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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Ethanol fuel for diesel tractors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of ethanol fuel in turbocharged diesel tractors is considered. The investigation was performed to evaluate the conversion of a diesel tractor for dual-fueling with ethanol by attaching a carburetor to the inlet air system or with the use of an alcohol spray-injection kit. In this system the mixture of water and alcohol is injected into the air stream by means of pressure from the turbocharger. The carburetor was attached to a by-pass apparatus which allowed the engine to start and shut off on diesel alone. Approximately 46% of the energy for the turbocharged 65 kW diesel tractor could be supplied by carbureted ethanol, and about 30% by the spray-injection approach. Knock limited the extent of substitution of ethanol for diesel fuel. The dual-fueling with ethanol caused a slight increase in brake thermal efficiency. Exhaust temperatures were much lower for equivalent high torque levels. Maximum power was increased by 36% with the spray-injection approach and about 59% with carburetion.

da Cruz, J.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

An instrumentation package for monitoring tractor performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of performance for most current tractor models was engine speed. Since overall tractor performance was influenced by several operating variables, not just engine speed, additional monitors and displays of performance were needed. Tractor performance monitors... Rotational Sp D' fferential Speed Measurement Draft Measurement Rear Axle Torque Measurement Fuel Consumption Measurement Campbell CR5 Digital Recorder Field Test Design and Procedures Data Requirements Test Site and Field Variables Travel Speed...

Green, Malcolm Kirk

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

SuperTruck ? Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Tractor & Trailer  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

4

Reducing Fuel Consumption through Semi-Automated Platooning with Class 8 Tractor Trailer Combinations (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of the fuel savings potential of semi-automated truck platooning. Platooning involves reducing aerodynamic drag by grouping vehicles together and decreasing the distance between them through the use of electronic coupling, which allows multiple vehicles to accelerate or brake simultaneously. The NREL study addressed the need for data on American style line-haul sleeper cabs with modern aerodynamics and over a range of trucking speeds common in the United States.

Lammert, M.; Gonder, J.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Development of a Micro Drive-Under Tractor- Research and Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract—The in-plant transport of goods is increasingly becoming automated. All reasons that argue for automation result in a better cost effectiveness. An extended percentage of the load units are lightweight and small goods that often occur either as single parts or as several articles in multiple small load carriers. Modern logistics concepts demand an efficient transport and the delivery within the intended time. To reduce the covered distance a flexible adjustment of the load capacity to single or accumulated transport is beneficial so that the vehicle can carry the required amount of goods without being oversized. To fulfill these specifications the paper at hand presents the development and realization of a new type of Automated Guided Vehicle that is optimized for the transportation of small goods [1]. The construction is carried out as an omnidirectional drive-under tractor in compact dimensions. The main purpose of the vehicle is the automated towing of trailers. Additionally the transport of single small load carriers can be accomplished by using a lifting table. Therefore it is for the first possible time to use a towing and carrying vehicle with a variable load capacity. For the drive system Mecanum wheels are used to enable omnidirectional maneuverability. Index Terms—Automated Guided Vehicle, drive-under tractor, omnidirectional drive.

Lothar Schulze; Sebastian Behling; Stefan Buhrs

6

Fuel-Cycle energy and emission impacts of ethanol-diesel blends in urban buses and farming tractors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 2.1 billion gallons of fuel ethanol was used in the United States in 2002, mainly in the form of gasoline blends containing up to 10% ethanol (E10). Ethanol use has the potential to increase in the U.S. blended gasoline market because methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), formerly the most popular oxygenate blendstock, may be phased out owing to concerns about MTBE contamination of the water supply. Ethanol would remain the only viable near-term option as an oxygenate in reformulated gasoline production and to meet a potential federal renewable fuels standard (RFS) for transportation fuels. Ethanol may also be blended with additives (co-solvents) into diesel fuels for applications in which oxygenation may improve diesel engine emission performance. Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate the fuel-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission effects of ethanol-gasoline blends relative to those of gasoline for applications in spark-ignition engine vehicles (see Wang et al. 1997; Wang et al. 1999; Levelton Engineering et al. 1999; Shapouri et al. 2002; Graboski 2002). Those studies did not address the energy and emission effects of ethanol-diesel (E-diesel or ED) blends relative to those of petroleum diesel fuel in diesel engine vehicles. The energy and emission effects of E-diesel could be very different from those of ethanol-gasoline blends because (1) the energy use and emissions generated during diesel production (so-called ''upstream'' effects) are different from those generated during gasoline production; and (2) the energy and emission performance of E-diesel and petroleum diesel fuel in diesel compression-ignition engines differs from that of ethanol-gasoline blends in spark-ignition (Otto-cycle-type) engine vehicles. The Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs (DCCA) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory to conduct a full fuel-cycle analysis of the energy and emission effects of E-diesel blends relative to those of petroleum diesel when used in the types of diesel engines that will likely be targeted first in the marketplace. This report documents the results of our study. The draft report was delivered to DCCA in January 2003. This final report incorporates revisions by the sponsor and by Argonne.

Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Lee, H.

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

7

Miniature pipe crawler tractor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pipe crawler tractor may comprise a half tractor assembly having a first base drive wheel, a second base drive wheel, and a top drive wheel. The drive wheels are mounted in spaced-apart relation so that the top drive wheel is positioned between the first and second base drive wheels. The mounting arrangement is also such that the first and second base drive wheels contact the inside surface of the pipe at respective first and second positions and so that the top drive wheel contacts the inside surface of the pipe at a third position, the third position being substantially diametrically opposed to the first and second positions. A control system connected to the half tractor assembly controls the rotation of the first base wheel, the second base wheel, and the top drive wheel to move the half tractor assembly within the pipe.

McKay, Mark D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Matthew O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ferrante, Todd A. (Westerville, OH); Willis, W. David (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Microhole Drilling Tractor Technology Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to increase the U.S. energy reserves and lower costs for finding and retrieving oil, the USDOE created a solicitation to encourage industry to focus on means to operate in small diameter well-Microhole. Partially in response to this solicitation and because Western Well Tool's (WWT) corporate objective to develop small diameter coiled tubing drilling tractor, WWT responded to and was awarded a contract to design, prototype, shop test, and field demonstrate a Microhole Drilling Tractor (MDT). The benefit to the oil industry and the US consumer from the project is that with the MDT's ability to facilitate Coiled Tubing drilled wells to be 1000-3000 feet longer horizontally, US brown fields can be more efficiently exploited resulting in fewer wells, less environmental impact, greater and faster oil recovery, and lower drilling costs. Shortly after award of the contract, WWT was approached by a major oil company that strongly indicated that the specified size of a tractor of 3.0 inches diameter was inappropriate and that immediate applications for a 3.38-inch diameter tractor would substantially increase the usefulness of the tool to the oil industry. Based on this along with an understanding with the oil company to use the tractor in multiple field applications, WWT applied for and was granted a no-cost change-of-scope contract amendment to design, manufacture, assemble, shop test and field demonstrate a prototype a 3.38 inch diameter MDT. Utilizing existing WWT tractor technology and conforming to an industry developed specification for the tool, the Microhole Drilling Tractor was designed. Specific features of the MDT that increase it usefulness are: (1) Operation on differential pressure of the drilling fluid, (2) On-Off Capability, (3) Patented unique gripping elements (4) High strength and flexibility, (5) Compatibility to existing Coiled Tubing drilling equipment and operations. The ability to power the MDT with drilling fluid results in a highly efficient tool that both delivers high level of force for the pressure available and inherently increases downhole reliability because parts are less subject to contamination. The On-Off feature is essential to drilling to allow the Driller to turn off the tractor and pull back while circulating in cleanout runs that keep the hole clean of drilling debris. The gripping elements have wide contact surfaces to the formation to allow high loads without damage to the formation. As part of the development materials evaluations were conducted to verify compatibility with anticipated drilling and well bore fluids. Experiments demonstrated that the materials of the tractor are essentially undamaged by exposure to typical drilling fluids used for horizontal coiled tubing drilling. The design for the MDT was completed, qualified vendors identified, parts procured, received, inspected, and a prototype was assembled. As part of the assembly process, WWT prepared Manufacturing instructions (MI) that detail the assembly process and identify quality assurance inspection points. Subsequent to assembly, functional tests were performed. Functional tests consisted of placing the MDT on jack stands, connecting a high pressure source to the tractor, and verifying On-Off functions, walking motion, and operation over a range of pressures. Next, the Shop Demonstration Test was performed. An existing WWT test fixture was modified to accommodate operation of the 3.38 inch diameter MDT. The fixture simulated the tension applied to a tractor while walking (pulling) inside 4.0 inch diameter pipe. The MDT demonstrated: (1) On-off function, (2) Pulling forces proportional to available differential pressure up to 4000 lbs, (3) Walking speeds to 1100 ft/hour. A field Demonstration of the MDT was arranged with a major oil company operating in Alaska. A demonstration well with a Measured Depth of approximately 15,000 ft was selected; however because of problems with the well drilling was stopped before the planned MDT usage. Alternatively, functional and operational tests were run with the MDT insi

Western Well Tool

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

9

Microcomputer-based on-board tractor performance monitor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

46 vii Chapter Page IV EXPERIHENTAL PROCEDURE 49 Calibration A/D Strain Gage Offsets Scan Timer and Counters Fuel Flowmeter PTO Dynamometer Test Speed Trials Field Test Design and Procedures Scan Parameters Tractor Logbook... 68 V RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 73 Field Performance Axle Load Heasurement Fuel Flowmeter Drawbar Load Cell Alternator Bubble Hemory PTO Dynamometer Test Speed Trials Soil Data Analysis 74 74 75 75 76 76 77 77 81 Tractor Performance...

Morris, David Alan

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combinatio...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

5: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors Fact 705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors The National Highway...

11

Safe Tractor Operation: Rollover Prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About 250 people are killed each year in tractor accidents, and rollovers cause more than half of these fatalities. In this publication you'll learn about the physics of tractor stability, how to prevent side and rear rollovers, and the importance...

Smith, David

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

Summary of NREL's Recent Class 8 Tractor Trailer Platooning Testing (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes NREL's recent class 8 tractor trailer platooning testing, including analysis of SAE J1321 Type II fuel consumption testing, fuel consumption improvement, fuel economy and platooning position accuracy.

Lammert, M.; Kelly, K.; Walkowicz, K.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Fuel Station Procedure Applicability All  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Station Procedure Applicability All Last Revised 11/20/12 Procedure Owner Andrew Grant agrant for the purchasing and distribution of fuel for vehicles owned by Bowling Green State University (BGSU). This centralization is important to ensure compliance for BGSU employees who use the centralized fuel station and fuel

Moore, Paul A.

14

Safe Tractor Operation: Driving on Highways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About 50 tractor drivers are killed each year in collisions with other vehicles on public roads. Many of these accidents could be prevented. This publication describes the legal requirements for operating a tractor on public roads, safe driving...

Smith, David

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

15

Microcomputer-based information feedback system for improving tractor efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) used a gear oontrol system based on a customized version of the Motorola 6800 microprocessor. When used with heavy duty automatic transmissions in trucks and off highway equipment, improvements were seen in fuel efficiency, performanoe, reliability... in oil prices over the past deoade sparked more interest in determining tractor efficiency and in exploring ways to improve fuel economy. During the same time period, explosive growth in the eleotronics industry has made available very compact...

Grogan, Joseph

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Fuel reforming for fuel cell application.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fossil fuels, such as natural gas, petroleum, and coal are currently the primary source of energy that drives the world economy. However, fossil fuel is… (more)

Hung, Tak Cheong

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Selection of a Wear-Resistant Tractor Drivetrain Material: Success...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Selection of a Wear-Resistant Tractor Drivetrain Material: Success stories at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Selection of a Wear-Resistant Tractor...

18

EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TRUCK EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGIES IN CLASS 8 TRACTOR-TRAILERS BASED ON A TRACTIVE ENERGY ANALYSIS USING MEASURED DRIVE CYCLE DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantifying the fuel savings that can be achieved from different truck fuel efficiency technologies for a fleet s specific usage allows the fleet to select the combination of technologies that will yield the greatest operational efficiency and profitability. This paper presents an analysis of vehicle usage in a commercial vehicle fleet and an assessment of advanced efficiency technologies using an analysis of measured drive cycle data for a class 8 regional commercial shipping fleet. Drive cycle measurements during a period of a full year from six tractor-trailers in normal operations in a less-than-truckload (LTL) carrier were analyzed to develop a characteristic drive cycle that is highly representative of the fleet s usage. The vehicle mass was also estimated to account for the variation of loads that the fleet experienced. The drive cycle and mass data were analyzed using a tractive energy analysis to quantify the fuel efficiency and CO2 emissions benefits that can be achieved on class 8 tractor-trailers when using advanced efficiency technologies, either individually or in combination. Although differences exist among class 8 tractor-trailer fleets, this study provides valuable insight into the energy and emissions reduction potential that various technologies can bring in this important trucking application.

LaClair, Tim J [ORNL] [ORNL; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Fu, Joshua S. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Calcagno, Jimmy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Yun, Jeongran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Progress in fuel cells for transportation applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current and projected states of development of fuel cells are described in terms of availability, performance, and cost. The applicability of various fuel cell types to the transportation application is discussed, and projections of power densities, weights, and volumes of fuel cell systems are made into the early 1990s. Research currently being done to advance fuel cells for vehicular application is described. A summary of near-term design parameters for a fuel cell transit line is given, including bus performance requirements, fuel cell power plant configuration, and battery peaking requirements. The objective of this paper is to determine a fuel cell technology suitable for near-term use as a vehicular power plant. The emphasis of the study is on indirect methanol fuel cell systems.

Murray, H.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Microfluidics for fuel cell applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this work, a microfluidics approach is applied to two fuel cell related projects; the study of deformation and contact angle hysteresis on water invasion… (more)

Stewart, Ian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Solid fuel applications to transportation engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The utilization of solid fuels as alternatives to liquid fuels for future transportation engines is reviewed. Alternative liquid fuels will not be addressed nor will petroleum/solid fuel blends except for the case of diesel engines. With respect to diesel engines, coal/oil mixtures will be addressed because of the high interest in this specific application as a result of the large number of diesel engines currently in transportation use. Final assessments refer to solid fuels only for diesel engines. The technical assessments of solid fuels utilization for transportation engines is summarized: solid fuel combustion in transportation engines is in a non-developed state; highway transportation is not amenable to solid fuels utilization due to severe environmental, packaging, control, and disposal problems; diesel and open-cycle gas turbines do not appear worthy of further development, although coal/oil mixtures for slow speed diesels may offer some promise as a transition technology; closed-cycle gas turbines show some promise for solid fuels utilization for limited applications as does the Stirling engine for use of cleaner solid fuels; Rankine cycle engines show good potential for limited applications, such as for locomotives and ships; and any development program will require large resources and sophisticated equipment in order to advance the state-of-the-art.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Coca-Cola Refreshments Class 8 Diesel Electric Hybrid Tractor Evaluation: 13-Month Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 13-month evaluation used five Kenworth T370 hybrid tractors and five Freightliner M2106 standard diesel tractors at a Coca Cola Refreshments facility in Miami, Florida. The primary objective was to evaluate the fuel economy, emissions, and operational field performance of hybrid electric vehicles when compared to similar-use conventional diesel vehicles. A random dispatch system ensures the vehicles are used in a similar manner. GPS logging, fueling, and maintenance records and laboratory dynamometer testing are used to evaluate the performance of these hybrid tractors. Both groups drive similar duty cycles with similar kinetic intensity (0.95 vs. 0.69), average speed (20.6 vs. 24.3 mph), and stops per mile (1.9 vs. 1.5). The study demonstrated the hybrid group had a 13.7% fuel economy improvement over the diesel group. Laboratory fuel economy and field fuel economy study showed similar trends along the range of KI and stops per mile. Hybrid maintenance costs were 51% lower per mile; hybrid fuel costs per mile were 12% less than for the diesels; and hybrid vehicle total cost of operation per mile was 24% less than the cost of operation for the diesel group.

Walkowicz, K.; Lammert, M.; Curran, P.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

AVTA: Hybrid-Electric Tractor Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following set of reports describes data collected from hybrid-electric tractor vehicles in the Coca-Cola fleet. This research was conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

24

Gasifiers optimized for fuel cell applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional coal gasification carbonate fuel cell systems are typically configured as shown in Figure 1, where the fuel gas is primarily hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide, with waste heat recovery for process requirements and to produce additional power in a steam bottoming cycle. These systems make use of present day gasification processes to produce the low to medium Btu fuel gas which in turn is cleaned up and consumed by the fuel cell. These conventional gasification/fuel cell systems have been studied in recent years projecting system efficiencies of 45--53% (HHV). Conventional gasification systems currently available evolved as stand-alone systems producing low to medium Btu gas fuel gas. The requirements of the gasification process dictates high temperatures to carry out the steam/carbon reaction and to gasify the tars present in coal. The high gasification temperatures required are achieved by an oxidant which consumes a portion of the feed coal to provide the endothermic heat required for the gasification process. The thermal needs of this process result in fuel gas temperatures that are higher than necessary for most end use applications, as well as for gas cleanup purposes. This results in some efficiency and cost penalties. This effort is designed to study advanced means of power generation by integrating the gasification process with the unique operating characteristics of carbonate fuel cells to achieve a more efficient and cost effective coal based power generating system. This is to be done by altering the gasification process to produce fuel gas compositions which result in more efficient fuel cell operation and by integrating the gasification process with the fuel cell as shown in Figure 2. Low temperature catalytic gasification was chosen as the basis for this effort due to the inherent efficiency advantages and compatibility with fuel cell operating temperatures.

Steinfeld, G.; Fruchtman, J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Lee, A.; Meyers, S.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Gasifiers optimized for fuel cell applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional coal gasification carbonate fuel cell systems are typically configured as shown in Figure 1, where the fuel gas is primarily hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide, with waste heat recovery for process requirements and to produce additional power in a steam bottoming cycle. These systems make use of present day gasification processes to produce the low to medium Btu fuel gas which in turn is cleaned up and consumed by the fuel cell. These conventional gasification/fuel cell systems have been studied in recent years projecting system efficiencies of 45--53% (HHV). Conventional gasification systems currently available evolved as stand-alone systems producing low to medium Btu gas fuel gas. The requirements of the gasification process dictates high temperatures to carry out the steam/carbon reaction and to gasify the tars present in coal. The high gasification temperatures required are achieved by an oxidant which consumes a portion of the feed coal to provide the endothermic heat required for the gasification process. The thermal needs of this process result in fuel gas temperatures that are higher than necessary for most end use applications, as well as for gas cleanup purposes. This results in some efficiency and cost penalties. This effort is designed to study advanced means of power generation by integrating the gasification process with the unique operating characteristics of carbonate fuel cells to achieve a more efficient and cost effective coal based power generating system. This is to be done by altering the gasification process to produce fuel gas compositions which result in more efficient fuel cell operation and by integrating the gasification process with the fuel cell as shown in Figure 2. Low temperature catalytic gasification was chosen as the basis for this effort due to the inherent efficiency advantages and compatibility with fuel cell operating temperatures.

Steinfeld, G.; Fruchtman, J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Lee, A.; Meyers, S.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

SuperTruck ? Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Tractor & Trailer 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

27

Fuel cell system technologies and application issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy usage has been the target of various conservation and cost control strategies for many years. Technologies have ranged from turing equipment off, to mystical black boxes that lower costs. Utilities have been instrumental in the support of customer energy conservation and development and implementation of efficiency improvements. Natural gas fuel cells are a direct energy conversion technology that has reached stages of development that will begin to supply electrical energy (and associated thermal energy) at comparable life cycle cost to those available from more conventional combustion based electrical generation systems. This article will briefly describe the basics of fuel cells and types of fuel cells. Recent advances in fuel cell technology and installations will be discussed. Finally an analysis will be presented to determine their future within grid, industrial, commercial, and/or residential applications.

Christenson, C.D. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). Oklahoma Industrial Assessment Center

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Rational Formulation of Alternative Fuels using QSPR Methods: Application to Jet Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rational Formulation of Alternative Fuels using QSPR Methods: Application to Jet Fuels D.A. Saldana Properties Relationship) Methods: Application to Jet Fuels -- Alternative fuels are a promising solution-662 Copyright © 2013, IFP Energies nouvelles DOI: 10.2516/ogst/2012034 Second and Third Generation Biofuels

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

29

Methane conversion for application in fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional steam reformers are large and expensive for small scale fuel cell installations. But also the high endothermicity of the reforming reaction for the production of synthesis gas is a drawback. An alternative to conventional steam reforming is the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas. This process is slightly exothermic. The flexibility of the process makes small scale application possible. However, the partial oxidation process seems especially attractive for application within a high temperature fuel cell, because of relatively high CO/H{sub 2}-ratio for the output gases. In this paper the results of the study on the mechanism of the partial oxidation to synthesis gas on silica-supported nickel catalysts are discussed. Moreover, a process for the partial oxidation is proposed in which air instead of oxygen can be used. Based on the results of the mechanistic study two processes for the catalytic partial oxidation are proposed and simulated using the Aspen Plus flowsheeting program with which the mass and heat balances were optimized.

Mulder, A. [Gastec N.V., Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Looy, F. van [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry; Waveren, A. van; Wingerden, A.J.M. van

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL®) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL® injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

Eteman, Shahrokh

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Catalysis Today 77 (2002) 6578 CO-free fuel processing for fuel cell applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydrocarbons has been proposed for production of CO-free hydrogen for fuel cell applications. The decomposition. Keywords: CO-free hydrogen; PROX; Fuel cells; Ammonia decomposition 1. Introduction Fuel cell technology [1 reforming process for hydrogen generation for PEM fuel cells. conditions employed) is passed into water gas

Goodman, Wayne

32

Fuel cell power conditioning for electric power applications: a summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel cell power conditioning for electric power applications: a summary X. Yu, M.R. Starke, L.M. Tolbert and B. Ozpineci Abstract: Fuel cells are considered to be one of the most promising sources, multiple complications exist in fuel cell operation. Fuel cells cannot accept current in the reverse

Tolbert, Leon M.

33

Fuel cell system for transportation applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A propulsion system for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and water and air and for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel with water and air in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor.

Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Ahmed, Shabbir (Evanston, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Myles, Kevin M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Fuel cell system for transportation applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A propulsion system is described for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell and receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and uses water and air for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor. 3 figures.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergy Frozen Telescope Looks4KickoffDepartment

36

Fuel cell systems for personal and portable power applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cells are devices that electrochemically convert fuel, usually hydrogen gas, to directly produce electricity. Fuel cells were initially developed for use in the space program to provide electricity and drinking water for astronauts. Fuel cells are under development for use in the automobile industry to power cars and buses with the advantage of lower emissions and higher efficiency than internal combustion engines. Fuel cells also have great potential to be used in portable consumer products like cellular phones and laptop computers, as well as military applications. In fact, any products that use batteries can be powered by fuel cells. In this project, we examine fuel cell system trade-offs between fuel cell type and energy storage/hydrogen production for portable power generation. The types of fuel cells being examined include stored hydrogen PEM (polymer electrolyte), direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) and indirect methanol fuel cells, where methanol is reformed producing hydrogen. These fuel cells systems can operate at or near ambient conditions, which make them potentially optimal for use in manned personal power applications. The expected power production for these systems is in the range of milliwatts to 500 watts of electrical power for either personal or soldier field use. The fuel cell system trade-offs examine hydrogen storage by metal hydrides, carbon nanotubes, and compressed hydrogen tanks. We examine the weights each system, volume, fuel storage, system costs, system peripherals, power output, and fuel cell feasibility in portable devices.

Fateen, S. A. (Shaheerah A.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Fuel cells for electric utility and transportation applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This review article presents: the current status and expected progress status of the fuel cell research and development programs in the USA, electrochemical problem areas, techno-economic assessments of fuel cells for electric and/or gas utilities and for transportation, and other candidate fuel cells and their applications. For electric and/or gas utility applications, the most likely candidates are phosphoric, molten carbonate, and solid electrolyte fuel cells. The first will be coupled with a reformer (to convert natural gas, petroleum-derived, or biomass fuels to hydrogen), while the second and third will be linked with a coal gasifier. A fuel cell/battery hybrid power source is an attractive option for electric vehicles with projected performance characteristics approaching those for internal combustion or diesel engine powered vehicles. For this application, with coal-derived methanol as the fuel, a fuel cell with an acid electrolyte (phosphoric, solid polymer electrolyte or super acid) is essential; with pure hydrogen (obtained by splitting of water using nuclear, solar or hydroelectric energy), alkaline fuel cells show promise. A fuel cell researcher's dream is the development of a high performance direct methanol-air fuel cell as a power plant for electric vehicles. For long or intermittent duty cycle load leveling, regenerative hydrogen-halogen fuel cells exhibit desirable characteristics.

Srinivasan, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Encouraging Industrial Demonstrations of Fuel Cell Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

amounts of electricity and process heat; yet none of these have tested a fuel cell. THE HARKET A recent study performed by the Department of Energy (reference 1) stated, "It is possi ble that the on-site market for fuel cells may eventually become... as large worldwide as that for electric utility fuel cell systems." The study included the industrial sector as part of the on-site market. It went on to state, "The potential industrial cogenera tion market is at present unknown. It may be as much...

Anderson, J. M.

39

Fuel cell systems for vehicular applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phosphoric acid fuel cell is used as the base line in these evaluations. Two cell sizes (15 and 60 kW) and two fuel options (methanol and propane) are included. Four vehicle types, the city bus, highway bus, delivery van, and general-purpose consumer car are selected for evaluation. Typical drive cycles and economics for these vehicles are compiled, and comparisons are made between the fuel-cell vehicle and current internal-combustion and diesel-engine vehicles. The conclusions of these evaluations are briefly related. Then, the initial results of two aspects of the fuel-cell-powered vehicle evaluation program ongoing at LASL are described. The first part of the program presents the results of detailed computer simulations to illustrate a number of the important system-design considerations in configuring a fuel cell/battery electric vehicle. The next program describes a fuel-cell-powered golf cart currently being used as an engineering test bed. (MCW)

Lynn, D.K.; McCormick, J.B.; Bobbett, R.E.; Kerwin, W.J.; Derouin, C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel Development for LWR Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept, fabrication, and key feasibility issues of a new fuel form based on the microencapsulated (TRISO-type) fuel which has been specifically engineered for LWR application and compacted within a SiC matrix will be presented. This fuel, the so-called fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel is currently undergoing development as an accident tolerant fuel for potential UO2 replacement in commercial LWRs. While the ability of this fuel to facilitate normal LWR cycle performance is an ongoing effort within the program, this will not be a focus of this paper. Rather, key feasibility and performance aspects of the fuel will be presented including the ability to fabricate a LWR-specific TRISO, the need for and route to a high thermal conductivity and fully dense matrix that contains neutron poisons, and the performance of that matrix under irradiation and the interaction of the fuel with commercial zircaloy clad.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Voit, Stewart L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Application of Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Use in Fueling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Use in Fueling Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles No. DE-EE0003507 Under Task 3.3: Hydrogen September 2014 HAWAI`I NATURAL ENERGY INSTITUTE School of Hydrogen Storage Technologies Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery

42

Diesel fuel to dc power: Navy & Marine Corps Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past year Analytic Power has tested fuel cell stacks and diesel fuel processors for US Navy and Marine Corps applications. The units are 10 kW demonstration power plants. The USN power plant was built to demonstrate the feasibility of diesel fueled PEM fuel cell power plants for 250 kW and 2.5 MW shipboard power systems. We designed and tested a ten cell, 1 kW USMC substack and fuel processor. The complete 10 kW prototype power plant, which has application to both power and hydrogen generation, is now under construction. The USN and USMC fuel cell stacks have been tested on both actual and simulated reformate. Analytic Power has accumulated operating experience with autothermal reforming based fuel processors operating on sulfur bearing diesel fuel, jet fuel, propane and natural gas. We have also completed the design and fabrication of an advanced regenerative ATR for the USMC. One of the significant problems with small fuel processors is heat loss which limits its ability to operate with the high steam to carbon ratios required for coke free high efficiency operation. The new USMC unit specifically addresses these heat transfer issues. The advances in the mill programs have been incorporated into Analytic Power`s commercial units which are now under test.

Bloomfield, D.P. [Analytic Power Corp., Boston, MA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Measurement of three-point hitch forces on agricultural tractors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dynamometer to be used as an additional tool in monitoring tractor performance. Phases 1, Z, and 3 have been completed and these were described by Green, et al. ( 1985), Morris ( 1984), and Grogan ( 1985), respectively. Phase 4 is the subject.... The upper link was instrumented for axial force measurement. measured forces were resolved into components based on the measured angle of the hitch. A second three-point hitch dynamometer was investigated that used load sensing clevis pins. These pins...

Bandy, Steven Morris

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

FUEL DEVICE APPLICATION Use this application to request a fuel device to access the University of Michigan (U-M) Parking and Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUEL DEVICE APPLICATION Use this application to request a fuel device to access the University of Michigan (U-M) Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) service stations for fuel. A fuel device owned and managed by PTS Fleet Services equipped with an automated fuel device. Please read the Use

Kirschner, Denise

45

Polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Potential transportation and stationary applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) as a primary power source in electric vehicles has received increasing attention during the last few years. This increased attention is the result of a combination of significant technical advances in this fuel cell technology and the initiation of some projects for the demonstration of a complete, PEFC-based power system a bus or in a passenger car. Such demonstration projects reflect an increase in industry's faith in the potential of this technology for transportation applications, or, at least, in the need for a detailed evaluation of this potential. Nevertheless, large scale transportation applications of PEFCs require a continued concerted effort of research on catalysis, materials and components, combined with the engineering efforts addressing the complete power system. This is required to achieve a cost effective, highly performing PEFC stack and power system. A related set of technical and cost challenges arises in the context of potential applications of PEFCs for stationary power applications, although there are clearly some differences in their nature, particularly, to do with the different types of fuels to be employed for each of these applications. We describe in this contribution some recent results of work performed by the Core Research PEFC Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which has addressed materials, components and single cell testing of PEFCS. Also included are some recent observations and some insights regarding the potential of this fuel cell technology for stationary Power generation.

Gottesfeld, S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Potential transportation and stationary applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) as a primary power source in electric vehicles has received increasing attention during the last few years. This increased attention is the result of a combination of significant technical advances in this fuel cell technology and the initiation of some projects for the demonstration of a complete, PEFC-based power system a bus or in a passenger car. Such demonstration projects reflect an increase in industry`s faith in the potential of this technology for transportation applications, or, at least, in the need for a detailed evaluation of this potential. Nevertheless, large scale transportation applications of PEFCs require a continued concerted effort of research on catalysis, materials and components, combined with the engineering efforts addressing the complete power system. This is required to achieve a cost effective, highly performing PEFC stack and power system. A related set of technical and cost challenges arises in the context of potential applications of PEFCs for stationary power applications, although there are clearly some differences in their nature, particularly, to do with the different types of fuels to be employed for each of these applications. We describe in this contribution some recent results of work performed by the Core Research PEFC Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which has addressed materials, components and single cell testing of PEFCS. Also included are some recent observations and some insights regarding the potential of this fuel cell technology for stationary Power generation.

Gottesfeld, S.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

PEM fuel cells for transportation and stationary power generation applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe recent activities at LANL devoted to polymer electrolyte fuel cells in the contexts of stationary power generation and transportation applications. A low cost/high performance hydrogen or reformate/air stack technology is being developed based on ultralow Pt loadings and on non-machined, inexpensive elements for flow-fields and bipolar plates. On board methanol reforming is compared to the option of direct methanol fuel cells because of recent significant power density increases demonstrated in the latter.

Cleghorn, S.J.; Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Gottesfeld, S.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

US fuel cell research and applications, 1960--1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the major fuel cell research and development (R and D) programs funded by the US government and the private sector, with a particular focus on terrestrial applications. Included in this overview is information on funding levels, project descriptions and goals, and selected accomplishments. Brief assessments as to the proximity of commercialization for each of the primary types of fuel cells are also furnished. 11 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs.

Kinzey, B.R.; Sen, R.K.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

EMPLOYEE FUEL ACCESS APPLICATION Use this application to request access for employees to use the campus service stations in conjunction with a fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMPLOYEE FUEL ACCESS APPLICATION Use this application to request access for employees to use the campus service stations in conjunction with a fuel access device. In order to obtain fuel from for access. Employee access is not required for the U-M fleet vehicle equipped with an automated fuel device

Kirschner, Denise

51

Farm Tractors in Kansas: How to Perfect a Security Interest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2153 . . . .”); id. § 28-2153(D) (“This section does not apply to: (1) [a] farm tractor.”). 3. Arkansas. See ARK. CODE ANN. § 4-9-311(a) (West 2004) (“[T]he filing of a financing statement is not necessary or effective to perfect a security interest in property... in an area away from the traveled surface of an established open highway.”); id. § 1102(33) (“‘Vehicle’ does not include bicycles, trailers except travel trailers and rental trailers, or implements of husbandry. . . . All implements of husbandry used...

Johnstun, Aaron J.; Ware, Stephen J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Dual fuel engine control systems for transportation applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microprocessor control systems have been developed for dual fuel diesel engines intended for transportation applications. Control system requirements for transportation engines are more demanding than for stationary engines, as the system must be able to cope with variable speed and load. Detailed fuel maps were determined for both normally aspirated and turbocharged diesel engines based on the criterion that the engine did not operate in the regimes where knock or incomplete combustion occurred. The control system was developed so that the engine would follow the detailed fuel map. The input variables to the control system are engine speed and load. Based on this, the system then controls the amount of natural gas and diesel fuel supplied to the engine. The performance of the system is briefly summarized.

Gettel, L.E.; Perry, G.C.; Boisvert, J.; O'Sullivan, P.J.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Modeling and simulation of a reformate supplied PEM fuel cell stack, application to fault detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling and simulation of a reformate supplied PEM fuel cell stack, application to fault detection exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are the main type of fuel cell developed for ground vehicle applications tool for thermal characteristic and fault detection of a PEM fuel cell stack. The fuel cell stack model

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

54

Low Temperature Constrained Sintering of Cerium Gadolinium Oxide Films for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, In: S.C. Singhal and M.Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology, U.S. Department ofOxide Films for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications by Jason

Nicholas, Jason.D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Tuning the transport properties of layer-by-layer thin films for fuel cell applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The increasing global focus on alternative energy sources has led to a renewed interest in fuel cells. For low power, portable applications, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are the most promising type of fuel cell. DMFCs ...

Ashcraft, James Nathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

E-Print Network 3.0 - applications pem fuel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: applications pem fuel Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 High Performance PEM Fuel Cells The development of high performance PEM fuel cells reflects the need Summary: been...

57

Fuel cell power plants in a distributed generator application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ONSI`s (a subsidiary of International Fuel Cells Corporation) world wide fleet of 200-kW PC25{trademark} phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants which began operation early in 1992 has shown excellent performance and reliability in over 1 million hours of operation. This experience has verified the clean, quiet, reliable operation of the PC25 and confirmed its application as a distributed generator. Continuing product development efforts have resulted in a one third reduction of weight and volume as well as improved installation and operating characteristics for the PC25 C model. Delivery of this unit began in 1995. International Fuel Cells (IFC) continues its efforts to improve product design and manufacturing processes. This progress has been sustained at a compounded rate of 10 percent per year since the late 1980`s. These improvements will permit further reductions in the initial cost of the power plant and place increased emphasis on market development as the pacing item in achieving business benefits from the PC25 fuel cell. Derivative product opportunities are evolving with maturation of the technologies in a commercial environment. The recent announcement of Praxair, Inc., and IFC introducing a non-cryogenic hydrogen supply system utilizing IFC`s steam reformer is an example. 11 figs.

Smith, M.J. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Investigation of Tractor Base Bleeding for Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag Reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main contributors to the aerodynamic drag of a heavy vehicle is tractor-trailer gap drag, which arises when the vehicle operates within a crosswind. Under this operating condition, freestream flow is entrained into the tractor-trailer gap, imparting a momentum exchange to the vehicle and subsequently increasing the aerodynamic drag. While a number of add-on devices, including side extenders, splitter plates, vortex stabilizers, and gap sealers, have been previously tested to alleviate this source of drag, side extenders remain the primary add-on device of choice for reducing tractor-trailer gap drag. However, side extenders are not without maintenance and operational issues. When a heavy vehicle pivots sharply with respect to the trailer, as can occur during loading or unloading operations, the side extenders can become crushed against the trailer. Consequently, fleet operators are forced to incur additional costs to cover the repair or replacement of the damaged side extenders. This issue can be overcome by either shortening the side extenders or by devising an alternative drag reduction concept that can perform just as effectively as side extenders. To explore such a concept, we investigate tractor base bleeding as a means of reducing gap drag. Wind tunnel measurements are made on a 1:20 scale heavy vehicle model at a vehicle width-based Reynolds number of 420,000. The tractor bleeding flow, which is delivered through a porous material embedded within the tractor base, is introduced into the tractor-trailer gap at bleeding coefficients ranging from 0.0-0.018. To determine the performance of tractor base bleeding under more realistic operating conditions, computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed on a full-scale heavy vehicle within a crosswind for bleeding coefficients ranging from 0.0-0.13.

Ortega, J; Salari, K; Storms, B

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

59

Chemical Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of 2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions, ammonia borane (AB) is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications in transportation sector. Several systems models for chemical hydride materials such as solid AB, liquid AB and alane were developed and evaluated at PNNL to determine an optimal configuration that would meet the 2010 and future DOE targets for hydrogen storage. This paper presents an overview of those systems models and discusses the simulation results for various transient drive cycle scenarios.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

60

Microfluidic fuel cell for off-the-grid applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The present doctoral thesis studies air-breathing microfluidic fuel cells with separated fuel and electrolyte streams as well as a membraneless fuel cell with selective electrodes.… (more)

Seyed Ali Mousavi Shaegh.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Universal Dual-Fuel Controller for OEM/Aftermarket Diesel Engineswit...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Active DPF for Off-Road Particulate Matter (PM) Control Propane-Diesel Dual Fuel for CO2 and Nox Reduction DPF for a Tractor Auxiliary Power Unit...

62

Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake Testing: Five-Axle Combination Tractor-Flatbed Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, in coordination with the Federal Highway Administration, sponsored the Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake Testing (HOVBT) program in order to provide information about the effect of gross vehicle weight (GVW) on braking performance. Because the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations limit the number of braking system defects that may exist for a vehicle to be allowed to operate on the roadways, the examination of the effect of brake defects on brake performance for increased loads is also relevant. The HOVBT program seeks to provide relevant information to policy makers responsible for establishing load limits, beginning with providing test data for a combination tractor/trailer. This testing was conducted on a five-axle combination vehicle with tractor brakes meeting the Reduced Stopping Distance requirement rulemaking. This report provides a summary of the testing activities, the results of various analyses of the data, and recommendations for future research. Following a complete brake rebuild, instrumentation, and brake burnish, stopping tests were performed from 20 and 40 mph with various brake application pressures (15 psi, 25 psi, 35 psi, 45 psi, 55 psi, and full system pressure). These tests were conducted for various brake conditions at the following GVWs: 60,000, 80,000, 91,000, 97,000, 106,000, and 116,000 lb. The 80,000-lb GVWs included both balanced and unbalanced loads. The condition of the braking system was also varied. To introduce these defects, brakes (none, forward drive axle, or rear trailer axle) were made inoperative. In addition to the stopping tests, performance-based brake tests were conducted for the various loading and brake conditions. Analysis of the stopping test data showed the stopping distance to increase with load (as expected) and also showed that more braking force was generated by the drive axle brakes than the trailer axle brakes. The constant-pressure stopping test data revealed a linear relationship between brake application pressure and was used to develop an algorithm to normalize stopping data for weight and initial speed.

Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the final technical report for DOE Program DE-FC36-04GO14301 titled “Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications”. Due to the public nature of this report some of the content reported in confidential reports and meetings to the DOE is not covered in detail in this report and some of the content has been normalized to not show actual values. There is a comparison of the projects accomplishments with the objectives, an overview of some of the key subsystem work, and a review of the three levels of prototypes demonstrated during the program. There is also a description of the eventual commercial product and market this work is leading towards. The work completed under this program has significantly increased the understanding of how Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC) can be deployed successfully to power consumer electronic devices. The prototype testing has demonstrated the benefits a direct methanol fuel cell system has over batteries typically used for powering consumer electronic devices. Three generations of prototypes have been developed and tested for performance, robustness and life. The technologies researched and utilized in the fuel cell stack and related subsystems for these prototypes are leveraged from advances in other industries such as the hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell industry. The work under this program advanced the state of the art of direct methanol fuel cells. The system developed by MTI micro fuel cells aided by this program differs significantly from conventional DMFC designs and offers compelling advantages in the areas of performance, life, size, and simplicity. The program has progressed as planned resulting in the completion of the scope of work and available funding in December 2008. All 18 of the final P3 prototypes builds have been tested and the results showed significant improvements over P2 prototypes in build yield, initial performance, and durability. The systems have demonstrated robust operation when tested at various orientations, temperatures, and humidity levels. Durability testing has progressed significantly over the course of the program. MEA, engine, and system level steady state testing has demonstrated degradation rates acceptable for initial product introduction. Test duration of over 5000 hrs has been achieved at both the MEA and breadboard system level. P3 level prototype life testing on engines (stacks with reactant conditioning) showed degradation rates comparable to carefully constructed lab fixtures. This was a major improvement over the P2 and P1 engine designs, which exhibited substantial reductions in life and performance between the lab cell and the actual engine. Over the course of the work on the P3 technology set, a platform approach was taken to the system design. By working in this direction, a number of product iterations with substantial market potential were identified. Although the main effort has been the development of a prototype charger for consumer electronic devices, multiple other product concepts were developed during the program showing the wide variety of potential applications.

Carlstrom, Charles, M., Jr.

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SOLID ELECTROLYTES: FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent of this project with Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC)/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to develop research infrastructure conductive to Fuel Cell research at Southern University and A and M College, Baton Route. A state of the art research laboratory (James Hall No.123 and No.114) for energy conversion and storage devices was developed during this project duration. The Solid State Ionics laboratory is now fully equipped with materials research instruments: Arbin Battery Cycling and testing (8 channel) unit, Electrochemical Analyzer (EG and G PAR Model 273 and Solartron AC impedance analyzer), Fuel Cell test station (Globe Tech), Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC-10), Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA), Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM), UV-VIS-NIR Absorption Spectrometer, Fluorescence Spectrometer, FT-IR Spectrometer, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurement capability at Center for Advanced Microstructure and Devices (CAMD- a multimillion dollar DOE facility), Glove Box, gas hood chamber, high temperature furnaces, hydraulic press and several high performance computers. IN particular, a high temperature furnace (Thermodyne 6000 furnace) and a high temperature oven were acquired through this project funds. The PI Dr. R Bobba has acquired additional funds from federal agencies include NSF-Academic Research Infrastructure program and other DOE sites. They have extensively used the multimillion dollar DOE facility ''Center'' for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) for electrochemical research. The students were heavily involved in the experimental EXAFS measurements and made use of their DCM beamline for EXAFS research. The primary objective was to provide hands on experience to the selected African American undergraduate and graduate students in experimental energy research.The goal was to develop research skills and involve them in the Preparation and Characterization of Solid Electrolytes. Ionically conducting solid electrolytes are successfully used for battery, fuel cell and sensor applications.

Rambabu Bobba; Josef Hormes; T. Wang; Jaymes A. Baker; Donald G. Prier; Tommy Rockwood; Dinesha Hawkins; Saleem Hasan; V. Rayanki

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Application of Microbial Fuel Cell technology for a Waste Water Treatment Alternative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of Microbial Fuel Cell technology for a Waste Water Treatment Alternative Eric A. Zielke February 15, 2006 #12;Application of Microbial Fuel Cell technology for a Waste Water Treatment Alternative Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use bacteria to generate electricity from organic

66

International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

McCulloch, R.W. (comp.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Webinar: Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronics for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Recording and text version of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar titled "Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronics for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Applications," originally presented on October 21, 2014.

68

Webinar February 17: Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar entitled "Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications" on Tuesday, February 17, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

69

Centers for Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicle Technology Pre-Application Workshop Attendee List  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PON-13-605 Centers for Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicle Technology Pre-Application Workshop. Clements Clean Air / Alternative Fuel / School Transportation Experience 559-356-1334 johndclements56@gmail

70

Advanced Fuels in HDV Applications | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2 DOE Hydrogen

71

Application of U10Mo Fuel for Space Fission Power Applications - White Paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel reactor design has been proposed for space applications to provide hundreds of watts to one or two kilowatts of electrical power. The reactor concept proposed uses the alloy U10Mo (uranium with 10 weight percent molybdenum) as the fuel. This fuel was selected for its high uranium density, high thermal conductivity, and excellent neutronic characteristics for this application. The core is surrounded by a BeO reflector. Heat is carried from the reactor by liquid metal heat pipes. A shadow shield of LiH tungsten is also utilized to reduce the neutron and gamma radiation dose to the rest of the spacecraft. This design represents a best effort at minimizing the complexity of the fission system and reducing the mass of the system. The compact nature of the block UMo core and BeO radial reflector allows the reactor diameter to be as small as practical while still meeting the neutronic and thermal power demands. This directly results in a reduced shield mass since the reactor diameter dictates the footprint of the radiation shield. The use of heat pipes offers a straightforward primary heat transport approach using proven liquid-metal heat pipe technology. Further, the elimination of a liquid core coolant system heat transport components, both at the reactor side and radiator side, contributes to reducing the total part-count and lowering system mass. The proposed reactor is using a fuel that is being developed by DOE, but there are significant differences in the fuels enrichment, operating conditions and the physical shape of the fuel itself. This paper attempts to highlight some of the basic consideration and needs that would be expected to be met in developing this fuel and qualifying it for use.

James Werner

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Evaluation of Corrosion Failure in Tractor-Trailer Brake System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As reported to ORNL, concomitant with the introduction of different deicing and anti-icing compounds, there was an increase in the brake failure rate of tractor-trailer trucks. A forensic evaluation of a failed brake system was performed. Optical and scanning electron microscopic evaluation showed corrosion to be mostly confined to the brake table/lining interface. The corrosion is non-uniform as is to be expected for plain carbon steel in chloride environments. This initial analysis found no evidence for the chlorides of calcium and magnesium, which are the newly introduced deicing and antiicing compounds and are less soluble in water than the identified chlorides of sodium and potassium, in the scale. The result could be as a result of non-exposure of the examined brake table to calcium and magnesium chloride. The mechanisms for the increased failure rate are postulated as being an increased rate of corrosion due to positive shifts in the corrosion potential, and an increased amount of corrosion due to an increased ''time of wetness'' that results from the presence of hygroscopic salts. Laboratory scale evaluation of the corrosion of plain carbon steel in simulated deicing and anti-icing solutions need to be performed to determine corrosion rates and morphological development of corrosion product, to compare laboratory data to in-service data, and to rank economically feasible replacement materials for low carbon steel. In addition, the mechanical behavior of the lining attached to the brake shoe table needs to be assessed. It is opined that an appropriate adjustment of materials could easily allow for a doubling of a brake table/lining lifetime. Suggestions for additional work, to clarify the mechanisms of rust jacking and to develop possible solutions, are described.

Wilson, DF

2002-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost Savings | DepartmentCase Study Fuel CellSummit |PowerPower

74

FUEL DEVICE REPLACEMENT Use this application to request a replacement fuel access device for a device that has been lost or stolen. Use and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUEL DEVICE REPLACEMENT Use this application to request a replacement fuel access device as those explained in the original Fuel Device Application and for your convenience provided on this form Information Lost Stolen Unknown Date of last known use Certification of Use I certify that fuel access device

Kirschner, Denise

75

Stationary Fuel Cell Application Codes and Standards: Overview and Gap Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of codes and standards related to stationary fuel cell applications and identifies gaps and resolutions associated with relative codes and standards.

Blake, C. W.; Rivkin, C. H.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Application of a Diesel Fuel Reformer for Tier 2 Bin 5 Emissions |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope Change #1 | Department ofApplication of

77

Air System Management for Fuel Cell Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and stack size/cost [5]. The gross power of the fuel celland cost of an expander (turbine) would be beneficial. For example, for a fixed fuel cell stack

Cunningham, Joshua M

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power densities in electrolyte Direct Methanol Fuel Cells have been achieved which are only three times lower than those achieved with similar reformate/air fuel cells. Remaining issues are: improved anode catalyst activity, demonstrated long-term stable performance, and high fuel efficiencies.

Ren, Xiaoming; Wilson, M.S.; Gottesfeld, S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Optical fuel pin scanner. [Patent application; for reading identifications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This patent relates to an optical identification system developed for post-irradiation disassembly and analysis of fuel bundle assemblies. The apparatus is designed to be lowered onto a stationary fuel pin to read identification numbers or letters imprinted on the circumference of the top fuel pin and cap. (DLC)

Kirchner, T.L.; Powers, H.G.

1980-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fuel Cell Systems for Portable, Backup, and UPS Applications | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergy Frozen TelescopeRenewable 0 0 A N N U A L

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatement Tuesday, Septemberof EnergyM A N AManyFuel

82

Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy Information on PV EconomicsOregon: EnergySolutions

83

APPLICATION OF CERAMICS TO HIGH PRESSURE FUEL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diesel fuel systems are facing increased demands as engines with reduced emissions are developed. Injection pressures have increased to provide finer atomization of fuel for more efficient combustion, Figure 1. This increases the mechanical loads on the system and requires tighter clearances between plungers and bores to prevent leakage. At the same time, fuel lubricity has decreased as a byproduct of reducing the sulfur levels in fuel. Contamination of fuel by water and debris is an ever-present problem. For oil-lubricated fuel system components, increased soot loading in the oil results in increased wear rates. Additionally, engine manufacturers are lengthening warranty periods for engines and systems. This combination of factors requires the development of new materials to counteract the harsher tribological environment.

Mandler, Jr., William F.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

84

APPLICATION OF MEMS TECHNOLOGY TO MICRO DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL Xiaowei Liu*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATION OF MEMS TECHNOLOGY TO MICRO DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL Xiaowei Liu* , Chunguang Suo, email: lxw@hit.edu.cn) ABSTRACT In view of micro fuel cells, the silicon processes are employed for microfabrication of the micro direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Using the MEMS technology we have successfully made

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

85

Membranes produced by PECVD technique for low temperature fuel cell applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Membranes produced by PECVD technique for low temperature fuel cell applications Aboubakr to manufacture by plasma processes all active layers of fuel cells cores to be integrated in original compact stability; Transport properties. 1. Introduction Micro fuel cells have received considerable attention over

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

86

Application of Bacterial Biocathodes in Microbial Fuel Cells Zhen He, Largus T. Angenent*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Application of Bacterial Biocathodes in Microbial Fuel Cells Zhen He, Largus T. Angenent breakthroughs are made. Keywords: Microbial fuel cell, Biofuel cell, Biocathode, Potentiostat-poised half cell, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are special types of biofuel cells, producing electric power by utilizing

87

Application of Verified Optimization Techniques to Parameter Identification for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of Verified Optimization Techniques to Parameter Identification for Solid Oxide Fuel at the latest, design and development of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) have been in the focus of research electrochemical reactions in each individual fuel cell. We consider different model dimensions resulting

Appelrath, Hans-JĂĽrgen

88

Thermal modeling and temperature control of a PEM fuel cell system for forklift applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal modeling and temperature control of a PEM fuel cell system for forklift applications simulation System modeling and control PEMFC a b s t r a c t Temperature changes in PEM fuel cell stacks. Stack thermal management and control are, thus, crucial issues in PEM fuel cell systems especially

Berning, Torsten

89

A fuel economy optimization system with applications in vehicles with human drivers and autonomous vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fuel economy optimization system with applications in vehicles with human drivers and autonomous University of New York, Buffalo, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Vehicle fuel economy Eco-driving Human developed and validated a new fuel-economy optimization system (FEOS), which receives input from vehicle

Wu, Changxu (Sean)

90

Assessment of bio-fuel options for solid oxide fuel cell applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Rising concerns of inadequate petroleum supply, volatile crude oil price, and adverse environmental impacts from using fossil fuels have spurred the United States to promote… (more)

Lin, Jiefeng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Microencapsulated Fuel Technology for Commercial Light Water and Advanced Reactor Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential application of microencapsulated fuels to light water reactors (LWRs) has been explored. The specific fuel manifestation being put forward is for coated fuel particles embedded in silicon carbide or zirconium metal matrices. Detailed descriptions of these concepts are presented, along with a review of attributes, potential benefits, and issues with respect to their application in LWR environments, specifically from the standpoints of materials, neutronics, operations, and economics. Preliminary experiment and modeling results imply that with marginal redesign, significant gains in operational reliability and accident response margins could be potentially achieved by replacing conventional oxide-type LWR fuel with microencapsulated fuel forms.

Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket | DepartmentPhotoelectrochemicalInan<aPilgrimA

93

Application of Synthetic Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012)Tie Ltd | Department of Energy Ltd

94

Advancing Plug In Hybrid Technology and Flex Fuel Application...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting vss063bazzi2012...

95

Advancing Plug In Hybrid Technology and Flex Fuel Application...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation vss063bazzi2011...

96

Water-retaining Polymer Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications - Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition3 WaterFebruary 18, 2014 B

97

Application of ALARA principles to shipment of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The public exposure from spent fuel shipment is very low. In view of this low exposure and the perfect safety record for spent fuel shipment, existing systems can be considered satisfactory. On the other hand, occupational exposure reduction merits consideration and technology improvement to decrease dose should concentrate on this exposure. Practices that affect the age of spent fuel in shipment and the number of times the fuel must be shipped prior to disposal have the largest impact. A policy to encourage a 5-year spent fuel cooling period prior to shipment coupled with appropriate cask redesign to accommodate larger loads would be consistent with ALARA and economic principles. And finally, bypassing high population density areas will not in general reduce shipment dose.

Greenborg, J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Murphy, D.W. Burnett, R.A.; Lewis, J.R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Five Kilowatt Fuel Cell Demonstration for Remote Power Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While most areas of the US are serviced by inexpensive, dependable grid connected electrical power, many areas of Alaska are not. In these areas, electrical power is provided with Diesel Electric Generators (DEGs), at much higher cost than in grid connected areas. The reasons for the high cost of power are many, including the high relative cost of diesel fuel delivered to the villages, the high operational effort required to maintain DEGs, and the reverse benefits of scale for small utilities. Recent progress in fuel cell technologies have lead to the hope that the DEGs could be replaced with a more efficient, reliable, environmentally friendly source of power in the form of fuel cells. To this end, the University of Alaska Fairbanks has been engaged in testing early fuel cell systems since 1998. Early tests were conducted on PEM fuel cells, but since 2001, the focus has been on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. In this work, a 5 kW fuel cell was delivered to UAF from Fuel Cell Technologies of Kingston, Ontario. The cell stack is of a tubular design, and was built by Siemens Westinghouse Fuel Cell division. This stack achieved a run of more than 1 year while delivering grid quality electricity from natural gas with virtually no degradation and at an electrical efficiency of nearly 40%. The project was ended after two control system failures resulted in system damage. While this demonstration was successful, considerable additional product development is required before this technology is able to provide electrical energy in remote Alaska. The major issue is cost, and the largest component of system cost currently is the fuel cell stack cost, although the cost of the balance of plant is not insignificant. While several manufactures are working on schemes for significant cost reduction, these systems do not as yet provide the same level of performance and reliability as the larger scale Siemens systems, or levels that would justify commercial deployment.

Dennis Witmer; Tom Johnson; Jack Schmid

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Spark Plasma Sintering of Fuel Cermets for Nuclear Reactor Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of the fabrication of tungsten based nuclear fuel cermets via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) is investigated in this work. CeO2 is used to simulate fuel loadings of UO2 or Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuels within tungsten-based cermets due to the similar properties of these materials. This study shows that after a short time sintering, greater than 90 % density can be achieved, which is suitable to possess good strength as well as the ability to contain fission products. The mechanical properties and the densities of the samples are also investigated as functions of the applied pressures during the sintering.

Yang Zhong; Robert C. O'Brien; Steven D. Howe; Nathan D. Jerred; Kristopher Schwinn; Laura Sudderth; Joshua Hundley

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Kinetic Modeling of Toluene Oxidation for Surrogate Fuel Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New environmental issues, like the effect of combustion-generated greenhouse gases, provide motivation to better characterize oxidation of hydrocarbons. Transportation, in particular, significantly contributes to energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Kinetic studies about the combustion of fuels under conditions typical of internal combustion engines provides important support to improve mechanism formulation and to eventually provide better computational tools that can be used to increase the engine performance. It is foreseeable that at least in the next 30 years the main transportation fuels will be either gasoline or diesel. Unfortunately, these fuels are very complex mixtures of many components. Moreover, their specifications and performance requirements significantly change the composition of these fuels: gasoline and diesel mixtures are different if coming from different refineries or they are different from winter to summer. At the same time a fuel with a well defined and reproducible composition is needed for both experimental and modeling work. In response to these issues, surrogate fuels are proposed. Surrogate fuels are defined as mixtures of a small number of hydrocarbons whose relative concentrations is adjusted in order to approximate the chemical and physical properties of a real fuel. Surrogate fuels are then very useful both for the design of reproducible experimental tests and also for the development of reliable kinetic models. The primary reference fuels (PRF) are a typical and old example of surrogate fuel: n-heptane and iso-octane mixtures are used to reproduce antiknock propensity of complex mixtures contained in a gasoline. PRFs are not able to surrogate gasoline in operating conditions different from standard ones and new surrogates have been recently proposed. Toluene is included in all of them as a species able to represent the behavior of aromatic compounds. On the other side, the toluene oxidation chemistry is not so well established and uncertainties still remain in the mechanism. This is especially true in the low temperature regime (< 850K). In these conditions, the toluene reactivity is too low to be conveniently investigated. Nonetheless, gasoline surrogates work in the engine at low temperatures, because of the presence of very reactive alkanes. The effect of these component interactions have to be taken into account. This work's aim is to present the model activity carried out by two different research groups, comparing the main pathways and results, matching data carried out in different devices both for pure toluene and mixtures. This is the starting point for a further activity to improve the two kinetic schemes.

Frassoldati, A; Mehl, M; Fietzek, R; Faravelli, T; Pitz, W J; Ranzi, E

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Coal-fueled diesel engines for locomotive applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GE Transportation Systems (GE/TS) completed a two and one half year study into the economic viability of a coal fueled locomotive. The coal fueled diesel engine was deemed to be one of the most attractive options. Building on the BN-NS study, a proposal was submitted to DOE to continue researching economic and technical feasibility of a coal fueled diesel engine for locomotives. The contract DE-AC21-85MC22181 was awarded to GE Corporate Research and Development (GE/CRD) for a three year program that began in March 1985. This program included an economic assessment and a technical feasibility study. The economic assessment study examined seven areas and their economic impact on the use of coal fueled diesels. These areas included impact on railroad infrastructure, expected maintenance cost, environmental considerations, impact of higher capital costs, railroad training and crew costs, beneficiated coal costs for viable economics, and future cost of money. The results of the study indicated the merits for development of a coal-water slurry (CWS) fueled diesel engine. The technical feasibility study examined the combustion of CWS through lab and bench scale experiments. The major accomplishments from this study have been the development of CWS injection hardware, the successful testing of CWS fuel in a full size, single cylinder, medium speed diesel engine, evaluation of full scale engine wear rates with metal and ceramic components, and the characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions.

Hsu, B.D.; Najewicz, D.J.; Cook, C.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

DPF for a Tractor Auxiliary Power Unit | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department1 Prepared by: U.S.-"Hydrated EGR" Fuelfor a

103

Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: Hybrid-Electric Tractor Vehicles |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram2-26TheUtility-Scaleof EnergyVehicleDepartment of Energy

104

Fleet DNA Project Data Summary Report for Class 8 Tractors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" | National Hansen 1 , M. R.Fleet3426 2

105

Application of a Diesel Fuel Reformer for Tier 2 Bin 5 Emissions |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope Change #1 | Department ofApplication of SprayDepartment

106

Synthetic and Jet Fuels Pyrolysis for Cooling and Combustion Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phenomenon (heat and mass transfers, pyrolysis, combustion) in a cooling channel surrounding a SCRamjet regeneratively cooled SCRamjet is provided to get a large vision of the fuel nature impact on the system of supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRamjet) [1]. For such high velocity, the total temperature of external air

Boyer, Edmond

107

Applications of nuclear data covariances to criticality safety and spent fuel characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Covariance data computational methods and data used for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis within the SCALE nuclear analysis code system are presented. Applications in criticality safety calculations and used nuclear fuel analysis are discussed.

Williams, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL] [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Webinar: Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronics for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronics for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Applications" on Tuesday, October 21, at 12:00 p...

109

APPLICATIONS OF CURRENT TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF SPENT FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advancements in technology have opened many opportunities to improve upon the current infrastructure surrounding the nuclear fuel cycle. Embedded devices, very small sensors, and wireless technology can be applied to Security, Safety, and Nonproliferation of Spent Nuclear Fuel. Security, separate of current video monitoring systems, can be improved by integrating current wireless technology with a variety of sensors including motion detection, altimeter, accelerometer, and a tagging system. By continually monitoring these sensors, thresholds can be set to sense deviations from nominal values. Then alarms or notifications can be activated as needed. Safety can be improved in several ways. First, human exposure to ionizing radiation can be reduced by using a wireless sensor package on each spent fuel cask to monitor radiation, temperature, humidity, etc. Since the sensor data is monitored remotely operator stay-time is decreased and distance from the spent fuel increased, so the overall radiation exposure is reduced as compared to visual inspections. The second improvement is the ability to monitor continuously rather than periodically. If changes occur to the material, alarm thresholds could be set and notifications made to provide advanced notice of negative data trends. These sensor packages could also record data to be used for scientific evaluation and studies to improve transportation and storage safety. Nonproliferation can be improved for spent fuel transportation and storage by designing an integrated tag that uses current infrastructure for reporting and in an event; tracking can be accomplished using the Iridium satellite system. This technology is similar to GPS but with higher signal strength and penetration power, but lower accuracy. A sensor package can integrate all or some of the above depending on the transportation and storage requirements and regulations. A sensor package can be developed using off the shelf technology and applying it to each specific need. There are products on the market for smart meters, industrial lighting control and home automation that can be applied to the Back End Fuel Cycle. With a little integration and innovation a cost effective solution is achievable.

Drayer, R.

2013-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

110

Fabrication of Microfluidic Devices with Application to Membraneless Fuel Cells Jon McKechnie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fabrication of Microfluidic Devices with Application to Membraneless Fuel Cells by Jon McKechnie B, by photocopy or other means, without the permission of the author. #12;ii Fabrication of Microfluidic Devices of microfluidic membraneless fuel cells. A primary goal of this particular work is the establishment

Victoria, University of

111

Improved Membrane Materials for PEM Fuel Cell Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to collect and integrate critical structure/property information in order to develop methods that lead to significant improvements in the durability and performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) materials. This project is focused on the fundamental improvement of PEMFC membrane materials with respect to chemical, mechanical and morphological durability as well as the development of new inorganically-modified membranes.

Kenneth A. Mauritz; Robert B. Moore

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

SHAPE SELECTIVE NANOCATALYSTS FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While gold and platinum have long been recognized for their beauty and value, researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are working on the nano-level to use these elements for creative solutions to our nation's energy and security needs. Multiinterdisciplinary teams consisting of chemists, materials scientists, physicists, computational scientists, and engineers are exploring unchartered territories with shape-selective nanocatalysts for the development of novel, cost effective and environmentally friendly energy solutions to meet global energy needs. This nanotechnology is vital, particularly as it relates to fuel cells.SRNL researchers have taken process, chemical, and materials discoveries and translated them for technological solution and deployment. The group has developed state-of-the art shape-selective core-shell-alloy-type gold-platinum nanostructures with outstanding catalytic capabilities that address many of the shortcomings of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). The newly developed nanostructures not only busted the performance of the platinum catalyst, but also reduced the material cost and overall weight of the fuel cell.

Murph, S.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

113

Dual-fueling turbocharged diesels with ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spray addition and carburetion methods were tested for dual-fueling a turbocharged, 65 kW diesel tractor. Approximately 30 percent of the fuel energy for the tractor was supplied by spraying ethanol into the intake air and about 46 percent by carburetion with little affect on the engine thermal efficiency. Further substitution of diesel fuel with ethanol was limited by knock. As the amount of ethanol fed into the engine was increased, ignition apparently changed from the steady burning process which normally occurs in a diesel engine to a rapid explosion which caused knock. The best fuel for the spray approach was a 50 percent ethanol/water solution and with the carburetor it was an 80 percent ethanol/water solution. (Refs. 6).

Cruz, J.M.; Rotz, C.A.; Watson, D.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Dual-fueling turbocharged diesels with ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spray addition and carburetion methods were tested for dual-fueling a turbocharged, 65 kW diesel tractor. Approximately 30 percent of the fuel energy for the tractor was supplied by spraying ethanol into the intake air and about 46 percent by carburetion with little affect on the engine thermal efficiency. Further substitution of diesel fuel with ethanol was limited by knock. As the amount of ethanol fed into the engine was increased, ignition apparently changed from the steady burning process which normally occurs in a diesel engine to a rapid explosion which caused knock. The best fuel for the spray approach was a 50 percent ethanol/water solution and with the carburetor it was an 80 percent ethanol/water solution.

Cruz, J.M.; Rotz, C.A.; Watson, D.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Development of 50 kW Fuel Processor for Stationary Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to develop and test a fuel processor capable of producing high hydrogen concentration (>98%) with less than ppm quantities of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide at lower capital cost and higher efficiency, compared to conventional natural gas reformers. It was intended that we achieve our objective by developing simple reactor/process design, and high durability CO2 absorbents, to replace pressure swing adsorption (PSA) or membrane separators. Cost analysis indicated that we would not meet DOE cost goals so the project was terminated before construction of the full scale fuel processor. The work on adsorbent development was focused on the development of calcium oxide-based reversible CO2 absorbents with various microstructures and morphologies to determine the optimum microstructure for long-term reversible CO2 absorption. The effect of powder production process variables was systematically studied including: the final target compositions, the reagents from which the final products were derived, the pore forming additives, the processing time and temperature. The sorbent materials were characterized in terms of their performance in the reversible reaction with CO2 and correlation made to their microstructure.

James F. Stevens; Balaji Krishnamurthy; Paolina Atanassova; Kerry Spilker

2007-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

116

NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accomplishments during the first six months of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers.

Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also, an unclad sapphire fiber was tested as a temperature sensor at moderate temperatures (up to 775 C).

Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Experimental validation of the DARWIN2.3 package for fuel cycle applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DARWIN package, developed by the CEA and its French partners (AREVA and EDF) provides the required parameters for fuel cycle applications: fuel inventory, decay heat, activity, neutron, {gamma}, {alpha}, {beta} sources and spectrum, radiotoxicity. This paper presents the DARWIN2.3 experimental validation for fuel inventory and decay heat calculations on Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). In order to validate this code system for spent fuel inventory a large program has been undertaken, based on spent fuel chemical assays. This paper deals with the experimental validation of DARWIN2.3 for the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Uranium Oxide (UOX) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel inventory calculation, focused on the isotopes involved in Burn-Up Credit (BUC) applications and decay heat computations. The calculation - experiment (C/E-1) discrepancies are calculated with the latest European evaluation file JEFF-3.1.1 associated with the SHEM energy mesh. An overview of the tendencies is obtained on a complete range of burn-up from 10 to 85 GWd/t (10 to 60 GWcVt for MOX fuel). The experimental validation of the DARWIN2.3 package for decay heat calculation is performed using calorimetric measurements carried out at the Swedish Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies, covering a large burn-up (20 to 50 GWd/t) and cooling time range (10 to 30 years). (authors)

San-Felice, L.; Eschbach, R.; Bourdot, P. [DEN, DER, CEA-Cadarache, F-13108 ST Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Tsilanizara, A.; Huynh, T. D. [DEN, DM2S, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Ourly, H. [EDF, R and D, 1 av. General de Gaulle, F-92131 Clamart Cedex (France); Thro, J. F. [AREVA, Tour AREVA, F-92084 Paris la Defense (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

CanolaFueledTractors CentreCounty|June22, 2011 extension.psu.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on and off-road equipment in Europe since 1980. Modified NH T6070 next to a canola field at the Russell E and comprise somewhere between 3% and 8% of the extracted product. These "foots" as the industry calls them an energy content that is similar to that of biodiesel and higher than that of ethanol. Furthermore, re

Kaye, Jason P.

120

Direct methanol fuel cells for transportation applications. Quarterly technical report, June 1996--September 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research and development effort is to advance the performance and viability of direct methanol fuel cell technology for light-duty transportation applications. For fuel cells to be an attractive alternative to conventional automotive power plants, the fuel cell stack combined with the fuel processor and ancillary systems must be competitive in terms of both performance and costs. A major advantage for the direct methanol fuel cell is that a fuel processor is not required. A direct methanol fuel cell has the potential of satisfying the demanding requirements for transportation applications, such as rapid start-up and rapid refueling. The preliminary goals of this effort are: (1) 310 W/l, (2) 445 W/kg, and (3) potential manufacturing costs of $48/kW. In the twelve month period for phase 1, the following critical areas will be investigated: (1) an improved proton-exchange membrane that is more impermeable to methanol, (2) improved cathode catalysts, and (3) advanced anode catalysts. In addition, these components will be combined to form membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA`s) and evaluated in subscale tests. Finally a conceptual design and program plan will be developed for the construction of a 5 kW direct methanol stack in phase II of the program.

Fuller, T.F.; Kunz, H.R.; Moore, R.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fuel cells -- An increasingly competitive reality now for on-site applications and for mobile applications before the year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fuel cell converts the energy released when hydrogen and oxygen combine to produce water, directly into electricity and heat--without combustion and without moving parts. Fuel cells are inherently clean, highly efficient and reliable. The most attractive near-term application is commercial cogeneration followed by distributed power. A fleet of over 70 ONSI 200 kW cogeneration plants has demonstrated reliability and durability significantly better than mature conventional cogeneration equipment. The cities of Chicago and Vancouver will introduce small fleets of prototype commercial fuel cell buses over the next two years and Daimler-Benz launched a prototype fuel cell powered car in May 1996. The US and Japanese governments are providing commercialization support to accelerate the market introduction of near-term stationary systems and plant will achieve competitive costs by 1998/99. Commercial buses will become available in 1998 and cars are expected within the following decade.

Nurdin, M.A.B. [World Fuel Cell Council, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

HIGH EFFICIENCY, LOW EMISSIONS, SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL SYSTEMS FOR MULTIPLE APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technology Management Inc. (TMI), teamed with the Ohio Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, has engineered, constructed, and demonstrated a stationary, low power, multi-module solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) prototype system operating on propane and natural gas. Under Phase I, TMI successfully operated two systems in parallel, in conjunction with a single DC-AC inverter and battery bus, and produced net AC electricity. Phase II testing expanded to include alternative and renewable fuels typically available in rural regions of Ohio. The commercial system is expected to have ultra-low pollution, high efficiency, and low noise. The TMI SOFC uses a solid ceramic electrolyte operating at high temperature (800-1000 C) which electrochemically converts gaseous fuels (hydrogen or mixed gases) and oxygen into electricity. The TMI system design oxidizes fuel primarily via electrochemical reactions and uses no burners (which pollute and consume fuel)--resulting in extremely clean exhaust. The use of proprietary sulfur tolerant materials developed by TMI allows system operation without additional fuel pre-processing or sulfur removal. Further, the combination of high operating temperatures and solid state operation increases the potential for higher reliability and efficiencies compared to other types of fuel cells. Applications for the TMI SOFC system cover a wide range of transportation, building, industrial, and military market sectors. A generic technology, fuel cells have the potential to be embodied into multiple products specific to Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program areas including: Fuel Cells and Microturbines, School Buildings, Transportation, and Bioenergy. This program focused on low power stationary applications using a multi-module system operating on a range of common fuels. By producing clean electricity more efficiently (thus using less fuel), fuel cells have the triple effect of cleaning up the environment, reducing the amount of fuel consumed and, for energy intensive manufacturers, boosting their profits (by reducing energy expenses). Compared to conventional power generation technologies such as internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and coal plants, fuel cells are extremely clean and more efficient, particularly at smaller scales.

Sara Ward; Michael A. Petrik

2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

123

Submersion Criticality Safety Analysis of Tungsten-Based Fuel for Nuclear Power and Propulsion Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is developing tungsten-encapsulated fuels for space nuclear applications. Aims to develop NTP fuels that are; Affordable Low impact on production and testing environment Producible on a large scale over suitable time period Higher-performance compared to previous graphite NTP fuel elements Space nuclear reactors remain subcritical before and during launch, and do not go critical until required by its mission. A properly designed reactor will remain subcritical in any launch abort scenario, where the reactor falls back to Earth and becomes submerged in terrestrial material. Submersion increases neutron reflection and thermalizes the neutrons, which typically increases the reactivity of the core. This effect is usually very significant for fast-spectrum reactors. This research provided a submersion criticality safety analysis for a representative tungsten/uranium oxide fueled reactor. Determine the submersion behavior of a reactor fueled by tungsten-based fuel. Considered fuel compositions with varying: Rhenium content (wt% rhenium in tungsten) Fuel loading fractions (UO2 vol%)

A.E. Craft; R. C. O'Brien; S. D. Howe; J. C. King

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Analysis of H2 storage needs for early market non-motive fuel cell applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen fuel cells can potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the United States dependence on foreign oil, but issues with hydrogen storage are impeding their widespread use. To help overcome these challenges, this study analyzes opportunities for their near-term deployment in five categories of non-motive equipment: portable power, construction equipment, airport ground support equipment, telecom backup power, and man-portable power and personal electronics. To this end, researchers engaged end users, equipment manufacturers, and technical experts via workshops, interviews, and electronic means, and then compiled these data into meaningful and realistic requirements for hydrogen storage in specific target applications. In addition to developing these requirements, end-user benefits (e.g., low noise and emissions, high efficiency, potentially lower maintenance costs) and concerns (e.g., capital cost, hydrogen availability) of hydrogen fuel cells in these applications were identified. Market data show potential deployments vary with application from hundreds to hundreds of thousands of units.

Johnson, Terry Alan; Moreno, Marcina; Arienti, Marco; Pratt, Joseph William; Shaw, Leo; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their effect on fuel economy was determined, either through on-road testing or full-size wind tunnel testing. All of the manufacturers worked with devices and systems that offer practical solutions to reduce aerodynamic drag, accounting for functionality, durability, cost effectiveness, reliability, and maintainability. The project team members and their roles and responsibilities are shown in Figure 2-1. Figure 2-2 shows the Phase I and II project schedules for all four projects and associated management activities.

Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Fuel cell power systems for remote applications. Phase 1 final report and business plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Fuel Cell Power Systems for Remote Applications project is to commercialize a 0.1--5 kW integrated fuel cell power system (FCPS). The project targets high value niche markets, including natural gas and oil pipelines, off-grid homes, yachts, telecommunication stations and recreational vehicles. Phase 1 includes the market research, technical and financial analysis of the fuel cell power system, technical and financial requirements to establish manufacturing capability, the business plan, and teaming arrangements. Phase 1 also includes project planning, scope of work, and budgets for Phases 2--4. The project is a cooperative effort of Teledyne Brown Engineering--Energy Systems, Schatz Energy Research Center, Hydrogen Burner Technology, and the City of Palm Desert. Phases 2 through 4 are designed to utilize the results of Phase 1, to further the commercial potential of the fuel cell power system. Phase 2 focuses on research and development of the reformer and fuel cell and is divided into three related, but potentially separate tasks. Budgets and timelines for Phase 2 can be found in section 4 of this report. Phase 2 includes: Task A--Develop a reformate tolerant fuel cell stack and 5 kW reformer; Task B--Assemble and deliver a fuel cell that operates on pure hydrogen to the University of Alaska or another site in Alaska; Task C--Provide support and training to the University of Alaska in the setting up and operating a fuel cell test lab. The Phase 1 research examined the market for power systems for off-grid homes, yachts, telecommunication stations and recreational vehicles. Also included in this report are summaries of the previously conducted market reports that examined power needs for remote locations along natural gas and oil pipelines. A list of highlights from the research can be found in the executive summary of the business plan.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. Its scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design and construction of a 2 t/h process development unit (PDU). Large lots of clean coal are to be produced in the PDU from three project coals. Investigation of the near-term applicability of the two advanced fine coal cleaning processes in an existing coal preparation plant is another goal of the project and is the subject of this report.

Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.; Phillips, D.I.; Yoon, R.H.

1997-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

128

Polymers for hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems : applications, properties, and gap analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document addresses polymer materials for use in hydrogen service. Section 1 summarizes the applications of polymers in hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems and identifies polymers used in these applications. Section 2 reviews the properties of polymer materials exposed to hydrogen and/or high-pressure environments, using information obtained from published, peer-reviewed literature. The effect of high pressure on physical and mechanical properties of polymers is emphasized in this section along with a summary of hydrogen transport through polymers. Section 3 identifies areas in which fuller characterization is needed in order to assess material suitability for hydrogen service.

Barth, Rachel Reina; Simmons, Kevin L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA; San Marchi, Christopher W.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Investigating Methods of Heat Recovery from Low-Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in CHP Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat recovery from low-temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells poses a number of challenges. In response to these challenges, thermodynamic assessments of proposed heat recovery methods are studied in the context of combined heat and power (CHP) for building applications. Preheating combustion air in conjunction with desiccant dehumidification and absorption cooling technologies is one of the two strategies examined in this study. The other approach integrates the PEM fuel cell with a water-loop heat pump (WLHP) for direct heat recovery. As the primary objective, energy-saving potentials of the adopted heat recovery strategies are estimated with respect to various benchmarks. The quantified energy-saving potentials are translated into effective CHP performance indices and compared with those typically specified by the manufacturers for service hot water applications. The need for developing CHP performance protocols is also discussed in light of the proposed energy recovery techniques - thereby, accomplishing the secondary objective.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Application for approval for construction of the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following ''Application for Approval of Construction'' is being submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office, pursuant to 40 CFR 61.07, for three new sources of airborne radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS), the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF), and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA), will be located in one facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post-irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were canceled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies to be used in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building and stack and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, these systems will be dealt with separately to the extent possible. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex. 2 refs., 16 figs., 12 tabs.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications development phase. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deployment and operation of clean power generation is becoming critical as the energy and transportation sectors seek ways to comply with clean air standards and the national deregulation of the utility industry. However, for strategic business decisions, considerable analysis is required over the next few years to evaluate the appropriate application and value added from this emerging technology. To this end the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) is proposing a three-year industry-driven project that centers on the creation of ``The Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications.`` A collaborative laboratory housed at and managed by HARC, the Center will enable a core group of six diverse participating companies--industry participants--to investigate the economic and operational feasibility of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells in a variety of applications (the core project). This document describes the unique benefits of a collaborative approach to PEM applied research, among them a shared laboratory concept leading to cost savings and shared risks as well as access to outstanding research talent and lab facilities. It also describes the benefits provided by implementing the project at HARC, with particular emphasis on HARC`s history of managing successful long-term research projects as well as its experience in dealing with industry consortia projects. The Center is also unique in that it will not duplicate the traditional university role of basic research or that of the fuel cell industry in developing commercial products. Instead, the Center will focus on applications, testing, and demonstration of fuel cell technology.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Coupling the core analysis program DeCART to the fuel performance application BISON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 3D neutron transport and core analysis program DeCART was coupled to the fuels performance application BISON to provide a higher fidelity tool for fuel performance simulation. This project is motivated by the desire to couple a high fidelity core analysis program (based on the method of characteristics) to a high fidelity fuel performance program, both of which can simulate 3D problems. DeCART provides sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux, with resonance treatment, during burnup or a fast transient. BISON implicitly solves coupled thermomechanical equations for the fuel on a sub-millimeter level finite element mesh. A method was developed for mapping the fission rate density and fast neutron flux from DeCART to BISON. Multiple depletion cases were run with one-way data transfer from DeCART to BISON. The one-way data transfer of fission rate density is shown to agree with the fission rate density obtained from an internal Lassman-style model in BISON. One-way data transfer was also demonstrated in a 3D case in which azimuthal asymmetry was induced in the fission rate density profile of a fuel rod modeled in DeCART. Two-way data transfer was established by mapping the temperature distribution from BISON to DeCART. A Picard iterative algorithm was developed for the loose coupling with two-way data transfer. (authors)

Gleicher, F. N.; Spencer, B.; Novascone, S.; Williamson, R.; Martineau, R. C. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Rose, M.; Downar, T. J.; Collins, B. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Aerodynamic drag reduction apparatus for gap-divided bluff bodies such as tractor-trailers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for reducing the aerodynamic drag of a bluff-bodied vehicle such as a tractor-trailer in a flowstream, the bluff-bodied vehicle of a type having a leading portion, a trailing portion connected to the leading portion, and a gap between the leading and trailing portions defining a recirculation zone. The apparatus is preferably a baffle assembly, such as a vertical panel, adapted to span a width of the gap between the leading and trailing portions so as to impede cross-flow through the gap, with the span of the baffle assembly automatically adjusting for variations in the gap width when the leading and trailing portions pivot relative to each other.

Ortega, Jason M. (Pacifica, CA); Salari, Kambiz (Livermore, CA)

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

134

Prevention of significant deterioration permit application for the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This New Source Review'' has been submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (PO Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352), pursuant to WAC 173-403-050 and in compliance with the Department of Ecology Guide to Processing A Prevention Of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Permit'' for three new sources of radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS), the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF), and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA), will be located in one facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post-irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were cancelled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies for use in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building, stack, and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, these systems will be dealt with separately to the extent possible. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Estimation of Hourly Solar Loads on the Surfaces of Moving Refrigerated Tractor Trailers Outfitted with Phase Change Materials (PCMs) for Several Routes across the Continental U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary objective of this thesis was to calculate solar loads, wind chill temperatures on the surfaces of moving refrigerated tractor trailers outfitted with phase change materials (PCMs) for several routes across the Continental United States...

Varadarajan, Krupasagar

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Reforming of Diesel Fuel for Transportation Applications J. P. Kopasz, S. Lottes, D-J. Liu, R. Ahluwalia, V. Novick and S. Ahmed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reforming of Diesel Fuel for Transportation Applications J. P. Kopasz, S. Lottes, D-J. Liu, R · Produce fuel (H2-rich gas) for PEM and/or solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) · Reduce NOx emissions through

137

Parameter Selection for Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel to be Used in the Yucca Mountain License Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the chemical, physical, and radiological parameters that were chosen to represent the U.S. Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel in the Yucca Mountain license application. It also contains the selected packaging requirements for the various fuel types and the criticality controls that were used. The data are reported for representative fuels and bounding fuels in groups of fuels that were selected for the analysis. The justification for the selection of each parameter is given. The data reported were not generated under any quality assurance program.

D. L. Fillmore

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Co-production Plant Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future high-efficiency, low-emission generation plants that produce electric power, transportation fuels, and/or chemicals from fossil fuel feed stocks require a new class of fuel-flexible combustors. In this program, a validated combustor approach was developed which enables single-digit NO{sub x} operation for a future generation plants with low-Btu off gas and allows the flexibility of process-independent backup with natural gas. This combustion technology overcomes the limitations of current syngas gas turbine combustion systems, which are designed on a site-by-site basis, and enable improved future co-generation plant designs. In this capacity, the fuel-flexible combustor enhances the efficiency and productivity of future co-production plants. In task 2, a summary of market requested fuel gas compositions was created and the syngas fuel space was characterized. Additionally, a technology matrix and chemical kinetic models were used to evaluate various combustion technologies and to select two combustor concepts. In task 4 systems analysis of a co-production plant in conjunction with chemical kinetic analysis was performed to determine the desired combustor operating conditions for the burner concepts. Task 5 discusses the experimental evaluation of three syngas capable combustor designs. The hybrid combustor, Prototype-1 utilized a diffusion flame approach for syngas fuels with a lean premixed swirl concept for natural gas fuels for both syngas and natural gas fuels at FA+e gas turbine conditions. The hybrid nozzle was sized to accommodate syngas fuels ranging from {approx}100 to 280 btu/scf and with a diffusion tip geometry optimized for Early Entry Co-generation Plant (EECP) fuel compositions. The swozzle concept utilized existing GE DLN design methodologies to eliminate flow separation and enhance fuel-air mixing. With changing business priorities, a fully premixed natural gas & syngas nozzle, Protoytpe-1N, was also developed later in the program. It did not have the diluent requirements of Prototype-1 and was demonstrated at targeted gas turbine conditions. The TVC combustor, Prototype-2, premixes the syngas with air for low emission performance. The combustor was designed for operation with syngas and no additional diluents. The combustor was successfully operated at targeted gas turbine conditions. Another goal of the program was to advance the status of development tools for syngas systems. In Task 3 a syngas flame evaluation facility was developed. Fundamental data on syngas flame speeds and flame strain were obtained at pressure for a wide range of syngas fuels with preheated air. Several promising reduced order kinetic mechanisms were compared with the results from the evaluation facility. The mechanism with the best agreement was selected for application to syngas combustor modeling studies in Task 6. Prototype-1 was modeled using an advanced LES combustion code. The tools and combustor technology development culminate in a full-scale demonstration of the most promising technology in Task 8. The combustor was operated at engine conditions and evaluated against the various engine performance requirements.

Joel Haynes; Justin Brumberg; Venkatraman Iyer; Jonathan Janssen; Ben Lacy; Matt Mosbacher; Craig Russell; Ertan Yilmaz; Williams York; Willy Ziminsky; Tim Lieuwen; Suresh Menon; Jerry Seitzman; Ashok Anand; Patrick May

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

US RERTR Program, its fuel development activities, and application in the KUHFR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals, structure, and accomplishments to date of the Reduced-Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program are described in detail. Plans and schedules for future program activities are outlined with the effect these activities may potentially have on the research reactor community. The fuel development activities of the program are discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on the new low-enrichment, high uranium density fuels the RERTR Program is developing for application in research reactors in the near future. The results of a joint study program between the RERTR Program and the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), aimed at converting the Kyoto University High-Flux reactor (KUHFR) to the use of reduced-enrichment uranium, are presented.

Travelli, A. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Stahl, D.; Shibata, T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

US RERTR program, its fuel-development activities, and application in the KUHFR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals, structure, and accomplishments to date of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program are described in detail. Plans and schedules for future program activities are outlined with the effect which these activities may potentially have on the research-reactor community. The fuel-development activities of the program are discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on the new low-enrichment, high-uranium-density fuels which the RERTR Program is developing for application in research reactors in the near future. The results of a joint study program between the RERTR Program and the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), aimed at converting the Kyoto University High-Flux Reactor (KUHFR) to the use of reduced-enrichment uranium, are presented. It is shown that the study has resulted in a positive decision and in a cooperative, well-structured plan for the KUHFR conversion.

Travelli, A.; Stahl, D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

NONE

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

142

264 Chapter 4 Applications of Impedance Spectroscopy London (1979-1984) and the Fuel Cells Group, Materials Research Department,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

264 Chapter 4 Applications of Impedance Spectroscopy London (1979-1984) and the Fuel Cells Group conductors because of their technological importance in such areas as batteries, fuel cells, elec trochromic (Macdonald [1995]). Its history, summarized in the- monograph of Bottcher and Bordewijk [1978], began more

Macdonald, James Ross

143

Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Model, J. Electrochem. Soc. ,in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells, J. Electrochem. Soc. ,Solid-Polymer- Electrolyte Fuel Cell, J. Electrochem. Soc. ,

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Biomimetic Synthesis of Noble Metal Nanoparticles and Their Applications as Electro-catalysts in Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. 1 Synthesis of highlyapplications, such as PEM fuel cells. More importantly thisapplications, such as PEM fuel cells. More importantly this

Li, Yujing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operating conditions. Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell System Modelconditions for a direct hydrogen fuel cell system Table 1simulation tool for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal of

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Secondary atomization of coal-water fuels for gas turbine applications: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main research objective was to determine the effectiveness of the CWF treatments on atomization quality when applied to an ultrafine coal-water fuel (solids loading reduced to 50%) and to gas turbine operating conditions (atomization at elevated pressures). Three fuel treatment techniques were studied: (1) heating of CWF under pressure to produce steam as the pressure drops during passage of the CWF through the atomizer nozzle, (2) absorption of CO/sub 2/ gas in the CWF to produce a similar effect, and (3) a combination of the two treatments above. These techniques were expected to produce secondary atomization, that is, disruptive shattering of CWF droplets subsequent to their leaving the atomizing nozzle, and to lead to better burnout and finer fly ash size distribution. A parallel objective was to present quantitative information on the spray characteristics (mean droplet size, radial distribution of droplet size, and spray shape) of CWF with and without fuel treatment, applicable to the design of CWF-burning gas turbine combustors. The experiments included laser diffraction droplet size measurements and high-speed photographic studies in the MIT Spray Test Facility to determine mean droplet size (mass median diameter), droplet size distribution, and spray shape and angle. Three systems of atomized sprays were studied: (1) water sprays heated to a range of temperatures at atmospheric pressure; (2) CWF sprays heated at atmospheric pressure to different temperatures; and (3) sprays at elevated pressure. 31 refs., 47 figs., 1 tab.

Yu, T.U.; Kang, S.W.; Beer, J.M.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Range of Applicability and Bias Determination for Postclosure Criticality of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation report, Range of Applicability and Bias Determination for Postclosure Criticality of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel, is to validate the computational method used to perform postclosure criticality calculations. The validation process applies the criticality analysis methodology approach documented in Section 3.5 of the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report. The application systems for this validation consist of waste packages containing transport, aging, and disposal canisters (TAD) loaded with commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) of varying assembly types, initial enrichments, and burnup values that are expected from the waste stream and of varying degree of internal component degradation that may occur over the 10,000-year regulatory time period. The criticality computational tool being evaluated is the general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. The nuclear cross-section data distributed with MCNP 5.1.40 and used to model the various physical processes are based primarily on the Evaluated Nuclear Data File/B Version VI (ENDF/B-VI) library. Criticality calculation bias and bias uncertainty and lower bound tolerance limit (LBTL) functions for CSNF waste packages are determined based on the guidance in ANSI/ANS 8.1-1998 (Ref. 4) and ANSI/ANS 8.17-2004 (Ref. 5), as described in Section 3.5.3 of Ref. 1. The development of this report is consistent with Test Plan for: Range of Applicability and Bias Determination for Postclosure Criticality. This calculation report has been developed in support of licensing activities for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and the results of the calculation may be used in the criticality evaluation for CSNF waste packages based on a conceptual TAD canister.

Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL; Mueller, Don [ORNL; Goluoglu, Sedat [ORNL; Hollenbach, Daniel F [ORNL; Fox, Patricia B [ORNL

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications. Hydrogen vehicle safety report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the safety characteristics of hydrogen as an energy carrier for a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), with emphasis on high pressure gaseous hydrogen onboard storage. The authors consider normal operation of the vehicle in addition to refueling, collisions, operation in tunnels, and storage in garages. They identify the most likely risks and failure modes leading to hazardous conditions, and provide potential countermeasures in the vehicle design to prevent or substantially reduce the consequences of each plausible failure mode. They then compare the risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas.

Thomas, C.E. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

An Investigation to Resolve the Interaction Between Fuel Cell, Power Conditioning System and Application Loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of high-performance and durable solidoxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and a SOFC power-generating system requires knowledge of the feedback effects from the power-conditioning electronics and from application-electrical-power circuits that may pass through or excite the power-electronics subsystem (PES). Therefore, it is important to develop analytical models and methodologies, which can be used to investigate and mitigate the effects of the electrical feedbacks from the PES and the application loads (ALs) on the reliability and performance of SOFC systems for stationary and non-stationary applications. However, any such attempt to resolve the electrical impacts of the PES on the SOFC would be incomplete unless one utilizes a comprehensive analysis, which takes into account the interactions of SOFC, PES, balance-of-plant system (BOPS), and ALs as a whole. SOFCs respond quickly to changes in load and exhibit high part- and full-load efficiencies due to its rapid electrochemistry, which is not true for the thermal and mechanical time constants of the BOPS, where load-following time constants are, typically, several orders of magnitude higher. This dichotomy can affect the lifetime and durability of the SOFCSs and limit the applicability of SOFC systems for load-varying stationary and transportation applications. Furthermore, without validated analytical models and investigative design and optimization methodologies, realizations of cost-effective, reliable, and optimal PESs (and power-management controls), in particular, and SOFC systems, in general, are difficult. On the whole, the research effort can lead to (a) cost-constrained optimal PES design for high-performance SOFCS and high energy efficiency and power density, (b) effective SOFC power-system design, analyses, and optimization, and (c) controllers and modulation schemes for mitigation of electrical impacts and wider-stability margin and enhanced system efficiency.

Sudip K. Mazumder

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Conceptual design of coal-fueled diesel system for stationary power applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary conceptual design of a coal-fueled diesel system was prepared as part of a previous systems study. Since then, our team has accumulated extensive results from testing coal-water slurry on the 13-inch bore JS engine (400 rpm) in 1987 and 1988. These results provided new insights into preferred design concepts for engine components. One objective, therefore, was to revise the preliminary design to incorporate these preferred design concepts. In addition there were certain areas where additional, more detailed analysis was required as a result of the previous conceptual design. Another objective, therefore was to perform additional detailed design efforts, such as: (1) market applications and engine sizes, (2) coal-water slurry cleaning and grinding processes, (3) emission controls and hot gas contaminant controls, (4) component durability, (5) cost and performance assessments. (VC)

Not Available

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of a Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this program TIAX LLC conducted the development of an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The overall objective of this program was to develop a hybrid compressor/expander module, based on both scroll and high-speed turbomachinery technologies, which will combine the strengths of each technology to create a concept with superior performance at minimal size and cost. The resulting system was expected to have efficiency and pressure delivery capability comparable to that of a scroll-only machine, at significantly reduced system size and weight when compared to scroll-only designs. Based on the results of detailed designs and analyses of the critical system elements, the Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module concept was projected to deliver significant improvements in weight, volume and manufacturing cost relative to previous generation systems.

McTaggart, Paul

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

SHAPE SELECTIVE NANO-CATALYSTS: TOWARD DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of bimetallic core-shell-alloy type Au-Pt nanomaterials with various morphologies, aspect ratios and compositions, were produced in a heterogenous epitaxial fashion. Gold nanoparticles with well-controlled particle size and shape, e.g. spheres, rods and cubes, were used as 'seeds' for platinum growth in the presence of a mild reducing agent, ascorbic acid and a cationic surfactant cethyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The reactions take place in air and water, and are quick, economical and amenable for scaling up. The synthesized nanocatalysts were characterized by electron microscopy techniques and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Nafion membranes were embedded with the Au-Pt nanomaterials and analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for their potential in direct methanol fuel cells applications.

Murph, S.

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

153

Characterization and development of a new ceramic electrolyte for fuel cell applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work consisted of research directed toward characterization and development of new solid electrolyte materials that are potentially superior to other solid electrolyte materials currently under development (such as yttria-stabilized zirconia). The solid electrolyte technology described herein is based on new ceramic materials generally described as Bismuth Oxide doped with Niobium or Yyyrium oxides that were exclusively licensed to Solid-State Fuel Cells, Inc. by CeramPhysics, Inc. The technology is also based on further material, cell and stack technology concepts and manufacturing methods that were earlier reduced to practice by Solid- State Fuel Cells, Inc., and which are therefore proprietary to the Company. In this report a presentation of the overall program background is provided in Section 2.0. This includes a technical discussion of the technology in the context of the current state of the art. The task work description for the applicable portion of Phase 1 is presented in Section 3.0. Specifically, Phase 1-A comprises the following elements: Electrolyte materials development; testing of electrolyte stability under a reducing environment; development of cell electrodes; test fixtures design and facility erection; and preliminary coupon cell tests. 24 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction and operation of 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). This report represents the findings of the PDU Advanced Column Flotation Testing and Evaluation phase of the program and includes a discussion of the design and construction of the PDU. Three compliance steam coals, Taggart, Indiana VII and Hiawatha, were processed in the PDU to determine performance and design parameters for commercial production of premium fuel by advanced flotation. Consistent, reliable performance of the PDU was demonstrated by 72-hr production runs on each of the test coals. Its capacity generally was limited by the dewatering capacity of the clean coal filters during the production runs rather than by the flotation capacity of the Microcel column. The residual concentrations of As, Pb, and Cl were reduced by at least 25% on a heating value basis from their concentrations in the test coals. The reduction in the concentrations of Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Mn, Hg, Ni and Se varied from coal to coal but the concentrations of most were greatly reduced from the concentrations in the ROM parent coals. The ash fusion temperatures of the Taggart and Indiana VII coals, and to a much lesser extent the Hiawatha coal, were decreased by the cleaning.

Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

1997-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

155

Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Direct-Hydrogen, Load-Following Fuel Cell Vehicle, SAEversus a Direct-Hydrogen Load-Following Fuel Cell Vehicle,vehicle model of a load-following direct hydrogen fuel cell

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Control for PEM Fuel Cell Stack System, Proceedings ofmodel for an automotive PEM fuel cell system with imbedded 1Friedman and R.M. Moore, PEM Fuel Cell System Optimization,

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Prospects for increased low-grade bio-fuels use in home and commercial heating applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Though we must eventually find viable alternatives for fossil fuels in large segments of the energy market, there are economically attractive fossil fuel alternatives today for niche markets. The easiest fossil fuels to ...

Pendray, John Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

PdnCO (n ) 1,2): Accurate Ab Initio Bond Energies, Geometries, and Dipole Moments and the Applicability of Density Functional Theory for Fuel Cell Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Applicability of Density Functional Theory for Fuel Cell Modeling Nathan E. Schultz, Benjamin F. Gherman Form: August 18, 2006 Electrode poisoning by CO is a major concern in fuel cells. As interest. Introduction Several of the most successful fuel cell applications use a Pt anode as a catalyst

Gherman, Benjamin F.

159

Novel catalysts for hydrogen fuel cell applications:Final report (FY03-FY05).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to develop novel hydrogen-oxidation electrocatalyst materials that contain reduced platinum content compared to traditional catalysts by developing flexible synthesis techniques to fabricate supported catalyst structures, and by verifying electrochemical performance in half cells and ultimately laboratory fuel cells. Synthesis methods were developed for making small, well-defined platinum clusters using zeolite hosts, ion exchange, and controlled calcination/reduction processes. Several factors influence cluster size, and clusters below 1 nm with narrow size distribution have been prepared. To enable electrochemical application, the zeolite pores were filled with electrically-conductive carbon via infiltration with carbon precursors, polymerization/cross-linking, and pyrolysis under inert conditions. The zeolite host was then removed by acid washing, to leave a Pt/C electrocatalyst possessing quasi-zeolitic porosity and Pt clusters of well-controlled size. Plotting electrochemical activity versus pyrolysis temperature typically produces a Gaussian curve, with a peak at ca. 800 C. The poorer relative performances at low and high temperature are due to low electrical conductivity of the carbon matrix, and loss of zeolitic structure combined with Pt sintering, respectively. Cluster sizes measured via adsorption-based methods were consistently larger than those observed by TEM and EXAFS, suggesting , that a fraction of the clusters were inaccessible to the fluid phase. Detailed EXAFS analysis has been performed on selected catalysts and catalyst precursors to monitor trends in cluster size evolution, as well as oxidation states of Pt. Experiments were conducted to probe the electroactive surface area of the Pt clusters. These Pt/C materials had as much as 110 m{sup 2}/g{sub pt} electroactive surface area, an almost 30% improvement over what is commercially (mfg. by ETEK) available (86 m{sup 2}/g{sub pt}). These Pt/C materials also perform qualitatively as well as the ETEK material for the ORR, a non-trivial achievement. A fuel cell test showed that Pt/C outperformed the ETEK material by an average of 50% for a 300 hour test. Increasing surface area decreases the amount of Pt needed in a fuel cell, which translates into cost savings. Furthermore, the increased performance realized in the fuel cell test might ultimately mean less Pt is needed in a fuel cell; this again translates into cost savings. Finally, enhanced long-term stability is a key driver within the fuel cell community as improvements in this area must be realized before fuel cells find their way into the marketplace; these Pt/C materials hold great promise of enhanced stability over time. An external laser desorption ion source was successfully installed on the existing Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. However, operation of this laser ablation source has only generated metal atom ions, no clusters have been found to date. It is believed that this is due to the design of the pulsed-nozzle/laser vaporization chamber. The final experimental configuration and design of the two source housings are described.

Thornberg, Steven Michael; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Jarek, Russell L.; Steen, William Arthur

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Development of Novel Nanomaterials for High-Performance and Low-Cost Fuel Cell Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are promising energy converting technologies to generate electricity by mainly using hydrogen as a fuel, producing water as the… (more)

Sun, Shuhui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Role of solid oxide fuel cell distributed generation for stationary power application.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Based on an availabe fuel cell dyanmical model, an inportant concept feasible operating area is introduced. Fuel cell based distributed generator is studied to solve… (more)

Li, Yonghui.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Prospects for increased low-grade bio-fuels use in home and commercial heating applications .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Though we must eventually find viable alternatives for fossil fuels in large segments of the energy market, there are economically attractive fossil fuel alternatives today… (more)

Pendray, John Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focused on creating a new tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel performance model and demonstrating the integration of this model into an existing system of neutronics and heat transfer codes, creating a user-friendly option for including fuel performance analysis within system design optimization and system-level trade-off studies. The end product enables both a deeper understanding and better overall system performance of nuclear energy systems limited or greatly impacted by TRISO fuel performance. A thorium-fueled hybrid fusion-fission Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) blanket design was used for illustrating the application of this new capability and demonstrated both the importance of integrating fuel performance calculations into mainstream design studies and the impact that this new integrated analysis had on system-level design decisions. A new TRISO fuel performance model named TRIUNE was developed and verified and validated during this work with a novel methodology established for simulating the actual lifetime of a TRISO particle during repeated passes through a pebble bed. In addition, integrated self-consistent calculations were performed for neutronics depletion analysis, heat transfer calculations, and then fuel performance modeling for a full parametric study that encompassed over 80 different design options that went through all three phases of analysis. Lastly, side studies were performed that included a comparison of thorium and depleted uranium (DU) LIFE blankets as well as some uncertainty quantification work to help guide future experimental work by assessing what material properties in TRISO fuel performance modeling are most in need of improvement. A recommended thorium-fueled hybrid LIFE engine design was identified with an initial fuel load of 20MT of thorium, 15% TRISO packing within the graphite fuel pebbles, and a 20cm neutron multiplier layer with beryllium pebbles in flibe molten salt coolant. It operated at a system power level of 2000 MW{sub th}, took about 3.5 years to reach full plateau power, and was capable of an End of Plateau burnup of 38.7 %FIMA if considering just the neutronic constraints in the system design; however, fuel performance constraints led to a maximum credible burnup of 12.1 %FIMA due to a combination of internal gas pressure and irradiation effects on the TRISO materials (especially PyC) leading to SiC pressure vessel failures. The optimal neutron spectrum for the thorium-fueled blanket options evaluated seemed to favor a hard spectrum (low but non-zero neutron multiplier thicknesses and high TRISO packing fractions) in terms of neutronic performance but the fuel performance constraints demonstrated that a significantly softer spectrum would be needed to decrease the rate of accumulation of fast neutron fluence in order to improve the maximum credible burnup the system could achieve.

Powers, J J

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of Vehicle/Fuel Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for natural gas as aGEAGNEPGREET Development

165

Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronics for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Applications  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Engines

166

Development of Dual-Fuel Engine for Class 8 Applications | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent Companya new highModelingDepartment

167

Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development; Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in 2005 to study and develop a competing technology for use in future fossil-fueled power generation facilities that could operate with near zero emissions. CES’s background in oxy-fuel (O-F) rocket technology lead to the award of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42645, “Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development,” where CES was to first evaluate the potential of these O-F power cycles, then develop the detailed design of a commercial-scale O-F combustor for use in these clean burning fossil-fueled plants. Throughout the studies, CES found that in order to operate at competitive cycle efficiencies a high-temperature intermediate pressure turbine was required. This led to an extension of the Agreement for, “Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications” where CES was to also develop an intermediate-pressure O-F turbine (OFT) that could be deployed in O-F industrial plants that capture and sequester >99% of produced CO2, at competitive cycle efficiencies using diverse fuels. The following report details CES’ activities from October 2005 through March 2013, to evaluate O-F power cycles, develop and validate detailed designs of O-F combustors (main and reheat), and to design, manufacture, and test a commercial-scale OFT, under the three-phase Cooperative Agreement.

Hollis, Rebecca

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

AN INVESTIGATION TO RESOLVE THE INTERACTION BETWEEN FUEL CELL, POWER CONDITIONING SYSTEM AND APPLICATION LOADS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) stacks respond quickly to changes in load and exhibit high part- and full-load efficiencies due to its rapid electrochemistry. However, this is not true for the thermal, mechanical, and chemical balance-of-plant subsystem (BOPS), where load-following time constants are, typically, several orders of magnitude higher. This dichotomy diminishes the reliability and performance of the electrode with increasing demand of load. Because these unwanted phenomena are not well understood, the manufacturers of SOFC use conservative schemes (such as, delayed load-following to compensate for slow BOPS response or expensive inductor filtering) to control stack responses to load variations. This limits the applicability of SOFC systems for load-varying stationary and transportation applications from a cost standpoint. Thus, a need exists for the synthesis of component- and system-level models of SOFC power-conditioning systems and the development of methodologies for investigating the system-interaction issues (which reduce the lifetime and efficiency of a SOFC) and optimizing the responses of each subsystem, leading to optimal designs of power-conditioning electronics and optimal control strategies, which mitigate the electrical-feedback effects. Equally important are ''multiresolution'' finite-element modeling and simulation studies, which can predict the impact of changes in system-level variables (e.g., current ripple and load-transients) on the local current densities, voltages, and temperature (these parameters are very difficult or cumbersome, if not impossible to obtain) within a SOFC cell. Towards that end, for phase I of this project, sponsored by the U.S. DOE (NETL), we investigate the interactions among fuel cell, power-conditioning system, and application loads and their effects on SOFC reliability (durability) and performance. A number of methodologies have been used in Phase I to develop the steady-state and transient nonlinear models of the SOFC stack subsystem (SOFCSS), the power-electronics subsystem (PES), and the BOPS. Such an approach leads to robust and comprehensive electrical, electrochemical, thermodynamic, kinetic, chemical, and geometric models of the SOFSS, PES and application loads, and BOPS. A comprehensive methodology to resolve interactions among SOFCSS, PES and application loads and to investigate the impacts of the fast- and slow-scale dynamics of the power-conditioning system (PCS) on the SOFCSS has been developed by this team. Parametric studies on SOFCSS have been performed and the effects of current ripple and load transients on SOFC material properties are investigated. These results are used to gain insights into the long-term performance and reliability of the SOFCSS. Based on this analysis, a novel, efficient, and reliable PES for SOFC has been developed. Impacts of SOFC PCS control techniques on the transient responses, flow parameters, and current densities have also been studied and a novel nonlinear hybrid controller for single/parallel DC-DC converter has been developed.

Sudip K. Mazumder; Chuck McKintyre; Dan Herbison; Doug Nelson; Comas Haynes; Michael von Spakovsky; Joseph Hartvigsen; S. Elangovan

2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

169

Business Case for a Micro-Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System in Commercial Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and hot water with greater efficiency and lower emissions than alternative sources. These systems can be used either as baseload, grid-connected, or as off-the-grid power sources. This report presents a business case for CHP-FCSs in the range of 5 to 50 kWe. Systems in this power range are considered micro-CHP-FCS. For this particular business case, commercial applications rather than residential or industrial are targeted. To understand the benefits of implementing a micro-CHP-FCS, the characteristics that determine their competitive advantage must first be identified. Locations with high electricity prices and low natural gas prices are ideal locations for micro-CHP-FCSs. Fortunately, these high spark spread locations are generally in the northeastern area of the United States and California where government incentives are already in place to offset the current high cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs. As a result of the inherently high efficiency of a fuel cell and their ability to use the waste heat that is generated as a CHP, they have higher efficiency. This results in lower fuel costs than comparable alternative small-scale power systems (e.g., microturbines and reciprocating engines). A variety of markets should consider micro-CHP-FCSs including those that require both heat and baseload electricity throughout the year. In addition, the reliable power of micro-CHP-FCSs could be beneficial to markets where electrical outages are especially frequent or costly. Greenhouse gas emission levels from micro-CHP-FCSs are 69 percent lower, and the human health costs are 99.9 percent lower, than those attributed to conventional coal-fired power plants. As a result, FCSs can allow a company to advertise as environmentally conscious and provide a bottom-line sales advantage. As a new technology in the early stages of adoption, micro-CHP-FCSs are currently more expensive than alternative technologies. As the technology gains a foothold in its target markets and demand increases, the costs will decline in response to improved manufacturing efficiencies, similar to trends seen with other technologies. Transparency Market Research forecasts suggest that the CHP-FCS market will grow at a compound annual growth rate of greater than 27 percent over the next 5 years. These production level increases, coupled with the expected low price of natural gas, indicate the economic payback period will move to less than 5 years over the course of the next 5 years. To better understand the benefits of micro-CHP-FCSs, The U.S. Department of Energy worked with ClearEdge Power to install fifteen 5-kWe fuel cells in the commercial markets of California and Oregon. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is evaluating these systems in terms of economics, operations, and their environmental impact in real-world applications. As expected, the economic analysis has indicated that the high capital cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs results in a longer payback period than typically is acceptable for all but early-adopter market segments. However, a payback period of less than 3 years may be expected as increased production brings system cost down, and CHP incentives are maintained or improved.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Anderson, David M.; Amaya, Jodi P.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Srivastava, Viraj; Upton, Jaki F.

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

170

Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) on Mono-uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US National Energy Policy of 2001 advocated the development of advanced fuel and fuel cycle technologies that are cleaner, more efficient, less waste-intensive, and more proliferation resistant. The need for advanced fuel development is emphasized in on-going DOE-supported programs, e.g., Global Nuclear Energy Initiative (GNEI), Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and GEN-IV Technology Development. The Directorates of Energy & Environment (E&E) and Chemistry & Material Sciences (C&MS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are interested in advanced fuel research and manufacturing using its multi-disciplinary capability and facilities to support a design concept of a small, secure, transportable, and autonomous reactor (SSTAR). The E&E and C&MS Directorates co-sponsored this Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) Project on Mono-Uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications. In fact, three out of the six GEN-IV reactor concepts consider using the nitride-based fuel, as shown in Table 1. SSTAR is a liquid-metal cooled, fast reactor. It uses nitride fuel in a sealed reactor vessel that could be shipped to the user and returned to the supplier having never been opened in its long operating lifetime. This sealed reactor concept envisions no fuel refueling nor on-site storage of spent fuel, and as a result, can greatly enhance proliferation resistance. However, the requirement for a sealed, long-life core imposes great challenges to research and development of the nitride fuel and its cladding. Cladding is an important interface between the fuel and coolant and a barrier to prevent fission gas release during normal and accidental conditions. In fabricating the nitride fuel rods and assemblies, the cladding material should be selected based on its the coolant-side corrosion properties, the chemical/physical interaction with the nitride fuel, as well as their thermal and neutronic properties. The US NASA space reactor, the SP-100 was designed to use mono-uranium nitride fuel. Although the SP-100 reactor was not commissioned, tens of thousand of nitride fuel pellets were manufactured and lots of them, cladded in Nb-1-Zr had been irradiated in fast test reactors (FFTF and EBR-II) with good irradiation results. The Russian Naval submarines also use nitride fuel with stainless steel cladding (HT-9) in Pb-Bi coolant. Although the operating experience of the Russian submarine is not readily available, such combination of fuel, cladding and coolant has been proposed for a commercial-size liquid-metal cooled fast reactor (BREST-300). Uranium mono-nitride fuel is studied in this LDRD Project due to its favorable properties such as its high actinide density and high thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of mono-nitride is 10 times higher than that of oxide (23 W/m-K for UN vs. 2.3 W/m-K for UO{sub 2} at 1000 K) and its melting temperature is much higher than that of metal fuel (2630 C for UN vs. 1132 C for U metal). It also has relatively high actinide density, (13.51 gU/cm{sup 3} in UN vs. 9.66 gU/cm{sup 3} in UO{sub 2}) which is essential for a compact reactor core design. The objective of this LDRD Project is to: (1) Establish a manufacturing capability for uranium-based ceramic nuclear fuel, (2) Develop a computational capability to analyze nuclear fuel performance, (3) Develop a modified UN-based fuel that can support a compact long-life reactor core, and (4) Collaborate with the Nuclear Engineering Department of UC Berkeley on nitride fuel reprocessing and disposal in a geologic repository.

Choi, J; Ebbinghaus, B; Meiers, T; Ahn, J

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

171

Evaluation of high power density annular fuel application in the Korean OPR-1000 reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compared to the traditional solid fuel geometry for PWRs, the internally and externally cooled annular fuel offers the potential to increase the core power density while maintaining or increasing safety margins. It is ...

Zhang, Liang, Ph. D.. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A systems engineering methodology for fuel efficiency and its application to a tactical wheeled vehicle demonstrator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The U.S. Department of Defense faces growing fuel demand, resulting in increasing costs and compromised operational capability. In response to this issue, the Fuel Efficient Ground Vehicle Demonstrator (FED) program was ...

Luskin, Paul (Paul L.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Systems Modeling of Chemical Hydride Hydrogen Storage Materials for Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fixed bed reactor was designed, modeled and simulated for hydrogen storage on-board the vehicle for PEM fuel cell applications. Ammonia Borane (AB) was selected by DOE's Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) as the initial chemical hydride of study because of its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to {approx}16% by weight for the release of {approx}2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions. The design evaluated consisted of a tank with 8 thermally isolated sections in which H2 flows freely between sections to provide ballast. Heating elements are used to initiate reactions in each section when pressure drops below a specified level in the tank. Reactor models in Excel and COMSOL were developed to demonstrate the proof-of-concept, which was then used to develop systems models in Matlab/Simulink. Experiments and drive cycle simulations showed that the storage system meets thirteen 2010 DOE targets in entirety and the remaining four at greater than 60% of the target.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

174

Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The original funding under this project number was awarded for a period 12/1999 until 12/2002 under the project title Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications. The project was extended until 06/2003 at which time a renewal proposal was awarded for a period 06/2003 until 06/2008 under the project title Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes. The work under DE-FG02-01ER15120 was initiated about the time the PI moved his research group from the Department of Chemistry at Utah State University to the Department of Chemistry at Michigan State University. This DOE-funded research was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder.

Swain; Greg M.

2009-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

175

Advancement in Fuel Spray and Combustion Modeling for Compression Ignition Engine Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

176

Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

internal combustion engine vehicles, the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle has the advantages of high energy efficiency and low emissions

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantification in Fuel Performance Modeling . . . . . . .3.4 Integration with Fuel Performance Calculations ivmicroscopic image of a TRISO fuel particle cracked open to

Powers, Jeffrey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Hydrogen Generation in Fuel Cell Applications1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Hydrogen Generation in Fuel Cell Ghosh3 , Huei Peng2 Abstract A fuel processor that reforms natural gas to hydrogen-rich mixture to feed of the hydrogen in the fuel processor is based on catalytic partial oxidation of the methane in the natural gas

Peng, Huei

179

Advancing Plug In Hybrid Technology and Flex Fuel Application on a Chrysler  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2|Department of EnergyMini-Van PHEV DOE

180

Advancing Plug In Hybrid Technology and Flex Fuel Application on a Chrysler  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2|Department of EnergyMini-Van PHEV

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of Vehicle/Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost SavingsEnergy GETEMGolden Field Office 1617 Cole-

182

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d FNEPA/309 Reviewers | Department ofProceedings | Department2

183

Near-term Fuel Cell Applications in Japan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOETowardExecutive SummaryDepartmentNavy's Section 2922a9

184

SuperTruck Â… Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4 RecoveryJulyEvaluationOffi ce U.S.SuperWi-FiTractor

185

Supertruck - Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4Superhard Coating Systems SuperhardTractor &

186

Supertruck - Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4Superhard Coating Systems SuperhardTractor

187

A comparison of gasoline and LP-gas as a fuel for medium or small size farm tractors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Veriaue Krie@e eiah Qaapreeeien aetie OT Vs@8sl ~ QGZ'Bur'656k $8 baitlaa 62 94 j OT r&JRXiRRlr&Is a a o XXo IIXX'66K 6Z Type ar 'net ~n nil Qenevmpaian e i6 66 6 6 I 4" ue 1 k9 ir' ' i2 e'er'6 L~e~apek R aur'6 iRuUl pewGp (2 nil Znr 6 8 Vie & per'6 t'9... en) o a K~eiivexed Gee@ 6Z XP~G@6 in LIif. emnt +FGS!6 a o o s a o a a o a o a a o a a a a XWQ ~viXtax' QleL%9 aa a%ox'688 4K@ el@cs?e O~h~e89AR'6laxx ce ?x~ PyeQ 8? Zagga~ Boa@ az Qx'e pe~em+a e~v pxaxeeeax af kgxlaalCuxel I"aglnaexin~, Ap*"3...

Maher, Thomas Francis

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Application of Diagnostic/Prognostic Methods to Critical Equipment for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Cleanup Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) project at the Hanford K-Basin in the 100 N Area has successfully restructured the preventive maintenance, spare parts inventory requirements, and the operator rounds data requirements. In this investigation, they continue to examine the different facets of the operations and maintenance (O&M) of the K-Basin cleanup project in search of additional reliability and cost savings. This report focuses on the initial findings of a team of PNNL engineers engaged to identify potential opportunities for reducing the cost of O&M through the application of advanced diagnostics (fault determination) and prognostics (residual life/reliability determination). The objective is to introduce predictive technologies to eliminate or reduce high impact equipment failures. The PNNL team in conjunction with the SNF engineers found the following major opportunities for cost reduction and/or enhancing reliability: (1) Provide data routing and automated analysis from existing detection systems to a display center that will engage the operations and engineering team. This display will be operator intuitive with system alarms and integrated diagnostic capability. (2) Change operating methods to reduce major transients induced in critical equipment. This would reduce stress levels on critical equipment. (3) Install a limited sensor set on failure prone critical equipment to allow degradation or stressor levels to be monitored and alarmed. This would provide operators and engineers with advance guidance and warning of failure events. Specific methods for implementation of the above improvement opportunities are provided in the recommendations. They include an Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) decision support system, introduction of variable frequency drives on certain pump motors, and the addition of limited diagnostic instrumentation on specified critical equipment.

Casazza, Lawrence O.; Jarrell, Donald B.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Meador, Richard J.; Wallace, Dale E.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

Research and Development of Proton-Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for Transportation Applications: Initial Conceptual Design Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses Task 1.1, model development and application, and Task 1.2, vehicle mission definition. Overall intent is to produce a methanol-fueled 10-kW power source, and to evaluate electrochemical engine (ECE) use in transportation. Major achievements include development of an ECE power source model and its integration into a comprehensive power source/electric vehicle propulsion model, establishment of candidate FCV (fuel cell powered electric vehicle) mission requirements, initial FCV studies, and a candidate FCV recommendation for further study.

Not Available

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Carbon-Supported Copper Complex of 3,5-Diamino-1,2,4-triazole as a Cathode Catalyst for Alkaline Fuel Cell Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Cell Applications Fikile R. Brushett, Matthew S. Thorum, Nicholas S. Lioutas, Matthew S. Naughton-tri/C) is investigated as a cathode material using an alkaline microfluidic H2/O2 fuel cell. The absolute Cu be realized by optimizing catalyst and electrode preparation procedures. Fuel cell-based systems hold promise

Kenis, Paul J. A.

191

Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive Applications: Fuel Cell Tech Team Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation reports on direct hydrogen PEMFC manufacturing cost estimation for automotive applications.

192

Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The occurrence of certain potential events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants could lead to significant consequences involving risk to operating personnel or to the general public. This document is a compilation of such potential initiating events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Possible general incidents and incidents specific to key operations in fuel reprocessing are considered, including possible causes, consequences, and safety features designed to prevent, detect, or mitigate such incidents.

Perkins, W.C.; Durant, W.S.; Dexter, A.H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

MA3T Model Application at ORNL Assesses the Future of Fuel Cell...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

has developed a model for simulating the market potential of fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV) and challenges to achieving success over time, including competition with...

194

PEM fuel cell and energy storage unit configuration for vehicle applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the current “future” automobile market; fuel cells have shown to be an alternative to the classic power sources like internal combustion engines. But in… (more)

Thota, Kalpana.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Novel Polymer Electrolyte Nano-Composite Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fuel cells are electrochemical devices which have been established to lead in the transition to clean energy technology and will become the energy efficient power… (more)

Zarrin, Hadis

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

MA3T Model Application at ORNL Assesses the Future of Fuel Cell Markets |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps More Documents & Publications Lumens Placard (Green) .M E M O R:.

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - applications fuel cell Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

() of ... Source: DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion...

198

Modeling and Analysis of UN TRISO Fuel for LWR Application Using the PARFUME Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboraroty (INL) PARFUME (particle fuel model) code was used to assess the overall fuel performance of uranium nitride (UN) tristructural isotropic (TRISO) ceramic fuel under irradiation conditions typical of a Light Water Reactor (LWR). The dimensional changes of the fuel particle layers and kernel were calculated, including the formation of an internal gap. The survivability of the UN TRISO particle was estimated depending on the strain behavior of the constituent materials at high fast fluence and burn up. For nominal cases, internal gas pressure and representative thermal profiles across the kernel and layers were determined along with stress levels in the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon (IPyC/OPyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers. These parameters were then used to evaluate fuel particle failure probabilities. Results of the study show that the survivability of UN TRISO fuel under LWR irradiation conditions might only be guaranteed if the kernel and PyC swelling rates are limited at high fast fluence and burn up. These material properties have large uncertainties at the irradiation levels expected to be reached by UN TRISO fuel in LWRs. Therefore, a large experimental effort would be needed to establish material properties, including kernel and PyC swelling rates, under these conditions before definitive conclusions can be drawn on the behavior of UN TRISO fuel in LWRs.

Blaise Collin

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A novel concept of QUADRISO particles Part III : applications to the plutonium-thorium fuel cycle.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present study, a plutonium-thorium fuel cycle is investigated including the {sup 233}U production and utilization. A prismatic thermal High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) and the novel concept of quadruple isotropic (QUADRISO) coated particles, designed at the Argonne National Laboratory, have been used for the study. In absorbing QUADRISO particles, a burnable poison layer surrounds the central fuel kernel to flatten the reactivity curve as a function of time. At the beginning of life, the fuel in the QUADRISO particles is hidden from neutrons, since they get absorbed in the burnable poison before they reach the fuel kernel. Only when the burnable poison depletes, neutrons start streaming into the fuel kernel inducing fission reactions and compensating the fuel depletion of ordinary TRISO particles. In fertile QUADRISO particles, the absorber layer is replaced by natural thorium with the purpose of flattening the excess of reactivity by the thorium resonances and producing {sup 233}U. The above configuration has been compared with a configuration where fissile (neptunium-plutonium oxide from Light Water Reactors irradiated fuel) and fertile (natural thorium oxide) fuels are homogeneously mixed in the kernel of ordinary TRISO particles. For the {sup 233}U utilization, the core has been equipped with europium oxide absorbing QUADRISO particles.

Talamo, A. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Neutronic aspects of inert matrix fuels for application in ADS J. Wallenius *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, safety parameters of 800 MWth ADS cores operating on oxide and nitride fuels with high americium content for americium and magnesia the highest burnup potential. Ă? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction In the Double Strata fuel cycle [1,2], the americium and curium produced in critical power

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Development, Application and Performance of Venturi Register L. E. A. Burner System for Firing Oil and Gas Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT, APPLICATION AND PERFORMANCE OF VENTURI REGISTER L. E. A. BURNER SYSTEM FOR FIRING OIL AND GAS FUELS A. D. Cawte CEA Combustion, Inc. Stamford, Connecticut INTRODUCTION The effect of reducing excess air as a means of curtailing..., extensive investigation work was undertaken us ing the water analog model techniques developed by Associated British Combustion for burner design. The development work resulted in the burner design known today as the Venturi Register, LEA (low excess air...

Cawte, A. D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Fact #620: April 26, 2010 Class 8 Truck Tractor Weight by Component |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFY 2011 Report1:Energy 2: MarchDepartment

203

Selection of a Wear-Resistant Tractor Drivetrain Material: Success stories  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartment of Energy Moniz: WhatM-1at the High Temperature

204

Fuel-flexible partial oxidation reforming of hydrocarbons for automotive applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Micro-reactor tests indicate that our partial oxidation catalyst is fuel-flexible and can reform conventional (gasoline and diesel) and alternative (ethanol, methanol, natural gas) fuels to hydrogen rich product gases with high hydrogen selectivity. Alcohols are reformed at lower temperatures (< 600 C) while alkanes and unsaturated hydrocarbons require slightly higher temperatures. Cyclic hydrocarbons and aromatics have also been reformed at relatively low temperatures, however, a different mechanism appears to be responsible for their reforming. Complex fuels like gasoline and diesel, which are mixtures of a broad range of hydrocarbons, require temperatures of > 700 C for maximum hydrogen production.

Ahmed, S.; Carter, J. D.; Kopasz, J. P.; Krumpelt, M.; Wilkenhoener, R.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

Valuing innovative technology R&D as a real option : application to fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aims to elucidate real option thinking and real option valuation techniques for innovative technology investment. Treating the fuel cell R&D investment as a real option for General Motor's light passenger vehicle ...

Tsui, Maggie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Application of advanced composites for efficient on-board storage of fuel in natural gas vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following outlines the performance requirements for high pressure containers for on-board storage of fuel in Natural Gas Vehicles. The construction of state-of-the-art carbon-fiber reinforced all-composite cylinders is described and the validation testing and key advantages are discussed. Carbon-fiber reinforced advanced composite technology offers a number of key advantages to the NGV industry, by providing: improved range, including up to 30% more fuel storage for a given storage envelope and up to 300% more fuel storage for a given weight allowance; life-cycle cost advantages, including savings in non-recurring costs (installation), savings in recurring costs (fuel and maintenance), and increased revenues from more passengers/payload; and uncompromising safety, namely, superior resistance to degradation from fatigue or stress rupture and inherent resistance to corrosion; proven toughness/impact resistance.

Sirosh, S.N. [EDO Canada Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Electrocatalytic activities of supported Pt nanoparticles for low-temperature fuel cell applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-temperature fuel cells (FCs) are highly efficient and environmentally friendly energy conversion devices that have been in the spotlight of many energy research efforts in the past few decades. However, FC commercialization ...

Sheng, Wenchao, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Development of thin CsHSO4 membrane electrode assemblies for electrolysis and fuel cell applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this work the use of the solid acid CsHSO4 as an electrolyte in a hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell or the disassociation of water into hydrogen… (more)

Ecklund-Mitchell, Lars E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Development of Gd-Enriched Alloys for Spent Nuclear Fuel Applications--Part 1: Preliminary Characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Gd-containing alloys for storage, transport, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. However, unlike, the basket materials must be corrosion resistant under the projected stor- age conditions. Recent research

DuPont, John N.

210

Webinar: Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This webinar, presented by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, will explore the synergy between a facility's use of hydrogen fuel cell forklifts and its reduction of electric grid time of use energy charges.

211

Summary of Off-Normal Events in US Fuel Cycle Facilities for AFCI Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for facilities comprising the fission reactor fuel cycle, with the exception of reactor operations. This report includes mines, mills, conversion plants, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication plants, transportation of fuel materials between these centers, and waste storage facilities. Some of the facilities discussed are no longer operating; others continue to produce fuel for the commercial fission power plant industry. Some of the facilities discussed have been part of the military’s nuclear effort; these are included when the processes used are similar to those used for commercial nuclear power. When reading compilations of incidents and accidents, after repeated entries it is natural to form an opinion that there exists nothing but accidents. For this reason, production or throughput values are described when available. These adverse operating experiences are compiled to support the design and decisions needed for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The AFCI is to weigh options for a new fission reactor fuel cycle that is efficient, safe, and productive for US energy security.

L. C. Cadwallader; S. J. Piet; S. O. Sheetz; D. H. McGuire; W. B. Boore

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Surrogate Fuels for Gasoline and Application to an HCCI Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasoline consists of many different classes of hydrocarbons, such as paraffins, olefins, aromatics, and cycloalkanes. In this study, a surrogate gasoline reaction mechanism is developed, and it has one representative fuel constituent from each of these classes. These selected constituents are iso-octane, n-heptane, 1-pentene, toluene, and methyl-cyclohexane. The mechanism was developed in a step-wise fashion, adding submechanisms to treat each fuel component. Reactions important for low temperature oxidation (<1000K) and cross-reactions among different fuels are incorporated into the mechanism. The mechanism consists of 1214 species and 5401 reactions. A single-zone engine model is used to evaluate how well the mechanism captures autoignition behavior for conditions corresponding to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine operation. Experimental data are available for both how the combustion phasing changes with fueling at a constant intake temperature, and also how the intake temperature has to be changed with pressure in order to maintain combustion phasing for a fixed equivalence ratio. Three different surrogate fuel mixtures are used for the modeling. Predictions are in reasonably good agreement with the engine data. In addition, the heat release rate is calculated and compared to the data from experiments. The model predicts less low-temperature heat release than that measured. It is found that the low temperature heat-release rate depends strongly on engine speed, reactions of RO{sub 2}+HO{sub 2}, fuel composition, and pressure boost.

Naik, C V; Pitz, W J; Sj?berg, M; Dec, J E; Orme, J; Curran, H J; Simmie, J M; Westbrook, C K

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

Plasmatron Fuel Reformer Development and Internal Combustion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Plasmatron Fuel Reformer Development and Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Applications Plasmatron Fuel Reformer Development and Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Applications...

214

Coca-Cola Refreshments Class 8 Diesel Electric Hybrid Tractor Evaluation: 13-Month Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean Communities ofCellulosic Feedstock - EnergyCoal2 -Wind

215

Application of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Transuranic Waste Recycling in PWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented is an investigation of the utilization of Tristructural-Isotropic (TRISO) particle-based fuel designs for the recycling of transuranic (TRU) wastes in typical Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Though numerous studies have evaluated the recycling of TRU in light water reactors (LWRs), this work differentiates itself by employing TRU-loaded TRISO particles embedded within a SiC matrix and formed into pellets that can be loaded into standard 17 x 17 fuel element cladding. This approach provides the capability of TRU recycling and, by virtue of the TRISO particle design, will allow for greater burnup (i.e., removal of the need for UO2 mixing) and improved fuel reliability. In this study, a variety of assembly layouts and core loading patterns were analyzed to demonstrate the feasibility of TRU-loaded TRISO fuel. The assembly and core design herein reported are a work in progress, so they still require some fine-tuning to further flatten power peaks; however, the progress achieved thus far strongly supports the conclusion that with further rod/assembly/core loading and placement optimization, TRU-loaded TRISO fuel and core designs that are capable of balancing TRU production and destruction can be designed within the standard constraints for thermal and reactivity performance in PWRs.

Gentry, Cole A [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Development of a catalytic partial oxidation ethanol reformer for fuel cell applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arthur D. Little in conjunction with the Department of Energy and the Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs are developing an ethanol fuel processor for fuel cell vehicles. Initial studies were carried out on a 25 kWe catalytic partial oxidation (POX) reformer to determine the effect of equivalence ratio, steam to carbon ratio, and residence time on ethanol conversion. Results of the POX experiments show near equilibrium yields of hydrogen and carbon monoxide for an equivalence ratio of 3.0 with a fuel processor efficiency of 80%. The size and weight of the prototype reformer yield power densities of 1.44 l/kW and 1.74 kg/kW at an estimated cost of $20/kW.

Mitchell, W.L.; Thijssen, J.H.J.; Bentley, J.M.; Marek, N.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

"Dedicated To The Continued Education, Training and Demonstration of PEM Fuel Cell Powered Lift Trucks In Real-World Applications."  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project objective was to further assist in the commercialization of fuel cell and H2 technology by building further upon the successful fuel cell lift truck deployments that were executed by LiftOne in 2007, with longer deployments of this technology in real-world applications. We involved facilities management, operators, maintenance personnel, safety groups, and Authorities Having Jurisdiction. LiftOne strived to educate a broad group from many areas of industry and the community as to the benefits of this technology. Included were First Responders from the local areas. We conducted month long deployments with end-users to validate the value proposition and the market requirements for fuel cell powered lift trucks. Management, lift truck operators, Authorities Having Jurisdiction and the general public experienced 'hands on' fuel cell experience in the material handling applications. We partnered with Hydrogenics in the execution of the deployment segment of the program. Air Products supplied the compressed H2 gas and the mobile fueler. Data from the Fuel Cell Power Packs and the mobile fueler was sent to the DOE and NREL as required. Also, LiftOne conducted the H2 Education Seminars on a rotating basis at their locations for lift trucks users and for other selected segments of the community over the project's 36 month duration. Executive Summary The technology employed during the deployments program was not new, as the equipment had been used in several previous demos and early adoptions within the material handling industry. This was the case with the new HyPx Series PEM - Fuel Cell Power Packs used, which had been demo'd before during the 2007 Greater Columbia Fuel Cell Challenge. The Air Products HF-150 Fueler was used outdoors during the deployments and had similarly been used for many previous demo programs. The methods used centered on providing this technology as the power for electric sit-down lift trucks at high profile companies operating large fleets. As a long-standing lift truck dealership, LiftOne was able to introduce the fuel cells to such companies in the demanding applications. Accomplishments vs Objectives: We were successful in respect to the stated objectives. The Education Segment's H2 Education Sessions were able to introduce fuel cell technology to many companies and reached the intended broad audience. Also, demos of the lift truck at the sessions as well as the conferences; expos and area events provided great additional exposure. The Deployments were successful in allowing the 6 participating companies to test the 2 fuel cell powered lift trucks in their demanding applications. One of the 6 sites (BMW) eventually adopted over 80 fuel cells from Plug Power. LiftOne was one of the 3 fuel cell demonstrators at BMW for this trial and played a major role in helping to prove the viability and efficiency of this alternative form of energy for BMW. The other 5 companies that participated in the project's deployments were encouraged by the trials and while not converting over to fuel cell power at this time, expressed the desire to revisit acquisition scenarios in the near future as the cost of fuel cells and infrastructure continue to improve. The Education sessions began in March of 2009 at the 7 LiftOne Branches and continued throughout the duration of the project. Attendees came from a large base of lift truck users in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia. The sessions were free and invitations were sent out to potential users and companies with intrigue. In addition to the Education content at the sessions (which was offered in a 'H2 101' format), LiftOne was able to demonstrate a working fuel cell powered lift truck, which proved to be a big draw with the 'hands on' experience. LiftOne also demo'd the fuel cell lift trucks at many conferences, expos, professional association meetings, trade shows and 'Green' events in major cities region including Charlotte, Greenville, and Columbia. Such events allowed for H2 Education Material to be presented, and recruit attendees for future sessi

Dever, Thomas J.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

218

HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE OWNERSHIP AND FUEL ECONOMY ACROSS TEXAS: AN APPLICATION OF SPATIAL MODELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and environmental policies (Koo et al. 2012). While EV sales (including both HEVs and PEVs) have risen considerably significant. If households registering more fuel- efficient vehicles, including hybrid EVs, are also more inclined to purchase plug-in EVs, these #12;findings can assist in spatial planning of charging

Kockelman, Kara M.

219

Molten tin reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements. [Patent application; continuous process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is described. Within a containment vessel, a solid plug of tin and nitride precipitates supports a circulating bath of liquid tin therein. Spent nuclear fuel is immersed in the liquid tin under an atmosphere of nitrogen, resulting in the formation of nitride precipitates. The layer of liquid tin and nitride precipitates which interfaces the plug is solidified and integrated with the plug. Part of the plug is melted, removing nitride precipitates from the containment vessel, while a portion of the plug remains solidified to support te liquid tin and nitride precipitates remaining in the containment vessel. The process is practiced numerous times until substantially all of the precipitated nitrides are removed from the containment vessel.

Heckman, R.A.

1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

Characterizing diamylamylphosphonate (DAAP) as an Americium Ligand for nuclear fuel cycle applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful deployment of the currently-envisioned advanced nuclear fuel cycle requires the development of a partitioning scheme to separate Am from the lanthanides. The Am/lanthanide separation is challenging since all the metals are normally trivalent and have similar ionic radii. Oxidation of Am to higher oxidation states is one option to achieve such a separation. Hexavalent Am has now been routinely prepared in our laboratory in strongly acidic solution using sodium bismuthate as the oxidant, and then extracted into diamylamylphosphonate/dodecane solution. Here, we have characterized this phosphonate-containing solvent with regard to the extraction of Am, the lanthanides, Cm, other fission product, and/or inert constituents expected in dissolved nuclear fuel. Additionally, the effects of irradiation on dispersion numbers and the phosphonate concentration were investigated.

Bruce J. Mincher; Nicholas C. Schmitt; Richard D. Tillotson; Gracy Elias; Byron M. White; Jack D. Law

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development for Auxiliary Power in Heavy Duty Vehicle Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changing economic and environmental needs of the trucking industry is driving the use of auxiliary power unit (APU) technology for over the road haul trucks. The trucking industry in the United States remains the key to the economy of the nation and one of the major changes affecting the trucking industry is the reduction of engine idling. Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC (Delphi) teamed with heavy-duty truck Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) PACCAR Incorporated (PACCAR), and Volvo Trucks North America (VTNA) to define system level requirements and develop an SOFC based APU. The project defines system level requirements, and subsequently designs and implements an optimized system architecture using an SOFC APU to demonstrate and validate that the APU will meet system level goals. The primary focus is on APUs in the range of 3-5 kW for truck idling reduction. Fuels utilized were derived from low-sulfur diesel fuel. Key areas of study and development included sulfur remediation with reformer operation; stack sensitivity testing; testing of catalyst carbon plugging and combustion start plugging; system pre-combustion; and overall system and electrical integration. This development, once fully implemented and commercialized, has the potential to significantly reduce the fuel idling Class 7/8 trucks consume. In addition, the significant amounts of NOx, CO2 and PM that are produced under these engine idling conditions will be virtually eliminated, inclusive of the noise pollution. The environmental impact will be significant with the added benefit of fuel savings and payback for the vehicle operators / owners.

Daniel T. Hennessy

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Analysis of Advanced Actinide-Fueled Energy Systems for Deep Space Propulsion Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[2]. Specific impulses on the order of 103 seconds are theoretically possible. Unfortunately, nuclear fusion ignition, confinement of hot dense plasma and extreme heat management continue to be enormous obstacles for even mid-term fusion.... In order to produce FF particles, a given fuel must fission with a high rate of probability, which is dependent on the energy of incident neutrons and target nuclei. The Java-based Nuclear Information Software (JANIS) program was used to prepare fission...

Guy, Troy Lamar

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

223

Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaing for Premium Fuel Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ash in six common bituminous coals, Taggart, Winifrede, Elkhorn No. 3, Indiana VII, Sunnyside and Hiawatha, could be liberated by fine grinding to allow preparation of clean coal meeting premium fuel specifications (< 1- 2 lb/ MBtu ash and <0.6 lb/ MBtu sulfur) by laboratory and bench- scale column flotation or selective agglomeration. Over 2,100 tons of coal were cleaned in the PDU at feed rates between 2,500 and 6,000 lb/ h by Microcel? column flotation and by selective agglomeration using recycled heptane as the bridging liquid. Parametric testing of each process and 72- hr productions runs were completed on each of the three test coals. The following results were achieved after optimization of the operating parameters: The primary objective was to develop the design base for commercial fine coal cleaning facilities for producing ultra- clean coals which can be converted into coal-water slurry premium fuel. The coal cleaning technologies to be developed were advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration, and the goal was to produce fuel meeting the following specifications -- Less than 2 pounds of ash per million Btu (860 grams per gigajoule) and

Frank J. Smit; Gene L. Schields; Mehesh C. Jha; Nick Moro

1997-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

224

Microfluidic Microbial Fuel Cells for Microstructure Interrogations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications of Microscale Microbial Fuel Cell SystemsApplications of Microscale Microbial Fuel Cell Systems Infrom the use of microscale microbial fuel cells is that of

Parra, Erika Andrea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). Accomplishments during the quarter are described on the following tasks and subtasks: Development of near-term applications (engineering development and dewatering studies); Engineering development of selective agglomeration (bench-scale testing and process scale-up); PDU and advanced column flotation module (coal selection and procurement and advanced flotation topical report); Selective agglomeration module (module operation and clean coal production with Hiawatha, Taggart, and Indiana 7 coals); Disposition of the PDU; and Project final report. Plans for next quarter are discussed and agglomeration results of the three tested coals are presented.

Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This renewal application for the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (IWRP) WRU-I-0160-01 at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Industrial Waste Ditch (IWD) and Industrial Waste Pond (IWP) is being submitted to the State of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). This application has been prepared in compliance with the requirements in IDAPA 58.01.17, Recycled Water Rules. Information in this application is consistent with the IDAPA 58.01.17 rules, pre-application meeting, and the Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater (September 2007). This application is being submitted using much of the same information contained in the initial permit application, submitted in 2007, and modification, in 2012. There have been no significant changes to the information and operations covered in the existing IWRP. Summary of the monitoring results and operation activity that has occurred since the issuance of the WRP has been included. MFC has operated the IWP and IWD as regulated wastewater land treatment facilities in compliance with the IDAPA 58.01.17 regulations and the IWRP. Industrial wastewater, consisting primarily of continuous discharges of nonhazardous, nonradioactive, routinely discharged noncontact cooling water and steam condensate, periodic discharges of industrial wastewater from the MFC facility process holdup tanks, and precipitation runoff, are discharged to the IWP and IWD system from various MFC facilities. Wastewater goes to the IWP and IWD with a permitted annual flow of up to 17 million gallons/year. All requirements of the IWRP are being met. The Operations and Maintenance Manual for the Industrial Wastewater System will be updated to include any new requirements.

No Name

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Coal fueled diesel system for stationary power applications-technology development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of coal as a fuel for diesel engines dates back to the early days of the development of the engine. Dr. Diesel envisioned his concept as a multi-fuel engine, with coal a prime candidate due to the fact that it was Germany`s primary domestic energy resource. It is interesting that the focus on coal burning diesel engines appears to peak about every twenty years as shortages of other energy resources increase the economic attractiveness of using coal. This periodic interest in coal started in Germany with the work of Diesel in the timeframe 1898-1906. Pawlikowski carried on the work from 1916 to 1928. Two German companies commercialized the technology prior to and during World War II. The next flurry of activity occurred in the United States in the period from 1957-69, with work done at Southwest Research Institute, Virginia Polytechnical University, and Howard University. The current period of activity started in 1978 with work sponsored by the Conservation and Renewable Energy Branch of the US Department of Energy. This work was done at Southwest Research Institute and by ThermoElectron at Sulzer Engine in Switzerland. In 1982, the Fossil Energy Branch of the US Department of Energy, through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) initiated a concentrated effort to develop coal burning diesel and gas turbine engines. The diesel engine work in the METC sponsored program was performed at Arthur D. Little (Cooper-Bessemer as subcontractor), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (now NIPER), Caterpillar, Detroit Diesel Corporation, General Motor Corporation (Electromotive Division), General Electric, Southwest Research Institute, and various universities and other research and development organizations. This DOE-METC coal engine RD & D initiative which spanned the 1982-1993 timeframe is the topic of this review document. The combustion of a coal-water fuel slurry in a diesel engine is described. The engine modifications necessary are discussed.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: thermal cycle stability and chemical compatibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alkali silicate glass (SCN-1) is currently being evaluated as a candidate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel (SOFC) applications. The glass containing ~17 mole% alkalis (K2O and Na2O) remains vitreous and compliant during SOFC operation, unlike conventional SOFC sealing glasses, which experience substantial devitrification after the sealing process. The non-crystallizing compliant sealing glass has lower glass transition and softening temperatures since the microstructure remains glassy without significant crystallite formation, and hence can relieve or reduce residual stresses and also has the potential for crack healing. Sealing approaches based on compliant glass will also need to satisfy all the mechanical, thermal, chemical, physical, and electrical requirements for SOFC applications, not only in bulk properties but also at sealing interfaces. In this first of a series of papers we will report the thermal cycle stability of the glass when sealed between two SOFC components, i.e., a NiO/YSZ anode supported YSZ bilayer and a coated ferritic stainless steel interconnect material. High temperature leak rates were monitored versus thermal cycles between 700-850oC using back pressures ranging from 0.2 psi to 1.0 psi. Isothermal stability was also evaluated in a dual environment consisting of flowing dilute H2 fuel versus ambient air. In addition, chemical compatibility at the alumina and YSZ interfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results shed new light on the topic of SOFC glass seal development.

Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Williams, Riley T.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, E.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safety Technology Group is developing methodology that can be used to assess the risk of operating a plant to reprocess spent nuclear fuel. As an early step in the methodology, a preliminary hazards analysis identifies safety-related incidents. In the absence of appropriate safety features, these incidents could lead to significant consequences and risk to onsite personnel or to the public. This report is a compilation of potential safety-related incidents that have been identified in studies at SRL and in safety analyses of various commercially designed reprocessing plants. It is an expanded revision of the version originally published as DP-1558, Published December 1980.

Durant, W.S.; Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Stoddard, D.H.

1982-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

230

Electrochemical separation of aluminum from uranium for research reactor spent nuclear fuel applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are developing an electrorefining process to treat aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel by electrochemically separating aluminum from uranium. The aluminum electrorefiner is modeled after the high-throughput electrorefiner developed at ANL. Aluminum is electrorefined, using a fluoride salt electrolyte, in a potential range of -0.1 V to -0.2 V, while uranium is electrorefined in a potential range of -0.3 V to -0.4 V; therefore, aluminum can be selectively separated electrochemically from uranium. A series of laboratory-scale experiments was performed to demonstrate the aluminum electrorefining concept. These experiments involved selecting an electrolyte (determining a suitable fluoride salt composition); selecting a crucible material for the electrochemical cell; optimizing the operating conditions; determining the effect of adding alkaline and rare earth elements to the electrolyte; and demonstrating the electrochemical separation of aluminum from uranium, using a U-Al-Si alloy as a simulant for aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel. Results of the laboratory-scale experiments indicate that aluminum can be selectively electrotransported from the anode to the cathode, while uranium remains in the anode basket.

Slater, S. A.; Willit, J. L.; Gay, E. C.; Chemical Engineering

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A Novel Non-Platinum Group Electrocatalyst for PEM Fuel Cell Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precious-metal catalysts (predominantly Pt or Pt-based alloys supported on carbon) have traditionally been used to catalyze the electrode reactions in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. However as PEM fuel systems begin to approach commercial reality, there is an impending need to replace Pt with a lower cost alternative. The present study investigates the performance of a carbon-supported tantalum oxide material as a potential oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst for use on the cathode side of the PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assembly. Although bulk tantalum oxide tends to exhibit poor electrochemical performance due to limited electrical conductivity, it displays a high oxygen reduction potential; one that is comparable to Pt. Analysis of the Pourbaix electrochemical equilibrium database also indicates that tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) is chemically stable under the pH and applied potential conditions to which the cathode catalyst is typically exposed during stack operation. Nanoscale tantalum oxide catalysts were fabricated using two approaches, by reactive oxidation sputtering and by direct chemical synthesis, each carried out on a carbon support material. Nanoscale tantalum oxide particles measuring approximately 6nm in size that were sputtered onto carbon paper exhibited a mass-specific current density as high as one-third that of Pt when measured at 0.6V vs. NHE. However because of the two-dimensional nature of this particle-on-paper structure, which limits the overall length of the triple phase boundary junctions where the oxide, carbon paper, and aqueous electrolyte meet, the corresponding area-specific current density was quite low. The second synthesis approach yielded a more extended, three-dimensional structure via chemical deposition of nanoscale tantalum oxide particles on carbon powder. These catalysts exhibited a high ORR onset potential, comparable to that of Pt, and displayed a significant improvement in the area-specific current density. Overall, the highest mass-specific current density of the carbon-powder supported catalyst was ~ 9% of that of Pt.

Kim, Jin Yong; Oh, Takkeun; Shin, Yongsoon; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Weil, K. Scott

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study focused on creating a new tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel performance model and demonstrating the integration of this model into an existing… (more)

Powers, Jeffrey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Transient fission-gas behavior in uranium nitride fuel under proposed space applications. Doctoral thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to investigate whether fission gas swelling and release would be significant factors in a space based nuclear reactor operating under the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) program, the finite element program REDSTONE (Routine For Evaluating Dynamic Swelling in Transient Operational Nuclear Environments) was developed to model the 1-D, spherical geometry diffusion equations describing transient fission gas behavior in a single uranium nitride fuel grain. The equations characterized individual bubbles, rather than bubble groupings. This limits calculations to those scenarios where low temperatures, low burnups, or both were present. Instabilities in the bubble radii calculations forced the implementation of additional constraints limiting the bubble sizes to minimum and maximum (equilibrium) radii. The validity of REDSTONE calculations were checked against analytical solutions for internal consistency and against experimental studies for agreement with swelling and release results.

Deforest, D.L.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Investigation of the effectiveness of smoke suppressant fuel additives for turbojet applications. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven fuel additives were tested to investigate their effectiveness at reducing exhaust stack gas opacity in a turbojet test cell. Exhaust particle sizes and mass concentrations were determined at the engine and stack exhausts using measurements of light transmittance at three frequencies. Particle samples were also collected at the engine exhaust and measured with a scanning electron microscope to verify the optical technique. Nitrous oxide emissions were measured at the test cell stack exhaust. Four of the additives tested were found effective at reducing stack exhaust opacity and particulate mass concentration. None of the additives had any measurable effect on particle diameters. No meaningful changes in particle size or mass occurred between the engine and stack exhausts. The optical technique for determining particle size was verified effective using the scanning electron microscope. No additive had any significant effect on nitrous oxide production.

Bramer, J.R.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Sulfur-tolerant anode materials for solid oxide fuel cell application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the degradation mechanisms for SOFC anodes in the presence of sulfur and recent developments in sulfur-tolerant anodes. There are two primary sulfur-degradation mechanisms for the anode materials: physical absorption of sulfur that blocks the hydrogen reaction sites, and chemical reaction that forms nickel sulfide. The sulfur-tolerant anodes are categorized into three kinds of materials: thiospinels and metal sulfides, metal cermets, and mixed ionic and electronic conductors. Each material has its own advantages and disadvantages, and the combined application of available materials to serve as different functional components in anodes through proper design may be effective to achieve a balance between stability and performance.

Gong, M. (West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV); Liu, X. (West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV); Trembly, J.; Johnson, C.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fuels options conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proceedings of the Fuels Options Conference held May 9-10, 1995 in Atlanta, Georgia are presented. Twenty-three papers were presented at the conference that dealt with fuels outlook; unconventional fuels; fuel specification, purchasing, and contracting; and waste fuels applications. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Breakthrough Vehicle Development - Fuel Cells  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Document describing research and development program for fuel cell power systems for transportation applications.

238

Poly(cyclohexadiene)-Based Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this research project was to create and develop fuel cell membranes having high proton conductivity at high temperatures and high chemical and mechanical durability. Poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) (PCHD) is of interest as an alternative polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) material due to its ring-like structure which is expected to impart superior mechanical and thermal properties, and due to the fact that PCHD can readily be incorporated into a range of homopolymer and copolymer structures. PCHD can be aromatized, sulfonated, or fluorinated, allowing for tuning of key performance structure and properties. These factors include good proton transport, hydrophilicity, permeability (including fuel gas impermeability), good mechanical properties, morphology, thermal stability, crystallinity, and cost. The basic building block, 1,3-cyclohexadiene, is a hydrocarbon monomer that could be inexpensively produced on a commercial scale (pricing typical of other hydrocarbon monomers). Optimal material properties will result in novel low cost PEM membranes engineered for high conductivity at elevated temperatures and low relative humidities, as well as good performance and durability. The primary objectives of this project were: (1) To design, synthesize and characterize new non-Nafion PEM materials that conduct protons at low (25-50%) RH and at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 120 C; and (2) To achieve these objectives, a range of homopolymer and copolymer materials incorporating poly(cyclohexadiene) (PCHD) will be synthesized, derivatized, and characterized. These two objectives have been achieved. Sulfonated and crosslinked PCHD homopolymer membranes exhibit proton conductivities similar to Nafion in the mid-RH range, are superior to Nafion at higher RH, but are poorer than Nafion at RH < 50%. Thus to further improve proton conductivity, particularly at low RH, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was incorporated into the membrane by blending and by copolymerization. Conductivity measurements at 120 C over RH ranging from 20 to 100% using the BekkTech protocol showed much improved proton conductivities. Conductivities for the best of these new membranes exceed the DOE Year 3 milestone of 100 mS/cm at 50% RH at 120 C. Further optimization of these very promising low cost membranes could be pursued in the future.

Mays, Jimmy W.

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

Low Temperature Constrained Sintering of Cerium Gadolinium OxideFilms for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cerium gadolinium oxide (CGO) has been identified as an acceptable solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrolyte at temperatures (500-700 C) where cheap, rigid, stainless steel interconnect substrates can be used. Unfortunately, both the high sintering temperature of pure CGO, >1200 C, and the fact that constraint during sintering often results in cracked, low density ceramic films, have complicated development of metal supported CGO SOFCs. The aim of this work was to find new sintering aids for Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 1.95}, and to evaluate whether they could be used to produce dense, constrained Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 1.95} films at temperatures below 1000 C. To find the optimal sintering aid, Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 1.95} was doped with a variety of elements, of which lithium was found to be the most effective. Dilatometric studies indicated that by doping CGO with 3mol% lithium nitrate, it was possible to sinter pellets to a relative density of 98.5% at 800 C--a full one hundred degrees below the previous low temperature sintering record for CGO. Further, it was also found that a sintering aid's effectiveness could be explained in terms of its size, charge and high temperature mobility. A closer examination of lithium doped Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 indicated that lithium affects sintering by producing a Li{sub 2}O-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CeO{sub 2} liquid at the CGO grain boundaries. Due to this liquid phase sintering, it was possible to produce dense, crack-free constrained films of CGO at the record low temperature of 950 C using cheap, colloidal spray deposition processes. This is the first time dense constrained CGO films have been produced below 1000 C and could help commercialize metal supported ceria based solid oxide fuel cells.

Nicholas, Jason.D.

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

Dynamics, Optimization and Control of a Fuel Cell Based Combined Heat Power (CHP) System for Shipboard Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics, Optimization and Control of a Fuel Cell Based Combined Heat Power (CHP) System, a natural gas fuel processor system (FPS), a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM-FC) and a catalytic) systems based on fuel cells and fuel processing technologies have great potential for future shipboard

Stefanopoulou, Anna

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 50, NO. 1, JANUARY 2001 125 The Application of Neural Networks to Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Neural Networks to Fuel Processors for Fuel-Cell Vehicles Laura C. Iwan and Robert F. Stengel, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Passenger vehicles fueled by hydrocarbons or alco- hols and powered by proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells address world air quality and fuel supply concerns while avoiding hydrogen

Stengel, Robert F.

242

Partial Oxidation Gas Turbine for Power and Hydrogen Co-Production from Coal-Derived Fuel in Industrial Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents a feasibility study of a new type of gas turbine. A partial oxidation gas turbine (POGT) shows potential for really high efficiency power generation and ultra low emissions. There are two main features that distinguish a POGT from a conventional gas turbine. These are associated with the design arrangement and the thermodynamic processes used in operation. A primary design difference of the POGT is utilization of a non?catalytic partial oxidation reactor (POR) in place of a conventional combustor. Another important distinction is that a much smaller compressor is required, one that typically supplies less than half of the air flow required in a conventional gas turbine. From an operational and thermodynamic point of view a key distinguishing feature is that the working fluid, fuel gas provided by the OR, has a much higher specific heat than lean combustion products and more energy per unit mass of fluid can be extracted by the POGT expander than in the conventional systems. The POGT exhaust stream contains unreacted fuel that can be combusted in different bottoming ycle or used as syngas for hydrogen or other chemicals production. POGT studies include feasibility design for conversion a conventional turbine to POGT duty, and system analyses of POGT based units for production of power solely, and combined production of power and yngas/hydrogen for different applications. Retrofit design study was completed for three engines, SGT 800, SGT 400, and SGT 100, and includes: replacing the combustor with the POR, compressor downsizing for about 50% design flow rate, generator replacement with 60 90% ower output increase, and overall unit integration, and extensive testing. POGT performances for four turbines with power output up to 350 MW in POGT mode were calculated. With a POGT as the topping cycle for power generation systems, the power output from the POGT ould be increased up to 90% compared to conventional engine keeping hot section temperatures, pressures, and volumetric flows practically identical. In POGT mode, the turbine specific power (turbine net power per lb mass flow from expander exhaust) is twice the value of the onventional turbine. POGT based IGCC plant conceptual design was developed and major components have been identified. Fuel flexible fluid bed gasifier, and novel POGT unit are the key components of the 100 MW IGCC plant for co producing electricity, hydrogen and/or yngas. Plant performances were calculated for bituminous coal and oxygen blown versions. Various POGT based, natural gas fueled systems for production of electricity only, coproduction of electricity and hydrogen, and co production of electricity and syngas for gas to liquid and hemical processes were developed and evaluated. Performance calculations for several versions of these systems were conducted. 64.6 % LHV efficiency for fuel to electricity in combined cycle was achieved. Such a high efficiency arise from using of syngas from POGT exhaust s a fuel that can provide required temperature level for superheated steam generation in HRSG, as well as combustion air preheating. Studies of POGT materials and combustion instabilities in POR were conducted and results reported. Preliminary market assessment was performed, and recommendations for POGT systems applications in oil industry were defined. POGT technology is ready to proceed to the engineering prototype stage, which is recommended.

Joseph Rabovitser

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Effect Of Platooning on Fuel Consumption of Class 8 Vehicles Over a Range of Speeds, Following Distances, and Mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project evaluates fuel consumption results of two Class 8 tractor-trailer combinations platooned together compared to their standalone fuel consumption. A series of ten modified SAE Type II J1321 fuel consumption track tests were performed to document fuel consumption of two platooned vehicles and a control vehicle at varying steady-state speeds, following distances, and gross vehicle weights (GVWs). The steady-state speeds ranged from 55 mph to 70 mph, the following distances ranged from a 20-ft following distance to a 75-ft following distance, and the GVWs were 65K lbs and 80K lbs. All tractors involved had U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SmartWay-compliant aerodynamics packages installed, and the trailers were equipped with side skirts. Effects of vehicle speed, following distance, and GVW on fuel consumption were observed and analyzed. The platooning demonstration system used in this study consisted of radar systems, Dedicated Short-Range Communication (DSRC) vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications, vehicle braking and torque control interface, cameras and driver displays. The lead tractor consistently demonstrated an improvement in average fuel consumption reduction as following distance decreased, with results showing 2.7% to 5.3% fuel savings at a GVW of 65k. The trailing vehicle achieved fuel consumption savings ranging from 2.8% to 9.7%; tests during which the engine cooling fan did not operate achieved savings of 8.4% to 9.7%. 'Team' fuel savings, considering the platooned vehicles as one, ranged from 3.7% to 6.4%, with the best combined result being for 55 mph, 30-ft following distance, and 65k GVW.

Lammert, M. P.; Duran, A.; Diez, J.; Burton, K.; Nicholson, A.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A model for correlating properties with molecular structure and its application to fuel/hydrocarbon processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural indices such as n (carbon number), z (hydrogen deficiency C{sub n}H{sub 2n+z}) and i (isomeric deviation from the normal compound) are defined to characterize the molecular structure in an unambiguous manner. The parameters are defined in a manner that results in complete orthogonality, one with any of the others. Classification of hydrocarbon compounds into z series yields a systematic change of property with molecular weight in a mathematically definable fashion. For pure compounds, molecular weight as a function of n and z is correlated with properties using regression techniques. Boiling point, density, freezing point, gravimetric and volumetric heat of combustion, heat of vaporization, heat capacity and viscosity were correlated for the z series of paraffins (2), cycloparaffins (0), alkyldecalins(-2), alkylbenzenes(-6), alkyltetralins(-8), and alkylnaphthalenes(-12). The equation form: P{sub z} = (a{sub z}m + b{sub z})/(m + c{sub z}) was found to fit well for all n and z values correlated. Isomeric structural effects may be expressed through an i parameter that quantifies the effects of methyl substituents, adjacency of bonds and symmetry of the molecule. Properties such as boiling point can be related to this parameter. Equations have been derived for properties of mixtures from pure compound data. A computer program for optimizing the composition of various components of fuel has been developed. Consideration has been given to the historic problem of accurate molecular weight measurements of mixtures. A procedure for calculating true molecular weights based on quantification of the thermodynamics of the associated state has been devised. Results suggest that conventional methods based on VPO may be highly erroneous.

Devineni, A.V.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Application of Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation to Natural Gas-Fueled Reciprocating Engines (HALO)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two key challenges facing Natural Gas Engines used for cogeneration purposes are spark plug life and high NOx emissions. Using Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation (HALO), these two keys issues are simultaneously addressed. HALO operation, as demonstrated in this project, allows stable engine operation to be achieved at ultra-lean (relative air/fuel ratios of 2) conditions, which virtually eliminates NOx production. NOx values of 10 ppm (0.07 g/bhp-hr NO) for 8% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) supplementation at an exhaust O2 level of 10% were demonstrated, which is a 98% NOx emissions reduction compared to the leanest unsupplemented operating condition. Spark ignition energy reduction (which will increase ignition system life) was carried out at an oxygen level of 9%, leading to a NOx emission level of 28 ppm (0.13 g/bhp-hr NO). The spark ignition energy reduction testing found that spark energy could be reduced 22% (from 151 mJ supplied to the coil) with 13% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) hydrogen supplementation, and even further reduced 27% with 17% hydrogen supplementation, with no reportable effect on NOx emissions for these conditions and with stable engine torque output. Another important result is that the combustion duration was shown to be only a function of hydrogen supplementation, not a function of ignition energy (until the ignitability limit was reached). The next logical step leading from these promising results is to see how much the spark energy reduction translates into increase in spark plug life, which may be accomplished by durability testing.

Chad Smutzer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 Side Studies 5.1 Depleted Uranium (DU)-fueled LIFEoperational approach for a depleted uranium (DU) LIFE engineof Energy (U.S. ) Depleted Uranium Effective Full Power Days

Powers, Jeffrey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Research and development of Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Fuel cell infrastructure and commercialization study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper has been prepared in partial fulfillment of a subcontract from the Allison Division of General Motors under the terms of Allison`s contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-90CH10435). The objective of this task (The Fuel Cell Infrastructure and Commercialization Study) is to describe and prepare preliminary evaluations of the processes which will be required to develop fuel cell engines for commercial and private vehicles. This report summarizes the work undertaken on this study. It addresses the availability of the infrastructure (services, energy supplies) and the benefits of creating public/private alliances to accelerate their commercialization. The Allison prime contract includes other tasks related to the research and development of advanced solid polymer fuel cell engines and preparation of a demonstration automotive vehicle. The commercialization process starts when there is sufficient understanding of a fuel cell engine`s technology and markets to initiate preparation of a business plan. The business plan will identify each major step in the design of fuel cell (or electrochemical) engines, evaluation of the markets, acquisition of manufacturing facilities, and the technical and financial resources which will be required. The process will end when one or more companies have successfully developed and produced fuel cell engines at a profit. This study addressed the status of the information which will be required to prepare business plans, develop the economic and market acceptance data, and to identify the mobility, energy and environment benefits of electrochemical or fuel cell engines. It provides the reader with information on the status of fuel cell or electrochemical engine development and their relative advantages over competitive propulsion systems. Recommendations and descriptions of additional technical and business evaluations that are to be developed in more detail in Phase II, are included.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Developing TiAIN Coatings for Intermediate Temperature-Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnect Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TiN-type coatings have potential to be used as SOFC interconnect coatings SOFC because of their low resistance and high temperature stability. In this research, various (Ti,Al)N coatings were deposited on stainless steels by filtered-arc method. ASR and XRD tests were conducted on these coatings, and SEM/EDAX analysis were conducted after ASR and XRD tests. SEM/EDAX analyses show that (Ti,Al)N remains stable at temperature up to 700°C. It is also indicated that Al has beneficial effect on the stability of TiN type coatings. At 900°C, (Ti-30Al)N is fully oxidized and some of (Ti-50Al)N coating still remains as nitride. The analyses on cross-sectional samples show that these coatings are effective barrier to the Cr migration. In summary, (Ti.Al)N coatings are good candidates for the SOFC interconnect applications at 700°C. The future directions of this research are to improve the stability of these coatings by alloy-doping and to develop multi-layer coatings.

Liu, X. (West Virginia University); Johnson, C.D.; Li, C. (West Virginia University); Xu, J. (West Virginia University); Cross, C.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Coal-fueled diesel system for stationary power applications -- Technology development. Final report, March 1988--June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Cooper-Bessemer and Arthur D. Little have developed the technology to enable coal-water slurry to be utilized in large-bore, medium-speed diesel engines. The target application is modular power generation in the 10 to 100 MW size, with each plant using between two and eight engines. Such systems are expected to be economically attractive in the non-utility generation market after 2000, when oil and natural gas prices are expected to escalate rapidly compared to the price of coal. During this development program, over 1,000 hours of prototype engine operation have been achieved on coal-water slurry (CWS), including over 100 hours operation of a six-cylinder, 1.8 MW engine with an integrated emissions control system. Arthur D. Little, Inc., managed the coal-fueled diesel development, with Cooper-Bessemer as the principal subcontractor responsible for the engine design and testing. Several key technical advances which enable the viability of the coal-fueled diesel engine were made under this program. Principal among them are the development and demonstration of (1) durable injection nozzles; (2) an integrated emissions control system; ad (3) low-cost clean coal slurry formulations optimized for the engine. Significant advances in all subsystem designs were made to develop the full-scale Cooper-Bessemer coal engine components in preparation for a 100-hour proof-of-concept test of an integrated system, including emissions controls. The Clean Coal Diesel power plant of the future will provide a cost-competitive, low-emissions, modular, coal-based power generation option to the non-utility generation, small utility, independent power producer, and cogeneration markets. Combined cycle efficiencies will be approximately 48% (lower heating value basis) and installed cost will be approximately $1,300/kW (1992 dollars).

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in Combined Heat and Power and Backup Power Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total cost of ownership model is described for low temperature proton exchange membrane stationary fuel cell systems for combined heat and power (CHP) applications from 1-250kW and backup power applications from 1-50kW. System designs and functional specifications for these two applications were developed across the range of system power levels. Bottom-up cost estimates were made for balance of plant costs, and detailed direct cost estimates for key fuel cell stack components were derived using design-for-manufacturing-and-assembly techniques. The development of high throughput, automated processes achieving high yield are projected to reduce the cost for fuel cell stacks to the $300/kW level at an annual production volume of 100 MW. Several promising combinations of building types and geographical location in the U.S. were identified for installation of fuel cell CHP systems based on the LBNL modelling tool DER CAM. Life-cycle modelling and externality assessment were done for hotels and hospitals. Reduced electricity demand charges, heating credits and carbon credits can reduce the effective cost of electricity ($/kWhe) by 26-44percent in locations such as Minneapolis, where high carbon intensity electricity from the grid is displaces by a fuel cell system operating on reformate fuel. This project extends the scope of existing cost studies to include externalities and ancillary financial benefits and thus provides a more comprehensive picture of fuel cell system benefits, consistent with a policy and incentive environment that increasingly values these ancillary benefits. The project provides a critical, new modelling capacity and should aid a broad range of policy makers in assessing the integrated costs and benefits of fuel cell systems versus other distributed generation technologies.

University of California, Berkeley; Wei, Max; Lipman, Timothy; Mayyas, Ahmad; Chien, Joshua; Chan, Shuk Han; Gosselin, David; Breunig, Hanna; Stadler, Michael; McKone, Thomas; Beattie, Paul; Chong, Patricia; Colella, Whitney; James, Brian

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

INVESTIGATION OF NOVEL ALLOY TiC-Ni-Ni3Al FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL INTERCONNECT APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cell interconnect materials must meet stringent requirements. Such interconnects must operate at temperatures approaching 800 C while resisting oxidation and reduction, which can occur from the anode and cathode materials and the operating environment. They also must retain their electrical conductivity under these conditions and possess compatible coefficients of thermal expansion as the anode and cathode. Results are presented in this report for fuel cell interconnect candidate materials currently under investigation based upon nano-size titanium carbide (TiC) powders. The TiC is liquid phase sintered with either nickel (Ni) or nickel-aluminide (Ni{sub 3}Al) in varying concentrations. The oxidation resistance of the submicron grain TiC-metal materials is presented as a function weight change versus time at 700 C and 800 C for varying content of metal/intermetallic in the system. Electrical conductivity at 800 C as a function of time is also presented for TiC-Ni to demonstrate the vitality of these materials for interconnect applications. TGA studies showed that the weight gain was 0.8 mg/cm{sup 2} for TiC(30)-Ni(30wt.%) after 100 hours in wet air at 800 C and the weight gain was calculated to be 0.5205 mg/cm{sup 2} for TiC(30)- Ni(10 wt.%) after 100 hours at 700 C and 100 hours at 800 C. At room temperature the electrical conductivity was measured to be 2444 1/[ohm.cm] for TiC-Ni compositions. The electrical conductivities at 800 C in air was recorded to be 19 1/[ohm.cm] after 125 hours. Two identical samples were supplied to PNNL (Dr. Jeff Stevenson) for ASR testing during the pre-decision period and currently they are being tested there. Fabrication, oxidation resistance and electrical conductivity studies indicate that TiC-Ni-Ni{sub 3}Al ternary appears to be a very important system for the development of interconnect composition for solid oxide fuel cells.

Rasit Koc; Geoffrey Swift; Hua Xie

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

252

Novel Surface Architecture Synthesis for Gas Separation and Fuel-Cell Catalyst Applications James Guthrie, Georgia Institute of Technology, SURF 2010 Fellow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel Surface Architecture Synthesis for Gas Separation and Fuel-Cell Catalyst Applications James-shell nanoparticle, Pt was deposited onto a flat surface substrate. Three separate substrates were used, Au(111 not significantly change over different voltages [3]. STM work was done using electrochemically etched tungsten tips

Li, Mo

253

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2007, 2010, and 2015, and is the first annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

254

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

255

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

256

SYSTEMS MODELING OF AMMONIA BORANE BEAD REACTOR FOR OFF-BOARD REGENERABLE HYDROGEN STORAGE IN PEM FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Out of the materials available for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) has a high hydrogen storage capacity (upto 19.6% by weight for the release of three hydrogen molecules). Therefore, AB was chosen in our chemical hydride simulation studies. A model for the AB bead reactor system was developed to study the system performance and determine the energy, mass and volume requirements for off-board regenerable hydrogen storage. The system includes hot and cold augers, ballast tank and reactor, product tank, H2 burner and a radiator. One dimensional models based on conservation of mass, species and energy were used to predict important state variables such as reactant and product concentrations, temperatures of various components, flow rates, along with pressure in the reactor system. Control signals to various components are governed by a control system which is modeled as an independent subsystem. Various subsystem components in the models were coded as C language S-functions and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. Preliminary system simulation results for a start-up case and for a transient drive cycle indicate accurate trends in the reactor system dynamics.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Rassat, Scot D.; King, Dale A.; Herling, Darrell R.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Assessment of the Current Level of Automation in the Manufacture of Fuel Cell Systems for Combined Heat and Power Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is interested in supporting manufacturing research and development (R&D) for fuel cell systems in the 10-1,000 kilowatt (kW) power range relevant to stationary and distributed combined heat and power applications, with the intent to reduce manufacturing costs and increase production throughput. To assist in future decision-making, DOE requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide a baseline understanding of the current levels of adoption of automation in manufacturing processes and flow, as well as of continuous processes. NREL identified and visited or interviewed key manufacturers, universities, and laboratories relevant to the study using a standard questionnaire. The questionnaire covered the current level of vertical integration, the importance of quality control developments for automation, the current level of automation and source of automation design, critical balance of plant issues, potential for continuous cell manufacturing, key manufacturing steps or processes that would benefit from DOE support for manufacturing R&D, the potential for cell or stack design changes to support automation, and the relationship between production volume and decisions on automation.

Ulsh, M.; Wheeler, D.; Protopappas, P.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Laminated exfoliated graphite composite-metal compositions for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically conductive laminate composition for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications. The laminate composition comprises at least a thin metal sheet having two opposed exterior surfaces and a first exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the first of the two exterior surfaces of the metal sheet wherein the exfoliated graphite composite sheet comprises: (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite and (b) a binder or matrix material to bond the expanded graphite for forming a cohered sheet, wherein the binder or matrix material is between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet. Preferably, the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet further comprises particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the non-expandable particles and the expanded graphite. Further preferably, the laminate comprises a second exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the second surface of the metal sheet to form a three-layer laminate. Surface flow channels and other desired geometric features can be built onto the exterior surfaces of the laminate to form a flow field plate or bipolar plate. The resulting laminate has an exceptionally high thickness-direction conductivity and excellent resistance to gas permeation.

Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

259

Soft X-Ray Spectroscopic Study of Dense Strontium-Doped Lanthanum Manganite Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modification of the Mn charge-state, chemical composition and electronic structure of La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 (LSMO) cathodes for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications remains an area of interest, due to the poorly understood enhanced catalytic activity (often referred to as the "burn-in" phenomenon) observed after many hours of operation. Using a combination of core-level X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray emission/absorption spectroscopy (XES/XAS), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and resonant photoemission spectroscopy (RPES), we have monitored the evolution of these properties in LSMO at various stages of fabrication and operation. By rapidly quenching and sealing in vacuum, we were able to directly compare the pristine (as-fabricated) LSMO with both "heat-treated" (800°C in air, and no bias) and "burnt-in" (800°C in air, -1 V bias) LSMO cathodes i.e. before and after the activation observed in our electrochemical impendence spectroscopy measurements. Comparison between the O K-edge XAS/XES and Mn L3,2-edge XAS of pristine and “burnt-in” LSMO cathodes revealed a severe change in the oxygen environment along with a reduced Mn2+ presence near the surface following activation. The change in the oxygen environment is attributed to SrxMnyOz formation, along with possible passive SrO and Mn3O4 species. We present evidence from our “heat-treated” samples that SrxMnyOz regions form at elevated temperatures in air before the application of a cathodic bias. Our core-level XPS, Mn L3,2-edge RIXS and Mn L3 RPES studies of “heat-treated” and pristine LSMO determined that SOFC environments result in La-deficiency (severest near the surface) and stronger Mn4+ contribution, leading to the increased insulating character of the cathode prior to activation. The passive Mn2+ species near the surface and increased hole-doping (>0.6) of the LSMO upon exposure to the operating environment are considered responsible for the initially poor performance of the SOFC. Meanwhile, the improved oxygen reduction following the application of a cathodic bias is considered to be due to enhanced bulk oxygen-ion diffusion resulting from the migration of Mn2+ ions towards the LSMO/electrolyte interface and the SrxMnyOz regions facilitating enhanced bulk oxygen reduction reaction kinetics.

Piper, L.F.J.; Preston, Andrew R.H.; Cho, Sang Wan; DeMasi, Alexander; Chen, Bin; Laverock, J.; Smith, K. E.; Miara, Lincoln J.; Davis, Jacob N.; Basu, Soumendra; Pal, Uday B.; Gopalan, Srikanth; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Matsuura, A. Y.; Glans, P.A.; Guo, Jianzhong

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

260

Supervised learning of a regression model based on latent process. Application to the estimation of fuel cell life time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of fuel cell life time Raďssa Onanena(1) , Faicel Chamroukhi(1) , Latifa Oukhellou(1)(2) , Denis Candusso to estimate fuel cell duration time from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. It consists for the estimation of fuel cell time duration. The performances of the proposed approach are evaluated

Chamroukhi, Faicel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mathematical modeling of solid oxide fuel cells using hydrocarbon fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency conversion devices that use hydrogen or light hydrocarbon (HC) fuels in stationary applications to produce quiet and clean power. While successful, HC-fueled SOFCs face ...

Lee, Won Yong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Application of /sup 252/Cf-source driven noise analysis measurements for subcriticality of HFIR fuel elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The approach-to-critical measurements reported were for a plate-type fuel element where the height of the water moderator and side and top reflector were increased. Measurements were also performed with each of the two annuli of the fuel element to verify both the presence of boron in the fuel plates and the proper uranium loading prior to assembly of the two annuli for full submersion measurements. Measurements were also performed with detectors external to the reflector (> 15 cm of water on top, bottom, and side) for the assembled, submerged HFIR fuel element.

King, W.T.; Mihalczo, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and potential application to fire and fuels management for the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for the Savannah River Site in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. using three data sources: FCCS, LANDFIRE, and SWRA. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the U.S. using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern U.S. using satellite imagery.

Kurth, Laurie; Hollingsworth, LaWen; Shea, Dan

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advancement in Fuel Spray and Combustion Modeling for Compression Ignition Engine Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advancement in...

265

Coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The introduction of coal based fuel systems such as coal/air and coal water mixtures was an attempt to minimize the use of heavy fuel oils in large scale power generation processes. This need was based on forecasts of fuel reserves and future pricing of fuel oils, therefore economic considerations predominated over environmental benefits, if any, which could result from widespread use of these fuels. Coal continued as the major fuel used in the power generation industry and combustion systems were developed to minimize gaseous emissions, such as NOx. Increasing availability of natural gas led to consideration of its use in combination with coal in fuel systems involving combined cycle or topping cycle operations. Dual fuel coal natural gas operations also offered the possibility of improved performance in comparison to 100% coal based fuel systems. Economic considerations have more recently looked at emulsification of heavy residual liquid fuels for consumption in power generation boiler and Orimulsion has emerged as a prime example of this alternative fuel technology. The paper will discuss some aspects of the burner technology related to the application of these various coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels in the power generation industry.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The introduction of coal based fuel systems such as coal/air and coal water mixtures was an attempt to minimise the use of heavy fuel oils in large scale power generation processes. This need was based on forecasts of fuel reserves and future pricing of fuel oils, therefore economic considerations predominated over environmental benefits, if any, which could result from widespread use of these fuels. Coal continued as the major fuel used in the power generation industry and combustion systems were developed to minimise gaseous emissions, such as NO{sub x}. Increasing availability of natural gas led to consideration of its use in combination with coal in fuel systems involving combined cycle or topping cycle operations. Dual fuel coal natural gas operations also offered the possibility of improved performance in comparison to 100% coal based fuel systems. Economic considerations have more recently looked at emulsification of heavy residual liquid fuels for consumption in power generation boiler and Orimulsion has emerged as a prime example of this alternative fuel technology. The next sections of the paper will discuss some aspects of the burner technology related to the application of these various coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels in the power generation industry.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R. [ABB Combustion Services Limited, Derby (United Kingdom)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the analysis and modeling approaches used in the evaluation for criticality-control applications of the neutron-absorbing structural-amorphous metal (SAM) coatings. The applications of boron-containing high-performance corrosion-resistant material (HPCRM)--amorphous metal as the neutron-absorbing coatings to the metallic support structure can enhance criticality safety controls for spent nuclear fuel in baskets inside storage containers, transportation casks, and disposal containers. The use of these advanced iron-based, corrosion-resistant materials to prevent nuclear criticality in transportation, aging, and disposal containers would be extremely beneficial to the nuclear waste management programs.

Choi, J

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

268

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 16, July--September, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by September 1997. 28 refs., 13 figs., 19 tabs.

Shields, G.L.; Moro, N.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

1996-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Optimization of Fuel Cell System Operating Conditions for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulation tool for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal ofApplication on Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles, 2008. Acsystem for direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles Fig. 3 Driver

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

A highway accident involving unirradiated nuclear fuel in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the early morning of Dec. 16, 1991, a severe accident occurred when a passenger vehicle traveling in the wrong direction collided with a tractor trailer carrying 24 unirradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in 12 containers on Interstate I-91 in Springfield, Massachusetts. The purpose of this report is to document the mechanical circumstances of the severe accident, confirm the nature and quantity of the radioactive materials involved, and assess the physical environment to which the containers were exposed and the response of the containers and their contents. The report consists of five major sections. The first section describes the circumstances and conditions of the accident and the finding of facts. The second describes the containers, the unirradiated nuclear fuel assemblies, and the tie down arrangement used for the trailer. The third describes the damage sustained during the accident to the tractor, trailer, containers, and unirradiated nuclear fuel assemblies. The fourth evaluates the accident environment and its effects on the containers and their contents. The final section gives conclusions derived from the analysis and fact finding investigation. During this severe accident, only minor injuries occurred, and at no time was the public health and safety at risk.

Carlson, R.W.; Fischer, L.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

various powertrains and alternative fuel options have beenthe corresponding breakeven alternative fuel price needed totruck, hybridization, alternative, fuel cell, fuel economy,

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Fossil fuels -- future fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Critical analysis of plume containment modeling in a thin heterogeneous unconfined aquifer: application to a bulk fuel storage terminal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reported hydrocarbon contamination and subsequent consultant work at a bulk fuel storage terminal has instigated the need to critically analyze modeling techniques in thin, heterogeneous, unconfined aquifers. This study provides an aquifer...

Mejia, Karl Edward

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2009 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report is the third annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing cost of complete 80 kWnet direct hydrogen proton exch

275

Mass Production Cost Estimation For Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systesm for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing costs of complete 80 kWnet direct?hydrogen proton ex

276

Application of Self-Propagating High Temperature Synthesis to the Fabrication of Actinide Bearing Nitride and Other Ceramic Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project uses an exothermic combustion synthesis reaction, termed self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), to produce high quality, reproducible nitride fuels and other ceramic type nuclear fuels (cercers and cermets, etc.) in conjunction with the fabrication of transmutation fuels. The major research objective of the project is determining the fundamental SHS processing parameters by first using manganese as a surrogate for americium to produce dense Zr-Mn-N ceramic compounds. These fundamental principles will then be transferred to the production of dense Zr-Am-N ceramic materials. A further research objective in the research program is generating fundamental SHS processing data to the synthesis of (i) Pu-Am-Zr-N and (ii) U-Pu-Am-N ceramic fuels. In this case, Ce will be used as the surrogate for Pu, Mn as the surrogate for Am, and depleted uranium as the surrogate for U. Once sufficient fundamental data has been determined for these surrogate systems, the information will be transferred to Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for synthesis of Zr-Am-N, Pu-Am-Zr-N and U-Pu-Am-N ceramic fuels. The high vapor pressures of americium (Am) and americium nitride (AmN) are cause for concern in producing nitride ceramic nuclear fuel that contains Am. Along with the problem of Am retention during the sintering phases of current processing methods, are additional concerns of producing a consistent product of desirable homogeneity, density and porosity. Similar difficulties have been experienced during the laboratory scale process development stage of producing metal alloys containing Am wherein compact powder sintering methods had to be abandoned. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop a low-temperature or low–heat fuel fabrication process for the synthesis of Am-containing ceramic fuels. Self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS), also called combustion synthesis, offers such an alternative process for the synthesis of Am nitride fuels. Although SHS takes thermodynamic advantage of the high combustion temperatures of these exothermic SHS reactions to synthesize the required compounds, the very fast heating, reaction and cooling rates can kinetically generate extremely fast reaction rates and facilitate the retention of volatile species within the rapidly propagating SHS reaction front. The initial objective of the research program is to use Mn as the surrogate for Am to synthesize a reproducible, dense, high quality Zr-Mn-N ceramic compound. Having determined the fundamental SHS reaction parameters and optimized SHS processing steps using Mn as the surrogate for Am, the technology will be transferred to Idaho National Laboratory to successfully synthesize a high quality Zr-Am-N ceramic fuel.

John J. Moore, Marissa M. Reigel, Collin D. Donohoue

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

277

Application of Self-Propagating High Temperature Synthesis to the Fabrication of Actinide Bearing Nitride and Other Ceramic Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high vapor pressures of americium (Am) and americium nitride (AmN) are cause for concern in producing nitride ceramic nuclear fuel that contains Am. Along with the problem of Am retention during the sintering phases of current processing methods, are additional concerns of producing a consistent product of desirable homogeneity, density and porosity. Similar difficulties have been experienced during the laboratory scale process development stage of producing metal alloys containing Am wherein compact powder sintering methods had to be abandoned. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop a low-temperature or low–heat fuel fabrication process for the synthesis of Am-containing ceramic fuels. Self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS), also called combustion synthesis, offers such an alternative process for the synthesis of Am nitride fuels. Although SHS takes thermodynamic advantage of the high combustion temperatures of these exothermic SHS reactions to synthesize the required compounds, the very fast heating, reaction and cooling rates can kinetically generate extremely fast reaction rates and facilitate the retention of volatile species within the rapidly propagating SHS reaction front. The initial objective of the research program is to use Mn as the surrogate for Am to synthesize a reproducible, dense, high quality Zr-Mn-N ceramic compound. Having determined the fundamental SHS reaction parameters and optimized SHS processing steps using Mn as the surrogate for Am, the technology will be transferred to Idaho National Laboratory to successfully synthesize a high quality Zr-Am-N ceramic fuel.

John J. Moore, Douglas E. Burkes, Collin D. Donohoue, Marissa M. Reigel, J. Rory Kennedy

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

278

Pipe crawlers: Versatile adaptations for real applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A problem at the Savannah River Site requires the unique application of a pipe crawler. A number of stainless steel pipes buried in concrete require ultrasonic inspection of the heat affected zones of the welds for detection of flaws or cracks. The paper describes the utilization of an inch-worm motion pipe crawler which negotiates a 90 degree reducing elbow with significant changes in diameter and vertical sections before entering the area of concern. After a discussion of general considerations and problem description, special requirements to meet the objectives and the design approach regarding the tractor, control system, instrument carriage, and radiation protection are discussed. 2 refs., 11 figs. (MB)

Hapstack, M.; Talarek, T.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Plasma Barodiffusion in Inertial-Confinement-Fusion Implosions: Application to Observed Yield Anomalies in Thermonuclear Fuel Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anomalies in Thermonuclear Fuel Mixtures Peter Amendt, O. L. Landen, and H. F. Robey Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551, USA C. K. Li and R. D. Petrasso Plasma Science and Fusion performance in general, and upcoming igni- tion tuning campaigns on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [4

280

Analyzing Nuclear Fuel Cycles from Isotopic Ratios of Waste Products Applicable to Measurement by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive study was conducted to determine isotopic ratios of nuclides in spent fuel that may be utilized to reveal historical characteristics of a nuclear reactor cycle. This forensic information is important to determine the origin of unknown nuclear waste. The distribution of isotopes in waste products provides information about a nuclear fuel cycle, even when the isotopes of uranium and plutonium are removed through chemical processing. Several different reactor cycles of the PWR, BWR, CANDU, and LMFBR were simulated for this work with the ORIGEN-ARP and ORIGEN 2.2 codes. The spent fuel nuclide concentrations of these reactors were analyzed to find the most informative isotopic ratios indicative of irradiation cycle length and reactor design. Special focus was given to long-lived and stable fission products that would be present many years after their creation. For such nuclides, mass spectrometry analysis methods often have better detection limits than classic gamma-ray spectroscopy. The isotopic ratios {sup 151}Sm/{sup 146}Sm, {sup 149}Sm/{sup 146}Sm, and {sup 244}Cm/{sup 246}Cm were found to be good indicators of fuel cycle length and are well suited for analysis by accelerator mass spectroscopy.

Biegalski, S R; Whitney, S M; Buchholz, B

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Report on the workshop "Decay spectroscopy at CARIBU: advanced fuel cycle applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics". 14-16 April 2011, Argonne National Laboratory, USA.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop on 'Decay Spectroscopy at CARIBU: Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics' will be held at Argonne National Laboratory on April 14-16, 2011. The aim of the workshop is to discuss opportunities for decay studies at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS facility with emphasis on advanced fuel cycle (AFC) applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics research. The workshop will consist of review and contributed talks. Presentations by members of the local groups, outlining the status of relevant in-house projects and availabile equipment, will also be organized. time will also be set aside to discuss and develop working collaborations for future decay studies at CARIBU. Topics of interest include: (1) Decay data of relevance to AFC applications with emphasis on reactor decay heat; (2) Discrete high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy following radioactive decya and related topics; (3) Calorimetric studies of neutron-rich fission framgents using Total ABsorption Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (TAGS) technique; (4) Beta-delayed neutron emissions and related topics; and (5) Decay data needs for nuclear astrophysics.

Kondev, F.; Carpenter, M.P.; Chowdhury, P.; Clark, J.A.; Lister, C.J.; Nichols, A.L.; Swewryniak, D. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (Univ. of Massachusetts); (Univ. of Surrey)

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

Turbocharging of small internal combustion engine as a means of improving engine/application system fuel economy-further turbocharger improvements. Final report Oct 80-Feb 82  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improvements to a small diesel engine turbocharger were made based on data gathered during a previous Army contract. The improved turbocharger was fabricated and tested on a small, four cylinder, 239 CID diesel engine. Engine dynamometer test data revealed a 2 to 9 percent reduction in fuel consumption at all points over the operating envelope. A turbocharger was operated for 1011 hours at speeds between 70000 and 78000 rpm without incident. The ball bearings were in excellent condition at the end of the test. A math model of the engine and turbocharger was generated. The model was used to estimate 13 Mode Federal Diesel Emissions Cycle, the LA4 driving cycle and the application of the variable area turbine nozzle (VATN) turbocharger to a diesel engine driven generator set. A recommendation was made to build a gen set demo unit. A fuel savings of 8 to 10 percent was estimated for a 30KW DED generator set.

Arvin, J.R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Finial Scientific/Technical Report: Application of a Circulating Fluidized Bed Process for the Chemical Looping Combustion of Solid Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical Looping Combustion is a novel combustion technology for the inherent separation of the greenhouse gas, CO{sub 2}. In 1983, Richter and Knoche proposed reversible combustion, which utilized both the oxidation and reduction of metal. Metal associated with its oxidized form as an oxygen carrier was circulated between two reactors--oxidizer and reducer. In the reducer, the solid oxygen carrier reacts with the fuel to produce CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and elemental metal only. Pure CO{sub 2} will be obtained in the exit gas stream from the reducer after H{sub 2}O is condensed. The pure CO{sub 2} is ready for subsequent sequestration. In the oxidizer, the elemental metal reacts with air to form metal oxide and separate oxygen from nitrogen. Only nitrogen and some unused oxygen are emitted from the oxidizer. The advantage of CLC compared to normal combustion is that CO{sub 2} is not diluted with nitrogen but obtained in a relatively pure form without any energy needed for separation. In addition to the energy-free purification of CO{sub 2}, the CLC process also provides two other benefits. First, NO{sub x} formation can be largely eliminated. Secondly, the thermal efficiency of a CLC system is very high. Presently, the CLC process has only been used with natural gas. An oxygen carrier based on an energy balance analysis and thermodynamics analysis was selected. Copper (Cu) seems to be the best choice for the CLC system for solid fuels. From this project, the mechanisms of CuO reduction by solid fuels may be as follows: (1) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are available, reduction of CuO could start at about 400 C or less. (2) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are unavailable and the reduction temperature is lower, reduction of CuO could occur at an onset temperature of about 500 C, char gasification reactivity in CO{sub 2} was lower at lower temperatures. (3) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are unavailable and the reduction temperature is higher than 750 C, all reaction reactivities were improved, especially the CO{sub 2} gasification reactivity of char. Thus, the reduction of CuO by the gasification product CO could proceed quickly. Based on the results obtained, the following coal characteristics would be desirable for the Chemical Looping Combustion process: high volatile matter with a high reactivity of the char produced. PRB coal meets these criteria while being comparatively less expensive and also very abundant. The high moisture content present in PRB coal might also increase the reactivity for char gasification through the development of pore structure and specific surface area in the char during pyrolysis. Biomass materials are also suitable, considering the reaction mechanism of CLC system of solid fuels. The feasibility of the chemical looping combustion process of solid fuels was verified by focusing on PRB coal and biomass. Based on PRB coal as the preferred solid fuel in the development of the CLC system, the mass, energy and system in a dual reactor recirculation system has been determined. In the Cu oxidation tests, it was confirmed that the heating rate is the most important effect on the Cu oxidation process. Lower heating rates and lower operational temperatures would result in incomplete conversion of Cu to CuO. Cu{sub 2}O may be the intermediate product. The operating temperature did not affect the reaction rate of the oxidation process. Under any operating conditions, the exothermic properties are clearly shown.

Dr. Wei-Ping Pan; Dr. John T. Riley

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

284

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: The Application of High Energy Ignition and Boosting/Mixing Technology to Increase Fuel Economy in Spark Ignition Gasoline Engines by Increasing EGR Dilution Capability  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by General Motors LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the application of high...

285

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conventional truck; the hydrogen fuel cell truck can improveconventional truck; the hydrogen fuel cell truck can improveLNG engines, fuel cell vehicles using hydrogen, and battery

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

An investigation of high pressure/late cycle injection of CNG (compressed natural gas) as a fuel for rail applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a demonstration effort to investigate the use of natural gas in a medium-speed diesel engine. The effort was unique in the sense that natural gas was injected directly into the combustion chamber late in the compression stroke, as a high pressure gas rather than through low pressure fumigation or low pressure injection early in the compression stroke. Tests were performed on a laboratory two-cylinder, two-stroke cycle medium-speed diesel engine in an attempt to define its ability to operate on the high pressure/late cycle injection concept and to define the performance and emission characteristics of the engine under such operation. A small quantity of No.-2 diesel fuel was injected into the cylinder slightly before the gas injection to be used as an ignition source for the gas. Pilot (diesel fuel) and main (natural gas) timing and injection duration were systematically varied to optimize engine performance. The test demonstrated that the medium-speed engine was capable of attaining full rated speed and load (unlike the low pressure approach) with very low percentages of pilot injection with the absence of knock. Thermal efficiency was as much as 10 percent less than thermal efficiency levels obtained with neat diesel fuel. This was primarily due to the placement and injection characteristics of the pilot and main injectors. Optimization of the injection system would undoubtedly result in increased thermal efficiency. 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Wakenell, J.F.; O'Neal, G.G.; Baker, Q.A.; Urban, C.M.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

RERTR program activities related to the development and application of new LEU fuels. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor; low-enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The statue of the U.S. Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a brief outline of RERTR Program objectives and goals, program accomplishments are discussed with emphasis on the development, demonstration and application of new LEU fuels. Most program activities have proceeded as planned, and a combination of two silicide fuels (U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al) holds excellent promise for achieving the long-term program goals. Current plans and schedules project the uranium density of qualified RERTR fuels for plate-type reactors to grow by approximately 1 g U/cm/sup 3/ each year, from the current 1.7 g U/cm/sup 3/ to the 7.0 g U/cm/sup 3/ which will be reached in late 1988. The technical needs of research and test reactors for HEU exports are also forecasted to undergo a gradual but dramatic decline in the coming years.

Travelli, A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Development of a Low-Cost, Durable Membrane and MEA for Stationary and Mobile Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of low cost, durable membranes and membranes electrode assemblies (MEAs) remain a critical challenge for the successful introduction of fuel cells into mass markets. It was the goal of the team lead by Arkema, Inc. (formerly Atofina, Inc.) to address these shortages. Thus, this project addresses the following technical barriers from the Fuel Cells section of the Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: (A) Durability (B) Cost Arkema’s approach consisted in using blends of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) and proprietary sulfonated polyelectrolytes. The strength and originality of Arkema’s approach lies in the decoupling of ion conductivity from the other requirements. Kynar® (Arkema trade name for PVDF) provides an exceptional combination of properties that make it ideally suited for a membrane matrix. In a first phase, Arkema demonstrated the feasibility of the concept with the M31 membrane generation. After MEA optimization, it was shown that the beginning-of-life (BOL) performance of M31 MEAs was essentially on a par with that of PFSA MEAs at 60şC under fully humidified conditions. On the other hand, long-term durability studies showed a high decay rate of 45µV/h over a 2100 hr. test. Arkema then designed several families of polyelectrolyte candidates, which – in principle – could not undergo the same failure mechanisms. A new membrane candidate was developed: M41. It offered the same generally good mechanical, ex-situ conductivity and gas barrier properties as M31. In addition, ex-situ accelerated testing suggested a several orders of magnitude improvement in chemical stability. M41 based MEAs showed comparable BOL performance with that of PFSA (80şC, 100% RH). M41 MEAs were further shown to be able to withstand several hours temperature excursions at 120şC without apparent damage. Accelerated studies were carried out using the DOE and/or US Fuel Cell Council protocols. M41 MEAs shown sizeable advantages over PFSA MEAs in the Open Circuit Voltage Hold test, Relative Humidity Cycling test and the Voltage Cycling test. The main known limitation of the M41 family is its ability to function well at low RH.

Michel Foure, Scott Gaboury, Jim Goldbach, David Mountz and Jung Yi (no longer with company)

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Provides an overview of fuel cell technology and research projects. Discusses the basic workings of fuel cells and their system components, main fuel cell types, their characteristics, and their development status, as well as a discussion of potential fuel cell applications.

NETL

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Cell Technologies http://www.hydrogen.energy.gov/pdfs/12020_fuel_cell_system_cost_2012.pdf; Program Record, [

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

None

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

292

NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

None

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

Safety Criticality Standards Using the French CRISTAL Code Package: Application to the AREVA NP UO{sub 2} Fuel Fabrication Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Criticality safety evaluations implement requirements to proof of sufficient sub critical margins outside of the reactor environment for example in fuel fabrication plants. Basic criticality data (i.e., criticality standards) are used in the determination of sub critical margins for all processes involving plutonium or enriched uranium. There are several criticality international standards, e.g., ARH-600, which is one the US nuclear industry relies on. The French Nuclear Safety Authority (DGSNR and its advising body IRSN) has requested AREVA NP to review the criticality standards used for the evaluation of its Low Enriched Uranium fuel fabrication plants with CRISTAL V0, the recently updated French criticality evaluation package. Criticality safety is a concern for every phase of the fabrication process including UF{sub 6} cylinder storage, UF{sub 6}-UO{sub 2} conversion, powder storage, pelletizing, rod loading, assembly fabrication, and assembly transportation. Until 2003, the accepted criticality standards were based on the French CEA work performed in the late seventies with the APOLLO1 cell/assembly computer code. APOLLO1 is a spectral code, used for evaluating the basic characteristics of fuel assemblies for reactor physics applications, which has been enhanced to perform criticality safety calculations. Throughout the years, CRISTAL, starting with APOLLO1 and MORET 3 (a 3D Monte Carlo code), has been improved to account for the growth of its qualification database and for increasing user requirements. Today, CRISTAL V0 is an up-to-date computational tool incorporating a modern basic microscopic cross section set based on JEF2.2 and the comprehensive APOLLO2 and MORET 4 codes. APOLLO2 is well suited for criticality standards calculations as it includes a sophisticated self shielding approach, a P{sub ij} flux determination, and a 1D transport (S{sub n}) process. CRISTAL V0 is the result of more than five years of development work focusing on theoretical approaches and the implementation of user-friendly graphical interfaces. Due to its comprehensive physical simulation and thanks to its broad qualification database with more than a thousand benchmark/calculation comparisons, CRISTAL V0 provides outstanding and reliable accuracy for criticality evaluations for configurations covering the entire fuel cycle (i.e. from enrichment, pellet/assembly fabrication, transportation, to fuel reprocessing). After a brief description of the calculation scheme and the physics algorithms used in this code package, results for the various fissile media encountered in a UO{sub 2} fuel fabrication plant will be detailed and discussed. (authors)

Doucet, M.; Durant Terrasson, L.; Mouton, J. [AREVA-NP (France)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Presentation...

295

Membrane Performance and Durability Overview for Automotive Fuel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Membrane Performance and Durability Overview for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications Membrane Performance and Durability Overview for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications Presented by...

296

Advancement in Fuel Spray and Combustion Modeling for Compression...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Applications Advancement in Fuel Spray and Combustion Modeling for Compression Ignition Engine Applications 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

297

Fuel pin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

298

Deformation Behavior of Laser Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant Fe-Cr-Al Alloys for Fuel Cladding Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al in weight percent with a minor addition of yttrium using laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions for all alloys studied. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. No significant correlation was found between the deformation behavior/mechanical performance of welds and the level of Cr or Al in the alloy ranges studied.

Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Soft X-Ray Spectroscopic Study of Dense Strontium-Doped Lanthanum Manganite Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of the Mn charge state, chemical composition, and electronic structure of La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) cathodes during the catalytic activation of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) has been studies using X-ray spectroscopy of as-processed, exposed, and activated dense thin LSMO films. Comparison of O K-edge and Mn L{sub 3,2}-edge X-ray absorption spectra from the different stages of LSMO cathodes revealed that the largest change after the activation occurred in the Mn charge state with little change in the oxygen environment. Core-level X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and Mn L{sub 3} resonant photoemission spectroscopy studies of exposed and as-processed LSMO determined that the SOFC environment (800 C ambient pressure of O{sub 2}) alone results in La deficiency (severest near the surface with Sr doping >0.55) and a stronger Mn{sup 4+} contribution, leading to the increased insulating character of the cathode prior to activation. Meanwhile, O K-edge X-ray absorption measurements support Sr/La enrichment nearer the surface, along with the formation of mixed Sr{sub x}Mn{sub y}O{sub z} and/or passive MnO{sub x} and SrO species.

L Piper; A Preston; S Cho; A DeMasi; J Laverock; K Smith; L Miara; J Davis; S Basu; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Technology and Manufacturing Readiness of Early Market Motive and Non-Motive Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNNL’s objective in this report is to provide DOE with a technology and manufacturing readiness assessment to identify hydrogen storage technologies’ maturity levels for early market motive and non-motive applications and to provide a path forward toward commercialization. PNNL’s Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) is based on a combination of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) designations that enable evaluation of hydrogen storage technologies in varying levels of development. This approach provides a logical methodology and roadmap to enable the identification of hydrogen storage technologies, their advantages/disadvantages, gaps and R&D needs on an unbiased and transparent scale that is easily communicated to interagency partners. The TRA report documents the process used to conduct the TRA, reports the TRL and MRL for each assessed technology and provides recommendations based on the findings.

Ronnebro, Ewa

2012-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

Song, Chunshan (State College, PA); Ma, Xiaoliang (State College, PA); Sprague, Michael J. (Calgary, CA); Subramani, Velu (State College, PA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

302

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heavy-Duty Long Haul Combination Truck Fuel Consumption andand fuel cell trucks over the day drive and the short and long hauland fuel cell trucks were modeled and simulated over the day drive, the short haul

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

1990 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains author prepared short resumes of the presentations at the 1990 Fuel Cell Seminar held November 25-28, 1990 in Phoenix, Arizona. Contained herein are 134 short descriptions organized into topic areas entitled An Environmental Overview, Transportation Applications, Technology Advancements for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells, Technology Advancements for Solid Fuel Cells, Component Technologies and Systems Analysis, Stationary Power Applications, Marine and Space Applications, Technology Advancements for Acid Type Fuel Cells, and Technology Advancement for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Controls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

241 Pu, etc. ). To prevent nuclear criticality in spent fuelto enhance criticality safety for spent nuclear fuel inSpent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trucks can increase fuel economy by 3-6% over the long haultrucks can increase fuel economy by 3-6% over the long haul

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds"OfficeTourFrom3, 2015 7:00FuelFuelFuel

307

Fuel Synthesis Catalysis Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Fuel Synthesis Catalysis Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fuel Synthesis Catalysis Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Fuel Synthesis Catalysis Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

Not Available

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL HomeYoung InventorNothing AboutPowerupdated:IBM

310

Application  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mailRadioimmunotherapy of Cancers.Appendix

311

Synthetic Fuel  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

312

1986 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ninety nine brief papers are arranged under the following session headings: gas industry's 40 kw program, solid oxide fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell technology, molten carbonate fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell systems, power plants technology, fuel cell power plant designs, unconventional fuels, fuel cell application and economic assessments, and plans for commerical development. The papers are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

none,

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Fuel Economy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Department is investing in groundbreaking research that will make cars weigh less, drive further and consume less fuel.

314

Automotive Fuel Processor Development and Demonstration with Fuel Cell Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for fuel cell systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions over conventional power systems has generated significant interest in fuel cell technologies. While fuel cells are being investigated for use in many applications such as stationary power generation and small portable devices, transportation applications present some unique challenges for fuel cell technology. Due to their lower operating temperature and non-brittle materials, most transportation work is focusing on fuel cells using proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology. Since PEM fuel cells are fueled by hydrogen, major obstacles to their widespread use are the lack of an available hydrogen fueling infrastructure and hydrogen's relatively low energy storage density, which leads to a much lower driving range than conventional vehicles. One potential solution to the hydrogen infrastructure and storage density issues is to convert a conventional fuel such as gasoline into hydrogen onboard the vehicle using a fuel processor. Figure 2 shows that gasoline stores roughly 7 times more energy per volume than pressurized hydrogen gas at 700 bar and 4 times more than liquid hydrogen. If integrated properly, the fuel processor/fuel cell system would also be more efficient than traditional engines and would give a fuel economy benefit while hydrogen storage and distribution issues are being investigated. Widespread implementation of fuel processor/fuel cell systems requires improvements in several aspects of the technology, including size, startup time, transient response time, and cost. In addition, the ability to operate on a number of hydrocarbon fuels that are available through the existing infrastructure is a key enabler for commercializing these systems. In this program, Nuvera Fuel Cells collaborated with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop efficient, low-emission, multi-fuel processors for transportation applications. Nuvera's focus was on (1) developing fuel processor subsystems (fuel reformer, CO cleanup, and exhaust cleanup) that were small enough to integrate on a vehicle and (2) evaluating the fuel processor system performance for hydrogen production, efficiency, thermal integration, startup, durability and ability to integrate with fuel cells. Nuvera carried out a three-part development program that created multi-fuel (gasoline, ethanol, natural gas) fuel processing systems and investigated integration of fuel cell / fuel processor systems. The targets for the various stages of development were initially based on the goals of the DOE's Partnership for New Generation Vehicles (PNGV) initiative and later on the Freedom Car goals. The three parts are summarized below with the names based on the topic numbers from the original Solicitation for Financial Assistance Award (SFAA).

Nuvera Fuel Cells

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Transportation Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler TinaContact-Information-TransmissionLaboratoryFuels

316

Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note:Computing | ArgonnechallengingFryFuel

317

Controlling the mechanical and transport properties of layer-by-layer films and electrospun mat composite membranes for fuel cell applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is an ever increasing need for clean, portable energy devices, such as fuel cells and high energy batteries to replace or reduce the world's dependence on fossil fuels. The continued development of thin-film solid ...

Liu, David ShinRen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: the effect of protective YSZ coating on electrical stability in dual environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, compliant sealing glass has been proposed as a potential candidate sealant for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. In a previous paper, the thermal stability and chemical compatibility were reported for a compliant alkali-containing silicate glass sealed between anode supported YSZ bi-layer and YSZ-coated stainless steel interconnect. In this paper, we will report the electrical stability of the compliant glass under a DC load and dual environment at 700-800 degrees C. Apparent electrical resistivity was measured with a 4-point method for the glass sealed between two plain SS441 metal coupons or YSZ-coated aluminized substrates. The results showed instability with plain SS441 at 800 degrees C, but stable behavior of increasing resistivity with time was observed with the YSZ coated SS441. In addition, results of interfacial microstructure analysis with scanning electron microscopy will be correlated with the measured resistivity results. Overall, the YSZ coating demonstrated chemically stability with the alkali-containing compliant silicate sealing glass under electrical field and dual environments.

Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: Combined stability in isothermal ageing and thermal cycling with YSZ coated ferritic stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alkali-containing silicate glass (SCN-1) is currently being evaluated as a candidate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass contains about 17 mole% alkalis (K+Na) and has low glass transition and softening temperatures. It remains vitreous and compliant around 750-800oC after sealing without substantial crystallization, as contrary to conventional glass-ceramic sealants, which experience rapid crystallization after the sealing process. The glassy nature and low characteristic temperatures can reduce residual stresses and result in the potential for crack healing. In a previous study, the glass was found to have good thermal cycle stability and was chemically compatible with YSZ coating during short term testing. In the current study, the compliant glass was further evaluated in a more realistic way in that the sealed glass couples were first isothermally aged for 1000h followed by thermal cycling. High temperature leakage was measured. The chemical compatibility was also investigated with powder mixtures at 700 and 800oC to enhance potential interfacial reaction. In addition, interfacial microstructure was examined with scanning electron microscopy and evaluated with regard to the leakage and chemical compatibility results.

Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


322

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

but this requires a fuel cell cost of less than $25/kW.but this requires a fuel cell cost of less than $25/kW.but this requires a fuel cell cost of less than $25/kW.

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Biodiesel Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

publication 442-880 There are broad and increasing interests across the nation in using domestic, renewable bioenergy. Virginia farmers and transportation fleets use considerable amounts of diesel fuel in their operations. Biodiesel is an excellent alternative fuel for the diesel engines. Biodiesel can be produced from crops commonly grown in Virginia, such as soybean and canola, and has almost the same performance as petrodiesel. The purpose of this publication is to introduce the basics of biodiesel fuel and address some myths and answer some questions about biodiesel fuel before farmers and fleet owners use this type of fuel. ASTM standard for biodiesel (ASTM D6751) Biodiesel fuel, hereafter referred to as simply biodiesel,

unknown authors

324

Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds"OfficeTourFrom3, 2015

325

Fuel Cell Seminar, 1992: Program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This year`s theme, ``Fuel Cells: Realizing the Potential,`` focuses on progress being made toward commercial manufacture and use of fuel cell products. Fuel cell power plants are competing for market share in some applications and demonstrations of market entry power plants are proceeding for additional applications. Development activity on fuel cells for transportation is also increasing; fuel cell products have potential in energy and transportation industries, with very favorable environmental impacts. This Seminar has the purpose of fostering communication by providing a forum for the international community interested in development, application, and business opportunities related fuel cells. Over 190 technical papers are included, the majority being processed for the data base.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 ton lots of each of three project coals, by each process. The project began in October, 1992 and is scheduled for completion by March, 1997. During Quarter 9 (October--December, 1995), parametric and optimization testing was completed for the Taggart, Sunnyside, and Indiana VII coal using a 12-inch Microcel{trademark} flotation column. The detailed design of the 2-t/hr PDU grinding, flotation, and dewatering circuits neared completion with the specification of the major pieces of capital equipment to be purchased for these areas. Selective agglomeration test work investigated the properties of various industrial grades of heptane for use during bench- and PDU-scale testing. It was decided to use a hydrotreated grade of commercial heptane due to its low cost and low concentration of aromatic compounds. The final Subtask 6.4 CWF Formulation Studies Test Plan was issued. A draft version of the Subtask 6.5 Preliminary Design and Test Plan Report was also issued, discussing the progress made in the design of the bench-scale selective agglomeration unit. PDU construction work moved forward through the issuing of 26 request for quotations and 21 award packages for capital equipment.

Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C. [AMAX Research and Development Center, Golden, CO (United States)

1995-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

327

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duty Diesel Truck Internal Combustion Engine Lower Heatinglow efficiency internal combustion engine (ICE) operation,the fuel in internal combustion engines, there are several

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: CFD Simulations and Experiments to Determine the Feasibility of Various Alternate Fuels for Compression Ignition Engine Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about CFD simulations...

329

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the hybrid-electric diesel and LNG Class 8 trucks wereengine truck, diesel hybrid-electric, conventional LNGhybrid-electric vehicles with diesel and LNG engines, fuel

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fluidic fuel feed system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the development and testing of a fluidic fuel injector for a coal-water slurry fueled diesel engine. The objective of this program was to improve the operating life of coal-water slurry fuel controls and injector components by using fluidic technology. This project addressed the application of fluidic devices to solve the problems of efficient atomization of coal-water slurry fuel and of injector component wear. The investigation of injector nozzle orifice design emphasized reducing the pressure required for efficient atomization. The effort to minimize injector wear includes the novel design of components allowing the isolation of the coal-water slurry from close-fitting injector components. Three totally different injectors were designed, fabricated, bench tested and modified to arrive at a final design which was capable of being engine tested. 6 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Badgley, P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2012 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel...

332

Combination of Diesel fuel system architectures and Ceria-based...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Diesel fuel system architectures and Ceria-based fuel-borne catalysts for improvement and simplification of the Diesel Particulate Filter System in serial applications...

333

Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Blake Marshall, AMO's lead for Additive Manufacturing Technologies, will provide an overview of current R&D activities in additive manufacturing and its application to fuel cell prototyping and...

334

Roadmap for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles in California: A Transition Strategy through 2017  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commitment to hydrogen and fuel cell vehicles has beenand storage R&D and fuel cell vehicle program, whilepower applications of fuel cells. Congress has recently re-

Ogden, J; Cunningham, Joshua M; Nicholas, Michael A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Fuel Cell Powered Vehicles Using Supercapacitors: Device Characteristics, Control Strategies, and Simulation Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cell vehicles (a) Direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles withoutApplication to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles, Researchconsidered: (a) Direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs)

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Application Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the...

337

Development of Pillared M(IV) Phosphate Phosphonate Inorganic Organic Hybrid Ion Exchange Materials for Applications in Separations found in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation focuses on key intergroup and intragroup separations found in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle, specifically americium from lanthanides and americium from other actinides, most importantly americium from curium. Our goal...

Burns, Jonathan

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

338

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a Class 8 Line-Haul Truck, SAE 2010 Commercial VehicleHeavy-Duty Long Haul Combination Truck Fuel Consumption andhaul, and long haul driving cycles were constructed using truck

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Modified PAG (polyalkylene glycol) High VI High Fuel Efficient Lubricant for LDV Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Ford Motor Company at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development of modified...

340

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric Drivetrain Conv. Diesel Diesel Hyb. Conv. LNG-SI LNG-SI Hyb.Conv. LNG-CI LNG-CI Hyb. Battery EV Fuel Cell Short Haul

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Unconventional fuel: Tire derived fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Material recovery of scrap tires for their fuel value has moved from a pioneering concept in the early 1980`s to a proven and continuous use in the United States` pulp and paper, utility, industrial, and cement industry. Pulp and paper`s use of tire derived fuel (TDF) is currently consuming tires at the rate of 35 million passenger tire equivalents (PTEs) per year. Twenty mills are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. The utility industry is currently consuming tires at the rate of 48 million PTEs per year. Thirteen utilities are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. The cement industry is currently consuming tires at the rate of 28 million PTEs per year. Twenty two cement plants are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. Other industrial boilers are currently consuming tires at the rate of 6.5 million PTEs per year. Four industrial boilers are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. In total, 59 facilities are currently burning over 117 million PTEs per year. Although 93% of these facilities were not engineered to burn TDF, it has become clear that TDF has found acceptance as a supplemental fuel when blending with conventional fuels in existing combustion devices designed for normal operating conditions. The issues of TDF as a supplemental fuel and its proper specifications are critical to the successful development of this fuel alternative. This paper will focus primarily on TDF`s use in a boiler type unit.

Hope, M.W. [Waste Recovery, Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

BWR Fuel Assembly BWR Fuel Assembly PWR Fuel Assembly  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

BWR Fuel Assembly BWR Fuel Assembly PWR Fuel Assembly PWR Fuel Assembly The PWR 17x17 assembly is approximately 160 inches long (13.3 feet), 8 inches across, and weighs 1,500 lbs....

343

National Fuel (Gas)- Small Commercial Conservation Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In conjunction with NYSERDA's Existing Facilities Program, National Fuel provides an energy efficient equipment application for custom and standard rebates. These rebates are available for large...

344

Transportation Services Fueling Operation Transportation Services has installed a software system that will facilitate fueling of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Services Fueling Operation Transportation Services has installed a software system into this system. All University vehicles that wish to fuel at UH M noa Transportation Services will be required the application below and submit your application to Transportation Services before attempting to fuel your

345

Heartland Grain Fuels LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridorPart A Permit ApplicationHeartlandHeartland Grain

346

Fossil Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuels A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi - Department of Petroleum Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals...

347

Laser ablation based fuel ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Laser ablation based fuel ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

349

Catalysts and materials development for fuel cell power generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catalytic processing of fuels was explored in this thesis for both low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell as well as high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. Novel catalysts were ...

Weiss, Steven E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

1136 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS, VOL. 39, NO. 4, JULY/AUGUST 2003 Simulation of Fuel-Cell Stacks Using a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1136 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS, VOL. 39, NO. 4, JULY/AUGUST 2003 Simulation. Those features allied to the low cost of this FC simulator con- tribute for market analysis and life TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS by the Industrial Power Converter Committee of the IEEE Industry

Simões, Marcelo Godoy

351

Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

352

Fuel Cell Handbook, Fourth Edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robust progress has been made in fuel cell technology since the previous edition of the Fuel Cell Handbook was published in January 1994. This Handbook provides a foundation in fuel cells for persons wanting a better understanding of the technology, its benefits, and the systems issues that influence its application. Trends in technology are discussed, including next-generation concepts that promise ultra high efficiency and low cost, while providing exceptionally clean power plant systems. Section 1 summarizes fuel cell progress since the last edition and includes existing power plant nameplate data. Section 2 addresses the thermodynamics of fuel cells to provide an understanding of fuel cell operation at two levels (basic and advanced). Sections 3 through 6 describe the four major fuel cell types and their performance based on cell operating conditions. The section on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells has been added to reflect their emergence as a significant fuel cell technology. Phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, and solid oxide fuel cell technology description sections have been updated from the previous edition. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed with proven cell designs, focusing instead on advancing the system surrounding the fuel cell to lower life cycle costs. Section 7, Fuel Cell Systems, has been significantly revised to characterize near-term and next-generation fuel cell power plant systems at a conceptual level of detail. Section 8 provides examples of practical fuel cell system calculations. A list of fuel cell URLs is included in the Appendix. A new index assists the reader in locating specific information quickly.

Stauffer, D.B; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Klett, M.G.; Engleman, R.R.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ignition quality determination of marine diesel fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition quality of heavy marine diesel fuels is considered to be an important parameter. The standard procedures used to quantify this parameter for distillate fuels are not applicable to residual fuels. Proton NMR Spectroscopy was demonstrated to be an effective tool to characterize the ''global'' fuel composition of commercially available fuels covering a wide range of ignition quality. Proton NMR data from these fuels were used to determine a cetane number (CNp) for the heavy fuels using procedures previously reported for distillate fuels. The validity of this instrumental technique for determining CNp was corroborated by actual ASTM D 613 engine tests on a number of commercially available fuels, run as blends with secondary reference fuels. Viscosity and density values of the analyzed heavy fuels were regressed against predicted cetane numbers to obtain a correlation expression.

Gulder, O.L.; Glavincevski, B.; Kassinger, R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Research and development of a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Progress report for Quarter 4 of the Phase II report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 4th quarter report summarizes activity from July 1, 1995 through October 1, 1995; the report is organized as usual into sections describing background information and work performed under the main WBS categories: The Fuel Processor (WBS 1.0) team activity during this quarter focused on the continued design/development of the full scale fuel processing hardware. The combustor test stand has been completed allowing more detailed testing of the various parts of the combustor subsystem; this subsystem is currently being evaluated using the dual fuel (methanol/hydrogen) option to gain a better understanding of the control issues. The Fuel Cell Stack (WBS 2.0) team activity focused on material analysis and testing to determine the appropriate approach for the first GM stack. Five hundred hours of durability was achieved on a single cell fixture using coated titanium plates (anode and cathode) with no appreciable voltage degradation of the SEL (Stack Engineering Lab) produced MEA. Additionally, the voltage level drop across each of the plates remained low (<5mv) over the full test period; The system integration and control team focused on the initial layout and configuration of the system; and the Reference powertrain and commercialization studies are currently under review.

NONE

1995-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

355

Hydrogen: Fueling the Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As our dependence on foreign oil increases and concerns about global climate change rise, the need to develop sustainable energy technologies is becoming increasingly significant. Worldwide energy consumption is expected to double by the year 2050, as will carbon emissions along with it. This increase in emissions is a product of an ever-increasing demand for energy, and a corresponding rise in the combustion of carbon containing fossil fuels such as coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Undisputable scientific evidence indicates significant changes in the global climate have occurred in recent years. Impacts of climate change and the resulting atmospheric warming are extensive, and know no political or geographic boundaries. These far-reaching effects will be manifested as environmental, economic, socioeconomic, and geopolitical issues. Offsetting the projected increase in fossil energy use with renewable energy production will require large increases in renewable energy systems, as well as the ability to store and transport clean domestic fuels. Storage and transport of electricity generated from intermittent resources such as wind and solar is central to the widespread use of renewable energy technologies. Hydrogen created from water electrolysis is an option for energy storage and transport, and represents a pollution-free source of fuel when generated using renewable electricity. The conversion of chemical to electrical energy using fuel cells provides a high efficiency, carbon-free power source. Hydrogen serves to blur the line between stationary and mobile power applications, as it can be used as both a transportation fuel and for stationary electricity generation, with the possibility of a distributed generation energy infrastructure. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies will be presented as possible pollution-free solutions to present and future energy concerns. Recent hydrogen-related research at SLAC in hydrogen production, fuel cell catalysis, and hydrogen storage will be highlighted in this seminar.

Leisch, Jennifer

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

356

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

collectors. In a Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, which is widely regarded as the most promisingFUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fuel Cells -- is the key to making it happen. Stationary fuel cells can be used for backup power, power for remote loca

357

Fuel Cell Handbook, Fifth Edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress continues in fuel cell technology since the previous edition of the Fuel Cell Handbook was published in November 1998. Uppermost, polymer electrolyte fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and solid oxide fuel cells have been demonstrated at commercial size in power plants. The previously demonstrated phosphoric acid fuel cells have entered the marketplace with more than 220 power plants delivered. Highlighting this commercial entry, the phosphoric acid power plant fleet has demonstrated 95+% availability and several units have passed 40,000 hours of operation. One unit has operated over 49,000 hours. Early expectations of very low emissions and relatively high efficiencies have been met in power plants with each type of fuel cell. Fuel flexibility has been demonstrated using natural gas, propane, landfill gas, anaerobic digester gas, military logistic fuels, and coal gas, greatly expanding market opportunities. Transportation markets worldwide have shown remarkable interest in fuel cells; nearly every major vehicle manufacturer in the U.S., Europe, and the Far East is supporting development. This Handbook provides a foundation in fuel cells for persons wanting a better understanding of the technology, its benefits, and the systems issues that influence its application. Trends in technology are discussed, including next-generation concepts that promise ultrahigh efficiency and low cost, while providing exceptionally clean power plant systems. Section 1 summarizes fuel cell progress since the last edition and includes existing power plant nameplate data. Section 2 addresses the thermodynamics of fuel cells to provide an understanding of fuel cell operation at two levels (basic and advanced). Sections 3 through 8 describe the six major fuel cell types and their performance based on cell operating conditions. Alkaline and intermediate solid state fuel cells were added to this edition of the Handbook. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed with proven cell designs, focusing instead on advancing the system surrounding the fuel cell to lower life cycle costs. Section 9, Fuel Cell Systems, has been significantly revised to characterize near-term and next-generation fuel cell power plant systems at a conceptual level of detail. Section 10 provides examples of practical fuel cell system calculations. A list of fuel cell URLs is included in the Appendix. A new index assists the reader in locating specific information quickly.

Energy and Environmental Solutions

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Microbial Fuel Cell Using Inexpensive Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial Fuel Cell Using Inexpensive Materials Group #4 Peter McAveney Brett Pedersen Jun-Chung Wong #12;Abstract We built and tested a microbial fuel cell using low-cost materials. Our intention- critical applications such as transportation. Microbial fuel cells cannot achieve comparable power

359

Ionic liquids and ionic liquid acids with high temperature stability for fuel cell and other high temperature applications, method of making and cell employing same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are developments in high temperature fuel cells including ionic liquids with high temperature stability and the storage of inorganic acids as di-anion salts of low volatility. The formation of ionically conducting liquids of this type having conductivities of unprecedented magnitude for non-aqueous systems is described. The stability of the di-anion configuration is shown to play a role in the high performance of the non-corrosive proton-transfer ionic liquids as high temperature fuel cell electrolytes. Performance of simple H.sub.2(g) electrolyte/O.sub.2(g) fuel cells with the new electrolytes is described. Superior performance both at ambient temperature and temperatures up to and above 200.degree. C. are achieved. Both neutral proton transfer salts and the acid salts with HSO.sup.-.sub.4 anions, give good results, the bisulphate case being particularly good at low temperatures and very high temperatures. The performance of all electrolytes is improved by the addition of a small amount of involatile base of pK.sub.a value intermediate between those of the acid and base that make the bulk electrolyte. The preferred case is the imidazole-doped ethylammonium hydrogensulfate which yields behavior superior in all respects to that of the industry standard phosphoric acid electrolyte.

Angell, C. Austen (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Wu (Broadview Heights, OH); Belieres, Jean-Philippe (Chandler, AZ); Yoshizawa, Masahiro (Tokyo, JP)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

360

Research and Development for Off-Road Fuel Cell Applications U.S. Department of Energy Grant DE-FG36-04GO14303 - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Off-road concerns are related to the effects of shock and vibration and air quality on fuel cell power requirements. Mechanical stresses on differing material makeup and mass distribution within the system may render some components susceptible to impulse trauma while others may show adverse effects from harmonic disturbances or broad band mechanical agitation. One of the recognized challenges in fuel cell systems air purification is in providing a highly efficient particulate and chemical filter with minimal pressure drop. PEM integrators do not want additional parasitic loads added to the system as compensation for a highly efficient yet highly restrictive filter. Additionally, there is challenge in integrating multiple functions into a single air intake module tasked with effectively filtering high dust loads, diesel soot, pesticides, ammonias, and other anticipated off-road contaminants. This project has investigated both off-road associated issues cumulating in the prototype build and testing of two light duty off-road vehicles with integrated fuel cell power plant systems.

Hicks, Michael [H2PowerTech (formerly known as IdaTech)] [H2PowerTech (formerly known as IdaTech); Erickson, Paul [Univeristy of California at Davis] [Univeristy of California at Davis; Lawrence, Richard [Retired (formerly employed by IdaTech)] [Retired (formerly employed by IdaTech); Tejaswi, Arun [Univeristy of California at Davis] [Univeristy of California at Davis; Brum, Magdalena [Univeristy of California at Davis] [Univeristy of California at Davis

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fuel quality issues in stationary fuel cell systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cell systems are being deployed in stationary applications for the generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen. These systems use a variety of fuel cell types, ranging from the low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) to the high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Depending on the application and location, these systems are being designed to operate on reformate or syngas produced from various fuels that include natural gas, biogas, coal gas, etc. All of these fuels contain species that can potentially damage the fuel cell anode or other unit operations and processes that precede the fuel cell stack. These detrimental effects include loss in performance or durability, and attenuating these effects requires additional components to reduce the impurity concentrations to tolerable levels, if not eliminate the impurity entirely. These impurity management components increase the complexity of the fuel cell system, and they add to the system's capital and operating costs (such as regeneration, replacement and disposal of spent material and maintenance). This project reviewed the public domain information available on the impurities encountered in stationary fuel cell systems, and the effects of the impurities on the fuel cells. A database has been set up that classifies the impurities, especially in renewable fuels, such as landfill gas and anaerobic digester gas. It documents the known deleterious effects on fuel cells, and the maximum allowable concentrations of select impurities suggested by manufacturers and researchers. The literature review helped to identify the impurity removal strategies that are available, and their effectiveness, capacity, and cost. A generic model of a stationary fuel-cell based power plant operating on digester and landfill gas has been developed; it includes a gas processing unit, followed by a fuel cell system. The model includes the key impurity removal steps to enable predictions of impurity breakthrough, component sizing, and utility needs. These data, along with process efficiency results from the model, were subsequently used to calculate the cost of electricity. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to correlate the concentrations of key impurities in the fuel gas feedstock to the cost of electricity.

Papadias, D.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

362

Catalytic autothermal reforming of hydrocarbon fuels for fuel cells.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cell development has seen remarkable progress in the past decade because of an increasing need to improve energy efficiency as well as to address concerns about the environmental consequences of using fossil fuel for producing electricity and for propulsion of vehicles [1]. The lack of an infrastructure for producing and distributing H{sub 2} has led to a research effort to develop on-board fuel processing technology for reforming hydrocarbon fuels to generate H{sub 2} [2]. The primary focus is on reforming gasoline, because a production and distribution infrastructure for gasoline already exists to supply internal combustion engines [3]. Existing reforming technology for the production of H{sub 2} from hydrocarbon feedstocks used in large-scale manufacturing processes, such as ammonia synthesis, is cost prohibitive when scaled down to the size of the fuel processor required for transportation applications (50-80 kWe) nor is it designed to meet the varying power demands and frequent shutoffs and restarts that will be experienced during normal drive cycles. To meet the performance targets required of a fuel processor for transportation applications will require new reforming reactor technology developed to meet the volume, weight, cost, and operational characteristics for transportation applications and the development of new reforming catalysts that exhibit a higher activity and better thermal and mechanical stability than reforming catalysts currently used in the production of H{sub 2} for large-scale manufacturing processes.

Krumpelt, M.; Krause, T.; Kopasz, J.; Carter, D.; Ahmed, S.

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

363

Fuel additives: Excluding aviation fuels. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning compositions, applications and performance of additives in fuels. Evaluations and environmental testing of additives in automotive, diesel, and boiler fuels are discussed. Additive effects on air pollution control, combustion stability, fuel economy and fuel storage are presented. Aviation fuel additives are covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fuel additives: Excluding aviation fuels. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning compositions, applications and performance of additives in fuels. Evaluations and environmental testing of additives in automotive, diesel, and boiler fuels are discussed. Additive effects on air pollution control, combustion stability, fuel economy and fuel storage are presented. Aviation fuel additives are covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 231 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

Loewe, W.E.

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with application to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power by Thomas Schmeister B.Sc., University to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power by Thomas Schmeister B.Sc., University of Colorado, 1991 cells as a heat and electrical power source for residential combined heat and power (CHP

Victoria, University of

367

Fuel cell technology for prototype logistic fuel cell mobile systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the aegis of the Advanced Research Project Agency`s family of programs to develop advanced technology for dual use applications, International Fuel Cells Corporation (IFC) is conducting a 39 month program to develop an innovative system concept for DoD Mobile Electric Power (MEP) applications. The concept is to integrate two technologies, the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) with an auto-thermal reformer (ATR), into an efficient fuel cell power plant of nominally 100-kilowatt rating which operates on logistic fuels (JP-8). The ATR fuel processor is the key to meeting requirements for MEP (including weight, volume, reliability, maintainability, efficiency, and especially operation on logistic fuels); most of the effort is devoted to ATR development. An integrated demonstration test unit culminates the program and displays the benefits of the fuel cell system, relative to the standard 100-kilowatt MEP diesel engine generator set. A successful test provides the basis for proceeding toward deployment. This paper describes the results of the first twelve months of activity during which specific program aims have remained firm.

Sederquist, R.A.; Garow, J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Application of curium measurements for safeguarding at reprocessing plants. Study 1: High-level liquid waste and Study 2: Spent fuel assemblies and leached hulls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In large-scale reprocessing plants for spent fuel assemblies, the quantity of plutonium in the waste streams each year is large enough to be important for nuclear safeguards. The wastes are drums of leached hulls and cylinders of vitrified high-level liquid waste. The plutonium amounts in these wastes cannot be measured directly by a nondestructive assay (NDA) technique because the gamma rays emitted by plutonium are obscured by gamma rays from fission products, and the neutrons from spontaneous fissions are obscured by those from curium. The most practical NDA signal from the waste is the neutron emission from curium. A diversion of waste for its plutonium would also take a detectable amount of curium, so if the amount of curium in a waste stream is reduced, it can be inferred that there is also a reduced amount of plutonium. This report studies the feasibility of tracking the curium through a reprocessing plant with neutron measurements at key locations: spent fuel assemblies prior to shearing, the accountability tank after dissolution, drums of leached hulls after dissolution, and canisters of vitrified high-level waste after separation. Existing pertinent measurement techniques are reviewed, improvements are suggested, and new measurements are proposed. The authors integrate these curium measurements into a safeguards system.

Rinard, P.M.; Menlove, H.O.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Navy fuel cell demonstration project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report on a field evaluation by the Department of the Navy of twenty 5-kW PEM fuel cells carried out during 2004 and 2005 at five Navy sites located in New York, California, and Hawaii. The key objective of the effort was to obtain an engineering assessment of their military applications. Particular issues of interest were fuel cell cost, performance, reliability, and the readiness of commercial fuel cells for use as a standalone (grid-independent) power option. Two corollary objectives of the demonstration were to promote technological advances and to improve fuel performance and reliability. From a cost perspective, the capital cost of PEM fuel cells at this stage of their development is high compared to other power generation technologies. Sandia National Laboratories technical recommendation to the Navy is to remain involved in evaluating successive generations of this technology, particularly in locations with greater environmental extremes, and it encourages their increased use by the Navy.

Black, Billy D.; Akhil, Abbas Ali

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Fuel Processing Valri Lightner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Hydrogen · Fuel Processors for PEM Fuel Cells Nuvera Fuel Cells, Inc. GE Catalytica ANL PNNL University-Board Fuel Processing Barriers $35/kW Fuel Processor $10/kW Fuel Cell Power Systems $45/kW by 2010 BARRIERS · Fuel processor start-up/ transient operation · Durability · Cost · Emissions and environmental issues

371

Alternative Fuel Vehicle Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Alternative fuel vehicles use fuel types other than petroleum and include such fuels as electricity, ethanol, biodiesel, natural gas, hydrogen, and propane. Compared to petroleum, these...

372

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel Grants and Rebates The Arkansas Alternative Fuels Development Program (Program) provides grants to alternative fuel producers, feedstock processors, and...

373

Alternative Fuel Implementation Toolkit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Alternative Fuels, the Smart Choice: Alternative fuels ­ biodiesel, electricity, ethanol (E85), natural gas...........................................................................................................................................................................6 Trends and Fleet Examples: Alternative Fuel Decision Table

374

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 1990. These many alternative-fuel initiatives failed tolow-cost, low-carbon alternative fuels would thrive. Theto introduce low-carbon alternative fuels. Former Federal

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Institute 1990 Fuel Cell Status," Proceedings ofMiller, "Introduction: Fuel-Cell-Powered Vehicle DevelopmentPrograms," presented at Fuel Cells for Transportation,

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

2007 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fuel cell industry, which has experienced continued increases in sales, is an emerging clean energy industry with the potential for significant growth in the stationary, portable, and transportation sectors. Fuel cells produce electricity in a highly efficient electrochemical process from a variety of fuels with low to zero emissions. This report describes data compiled in 2008 on trends in the fuel cell industry for 2007 with some comparison to two previous years. The report begins with a discussion of worldwide trends in units shipped and financing for the fuel cell industry for 2007. It continues by focusing on the North American and U.S. markets. After providing this industry-wide overview, the report identifies trends for each of the major fuel cell applications -- stationary power, portable power, and transportation -- including data on the range of fuel cell technologies -- polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), alkaline fuel cell (AFC), molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC), and direct-methanol fuel cell (DMFC) -- used for these applications.

McMurphy, K.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Application Acceleration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication Acceleration on Current and Future Cray

379

Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Multi-fuel reformers: Phase 1 -- Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: the effect of protective alumina coating on electrical stability in dual environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alkali-containing silicate glass was recently proposed as a potential sealant for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The glass contains appreciable amount of alkalis and retains its glassy microstructure at elevated temperatures over time. It is more compliant as compared to conventional glass-ceramics sealants and could potentially heal cracks during thermal cycling. In previous papers the thermal cycle stability, thermal stability and chemical compatibility were reported with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and YSZ-coated ferritic stainless steel interconnect. In this paper, we report the electrical stability of the compliant glass with aluminized AISI441 interconnect material under DC load in dual environment at 700-800oC. Apparent electrical resistivity was measured with a 4-point method for the glass sealed between two aluminized AISI441 metal coupons as well as plain AISI441 substrates. The results showed good electrical stability with the aluminized AISI441 substrate, while unstable behavior was observed for un-coated substrates. In addition, interfacial microstructure was examined with scanning electron microscopy and correlated with the measured resistivity results. Overall, the alumina coating demonstrated good chemical stability with the alkali-containing silicate sealing glass under DC loading.

Chou, Y. S.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ballard fuel cell development for the new energy environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ballard Power Systems is the world leader in the development of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells. PEM fuel cells use a solid polymer membrane as the electrolyte. These fuel cells are compact and produce powerful electric current relative to their size. PEM fuel cells can deliver higher power density than other types of fuel cells, resulting in reduced cost, weight and volume, and improved performance. The PEM fuel cell is the only fuel cell considered practical for both transportation and stationary applications. Ballard fuel cells are the heart of BGS`s products. The proprietary zero-emission engine converts natural gas, methanol or hydrogen fuel into electricity without combustion.

Dunnison, D.; Smith, D. [Ballard Power Systems, Inc., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada); Torpey, J. [GPU International, Parsippany, NJ (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

DIESEL FUEL TANK FOUNDATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to design structural foundations for the Diesel Fuel Tank and Fuel Pumps.

M. Gomez

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

383

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirementand Fuel-EfficientAlternative Fuel

384

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV)Fuel

385

Alternative Fuel Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle & Fueling Infrastructure

386

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle & FuelingDo alternative

387

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle & FuelingDo

388

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle & FuelingDoAnnual Electric

389

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle & FuelingDoAnnual

390

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer1,Alternative Fuel Vehicle

391

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer1,Alternative Fuel

392

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels TaxAlternative Fueling

393

Preferential oxidation of methanol and carbon monoxide for gas cleanup during methanol fuel processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methanol fuel processing generates hydrogen for low-temperature, PEM fuel cell systems now being considered for transportation and other applications. Although liquid methanol fuel is convenient for this application, existing fuel processing techniques generate contaminants that degrade fuel cell performance. Through mathematical models and laboratory experiments chemical processing is described that removes CO and other contaminants from the anode feed stream.

Birdsell, S.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Inbody, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

CLIMATE CHANGE FUEL CELL PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ChevronTexaco has successfully operated a 200 kW PC25C phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant at the corporate data center in San Ramon, California for the past two years and seven months following installation in December 2001. This site was chosen based on the ability to utilize the combined heat (hot water) and power generation capability of this modular fuel cell power plant in an office park setting . In addition, this project also represents one of the first commercial applications of a stationary fuel cell for a mission critical data center to assess power reliability benefits. This fuel cell power plant system has demonstrated outstanding reliability and performance relative to other comparably sized cogeneration systems.

Mike Walneuski

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

Status of the US Fuel Cell Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring major programs to develop high efficiency fuel cell technologies to produce electric power from natural gas and other hydrogen sources. Fuel cell systems offer attractive potential for future electric power generation and are expected to have worldwide markets. They offer ultra-high energy conversion efficiency and extremely low environmental emissions. As modular units for distributed power generation, fuel cells are expected to be particularly beneficial where their by-product, heat, can be effectively used in cogeneration applications. Advanced fuel cell power systems fueled with natural gas are expected to be commercially available after the turn of the century.

Williams, M.C.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Fuel Cell Seminar on November...

397

Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Presentation covers stationary fuel cells...

398

Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2 DOE Hydrogen andEnzymeAdvancedDepartment

399

Page 1 of 30 Fundamentals of Benthic Microbial Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 of 30 17 Fundamentals of Benthic Microbial Fuel Cells: Theory, Development and Application a watershed for fuel cell research, in particular for microbial fuel cells (see for example: Larminie & Dicks; Schröder, 2007; Logan, 2008). While the majority of microbial fuel cell (MFC) research has focused

Girguis, Peter R.

400

California Fuel Cell Partnership: Alternative Fuels Research  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 20154: CategoricalDepartmentFuel Cell Partnership -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWayElectricity Fuel Basics to someone byEthanolFueling

402

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWayElectricity Fuel Basics toWithHybridHydrogenFueling

403

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center:Basics toFueling

404

Combustion and fuel characterization of coal-water fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities conducted under this contract include studies on the combustion and fireside behavior of numerous coal-water fuels (CWFs). The work has been broken down into the following areas: Task 1 -- Selection of Candidate Fuels; Task 2 -- Bench Scale Tests; Task 3 -- CWF Preparation and Supply; Task 4 -- Combustion Characterization; Task 5 -- Ash Deposition and Performance Testing; Task 6 -- Commercial Applications. This report covers Task 6, the study of commercial applications of CWFs as related to the technical and economic aspects of the conversion of existing boilers and heaters to CWF firing. This work involves the analysis of seven units of various sizes and configurations firing several selected CWFs. Three utility boilers, two industrial boilers, and two process heater designs are included. Each of the units was considered with four primary selected CWFs. A fifth fuel was considered for one of the utility units. A sixth fuel, a microfine grind CWF, was evaluated on two utility units and one industrial unit. The particular fuels were chosen with the objective of examining the effects of coal source, ash level, ash properties, and beneficiation on the CWF performance and economics of the seven units. 10 refs., 81 figs., 80 tabs.

Beal, H.R.; Gralton, G.W.; Gronauer, T.W.; Liljedahl, G.N.; Love, B.F.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop - Breakout Group 5: Long...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* Non-polymer based proton conductivity is needed for membranes in low temperature fuel cell system applications * Alternative electrolytes in membranes for medium temperature fuel...

406

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

07 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems...

407

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative fuel buses Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

applications for alternative fuel or advanced... ) mandated a conversion from diesel to alternative fuel buses. Investigation into alternatives to diesel... , preliminary studies...

408

Comprehensive, Consistent and Systematic Approach to the Mathematical Modeling of PEM Fuel Cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are a promising zero-emission power source for transportation applications. An important tool for advancing PEM fuel cell technology is… (more)

Baschuk, Jeffrey

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

A Fast Start-up On-Board Fuel Reformer for NOx Adsorber Regeneration...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Plasmatron Fuel Reformer Development and Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Applications Use of a Diesel Fuel Processor for Rapid...

410

LMFBR fuel component costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs.

Epperson, E.M.; Borisch, R.R.; Rice, L.H.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

411

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew YorkLouisianaRetailer LicenseVehicleFuel Inefficient Vehicle

412

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew YorkLouisianaRetailer LicenseVehicleFuel Inefficient

413

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew YorkLouisianaRetailer LicenseVehicleFuel

414

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew YorkLouisianaRetailer LicenseVehicleFuelConnecticut joined

415

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew YorkLouisianaRetailer LicenseVehicleFuelConnecticut

416

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew YorkLouisianaRetailer LicenseVehicleFuelConnecticutNew

417

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew YorkLouisianaRetailerVoluntaryElectricNatural Gas Fueling

418

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirement All AFVs,HybridAlternative Fuel

419

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirement AllFleet UserAlternative Fuel

420

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirementand Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Tax

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirementand Fuel-Efficient Vehicle

422

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirementand Fuel-Efficient VehicleProvision

423

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirementand Fuel-Efficient

424

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirementand Fuel-EfficientAlternative

425

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test RequirementandAnnualEthanolAlternative Fuel

426

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel Fuel Use The Missouri

427

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel Fuel Use The

428

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel Fuel Use

429

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel Fuel UseTax

430

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel Fuel UseTaxand

431

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel Fuel

432

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel FuelTax Rates

433

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel FuelTax

434

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel FuelTaxLicense

435

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestStateBiofuels Tax Deduction AAlternative Fuel

436

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestStateBiofuelsProduction TaxAlternative Fuel

437

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and

438

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV)

439

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel Vehicle

440

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel VehicleImmunity for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel VehicleImmunity

442

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel VehicleImmunityRetail

443

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel

444

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative FuelDefinition Biodiesel is

445

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative FuelDefinition Biodiesel

446

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative FuelDefinition

447

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative FuelDefinitionRenewable

448

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropaneState EnergyIdle ReductionFuel Exclusivity

449

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropaneState EnergyIdle ReductionFuel

450

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropaneStateLow-Speedand Methanol Tax EthylFuel

451

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program The Hawaii Department ofAlternative Fuel

452

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program The HawaiiDistributionHydrogen and Fuel Cell

453

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program The HawaiiDistributionHydrogen and Fuel

454

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program The HawaiiDistributionHydrogen and FuelClean

455

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program TheProduction TaxAlternative Fuel and

456

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program TheProduction TaxAlternative Fuel

457

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program TheProduction TaxAlternative FuelBiodiesel

458

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock ProgramPublic AccessStateRenewable Fuels Mandate One

459

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock ProgramPublic AccessStateRenewable Fuels Mandate

460

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock ProgramPublic AccessStateRenewable Fuels

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "application tractor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock ProgramPublic AccessStateRenewable FuelsAlternative

462

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock ProgramPublicSchool BusInfrastructureBiofuelandFuel

463

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy FeedstockAuthorization forCompressed NaturalAlternative Fuel

464

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy FeedstockAuthorizationExcisePlug-InSchoolBiodieselIdleFuel

465

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for Plug-InHeavy-DutyAftermarketAlternative Fuel

466

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle &

467

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle &Plug-in Electric Vehicle

468

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle &Plug-in Electric

469

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle &Plug-in

470

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle &Plug-inIncentives

471

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Shar