of developing foundational information toward the development of a Building America Measure Guideline on this topic. The meeting was held at the Westford Regency Hotel, in Westford, Massachusetts on 7/31/2011.

Rudd, A.; Ueno, K.; Bergey, D.; Osser, R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Cooling and Heating Loads | Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling and Heating Loads Cooling and Heating Loads The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on heating and cooling system design loads for the purpose of sizing systems and equipment should be calculated in accordance with generally accepted engineering standards and handbooks such as ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 air_cooling_and_heating_loads.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999

68

What`s new in building energy research: Thermal distribution technology. DOE looks at cutting energy losses in a building`s heating and cooling distribution system  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy takes a look at cutting energy losses in a building`s heating and cooling distribution system.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Energy conservation by adaptive control for a solar heated building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Identification and optimal control techniques are combined to form an adaptive optimal control strategy which is used to minimize the auxiliary energy consumption for a solar heated building. The adaptive optimal control strategy is described and application of the adaptive optimal controller to the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system in an appropriate building is modeled. The building used is the newly completed National Security and Resources Study Center (NSRSC) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). The NSRSC uses an 8000 sq. ft. solar collector to provide energy for heating and cooling the building. A cost functional to define optimal performance of the HVAC system and an identification process to produce a linearized building model are combined to yield an adaptive linear regulator solution. Although solar energy is used for both heating and cooling the NSRSC, only the results from the heating simulation are available for presentation here. Energy savings predicted by the model when compared to a conventional control system are described and an alternate system configuration is briefly discussed. Plans for actual implementation of the adaptive optimal controller are discussed.

Farris, D.R.; Melsa, J.L.; Murray, H.S.; McDonald, T.E.; Springer, T.E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Heating remote rooms in passive solar buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Remote rooms can be effectively heated by convection through a connecting doorway. A simple steady-state equation is developed for design purposes. Validation of a dynamic model is achieved using data obtained over a 13-day period. Dynamic effects are investigated using a simulation analysis for three different cases of driving temperature; the effect is to reduce the temperature difference between the driving room and the remote room compared to the steady-state model. For large temperature swings in the driving room a strategy which uses the intervening door in a diode mode is effective. The importance of heat-storing mass in the remote room is investigated.

Balcomb, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Applying Learnable Evolution Model to Heat Exchanger Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new approach to evolutionary computation, called Learnable Evolution Model (LEM), has been applied to the problem of optimizing tube structures of heat exchangers. In contrast to conventional Darwiniantype evolutionary computation algorithms that use various forms of mutation and/or recombination operators, LEM employs machine learning to guide the process of generating new individuals. A system, ISHED1, based on LEM, automatically searches for the highest capacity heat exchangers under given technical and environmental constraints. The results of experiments have been highly promising, often producing solutions exceeding the best human designs.

Kenneth A. Kaufman; Ryszard S. Michalski

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Convective heat transfer inside passive solar buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Natural convection between spaces in a building can play a major role in energy transfer. Two situations are investigated: convection through a single doorway into a remote room, and a convective loop in a two-story house with a south sunspace where a north stairway serves as the return path. A doorway-sizing equation is given for the single-door case. Detailed data are given from the monitoring of airflow in one two-story house and summary data are given for five others. Observations on the nature of the airflow and design guidelines are presented.

Jones, R.W.; Balcomb, J.D.; Yamaguchi, K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Space heating for office building at Glenwood Springs, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical assistance in a preliminary design and economic evaluation of a geothermal heating system was provided. The use of a downhole heat exchanger was evaluated, with the objective of reducing costs in this first stage of the project, but was abandoned. The low resource temperature and lack of sufficient aquifer data were the reasons for abandonment of the downhole heat exchanger concept. The use of surface plate heat exchangers was selected as the preferred approach for utilizing the geothermal resource. Brine will be passed through three plate heat exchangers in the building basement. Separate loops of clean circulating fluid will be used to extract heat from the brine in three heat exchangers, with the loops providing heat to the building, a hot tub, and a deicing system. The cooled geothermal fluid from the heat exchangers will be injected to an isolated injection zone at the bottom of the production well. Aquifer tests are required to develop final pump sizes and process flows. The information developed from the work tasks of this project is presented.

Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Feasibility Analysis For Heating Tribal Buildings with Biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a feasibility study for the heating of Tribal buildings using woody biomass. The study was conducted for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation in western Montana. S&K Holding Company and TP Roche Company completed the study and worked together to provide the final report. This project was funded by the DOE's Tribal Energy Program.

Steve Clairmont; Micky Bourdon; Tom Roche; Colene Frye

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

75

Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Federal Facilities, Second Edition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E E N E R G Y M A N A G E M E N T P R O G R A M and exterior to the facility, are typically less than those for conventional systems. Potential Application The technology has been shown to be techni- cally valid and economically attractive in many applications. It is efficient and effective. This Federal Technology Alert reports on the collec- tive experience of heat pump users and evalua- tors and provides application guidance. An estimated 400,000 ground-source heat pumps are operating in the private and public sector, although most of these systems operate in resi- dential applications. A ground-source heat pump system can be applied in virtually any category of climate or building. The large num- ber of installations testifies to the stability of this technology. The reported problems can

76

Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Federal Facilities, Second Edition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and exterior to the facility, are typically less and exterior to the facility, are typically less than those for conventional systems. Potential Application The technology has been shown to be techni- cally valid and economically attractive in many applications. It is efficient and effective. This Federal Technology Alert reports on the collec- tive experience of heat pump users and evalua- tors and provides application guidance. An estimated 400,000 ground-source heat pumps are operating in the private and public sector, although most of these systems operate in resi- dential applications. A ground-source heat pump system can be applied in virtually any category of climate or building. The large num- ber of installations testifies to the stability of this technology. The reported problems can usually be attributed to faulty design or

77

Building codes as barriers to solar heating and cooling of buildings  

SciTech Connect

The application of building codes to solar energy systems for heating and cooling of buildings is discussed, using as typical codes the three model building codes most widely adopted by states and localities. Some potential barriers to solar energy systems are found, federal and state programs to deal with these barriers are discussed, and alternatives are suggested. To remedy this, a federal program is needed to encourage state adoption of standards and acceptance of certification of solar systems for code approval, and to encourage revisions to codes based on model legislation prepared for the federal government by the model codes groups.

Meeker, F.O. III

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Table B28. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated","All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated" "All Buildings ................",4657,641,576,627,2813,67338,5736,7593,10745,43264 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,366,230,272,1479,6774,1091,707,750,4227 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,164,194,149,603,8238,1148,1504,1177,4409

80

On Variations of Space-heating Energy Use in Office Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On Variations of Space-heating Energy Use in Office Buildings Title On Variations of Space-heating Energy Use in Office Buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Heat recovery and thermal storage : a study of the Massachusetts State Transportation Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the energy system at the Massachusetts State Transportation Building was conducted. This innovative energy system utilizes internal-source heat pumps and a water thermal storage system to provide building heating ...

Bjorklund, Abbe Ellen

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

An in-depth Analysis of Space Heating Energy Use in Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experimental data, Energy and Buildings 36, 543-555. O.G.consumption for heating, Energy and Buildings 43, 2662-2672.reduction for a net zero energy building, ACEEE Summer Study

Lin, Hung-Wen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Solar energy collector for mounting over windows of buildings for space heating thereof  

SciTech Connect

The ornamental design for a solar energy collector for mounting over windows of buildings for space heating thereof, as shown.

Arrington, P.M.

1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Direct Use for Building Heat and Hot Water Presentation Slides and Text Version  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Download presentation slides from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on direct use for building heat and hot water.

85

Performance estimates for attached-sunspace passive solar heated buildings  

SciTech Connect

Performance predictions have been made for attached-sunspace types of passively solar heated buildings. The predictions are based on hour-by-hour computer simulations using computer models developed in the framework of PASOLE, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) passive solar energy simulation program. The models have been validated by detailed comparison with actual hourly temperature measurements taken in attached-sunspace test rooms at LASL.

McFarland, R.D.; Jones, R.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Title Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6267E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Stadler, Michael, Markus Groissböck, Gonçalo Cardoso, Andreas Müller, and Judy Lai Abstract Governor Brown's research priorities include an additional 6.5 GW of combined heat and power (CHP) by 2030. As of 2009, roughly 0.25 GW of small natural gas and biogas fired CHP is documented by the Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) database. The SGIP is set to expire, and the anticipated grid de-carbonization based on the development of 20 GW of renewable energy will influence the CHP adoption. Thus, an integrated optimization approach for this analysis was chosen that allows optimizing the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER) such as photovoltaics (PV), CHP, storage technologies, etc. in the California commercial sector from the building owners' perspective. To solve this DER adoption problem the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and used extensively to address the problem of optimally investing and scheduling DER under multiple settings, has been used. The application of CHP at large industrial sites is well known, and much of its potential is already being realized. Conversely, commercial sector CHP, especially those above 50 to 100 kW peak electricity load, is widely overlooked. In order to analyze the role of DER in CO2 reduction, 147 representative sites in different climate zones were selected from the California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS). About 8000 individual optimization runs, with different assumptions for the electric tariffs, natural gas costs, marginal grid CO2 emissions, and nitrogen oxide treatment costs, SGIP, fuel cell lifetime, fuel cell efficiency, PV installation costs, and payback periods for investments have been performed. The most optimistic CHP potential contribution in this sector in 2020 will be 2.7 GW. However, this result requires a SGIP in 2020, 46% average electric efficiency for fuel cells, a payback period for investments of 10 years, and a CO2 focused approach of the building owners. In 2030 it will be only 2.5 GW due to the anticipated grid de-carbonization. The 2030 result requires a 60% electric efficiency and 20 year life time for fuel cells, a payback period of 10 years, and a CO2 minimization strategy of building owners. Finally, the possible CHP potential in 2030 shows a significant variance between 0.2 GW and 2.5 GW, demonstrating the complex interactions between technologies, policies, and customer objectives.

87

Building Technologies Office: Heat Pump Laundry Dryer Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings News Building Technologies Office Announces 3 Million to Advance Building Automation Software Solutions in Small to Medium-Sized Commercial Buildings March 29,...

88

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DstrtHeating | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DstrtHeating Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. District heating Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DstrtHeating" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 111.56331078 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 72.7932960894 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 111.899416255 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 72.865497076 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 285.840707965 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 128.449958182 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 63.8377147588 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 115.128205128 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 66.5515753129 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 148.741418764 +

89

Expert Meeting Report: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recommendations for Applying Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems A. Rudd, K. Ueno, D. Bergey, R. Osser Building Science Corporation June 2012 i This report received minimal editorial review at NREL. NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, subcontractors, or affiliated partners makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

90

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1766,2165,360,65,372,113 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,888,1013,196,"Q",243,72 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,349,450,86,"Q",72,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,311,409,46,18,38,"Q"

91

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3472,1910,1445,94,27,128 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,1715,1020,617,41,"N",66 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,725,386,307,"Q","Q",27 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,607,301,285,16,"Q",27

92

Solar load ratio method applied to commercial building active solar system sizing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hourly simulation procedure is the DOE-2 building energy analysis computer program. It is capable of calculating the loads and of simulating various control strategies in detail for both residential and commercial buildings and yet is computationally efficient enough to be used for extensive parametric studies. In addition, to a Building Service Hot Water (BSHW) System and a combined space heating and hot water system using liquid collectors for a commercial building analyzed previously, a space heating system using an air collector is analyzed. A series of runs is made for systems using evacuated tube collectors for comparison to flat-plate collectors, and the effects of additional system design parameters are investigated. Also, the generic collector types are characterized by standard efficiency curves, rather than by detailed collector specifications. (MHR)

Schnurr, N.M.; Hunn, B.D.; Williamson, K.D. III

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects to someone by E-mail Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on AddThis.com...

94

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumps | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumps SPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumps Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Heat pumps Pages using the property "Building/SPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumps" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 0.0 +

95

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

267E 267E Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Michael Stadler, Markus Groissböck, Gonçalo Cardoso, Andreas Müller, and Judy Lai Environmental Energy Technologies Division http://microgrid.lbl.gov This project was funded by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program under WFO Contract No. 500-10-052 and by the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. We are appreciative of the Commission's timely support for this project. We particularly thank Golam Kibrya and Chris Scruton for their guidance and assistance through all phases of the project. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California

96

Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide-Based Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on AddThis.com...

97

Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas-Fired Absorption Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on AddThis.com...

98

Building Technologies Office: Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Function Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities

99

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2HeatPumps | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2HeatPumps SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2HeatPumps Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Heat pumps Pages using the property "Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2HeatPumps" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 0.0 +

100

Semi-empirical method for estimating the performance of direct gain passive solar heated buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sunspot code for performance analysis of direct gain passive solar heated buildings is used to calculate the annual solar fraction for two representative designs in ten American cities. The two representative designs involve a single thermal storage mass configuration which is evaluated with and without night insulation. In both cases the solar aperture is double glazed. The results of the detailed thermal network calculations are then correlated using the monthly solar load ratio method which has already been successfully applied to the analysis of both active solar heated buildings and passive thermal storage wall systems. The method is based on a correlation between the monthly solar heating fraction and the monthly solar load ratio. The monthly solar load ratio is defined as the ratio of the monthly solar energy transmitted through the glazing aperture to the building's monthly thermal load. The procedure using the monthly method for any location is discussed in detail. In addition, a table of annual performance results for 84 cities is presented, enabling the designer to bypass the monthly method for these locations.

Wray, W.O.; Balcomb, J.D.; McFarland, R.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDstrtHeating | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDstrtHeating SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDstrtHeating Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. District heating Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDstrtHeating" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 2067.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 492.2 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 473.4 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 1763.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 605.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 1727.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1448.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 844.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 2176.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 61.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 967.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 1185.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 1704.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 154.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 145.0 +

102

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDstrtHeating | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDstrtHeating SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDstrtHeating Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. District heating Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDstrtHeating" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 2193.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 521.2 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 498.4 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 1869.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 646.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 1843.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1542.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 898.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 2313.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 65.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 1032.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 1256.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 1817.6002445 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 162.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 158.0 +

103

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercElctrcHeating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPElectrtyUsePercElctrcHeating SPElectrtyUsePercElctrcHeating Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Electric heating Pages using the property "Building/SPElectrtyUsePercElctrcHeating" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 1.28146332495 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 1.35810846872 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 36.3055086974 +

104

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumpsUsedForColg | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumpsUsedForColg SPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumpsUsedForColg Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Heat pumps used for cooling Pages using the property "Building/SPElectrtyUsePercHeatPumpsUsedForColg" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.384283126305 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 +

105

Applying Learnable Evolution Model to Heat Exchanger Design Kenneth A. Kaufman and Ryszard S. Michalski*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applying Learnable Evolution Model to Heat Exchanger Design Kenneth A. Kaufman and Ryszard S), has been applied to the problem of optimizing tube structures of heat exchangers. In contrast. A system, ISHED1, based on LEM, automatically searches for the highest capacity heat exchangers under given

Michalski, Ryszard S.

106

Brain emotional learning based intelligent controller applied to neurofuzzy model of micro-heat exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an intelligent controller is applied to govern the dynamics of electrically heated micro-heat exchanger plant. First, the dynamics of the micro-heat exchanger, which acts as a nonlinear plant, is identified using a neurofuzzy network. ... Keywords: Emotion based learning, Heat exchanger, Intelligent control, Locally linear models, Neurofuzzy models, Nonlinear system identification

Hossein Rouhani; Mahdi Jalili; Babak N. Araabi; Wolfgang Eppler; Caro Lucas

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Technical and Energy Assessment of Building Integrated Photovoltaic Systems applied to the UAE Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the market, the embodied energy payback time (EPBT) is the scale to measure and compare the viability of PV systems against other technologies. Although the impact of PV panels on the operational energy is significant, it is not considered at the time of EPBT estimation. Including savings in operational energy gained over the PV system life leads to shortening the total EPBT. This study shows that the ratio between PV outputs and savings in energy due to PV panels is about 1:3. For the southern and western PV facades of the UAE office buildings, the embodied energy payback time is 12-13 years. When reductions in operational energy are considered the payback time can be reduced to 3 years. It is obvious that the reduction in the operational energy due to the PV panels represents an important factor when the EPBT is estimated.

Radhi, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2ElctrcHeating | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2ElctrcHeating" SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2ElctrcHeating" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.915704329247 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.745132743363 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 25.8064516129 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 5.89159465829 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0018 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0019 + 0.0 +

109

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrcHeating | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrcHeating" SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrcHeating" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.915704329247 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.745132743363 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 25.8064516129 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 5.89159465829 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0018 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0019 + 0.0 +

110

Analysis of Heat Charging and Discharging on the Phase Change Energy-Storage Composite Wallboard (PCECW) in Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research paper combines the phase change material and the basal building material to constitute a kind of new phase change energy- storage composite wallboard (PCECW), applied in a residential building in Beijing. We analyzed the energy-storage characteristics of the PCECW according to phase change energy-storage theory, which is used as the storage-heat body in the “light" inner wallboards, compared to the normal “heavy" inner wallboards. Through computer simulation, we measured the effects on the heating and energy consumption of the room when the enthalpy, thermal coefficient and thickness of the PCECW were changed. The results show that the PCECW the phase change wall could effectively reduce the temperature fluctuation and the winter heating energy consumption in the residential building.

Yue, H.; Chen, C.; Liu, Y.; Guo, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Integration of Combined Heat and Power Generators into Small Buildings - A Transient Analysis Approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Small combined heat and power generators have the potential to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of residential buildings. Recently, much attention has been… (more)

DeBruyn, Adrian Bryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Vapnik's learning theory applied to energy consumption forecasts in residential buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the purpose of energy conservation, we present in this paper an introduction to the use of support vector (SV) learning machines used as a data mining tool applied to buildings energy consumption data from a measurement campaign. Experiments using ... Keywords: data mining, energy conservation, energy efficiency, predictive modelling, statistical learning theory

Florence Lai; Frederic Magoules; Fred Lherminier

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A methodology to assess the influence of local wind conditions and building orientation on the convective heat transfer at building surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information on the statistical mean convective heat transfer coefficient (CHTC"S"M) for a building surface, which represents the temporally-averaged CHTC over a long time span (e.g. the lifetime of the building), could be useful for example for the optimisation ... Keywords: Building facade, Building orientation, CFD, Convective heat transfer coefficient, Low-Reynolds number modelling, RANS, Wind climate

Thijs Defraeye; Jan Carmeliet

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

An analysis of heating and cooling conservation features in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

One purpose of this study is to estimate the relationship in commercial buildings between conservation investments, fuel prices, building occupancy and building characteristics for new buildings and for existing buildings. The database is a nationwide survey of energy in commercial buildings conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in 1906. Some simple cross-tabulations indicate that conservation measures vary with building size, building age, and fuel used for building heating. Regression estimates of a conservation model indicate that the number of conservation model indicate that the number of conservation features installed during construction is a positive function of the price of the heating fuel at the time of construction. Subsequent additions of conservation features are positively correlated with increases in heating fuel prices. Given the EIA projection of relatively stable future energy prices, the number of retrofits may not increase significantly. Also, energy efficiency in new buildings may not continue to increase relative to current new buildings. If fuel prices affect consumption via initial conservation investments, current fuel prices, marginal or average, are not the appropriate specification. The fuel price regression results indicate that conservation investments in new buildings are responsive to market signals. Retrofits are less responsive to market signals. The number of conservation features in a building is not statistically related to the type of occupancy (owner versus renter), which implies that conservation strategies are not impeded by the renting or leasing of buildings.

Sutherland, R.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

An analysis of heating and cooling conservation features in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

One purpose of this study is to estimate the relationship in commercial buildings between conservation investments, fuel prices, building occupancy and building characteristics for new buildings and for existing buildings. The database is a nationwide survey of energy in commercial buildings conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in 1906. Some simple cross-tabulations indicate that conservation measures vary with building size, building age, and fuel used for building heating. Regression estimates of a conservation model indicate that the number of conservation model indicate that the number of conservation features installed during construction is a positive function of the price of the heating fuel at the time of construction. Subsequent additions of conservation features are positively correlated with increases in heating fuel prices. Given the EIA projection of relatively stable future energy prices, the number of retrofits may not increase significantly. Also, energy efficiency in new buildings may not continue to increase relative to current new buildings. If fuel prices affect consumption via initial conservation investments, current fuel prices, marginal or average, are not the appropriate specification. The fuel price regression results indicate that conservation investments in new buildings are responsive to market signals. Retrofits are less responsive to market signals. The number of conservation features in a building is not statistically related to the type of occupancy (owner versus renter), which implies that conservation strategies are not impeded by the renting or leasing of buildings.

Sutherland, R.J.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course on Direct Use for Building Heat and Hot Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Direct Use for Building Direct Use for Building Heat and Hot Water Webinar (text version) Below is the text version of the Webinar titled "DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Courses Renewable Energy Technologies: Direct Use for Building Heat and Hot Water." Slide 1 Amy Hollander: Hello, I'm Amy Hollander with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Welcome to today's webinar on Building Heat and Hot Water sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs. This webinar is being recorded from DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory's new state-of-the-art net zero

117

Experimental study of natural convection heat transfer through an aperture in passive solar heated buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to obtain correlations between natural convection heat transfer through an aperture and temperature difference between the two rooms. A one-fifth similitude model of a two-room building is used. The model is filled with Freon gas to satisfy similarity of the experiment to full-scale conditions in air. The experimental apparatus and experimental techniques are explained. Experimental results are presented in terms of Grashof, Nusselt, and Prandtl numbers. The effects of the height, the width, and the vertical position of the apertures are investigated, as is the effect of the room volume.

Yamaguchi, Kenjiro

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Virtual sensors for estimation of energy consumption and thermal comfort in buildings with underfloor heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating a building's performance usually requires a high number of sensors especially if individual rooms are analyzed. This paper introduces a simple and scalable model-based virtual sensor that allows analysis of a buildings' heat consumption down ... Keywords: Building performance analysis, Energy efficiency, Hybrid HVAC systems, Virtual sensors

Joern Ploennigs; Ammar Ahmed; Burkhard Hensel; Paul Stack; Karsten Menzel

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Characterization of Multicrystalline Silicon Modules with System Bias Voltage Applied in Damp Heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As it is considered economically favorable to serially connect modules to build arrays with high system voltage, it is necessary to explore potential long-term degradation mechanisms the modules may incur under such electrical potential. We performed accelerated lifetime testing of multicrystalline silicon PV modules in 85 degrees C/ 85% relative humidity and 45 degrees C/ 30% relative humidity while placing the active layer in either positive or negative 600 V bias with respect to the grounded module frame. Negative bias applied to the active layer in some cases leads to more rapid and catastrophic module power degradation. This is associated with significant shunting of individual cells as indicated by electroluminescence, thermal imaging, and I-V curves. Mass spectroscopy results support ion migration as one of the causes. Electrolytic corrosion is seen occurring with the silicon nitride antireflective coating and silver gridlines, and there is ionic transport of metallization at the encapsulant interface observed with damp heat and applied bias. Leakage current and module degradation is found to be highly dependent upon the module construction, with factors such as encapsulant and front glass resistivity affecting performance. Measured leakage currents range from about the same seen in published reports of modules deployed in Florida (USA) and is accelerated to up to 100 times higher in the environmental chamber testing.

Hacke, P.; Kempe, M.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S.; Call, N.; Johnston, S.; Kurtz, S.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Variable Refrigerant Flow Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps for Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-split heat pumps have evolved from a technology suitable for residential and light commercial buildings to variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems that can provide efficient space conditioning for large commercial buildings. VRF systems are enhanced versions of ductless multi-split systems, permitting more indoor units to be connected to each outdoor unit and providing additional features such as simultaneous heating and cooling and heat recovery. VRF systems are very popular in Asia and Europe and...

2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

IRP applied to district heating in Eastern Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cities of Plzen, Czech Republic, and Handlova, Republic of Slovakia, are examining options for meeting the thermal energy requirements of their citizens with consideration of both economics and the environment. Major energy related issues faced by the cities are: the frequent need to replace and/or implement a major rehabilitation of the central heating plants and the transmission and distribution systems that supply the consumers; and the need to reduce emissions in order to comply with more stringent environmental regulations and improve air quality; and the need to minimize consumer energy bills, particularly to accommodate the upcoming decontrol of energy prices and to minimize non-payment problems. The intent of the integrated resource planning (IRP) projects is to present analyses of options to support the cities` decision-making processes, not to provide specific recommendations or guidance for the cities to follow.

Bull, M. [USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States); Secrest, T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Zeman, J. [Czech Energy Efficiency Center (SEVEn) (Czech Republic); Popelka, A. [TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Heating Energy Consumption in a Residential Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In winter, much of the building energy is used for heating in the north region of China. In this study, the heating energy consumption of a residential building in Tianjin during a heating period was simulated by using the EnergyPlus energy simulation program. The study showed that the heat loss from exterior walls, exterior windows and infiltration took three main parts of the total heat loss. Furthermore, the results of on-site measurement are presented with the conclusion that the EnergyPlus program provides sufficient accuracy for this energy simulation application.

Liu, J.; Yang, M.; Zhao, X.; Zhu, N.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

North American Overview - Heat Pumps Role in Buildings Energy Efficiency Improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief overview of the situation in North America regarding buildings energy use and the current and projected heat pump market is presented. R&D and deployment strategies for heat pumps, and the impacts of the housing market and efficiency regulations on the heating and cooling equipment market are summarized as well.

Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Bouza, Antonio [U.S. Department of Energy; Gigučre, Daniel [Natural Resources Canada; Hosatte, Sophie [Natural Resources Canada

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Photovoltaic and solar-thermal technologies in residential building codes, tackling building code requirements to overcome the impediments to applying new technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the building code requirements and impediments to applying photovoltaic (PV) and solar-thermal technologies in residential buildings (one- or two-family dwellings). It reviews six modern model building codes that represent the codes to be adopted by most locations in the coming years: International Residential Code, First Draft (IRC), International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), International Mechanical Code (IMC), International Plumbing Code (IPC), International Fuel Gas Code (IFGC), and National Electrical Code (NEC). The IRC may become the basis for many of the building codes in the United States after it is released in 2000, and it references the other codes that will also likely become applicable at that time. These codes are reviewed as they apply to photovoltaic systems in buildings and building-integrated photovoltaic systems and to active-solar domestic hot-water and space-heating systems. The first discussion is on general code issues that impact the s e technologies-for example, solar access and sustainability. Then, secondly, the discussion investigates the relationship of the technologies to the codes, providing examples, while keeping two major issues in mind: How do the codes treat these technologies as building components? and Do the IECC and other codes allow reasonable credit for the energy impacts of the technologies? The codes can impact the implementation of the above technologies in several ways: (1) The technology is not mentioned in the codes. It may be an obstacle to implementing the technology, and the solution is to develop appropriate explicit sections or language in the codes. (2) The technology is discussed by the codes, but the language is confusing or ambiguous. The solution is to clarify the language. (3) The technology is discussed in the codes, but the discussion is spread over several sections or different codes. Practitioners may not easily find all of the relevant material that should be considered. The so lution is to put all relevant information in one section or to more clearly reference relevant sections. (4) The technology is prohibited by the code. Examples of this situation were not found. However, energy credit for some technologies cannot be achieved with the requirements of these codes. Finally, four types of future action are recommended to make the codes reviewed in this report more accommodating to renewable energy technologies: (1) Include suggested language additions and changes in the codes; (2) Create new code sections that place all of the requirements for a technology in one section of an appropriate code; (3) Apply existing standards, as appropriate, to innovative renewable energy and energy conservation technologies; and (4) Develop new standards, as necessary, to ease code compliance. A synergy may be possible in developing suitable code language changes for both photovoltaic and solar hot-water systems. The installation of rooftop photovoltaic panels and solar hot- water collectors involves many overlapping issues. Roof loading, weather tightness, mounting systems, roof penetrations, and similar concerns are identical for both technologies. If such work can be coordinated, organizations supporting both technologies could work together to implement the appropriate revisions and additions to the codes.

Wortman, D.; Echo-Hawk, L. [authors] and Wiechman, J.; Hayter, S.; Gwinner, D. [eds.

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

127

Estimation of the relationship between remotely sensed anthropogenic heat discharge and building energy use  

SciTech Connect

This paper examined the relationship between remotely sensed anthropogenic heat discharge and energy use from residential and commercial buildings across multiple scales in the city of Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Anthropogenic heat discharge was estimated based on a remote sensing-based surface energy balance model, which was parameterized using land cover, land surface temperature, albedo, and meteorological data. Building energy use was estimated using a GIS-based building energy simulation model in conjunction with Department of Energy/ Energy Information Administration survey data, Assessor's parcel data, GIS floor areas data, and remote sensing-derived building height data.

Zhou, Yuyu; Weng, Qihao; Gurney, Kevin R.; Shuai, Yanmin; Hu, Xuefei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Using infrared thermography for the study of heat transfer through building envelope components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat transfer through building envelope components is typically characterized by one number, the conductance. Such a characterization is best suited for homogeneous samples since it does not quantify or illustrate spatial variations within a sample. However, the growing use of advanced wall and window insulations with existing framing materials has increased the importance of understanding spatial heat transfer effects within building envelope components. An infrared thermography laboratory has been established to provide detailed quantitative and qualitative information on the spatial heat transfer effects of building envelope materials. The use of this facility for more effective product development and more accurate product development and more accurate product characterization is discussed.

Arasteh, D.; Beck, F.; Griffith, B.; Acevedo-Ruiz, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Byars, N. (California Polytechnic Univ., San Luis Obispo, CA (United States). Dept. of Engineering Technology)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Evaluating the performance of passive-solar-heated buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methods of evaluating the thermal performance of passive-solar buildings are reviewed. Instrumentation and data logging requirements are outlined. Various methodologies that have been used to develop an energy balance for the building and various performance measures are discussed. Methods for quantifying comfort are described. Subsystem and other special-purpose monitoring are briefly reviewed. Summary results are given for 38 buildings that have been monitored.

Balcomb, J.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Heat pumps and under floor heating as a heating system for Finnish low-rise residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In bachelor’s thesis the study of under floor heating system with ground source heat pump for the heat transfers fluid heating is considered. The case… (more)

Chuduk, Svetlana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course on Direct Use for Building Heat and Hot Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DIRECT USE FOR BUILDING HEAT & HOT WATER Presented by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Course Outline 2 What we will cover...  About the DOE Office of Indian Energy Education Initiative  Course Introduction  Solar Thermal and Solar Ventilation Air Pre-Heat - Resources, Technology, Examples & Cost, and References  Biomass Heat - Resources, Technology, Examples & Cost, and References  Geothermal Building Heat - Resources, Technology, Examples & Cost, and References  Additional Information & Resources Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs is responsible for assisting Tribes with energy planning and development, infrastructure, energy costs, and electrification of Indian

132

Ground-Coupled Heat and Moisture Transfer from Buildings; Part 2: Application (Preprint)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper the effects of moisture on the heat transfer from two basic types of building foundations, a slab-on-grade and a basement, are examined. A two-dimensional finite element heat and moisture transfer program is used to show the effects of precipitation, soil type, foundation insulation, water table depth, and freezing on the heat transfer from the building foundation. Comparisons are made with a simple heat conduction model to illustrate the dependency of the soil thermal conductivity on moisture content.

Deru, M.P. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Kirkpatrick, A.T. (Colorado State University)

2001-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

133

Design methodologies for energy conservation and passive heating of buildings utilizing improved building components. Progress report No. 3, January 15--April 15, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recently completed MIT Solar Building 5 demonstrates direct gain solar space heating through the use of new architectural finish materials. February 1978 measurements are summarized. Results indicate the building performed nearly as expected.

Habraken, N.J.; Johnson, T.E.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Detecting sources of heat loss in residential buildings from infrared imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrared image analysis was conducted to determine the most common sources of heat loss during the winter in residential buildings. 135 houses in the greater Boston and Cambridge area were photographed, stitched, and tallied ...

Shao, Emily Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Tribal Renewable Energy Foundational Course: Direct Use for Building Heat and Hot Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Watch the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy foundational course webinar on direct use for building heat and hot water by clicking on the .swf link below. You can also download the...

136

1-2-3D Heat Transfer Simulation Software for Buildings by Physibel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-2-3D Heat Transfer Simulation Software for Buildings by Physibel Speaker(s): Piet Standaert Date: August 8, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

137

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e., ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site's annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB's assumed utilization is far higherthan is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inland areas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

138

Study of thermosiphon and radiant panel passive heating systems for metal buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of passive-heating systems appropriate for use on metal buildings is being conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, Port Hueneme, California. The systems selected for study were chosen on the basis of their appropriateness for retrofit applications, although they are also suitable for new construction: simple radiant panels that communicate directly with the building interior and a backflow thermosiphon that provides heat indirectly.

Biehl, F.A.; Schnurr, N.M.; Wray, W.O.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Hydronic Heating Retrofits for Low-Rise Multifamily Buildings: Boiler Control Replacement and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The ARIES Collaborative, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team, partnered with NeighborWorks America affiliate Homeowners' Rehab Inc. of Cambridge, Massachusetts, to implement and study improvements to the central hydronic heating system in one of the nonprofit's housing developments. The heating control systems in the three-building, 42-unit Columbia Cambridge Alliance for Spanish Tenants housing development were upgraded.

Dentz, J.; Henderson, H.; Varshney, K.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Main Commercial Primary Energy Use of Heating and Cooling Equipment as of 1995 Heating Equipment | Cooling Equipment Packaged Heating Units 25% | Packaged Air Conditioning Units 54% Boilers 21% | Room Air Conditioning 5% Individual Space Heaters 2% | PTAC (2) 3% Furnaces 20% | Centrifugal Chillers 14% Heat Pumps 5% | Reciprocating Chillers 12% District Heat 7% | Rotary Screw Chillers 3% Unit Heater 18% | Absorption Chillers 2% PTHP & WLHP (1) 2% | Heat Pumps 7% 100% | 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) PTHP = Packaged Terminal Heat Pump, WLHP = Water Loop Heat Pump. 2) PTAC = Packaged Terminal Air Conditioner BTS/A.D. Little, Energy Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Building HVAC Systems, Volume 1: Chillers, Refrigerant Compressors, and Heating Systems, Apr. 2001, Figure 5-5, p. 5-14 for cooling and Figure 5-10, p. 5-18 for heating

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy Performance Comparison of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems for Multi-Family Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The type of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system has a large impact on the heating and cooling energy consumption in multifamily residential buildings. This paper compares the energy performance of three HVAC systems: a direct expansion (DX) split system, a split air source heat pump (ASHP) system, and a closed-loop water source heat pump (WSHP) system with a boiler and an evaporative fluid cooler as the central heating and cooling source. All three systems use gas furnace for heating or heating backup. The comparison is made in a number of scenarios including different climate conditions, system operation schemes and applicable building codes. It is found that with the minimum code-compliant equipment efficiency, ASHP performs the best among all scenarios except in extremely code climates. WSHP tends to perform better than the split DX system in cold climates but worse in hot climates.

Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

Table B19. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manufact-uring",,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water...

143

PREDICTING THE TIME RESPONSE OF A BUILDING UNDER HEAT INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INPUT CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS Mashuri L.CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS * • Mashuri L.consists of a hydronic solar space heating system with heat

Warren, Mashuri L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Building Technologies Office: Space Heating and Cooling Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(HVAC) and refrigeration. DOE is conducting research into integration of optimized heat exchanger designs into new products and space conditioning systems. DOE projects...

145

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: HEAT Energy Audit Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

not only compiles data in the field, but produces the reports you need for vendors, inventory control, auditing, invoicing and more. HEAT Energy Audit Tool is flexible,...

146

Feasibility Study of Using Ground Source Heat Pumps in Two Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The building is located near the end of the central steam distribution system. Steam from the central steam and Mt. Olympus BOQ) presently heated by steam from the central steam plant. Ground source heat pump, it was assumed that natural gas-fired water heaters would replace the steam converters that presently provide hot

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

147

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: sizing, installation and operation of systems. 1980 edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual was prepared as a text for a training course on solar heating and cooling of residential buildings. The course and text are directed toward sizing, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar systems for space heating and hot water supply, and solar cooling is treated only briefly. (MHR)

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Solar heating of buildings and domestic hot water  

SciTech Connect

Design criteria and cost analysis methods are presented for the sizing and justification of solar heat collectors for augmentation of potable water heaters and space heaters. Sufficient information is presented to enable engineers to design solar space and water heating systems or conduct basic feasibility studies preparatory to design of large installations. Both retrofit and new installations are considered. (WDM)

Beck, E.J. Jr.; Field, R.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Heat Pump Design Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Pump Design Model Heat Pump Design Model Heat Pump Design Model logo. Research tool for use in the steady-state simulation and design analysis of air-to-air heat pumps and air conditioners. The program can be used with most of the newer HFC refrigerants as well as with HCFCs and CFCs. The standard vapor-compression cycle is modeled with empirical representations for compressor performance and first-principle region-by-region modeling of the heat exchangers. An online Web version is available that can be used with default configurations or with user-specified component and operating parameters for analyzing the performance of single-speed, air-to-air equipment. User configurations can be saved for later use. Parametric analyses can be made and performance trends plotted online.

150

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Window Heat Gain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window Heat Gain Window Heat Gain Window Heat Gain image Calculates the solar heat gain through vertical windows in temperate latitudes. Screen Shots Keywords Solar, window, energy Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required None. Users Few (new program). Audience Architects, energy analysts. Input Location, window characteristics, ground characteristics. Output Daily/monthly heat gain through window. Computer Platform Web Programming Language JavaScript Strengths Allows default locations/windows/surfaces or custom user data. Incorporates lots of ASHRAE SHGF data that is otherwise burdensome to deal with. Weaknesses Only works for windows facing close to due north, south, east, or west. Doesn't address conductive losses or shading. Contact Company: Sustainable By Design Address: 3631 Bagley Avenue North

151

Field Measurement of Heating System in a Hotel Building in Harbin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating energy consumption in winter is an important component of the whole building energy consumption in the severe cold zone in north China. This paper presents a heating water system of a hotel building in Harbin, finishes the testing of its heating energy consumption in winter under operational conditions, and presents an stimation index of the performance of an exchanger, pump and motor. Analysis of device running conditions based on testing data is conducted. Results show that low stream supply temperature and wide-range flow fluctuation mainly lead to unhealthy working conditions of the device and excessive energy consumption, and a corresponding improved method is presented.

Zhao, T.; Zhang, J.; Li, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hydronic Heating Retrofits for Low-Rise Multifamily Buildings - Phase 1: Boiler Control Replacement and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The ARIES Collaborative, a Department of Energy Building America research team, partnered with NeighborWorks America affiliate Homeowners' Rehab Inc. (HRI) of Cambridge, MA to implement and study improvements to the heating system in one of the non-profit's housing developments. The heating control systems in the 42-unit Columbia CAST housing development were upgraded in an effort projected to reduce heating costs by 15 to 25 percent.

Dentz, J.; Henderson, H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Equipment End-Use Equipment The types of space heating equipment used in office buildings were similar to those of the commercial buildings sector as a whole (Table 8 and Figure 5). Furnaces were most used followed by packaged heating systems. Individual space heaters were third-most used but were primarily used to supplement the building's main heating system. Boilers and district heat systems were more often used in larger buildings. Table 8. Types of Heating Equipment Used in Office Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings 4,645 824 64,783 12,208 All Buildings with Space Heating 3,982 802 60,028 11,929 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)

154

A Review of Ground Coupled Heat Pump Models Used in Whole-Building Computer Simulation Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasingly, building owners are turning to ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems to improve energy efficiency. Ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) systems with a vertical closed ground loop heat exchanger are one of the more widely used systems. Over the last thirty years, a number of simulation models have been developed to calculate the performance of the ground heat exchanger (GHX). The several computer programs can evaluate the GCHP systems as a part of the whole-building energy simulation. This paper briefly presents a general introduction to GSHP systems and the GCHP system, and reviews the currently developed GCHP models and compares computer programs for a GCHP design. In addition, GHX models which play an important role on the GCHP performance are reviewed. Finally, several widely recognized computer simulation programs for building energy analysis are compared regarding their GCHP simulation capability.

Do, S. L.; Haberl, J. S.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Energy analysis of facade-integrated photovoltaic systems applied to UAE commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

Developments in the design and manufacture of photovoltaic cells have recently been a growing concern in the UAE. At present, the embodied energy pay-back time (EPBT) is the criterion used for comparing the viability of such technology against other forms. However, the impact of PV technology on the thermal performance of buildings is not considered at the time of EPBT estimation. If additional energy savings gained over the PV system life are also included, the total EPBT could be shorter. This paper explores the variation of the total energy of building integrated photovoltaic systems (BiPV) as a wall cladding system applied to the UAE commercial sector and shows that the ratio between PV output and saving in energy due to PV panels is within the range of 1:3-1:4. The result indicates that for the southern and western facades in the UAE, the embodied energy pay-back time for photovoltaic system is within the range of 12-13 years. When reductions in operational energy are considered, the pay-back time is reduced to 3.0-3.2 years. This study comes to the conclusion that the reduction in operational energy due to PV panels represents an important factor in the estimation of EPBT. (author)

Radhi, Hassan [Architectural Engineering Department, UAE University, Al-ain (United Arab Emirates)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Energy Impacts of Nonlinear Behavior of PCM When Applied into Building Envelope: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Nonlinear Impacts of Nonlinear Behavior of PCM When Applied into Building Envelope Preprint P.C. Tabares-Velasco Presented at the ASME 2012 6th International Conference on Energy Sustainability & 10th Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology Conference San Diego, California July 23-26, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-54245 August 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

157

Autonomous Correction of Sensor Data Applied to Building Technologies Utilizing Statistical Processing Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Autonomous detection and correction of potentially missing or corrupt sensor data is a essential concern in building technologies since data availability and correctness is necessary to develop accurate software models for instrumented experiments. Therefore, this paper aims to address this problem by using statistical processing methods including: (1) least squares; (2) maximum likelihood estimation; (3) segmentation averaging; and (4) threshold based techniques. Application of these validation schemes are applied to a subset of data collected from Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL) ZEBRAlliance research project, which is comprised of four single-family homes in Oak Ridge, TN outfitted with a total of 1,218 sensors. The focus of this paper is on three different types of sensor data: (1) temperature; (2) humidity; and (3) energy consumption. Simulations illustrate the threshold based statistical processing method performed best in predicting temperature, humidity, and energy data.

Castello, Charles C [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Solar Heating and Cooling in Buildings: Methods of Economic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (1) where PV = present value cost of the HVAC system over period N, ... to apply a price index ... to convert them to present prices. This ...

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2HeatPumpsUsedForColg | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HeatPumpsUsedForColg HeatPumpsUsedForColg Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Heat pumps used for cooling Pages using the property "Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2HeatPumpsUsedForColg" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.250906049624 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 +

160

Interaction of lighting, heating, and cooling systems in buildings  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of building lighting and HVAC systems, and the effects on cooling load and lighting system performance, are being evaluated using a full-scale test facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The results from a number of test configurations are described, including lighting system efficiency and cooling load due to lighting. The effect of lighting and HVAC system design and operation on performance is evaluated. Design considerations are discussed.

Treado, S.J.; Bean, J.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Innovative Control of Electric Heat in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of web-based wireless technology for control of electric heating in a large multifamily housing complex. The control system architecture and components are described. A web-based application enables remote monitoring of temperature, electric usage and control of peak demand through a temperature-based duty-cycling algorithm developed specifically for the application. Installed costs and energy savings are discussed. A 16% energy-use reduction was confirmed through the first heating season of operation. The response of occupants and management to changes in temperature regime has been a critical aspect of system start-up and commissioning.

Lempereur, D.; Bobker, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Solar heating panel: Parks and Recreation Building, Saugatuck Township Park and Recreation Commission. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an account of the design and installation of a solar heating system on an existing building in Saugatuck, MI, using existing technology. The purpose of this program is to demonstrate the possibilities of alternative energy, educate local craftsmen, and make the building more useful to the community. The structure of the building is described. The process of insulating the structure is described. The design of the solar panel, headers, and strong box full of rocks for heat storage is given complete with blueprints. The installation of the system is also described, including photographs of the solar panel being installed. Included is a performance report on this system by Purbolt's Inc., which describes measurements taken on the system and outlines the system's design and operation. Included also are 12 slides of the structure and the solar heating system. (LEW)

Not Available

1980-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

163

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings often have extensive periods where one space needs cooling and another heating. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If a building's heating and cooling system could be integrated with the building's structural mass such that the mass can be used to collect, store, and deliver energy, significant energy might be saved. Computer models were developed to simulate this interaction for an existing office building in Seattle, Washington that has a decentralized water-source heat pump system. Metered data available for the building was used to calibrate a base'' building model (i.e., nonintegrated) prior to simulation of the integrated system. In the simulated integration strategy a secondary water loop was manifolded to the main HVAC hydronic loop. tubing in this loop was embedded in the building's concrete floor slabs. Water was routed to this loop by a controller to charge or discharge thermal energy to and from the slabs. The slabs were also in thermal communication with the conditioned spaces. Parametric studies of the building model, using weather data for five other cities in addition to Seattle, predicted that energy can be saved on cooling dominated days. On hot, dry days and during the night the cooling tower can beneficially be used as a free cooling'' source for thermally charging'' the floor slabs using cooled water. Through the development of an adaptive/predictive control strategy, annual HVAC energy savings as large as 30% appear to be possible in certain climates. 8 refs., 13 figs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Marketing research for EE G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research conducted by ITI to evaluate the commercialization potential of EG G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials. The remainder of the report describes the nature of demand for maraging steel, extent of demand, competitors, environmental trends, technology life cycle, industry structure, and conclusion. (JL)

Shackson, R.H.

1991-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

165

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Evolving Electricity Generation and Deliveryfor meeting building electricity and heat requirementswas funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Method of energy load management using PCM for heating and cooling of buildings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for energy load management for the heating and cooling of a building. The method involves utilizing a wallboard as a portion of the building, the wallboard containing about 5 to about 30 wt.% phase change material such that melting of the phase change material occurs during a rise in temperature within the building to remove heat from the air, and a solidification of the phase change material occurs during a lowering of the temperature to dispense heat into the air. At the beginning of either of these cooling or heating cycles, the phase change material is preferably ``fully charged``. In preferred installations one type of wallboard is used on the interior surfaces of exterior walls, and another type as the surface on interior walls. The particular PCM is chosen for the desired wall and room temperature of these locations. In addition, load management is achieved by using PCM-containing wallboards that form cavities of the building such that the cavities can be used for the air handling duct and plenum system of the building. Enhanced load management is achieved by using a thermostat with reduced dead band of about the upper half of a normal dead band of over three degrees. In some applications, air circulation at a rate greater than normal convection provides additional comfort. 7 figs.

Stovall, T.K.; Tomlinson, J.J.

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

167

Method of energy load management using PCM for heating and cooling of buildings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of energy load management for the heating and cooling of a building. The method involves utilizing a wallboard as a portion of the building, the wallboard containing about 5 to about 30 wt. % a phase change material such that melting of the phase change material occurs during a rise in temperature within the building to remove heat from the air, and a solidification of the phase change material occurs during a lowering of the temperature to dispense heat into the air. At the beginning of either of these cooling or heating cycles, the phase change material is preferably "fully charged". In preferred installations one type of wallboard is used on the interior surfaces of exterior walls, and another type as the surface on interior walls. The particular PCM is chosen for the desired wall and room temperature of these locations. In addition, load management is achieved by using PCM-containing wallboard that form cavities of the building such that the cavities can be used for the air handling duct and plenum system of the building. Enhanced load management is achieved by using a thermostat with reduced dead band of about the upper half of a normal dead band of over three degree. In some applications, air circulation at a rate greater than normal convection provides additional comfort.

Stovall, Therese K. (Knoxville, TN); Tomlinson, John J. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Solar heating system for recreation building at Scattergood School  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in May 1976 and was completed in June 1977. A six-month acceptance-testing period followed during which time a number of minor modifications and corrections were made to improve system performance and versatility. This Final Report describes in considerable detail the solar heating facility and the project involved in its construction. As such, it has both detailed drawings of the completed system and a section that discusses the bottlenecks that were encountered along the way.

Heins, C.F.

1978-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

169

A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Bottom Heating Effects on Scalar Dispersion in and above a Cubical Building Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal effects on scalar dispersion in and above a cubical building array are numerically investigated using the parallelized large-eddy simulation model (PALM). Two cases (no heating and bottom heating) are simulated, and scalar dispersion ...

Seung-Bu Park; Jong-Jin Baik; Young-Hee Ryu

170

"Table B29. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,15996,32970,3818,4907 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,1779,2672,484,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,1686,3068,428,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,3366,5807,536,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,8060,2264,4974,300,325

171

Whole-Building Energy Simulation with a Three-Dimensional Ground-Coupled Heat Transfer Model: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-dimensional, finite-element, heat-transfer computer program was developed to study ground-coupled heat transfer from buildings. It was used in conjunction with the SUNREL whole-building energy simulation program to analyze ground-coupled heat transfer from buildings, and the results were compared with the simple ground-coupled heat transfer models used in whole-building energy simulation programs. The detailed model provides another method of testing and refining the simple models and analyzing complex problems. This work is part of an effort to improve the analysis of the ground-coupled heat transfer in building energy simulation programs. The output from this detailed model and several others will form a set of reference results for use with the BESTEST diagnostic procedure. We anticipate that the results from the work will be incorporated into ANSI/ASHRAE 140-2001, Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs.

Deru, M.; Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Buildings*","Buildings Using Any Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Other a " "All Buildings* ...",4645,4414,4404,2391,451,67,33,5...

173

Behavioral determinants of energy consumption in a centrally-heated apartment building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses tenant perceptions and behavior regarding heating and ventilation in multifamily buildings. Data were collected at a 60-unit subsidized housing complex for senior citizens. The building has central steam heating and the fuel is neither billed nor metered to individual apartments. Winter indoor temperatures average 26/sup 0/C (79/sup 0/F). In order to explain behavior more fully than the simple statement ''tenants don't pay for the heat,'' we show how the tenants and maintenance staff act as a self-regulating system that determines heating system operation through local optimization. Using data from ethnographic interviews and a questionnaire survey of all the residents, the authors give quantitative measures of reported comfort and strategies for controlling comfort. They also discuss thee factors which tenants consider important for thermal comfort and their choices among various heat control strategies. For examples, why do only 35% use radiator valves to control the heat while 84% use windows. Implications are discussed for new construction and retrofit, as well as for equity and management policies. The authors argue that a proper understanding of the behavioral context in multifamily buildings is essential, both to avoid ineffective and costly retrofits and to suggest low-cost measures which address the behavioral determinants of energy use.

De Cicco, J.M.; Kempton, W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Buildings | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Buildings Home > Features > Groups Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Content type Blog entry Discussion Document Event Poll Question Keywords Author Apply Dc Living Walls Posted by: Dc 15 Nov 2013 - 13:26 Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more... Tags: ancient building system, architect, biomimicry, building technology, cooling, cu, daylight, design problem, energy use, engineer, fred andreas, geothermal, green building, heat transfer, heating, living walls, metabolic adjustment, net zero, pre-electricity, Renewable Energy, Solar, university of colorado, utility grid, Wind

175

Commercial building unitary heat pump system with solar heating. Final report, May 1, 1976--October 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A generalized dynamic computer program (SYRSOL) has been developed for the mathematical simulation of the thermal behavior of multi-zone solar heated buildings. The system modeled employs a series of water-to-air heat pumps connected in a closed loop, flat-plate liquid cooled solar collector, a water storage tank, and a cooling tower. Weather data are represented by sinusoids, which provide a convenient and economical alternative to weather tapes. Results indicate that the use of sinusoidal functions for temperature and monthly average values for cloud cover is quite realistic and accurate. Temperature functions for thirteen cities are presented. A preliminary analysis has been done of the feasibility of using solar-energized desiccant dehumidification systems to reduce summer cooling loads. Service hot water production using a water-to-water heat pump from the storage tank is shown to be highly effective and idle solar collectors can be used directly to make service hot water in the summer. A new mathematical heat pump heating model, in which the COP increases linearly with the source water temperature, has been developed and incorporated into SYRSOL. The computer simulation capability has been extended from a heating season to an entire year. The results of some experiments, that have improved the COP of a heat pump, are also reported.

Drucker, E.E.; Ucar, M.; LaGraff, J.E.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Initial findings: The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

This report is one in a series of reports describing research activities in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Building System Integration Research Program. The goal of the program is to develop the scientific and technical basis for improving integrated decision-making during design and construction. Improved decision-making could significantly reduce buildings' energy use by the year 2010. The objectives of the Commercial Building System Integration Research Program are: to identify and quantify the most significant energy-related interactions among building subsystems; to develop the scientific and technical basis for improving energy related interactions in building subsystems; and to provide guidance to designers, owners, and builders for improving the integration of building subsystems for energy efficiency. The lead laboratory for this program is the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A wide variety of expertise and resources from industry, academia, other government entities, and other DOE laboratories are used in planning, reviewing and conducting research activities. Cooperative and complementary research, development, and technology transfer activities with other interested organizations are actively pursued. In this report, the interactions of a water loop heat pump system and building structural mass and their effect on whole-building energy performance is analyzed. 10 refs., 54 figs., 1 tab.

Marseille, T.J.; Johnson, B.K.; Wallin, R.P.; Chiu, S.A.; Crawley, D.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Simple procedure for assessing thermal comfort in passive solar heated buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fanger thermal comfort equation is linearized and used to develop a procedure for assessing thermal comfort levels in passive solar heated buildings. In order to relate comfort levels in nonuniform environments to uniform conditions, a new thermal index called the equivalent uniform temperature is introduced.

Wray, W.O.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Assessment and Demonstration of Advanced Heat Pumps for Commercial Building Water Heating Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWH) are an alternative to electric resistance or natural gas for domestic water heating. HPWHs are less common than other water heating technologies, but offer the potential for improved energy efficiency and potential for reduction of net CO2 emissions. New products, mainly for residential application, have been introduced to the American market over the last 2 years, which have been previously reviewed by EPRI. This report focuses on commercial applications and provides initi...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Summer-heat-gain control in passive-solar-heated buildings: fixed horizontal overhangs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An aspect of passive cooling relates to cooling load reduction by the use of solar controls. When there is a substantial winter heating requirement, and when the winter heating needs are met in part by a passive solar heating system, then the potential aggravation of summer cooling loads by the heating system is an important design issue. A traditional solution is the use of a fixed, horizontal shading overhang. An approach to quantitative design rules for the sizing of a shading overhang to minimize total annual space conditioning energy needs is outlined.

Jones, R.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Economic analysis of wind-powered farmhouse and farm building heating systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study evaluated the break-even values of wind energy for selected farmhouses and farm buildings focusing on the effects of thermal storage on the use of WECS production and value. Farmhouse structural models include three types derived from a national survey - an older, a more modern, and a passive solar structure. The eight farm building applications that were analyzed include: poultry-layers, poultry-brooding/layers, poultry-broilers, poultry-turkeys, swine-farrowing, swine-growing/finishing, dairy, and lambing. These farm buildings represent the spectrum of animal types, heating energy use, and major contributions to national agricultural economic values. All energy analyses were based on hour-by-hour computations which allowed for growth of animals, sensible and latent heat production, and ventilation requirements. Hourly or three-hourly weather data obtained from the National Climatic Center was used for the nine chosen analysis sites, located throughout the United States and corresponding to regional agricultural production centers.

Stafford, R.W.; Greeb, F.J.; Smith, M.F.; Des Chenes, C.; Weaver, N.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy Impacts of Nonlinear Behavior of PCM When Applied into Building Envelope: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous research on phase change materials (PCM) for building applications has been done for several decades resulting in plenty of literature on PCM properties, temperature, and peak reduction potential. Thus, PCMs are a potential technology to reduce peak loads and HVAC energy consumption in buildings. There are few building energy simulation programs that have PCM modeling features, and even fewer have been validated. Additionally, there is no previous research that indicates the level of accuracy when simulating PCM from a building energy simulation perspective. This study analyzes the effects a nonlinear enthalpy profile has on thermal performance and expected energy benefits for PCM-enhanced insulation.

Tabares-Velasco, P. C.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: design of systems, 1980 edition  

SciTech Connect

This manual was prepared primarily for use in conducting a practical training course on the design of solar heating and cooling systems for residential and small office buildings, but may also be useful as a general reference text. The content level is appropriate for persons with different and varied backgrounds, although it is assumed that readers possess a basic understanding of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems of conventional (non-solar) types. This edition is a revision of the manual with the same title, first printed and distributed by the US Government Printing Office in October 1977. The manual has been reorganized, new material has been added, and outdated information has been deleted. Only active solar systems are described. Liquid and air-heating solar systems for combined space and service water heating or service water heating are included. Furthermore, only systems with proven experience are discussed to any extent.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Using Remote Control Systems for the Re-Commissioning of Heating Plants of School Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop a semi-automatic commissioning tool that can be implemented in Remote Control Systems to help building operators test the performance of heating plants in school buildings. The work was carried out with the city of Paris and the tool was adapted to the requirements of end-users who are operating more than 700 schools. This semi-automatic commissioning tool could help to reduce costs and time for commissioning tasks of a large number of buildings. It also helps to improve the commissioning process, to have a whole building functional testing approach and make the commissioning procedure available for different users with different skills. This work was carried out as part of an IEA Annex 40 research project, an international research group focused on energy saving technologies and activities that support their application in practice.

Vaezi-Nejad, H.; Detaille, C.; Jandon, M.; Bruyat, F.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Roof shading and wall glazing techniques for reducing peak building heating and cooling loads. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The roof shading device proved to be effective in reducing peak building cooling loads under both actual testing conditions and in selected computer simulations. The magnitude of cooling load reductions varied from case to case depending on individual circumstances. Key variables that had significant impacts on its thermal performance were the number of months of use annually, the thermal characteristics of the roof construction, hours of building use, and internal gains. Key variables that had significant impacts upon economic performance were the costs of fuel energy for heating and cooling, and heating and cooling equipment efficiency. In general, the more sensitive the building is to climate, the more effective the shading device will be. In the example case, the annual fuel savings ($.05 psf) were 6 to 10% of the estimated installation costs ($.50 to .75 psf). The Trombe wall installation at Roxborough High School proved to be effective in collecting and delivering significant amounts of solar heat energy. It was also effective in conserving heat energy by replacing obsolete windows which leaked large amounts of heat from the building. Cost values were computed for both solar energy contributions and for heat loss reductions by window replacement. Together they amount to an estimated three hundred and ninety dollars ($390.00) per year in equivalent electric fuel costs. When these savings are compared with installation cost figures it is apparent that the Trombe wall installation as designed and installed presents a potentially cost-effective method of saving fuel costs. The study results indicate that improved Trombe wall efficiency can be achieved by making design and construction changes to reduce or eliminate outside air leakage into the system and provide automatic fan control.

Ueland, M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Computer Modeling VRF Heat Pumps in Commercial Buildings using EnergyPlus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) heat pumps are increasingly used in commercial buildings in the United States. Monitored energy use of field installations have shown, in some cases, savings exceeding 30% compared to conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. A simulation study was conducted to identify the installation or operational characteristics that lead to energy savings for VRF systems. The study used the Department of Energy EnergyPlus? building simulation software and four reference building models. Computer simulations were performed in eight U.S. climate zones. The baseline reference HVAC system incorporated packaged single-zone direct-expansion cooling with gas heating (PSZ-AC) or variable-air-volume systems (VAV with reheat). An alternate baseline HVAC system using a heat pump (PSZ-HP) was included for some buildings to directly compare gas and electric heating results. These baseline systems were compared to a VRF heat pump model to identify differences in energy use. VRF systems combine multiple indoor units with one or more outdoor unit(s). These systems move refrigerant between the outdoor and indoor units which eliminates the need for duct work in most cases. Since many applications install duct work in unconditioned spaces, this leads to installation differences between VRF systems and conventional HVAC systems. To characterize installation differences, a duct heat gain model was included to identify the energy impacts of installing ducts in unconditioned spaces. The configuration of variable refrigerant flow heat pumps will ultimately eliminate or significantly reduce energy use due to duct heat transfer. Fan energy is also studied to identify savings associated with non-ducted VRF terminal units. VRF systems incorporate a variable-speed compressor which may lead to operational differences compared to single-speed compression systems. To characterize operational differences, the computer model performance curves used to simulate cooling operation are also evaluated. The information in this paper is intended to provide a relative difference in system energy use and compare various installation practices that can impact performance. Comparative results of VRF versus conventional HVAC systems include energy use differences due to duct location, differences in fan energy when ducts are eliminated, and differences associated with electric versus fossil fuel type heating systems.

Raustad, Richard

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the existence of the principal-agent (PA) problem in non-government, non-mall commercial buildings in the U.S. in 2003. The analysis concentrates on space heating and cooling energy consumed by centrally installed equipment in order to verify whether a market failure caused by the PA problem might have prevented the installation of energy-efficient devices in non-owner-occupied buildings (efficiency problem) and/or the efficient operation of space-conditioning equipment in these buildings (usage problem). Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 2003 data for single-owner, single-tenant and multi-tenant occupied buildings were used for conducting this evaluation. These are the building subsets with the appropriate conditions for assessing both the efficiency and the usage problems. Together, these three building types represent 51.9percent of the total floor space of all buildings with space heating and 59.4percent of the total end-use energy consumption of such buildings; similarly, for space cooling, they represent 52.7percent of floor space and 51.6percent of energy consumption. Our statistical analysis shows that there is a usage PA problem. In space heating it applies only to buildings with a small floor area (<_50,000 sq. ft.). We estimate that in 2003 it accounts for additional site energy consumption of 12.3 (+ 10.5 ) TBtu (primary energy consumption of 14.6 [+- 12.4] TBtu), corresponding to 24.0percent (+- 20.5percent) of space heating and 10.2percent (+- 8.7percent) of total site energy consumed in those buildings. In space cooling, however, the analysis shows that the PA market failure affects the complete set of studied buildings. We estimate that it accounts for a higher site energy consumption of 8.3 (+-4.0) TBtu (primary energy consumption of 25.5 [+- 12.2]TBtu), which corresponds to 26.5percent (+- 12.7percent) of space cooling and 2.7percent (+- 1.3percent) of total site energy consumed in those buildings.

Blum, Helcio; Sathaye, Jayant

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

Design methodologies for energy conservation and passive heating of buildings utilizing improved building components. Progress report, 1 August 1977--31 October 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of the experimental building demonstrating light weight ceiling thermal storage tiles, transparent insulation assemblies, and specialized louvers is well underway. Difficulties in acquiring materials have put the building two weeks behind schedule. A superior heat mirror product is being used in place of the original proposed transparent insulation for the south windows. Negotiations are underway to acquire superior logging devices at no additional cost for monitoring the building.

Habraken, J.; Johnson, T.E.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Infrared Thermography applied to measurement of Heat transfer coefficient of water in a pipe heated by Joule effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Internal sources of heat are due to convection from flow of the heat transfer fluid through the pipes. Heat (material, diameter, spacing, and burial depth), (4) system flow rates, (5) heat transfer fluid properties · heat transfer fluid = 42% propylene glycol @ a flow rate of 350 gpm · heat pump model = Water Furnace

189

Solar heating and cooling of buildings: activities of the private sector of the building community and its perceived needs relative to increased activity  

SciTech Connect

A description of the state of affairs existing in the private sector of the building community between mid-1974 and mid-1975 with regard to solar heating and cooling of buildings is presentd. Also, information on the needs perceived by the private sector with regard to governmental actions (besides research) required to induce widespread application of solar energy for the heating and cooling of buildings is given. The information is based on surveys, data obtained at workshops, sales literature of manufacturers, symposia, and miscellaneous correspondence. Selected interests and projects of individuals and organizations are described. (WHK)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Development of an integrated building load-ground source heat pump model as a test bed to assess short- and long-term heat pump and ground loop performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ground source heat pumps (GSHP) have the ability to significantly reduce the energy required to heat and cool buildings. Historically, deployment of GSHP's in the… (more)

Gaspredes, Jonathan Louis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Central unresolved issues in thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document explores the frontier of the rapidly expanding field of thermal energy storage, investigates unresolved issues, outlines research aimed at finding solutions, and suggests avenues meriting future research. Issues related to applications include value-based ranking of storage concepts, temperature constraints, consistency of assumptions, nomenclature and taxonomy, and screening criteria for materials. Issues related to technologies include assessing seasonal storage concepts, diurnal coolness storage, selection of hot-side storage concepts for cooling-only systems, phase-change storage in building materials, freeze protection for solar water heating systems, and justification of phase-change storage for active solar space heating.

Swet, C.J.; Baylin, F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

East Bank District Heating-to-Cooling Conversion Plan Check the date your building's cooling system is scheduled to be on.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

East Bank District Heating-to-Cooling Conversion Plan Check the date your building's cooling system Coal Storage Building 39 NA Cooke Hall 56 Donhowe Building 044 East Gateway District Steam Distr. 199

Webb, Peter

193

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricityand heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energyquality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first major paradigm shift in electricity generation,delivery, and control is emerging in the developed world, notably Europe,North America, and Japan. This shift will move electricity supply awayfrom the highly centralised universal service quality model with which weare familiar today towards a more dispersed system with heterogeneousqualities of service. One element of dispersed control is the clusteringof sources and sinks into semi-autonomous mu grids (microgrids).Research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RD3) of mu gridsare advancing rapidly on at least three continents, and significantdemonstrations are currently in progress. This paradigm shift will resultin more electricity generation close to end-uses, often involvingcombined heat and power application for building heating and cooling,increased local integration of renewables, and the possible provision ofheterogeneous qualities of electrical service to match the requirementsof various end-uses. In Europe, mu grid RD3 is entering its third majorround under the 7th European Commission Framework Programme; in the U.S.,one specific mu grid concept is undergoing rigorous laboratory testing,and in Japan, where the most activity exists, four major publiclysponsored and two privately sponsored demonstrations are in progress.This evolution poses new challenges to the way buildings are designed,built, and operated. Traditional building energy supply systems willbecome much more complex in at least three ways: 1. one cannot simplyassume gas arrives at the gas meter, electricity at its meter, and thetwo systems are virtually independent of one another; rather, energyconversion, heat recovery and use, and renewable energy harvesting mayall be taking place simultaneously within the building energy system; 2.the structure of energy flows in the building must accommodate multipleenergy processes in a manner that permits high overall efficiency; and 3.multiple qualities of electricity may be supplied to various buildingfunctions.

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating andcooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

SciTech Connect

A recently completed project for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Building Equipment combined DOE-2 results for a large set of prototypical commercial and residential buildings with data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) residential and commercial energy consumption surveys (RECS, CBECS) to estimate the total heating and cooling loads in U.S. buildings attributable to different shell components such as windows, roofs, walls, etc., internal processes, and space-conditioning systems. This information is useful for estimating the national conservation potentials for DOE's research and market transformation activities in building energy efficiency. The prototypical building descriptions and DOE-2 input files were developed from 1986 to 1992 to provide benchmark hourly building loads for the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and include 112 single-family, 66 multi-family, and 481 commercial building prototypes. The DOE study consisted of two distinct tasks : (1) perform DOE-2 simulations for the prototypical buildings and develop methods to extract the heating and cooling loads attributable to the different building components; and (2) estimate the number of buildings or floor area represented by each prototypical building based on EIA survey information. These building stock data were then multiplied by the simulated component loads to derive aggregated totals by region, vintage, and building type. The heating and cooling energy consumption of the national building stock estimated by this bottom-up engineering approach was found to agree reasonably well with estimates from other sources, although significant differences were found for certain end-uses. The main added value from this study, however, is the insight it provides about the contributing factors behind this energy consumption, and what energy savings can be expected from efficiency improvements for different building components by region, vintage, and building type.

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Building, Testing, and Post Test Analysis of Durability Heat Pipe No.6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Thermal Program at Sandia supports work developing dish/Stirling systems to convert solar energy into electricity. Heat pipe technology is ideal for transferring the energy of concentrated sunlight from the parabolic dish concentrators to the Stirling engine heat tubes. Heat pipes can absorb the solar energy at non-uniform flux distributions and release this energy to the Stirling engine heater tubes at a very uniform flux distribution thus decoupling the design of the engine heater head from the solar absorber. The most important part of a heat pipe is the wick, which transports the sodium over the heated surface area. Bench scale heat pipes were designed and built to more economically, both in time and money, test different wicks and cleaning procedures. This report covers the building, testing, and post-test analysis of the sixth in a series of bench scale heat pipes. Durability heat pipe No.6 was built and tested to determine the effects of a high temperature bakeout, 950 C, on wick corrosion during long-term operation. Previous tests showed high levels of corrosion with low temperature bakeouts (650-700 C). Durability heat pipe No.5 had a high temperature bakeout and reflux cleaning and showed low levels of wick corrosion after long-term operation. After testing durability heat pipe No.6 for 5,003 hours at an operating temperature of 750 C, it showed low levels of wick corrosion. This test shows a high temperature bakeout alone will significantly reduce wick corrosion without the need for costly and time consuming reflux cleaning.

MOSS, TIMOTHY A.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Total Facility Control - Applying New Intelligent Technologies to Energy Efficient Green Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy efficiency through intelligent control is a core element of any "Green Building". We need smarter, more efficient ways of managing the energy consuming elements within a building. But what we think of as "the building" is only a small piece of the puzzle. We have to think broader in order to gain the greater energy savings and efficiencies that are possible. "Total Facility Control" is a concept that we need to embrace and consider when we design, commission, and retrofit our facilities. Very often a single building is part of a larger campus or collection of buildings under a common management domain. Be it a university, public school district, office complex, or multiuse tenant space, there are often multiple "buildings" plus the connectivity between buildings: walkway lighting, signage, parking structures, and even the irrigation systems. We don't often think about the outdoor lighting, security, or irrigation as part of the building management plan, but it can be a significant contributing factor when looking at places to save on energy and improve operational efficiency. We must change the way we design our buildings, facilities, campuses, and enterprises in order to be more energy efficient and be green. A variety of technologies and design principles are available to ensure we move in a positive direction. We must make our systems and processes more visible and, hence, more accessible. At the core of this is the visibility and control of the systems within these environments. A majority of the building control systems in operation today are extremely limited in their ability to achieve higher efficiencies because there is no intelligent control or communication system available; and the amount of cross system interoperability is even scarcer. What does an interoperable system architecture look like? It's one in which a wide variety of energy consuming, intelligent devices can share their information and be controlled by an energy management system. Newer technologies use open systems, open protocols, and higher levels of interoperability, all of which have been proven to cost effectively provide competitive solutions. Better energy efficiency and improved operational costs start with better visibility and control of the myriad of systems within a facility. They must communicate together in a way that enables greater functionality and lower costs. Total Facility Control must be considered as we look at the entire building envelope as well as the rest of the facility systems. Included in the mix are HVAC, indoor lighting, security, access, sun shading, indoor air quality, sound masking and alarm annunciation, elevators/escalators, appliances, power conditioning, irrigation, energy metering, outdoor/parking lot lighting, street lighting, co-generation stations, and much more. This paper will discuss some of the basic concepts, architectures, and technologies that are being used today to implement a Total Facility Control model.

Bernstein, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Monitoring of the performance of a solar heated and cooled apartment building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An all-electric apartment building was retrofitted for solar heating and cooling and hot water. The resulting system consists of an array of 1280 square feet of Northrup concentrating tracking collectors, a 5000-gallon hot water storage vessel, a 500-gallon chilled water storage vessel, a 25-ton Arkla Industries absorption chiller, and a two-pipe hydronic air conditioning system. The solar air conditioning equipment is installed in parallel with the existing conventional electric heating and cooling system, and the solar domestic water heating serves as preheat to the existing electric water heaters. With support from the State of Texas Energy Development Fund and the Department of Energy the system was fully instrumented for monitoring.

Vliet, G.C.; Srubar, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Monitoring of the performance of a solar heated and cooled apartment building. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An all-electric apartment building in Texas was retrofitted for solar heating and cooling and hot water. The system consists of an array of 1280 square feet of Northrup concentrating tracking collectors, a 5000-gallon hot water storage vessel, a 500-gallon chilled water storage vessel, a 25-ton Arkla Industries absorption chiller, and a two-pipe hydronic air conditioning system. The solar air conditioning equipment is installed in parallel with the existing conventional electric heating and cooling system, and the solar domestic water heating serves as preheat to the existing electric water heaters. The system was fully instrumented for monitoring. Detailed descriptions are given of the solar system, the performance monitoring system, and the data reduction processes. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

Vliet, G.C.; Srubar, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Proposed Design for a Coupled Ground-Source Heat Pump/Energy Recovery Ventilator System to Reduce Building Energy Demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work presented in this thesis focuses on reducing the energy demand of a residential building by using a coupled ground-source heat pump/energy recovery ventilation… (more)

McDaniel, Matthew Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Instrumentation and performance analysis of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture solar heated and cooled building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An instrumentation system was designed and installed on the New Mexico Department of Agriculture (NMDA) building to evaluate the performance of the solar system. The NMDA building is the first specifically designed solar heated and cooled building constructed in the United States. The solar system utilizes the flat plate collectors with liquid as the thermal transfer fluid, hot and cold storage tanks, and an absorption chiller. Over two years of operating experience now exists in regard to the NMDA building. Operation of the NMDA building heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system involves three modes. The full heating mode utilizes the collected solar thermal energy for space heating. The full cooling mode utilizes the energy input from the solar collectors in driving the absorption chiller to provide space cooling. The intermediate mode requires heating during the morning hours and cooling during the afternoon. Cooling for the intermediate mode utilizes the cooling tower due to the low ambient relative humidity. The requirement of auxiliary energy is met with a gas fired boiler within the building. The instrumentation system installed on the NMDA building monitored solar insolation, 45 temperatures, 15 flow rates, the rate of electrical energy consumption, local meterology and the relative humidity. The data was recorded on a 15 minute time interval during daylight and every hour during the night.

San Martin, R.L.; Fenton, D.L.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Advanced phase change materials and systems for solar passive heating and cooling of residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

During the last three years under the sponsorship of the DOE Solar Passive Division, the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has investigated four phase change material (PCM) systems for utility in thermal energy storage for solar passive heating and cooling applications. From this research on the basis of cost, performance, containment, and environmental acceptability, we have selected as our current and most promising series of candidate phase change materials, C-15 to C-24 linear crystalline alkyl hydrocarbons. The major part of the research during this contract period was directed toward the following three objectives. Find, test, and develop low-cost effective phase change materials (PCM) that melt and freeze sharply in the comfort temperature range of 73--77{degree}F for use in solar passive heating and cooling of buildings. Define practical materials and processes for fire retarding plasterboard/PCM building products. Develop cost-effective methods for incorporating PCM into building construction materials (concrete, plasterboard, etc.) which will lead to the commercial manufacture and sale of PCM-containing products resulting in significant energy conservation.

Salyer, I.O.; Sircar, A.K.; Dantiki, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Modelica Library for Building Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a freely available Modelica library for building heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The library is based on the Modelica.Fluid library. It has been developed to support research and development of integrated building energy and control systems. The primary applications are controls design, energy analysis and model-based operation. The library contains dynamic and steady-state component models that are applicable for analyzing fast transients when designing control algorithms and for conducting annual simulations when assessing energy performance. For most models, dimensional analysis is used to compute the performance for operating points that differ from nominal conditions. This allows parameterizing models in the absence of detailed geometrical information which is often impractical to obtain during the conceptual design phase of building systems. In the first part of this paper, the library architecture and the main classes are described. In the second part, an example is presented in which we implemented a model of a hydronic heating system with thermostatic radiator valves and thermal energy storage.

Wetter, Michael

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

203

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

204

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present worth cost (PWC) method, which covers the initial costs, operating costs, maintenance costs, replacement costs and salvage values is the useful tool to merit various cooling and power generation systems for building applications. A life cycle of 23 years was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller is estimated to be US $ 1.5 million which is about 71.5 % low compared to electric powered conventional vapour compression chiller. From the analysis it was found that the initial cost of VARS system was 125 % higher than that of VCRS, while the PWC of operating cost of VARS was 78.2 % lower compared to VCRS. The result shows that the waste heat operated VARS would be preferable from the view point of operating cost and green house gas emission reduction.

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Modeling principles applied to the simulation of a joule-heated glass melter  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional conservation equations applicable to the operation of a joule-heated glass melter were rigorously examined and used to develop scaling relationships for modeling purposes. By rigorous application of the conservation equations governing transfer of mass, momentum, energy, and electrical charge in three-dimensional cylindrical coordinates, scaling relationships were derived between a glass melter and a physical model for the following independent and dependent variables: geometrical size (scale), velocity, temperature, pressure, mass input rate, energy input rate, voltage, electrode current, electrode current flux, total power, and electrical resistance. The scaling relationships were then applied to the design and construction of a physical model of the semiworks glass melter for the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The design and construction of such a model using glycerine plus LiCl as a model fluid in a one-half-scale Plexiglas tank is described.

Routt, K.R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Topic 14. Retrofit and optimal operation of the building energy systems Performances of Low Temperature Radiant Heating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

panel system are given by its energy (the consumption of gas for heating, electricity for pumps for residential buildings are increasingly used. According to some studies, this figure exceeds 50% (Kilkis et al of new calculation methods. However, in terms of heat transfer modelling, there are several analytical

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

207

Building America Expert Meeting Final Report: Multifamily Hydronic and Steam Heating Controls and Distribution Retrofits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydronic Hydronic Heating in Multifamily Buildings Jordan Dentz The ARIES Collaborative October 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation,

208

Application Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps in Building Space Conditioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application Analysis of Ground Source Heat Application Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps in Building Space Conditioning Hua Qian 1,2 , Yungang Wang 2 1 School of Energy and Environment Southeast University Nanjing, 210096, China 2 Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720, USA July 2013 The project was supported by National Key Technology Supported Program of China (2011BAJ03B10-1) and by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the

209

City of Santa Monica - Expedited Permitting for Green Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expedited Permitting for Green Buildings Expedited Permitting for Green Buildings City of Santa Monica - Expedited Permitting for Green Buildings < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State California Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Santa Monica The City of Santa Monica allows for priority plan check processing for building projects that are registered with the United States Green Building Council for certification under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System. The priority status applies to

210

Investigation of a Novel Solar Assisted Water Heating System with Enhanced Energy Yield for Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presented the concept, prototype application, operational performance and benefits relating to a novel solar assisted water heating system for building services. It was undertaken through dedicated theoretical analysis, computer simulation and experimental verification. The unique characteristic of such system consists in the integrated loop heat pipe and heat pump unit (LHP-HP), which was proposed to improve solar photovoltaic (PV) generation, capture additional solar heat, and therefore enhance overall solar energy yield. The evaluation approaches derived from the first-law thermodynamics and the standard/hybrid system performance coefficients (COP/COPPV/T) were developed for the comprehensive assessments. Under the featured weather conditions, the mean electrical, thermal and overall energetic efficiencies of the module were tested around 9.12%, 38.13% and 47.25% respectively. Whilst the COP and COPPV/T values of entire system were measured at about 5.51 and 8.81 averagely. Moreover, a general comparison of this prototype system against the conventional solar/air energy systems was simply discussed.

Zhang, X.; Zhao, X.; Xu, J.; Yu, X.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) advances building energy performance through the development and promotion of efficient, affordable, and high impact technologies, systems, and practices. The...

212

Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multifamily Individual Heating Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems Lawrence, Massachusetts PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Retrofit Type: Multifamily, affordable Builder: Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) www.merrimackvalleyhabitat.org Size: 840 to 1,170 ft 2 units Price Range: $125,000-$130,000 Date completed: Slated for 2014 Climate Zone: Cold (5A) PERFORMANCE DATA HERS Index Range: 48 to 63 Projected annual energy cost savings: $1,797 Incremental cost of energy efficiency measures: $3,747 Incremental annual mortgage: $346 Annual cash flow: $1,451 Billing data: Not available The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley

213

Build-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

321,"Q",12,255,36,"Q" "District Heat ...",65,53,"Q",2,12,24,14,7,"Q","Q" "Boilers ...",579,485,127,39,169,5,73,207,22,9 "Packaged Heating Units...

214

Monitoring of the performance of a solar-heated-and-cooled apartment building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 12-unit student apartment building was retrofitted for solar heating and cooling and hot water. The retrofit of the all-electric building resulted in a system consisting of an array of 1280 square feet of concentrating tracking collectors, a 5000-gallon hot water storage vessel, a 500-gallon chilled water storage vesel, a 25-ton absorption chiller, and a two-pipe hydronic air conditioning system. The solar air conditioning equipment is installed in parallel with the existing conventional electric heating and cooling system, and the solar domestic water heating serves as preheat to the existing electric water heaters. The system was fully instrumented for temperature, flow rate, electrical power, and meteorological measurements. The data indicate that 11.2% of the cooling load was met by solar and 8.2% of the total load (cooling plus hot water) was met by solar. The performance of the collector array was determined to be approximately 60% of that suggested by the manufacturer. Steady-state chiller operation exhibited a C.O.P. very close to the manufacturer's specified performance values, but the time-averaged chiller C.O.P. is degraded due to cycling. The composite solar fraction (8.2%) is less than solar cooling only (11.2%) because there was no solar domestic hot water delivery during this monitoring period. The evaluation of system performance for the cooling season indicates a lower performance than expected. However, system performance in the cooling mode can be improved by better adjustment of the thermostats and controls. Continued data collection and analysis should be performed, to improve system operations, assess performance limits, and compare results with design projections.

Vliet, G.C.; Srubar, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Procedure for Applying an Open-Cycle Heat Pump to An Existing Evaporator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An open-cycle heat pump, or mechanical vapor compression (MVC) system, is often an attractive technique for increasing the energy efficiency of an evaporator. With proper design, an MVC system is capable of dramatic cost savings when retrofitted to an existing evaporator. This is especially true if the evaporator is a single or double effect design. Many such evaporators were built when energy was cheap, or because a particular process is not amenable to modern designs incorporating many effects. Advances in compressor design have made MVC applicable to a broader range of processes than ever before. This paper discusses the basic steps required to apply MVC as a retrofit to an existing evaporator. Because of their importance to identification of candidate applications, this paper emphasizes the preliminary analysis and premonitoring steps. For illustration purposes the authors refer to an MVC retrofit in progress at a plant operated by Kraft, Inc. The project is cofunded by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Albany, NY), and will serve as a demonstration site to facilitate increased adoption of MVC by other industrial firms.

Wagner, J. R.; Brush, F. C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling applications. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first in a series of quarterly progress reports covering activities at ORNL to develop thermal energy storage (TES) technology applicable to building heating and cooling. Studies to be carried out will emphasize latent heat storage in that sensible heat storage is held to be an essentially existing technology. Development of a time-dependent analytical model of a TES system charged with a phase-change material was started. A report on TES subsystems for application to solar energy sources is nearing completion. Studies into the physical chemistry of TES materials were initiated. Preliminary data were obtained on the melt-freeze cycle behavior and viscosities of sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate and a mixture of Glauber's salt and Borax; limited melt-freeze data were obtained on two paraffin waxes. A subcontract was signed with Monsanto Research Corporation for studies on form-stable crystalline polymer pellets for TES; subcontracts are being negotiated with four other organizations (Clemson University, Dow Chemical Company, Franklin Institute, and Suntek Research Associates). Review of 10 of 13 unsolicited proposals received was completed by the end of June 1976.

Hoffman, H.W.; Kedl, R.J.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Performance analysis of dedicated heat-pump water heaters in an office building  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation is made of the performance of two generic dedicated heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) in supplying the domestic hot water (DHW) needs of a medium-sized office building in Colorado. Results are based on preliminary data measurements, and assumptions are made to compensate for a faulty flow meter. A stand-alone heat pump plumbed to a conventional tank obtains a coefficient of performance (COP) of 2.4 but only delivers load water temperatures of about 41/sup 0/C (105/sup 0/F) because of the 15,142 L/day (4000 gal/day) recirculating loop flow. An industrial-grade stand-alone HPWH will replace this unit. An integral heat pump/tank unit is being tested, but results are not available because of compressor starting problems. Recirculating loop losses account for 75% of the energy delivered by the HPWHs. These losses could be reduced by 75% if the recirculating loop were insulated, thus reducing the DHW fuel costs by 50%. The insulation expense could be paid in less than 3 years by savings in DHW fuel costs.

Morrison, L.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Energy Performance and Economic Evaluations of the Geothermal Heat Pump System used in the KnowledgeWorks I and II Buildings, Blacksburg, Virginia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Systems (HVAC) are not only one of the most energy consuming components in buildings but also contribute to green house… (more)

Charoenvisal, Kongkun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Influence of Transfer Efficiency of the Outdoor Pipe Network and Boiler Operating Efficiency on the Building Heat Consumption Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the influence of transfer efficiency of the outdoor pipe network and operating efficiency of the boiler on the building heat consumption index, on the premise of saving up to 65 percent energy in different climates. The results show that transfer efficiency is not influenced by the climate, and the influence is in accordance with that in other climates. The article also presents data on the energy consumption caused by the improvement of the transfer efficiency of the outdoor pipe network and the operating efficiency of the boiler, and the calculated formula for the building heat consumption index on the condition of saving 65 percent energy.

Fang, X.; Wang, Z.; Liu, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Evaluation and demonstration of decentralized space and water heating versus centralized services for new and rehabilitated multifamily buildings. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The general objective of this research was aimed at developing sufficient technical and economic know-how to convince the building and design communities of the appropriateness and energy advantages of decentralized space and water heating for multifamily buildings. Two main goals were established to guide this research. First, the research sought to determine the cost-benefit advantages of decentralized space and water heating versus centralized systems for multifamily applications based on innovative gas piping and appliance technologies. The second goal was to ensure that this information is made available to the design community.

Belkus, P. [Foster-Miller, Inc., Waltham, MA (US); Tuluca, A. [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Build-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"District Heat ...",5166,4376,"Q",404,758,2231,1737,1023,"Q","Q" "Boilers ...",20423,19051,3352,2919,5926,391,7857,9946,620,596 "Packaged...

222

Passive solar heating of building with attached greenhouse. Final report, August 31, 1979-August 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research has been conducted on the attached-greenhouse type of passive solar heating system in the north-central region. The thermal performance of attached-greenhouse buildings was analyzed in order to determine the component sizes and configurations which optimize performance. The analytical method is dynamic computer simulation using a thermal network model and actual hourly meteorological and solar radiation data from the north-central region. The project has consisted of a large number of computer simulation runs and resulting performance estimates for certain designs. Conclusions on design guidelines emerge from the results. The overall result of the project is the development of specific design guidelines useful to architects and builders.

Jones, R W

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Solar heating and cooling system for an office building at Reedy Creek Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes in detail the solar energy system installed in a new two-story office building at the Reedy Creek Utilities Company, which provides utility service to Walt Disney World at Lake Buena Vista, Florida. The solar components were partly funded by the Department of Energy under Contract EX-76-C-01-2401, and the technical management was by NASA/George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. The solar energy system application is 100 percent heating, 80 percent cooling, and 100 percent hot water. The collector is a modular cylindrical concentrator type with an area of 3.840 square feet. The storage medium is water with a capacity of 10,000 gallons hot and 10,000 gallons chilled. Design, construction, operation, cost, maintenance, and performance are described in depth. Detailed drawings are included.

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Passive solar heating of buildings with attached greenhouse. Progress report, November 30, 1979-February 28, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Research is being conducted on the attached-greenhouse type of passive solar heating system in the north-central region. The thermal performance of attached-greenhouse buildings is being analyzed in order to determine the component sizes and configurations which optimize performance. The analytical method is dynamic computer simulation using a thermal network model and actual hourly meteorological and solar radiation data from the north-central region. Progress has consisted of a large number of computer simulation runs resulting in performance estimates for certain designs. Preliminary conclusions on design guidelines are suggested by the results. The overall aim of the project is the development of specific design guidelines useful to architects and builders.

Jones, R.W.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Bottom-Heating Effects on Scalar Dispersion in and above a Cubical Building Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal effects on scalar dispersion in and above a cubical building array are numerically investigated using the parallelized large-eddy simulation model (PALM). Two cases (no heating and bottom heating) are simulated, and scalar dispersion ...

Seung-Bu Park; Jong-Jin Baik; Young-Hee Ryu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings to Grid Buildings to Grid Integration to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

227

Modeling of Heat Transfer in Rooms in the Modelica Buildings Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for one-dimensional heat conduction in a solid only needs todifferent models to compute heat conduction through opaqueone-dimensional heat conduction through multi-layered

Wetter, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Heat pipes applied to flat-plate solar collectors. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to analytically and experimentally investigate the use of heat pipes in flat-plate solar collectors. Heat pipes are passive heat transport devices which utilize a closed evaporation-condensation cycle. Because of their high equivalent conductance, they appear to be well suited to transport heat from the solar absorber to an air or liquid distribution system. The program consisted of the following tasks: (I) Configuration Studies, (II) Parametric Performance Studies, (III) Economic Analysis, (IV) System Integration Studies, (V) Submodule Fabrication and Testing (in the laboratory), and (VI) Full-Scale Module Fabrication and Testing (using solar input). An additional Task VII, Feasibility Study of a Stationary Concentrator, was identified during the program and was also completed. In performing Tasks I through IV, various aspects of integrating heat pipes into flat-palte solar collectors were investigated. The results of these tasks were reported in the Annual Progress Report (Ref. 2) dated January 31, 1975. A summary of that program effort is included in the present report. The results of the experimental work conducted under Tasks V and VI are presented in this report. Under Task V, breadboard heat pipes were fabricated from sections of Roll-Bond panels and their heat transfer performance was evaluated in the laboratory. Three complete solar panels, two of which were heat pipe absorbers and one was a Roll-Bond control panel, were fabricated and solar tested during Task VI. Finally, under the new Task VII, a feasibility study of a stationary concentrator using heat pipes as thermal diodes was conducted. Results are presented and discussed.

Bienert, W.B.; Wolf, D.A.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Federal Technology Alert: Ground-Source Heat Pumps Applied to Federal Facilities--Second Edition  

SciTech Connect

This Federal Technology Alert, which was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs, provides the detailed information and procedures that a Federal energy manager needs to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. This report updates an earlier report on ground-source heat pumps that was published in September 1995. In the current report, general benefits of this technology to the Federal sector are described, as are ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits. In addition, information on current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are provided.

Hadley, Donald L.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Simple empirical method for estimating the performance of a passive solar heated building of the thermal storage wall type  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two methods are presented for estimating the annual solar heating performance of a building utilizing a passive thermal storage wall of the Trombe wall or water wall type with or without night insulation and with or without a reflector. The method is accurate to +-3% as compared with hour-by-hour computer simulations.

Balcomb, J.D.; McFarland, R.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... building materials; thermal conductivity; databases; insulation; building technology; density; fibrous glass; guarded hot plate; heat flow; insulation ...

232

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heat activated absorption cooling, direct-fired naturalwith absorption chillers that use waste heat for cooling (

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Solar heating and cooling of buildings, Phase 1 (non-residential). Recommendation for solar heating and cooling demonstrations as an integrated package  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recommendations to ERDA of four solar heating and cooling demonstration projects are presented. Recommendations include (1) the Westchester Work Center Building owned by Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania, (2) the Scottsdale County Courts Building in Scottsdale, Arizona, (3) Howard Johnson's Inc. Hotel in North Miami, Florida, and (4) a combination warehouse, manufacturing facility offered by Mr. John I. Ladd of Ladd Brothers, Pueblo, Colorado. A conceptual diagram and a fact sheet is included for each proposed demonstration site. The combined estimated cost for the four projects is $334,586. (WHK)

None

1976-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

234

Solar heating and cooling of buildings, Phase 1 (non-residential). Recommendation for solar heating and cooling demonstrations as an integrated package  

SciTech Connect

Recommendations to ERDA of four solar heating and cooling demonstration projects are presented. Recommendations include (1) the Westchester Work Center Building owned by Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania, (2) the Scottsdale County Courts Building in Scottsdale, Arizona, (3) Howard Johnson's Inc. Hotel in North Miami, Florida, and (4) a combination warehouse, manufacturing facility offered by Mr. John I. Ladd of Ladd Brothers, Pueblo, Colorado. A conceptual diagram and a fact sheet is included for each proposed demonstration site. The combined estimated cost for the four projects is $334,586. (WHK)

1976-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

235

A solar thermal cooling and heating system for a building: Experimental and model based performance analysis and design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar thermal cooling and heating system at Carnegie Mellon University was studied through its design, installation, modeling, and evaluation to deal with the question of how solar energy might most effectively be used in supplying energy for the operation of a building. This solar cooling and heating system incorporates 52 m{sup 2} of linear parabolic trough solar collectors; a 16 kW double effect, water-lithium bromide (LiBr) absorption chiller, and a heat recovery heat exchanger with their circulation pumps and control valves. It generates chilled and heated water, dependent on the season, for space cooling and heating. This system is the smallest high temperature solar cooling system in the world. Till now, only this system of the kind has been successfully operated for more than one year. Performance of the system has been tested and the measured data were used to verify system performance models developed in the TRaNsient SYstem Simulation program (TRNSYS). On the basis of the installed solar system, base case performance models were programmed; and then they were modified and extended to investigate measures for improving system performance. The measures included changes in the area and orientation of the solar collectors, the inclusion of thermal storage in the system, changes in the pipe diameter and length, and various system operational control strategies. It was found that this solar thermal system could potentially supply 39% of cooling and 20% of heating energy for this building space in Pittsburgh, PA, if it included a properly sized storage tank and short, low diameter connecting pipes. Guidelines for the design and operation of an efficient and effective solar cooling and heating system for a given building space have been provided. (author)

Qu, Ming [School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2051 (United States); Yin, Hongxi [School of Engineering Education, Purdue University, 701 W. Stadium Ave., West Lafayette, IN 47907-2061 (United States); Archer, David H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1258,1999,282,63 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,699,955,171,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,233,409,58,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,211,372,32,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,63,140,8,9

237

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes Building Energy Codes Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat.

238

Solar energy applied to dehumidification and water heating in an integrated system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project involved the demonstration of a desiccant dryer assist for use with residential air conditioning systems and designed for retrofitting to in-place equipment. The dryer is part of an integrated package including solar regeneration of the desiccant, water heating, and winter time humidification. Some of the key features and results of the project are summarized in this report.

Fago, E.T. Jr.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

239

Update on maintenance and service costs of commercial building ground-source heat pump systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An earlier paper showed that commercial ground-source heat pump systems have significantly lower service and maintenance costs than alternative HVAC systems. This paper expands on those results by adding 13 more buildings to the original 25 sites and by comparing the results to the latest ASHRAE survey of HVAC maintenance costs. Data from the 38 sites are presented here including total (scheduled and unscheduled) maintenance costs in cents per square foot per year for base cost, in-house, and contractor-provided maintenance. Because some of the new sites had maintenance costs that were much higher than the industry norm, the resulting data are not normally distributed. Analysis (O'Hara Hines 1998) indicated that a log-normal distribution is a better fit; thus, the data are analyzed and presented here as log-normal. The log-mean annual total maintenance costs for the most recent year of the survey ranged from 6.07 cents per square foot to 8.37 cents per square foot for base cost and contractor-provided maintenance, respectively.

Cane, D.; Garnet, J.M.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

InterTechnology Corporation proposed systems level plan for solar heating and cooling commercial buildings. National Solar Demonstration Program. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of the National Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program for non-residential buildings are embodied in the following: (1) Demonstrate the ultimate economic and technical feasibility of solar heating and combined heating and cooling. (2) Stimulate industry to produce and market solar equipment. (3) Stimulate a commercial market for solar systems. The systems level plan is designed to address the above stated goals as they relate to the building community associated with the commercial sector of the economy. (WDM)

None

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

INTERACTION OF A SOLAR SPACE HEATING SYSTEM WITH THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a typical h"ydronic solar heating system for differentlarger by the active solar heating system. its, Schiller,Klein, and J, A. Duffie, "Solar Heating Design", (New York:

Vilmer, Christian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

INTERACTION OF A SOLAR SPACE HEATING SYSTEM WITH THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pant Rfict Fan coil heat exchanger effectiveness. c min Fanis modeled as a fan-coil heat exchanger. The fan coil outputsystem with a fan-coil heat exchanger sized for a solar

Vilmer, Christian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Duct Systems in large commercial buildings: Physical characterization, air leakage, and heat conduction gains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Leakage, and Heat Conduction Gains William 1. Fisk,0.75 to 0.90; thus, heat conduction decreased the coolingby air leakage or heat conduction, because these ducts are

Fisk, W.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Modeling of Heat Transfer in Rooms in the Modelica Buildings Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for convective and radiative heat transfer yielded a twofoldModeling of Heat Transfer in Rooms in the Modelica “of California. MODELING OF HEAT TRANSFER IN ROOMS IN THE

Wetter, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Annual fuel usage charts for oil-fired boilers. [Building space heating and hot water supplies  

SciTech Connect

On the basis of laboratory-determined boiler efficiency data, one may calculate the annual fuel usage (AFU) for any oil-fired boiler, serving a structure of a given design heat load, for any specified hourly weather pattern. Further, where data are available regarding the energy recapture rates of the strucutre due to direct gain solar energy (windows), lighting, cooking, electrical appliances, metabolic processes, etc., the annual fuel usage savings due to such (re) capture are straightforwardly determinable. Employing the Brookhaven National Laboratory annual fuel usage formulation, along with efficiency data determined in the BNL Boiler Laboratory, computer-drawn annual fuel usage charts can be generated for any selected boiler for a wide range of operating conditions. For two selected boilers operating in any one of the hour-by-hour weather patterns which characterize each of six cities over a wide range of firing rates, domestic hot water consumption rates, design heat loads, and energy (re) capture rates, annual fuel usages are determined and graphically presented. Figures 1 to 98, inclusive, relate to installations for which energy recapture rates are taken to be zero. Figures 97 to 130, inclusive, apply to a range of cases for which energy recapture rates are nonzero and determinable. In all cases, simple, direct and reliable annual fuel usage values can be determined by use of charts and methods such as those illustrated.

Berlad, A.L.; Yeh, Y.J.; Salzano, F.J.; Hoppe, R.J.; Batey, J.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar heat; • refrigeration loads that can be met either by standard equipment or absorption equivalents; • hot-water and space-heating

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storageCHP, often with absorption chillers that use waste heat forand • heat-driven absorption chillers. Figure 1 shows a

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Definition: Heat pump | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pump pump Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Heat pump Heating and/or cooling equipment that, during the heating season, draws heat into a building from outside and, during the cooling season, ejects heat from the building to the outside[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A heat pump is a device that transfers heat energy from a heat source to a heat sink against a temperature gradient. Heat pumps are designed to move thermal energy opposite the direction of spontaneous heat flow. A heat pump uses some amount of external high-grade energy to accomplish the desired transfer of thermal energy from heat source to heat sink. While compressor-driven air conditioners and freezers are familiar examples of heat pumps, the term "heat pump" is more general and applies to

249

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

250

Operator splitting approach applied to oscillatory flow and heat transfer in a tube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The method of operator splitting is applied to an advection-diffusion model as it occurs in a pulse tube. Firstly, the governing equations of the simplified model are studied and the mathematical description is derived. Then the splitting approach is ... Keywords: 35L65, 65M06, 80A20, Domain decomposition, Operator splitting, Pulse tube, Recuperator, Taylor dispersion

R. Widura; M. Lehn; K. Muralidhar; R. Scherer

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Roof aperture system for selective collection and control of solar energy for building heating, cooling and daylighting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The amount of building heating, cooling and daylighting is controlled by at least one pair of solar energy passing panels, with each panel of the pair of panels being exposed to a separate direction of sun incidence. A shutter-shade combination is associated with each pair of panels and the shutter is connected to the shade so that rectilinear movement of the shutter causes pivotal movement of the shade.

Sanders, William J. (Kansas City, KS); Snyder, Marvin K. (Overland Park, KS); Harter, James W. (Independence, MO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

New Buildings Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Program New Buildings Program Eligibility Commercial State Government Savings For Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction...

253

Project title: Natural ventilation, solar heating and integrated low-energy building design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrated low-energy building design. In Cambridge, research was conducted at the BP Institute - which was set up in 1999 with an endowment from BP to research some of the fundamental scientific challenges that the oil industry encounters. In the CMI... in building design. Summary of Intended Outcomes: The objectives of the project will be to develop designs and technologies to: reduce energy costs of maintaining a comfortable environment with buildings through use of solar power, natural ventilation...

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

254

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Keywords: building technology; brazed plate; compact heat exchanger; evaporator; condenser; gravity Abstract: This study ...

255

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial-Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions on2009, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management, (CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation...  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Buildings Technologies Reference Case, Second Edition (Revised), Sept. 2007, p. 26-31. Efficiency U.S. Average Best-Available Parameter Efficiency New Efficiency New Efficiency...

257

Direct contact liquid-liquid heat exchanger for solar heated and cooled buildings. Final report, January 1, 1979-May 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of using a direct contact liquid-liquid heat exchanger (DCLLHE) storage unit in a solar heating and cooling system is established. Experimental performance data were obtained from the CSU Solar House I using a DCLLHE for both heating and cooling functions. A simulation model for the system was developed. The model was validated using the experimental data and applied in five different climatic regions of the country for a complete year. The life-cycle cost of the system was estimated for each application. The results are compared to a conventional solar system, using a standard shell-and-tube heat exchanger. It is concluded that while thare is a performance advantage with a DCLLHE system over a conventional solar system, the advantage is not sufficiently large to overcome slightly higher capital and operating costs for the DCLLHE system.

Karaki, S.; Brothers, P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 222 194 17...

259

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,100...

260

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,928 1,316...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

262

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

263

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

264

Roles of Urban Tree Canopy and Buildings in Urban Heat Island Effects: Parameterization and Preliminary Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban heat island (UHI) effects can strengthen heat waves and air pollution episodes. In this study, the dampening impact of urban trees on the UHI during an extreme heat wave in the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan area is ...

Christopher P. Loughner; Dale J. Allen; Da-Lin Zhang; Kenneth E. Pickering; Russell R. Dickerson; Laura Landry

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Comparison of Energy Needed to Heat Greenhouses and Insulated Frame Buildings Used in Aquaculture1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be as low as $4 to $6 per square foot. Construction costs for wood or metal frame buildings are greater than for the structure can be as low as $1 per square foot, but plastic covered greenhouse structures have structure is easy to construct on almost any site and has a low initial cost. Building material costs

Watson, Craig A.

266

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Main Commercial Heating and Cooling Equipment as of 1995, 1999, and 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Heating Equipment 1995 1999 2003 (2) Cooling Equipment 1995 1999 2003 (2) Packaged Heating Units 29% 38% 28% Packaged Air Conditioning Units 45% 54% 46% Boilers 29% 29% 32% Individual Air Conditioners 21% 21% 19% Individual Space Heaters 29% 26% 19% Central Chillers 19% 19% 18% Furnaces 25% 21% 30% Residential Central Air Conditioners 16% 12% 17% Heat Pumps 10% 13% 14% Heat Pumps 12% 14% 14% District Heat 10% 8% 8% District Chilled Water 4% 4% 4% Other 11% 6% 5% Swamp Coolers 4% 3% 2% Other 2% 2% 2% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Heating and cooling equipment percentages of floorspace total more than 100% since equipment shares floorspace. 2) Malls are no longer included in most CBECs tables; therefore, some data is not directly comparable to past CBECs.

267

Toxicological evaluation of liquids proposed for use in direct contact liquid--liquid heat exchangers for solar heated and cooled buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of the toxicological evaluation part of the project entitled, ''Direct Contact Liquid-Liquid Heat Exchangers for Solar Heated and Cooled Buildings.'' Obviously any liquid otherwise suitable for use in such a device should be subjected to a toxicological evaluation. 34 liquids (24 denser than water, 10 less dense) have physical and chemical properties that would make them suitable for use in such a device. In addition to the complexity involved in selecting the most promising liquids from the standpoint of their chemical and physical properties is added the additional difficulty of also considering their toxicological properties. Some of the physical and chemical properties of these liquids are listed. The liquids are listed in alphabetical order within groups, the denser than water liquids are listed first followed by those liquids less dense than water.

Buchan, R.M.; Majestic, J.R.; Billau, R.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Commercial Buildings News Energy Department Invests in Heating, Cooling, and Lighting August 21, 2013 Energy Department...

269

Building Technologies Office: Contact the Building Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Commercial Buildings News Energy Department Invests in Heating, Cooling, and Lighting August 21, 2013 Energy Department...

270

Study on the use of adaptive control for energy conservation in large solar heated and cooled buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Security and Resources Study Center at LASL provides the basis for a general model used in this simulation. The NSRSC is a 59,000 ft/sup 2/ library and conference facility. A simplified model of the solar heating system is used. The adaptive optimal control technique is described and applied and the results are discussed. (MHR)

Farris, D.R.; Melsa, J.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide-Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document serves as the final report documenting work completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Fraunhofer Institute in Building Physics (Holzkirchen, Germany) under an international CRADA No. 0575 with Fraunhofer Institute of Bauphysics of the Federal Republic of Germany for Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads. This CRADA required a multi-faceted approach to building envelope research that included a moisture engineering approach by blending extensive material property analysis, laboratory system and sub-system thermal and moisture testing, and advanced moisture analysis prediction performance. The Participant's Institute for Building physics (IBP) and the Contractor's Buildings Technology Center (BTC) identified potential research projects and activities capable of accelerating and advancing the development of innovative, low energy and durable building envelope systems in diverse climates. This allowed a major leverage of the limited resources available to ORNL to execute the required Department of Energy (DOE) directives in the area of moisture engineering. A joint working group (ORNL and Fraunhofer IBP) was assembled and a research plan was executed from May 2000 to May 2005. A number of key deliverables were produced such as adoption of North American loading into the WUFI-software. in addition the ORNL Weather File Analyzer was created and this has been used to address environmental loading for a variety of US climates. At least 4 papers have been co-written with the CRADA partners, and a chapter in the ASTM Manual 40 on Moisture Analysis and Condensation Control. All deliverables and goals were met and exceeded making this collaboration a success to all parties involves.

Karagiozis, A.N.

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Residential About Residential Building Programs to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat.

273

Analysis of space heating and domestic hot water systems for energy-efficient residential buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis of the best ways of meeting the space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) needs of new energy-efficient houses with very low requirements for space heat is provided. The DHW load is about equal to the space heating load in such houses in northern climates. The equipment options which should be considered are discussed, including new equipment recently introduced in the market. It is concluded that the first consideration in selecting systems for energy-efficient houses should be identification of the air moving needs of the house for heat distribution, heat storage, ventilation, and ventilative cooling. This is followed, in order, by selection of the most appropriate distribution system, the heating appliances and controls, and the preferred energy source, gas, oil, or electricity.

Dennehy, G

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Factsheet on Summer Heat Gain and Winter Heat Loss In the summer we often feel warm in buildings and in the winter we may feel cold. This may be due  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is lost as heat. energy Eg 2 31 Absorption process #12;ELEG620: Solar Electric Systems University single sided buried contact solar cell. Buried contact solar cells used in building-integrated application at G8 Summit Building, England. #12;ELEG620: Solar Electric Systems University of Delaware, ECE

275

Regulations establishing energy-conservation standards for new residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

The text of the California Administrative Code, Title 24, Part 6, Article 1 is presented. The energy conservation standards described apply to all new hotels, motels, apartment houses, lodging houses, dwellings, and other residential buildings which are heated or mechanically cooled. Standards for the building envelope, climate control systems and equipment, and water heating are included. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

National program plan for research and development in solar heating and cooling for building, agricultural, and industrial applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main feature of the directed program is the focus on specific approaches, called paths, to the application of solar energy. A path is the linking of a method of energy collection or rejection with a particular application. Eleven such paths are identified for building applications and eleven for agricultural and industrial process applications. Here, an overview is given of the program plan. The 11 paths to the solar heating and cooling of buildings and the 11 paths for agricultural and industrial process applications are described. Brief descriptions of these tasks and of the non-engineering tasks are included. The importance of each non-engineering task to the overall R and D program is indicated. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 3.25. Water-Heating Equipment in FBSS Buildings in Federal Region 3, Number of Buildings and...

278

Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Eagle County In an effort to reduce county-wide energy consumption and improve the environment, Eagle County established their own efficient building code (ECO-Green Build) which applies to all new construction and renovations/additions over 50% of the existing floor area of single-family and multifamily residences, and commercial buildings.

279

INTERACTION OF A SOLAR SPACE HEATING SYSTEM WITH THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Duffie [17], the fan give 185 % of the design heat loadfan coil heating system sized at 130 % of design load tofan coil output power of 32 kW (110 kBtu/hr), or about three times the design

Vilmer, Christian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Design manual for solar heating of buildings and domestic hot water  

SciTech Connect

This manual presents design and cost analysis methods for sizing and payback estimating of solar heat collectors for augmentation of portable water heaters and space heaters. Sufficient information is presented to enable almost anyone to design solar space and water heating systems or conduct basic feasibility studies preparatory to design of large installations. Both retrofit and new installations are considered. (MOW)

Field, R.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Modeling with finite element the convective heat transfer in civil building EPS insulated walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the analysis of convective heat transfer in the walls of a house insulated with polystyrene. In the first part we make an evaluation of the insulation that is currently used in the houses. We start the simulation using a real ... Keywords: convective heat transfer, dew-point, finite element, polystyrene insulation

Madalina Xenia Calbureanu; Mihai Lungu; Dragos Tutunea; Raluca Malciu; Alexandru Dima

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Solar collector related research and development in the United States for heating and cooling of buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the research funded by the Research and Development Branch of the Heating and Cooling Division of Solar Energy of the United States Energy Research and Development Administration is described. Specifically, collector and collector materials research is reported on during FY-1977. The R and D Branch has funded research in open and closed cycle liquid heating flat plate collectors, air heating flat plate collectors, heat pipe collectors, concentrating collectors, collector heat transfer studies, honeycomb glazings, evacuated tube collectors, ponds both salt gradient and viscosity stabilized, materials exposure testing, collector testing standards, absorber surface coatings, and corrosion studies. A short description of the nature of the research is provided as well as a presentation of the significant results.

Collier, R.K.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Buildings*","Energy Used For  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 4. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manu- facturing" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,3625,3472,801,119 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,1841,1715,354,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,732,725,155,29 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,629,607,127,28 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,216,217,69,"Q" "50,001 to 100,000 ............",129,123,118,119,50,8

284

Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A variety of heating technologies are available today. In addition to heat pumps, which are discussed separately, many homes and buildings use the following approaches:

285

City of Asheville - Building Permit Fee Waiver | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Asheville - Building Permit Fee Waiver City of Asheville - Building Permit Fee Waiver City of Asheville - Building Permit Fee Waiver < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 7/01/2009 State North Carolina Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider Building Safety Department The City of Asheville waives fees for building permits and plan reviews for certain renewable energy technologies and green building certifications for homes and mixed-use commercial buildings. Waivers for building permit fees may apply to residences with the following designations (the regular fee is in parentheses): * HealthyBuilt Home Certification* ($100) * Energy Star Rating ($100) * Geothermal heat pumps ($50)

286

Measurement of performance of solar-heated office buildings. Final report, June 1, 1982-October 31, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prudential Insurance Company is building two new office buildings that are a showcase of innovative energy efficient design and solar energy utilization. In order for this effort to be fully successful, the actual performance of these buildings needs to be monitored. This report summarizes the progress made during the first year. A thorough theoretical analysis has been carried out, using the DOE2.1 computer simulation code. This analysis has been supplemented by shorthand calculations and by special models to provide an independent check of the coding and to evaluate certain features, e.g. the double wall, that cannot be modeled by DOE2.1. A steady state shorthand method has been developed to calculate annual energy use; it is a modification of the ASHRAE bin method and agrees with the computer simulation within about 15% for cooling and 2% for heating. Energy savings due to daylighting have been evaluated using both shorthand methods and the computer code DOE2.1b. The calculations of annual energy use that were performed at the design stage have been reproduced, and changes during later design phases, e.g. the outdoor air flow rate, have been identified. Even without a variety of further energy savings that appear feasible, these buildings promise to be among the most efficient in the current stock of office buildings. A 100-channel instrumentation and data acquisition system has been designed, and installation should be complete by February 1984. Extensive software has been prepared to confront the model predictions with field data.

Norford, L.N.; Rabl, A.; Socolow, R.H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 25. Cooling Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 26. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 27. Water-Heating Energy...

288

Field measurement of the interactions between heat pumps and attic duct systems in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts to improve residential heat-pump performance have tended to focus on laboratory and theoretical studies of the machine itself, with some limited field research having been focused on in-situ performance and installation issues. One issue that has received surprisingly little attention is the interaction between the heat pump and the duct system to which it is connected. This paper presents the results of a field study that addresses this interaction. Field performance measurements before and after sealing and insulating the duct systems were made on three heat pumps. From the pre-retrofit data it was found that reductions in heat-pump capacity due to low outdoor temperatures and/or coil frosting are accompanied by lower duct-system energy delivery efficiencies. The conduction loss reductions, and thus the delivery temperature improvements, due to adding duct insulation were found to vary widely depending on the length of the particular duct section, the thermal mass of that duct section, and the cycling characteristics of the heat-pump. In addition, it was found that the use of strip-heat back-up decreased after the retrofits, and that heat-pump cycling increased dramatically after the retrofits, which respectively increase and decrease savings due to the retrofits. Finally, normalized energy use for the three systems which were operated consistently pre- and post-retrofit showed an average reduction of 19% after retrofit, which corresponds to a chance in overall distribution-system efficiency of 24%.

Modera, M.P.; Jump, D.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab has for several years been developing methods for selection of optimal microgrid systems, especially for commercial building applications, and applying these methods in the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York, (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage, and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of power quality and reliability (PQR) to the capabilities of DER-CAM. All of these objectives have been pursued via analysis of the attractiveness of a Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid consisting of multiple nameplate 100 kW Tecogen Premium Power Modules (CM-100). This unit consists of an asynchronous inverter-based variable speed internal combustion engine genset with combined heat and power (CHP) and power surge capability. The essence of CERTS Microgrid technology is that smarts added to the on-board power electronics of any microgrid device enables stable and safe islanded operation without the need for complex fast supervisory controls. This approach allows plug and play development of a microgrid that can potentially provide high PQR with a minimum of specialized site-specific engineering. A notable feature of the CM-100 is its time-limited surge rating of 125 kW, and DER-CAM capability to model this feature was also a necessary model enhancement.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

290

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Residential Boiler Efficiencies (1) Gas-Fired Boilers Oil-Fired Boilers Average shipped in 1985 (2): 74% AFUE Average shipped in 1985 (2): 79% AFUE Best Available in 1981: 81% AFUE Best Available in 1981: 86% AFUE Best Available in 2007: 96% AFUE Best Available in 2007: 89% AFUE Note(s): Source(s): 1) Federal appliance standards effective Jan. 1, 1992, require a minimum of 80% AFUE (except gas-fired steam boiler, which must have a 75% AFUE or higher). 2) Includes furnaces. GAMA, Consumer's Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Residential Heating and Water Heating Equipment, Aug. 2005, p. 88 and 106 for best- available AFUE; and GAMA for 1985 average AFUEs; GAMA Tax Credit Eligible Equipment: Gas- and Oil-Fired Boilers 95% AFUE or Greater, May 2007; and GAMA Consumer's Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Heating and Water Heating Equipment, May 2007

291

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation...  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Standard (Trane) 14% York 12% Nordyne 12% Rheem 9% Lennox 9% Others 3% Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): 5,833,354 1) Does not include water-source or ground-source heat pumps....

292

Solar space and water heating system at Stanford University Central Food Services Building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This active hydronic domestic hot water and space heating system was 840 ft/sup 2/ of single-glazed, liquid, flat plate collectors and 1550 gal heat storage tanks. The following are discussed: energy conservation, design philosophy, operation, acceptance testing, performance data, collector selection, bidding, costs, economics, problems, and recommendations. An operation and maintenance manual and as-built drawings are included in appendices. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Green Energy Standards for Public Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Energy Standards for Public Buildings Green Energy Standards for Public Buildings Green Energy Standards for Public Buildings < Back Eligibility Fed. Government Local Government State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider West Virginia Department of Administration In March 2012, West Virginia enacted the Green Buildings Act, which applies to all new construction of public buildings, buildings receiving state grant funds, and buildings receiving state appropriations. For those buildings that have not entered the schematic design phase prior to July 1, 2012, buildings must be designed and construction to comply with the ICC

294

Microgrids for Commercial Building Combined Heat and Power and Power and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biofuels), photovoltaics (PV), fuel cells, local heat and electricity storage, etc. Trends emerging at a consistent level of PQR throughout large regions. For example, PQR targets are consistent virtually all cost, point A, which in Fig. 3 occurs to the left of the current U.S. target of about 3-4 nines, point

295

Some potential material supply constraints in solar systems for heating and cooling of buildings and process heat. (A preliminary screening to identify critical materials)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings (SHACOB) designs and three Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat (AIPH) designs have been studied to identify potential future material constraints to their large scale installation and use. The nine SHACOB and three AIPH systems were screened and found to be free of serious future material constraints. The screening was carried out for each individual system design assuming 500 million m/sup 2/ of collector area installed by the year 2000. Also, two mixed design scenarios, containing equal portions of each system design, were screened. To keep these scenarios in perspective, note that a billion m/sup 2/ containing a mixture of the nine SHACOB designs will yield an annual solar contribution of about 1.3 Quads or will displace about 4.2 Quads of fossil fuel used to generate electricity. For AIPH a billion square meters of the mixed designs will yield about 2.8 Quads/year. Three materials were identified that could possibly restrain the deployment of solar systems in the specific scenarios investigated. They are iron and steel, soda lime glass and polyvinyl fluoride. All three of these materials are bulk materials. No raw material supply constraints were found.

Watts, R.L.; Gurwell, W.E.; Nelson, T.A.; Smith, S.A.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

U.S. Heating and Air-Conditioning System Manufacturer Shipments, by Type (Including Exports) 2005 Value of 2000 2005 2007 2009 2010 Shipments Equipment Type (1,000s) (1,000s) (1,000s) (1,000s) (1,000s) ($million) (7) Air-Conditioners (1) 5,346 6,472 4,508 3,516 3419 5,837 Heat Pumps 1,539 2,336 1,899 1,642 1,748 2,226 Air-to-Air Heat Pumps 1,339 2,114 1,899 1,642 1748 1,869 Water-Source Heat Pumps (2) 200 222 N.A. N.A. N.A. 357 Chillers 38 37 37 25 29 1,093 Reciprocating 25 24 30 20 24 462 Centrifugal/Screw 8 6 7 5 5 566 Absorption (3) 5 7 N.A. N.A. N.A. 64 Furnaces 3,681 3,624 2,866 2,231 2,509 2,144 Gas-Fired (4) 3,104 3,512 2,782 2,175 2453 2,081 Electric 455 N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. Oil-Fired (5) 121 111 84 56 56 63 Boilers (6) 368 370 N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes exports and gas air conditioners (gas units <10,000 units/yr) and rooftop equipment. Excludes heat pumps, packaged terminal air

297

Simulation and Analysis for Applying the Double-Stage Coupled Heat Pump System in the Villa of Cold Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conventional heating mode is a one-way circulation in cold areas, which causes abatement in the reserves of energy source and increases environmental pollution. An ecological cycle heating system, an air-to-water + apartment water-to-water double-stage coupled heat pump system, is presented in this paper based on analyzing the characteristics of the villa district heating. Prediction and analysis of the feasibility of the double-stage coupled heat pump system in cold areas were carried after the components and characteristics of the system are introduced. The lumped parameter method was used to establish a mathematical model of the whole system, and the system control methods and the volume of the heat storage tank were decided to get the best value of the heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF). Furthermore, the application of the double-stage coupled heat pump system in some representative cities of cold areas in China was analyzed. The results show that the novel heat pump system can be used for heating the villa district in cold areas. To make the HSPF of the system much better, the water circulations of the double-stage coupled heat pump system also were analyzed in this paper; some improvements are put forward, and single-double stages mixed heat pumps system for the villa districts heating are introduced.

Yang, L.; Yao, Y.; Ma, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Model document for code officials on solar heating and cooling of buildings. First draft  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this document is to promote the use and further development of solar energy through a systematic categorizing of all the attributes in a solar energy system that may impact on those requirements in the nationally recognized model codes relating to the safeguard of life or limb, health, property, and public welfare. Administrative provisions have been included to integrate this document with presently adopted codes, so as to allow incorporation into traditional building, plumbing, mechanical, and electrical codes. In those areas where model codes are not used it is recommended that the requirements, references, and standards herein be adopted to regulate all solar energy systems. (MOW)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Optimal design of seasonal storage for 100% solar space heating in buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis is presented of seasonal solar systems that contain water as the sensible heat storage medium. A concise model is developed under the assumption of a fully mixed, uniform temperature, storage tank that permits efficient simulation of long-term (multi-day) system performance over the course of the year. The approach explicitly neglects the effects of short-term (sub-daily) fluctuations in insolation and load, effects that will be extremely small for seasonal solar systems. This approach is useful for examining the major design tradeoffs of concern here. The application considered is winter space heating. The thermal performance of seasonal solar systems that are designed to supply 100% of load without any backup is solved for, under ''reference year'' monthly normal ground temperature and insolation conditions. Unit break-even costs of seasonal storage are estimated by comparing the capital and fuel costs of conventional heating technologies against those of a seasonal solar system. A rough comparison between the alternatives for more severe winters was made by examining statistical variations in winter season conditions over the past several decades. (MHR)

Mueller, R.O.; Asbury, J.G.; Caruso, J.V.; Connor, D.W.; Giese, R.F.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Buildings*","Buildings Using Any Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 3. Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings Using Any Energy Source","Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Other a " "All Buildings* ...............",64783,63343,63307,43468,15157,5443,2853,7076,1401 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6362,6346,3084,600,"Q","Q",806,199 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6212,6197,3692,716,"Q","Q",725,"Q"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Office Buildings - Full Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

heaters were third-most used but were primarily used to supplement the building's main heating system. Boilers and district heat systems were more often used in larger...

302

Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Service Buildings... Most service buildings were small, with almost ninety percent between 1,001 and 10,000 square feet. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Category Figure showing number of service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Service Buildings

303

New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Bioenergy Solar Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Mayor's Office of Operations In 2005 New York City passed a law (Local Law No. 86) making a variety of green building and energy efficiency requirements for municipal buildings and other projects funded with money from the city treasury. The building

304

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... residential energy consumption. Field Study of the Effect of Wall Mass on the Heating and Cooling Loads of Residential Buildings. ...

305

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... thermal conductance; thermal insulation; test methods Abstract: Calibration measurements of thin heat flux sensors for building applications are ...

306

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Commercial Equipment Efficiencies Equipment Type Chiller Screw COP(full-load / IPLV) 2.80 / 3.05 2.80 / 3.05 3.02 / 4.45 Scroll COP 2.80 / 3.06 2.96 / 4.40 N.A. Reciprocating COP(full-load / IPLV) 2.80 / 3.05 2.80 / 3.05 3.52 / 4.40 Centrifugal COP(full-load / IPLV) 5.0 / 5.2 6.1 / 6.4 7.3 / 9.0 Gas-Fired Absorption COP 1.0 1.1 N.A. Gas-Fired Engine Driven COP 1.5 1.8 N.A. Rooftop A/C EER 10.1 11.2 13.9 Rooftop Heat Pump EER (cooling) 9.8 11.0 12.0 COP (heating) 3.2 3.3 3.4 Boilers Gas-Fired Combustion Efficiency 77 80 98 Oil-Fired Thermal Efficiency 80 84 98 Electric Thermal Efficiency 98 98 98 Furnace AFUE 77 80 82 Water Heater Gas-Fired Thermal Efficiency 78 80 96 Oil-Fired Thermal Efficiency 79 80 85 Electric Resistance Thermal Efficiency 98 98 98 Gas-Fired Instantaneous Thermal Efficiency 77 84 89 Source(s): Parameter Efficiency

307

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Main Residential Heating Equipment as of 1987, 1993, 1997, 2001, and 2005 (Percent of Total Households) Equipment Type 1987 1993 1997 2001 2005 Natural Gas 55% 53% 53% 55% 52% Central Warm-Air Furnace 35% 36% 38% 42% 40% Steam or Hot-Water System 10% 9% 7% 7% 7% Floor/Wall/Pipeless Furnace 6% 4% 4% 3% 2% Room Heater/Other 4% 3% 4% 3% 3% Electricity 20% 26% 29% 29% 30% Central Warm-Air Furnace 8% 10% 11% 12% 14% Heat Pump 5% 8% 10% 10% 8% Built-In Electric Units 6% 7% 7% 6% 5% Other 1% 1% 2% 2% 1% Fuel Oil 12% 11% 9% 7% 7% Steam or Hot-Water System 7% 6% 5% 4% 4% Central Warm-Air Furnace 4% 5% 4% 3% 3% Other 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% Other 13% 11% 9% 8% 10% Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): Other equipment includes wood, LPG, kerosene, other fuels, and none. EIA, A Look at Residential Consumption in 2005, June 2008, Table HC2-4; EIA, A Look at Residential Energy Consumption in 2001, Apr. 2004, 'Table HC3-

308

Consumer demand analysis: solar heating and cooling of buildings. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study concerns the acceptability of solar heating and cooling to homebuyers for residential applications. The study assesses the extent of homeowner awareness of solar technologies, estimates the acceptability of elevated first costs including willingness to trade higher initial costs for life cycle savings, and investigates the impact of solar aesthetics. Also explored are other areas of potential concern to homeowners in evaluating a solar alternative as well as positive motivations that would encourage purchase. Finally, the socioeconomic and attitudinal characteristics of individuals more likely to purchase a solar home rather than a conventional home were studied. The results are based on group depth interviews and personal interviews with active homeseekers, top executives of large residential development firms, and architects. The sample was split evenly between Denver, Colorado and the Philadelphia, Pa./Wilmington, Del. areas. Implications of the results for the commercialization of solar energy and possible public policy decisions are also discussed.

Scott, J.E.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Building Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science The "Enclosure" Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com * Control heat flow * Control airflow * Control water vapor flow * Control rain * Control ground water * Control light and solar radiation * Control noise and vibrations * Control contaminants, environmental hazards and odors * Control insects, rodents and vermin * Control fire * Provide strength and rigidity * Be durable * Be aesthetically pleasing * Be economical Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Water Control Layer Air Control Layer Vapor Control Layer Thermal Control Layer Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Building Science Corporation

310

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 Major Residential HVAC Equipment Lifetimes, Ages, and Replacement Picture Equipment Type Central Air Conditioners 8 - 14 11 8 5,354 Heat Pumps 9 - 15 12 8 1,260 Furnaces Electric 10 - 20 15 11 N.A. Gas-Fired 12 - 17 15 11 2,601 Oil-Fired 15 - 19 17 N.A. 149 Gas-Fired Boilers (1) 17 - 24 20 17 204 Note(s): Source(s): Lifetimes based on use by the first owner of the product, and do not necessarily indicate that the product stops working after this period. A replaced unit may be discarded or used elsewhere. 1) 2005 average stock age is for gas- and oil-fired steam and hot water boilers. Appliance Magazine, U.S. Appliance Industry: Market Share, Life Expectancy & Replacement Market, and Saturation Levels, January 2010, p. 10 for service and average lifetimes, and units to be replaced; ASHRAE, 1999 ASHRAE Handbook: HVAC Applications, Table 3, p. 35.3 for boilers service lifetimes; and

311

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Physibel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

grid refinement (KOBRU86SECTRATRISCOVOLTRA). Automatic triangulation (BISCO). Animations of transient heat transfer in building details (SECTRAVOLTRA) and buildings...

312

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial...

313

Energy Efficiency Standards for State Buildings | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency Standards for State Buildings Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial...

314

Storage of heat and coolth in hollow-core concrete slabs. Swedish experience, and application to large, American-style buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Folksam office building in Farsta, near Stockholm, has operated since December 1977 with an energy use for direct space heating of only 60 kWh/m/sup 2/ (19,000 Btu/ft/sup 2/), which is only half the Stockholm average for new buildings. To this 60 kWh/m/sup 2/ must be added the typical electric use of another 60 kWh/m/sup 2/ for lights, equipment, fans, etc. Even though Stockholm has 3580 deg-day (C), new Swedish buildings are so well insulated that their temperature floats upwards during most winter working days. In the Folksam building, this surplus heat from 40 full-occupied hours per week is stored in hollow-core concrete slabs, and then is used to compensate for the heat losses during the remaining 128 unoccupied hours. The energy transport/storage system necessary to keep the indoor temperature comfortable, summer and winter, is called Thermodeck, and is described in detail.

Anderson, L.O.; Bernander, K.G.; Isfaelt, E.; Rosenfeld, A.H.

1979-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

315

Energy Basics: Home and Building Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Cooling Water Heating Home and Building Technologies Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for...

316

Building Technologies Office: Webinars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars Webinars Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Webinars to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Webinars on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program Building Energy Software Tools Directory High Performance Buildings Database

317

Town of Buckeye - Green Building Incentive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buckeye - Green Building Incentive Town of Buckeye - Green Building Incentive Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home...

318

Home and Building Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home and Building Technologies Home and Building Technologies Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for...

319

Development of solar assisted heat pumps for the heating and cooling of buildings. Volume II. Final technical report, February 1, 1978-June 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A second volume containing the appendices to the report on the development of high efficiency vapor compression cycle heat pumps for use in solar assisted heat pump (SAHP) systems is presented. A water source heat pump and a solar powered absorption chiller are studied for their feasibility in improving the performance of a SAHP system. A two speed multiple level heat pump compressor is analyzed. The product data for two advanced water source heat pump models are provided along with operating instructions for a parallel compressor water source heat pump. Marketing data for SAHP systems are included.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Building Technologies Office: Buildings Events Archive NewsDetail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Up to Pump Heat. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program Building Energy Software Tools Directory High Performance...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Annual collection and storage of solar energy for the heating of buildings. Report No. 2. Annual progress report, May 1976--July 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new system for year-round collection and storage of solar heated water for heating of buildings has been designed and constructed at the University of Virginia. The system is composed of an energy storage sub-system which stores hot water in an underground pool and of a solar collector sub-system which acts not only to collect solar energy throughout the year but also to limit the evaporative and convective heat losses from the storage system. The annual collection and storage system began operation in late February 1977. Data are presented which illustrates the transient heat transfer which occurs during the start-up phase of operation. Thermal performance results are presented illustrating the efficiency of the solar collector and the variation of solar energy input to storage during a typical day's operation in May. Data are also presented which show the transient build-up of energy storage in the earth which surrounds the storage pool. An analog model has been developed to analyze the transient energy phenomena which occur within the earth surrounding the pool. These include transient heat losses from the pool to the earth and energy storage within the earth. Results of the analog model for idealized conditions are confirmed by exact mathematical solutions and by numerical analysis using a digital computer.

Beard, J. T.; Iachetta, F. A.; Lilleleht, L. U.; Dickey, J. W.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST); Volume 1: Cases E100-E200  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the Building Energy Simulation Test for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST) project conducted by the Tool Evaluation and Improvement International Energy Agency (IEA) Experts Group. The group was composed of experts from the Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) Programme, Task 22, Subtask A. The current test cases, E100-E200, represent the beginning of work on mechanical equipment test cases; additional cases that would expand the current test suite have been proposed for future development.

Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Code Building Energy Code Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling...

324

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 37. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 38. Water-Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 39. Lighting...

325

Solar Ready Buildings Planning Guide  

SciTech Connect

This guide offers a checklist for building design and construction to enable installation of solar photovoltaic and heating systems at some time after the building is constructed.

Lisell, L.; Tetreault, T.; Watson, A.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Initial Evaluation of the Heat-Affected Zone, Local Embrittlement Phenomenon as it Applies to Nuclear Reactor Vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine if the local brittle zone (LBZ) problem, encountered in the testing of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) part of welds in offshore platform construction, can also be found in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) welds. Both structures have multipass welds and grain coarsening along the fusion line. Literature was obtained that described the metallurgical evidence and the type of research work performed on offshore structure welds.

McCabe, D.E.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Applying the Systems Engineering Process for Establishing Requirements for the Safety and Health Monitoring System of the Waste Solidification Building at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Safety and Health Monitoring (SHM) System technical basis document for the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) was developed by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company design team. The WSB is being designed and built to support the waste disposal needs of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The main mission of the WSB is to process the radiological liquid waste streams from the PDCF and the MFFF into a solid waste form. The solid waste form, concrete encased waste, is acceptable for shipment and disposal as transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and as Low Level Waste (LLW) at on-site disposal areas. The SHM System will also handle the job control waste from the PDCF, the MFFF, and the WSB. The SHM System will serve the WSB by monitoring personnel radiation exposure and environmental releases. The WSB design used HPT design support in determining the air monitoring equipment required for the WSB. The Systems Engineering (SE) process was applied to define the functions and requirements necessary to design and operate the SHM System. The SE process is a proven disciplined approach that supports management in clearly defining the mission or problem, managing system functions and requirements, identifying and managing risk, establishing bases for informed decision making, and verifying that products and services meet customer needs. This SE process applied to the SHM System was a major effort encompassing requirements analysis and interface control. Use of the SE process combined with HPT design input resulted in well-defined requirements to support the procurement of a safe-mission essential SHM System.

Simpkins, P.J.

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

328

City of Chicago - Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chicago - Building Energy Code Chicago - Building Energy Code City of Chicago - Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Insulation Program Info State Illinois Program Type Building Energy Code Provider City of Chicago The Chicago Energy Conservation Code (CECC) requires residential buildings applying for building permits to comply with energy efficient measures which go beyond those required by the [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=I... Illinois Building Energy Code]. The applicability of the CECC to commercial construction was superseded when the state of Illinois adopted the more stringent IECC 2009 model code. Illinois state law in 2009 also mandated

329

Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

SciTech Connect

Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

Faletti, D.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

Faletti, D.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

customer load profiles, energy tariff structures, and fuelenergy services in the building, the local economic environment, e.g. utility tariffs,

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Energy and building envelope  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers given at a conference on building thermal insulation, energy efficiency, and solar architecture. Topics considered at the conference include thermal comfort, heating loads, the air change rate in residential buildings, core-insulated external walls, passive solar options, cooling loads, daylighting, solar gain, the energy transmittance of glazings, heat storage units in phase change materials, heat transfer through windows, and rock bed heat storage for solar heating systems.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Solar-assisted heat pumps for the heating and cooling of buildings. Six month technical report, November 6, 1978-May 5, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I of this study deals with the determination of the most cost-effective SAHP (Solar-assisted Heat Pump) system. The series (solar-assisted), parallel (solar-boosted), and standard heat pump systems with electric resistance heat backup are emphasized. Performance characteristics of all major SAHP components are determined and used in conjunction with the TRNSYS simulation program to obtain heating and cooling system performance for four different climates: Phoenix, Arizona; New York, New York; Fort Worth, Texas; and Madison, Wisconsin. Material and installation costs are obtained for the SAHP components and are used in a life-cycle cost analysis to determine the economic viability of the various systems. Ground coupling, evacuated tube collectors, and power demand distributions are studied. A marketing analysis is performed to assess the potential of SAHP systems in the residential marketplace. The results of this study indicate that solar-boosted heat pumps (parallel) will be more cost effective than solar-assisted (series) heat pumps for the foreseeable future. Since all components for solar-boosted heat pumps are now commercially available, no further development work is needed to optimize the heat pumps for such a system. Furthermore, SAHP systems are not currently cost effective when compared to standard air-to-air heat pumps, nor is there evidence that they will be in the foreseeable future.

Not Available

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF BUILDINGS AND BUILDING ENVELOPE SYSTEMS: AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters for typ- ical building envelope constructions,Energy Conservation: Buildings," u. s. Dept. of Commerce,Heated Floor Structures and Buildings Foundation Soils with

Carroll, William L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Office of the State Engineer In March 2008, South Dakota enacted legislation mandating the use of high-performance building standards in new state construction and renovations. This policy requires that new and renovated state buildings

336

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider State of Wisconsin Department of Administration In March, 2006, Wisconsin enacted SB 459, the Energy Efficiency and Renewables Act. With respect to energy efficiency, this bill requires the Department of Administration (DOA) to prescribe and annually review energy

337

NUMERICAL DETERMINATION AND TREATMENT OF CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT IN THE COUPLED BUILDING ENERGY AND CFD SIMULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the correct prediction of the convective heat. A finer grid resolution in CFD does not always lead to a more conservation equations of flow on these grid cells. As shown in Figure 1(a), CFD calculates convective heat1 NUMERICAL DETERMINATION AND TREATMENT OF CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT IN THE COUPLED

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

338

Measured energy performance of a US-China demonstration energy-efficient office building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating is provided by district heating. The building isis heated from a district heating system that provides hotconverts the heat from district heating system to the hot

Xu, Peng; Huang, Joe; Jin, Ruidong; Yang, Guoxiong

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Membrane-Based Absorption Refrigeration Systems: Nanoengineered Membrane-Based Absorption Cooling for Buildings Using Unconcentrated Solar & Waste Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: UFL is improving a refrigeration system that uses low quality heat to provide the energy needed to drive cooling. This system, known as absorption refrigeration system (ARS), typically consists of large coils that transfer heat. Unfortunately, these large heat exchanger coils are responsible for bulkiness and high cost of ARS. UFL is using new materials as well as system design innovations to develop nanoengineered membranes to allow for enhanced heat exchange that reduces bulkiness. UFL’s design allows for compact, cheaper and more reliable use of ARS that use solar or waste heat.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, ... commercial buildings, manufacturing, ... solar, wind, geothermal, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Building Integration of Micro-Generation Technologies ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Applications Considerations for Combined Heat & Power in Multifamily Buildings Marc Zuluaga, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

342

Field Test of High Efficiency Residential Buildings with Ground-source and Air-source Heat Pump Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the field performance of space conditioning and water heating equipment in four single-family residential structures with advanced thermal envelopes. Each structure features a different, advanced thermal envelope design: structural insulated panel (SIP); optimum value framing (OVF); insulation with embedded phase change materials (PCM) for thermal storage; and exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Three of the homes feature ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and water heating while the fourth has a two-capacity air-source heat pump (ASHP) and a heat pump water heater (HPWH). Two of the GCHP-equipped homes feature horizontal ground heat exchange (GHX) loops that utillize the existing foundation and utility service trenches while the third features a vertical borehole with vertical u-tube GHX. All of the houses were operated under the same simulated occupancy conditions. Operational data on the house HVAC/Water heating (WH) systems are presented and factors influencing overall performance are summarized.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Be06  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ventilation system, heating installation and energy supply including alternatives as solar heating, solar power and heat pumps. The energy supply needed to the building is...

344

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Buildings and Community Systems Solar Heating and CoolingBuildings and Community Systems (ECBCS) Heat Pumps Solar HeatingBuildings and Community Systems, • Heat Pumping Technologies, • Solar Heating

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

RESFEN 3.0: Program Description - a PC program for calculating the heating and cooling energy use of windows in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Today`s energy-efficient windows can dramatically lower the heating and cooling costs associated with windows while increasing occupant comfort and minimizing window surface condensation problems. However, consumers are often confused about how to pick the most efficient window for their residence. They are typically given window properties such as U-factors or R-values, Solar Heat Gain Coefficients or Shading Coefficients, and air leakage rates. However, the relative importance of these properties depends on the site and building specific conditions. Furthermore, these properties are based on static evaluation conditions that are very different from the real situation the window will be used in. Knowing the energy and associated cost implications of different windows will help consumers and builders make the best decision for their particular application, whether it is a new home, an addition, or a window replacement. A computer tool such as RESFEN can help consumers and builders pick the most energy-efficient and cost-effective window for a given application. It calculates the heating and cooling energy use and associated costs as well as the peak heating and cooling demand for specific window products. Users define a problem by specifying the house type (single story or two story), geographic location, orientation, electricity and gas cost, and building configuration details (such as wall type, floor type, and HVAC systems). Window options are defined by specifying the window`s size, shading, and thermal properties: U-factor, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient, and air leakage rate. RESFEN calculates the energy and cost implications of the windows compared to insulated walls. The relative energy and cost impacts of two different windows can be compared against each other. RESFEN 3.0 is a major improvement over previous versions of RESFEN because it performs hourly calculations using a version of the DOE 2.1E energy analysis simulation program.

Huang, J.; Sullivan, R.; Arasteh, D.; Mitchell, R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Heat Flux Sensors Calibration Using Black-Body Radiation. ... 12-15, 2007, Richmond, VA, 1-8 ... Siebel, R. Studying the Response of Building Systems ...

347

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... approaches: a base case of envelope infiltration only, passive inlet vents in ... building air change rates, air distribution within the house, heating and ...

348

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

349

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

350

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

351

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

352

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling offset storage natural gas combustion solar thermalnatural gas-fired genset, solar thermal collectors, an absorption chiller and both electrical and heat storage.

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

City of Plano - LEED Standard for Public Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plano - LEED Standard for Public Buildings Plano - LEED Standard for Public Buildings City of Plano - LEED Standard for Public Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Insulation Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider City of Plano As of January 2007, the City of Plano adopted a policy to "finance, plan, design, construct, manage, renovate, and maintain its facilities and buildings to be sustainable." This standard applies to new construction and major remodels. The City will use the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED

354

Building Technologies Research and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that selectively accepts or rejects solar radiation and outdoor air, depending on the need for heating, cooling rooftop unit inside the large "outdoor" environmental chamber (Building 5800, D-103) Heat pump water

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

355

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but solar thermal and absorption cooling are attractive, andthermal heat collection, and heat-activated cooling can befrom solar thermal Total heat load Heat for cooling Heat

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appliances Research to Appliances Research to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research Sensors & Controls Research Energy Efficient Buildings Hub Building Energy Modeling

357

Marin County - Green Building Requirements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marin County - Green Building Requirements Marin County - Green Building Requirements Eligibility Commercial Construction Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home...

358

State Buildings Energy Reduction Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Buildings Energy Reduction Plan State Buildings Energy Reduction Plan Eligibility Institutional State Government Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization...

359

33Research Horizons Above: The Sustainable Facilities and Infrastructure Branch at the Georgia Tech Research Institute recently hosted a "green" building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a park in Colorado where buildings had been outfitted with a solar water-heating system.The operations Research Institute recently hosted a "green" building seminar to help participants learn to apply sustainable materials and methods to construction and renovation projects. S ustainable building isn

Sherrill, David

360

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey website.Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 2003of the total end-use energy consumption of such buildings;

Blum, Helcio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Use of thermography in the detection of heat loss from school buildings: a manual for school officials  

SciTech Connect

Approaches to the assessment of thermal efficiency of a building are described. Other topics discussed are: the effectiveness of various systems, the use of thermography, cost-effectiveness considerations, and the use of this technology in the public school setting. (MHR)

Cage, B.N.; Walls, M.; Wolfe, C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Beyond Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

without compromising future generations SUSTAINABLE INL Buildings Beyond Buildings Sustainability Beyond Buildings INL is taking sustainability efforts "beyond buildings" by...

363

An improved procedure for developing a calibrated hourly simulation model of an electrically heated and cooled commercial building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increased use of building energy simulation programs, calibration of simulated data to measured data has been recognized as an important factor in substantiating how well the model fits a real building. Model calibration to measured monthly utility data has been utilized for many years. Recently, efforts have reported calibrated models at the hourly level. Most of the previous methods have relied on very simple comparisons including bar charts, monthly percent difference time-series graphs, and x-y scatter plots. A few advanced methods have been proposed as well which include carpet plots and comparative 3-D time-series plots. Unfortunately, at hourly levels of calibration, many of the traditional graphical calibration techniques become overwhelmed with data and suffer from data overlap. In order to improve upon previously established techniques, this thesis presents new calibration methods including temperature binned box-whisker-mean analysis to improve x-y scatter plots, 24-hour weather-daytype box-whisker-mean graphs to show hourly temperature-dependent energy use profiles, and 52-week box-whisker-mean plots to display long-term trends. In addition to the graphical calibration techniques, other methods are also used including indoor temperature calibration to improve thermostat schedules and architectural rendering as a means of verifying the building envelope dimensions and shading placement. Several statistical methods are also reviewed for their appropriateness including percent difference, mean bias error (MBE), and the coefficient of variation of the root mean squared error. Results are presented using a case study building located in Washington, D.C. In the case study building, nine months of hourly whole-building electricity data and site-specific weather data were measured and used with the DOE-2. 1D building simulation program to test the new techniques. Use of the new calibration procedures were able to produce a MBE of-0.7% and a CV(RMSE) of 23. 1 % which compare favorably with the most accurate hourly neural network models.

Bou-Saada, Tarek Edmond

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

365

Focus on Energy - Incentives for Existing Multi-Family Buildings...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Furnaces, Boilers, Heat pumps, Heat recovery, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Geothermal...

366

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Subject -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

commercial buildings buildings Software has been updated. AnTherm Thermal heat bridges, heat flow, steady state, 2D, 3D, transfer coefficients, thermal conductance,...

367

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability:A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In past work, Berkeley Lab has developed the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). Given end-use energy details for a facility, a description of its economic environment and a menu of available equipment, DER-CAM finds the optimal investment portfolio and its operating schedule which together minimize the cost of meeting site service, e.g., cooling, heating, requirements. Past studies have considered combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. Methods and software have been developed to solve this problem, finding optimal solutions which take simultaneity into account. This project aims to extend on those prior capabilities in two key dimensions. In this research storage technologies have been added as well as power quality and reliability (PQR) features that provide the ability to value the additional indirect reliability benefit derived from Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid capability. This project is intended to determine how attractive on-site generation becomes to a medium-sized commercial site if economical storage (both electrical and thermal), CHP opportunities, and PQR benefits are provided in addition to avoiding electricity purchases. On-site electrical storage, generators, and the ability to seamlessly connect and disconnect from utility service would provide the facility with ride-through capability for minor grid disturbances. Three building types in both California and New York are assumed to have a share of their sensitive electrical load separable. Providing enhanced service to this load fraction has an unknown value to the facility, which is estimated analytically. In summary, this project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York; (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage; and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of PQR into the capabilities of DER-CAM.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01  

SciTech Connect

The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those {approx}70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the K-G basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m{sup 2}. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basi

Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Applied Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Science Applied Science Correlation of predicted and measured iron oxidation states in mixed iron oxides H. D. Rosenfeld and W. L. Holstein Development of a quantitative measurement of a diesel spray core using synchrotron x-rays C.F. Powell, Y. Yue, S. Gupta, A. McPherson, R. Poola, and J. Wang Localized phase transformations by x-ray-induced heating R.A. Rosenberg, Q. Ma, W. Farrell, E.D. Crozier, G.J. Soerensen, R.A. Gordon, and D.-T. Jiang Resonant x-ray scattering at the Se edge in ferroelectric liquid crystal materials L. Matkin, H. Gleeson, R. Pindak, P. Mach, C. Huang, G. Srajer, and J. Pollmann Synchrotron-radiation-induced anisotropic wet etching of GaAs Q. Ma, D.C. Mancini, and R.A. Rosenberg Synchrotron-radiation-induced, selective-area deposition of gold on

371

temperature heat pumps applied to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are thermal requirements in the industrial plant Treq requirement in the industrial plant Look for outside thermal requirements Neighbor industrial plant, thermal Ă  55 m3/h Thermal power >700 kW Able to reproduce industrial conditions Supervisory control

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

372

Home and Building Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home and Building Technology Basics Home and Building Technology Basics Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water,...

373

Evaluation and Analysis of an Integrated PEM Fuel Cell with Absorption Cooling and Water Heating System for Sustainable Building Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, a parametric study of a PEM fuel cell integrated with a double effect absorption system is carried out in order to study the effect of different operating conditions on the efficiency of the PEM fuel cell, utilization factor of the over all system, COPs of the double effect cooling and heating system, and power and heat output of the PEM fuel cell. It is found that the efficiency of the cell decreases, ranging from 46.2% to 24.4% with increase in membrane thickness and current density, and at the same time the COP increases ranging from 0.65 to 1.52. The heat and power output of the fuel cell decreases from 10.54 kW to 5.12 kW, and 9.12 kW to 6.99 kW, respectively for the increase in membrane thickness. However, when the temperature of the cell is increased the heat and power output increases from 5.12 kW to 10.54 kW, and 6.9 kW to 7.02 kW, respectively. The COP is found to be decreasing ranging from 1.53 to 0.33 with the increase in temperature of the cell and heat input to the HTG. As for the utilization factor, it increases ranging from 17% to 87% with increase in the temperature of the cell and heat input to the HTG. This study reveals that an integrated PEM fuel cell with a double effect absorption cooling systems has a very high potential to be an economical and environmental solution as compared with conventional systems of high electricity and natural gas prices which emit lots of harmful gasses and are not that efficient.

Gadalla, M.; Ratlamwala, T.; Dincer, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Compare All CBECS Activities: District Heat Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District Heat Use District Heat Use Compare Activities by ... District Heat Use Total District Heat Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 433 trillion Btu of district heat (district steam or district hot water) in 1999. There were only five building types with statistically significant district heat consumption; education buildings used the most total district heat. Figure showing total district heat consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. District Heat Consumption per Building by Building Type Health care buildings used the most district heat per building. Figure showing district heat consumption per building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

375

Annual collection and storage of solar energy for the heating of buildings, report No. 1. Progress report, May--November 1976. [Underground pool of water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new system for the annual collection and storage of solar heated water for heating of buildings is under development at the University of Virginia. The system is composed of an energy storage sub-system which stores hot water in an underground pool and of a solar collector sub-system which acts not only to collect solar energy throughout the year but also to limit the evaporative and convective heat losses from the storage system. During the summer of 1976, a storage sub-system was constructed using the initial design specifications. A structural failure of that storage pool occurred in August resulting from a leak in the pool liner which caused a failure of the pool structure. A revised design of the storage pool sub-system has been implemented and construction was completed in November, 1976. The collector sub-system has been designed and constructed. Collector operation began in February 1977. A vertical reflector on the north edge of the collector was added in March 1977. Future research will include initial total system operation, performance evaluation, and analytical modeling.

Beard, J. T.; Dickey, J. W.; Iachetta, F. A.; Lilleleht, L. U.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Energy Consumption and Demand as Affected by Heat Pumps that Cool, Heat and Heat Domestic Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Products or systems that heat, cool and heat domestic water, which are also referred to as integrated systems, have been available for several years. The concept is simple and appeals to consumers. This paper presents methods for evaluating the potential savings by using an integrated system that heats water by desuperheating discharge gas in the refrigeration cycle. The methods may be applied for any specific location, and their accuracy will depend on the accuracy of building loads and water usage estimates. Power demand can also be affected by electric water heaters. The methods presented demonstrate how integrated systems can be of value in reducing daily summertime peaks.

Cawley, R.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Black Box Approach for Energy Monitoring of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential to save energy by changing operational parameters - especially in existing commercial buildings – is in the magnitude of 5-30%. In order to realize this saving potential in the long term, continuous commissioning of the building is a key issue. Necessary for successful continuous commissioning is real time monitoring of the building performance which allows for Fault Detection and Diagnosis (FDD). This paper presents a method to monitor building operation and detect faulty or unusual behaviour using a black box model approach. The approach is to identify a building’s basic operating characteristics by means of measured data from a building to train a multiple linear regression model based on energy signatures of the building. In addition to supplying measured building data to the regression a clustering process is added which determines the building’s day-types. Once the model is trained it can predict the energy consumption at the building site and unusual or faulty days can be identified by comparing the predictions to real measurements. Models to monitor the daily heating and electricity demand are developed and applied to measured data from two demonstration buildings.

Komhard, S.; Neumann, C.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization...

379

Sustainable Building Design Revolving Loan Fund (Arkansas) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MeasuresWhole Building, CustomOthers pending approval, Doors, DuctAir sealing, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Furnaces, Heat recovery, Lighting, Motor VFDs,...

380

Building Energy Conservation Initiative (New Hampshire) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Lighting, Chillers, Furnaces, Boilers, Heat pumps, Central Air conditioners, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation Active...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Energy Efficiency Standards for State Buildings | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency Standards for State Buildings Eligibility State Government Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial...

382

Energy Basics: Home and Building Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Home and Building Technologies Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for appliances and electronics. Today's...

383

Solar buildings. Overview: The Solar Buildings Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Buildings account for more than one third of the energy used in the United States each year, consuming vast amounts of electricity, natural gas, and fuel oil. Given this level of consumption, the buildings sector is rife with opportunity for alternative energy technologies. The US Department of Energy`s Solar Buildings Program was established to take advantage of this opportunity. The Solar Buildings Program is engaged in research, development, and deployment on solar thermal technologies, which use solar energy to produce heat. The Program focuses on technologies that have the potential to produce economically competitive energy for the buildings sector.

Not Available

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Food Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Food Service Food service buildings are those used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Food Service Buildings... An overwhelming majority (72 percent) of food service buildings were small buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet). Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Food Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of food service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Food Service Buildings

385

Building Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News to someone by News to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: News on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: News on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: News on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program Building Energy Software Tools Directory High Performance Buildings Database Financial Opportunities Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Funding Opportunities Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings

386

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchanges and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

Swenson, Paul F. (Cleveland, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaurn, FL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchangers and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

Swenson, Paul F. (Cleveland, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaurn, FL)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Cool Roofs and Heat Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(510) 486-7494 Links Heat Island Group The Cool Colors Project Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and...

389

Solar Buildings: Transpired Air Collectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transpired air collectors preheat building ventilation air by using the building's ventilation fan to draw fresh air through the system. The intake air is heated as it passes through the perforated absorber plate and up the plenum between the absorber and the south wall of the building. Reduced heating costs will pay for the systems in 3--12 years.

NONE

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

390

Heating/daylighting prototype development. Phase I, Passive and Hybrid Solar Manufactured Building Project. Interim report and project status report No. 1, 1 October 1979-29 February 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Climatological data, both representative (typical) and extreme conditions, relevant to building energy use in Grandview, Missouri are presented. The energy-related characteristics of a particular building and its use are merged with ambient weather conditions. The graphs depict daily fluctuations in the major categories of building heating/cooling load for the experimental building (Roof Runner facility) at Butler Research Center. Data input include hourly weather and building occupancy schedules, the geometry and fixed thermal characteristics (component R-values, heat capacities, etc.) of the prototype structure, and variable conditions (status of moveable insulating shutters, HVAC operating modes, etc.). The prototype systems to be incorporated in the new Roof Runner building are shown. Both warehouse (no ceiling) and office (suspended ceiling) system types are included. The diagrams conceptually depict the heat flows in several representative operating modes, sampling the wide variety of operating conditions which will be evaluated during the testing phase of this project. Cost estimates for the designs selected for construction are provided. (MHR)

Snyder, M.; Fraker, H.; Lindsey, L.; Braham, W.; Hallagan, W.; Huffman, J.

1980-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Converting the Sun's Heat to Gasoline Solar Fuel Corporation is a clean tech company transforming the way gasoline, diesel and hydrogen fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the building below The sun's heat hits the roof surface A non-residential cool roof Coating for a low. These requirements apply only to buildings that are mechanically heated or cooled. What are the minimum requirementswhat is a cool roof? what is the solar reflectance index (sri)? SRI combines SR and TE

Choate, Paul M.

392

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1334E-2009 1334E-2009 Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States Michael Stadler, Chris Marnay, Afzal Siddiqui, Judy Lai, Brian Coffey, and Hirohisa Aki Environmental Energy Technologies Division Revised March 2009 http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/emp-pubs.html The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program in the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct

393

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Delphin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delphin Delphin Delphin logo Delphin is a comprehensive numerical simulation tool for the combined heat, moisture, and matter (e.g. salt) transport in porous building materials. It is mostly applied to calculate transient processes in building envelopes and construction details, and predict condensation problems and durability risks in general. Screen Shots Keywords Coupled heat, air and moisture transport, porous materials, building envelope Validation/Testing The software was tested according to HAMSTAD Benchmarks 1 to 5, EN 15026:2007. The software is also validated to conform with both two-dimensional cases of ISO 10211:2007, Annex A. The testcases are available on http://www.bauklimatik-dresden.de/delphin/benchmarks/en-10211_2007.php The parameterization and transport models are also tested against

394

High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Oklahoma Department of Central Services In June 2008, the governor of Oklahoma signed [http://webserver1.lsb.state.ok.us/2007-08bills/HB/hb3394_enr.rtf HB 3394] requiring the state to develop a high-performance building certification program for state construction and renovation projects. The standard, which

395

City of Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings City of Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider City of Chandler The mayor and city council of Chandler, AZ adopted Resolution 4199 in June 2008, establishing a requirement for all new occupied city buildings larger than 5,000 square feet to be designed and built to achieve the Silver level

396

A study of the utility of heat collectors in reducing the response time of automatic fire sprinklers located in production modules of Building 707  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several of the ten production Modules in Building 707 at the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant recently underwent an alteration which can adversely affect the performance of the installed automatic fire sprinkler systems. The Modules have an approximate floor to ceiling height of 17.5 ft. The alterations involved removing the drop ceilings in the Modules which had been at a height of 12 ft above the floor. The sprinkler systems were originally installed with the sprinkler heads located below the drop ceiling in accordance with the nationally recognized NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Automatic Sprinkler Systems. The ceiling removal affects the sprinkler`s response time and also violates NFPA 13. The scope of this study included evaluation of the feasibility of utilizing heat collectors to reduce the delays in sprinkler response created by the removal of the drop ceilings. The study also includes evaluation of substituting quick response sprinklers for the standard sprinklers currently in place, in combination with a heat collector.

Shanley, J.H. Jr.; Budnick, E.K. Jr. [Hughes Associates, Inc., Wheaton, MD (United States)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1b] over different ranges of building area. Table 5. Results6. Results from Model [1b] for Different Ranges of BuildingArea Building Area ?50k sq. ft. 50<…<600k sq. ft. ?600k sq.

Blum, Helcio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Green Building- Efficient Life Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy saving does not just apply to traffic, production or agriculture. Buildings are also contributing to the climate change. The focus here is on the energy they use and on their CO2 emissions. Each year, Siemens invests more than two billion euros in the appropriate research and development. For customers, this means that Siemens is already providing them with energy efficient solutions that save resources and reduce emissions. Siemens Real Estate (SRE) has taken on the task of ensuring that Siemens AG will become 20 percent more energy efficient by 2011, and it has turned an efficiency program for existing real estate, which has been in existence since 2005, into an integrated green building initiative. This initiative comprises the components “Sustainable Building Design”, “Life Cycle Cost Analysis”, “Green Building Certification” and “Natural Resources Management”. These components are deliberately arranged around the life cycle of the real estate concerned. This allows a different emphasis to be placed on the different questions in each project phase and each phase of a building’s life and for them to be answered in a targeted manner. “Sustainable Building Design” comes into effect during the tasking and preliminary planning phase of a building project; and, by providing a specially developed sustainability manual, it helps with the definition of target values and the drawing up of efficiency strategies for the planning of the building. The manual epitomizes, and sets out clearly, the attitude of SRE to all building-specific sustainability matters. In addition, it is used in the offering of rewards for project competitions. As a result, through a selection of different energy-efficiency measures that have been roughly conceived beforehand, the primary energy consumption can already be restricted in the project definition phase. “Life Cycle Cost Analysis” comes into effect when the blueprint for buildings is being drawn up. Up to now, when components and systems were being chosen, the main focus was usually on the investment costs involved. By using a cost tool developed specifically to meet the needs of the company, SRE will in future be able to estimate the component-specific utilization costs – such as cleaning, maintenance, and the use of energy – at an early planning stage. “Green Building Certification” is used in building projects during the planning and implementation phase, and it thus ensures the quality of the new real estate over the long term. Siemens is implementing the Green Building Program of the European Commission in new building projects and renovation work in EU countries. In all other countries that are not taking part in the EU Green Building Program, SRE uses certification in accordance with LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design). In the LEED certification, a transparent and easy-to-use catalog of criteria is employed to make an assessment of the use of energy and other aspects of sustainability, such as the selection of the plot of land, the efficient use of water, the quality of air within buildings, and the selection of materials. This ensures that a neutral and independent assessment is made of all new building and large-scale renovation projects. The action program “Natural Resources Management” rounds off the range of measures in the area of existing real estate. The aim of the program is to identify and highlight all latent efficiency potential in existing buildings. This includes, for instance, modernizing the control equipment used for the heating and ventilation systems. This entails replacing electrical power units with more efficient models, and retrofitting fans and pumps with frequency converters. Sixty buildings have now been inspected, and savings of almost eight million Euros have been achieved. The average payback period is less than two years. One example of this is an old Siemens building from the 1970s at the Munich-Perlach site. Through energy optimization, it has been possible to cu

Kohns, R.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Building Envelope and HVAC FOA Selection Projects  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

cold climate commercial heat pump system. The system will reduce annual electricity use for commercial building space heating in cold climates by at least 25 percent....

400

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: FRAME4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FRAME4 FRAME4 FRAME4 logo. Uses two-dimensional finite-volume analysis to evaluate heat transfer through complex building components. FRAME is part of the FRAMEplus toolkit for analysis of windows, doors, walls, roofs and below-grade assemblies. Users draw building components as assemblies of cross-sections. Any interior or exterior environmental condition can be applied. .DXF files and VISION4 files can be imported to speed up data entry. Results are displayed graphically and are used to determine heat transfer, potential for thermal bridging and surface condensation. The FRAME4 simulations (when combined with VISION) are an equal alternative to testing to determine the U-value and solar heat gain coefficient of windows and doors. The U.S. National Fenestration Rating Council and Canadian Standard Association recognize

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but solar thermal and absorption cooling are attractive, andthermal heat collection, and heat-activated cooling can bethe cooling offset by utilization of solar thermal heat,

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Optimum building shape in view of energy saving  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In most highly developed countries there are standards applied to define the requirements for the insulation coefficient of outer partitions, as well as adequate computer programs to both measure the heat loss in the buildings designed and calculate ... Keywords: architecture, ecology, economy, ergonomics

Andrzej Skowronski

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Santa Clara County - Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Policy for County Government Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings Santa Clara County - Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Santa Clara County Executive's Office In February 2006, the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors approved a Green Building Policy for all county-owned or leased buildings. The standards were revised again in September 2009. All new buildings over 5,000 square feet are required to meet LEED Silver

404

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Country -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ireland P Tool Applications Free Recently Updated PASSPORT heating requirements, passive solar, residential buildings, standards...

405

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Connecticut Office of Policy and Management ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/

406

Green Building Requirement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Requirement Green Building Requirement Green Building Requirement < Back Eligibility Commercial Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider District Department of the Environment The District of Columbia City Council enacted [http://dcclims1.dccouncil.us/images/00001/20061218152322.pdf B16-515] on December 5, 2006, establishing green building standards for public buildings and privately-owned commercial buildings of 50,000 square feet or

407

Design & Construct New Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design & Construct New Buildings Design & Construct New Buildings Design & Construct New Buildings Photo of NREL's Research Support Facility under construction, with two workers straddling I-beams. Establishing and implementing aggressive energy performance goals during the design and construction of new commercial buildings is important to achieving those goals over the lifetime of the building. Energy efficiency measures can be applied in various stages of the design and construction process, including scoping and design, procurement, codes and standards compliance, construction and commissioning. Energy savings through these measures can be significant and will have lasting positive impacts on the overall energy use of the building. For example, using technologies and concepts such as radiant heating and cooling, precast concrete insulated

408

UNDERSTANDING FLOW OF ENERGY IN BUILDINGS USING MODAL ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

It is widely understood that energy storage is the key to integrating variable generators into the grid. It has been proposed that the thermal mass of buildings could be used as a distributed energy storage solution and several researchers are making headway in this problem. However, the inability to easily determine the magnitude of the building’s effective thermal mass, and how the heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system exchanges thermal energy with it, is a significant challenge to designing systems which utilize this storage mechanism. In this paper we adapt modal analysis methods used in mechanical structures to identify the primary modes of energy transfer among thermal masses in a building. The paper describes the technique using data from an idealized building model. The approach is successfully applied to actual temperature data from a commercial building in downtown Boise, Idaho.

John Gardner; Kevin Heglund; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Energy Basics: Solar Air Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Homes & Buildings Printable Version Share this resource Lighting & Daylighting Passive Solar Design Space Heating & Cooling Cooling Systems Heating Systems Furnaces & Boilers Wood...

410

Energy Basics: Solar Liquid Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Homes & Buildings Printable Version Share this resource Lighting & Daylighting Passive Solar Design Space Heating & Cooling Cooling Systems Heating Systems Furnaces & Boilers Wood...

411

Available Technologies: Convection Heat Pump  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Solar thermal systems; Heating and cooling systems for buildings; Refrigeration; Compressed air source; Recycling waste heat from chimneys

412

City of Scottsdale - Green Building Incentives | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incentives City of Scottsdale - Green Building Incentives Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home...

413

Monthly average clear-sky broadband irradiance database for worldwide solar heat gain and building cooling load calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper establishes the formulation of a new clear-sky solar radiation model appropriate for algorithms calculating cooling loads in buildings. The aim is to replace the ASHRAE clear-sky model of 1967, whose limitations are well known and are reviewed. The new model is derived in two steps. The first step consists of obtaining a reference irradiance dataset from the REST2 model, which uses a high-performance, validated, two-band clear-sky algorithm. REST2 requires detailed inputs about atmospheric conditions such as aerosols, water vapor, ozone, and ground albedo. The development of global atmospheric datasets used as inputs to REST2 is reviewed. For the most part, these datasets are derived from space observations to guarantee universality and accuracy. In the case of aerosols, point-source terrestrial measurements were also used as ground truthing of the satellite data. The second step of the model consists of fits derived from a REST2-based reference irradiance dataset. These fits enable the derivation of compact, but relatively accurate expressions, for beam and diffuse clear-sky irradiance. The fitted expressions require the tabulation of only two pseudo-optical depths for each month of the year. The resulting model, and its tabulated data, are expected to be incorporated in the 2009 edition of the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals. (author)

Gueymard, Christian A. [Solar Consulting Services, P.O. Box 392, Colebrook, NH 03576 (United States); Thevenard, Didier [Numerical Logics Inc., 498 Edenvalley Cres., Waterloo, Ont. (Canada)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www from buildings. Ventilation, however, comes with a significant energy cost. Currently, heating, cooling and ventilating commercial buildings represents 29 percent of their total onsite energy use

415

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey ... and energy-using equipment types (heating, cooling, refrigeration, water ...

416

Green Building : Concepts and Solutions An Introductory ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Applications Considerations for Combined Heat & Power in Multifamily Buildings Presented by: Marc Zuluaga, PE Steven Winter Associates ...

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

417

Idaho Falls Power - Energy Efficient Heat Pump Loan Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Falls Power - Energy Efficient Heat Pump Loan Program Idaho Falls Power - Energy Efficient Heat Pump Loan Program Idaho Falls Power - Energy Efficient Heat Pump Loan Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Residential Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Heat Pumps: $7,500 Ductless Heat Pumps: $5,000 Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $500 - $7,500 Provider Idaho Falls Power Idaho Falls Power offers zero interest loans to all eligible customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient heat pumps. The Heat Pump Program applies to heating or cooling in existing buildings. Ducted, ductless, and geothermal heat pumps are all eligible for this offer. The program will loan up to 100% of the actual cost of installing heat pumps

418

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the estimated national energy consumption for residentialand cooling energy consumption of the national building

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zone A space or group of spaces within a building with any combination of heating, cooling, or lighting requirements sufficiently similar so that desired conditions can be...

420

Building Technologies Office: Webinar Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

titles: Industry Review: Low-Cost Cold Climate Solar Water Heating Roadmap Saving Energy in Multifamily Buildings An Introduction to the EnergyValue Housing Awards (EVHA) -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Evaluating Incentives for Solar Heating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. t ~ Ii '.:)' NBSIR 76-1127(IE') Evaluating Incentives for Solar Heating Rosalie T. Ruegg Building Economics Section ...

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

422

Test building instrumentation cooperative agreement: heating/daylighting prototype development. Phase II. Passive and hybrid solar manufactured building project. Project status report No. 2, April 16, 1980-March 16, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the test building instrumentation and problems encountered are described. An instrumentation trip report is presented dealing with installation of data acquisition systems, roof and roll runner building. (MCW)

Lindsey, L.L.; Snyder, M.K.

1981-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

423

Mass and Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last few years heat recovery was under spot and in air conditioning fields usually we use heat recovery by different types of heat exchangers. The heat exchanging between the exhaust air from the building with the fresh air to the building (air to air heat exchanger). In my papers I use (water to air heat exchanger) as a heat recovery and I use the water as a mass recovery. The source of mass and heat recovery is the condensate water which we were dispose and connect it to the drain lines.

Hindawai, S. M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Building Energy Code Provider State Board of Building Regulations and Standards ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Massachusetts Board of Building Regulations and Standards has authority

425

Energy Efficiency Improvements Through the Use of Combined Heat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) in Buildings Combined technology helps Federal energy managers meet mission critical energy needs Buildings Cooling, Heating and Power...

426

Kiowa County Commons Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South- and west-facing windows allow more South- and west-facing windows allow more natural light into the building and reduce electricity use * Extensive awnings and overhangs control the light and heat entering the building during the day to reduce cooling loads * Rooftop light monitors in the garden area provide controllable natural light from above to save on electricity consumption * Insulating concrete form block construction with an R-22 insulation value helps control the temperature of the building and maximize

427

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In order to allow equivalent comparisons of buildings across the U.S., the Asset Scoring Tool applies a weather adjustment to those energy uses that depend on climate (e.g.,...

428

Passive solar space heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of passive solar space heating is presented indicating trends in design, new developments, performance measures, analytical design aids, and monitored building results.

Balcomb, J.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

"Table B26. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" 6. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings ................",67338,56115,24171,29196,2218,4182,1371 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,4280,2307,1719,"Q","Q","Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,5748,2287,3204,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9000,4220,4221,224,164,493

430

"Table B21. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" 1. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Othera" "All Buildings ................",67338,61612,32291,37902,5611,5534,2728,945 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,2651,3250,598,"Q",469,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,2808,4613,573,"Q",688,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,5079,6069,773,307,682,"Q"

431

STORAGE OF HEAT AND COOLTH IN HOLLOW-CORE CONCRETE SLABS. SWEDISH EXPERIENCE, AND APPLICATION TO LARGE, AMERICAN-STYLE BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

different slabs, each with a heat capacity of 100 Wh/m2~ Thefloor slabs have a large heat capacity (100 Wh/m2K - where Krequired, but the concrete heat capacity will still handle

Andersson, L.O.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information is useful for estimating the national conservation potentials for DOE's research and market transformation activities in building energy

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quad. The estimates for total energy usage are within 12% ofthe total heating and cooling energy usages represented bythe total heating and cooling energy usages represented by

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Space Heating and Cooling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A wide variety of technologies are available for heating and cooling homes and other buildings. In addition, many heating and cooling systems have certain supporting equipment in common, such as...

435

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C-Factor C-Factor Time rate of steady-state heat flow through the unit area of a material or construction surfaces. Units of C-Factor are Btu/h x ft2 x degrees Fahrenheit. Note that the C-factor does not include soil or air films. CABO The Council of American Building Officials. Cavity Insulation Insulation installed between structural members such as wood studs, metal framing, and Z-clips. CDD Cooling degree day. See "Cooling Degree Days." CDD50 Cooling degree days base 50°F. See "Degree Day Base 50F." CE Combustion efficiency. Ceiling The ceiling requirements apply to portions of the roof and/or ceiling through which heat flows. Ceiling components include the interior surface of flat ceilings below attics, the interior surface of cathedral or vaulted

436

Investigation and Analysis of Energy Consumption and Cost of Electric Air Conditioning Systems in Civil Buildings in Changsha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigated 40 typical air conditioned buildings in Changsha in 2005, including 15 hotel buildings, 6 commercial buildings, 5 office buildings, 6 hospital buildings and 8 synthesis buildings. On this basis we analyze the relation between types of cold and heat sources and the HVAC area of the buildings. Meanwhile the economical and feasible types of cold and heat sources are pointed out, i.e., oil boilers and gas boilers for heat source, and centrifugal and screw water chillers for cold source based on the electric refrigeration. Among the heat sources, the prospect of gas boilers is better. In addition, the air source heat pump depends heavily on whether some crucial issues such as frost can be solved during its application. The water-source heat pump will likely be applied. Based on the analysis of energy consumption and energy bills, we determine the feasible measures for energy conservation including the aspects of design, operation and management. Among them, special attention should be paid to energy metering and running time of air conditioning systems in civil buildings in Changsha.

Xie, D.; Chen, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings...

438

City of Greensburg - Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greensburg - Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Greensburg - Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Buildings City of Greensburg - Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Greensburg City Hall In the aftermath of a May 2007 tornado that destroyed 95% of the city, the Greensburg City Council passed an ordinance requiring that all newly constructed or renovated municipally owned facilities larger than 4,000

439

Water Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heating Water Heating August 19, 2013 - 11:15am Addthis A variety of systems are available for water heating in homes and buildings. Learn about: Conventional Storage Water...

440

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Ohio Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Ohio Department of Commerce ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Board of Building Standards is the primary state agency that protects

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Building Technologies Office: Building Science Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Education Science Education Photo of students investigating building enclosure moisture problems at a field testing facility in British Columbia. Students study moisture building enclosure issues at the Coquitlam Field Test facility in Vancouver, British Columbia. Credit: John Straube The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program recognizes that the education of future design/construction industry professionals in solid building science principles is critical to widespread development of high performance homes that are energy efficient, healthy, and durable. In November 2012, DOE met with leaders in the building science community to develop a strategic Building Science Education Roadmap that will chart a path for training skilled professionals who apply proven innovations and recognize the value of high performance homes. The roadmap aims to:

442

Assembly and testing of a composite heat pipe thermal intercept for HTS current leads  

SciTech Connect

We are building high temperature superconducting (HTS) current leads for a demonstration HTS-high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system cooled by a cryocooler. The current leads are entirely conductively cooled. A composite nitrogen heat pipe provides efficient thermal communication, and simultaneously electrical isolation, between the lead and an intermediate temperature heat sink. Data on the thermal and electrical performance of the heat pipe thermal intercept are presented. The electrical isolation of the heat pipe was measured as a function of applied voltage with and without a thermal load across the heat pipe. The results show the electrical isolation with evaporation, condensation and internal circulation taking place in the heat pipe.

Daugherty, M.A.; Daney, D.E.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Williams, P.M.; Boenig, H.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Promotion of efficient heat pumps for heating (ProHeatPump)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and towns have (some) district heating, and DH currently supplies 1% of heating for buildings in Norway.2 to district heating if there is a supply. According to HP industry representatives, howeverProject Promotion of efficient heat pumps for heating (ProHeatPump) EIE/06/072 / S12

444

Heat Recovery in Building Envelopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

glass fiber insulation), an exterior plywood sheathing andan interior plywood layer. The cross-section of a

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technology Program funds research that can dramatically improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. Credit: Dennis Schroeder, NREL PIX 20181 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows, walls, and roofs; space heating and cooling; lighting; and whole building design strategies.

446

Performance of a Heat Pump Water Heater in the Hot-Humid Climate, Windermere, Florida (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance of a Performance of a Heat Pump Water Heater in the Hot-Humid Climate Windermere, Florida Over recent years, heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have become more read- ily available and more widely adopted in the marketplace. A key feature of an HPWH unit is that it is a hybrid system. When conditions are favorable, the unit will operate in heat pump mode (using a vapor compression system that extracts heat from the surrounding air) to efficiently provide domestic hot water (DHW). Homeowners need not adjust their behavior to conform to the heat pump's capabilities. If a heat pump cannot meet a higher water draw demand, the heater will switch to electric resistance to provide a higher heating rate. This flexibility

447

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

448

City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider City of Boulder The Boulder Green Points Building Program is a mandatory residential green building program that requires a builder or homeowner to include a variety of sustainable building components based on the size of the proposed structure. Similar to the US Green Building Council's LEED program, the

449

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alternative system used to meet a building’s heating and coolingof US$117/kW of cooling. The alternative system is assumed

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

System-Level Monitoring and Diagnosis of Building HVAC System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) is an indoor environmental technology that is extensively instrumented for large-scale buildings. Among all subsystems of buildings, the HVAC… (more)

Wu, Siyu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

City of San Antonio - Green Building Requirement | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

San Antonio - Green Building Requirement City of San Antonio - Green Building Requirement Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Heating...

452

Broward County - Green Building Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Broward County - Green Building Policy Broward County - Green Building Policy Eligibility Local Government Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial...

453

Building Technologies Office: Draft Job and Task Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Commercial Buildings News Energy Department Invests in Heating, Cooling, and Lighting August 21, 2013 Energy Department...

454

City of Scottsdale - Green Building Incentives (Arizona) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, CustomOthers pending approval, DuctAir sealing, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Heat pumps,...

455

City of Bloomington - Green Building Requirements for Municipal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applicable Sector Local Government Eligible Technologies Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Biomass, Daylighting, Geothermal Heat...

456

Building the Intelligent City - Integrating Mobility and Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems...

457

Town of Buckeye - Green Building Incentive (Arizona) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, CustomOthers pending approval, DuctAir sealing, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Heat pumps,...

458

LBNL Building 90 Monitoring: Status Update and New Energy Information...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings...

459

Energy Efficiency Program for State Government Buildings | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program for State Government Buildings Energy Efficiency Program for State Government Buildings Eligibility State Government Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization...

460

EnergyPlus: Energy Simulation Software for Buildings - Energy ...  

EnergyPlus is a building energy simulation program for modeling building heating, cooling, lighting, ventilating, and other energy flows. While it is based on the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "apply heated buildings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Duct systems in large commercial buildings: physical characterization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct systems in large commercial buildings: physical characterization, air leakage and heat conduction gains Title Duct systems in large commercial buildings: physical...

462

Guam - Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement Guam - Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling...

463

City of Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings City of Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Greenprint Denver Executive Order 123, signed in October 2007, established the Greenprint Denver Office and the Sustainability Policy for the city. The Sustainability Policy includes several goals and requirements meant to increase the sustainability of Denver by having the city government lead by

464

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. Hatziargyriou, N. et al. , “Microgrids, An Overview ofand Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings”, IEEEequipment combination for microgrids at a few promising

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

A prediction of energy savings resulting from building infiltration control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis provides a description of the methods of application of theoretical models of heat transfer in computer simulations, to determine the energy performance of a wall or building. The heat transfer simulations include calculation equations which account for the interaction among conduction heat transfer, solar gain, and infiltration heat transfer in building walls. This interaction effect has received only limited previous study. The goal of modeling the behavior of a building with these simulations is to determine optimum arrangements of induced (or controlled) airflow direction and magnitude in building exterior walls, where the walls can be considered porous and can act, to an extent, like a heat exchanger. Recent research toward designing walls especially suited to this application has developed porous walls which are dubbed "dynamic walls." This study attempts to determine the optimum application of dynamic walls, or walls which behave in a similar fashion, in a building in a theoretical analysis. The computer simulations which apply the calculations to model the energy use of a building have been written especially for this study. The results of the theoretical analysis made for this thesis show that significant energy savings can be realized with the use of controlled airflow through non-airtight walls in a building. Comparing the energy use of a building which uses airflow control in dynamic walls with the energy use found with a standard calculation (where the interaction effect is not considered), annual energy savings were found in a warm climate as high as 17%, and as high as 30% in a cooler climate. The results were less promising when compared against the performance of a building experiencing natural, or not induced, airflow (and heat recovery) through its exterior walls: the best annual savings percentages were 10% in a warm climate and just 2% in a cooler climate. The specific building airflow arrangements which produce the best theoretical performances found in this study should be considered for application in future experimental tests, if the dynamic walls and/or building airflow control system are considered economically feasible in light of the projected energy savings they produce.

McWatters, Kenneth Rob

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Energy Basics: Wood and Pellet Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating Wood and Pellet Heating Wood-burning and pellet fuel appliances use biomass or waste resources to heat homes or buildings. Types of Wood-...

467

Building Envelope Requirements Overview Page 3-1 3 Building Envelope Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For the building envelope, field verification and diagnostic testing procedures exist for insulation qualityBuilding Envelope Requirements ­ Overview Page 3-1 3 Building Envelope Requirements The building. The principal components of heating loads are building envelope infiltration as well as conduction losses

468

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Building Energy Code Provider California Energy Commission '''''Note: The California Energy Commission adopted the 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards for new residential and commercial construction on May 31, 2012. The new standards are expected to take effect on January 1, 2014, and represent significant energy and water savings compared to the current standards. Among many notable provisions, the new standards will

469

"Table B25. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manu- facturing" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,56940,56478,22237,3138 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,5007,4759,997,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,5408,5348,1136,214 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,9922,9562,1954,472 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,8060,7776,7734,2511,"Q"

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