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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy...

2

Commonwealth of Australia STATUTORY DECLARATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commonwealth of Australia STATUTORY DECLARATION Statutory Declarations Act 1959 1 Insert the name or Territory, or the High Court of Australia, as a legal practitioner (however described); or (3) a person who or place outside Australia; and (b) authorised under paragraph 3 (d) of the Consular Fees Act 1955; and (c

Chen, Ying

3

RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA statutory overview updated July 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The module presents a brief overview of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It explains the relationship between RCRA statutory language and codified regulatory language. It describes the major components of each subtitle of RCRA and identifies the major provisions established by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA).

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA statutory overview, updated as of July 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The module presents a brief overview of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It explains the relationship between RCRA statutory language and codified regulatory language. It describes the major components of each subtitle of RCRA and identifies the major provisions established by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Application of the LBB regulatory approach to the steamlines of advanced WWER 1000 reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LBB regulatory approach adopted in Russia in 1993 as an extra safety barrier is described for advanced WWER 1000 reactor steamline. The application of LBB concept requires the following additional protections. First, the steamline should be a highly qualified piping, performed in accordance with the applicable regulations and guidelines, carefully screened to verify that it is not subjected to any disqualifying failure mechanism. Second, a deterministic fracture mechanics analysis and leak rate evaluation have been performed to demonstrate that postulated through-wall crack that yields 95 1/min at normal operation conditions is stable even under seismic loads. Finally, it has been verified that the leak detection systems are sufficiently reliable, diverse and sensitive, and that adequate margins exist to detect a through wall crack smaller than the critical size. The obtained results are encouraging and show the possibility of the application of the LBB case to the steamline of advanced WWER 1000 reactor.

Kiselyov, V.A.; Sokov, L.M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Statistical Learning Procedures for Monitoring Regulatory Compliance: An Application to Fisheries Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dolphin rescue and release procedures. Absence; presence ofStatistical Learning Procedures for Monitoring RegulatoryWe apply the ensemble procedure random forests (Breiman,

Cleridy E. Lennert-Cody; Richard A. Berk

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Statutory Authority for an SPR Drawdown | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartmentScopingOverviewFranklinStatus Status StatusStatutory

8

Application of Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation Equivalency to Construction of New Nuclear Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office, is charged with moving 2.100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel elements left over from plutonium production into semi-permanent storage at DOE'S Hanford site in Washington state. In anticipation of eventual NRC regulation, the DOE decided to impose NRC requirements on new SNFP facility design and construction, specifically for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The SNFP implemented this policy of ''NRC equivalency'' with the goal of achieving a level of nuclear safety equivalent to that of NRC-licensed fuel processing facilities. Appropriate features of the NRC licensing process were adopted. However, the SNFP maintained applicable DOE requirements in tandem with the NRC regulations. Project work is continuing, with the first fuel movement scheduled for November, 2000.

BISHOP, G.E.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

9

All executive branch employees are subject to statutory and regulatory conflict of interest restrictions  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 Documentation and Approval ofAll Active2.1SelectedGC

10

Regulatory guidance document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

NONE

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Application of Performance Assessment to Make Regulatory and Operational Changes in an Operating Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes how performance assessment (PA) is used to support changes to the regulatory basis of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP, located near Carlsbad, New Mexico is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as the nation's only deep geologic repository for the disposal of transuranic nuclear waste. In 1998, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP met the performance requirements of 40 CFR Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes. A PA analysis of long term (10,000 year) repository performance successfully demonstrated that the probability and consequences of potential long-term releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment would be well below the established limits. These results were key in obtaining WIPP's initial certification, allowing the first shipment and disposal of nuclear waste in March of 1999. As disposal operations have taken place over the last eight years, changes have been identified in the regulatory and operational realms of the facility that would enhance waste disposal efficiency. Such changes, however, cannot be made without prior consent of the EPA. Therefore, changes planned by the DOE must be thoroughly described and supported by varying degrees of the same type of analyses that were conducted to demonstrate the WIPP's containment capabilities as presented in the initial compliance application submitted to EPA in 1996. Such analyses are used to identify the impacts or benefits of implementing the planned change. The DOE has successfully used performance assessment analyses for the approval of changes such as: 1) the disposal of super-compacted waste forms, and; 2) the adoption of new parameters and modeling assumptions In some cases the planned changes are simpler in nature than those listed above, and therefore only require targeted or simplified PA analyses to demonstrate the effect on performance. Targeted analyses have been used to successfully gain approval of the following: 1) a reduction in the amount of magnesium oxide (MgO) chemical buffer backfill that must be emplaced in the repository 2) a change in the repository mining/disposal horizon In addition to these approved changes, the DOE has used PA analyses to support the following planned change requests that await EPA's approval: 1) panel closure redesign 2) further reduction in the MgO-to-waste ratio Finally, this paper will discuss some of the changes that the DOE is currently preparing and plans to submit to the EPA for approval in the near future. This paper will describe how a set of analytical tools initially used to open the WIPP continues to have a role in making the repository more efficient and adaptable as variations in waste streams, operational demands, and other dynamic forces change the operating environment over time. (authors)

Patterson, R. [Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Kirkes, R. [John Hart and Associates, P.A., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Regulatory facility guide for Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rymer, A.C. [Transportation Consulting Services, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

13

Regulatory Tools  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONewsRegulatoryRegulatory Response

14

Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Mineral Hole Regulatory Act is applicable to any person (individual, corporation, company, association, joint venture, partnership, receiver, trustee, guardian, executor, administrator,...

15

Evaluation of the applicability of existing nuclear power plant regulatory requirements in the U.S. to advanced small modular reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current wave of small modular reactor (SMR) designs all have the goal of reducing the cost of management and operations. By optimizing the system, the goal is to make these power plants safer, cheaper to operate and maintain, and more secure. In particular, the reduction in plant staffing can result in significant cost savings. The introduction of advanced reactor designs and increased use of advanced automation technologies in existing nuclear power plants will likely change the roles, responsibilities, composition, and size of the crews required to control plant operations. Similarly, certain security staffing requirements for traditional operational nuclear power plants may not be appropriate or necessary for SMRs due to the simpler, safer and more automated design characteristics of SMRs. As a first step in a process to identify where regulatory requirements may be met with reduced staffing and therefore lower cost, this report identifies the regulatory requirements and associated guidance utilized in the licensing of existing reactors. The potential applicability of these regulations to advanced SMR designs is identified taking into account the unique features of these types of reactors.

LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wheeler, Timothy A.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Middleton, Bobby D.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Duran, Felicia Angelica; Baum, Gregory A.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

U.S. Department of Energy National Environmental Policy Act Categorica...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory,...

17

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Tucson...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety and health, or similar requirements of DOE or Executive Orders. X (2) Require siting...

18

Key regulatory drivers affecting shipments of mixed transuranic waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of key regulatory drivers affect the nature, scope, and timing of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL`s) plans for mixed transuranic (MTRU) waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which are planned to commence as soon as possible following WIPP`s currently anticipated November, 1997 opening date. This paper provides an overview of some of the key drivers at LANL, particularly emphasizing those associated with the hazardous waste component of LANL`s MTRU waste (MTRU, like any mixed waste, contains both a radioactive and a hazardous waste component). The key drivers discussed here derive from the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and its amendments, including the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAU), and from the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (NMHWA). These statutory provisions are enforced through three major mechanisms: facility RCRA permits; the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, set forth in the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 4, Part 1: and compliance orders issued to enforce these requirements. General requirements in all three categories will apply to MTRU waste management and characterization activities at both WIPP and LANL. In addition, LANL is subject to facility-specific requirements in its RCRA hazardous waste facility permit, permit conditions as currently proposed in RCRA Part B permit applications presently being reviewed by the New Mexico Environment Department (NNED), and facility-specific compliance orders related to MTRU waste management. Likewise, permitting and compliance-related requirements specific to WIPP indirectly affect LANL`s characterization, packaging, record-keeping, and transportation requirements for MTRU waste. LANL must comply with this evolving set of regulatory requirements to begin shipments of MTRU waste to WIPP in a timely fashion.

Schumann, P.B.; Bacigalupa, G.A.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Sinkule, B.J. [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Environment, safety, and health regulatory implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To identify, document, and maintain the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s environment, safety, and health (ES&H) regulatory requirements, the US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office tasked the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to develop a regulatory operating envelope for the UMTRA Project. The system selected for managing the UMTRA regulatory operating envelope data bass is based on the Integrated Project Control/Regulatory Compliance System (IPC/RCS) developed by WASTREN, Inc. (WASTREN, 1993). The IPC/RCS is a tool used for identifying regulatory and institutional requirements and indexing them to hardware, personnel, and program systems on a project. The IPC/RCS will be customized for the UMTRA Project surface remedial action and groundwater restoration programs. The purpose of this plan is to establish the process for implementing and maintaining the UMTRA Project`s regulatory operating envelope, which involves identifying all applicable regulatory and institutional requirements and determining compliance status. The plan describes how the Project will identify ES&H regulatory requirements, analyze applicability to the UMTRA Project, and evaluate UMTRA Project compliance status.

Not Available

1993-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

20

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT POWER MARKETS The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today ordered its staff to conduct investigators will find out if any technical or operational factors, federal or state regulatory prohibitions

Laughlin, Robert B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to the regulatory analyst to promote preparation of quality regulatory analysis documents and to implement the policies of the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NUREG/BR-0058 Rev. 2). This Handbook expands upon policy concepts included in the NRC Guidelines and translates the six steps in preparing regulatory analyses into implementable methodologies for the analyst. It provides standardized methods of preparation and presentation of regulatory analyses, with the inclusion of input that will satisfy all backfit requirements and requirements of NRC`s Committee to Review Generic Requirements. Information on the objectives of the safety goal evaluation process and potential data sources for preparing a safety goal evaluation is also included. Consistent application of the methods provided here will result in more directly comparable analyses, thus aiding decision-makers in evaluating and comparing various regulatory actions. The handbook is being issued in loose-leaf format to facilitate revisions. NRC intends to periodically revise the handbook as new and improved guidance, data, and methods become available.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT AND FERC STAFF The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today accepted a settlement, valued at nearly $500 stemming from the 2000-2001 energy crisis in California and other Western states. The global settlement

Laughlin, Robert B.

23

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT SETTLEMENT BETWEEN DUKE AND COMMISSION STAFF The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today accepted a settlement between the Commission's enforcement staff and Houston-based units of Duke Energy that resolves

Laughlin, Robert B.

24

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT POWER EXCHANGE MARKET The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved a staff settlement calling-2-001 COMMISSION APPROVES $13.8 MILLION SETTLEMENT WITH RELIANT ENERGY OVER PHYSICAL WITHHOLDING IN CALIFORNIA

Laughlin, Robert B.

25

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today accepted an agreement between Nevada Power and Sierra Pacific. AGREEMENT ACCEPTED BETWEEN ENRON AND NEVADA COMPANIES SETTLING MATTERS STEMMING FROM WESTERN ENERGY CRISIS

Laughlin, Robert B.

26

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT FERC APPROVES SETTLEMENT WITH RELIANT IN CALIFORNIA CASES; PROCEEDS COULD TOTAL $50 MILLION The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved a settlement between the Commission's enforcement staff

Laughlin, Robert B.

27

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT CRISIS The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved a comprehensive settlement among APX Inc. Coral Power LLC, Puget Sound Energy Inc. and Avista are Supporting Parties. R-07-14 (30) #12;

Laughlin, Robert B.

28

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT-95-191 COMMISSION APPROVES TWO WESTERN POWER SETTLEMENTS The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved two markets during the Western energy crisis of 2000-2001. The first case involves a settlement agreement

Laughlin, Robert B.

29

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS.0 NEPA REQUIREMENTS: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.1 Environmental Impacts of the Alternatives

30

Phenylpropanoid related regulatory protein-regulatory region associations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Materials and methods for identifying lignin regulatory region-regulatory protein associations are disclosed. Materials and methods for modulating lignin accumulation are also disclosed.

Apuya, Nestor (Culver City, CA); Bobzin, Steven Craig (Malibu, CA); Park, Joon-Hyun (Oak Park, CA); Doukhanina, Elena (Newbury Park, CA)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

31

REGULATORY STATUS: AOC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

184 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble pile 129) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security south of C-611 Water Treatment Plant. Estimated to be less than 5 cubic feet....

32

Threat Insight Quarterly Regulatory Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the importance of integrating regulatory compliance into an organization's overall strategic IT security planning

33

Techniques for analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Regulatory laws and policies. [State by state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a legal study prepared to provide a review of the substantive and procedural laws of each regulatory jurisdiction that may affect implementation of the PURPA standards, and to summarize the current state of consideration and implementation of policies and rate designs similar or identical to the PURPA standards by state regulatory agencies and nonregulated utilities. This report is divided into three sections. The first section, the Introduction, summarizes the standards promulgated by PURPA and the results of the legal study. The second section, State Regulatory Law and Procedure, summarizes for each state or other ratemaking jurisdiction: (1) general constitutional and statutory provisions affecting utility rates and conditions of service; (2) specific laws or decisions affecting policy or rate design issues covered by PURPA standards; and (3) statutes and decisions governing administrative procedures, including judicial review. A chart showing actions taken on the policy and rate design issues addressed by PURPA is also included for each jurisdiction, and citations to relevant authorities are presented for each standard. State statutes or decisions that specifically define a state standard similar or identical to a PURPA standard, or that refer to one of the three PURPA objectives, are noted. The third section, Nonregulated Electric Utilities, summarizes information available on nonregulated utilities, i.e., publicly or cooperatively owned utilities which are specifically exempted from state regulation by state law.

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A Regulatory Analysis and Reassessment of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Listed Hazardous Waste Numbers for Applicability to the INTEC Liquid Waste System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report concludes that there are four listed hazardous waste numbers (F001, F002, F005, and U134) applicable to the waste in the Process Equipment Waste Evaporator (PEWE) liquid waste system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The chemical constituents associated with these listed hazardous waste numbers, including those listed only for ignitability are identified. The RCRA Part A permit application hazardous waste numbers identify chemical constituents that may be treated or stored by the PEWE liquid waste system either as a result of a particular characteristic (40 CFR, Subpart C) or as a result of a specific process (40 CFR 261, Subpart D). The RCRA Part A permit application for the PEWE liquid waste system identifies the universe of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hazardous waste numbers [23 characteristic (hazardous waste codes) numbers and 105 listed numbers (four F-listed hazardous waste numbers, 20 P-listed hazardous waste numbers, and 81 U-listed hazardous waste numbers)] deemed acceptable for storage and treatment. This evaluation, however, identifies only listed wastes (and their chemical constituents) that have actually entered the PEWE liquid waste system and would, therefore, be assigned to the PEWE liquids and treatment residuals.

Gilbert, K.L.; Venneman, T.E.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Generation Projects on Federal Lands Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal Lands Presentation covers regulatory considerations for developing...

36

Microsoft Word - PTPC_BAASA_CX.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

action would not (i) threaten a violation of applicable statutory, DOE F 1325.8 e Electronic Form Approved by CGIR - 012095 (8-89) memorandum TO : regulatory, or permit...

37

Regulatory Analysis on Criteria  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONewsRegulatory Analysis on Criteria for

38

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS Amendment and Need The purpose of the non-AFA crab sideboard limits was to prevent vessels with crab QS from paper of all GOA sideboards for non-American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels. In April 2007

39

Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen Vehicles...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PSU under MOP&NG (i.e. IOCL, BPCL, HPCL, BRPL, CPCL, EIL, ONGC, OIL, GAIL, NRL), Two from private sector on rotation basis from 2008 Statutory Bodies *Chief Controller of...

40

Regulatory guidance for lightning protection in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance to address design and implementation practices for lightning protection systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Lightning protection is becoming increasingly important with the advent of digital and low-voltage analog systems in NPPs. These systems have the potential to be more vulnerable than older analog systems to the resulting power surges and electromagnetic interference (EMI) when lightning strikes facilities or power lines. This paper discusses the technical basis for guidance to licensees and applicants covered in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.204, Guidelines for Lightning Protection of Nuclear Power Plants, issued August 2005. RG 1.204 describes guidance for practices that are acceptable to the NRC staff for protecting nuclear power structures and systems from direct lightning strikes and the resulting secondary effects. (authors)

Kisner, R. A.; Wilgen, J. B.; Ewing, P. D.; Korsah, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6007 (United States); Antonescu, C. E. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Regulatory Guidance for Lightning Protection in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance to address design and implementation practices for lightning protection systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Lightning protection is becoming increasingly important with the advent of digital and low-voltage analog systems in NPPs. These systems have the potential to be more vulnerable than older analog systems to the resulting power surges and electromagnetic interference (EMI) when lightning strikes facilities or power lines. This paper discusses the technical basis for guidance to licensees and applicants covered in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.204, Guidelines for Lightning Protection of Nuclear Power Plants, issued August 2005. RG 1.204 describes guidance for practices that are acceptable to the NRC staff for protecting nuclear power structures and systems from direct lightning strikes and the resulting secondary effects.

Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Ewing, Paul D [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Antonescu, Christina E [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) engaged in numerous projects outlined under the scope of work discussed in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) grant number DE-FC26-04NT15456 awarded to the IOGCC. Numerous projects were completed that were extremely valuable to state oil and gas agencies as a result of work performed utilizing resources provided by the grant. There are numerous areas in which state agencies still need assistance. This additional assistance will need to be addressed under future scopes of work submitted annually to DOE's Project Officer for this grant. This report discusses the progress of the projects outlined under the grant scope of work for the 2005-2006 areas of interest, which are as follows: Area of Interest No. 1--Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement: This area of interest continues to support IOGCC's regulatory streamlining efforts that include the identification and elimination of unnecessary duplications of efforts between and among state and federal programs dealing with exploration and production on public lands. Area of Interest No. 2--Technology: This area of interest seeks to improve efficiency in states through the identification of technologies that can reduce costs. Area of Interest No. 3--Training and Education: This area of interest is vital to upgrading the skills of regulators and industry alike. Within the National Energy Policy, there are many appropriate training and education opportunities. Education was strongly endorsed by the President's National Energy Policy Development group. Acting through the governors offices, states are very effective conduits for the dissemination of energy education information. While the IOGCC favors the development of a comprehensive, long-term energy education plan, states are also supportive of immediate action on important concerns, such as energy prices, availability and conservation. Area of Interest No. 4--Resource Assessment and Development: This area of interest relates directly to helping maximize production of domestic oil and natural gas resources, including areas that are under explored or have not been adequately defined.

Mark A. Carl

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

43

Plans, Updates, Regulatory Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010 Target Action Level (TAL) Exceedance Report 2011 Updates on Permit Compliance March 7, 2013, NPDES Permit No. NM0030759 - Request for Extenstion to Submit Renewal Application...

44

Regulatory Review of the Safety Case for Siting Licensing of Saligny Low and Intermediate Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper contains the regulatory review comments produced following submission of siting license application of Saligny repository. The regulatory review was conducted in order to verify the compliance with Romanian regulatory criteria and requirements. After assessment of completeness of safety case and availability of supporting documents the review the main technical areas started. The review process was focused on the site characteristics, waste characteristics, safety considerations as scenarios development, mathematical models, identification and treatment of uncertainties, availability of parameters. (authors)

Dogaru, D.M. [National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control, 5 Bucharest (Romania)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Regulatory cross-cutting topics for fuel cycle facilities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report overviews crosscutting regulatory topics for nuclear fuel cycle facilities for use in the Fuel Cycle Research&Development Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation and Screening study. In particular, the regulatory infrastructure and analysis capability is assessed for the following topical areas:Fire Regulations (i.e., how applicable are current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and/or International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fire regulations to advance fuel cycle facilities)Consequence Assessment (i.e., how applicable are current radionuclide transportation tools to support risk-informed regulations and Level 2 and/or 3 PRA) While not addressed in detail, the following regulatory topic is also discussed:Integrated Security, Safeguard and Safety Requirement (i.e., how applicable are current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations to future fuel cycle facilities which will likely be required to balance the sometimes conflicting Material Accountability, Security, and Safety requirements.)

Denman, Matthew R.; Brown, Jason; Goldmann, Andrew Scott; Louie, David

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Document covers the Regulatory...

47

Regulatory Requirements for Cogeneration Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for cogeneration, therefore, the discussion will be limited to those portions of each act that affect cogenerators. Since the original cogeneration legislation was passed in 1978 and implemented by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in 1980... major pieces of legislation that impact cogeneration as well as an outline of the major provisions obtain ed in the Department of Energy Federal Energy Regulatory Commission final rule implementing Section 201 and Section 210 of PURPA. Public Uti...

Curry, K. A., Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

Hendrickson, P.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. The performance of these activities may generate asbestos-containing waste because asbestos was formerly used in many building materials, including floor tile, sealants, plastics, cement pipe, cement sheets, insulating boards, and insulating cements. The regulatory requirements governing the disposal of these wastes depend on: (1) the percentage of asbestos in the waste and whether the waste is friable (easily crumbled or pulverized); (2) other physical and chemical characteristics of the waste; and (3) the State in which the waste is generated. This Information Brief provides an overview of the environment regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste. It does not address regulatory requirements applicable to worker protection promulgated under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHAct), the Mining Safety and Health Act (MSHA), or the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Regulatory Guidance Letter 87-05 SUBJECT: EIS Costs that can be Paid by the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory Guidance Letter 87-05 SUBJECT: EIS Costs that can be Paid by the Applicant DATE: May 28 activities (FOAs) about whether or not the applicant can somehow pay the costs of EIS preparation in cases to the Corps for the Corps to prepare the EIS, the applicant can certainly bear a major part of the costs

US Army Corps of Engineers

51

State Regulatory Oversight of Geothermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State Regulatory Oversight of Geothermal Heat Pump Installations: 2012 Kevin McCray Executive of this project was to update previous research accomplished by the Geothermal Heat Pump Consortium (GHPC of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems. The work was to provide insight into existing and anticipated

52

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION OFFICE OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL SAFETY AND SAFEGUARDS ON RADIATION THERAPY OVEREXPOSURES IN PANAMA Addressees All medical licensees. Purpose The U.S. Nuclear times resulted in significant radiation overexposures to patients. The hospital staff did not perform

53

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research: Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through December 31, 1988.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Identification and Characterization of Prokaryotic Regulatory Networks: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have completed our characterization of both the transcriptional regulatory network and post-transcriptional regulatory motifs in Shewanella.

Gary D Stormo

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Fact Sheet: DOE/National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissione...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

DOENational Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners Natural Gas Infrastructure Modernization Partnership Fact Sheet: DOENational Association of Regulatory Utility...

56

Coal-Fired Power Plants, Greenhouse Gases, and State Statutory Substantial Endangerment Provisions: Climate Change Comes to Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to climate change. Second, it provides regulatory context for KDHE?s decision denying a permit for the Sunflower project. It summarizes the status of federal regulation of greenhouse gas (?GHG?) emissions. It also describes state efforts to fill... of air quality permits for the Sunflower units is within KDHE?s authority to take actions to prevent the substantial endangerment to public health and the environment arising from GHG emissions. I reach this conclusion even though the denial was based...

Glicksman, Robert L.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Montana Water Quality Permit Application, Nondegradation Authorization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Supplemental Material: Montana Water Quality Permit Application, Nondegradation Authorization, and Permit FeesPermitting...

58

Approach of Czech regulatory body to LBB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present there are two NPPs equipped with PWR units in Czech Republic. The Dukovany, NPP is about ten years in operation (four units 440 MW - WWBFL model 213) and Tomelin NPP is under construction (two units 1000 MW - WWER model 320). Both NPPs were built to Soviet design and according to Soviet regulations and standards but most of equipment for primary circuits was supplied by home manufacturers. The objective of the Czech LBB program is to prove the LBB status of the primary piping systems of there NPPs and the LBB concept is a part of strategy to meet western style safety standards. The reason for the Czech LBB project is a lack of some standard safety Facilities too. For both Dukovany and Tomelin NPPs a full LBB analysis should be carried out. The application of LBB to the piping system should be also a cost effective means to avoid installations of pipe whip restraints and jet shields. The Czech regulatory body issued non-mandatory requirement, {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} which is in compliance with national legal documents and which is based on the US NRC Regulatory Procedures and US standards (ASMF CODE, ANSI). The requirement has been published in the document {open_quotes}Safety of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes} No 1/1991 as {open_quotes}Requirements on the Content and Format of Safety Reports and their Supplements{close_quote} and consist of two parts (1) procedure for obtaining proof of evidence {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} (2) leak detection systems for the pressurized reactor primary circuit. At present some changes concerning both parts of the above document will be introduced. The reasons for this modifications will be presented.

Tendera, P.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Approach for Czech regulatory body to LBB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present there are two NPPs equipped with PWR units in Czech Republic. The Dukovany NPP is about ten years in operation (four units 440 MW - WWER model 213) and Temelin NPP is under construction (two units 1000 MW-WWER model 320). Both NPPs were built to Soviet design and according to Soviet regulations and standards but most of equipment for primary circuits was supplied by home manufactures. The objective for the Czech LBB programme is to prove the LBB status of the primary piping systems of these NPPs and the LBB concept is a part of strategy to meet western style safety standards. The reason for the Czech LBB project is a lack of some standard safety facilities, too. For both Dukovany and Temolin NPPs a full LBB analysis should be carried out. The application of LBB to the piping system should be also a cost effective means to avoid installations of pipe whip restraints and jet shields. The Czech regulatory body issued non-mandatory requirement {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} which is in compliance with national legal documents and which is based on the US NRC Regulatory Procedures and US standards (ASME, CODE, ANSI). The requirement has been published in the document {open_quotes}Safety of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes} No. 1/1991 as {open_quotes}Requirements on the Content and Format of Safety Reports and their Supplements{close_quotes} and consists of two parts (1) procedure for obtaining proof of evidence {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} (2) leak detection systems for the pressurized reactor primary circuit. At present some changes concerning both parts of the above document will be introduced. The reasons for this modifications will be presented.

Tendera, P. [State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS), Prague (Czech Republic)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Regulatory Requirements | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONewsRegulatory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Grand Gulf-prioritization of regulatory requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As cost pressures mount, Grand Gulf nuclear station (GGNS) is relying increasingly on various prioritization approaches to implement, modify, eliminate, or defer regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements can be prioritized through the use of three measures: (1) safety (or risk) significance; (2) cost; and (3) public policy (or political) significance. This paper summarizes GGNS' efforts to implement solutions to regulatory issues using these three prioritization schemes to preserve a balance between cost and safety benefit.

Meisner, M.J. (Entergy Operations Inc., Port Gibson, MS (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlbert, L.M.; Langston, M.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Environmental regulatory update table, March 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, April 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, October 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Hawkins, G.T.; Houlberg, L.M.; Noghrei-Nikbakht, P.A.; Salk, M.S.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Environmental regulatory update table, July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (July 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, August 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (August 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M., Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Sandia National Laboratories: Federal Electric Regulatory Commission...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Small Generator Interconnection Agreement Dakota Version 5.4 Released Sandia-UC Davis Collaboration Funded by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Federal Electric Regulatory...

73

Federal / State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Issues Federal and State Blending Restrictions Action by ASTM NCWM to address higher ethanol blends Federal State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for Introduction of...

74

EAC Recommendations Regarding Emerging and Alternative Regulatory...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the continued exploration of initiatives focused on the concepts of regulatoryutility business models. The paper includes a summary of regulatory model initiatives, current and...

75

Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) Remediation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Laboratory December 17, 2014 To view all the P&RA CoP 2014 Technical Exchange Meeting videos click here. Video Presentation Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC)...

76

Seamless Transport Policy: Institutional and Regulatory Aspects...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seamless Transport Policy: Institutional and Regulatory Aspects of Inter-Modal Coordination Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Seamless Transport Policy:...

77

Other Regulatory Efforts | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efforts Other Regulatory Efforts In addition to regulating international electricity trade, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability participates in other...

78

Commission decision on the Department of Water Resources' Application for Certification for the Bottle Rock Geothermal Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Application for Certification for the construction of a 55 MW geothermal power plant and related facilities in Lake County was approved subject to terms identified in the Final Decision. The following are covered: findings on compliance with statutory site-certification requirements; final environmental impact report; procedural steps; evidentiary bases; need, environmental resources; public health and safety; plant and site safety and reliability; socioeconomic, land use, and cultural concerns, and transmission tap line. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.

Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W.; Rifkin, S.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Uranium Watch REGULATORY CONFUSION: FEDERALAND STATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uranium Watch Report REGULATORY CONFUSION: FEDERALAND STATE ENFORCEMENT OF 40 C.F.R. PART 61 SUBPART W INTRODUCTION 1. This Uranium Watch Report, Regulatory Confusion: Federal and State Enforcement at the White Mesa Uranium Mill, San Juan County, Utah. 2. The DAQ, a Division of the Utah Department

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

State Regulatory Oversight of Geothermal Heat Pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State Regulatory Oversight of Geothermal Heat Pump Installa:ons: 2012 & 2009 Kevin McCray, Execu:ve Director #12;2009 #12;Sponsors ·The Geothermal Hea requested geothermal hea:ng and cooling regulatory data. · An email containing

82

Regulatory Roadmap Workshop for Federal Bulk Transmission Regulations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regulatory Roadmapping Pgower's picture Submitted by Pgower(45) Member 7 August, 2014 - 13:19 One-day workshop to review regulatory roadmaps for bulk transmission. Date:...

83

Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the...

84

Comments from The National Association of Regulatory Utility...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

from The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) on the Smart Grid RFI Comments from The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC)...

85

US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart...

86

Environmental regulatory guide for radiological effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is obligated to regulate its own activities so as to provide radiation protection for both workers and the public.'' Presidential Executive Order 12088, Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards,'' further requires the heads of executive agencies to ensure that all Federal facilities and activities comply with applicable pollution control standards and to take all actions necessary for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution. This regulatory guide describes the elements of an acceptable effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance program for DOE sites involving radioactive materials. These elements are applicable to all DOE and contractor activities for which the DOE exercises environmental, safety, and health responsibilities, and are intended to be applicable over the broad range of DOE facilities and sites. In situations where the high-priority elements may not provide sufficient coverage of a specific monitoring or surveillance topic, the document provides additional guidance. The high-priority elements are written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed, and the guidance is written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed. The regulatory guide both incorporates and expands on requirements embodied in DOE 5400.5 and DOE 5400.1. 221 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Techniques of analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography provides documentation for use by state public utility commissions and major nonregulated utilities in evaluating the applicability of a wide range of electric utility rate design and regulatory concepts in light of certain regulatory objectives. Part I, Utility Regulatory Objectives, contains 2084 citations on conservation of energy and capital; efficient use of facilities and resources; and equitable rates to electricity consumers. Part II, Rate Design Concepts, contains 1238 citations on time-of-day rates; seasonally-varying rates; cost-of-service rates; interruptible rates (including the accompanying use of load management techniques); declining block rates; and lifeline rates. Part III, Regulatory Concepts, contains 1282 references on restrictions on master metering; procedures for review of automatic adjustment clauses; prohibitions of rate or regulatory discrimination against solar, wind, or other small energy systems; treatment of advertising expenses; and procedures to protect ratepayers from abrupt termination of service.

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances: February 1995. Volume 41, Number 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains an issuance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and a Director`s Decision. The issuance concerns consideration by the Commission of appeals from both the Initial Decision and a Reconsideration Order issued by the Presiding Officer involving two materials license amendment applications filed by the University of Missouri. The Director`s Decision from the Office of Enforcement denies petitions filed by Northeast Utilities employees requesting that accelerated enforcement action be taken against Northeast Utilities for activities concerned with NU`s fitness-for-duty program.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Regulatory Facility Guide for Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation related regulations applicable to shipments originating at or destined to Tennessee facilities. Information on preferred routes is also given.

Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rymer, A.C. [Transportation Consulting Services, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

90

Nevada Sample Application for Permit Under Utility Environmental...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sample Application for Permit Under Utility Environmental Protection Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance -...

91

Reliability and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentationgiven at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meetingcovers the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) strategic plan, the Federal Power Act (FPA), current energy security posture, and more.

92

Regulatory status of transgrafted plants is unclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3. Graff GD, Wright BD, Bennett AB, Zilberman D. 2004. Ac-PIPRA, Davis; and A.B. Bennett is Profes- sor, Department ofL. Chi-Ham and Alan B. Bennett T he regulatory implications

Haroldsen, Victor M; Paulino, Gabriel; Chi-ham, Cecilia; Bennett, Alan B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Regulatory roles of endothelial cells in cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the biochemical regulatory impact of endothelial cells, the cells that line all blood vessels, in cancer. Our work draws from concepts in vascular repair and tissue engineering and extends the view ...

Franses, Joseph W. (Joseph Wang)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Evolution and statistics of biological regulatory networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I study the process of evolution of the gene regulatory network in Escherichia coli. First, I characterize the portion of the network that has been documented, and then I simulate growth of the network. In ...

Chandalia, Juhi Kiran, 1979-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Natural Gas Regulatory Policy: Current Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL GAS REGULATORY roLICY: CURRENT ISSUES G. GAIL WATKINS Railroad Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Many changes have occurred in recent months in both federal and state natural gas regulation. Those changes have increased... the options of industrial energy consumers for purchasing and moving natural gas. This panel viII discuss important developments in federal and state regulatory arenas and their impacts on purchasing options. Among the issues discussed viII be: 1...

Watkins, G.

96

Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromComments on NBPSiting Guidelines |Regulatory BurdenRegulatory

97

Regulatory Guidance Letter 88-15 SUBJECT: Third-Party Contracting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory Guidance Letter 88-15 SUBJECT: Third-Party Contracting DATE: November 7, 1988 EXPIRES is to clarify the Corps role when the permit applicant or permittee chooses to use third-party contracting to obtain the information. This policy applies to all information requests involving third-party contracting

US Army Corps of Engineers

98

This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains regulatory documents having general  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains regulatory documents having general applicability by the Superintendent of Documents. Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each week OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET 2 CFR Part 176 Requirements for Implementing Sections 1512, 1605, and 1606

Weber, David J.

99

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Office of General Counsel ­ Markets, Tariffs & Rates Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 888 FirstUNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION 18 CFR Chapter I (Docket No. RM05 Energy Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Inquiry (NOI). SUMMARY: The Federal Energy Regulatory

Laughlin, Robert B.

100

Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the ESPDP is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. The results of the technical and licensing evaluations are presented in this report. The purpose, background, and organization of the ESPDP is delineated in Section 1. Section 11 contains flowcharts defining siting application requirements, environmental report requirements, and emergency planning/preparedness requirements for ALWRS. The licensing and technical review results are presented in Section III.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (EA . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.0 NEPA REQUIREMENTS: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.1 Environmental Impacts of the Alternatives . . . . . 15 2.2 Whale watching activity in Alaska

102

Legal and regulatory issues affecting the aquifer thermal energy storage concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of legal and regulatory issus that potentially can affect implementation of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) concept are examined. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

Hendrickson, P.L.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest, 1991 edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, and the areas NRC licenses. This digest is a compilation of NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1990, with exceptions noted. For operating US commercial nuclear power reactors, information on generating capacity and average capacity factor is obtained from Monthly Operating Reports submitted to the NRC directly by the licensee. This information is reviewed for consistency only. No independent validation and/or verification is performed by the NRC. For detailed and complete information about tables and figures, refer to the source publications. This digest is published annually for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. 30 figs., 12 tabs.

Olive, K L

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Ohio. Preliminary background report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Public Utilities Commission (PUCO) is a body created by the Ohio State legislature to administer the provisions of the Ohio Public Utilities Act. It is composed of three commissioners appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Once appointed, a commissioner serves for a six-year period. The PUCO is vested with the power and jurisdiction to supervise and regulate public utilities and railroads... . The term public utility includes every corporation, company, co-partnership, person or association, their lessees, trustees, or receivers, as defined in the Ohio Code. Among the various services enumerated in the Code under the definition of public utility are an electric light company; a gas company; a pipeline company transporting gas, oil or coal; a waterworks company; a heating or cooling company. The power to regulate public utilities is shared by the PUCO and municipal governments. The municipal regulatory authority is derived from the Ohio Constitution, statutory provisions, and municipal franchising authority. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Trawler: de novo regulatory motif discovery pipeline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trawler: de novo regulatory motif discovery pipeline for chromatin immunoprecipitation Laurence, the fastest computational pipeline to date, to efficiently discover over-represented motifs in chromatin present the Trawler pipeline (Fig. 1a) that attempts the de novo identification of all over

Cai, Long

106

A Comparison of International Regulatory Organizations and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparison of International Regulatory Organizations and Licensing Procedures for New Nuclear the safety regulation and the licensing of new nuclear power plants. The paper considers both design safety approval and issues of site licensing. Advice from international organisations is summarised. Nuclear power

Aickelin, Uwe

107

Regulatory Promotion of Emergent CCS Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the growing inevitability of climate change and the attendant need for mitigation strategies, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has yet to gain much traction in the United States. Recent regulatory proposals by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), limited in scope to new-build power plants, represent the only significant policy initiative intended to mandate diffusion of CCS technology. Phase I of this Project assessed barriers to CCS deployment as prioritized by the CCS community. That research concluded that there were four primary barriers: (1) cost, (2) lack of a carbon price, (3) liability, and (4) lack of a comprehensive regulatory regime. Phase II of this Project, as presented in this Report, assesses potential regulatory models for CCS and examines where those models address the hurdles to diffusing CCS technology identified in Phase I. It concludes (1) that a CCS-specific but flexible standard, such as a technology performance standard or a very particular type of market-based regulation, likely will promote CCS diffusion, and (2) that these policies cannot work alone, but rather, should be combined with other measures, such as liability limits and a comprehensive CCS regulatory regime.

Davies, Lincoln; Uchitel, Kirsten; Johnson, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

NOTICE OF PROPOSED REGULATION AMENDMENT Date: July 29, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the General Counsel or shall be considered null and void. (7) Escalation Clauses Prohibited. A lease shall information previously spread across several other regulations in this area. By combining all general shall be interpreted as circumventing any applicable statutory or regulatory requirements for life

Wu, Shin-Tson

109

Integrative approaches for systematic reconstruction of regulatory circuits in mammals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reconstruction of regulatory networks is one of the most challenging tasks in systems biology. Although some models for inferring regulatory networks can make useful predictions about the wiring and mechanisms of ...

Santos Botelho Oliveira Leite, Ana Paula

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

US Department of Energys Regulatory Negotiations Convening...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Regulatory Negotiations Convening on Commercial Certification for Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration Equipment regnegonacconfidentiality.pdf More...

111

Conservation and Evolution of Cis-Regulatory Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation and Evolution of Cis-Regulatory Systems in Ascomycete Fungi Audrey P. Gasch1¤*, Alan M expression regulation evolves. To investigate this, we systematically explored the conservation of regulatory, indicating that those regulatory systems have been conserved in multiple ascomycete species. In addition

Gasch, Audrey P.

112

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives impacting environmental, health, and safety management responsibilities. the table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Mayer, S.J.; Salk, M.S.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Regulatory Networks Controlling Plant Cold Acclimation or Low Temperature Regulatory Networks Controlling Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis (2011 JGI User Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Mike Thomashow of Michigan State University gives a presentation on on "Low Temperature Regulatory Networks Controlling Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

Thomashow, Mike

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

114

Regulatory Networks Controlling Plant Cold Acclimation or Low Temperature Regulatory Networks Controlling Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis (2011 JGI User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Mike Thomashow of Michigan State University gives a presentation on on "Low Temperature Regulatory Networks Controlling Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

Thomashow, Mike

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

115

@ GW Regulatory Studies Center | www.RegulatoryStudies.gwu.edu | Follow us @RegStudies DOE's Proposed Commercial Refrigeration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equipment, establishing maximum allowable energy usage standards as a function of either refrigerated volume.RegulatoryStudies.gwu.edu | Follow us @RegStudies Source: Department of Energy's Technical Support Document for the Proposed Rule@ GW Regulatory Studies Center | www.RegulatoryStudies.gwu.edu | Follow us @RegStudies DOE

Schmitt, William R.

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - abrogates regulatory function Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

actions that are functionally equivalent... : Regulatory Taking Challenges to Local Environmental Regulation Environmental Practicum Memo: Regulatory... , how should a...

117

Papers on the nuclear regulatory dilemma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The four papers contained in this report are titled: (1) From Prescriptive to Performance-Based Regulation of Nuclear Power; (2) Nuclear Regulatory Reform: A Technology-Forcing Approach; (3) Improving the Regulation of Nuclear Power; and (4) Science and Its Limits: The Regulators' Dilemma. These four papers investigate issues relating to the long-term regulation of nuclear energy. They were prepared as part of the Institute for Energy Analysis' project on Nuclear Regulation funded by a grant from the Mellon Foundation and a smaller grant by the MacArthur Foundation. Originally this work was to be supplemented by contributions from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and from the Department of Energy. These contributions were not forthcoming, and as a result the scope of our investigations was more restricted than we had originally planned.

Barkenbus, J.N.; Freeman, S.D.; Weinberg, A.M.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Plant nitrogen regulatory P-PII genes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally relates to plant nitrogen regulatory PII gene (hereinafter P-PII gene), a gene involved in regulating plant nitrogen metabolism. The invention provides P-PII nucleotide sequences, expression constructs comprising said nucleotide sequences, and host cells and plants having said constructs and, optionally expressing the P-PII gene from said constructs. The invention also provides substantially pure P-PII proteins. The P-PII nucleotide sequences and constructs of the

Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Lam, Hon-Ming (Hong Kong, HK); Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun (Woodside, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Plant nitrogen regulatory P-PII polypeptides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally relates to plant nitrogen regulatory PII gene (hereinafter P-PII gene), a gene involved in regulating plant nitrogen metabolism. The invention provides P-PII nucleotide sequences, expression constructs comprising said nucleotide sequences, and host cells and plants having said constructs and, optionally expressing the P-PII gene from said constructs. The invention also provides substantially pure P-PII proteins. The P-PII nucleotide sequences and constructs of the invention may be used to engineer organisms to overexpress wild-type or mutant P-PII regulatory protein. Engineered plants that overexpress or underexpress P-PII regulatory protein may have increased nitrogen assimilation capacity. Engineered organisms may be used to produce P-PII proteins which, in turn, can be used for a variety of purposes including in vitro screening of herbicides. P-PII nucleotide sequences have additional uses as probes for isolating additional genomic clones having the promoters of P-PII gene. P-PII promoters are light- and/or sucrose-inducible and may be advantageously used in genetic engineering of plants.

Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Lam, Hon-Ming; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

Statutory Compliance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on Energy andDepartmentDepartment of EnergyDavis Bacon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel Cell VehicleEnergy (5 Activities) GeothermalHeatRegulatory

122

Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |RebeccaRegional StandardsExecutive OrderTheRegulatory

123

NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D. C. 20555  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28 1% - :NEW YORIC LedouxREGULATORY

124

Regulatory Drivers | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONewsRegulatory Analysis on

125

Regulatory Framework at LANL.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONewsRegulatory Analysis onEnvironmental

126

Sandia National Laboratories: Pollution Prevention: Regulatory Drivers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik SpoerkeSolar Regional Test Center inInsights forAwards 2010Regulatory

127

Sandia National Laboratories: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit at Explora Museum OnFact SheetsEnergy Regulatory

128

Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues. This document does not address health or safety regulations or requirements (those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) or continuous emission monitoring systems. This DQO is applicable to all equipment, facilities, and operations under the jurisdiction of RPP that emit or have the potential to emit regulated air pollutants.

MULKEY, C.H.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

129

Environmental regulatory update table, July/August 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, July--August 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Environmental sciences division: Environmental regulatory update table July 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Environmental regulatory update table, September--October 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action. This table is for January/February 1992.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January--February 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November--December 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly wit information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May--June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Environmental regulatory update table: September/October 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September/October 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operation and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January--February 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations ad contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Information resources in state regulatory agencies-a California perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various state regulatory agencies have expressed a need for networking with information gatherers/researchers to produce a concise compilation of primary information so that the basis for regulatory standards can be scientifically referenced. California has instituted several programs to retrieve primary information, generate primary information through research, and generate unique regulatory standards by integrating the primary literature and the products of research. This paper describes these programs.

DiZio, S.M. [California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) established a national emission allowance trading system, a market-based form of environmental regulation designed to reduce and limit sulfur dioxide emissions. However, the allowance trading system is being applied primarily to an economically regulated electric utility industry. The combining of the new form of environmental regulation and economic regulation of electric utilities has raised a number of questions including what the role should be of the federal and state utility regulating commissions and how those actions will affect the decision making process of the utilities and the allowance market. There are several dimensions to the regulatory problems that commissions face. Allowances and utility compliance expenditures have implications for least-cost/IPR (integrated resource planning), prudence review procedures, holding company and multistate utility regulation and ratemaking treatment. The focus of this paper is on the ratemaking treatment. The following topics are covered: ratemaking treatment of allowances and compliance costs; Traditional cost-recovery mechanisms; limitations to the traditional approach; traditional approach and the allowance trading market; market-based cost recovery mechanisms; methods of determining the benchmark; determining the split between ratepayers and the utility; other regulatory approaches; limitations of incentive mechanisms.

Rose, K. [National Regulatory Research Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council Webinar:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

is a presentation from the January 12, 2015 Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council webinar for Natural Resources Canada and the US Department of Energy regarding a...

145

Comments on Request For Information regarding Reducing Regulatory...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Request For Information regarding Reducing Regulatory Reform issued February 3, 2011 (Federal Register Vol. 76, No. 23 Thursday, February 3, 2011 Notices). Comments on Request...

146

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommenda...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy:...

147

Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overview of DOE's Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit project, providing information on where to go to view documents and who to contact to get involved.

Young, K.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

activities international regulatory: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

through active, but not inactive, regulatory links1,2. Thus Dunlop, Mary 4 INTERNAL AUDIT ACTIVITY ANNUAL REPORT Engineering Websites Summary: management, control, and...

149

Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Commission's Approval of a Second Early Site Permit in Just One Month Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approval of a Second Early Site Permit...

150

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics:...

151

Sandia National Laboratories: Policy and Regulatory, Codes and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Grid-Tied PV System Energy Smoothing Tagged with: Codes * Energy * photovoltaic * Photovoltaics * Policy * PV * Regulatory * Renewable Energy * SAND2012-2566W * solar * Solar...

152

Regulatory Models and the Environment: Practice, Pitfalls, and Prospects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational models support environmental regulatory activities by providing the regulator an ability to evaluate available knowledge, assess alternative regulations, and provide a framework to assess compliance. But all models face inherent uncertainties, because human and natural systems are always more complex and heterogeneous than can be captured in a model. Here we provide a summary discussion of the activities, findings, and recommendations of the National Research Council's Committee on Regulatory Environmental Models, a committee funded by the US Environmental Protection Agency to provide guidance on the use of computational models in the regulatory process. Modeling is a difficult enterprise even outside of the potentially adversarial regulatory environment. The demands grow when the regulatory requirements for accountability, transparency, public accessibility, and technical rigor are added to the challenges. Moreover, models cannot be validated (declared true) but instead should be evaluated with regard to their suitability as tools to address a specific question. The committee concluded that these characteristics make evaluation of a regulatory model more complex than simply comparing measurement data with model results. Evaluation also must balance the need for a model to be accurate with the need for a model to be reproducible, transparent, and useful for the regulatory decision at hand. Meeting these needs requires model evaluation to be applied over the"life cycle" of a regulatory model with an approach that includes different forms of peer review, uncertainty analysis, and extrapolation methods than for non-regulatory models.

Holmes, K. John; Graham, Judith A.; McKone, Thomas; Whipple, Chris

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Panel 4, Grid-Scale Storage Technologies: Regulatory Barriers...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Grid-scale Storage Technologies Regulatory Barriers and Policy Instruments Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services May 15 th , 2014 Sacramento, CA Demand 599...

154

Public Utility Regulatory Act, Alternative Energy Providers (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Chapter 35 of the Public Utility Regulatory Act specifically addresses alternative energy providers, and contains provisions designed to aid such providers in selling power in Texas's competitive...

155

Determinants of effective information transfer in international regulatory standards adoption.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The role of international regulatory standards within the current global environment has become of the most importance. The age of the global system and (more)

Popescu, Denisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

TRAINING THE STAFF OF THE REGULATORY BODY FOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES:  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training the staff of the regulatory body for nuclear facilities: A competency framework November 2001The originating Section of this publication in the IAEA was:

Wagramer Strasse; A Competency Framework

157

UNIT NAME C-611 PCB Spill Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

79 UNIT NAME C-611 PCB Spill Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION C-611 Transformer area (Map location 79) APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS FUNCTION Spill Site OPERATIONAL STATUS NA DATES...

158

Regulatory impact analysis of environmental standards for uranium mill tailings at active sites. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency was directed by Congress, under PL 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, to set standards of general application that provide protection from the hazards associated with uranium mill tailings. Title I of the Act pertains to tailings at inactive sites for which the Agency has developed standards as part of a separate rulemaking. Title II of the Act requires standards covering the processing and disposal of byproduct materials at mills which are currently licensed by the appropriate regulatory authorities. This Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) addresses the standards developed under Title II. There are two major parts of the standards for active mills: standards for control of releases from tailings during processing operations and prior to final disposal, and standards for protection of the public after the disposal of tailings. This report presents a detailed analysis of standards for disposal only, since the analysis required for the operations standards is very limited.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Regulatory impact analysis of final environmental standards for uranium mill tailings at active sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency was directed by Congress, under PL 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), to set standards of general application that provide protection from the hazards associated with uranium mill tailings. Title II of the Act requires standards covering the processing and disposal of byproduct materials at mills which are currently licensed by the appropriate regulatory authorities. This Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) addresses the standards promulgated under Title II. There are two major parts of the standards for active mills: standards for control of releases from tailings during processing operations and prior to final disposal, and standards for protection of the public health and environment after the disposal of tailings. This report presents a detailed analysis of standards for disposal only, since the analysis required for the standards during mill operations is very limited.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Comparison of the NRC and the IAEA regulatory documents in the area of nuclear fuel systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A main objective of this work was to identify the safety requirements in the area of fuel system design and performance from both the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) points of view. The study covered requirements during normal plant operation as well as during accident conditions. This study revealed that, although none of the factors to be considered for fuel safety were neglected in the IAEA regulatory documents, these documents are not complete in themselves, particularly because they lack quantitative guidelines and specific industrial standards. Although generality makes the IAEA requirements adaptable to many countries, on the other hand, it makes their applicability constrained by the availability of highly qualified and experienced personnel who can translate the qualitative requirements given in these documents into actual engineering solutions. 20 refs.

El-Adham, K.; Shinaishin, M.A.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Staff Report to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affecting competitive pricing of electric energy or reliability of service and (b) report its findingsStaff Report to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the Bulk Power Markets In the United of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, any individual Commissioner, or the Commission itself

Laughlin, Robert B.

162

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW FOR THE PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS WITHIN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.1Environmental Assessment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.2Regulatory Impact Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.0 ENVIRONMENTAL AND BIOLOGICAL IMPACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Atka Mackerel Biology

163

SECRETARIAL REVIEW DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECRETARIAL REVIEW DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ INITIAL REGULATORY The purpose of the non-AFA crab sideboard limits was to prevent vessels with crab QS from disadvantaging non for non-American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels. In April 2007, the Council began developing options

164

ERDC/ELTR-10-17 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-17 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program A Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to the Functional Assessment of Forested Wetlands in Alluvial Valleys of East Texas Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC

US Army Corps of Engineers

165

ERDC/ELTR-12-5 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-12-5 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Hawai`i and Pacific Islands Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U;#12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC/EL TR-12-5 February 2012 Regional Supplement to the Corps

US Army Corps of Engineers

166

ERDC/ELTR-11-11 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-11-11 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to Assessing the Functions of Headwater Slope Wetlands on the South Carolina Coastal Ainslie September 2011 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

167

ERDC/ELTR-10-1 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-1 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Great Plains Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers March 2010 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

168

ERDC/ELTR-12-9 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-12-9 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Eastern Mountains and Piedmont Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U;#12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC/EL TR-12-9 April 2012 Regional Supplement to the Corps

US Army Corps of Engineers

169

ERDC/ELTR-10-16 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-16 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Midwest Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U.S. Army Corps of Engineers August 2010 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

170

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, April 1995. Volume 41, Number 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains issuances of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and an issuance of the Director`s decision. The issuances concern a petition filed by Dr. James E Bauer seeking interlocutory Commission review of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board`s order imposing several restrictions on Dr. Bauer; a denial of an Interveners` Petition for Review addressing the application of Babcock and Wilcox for a renewal of its Special Nuclear Materials License; granting a motion for a protective order, by Sequoyah Fuel Corporation and General Atomics, limiting the use of the protected information to those individuals participating in the litigation and for the purposes of the litigation only; granting a Petitioner`s petition for leave to intervene and request for a hearing concerning Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech Research Reactor) renewal of a facility license; and a denial of a petition filed by Mr. Ted Dougherty requesting a shutdown of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station based on concerns regarding the vulnerability of the plant to earthquakes and defensibility of the plant to a terrorist threat.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Codes and standards and other guidance cited in regulatory documents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program (SRP-UDP), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a listing of industry consensus codes and standards and other government and industry guidance referred to in regulatory documents. The SRP-UDP has been completed and the SRP-Maintenance Program (SRP-MP) is now maintaining this listing. Besides updating previous information, Revision 3 adds approximately 80 citations. This listing identifies the version of the code or standard cited in the regulatory document, the regulatory document, and the current version of the code or standard. It also provides a summary characterization of the nature of the citation. This listing was developed from electronic searches of the Code of Federal Regulations and the NRC`s Bulletins, Information Notices, Circulars, Enforcement Manual, Generic Letters, Inspection Manual, Policy Statements, Regulatory Guides, Standard Technical Specifications and the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800).

Nickolaus, J.R.; Bohlander, K.L.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Rules implementing Sections 201 and 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978: a regulatory history  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis is made of the rules implementing Sections 201 and 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA). The act provides that utilities must purchase power from qualifying producers of electricity at nondiscriminatory rates, and it exempts private generators from virtually all state and Federal utility regulations. Most of the analysis presented is taken from the perspective of photovoltaics (PV) and solar thermal electric point-focusing distributed receivers (pfdr). It is felt, however, that the analysis is applicable both to cogeneration and other emerging technologies. Chapters presented are: The FERC Response to Oral Comments on the Proposed Rules Implementing Sections 201 and 210 of PURPA; Additional Changes Made or Not Made That Were Addressed in Other Than Oral Testimony; View on the Proposed Rules Implementing Sections 201 and 210 of PURPA; Response to Comments on the Proposed 201 and 210 Rules; and Summary Analysis of the Environmental Assessment of the Rules. Pertinent reference material is provided in the Appendices, including the text of the rules. (MCW)

Danziger, R.N.; Caples, P.W.; Huning, J.R.

1980-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances. Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders: July 1, 1992--December 31, 1992, Volume 36, Pages 1--396  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the thirty-sixth volume of issuances (1-396) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, Administrative Law Judges, and Office Directors. It covers the period from July 1, 1992-December 31, 1992. Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards are authorized by Section 191 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. These Boards, comprised of three members conduct adjudicatory hearings on applications to construct and operate nuclear power plants and related facilities and issue initial decisions which, subject to internal review and appellate procedures, become the final Commission action with respect to those applications. Boards are drawn from the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel, comprised of lawyers, nuclear physicists and engineers, environmentalists, chemists, and economists. The Atomic Energy Commission first established Licensing Boards in 1962 and the Panel in 1967.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Handling of Beyond Design Basis Events for Nuclear Power Reactors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Bill Reckley, Chief, Policy and Support Branch, Japan Lessons-Learned Project Directorate, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - adipor1 regulatory region Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was lower in mi... regulatory machinery of the cell. Keywords: Dicer; gene regulatory networks; miRNA targets; micro Source: Bartel, David - Whitehead Institute for Biomedical...

176

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May/June 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a bi-monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. Any proposed regulation that raises significant issues for any DOE operation should be reported to the Office of Environmental Guidance (EH-23) as soon as possible so that the Department can make its concerns known to the appropriate regulatory agency. Items of particular interest to EH-23 are indicated by a shading of the RU{number_sign}.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May/June 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a bi-monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. Any proposed regulation that raises significant issues for any DOE operation should be reported to the Office of Environmental Guidance (EH-23) as soon as possible so that the Department can make its concerns known to the appropriate regulatory agency. Items of particular interest to EH-23 are indicated by a shading of the RU{number sign}.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The waste isolation pilot plant regulatory compliance program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The passage of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act of 1992 (LWA) marked a turning point for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) program. It established a Congressional mandate to open the WIPP in as short a time as possible, thereby initiating the process of addressing this nation`s transuranic (TRU) waste problem. The DOE responded to the LWA by shifting the priority at the WIPP from scientific investigations to regulatory compliance and the completion of prerequisites for the initiation of operations. Regulatory compliance activities have taken four main focuses: (1) preparing regulatory submittals; (2) aggressive schedules; (3) regulator interface; and (4) public interactions

Mewhinney, J.A. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Kehrman, R.F. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research: Quarterly progress report, July 1-September 30, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report will describe current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Accident Evaluation, Division of Engineering Technology, and Division of Risk Analysis and Operations of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The projects reported are the following: High Temperature Reactor Research, SSC code improvements, Thermal-Hydraulic Reactor Safety Experiments, Thermodynamic Core-Concrete Interaction Experiments and Analysis, Plant Analyzer, Code Assessment and Application, Code Maintenance (RAMONA-3B), MELCOR Verification and Benchmarking, Source Term Code Package Verification and Benchmarking, Uncertainty Analysis of the Source Term; Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing, Soil-Structure Interaction Evaluation and Structural Benchmarks, Identification of Age Related Failure Modes; Application of HRA/PRA Results to Support Resolution of Generic Safety Issues Involving Human Performance, Protective Action Decisionmaking, Rebaseling of Risk for Zion, Containment Performance Design Objective, and Operational Safety Reliability Research.

Bari, R.A.; Bezler, P.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Greene, G.A.; Guppy, J.G.; Hall, R.E.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Khatib-Rahbar, H.; Luckas, W.J. Jr.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

SEC Confidential Treatment Orders: Balancing Competing Regulatory Objectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examines how the Securities and Exchange Commission balances competing regulatory objectives in its decisions to approve requests to withhold proprietary information from firms' financial reports. The confidential treatment process...

Thompson, Anne Margaret

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NGNP Project Regulatory Gap Analysis for Modular HTGRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project Regulatory Gap Analysis (RGA) for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) was conducted to evaluate existing regulatory requirements and guidance against the design characteristics specific to a generic modular HTGR. This final report presents results and identifies regulatory gaps concerning current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing requirements that apply to the modular HTGR design concept. This report contains appendices that highlight important HTGR licensing issues that were found during the RGA study. The information contained in this report will be used to further efforts in reconciling HTGR-related gaps in the NRC licensing structure, which has to date largely focused on light water reactor technology.

Wayne Moe

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 Fed. Reg. 75798 (Dec. 5, 2011) Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 75798 (Dec. 5, 2011) The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) is submitting...

183

Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012) Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012) The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) is submitting...

184

Inferring regulatory networks from multiple sources of genomic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) algorithm to identify the regulatory models from protein-DNA binding and gene expression data. These models to a large extent agree with the knowledge of gene regulation pertaining to the corresponding regulators. ...

Yeang, Chen-Hsiang, 1969-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Michigan regulatory incentives study for electric utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of Phase I of the Michigan Regulatory Incentives Study for Electric Utilities, a three-phase review of Michigan's regulatory system and its effects on resource selection by electric utilities. The goal of Phase I is to identify and analyze financial incentive mechanisms that encourage selection of resources in accord with the principles of integrated resource planning (IRP) or least-cost planning (LCP). Subsequent study phases will involve further analysis of options and possibly a collaborative formal effort to propose regulatory changes. The Phase I analysis proceeded in three steps: (1) identification and review of existing regulatory practices that affect utilities; selection of resources, particularly DSM; (2) preliminary analysis of ten financial mechanisms, and selection of three for further study; (3) detailed analysis of the three mechanisms, including consideration of how they could be implemented in Michigan and financial modeling of their likely impacts on utilities and ratepayers.

Reid, M.W.; Weaver, E.M. (Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)) [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

1991-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

alters fyn regulatory: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

human genome where many TFsRegulatory Analysis for Exploring Human Disease Progression Dustin T. Holloway1 , Mark Kon2 have been built and tested for 153 human TFs. These...

187

Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UTILITY & REGULATORY FACTORS AFFECTiNG COGENERATION & INDEPENDENT POWER PLANT DESIGN & OPERATION Richard P. Felak General Electric Company Schenectady, New York ABSTRACT In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner... should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design. reliability/ availabilitY, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples...

Felak, R. P.

188

Panel Data Analysis of Regulatory Factors Shaping Environmental Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the influence of regulatory factors in general, this paper examines a specific demonstration of environmental perfor- mance: biological oxygen demand (BOD) wastewater dis- charges by large (major) municipal wastewater treatment plants in Kansas during... example, limit levels). To analyze the effects of these regulatory factors on envi- ronmental performance, this particular empirical analysis examines the wastewater discharges by large municipal wastewater treatment facilities in the state of Kansas...

Earnhart, Dietrich H.

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

189

Regulatory and extra-regulatory testing to demonstrate radioactive material packaging safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Packages for the transportation of radioactive material must meet performance criteria to assure safety and environmental protection. The stringency of the performance criteria is based on the degree of hazard of the material being transported. Type B packages are used for transporting large quantities of radioisotopes (in terms of A{sub 2} quantities). These packages have the most stringent performance criteria. Material with less than an A{sub 2} quantity are transported in Type A packages. These packages have less stringent performance criteria. Transportation of LSA and SCO materials must be in {open_quotes}strong-tight{close_quotes} packages. The performance requirements for the latter packages are even less stringent. All of these package types provide a high level of safety for the material being transported. In this paper, regulatory tests that are used to demonstrate this safety will be described. The responses of various packages to these tests will be shown. In addition, the response of packages to extra-regulatory tests will be discussed. The results of these tests will be used to demonstrate the high level of safety provided to workers, the public, and the environment by packages used for the transportation of radioactive material.

Ammerman, D.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit combines the former Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Database, and other resources into a Web-based tool that gives the regulatory and utility-scale geothermal developer communities rapid and easy access to permitting information. RAPID currently comprises five tools - Permitting Atlas, Regulatory Roadmap, Resource Library, NEPA Database, and Best Practices. A beta release of an additional tool, the Permitting Wizard, is scheduled for late 2014. Because of the huge amount of information involved, RAPID was developed in a wiki platform to allow industry and regulatory agencies to maintain the content in the future so that it continues to provide relevant and accurate information to users. In 2014, the content was expanded to include regulatory requirements for utility-scale solar and bulk transmission development projects. Going forward, development of the RAPID Toolkit will focus on expanding the capabilities of current tools, developing additional tools, including additional technologies, and continuing to increase stakeholder involvement.

Young, K. R.; Levine, A.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Review of Technical Studies in the United States in Support of Burnup Credit Regulatory Guidance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taking credit for the reduction in reactivity associated with fuel depletion can enable more cost-effective, higher-density storage, transport, disposal, and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) while maintaining sufficient subcritical margin to establish an adequate safety basis. Consequently, there continues to be considerable interest in the United States (U.S.), as well as internationally, in the increased use of burnup credit in SNF operations, particularly related to storage, transport, and disposal of commercial SNF. This interest has motivated numerous technical studies related to the application of burnup credit, both domestically and internationally, as well as the design of SNF storage, transport and disposal systems that rely on burnup credit for maintaining subcriticality. Responding to industry requests and needs, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated a burnup credit research program in 1999, with support from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to develop regulatory guidance and the supporting technical bases for allowing and expanding the use of burnup credit in pressurized-water reactor SNF storage and transport applications. Although this NRC research program has not been continuous since its inception, considerable progress has been achieved in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues, availability of relevant information and data, and subsequently updated regulatory guidance for expanded use of burnup credit. This paper reviews technical studies performed by ORNL for the U.S. NRC burnup credit research program. Examples of topics include reactivity effects associated with reactor operating characteristics, fuel assembly characteristics, burnable absorbers, control rods, spatial burnup distributions, cooling time, and assembly misloading; methods and data for validation of isotopic composition predictions; methods and data for validation of criticality calculations; and operational issues and data related to assembly burnup confirmation. The objective of this paper is to summarize the work and significant accomplishments, with references to the technical reports and publications for complete details, and provide a useful resource to others in the burnup credit community.

Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL; Parks, Cecil V [ORNL] [ORNL; Mueller, Don [ORNL] [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the Matter of CALVERT CLIFFS 3 NUCLEAR PROJECT, LLC, and UNISTAR NUCLEAR OPERATING SERVICES, LLC (Combined, 2009 MEMORANDUM AND ORDER (Ruling on Joint Petitioners' Standing and Contentions) I. Introduction This case arises from an application by UniStar Nuclear Operating Services, LLC and Calvert Cliffs 3 Nuclear

Laughlin, Robert B.

193

Early Regulatory Engagement for Successful Site Remediation: the UK Experience - 13173  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR) is an independent safety, security and transport regulator of the UK nuclear industry. ONR regulates all civil nuclear reactor power stations, fuel manufacture, enrichment, spent fuel reprocessing, most defence sites and installations that store and process legacy spent fuel and radioactive waste. The responsibility for funding and strategic direction of decommissioning and radioactive waste management of state owned legacy sites has rested solely with the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) since 2005. A key component of NDA's mandate was to encourage new strategic approaches and innovation to dealing with the UK's waste legacy and which deliver value-for-money to the UK taxpayer. ONR, as an agency of the Health and Safety Executive, is entirely independent of NDA and regulates all prescribed activities on NDA's sites. NDA's competition of site management and closure contracts has attracted significant international interest and the formation of consortia comprised of major British, US, French and Swedish organizations bidding for those contracts. The prominence of US organizations in each of those consortia reflects the scale and breadth of existing waste management and D and D projects in the US. This paper will articulate, in broad terms, the challenges faced by international organizations seeking to employ 'off-the-shelf' technology and D and D techniques, successfully employed elsewhere, into the UK regulatory context. The predominantly 'goal-setting' regulatory framework in the UK does not generally prescribe a minimum standard to which a licensee must adhere. The legal onus on licensees in the UK is to demonstrate, whatever technology is selected, that in its applications, risks are reduced 'So Far As Is Reasonably Practicable' or 'SFAIRP'. By the nature of its role, ONR adopts a conservative approach to regulation; however ONR also recognises that in the decommissioning (and ultimately the site closure) domain, it is often necessary to consider and support novel approaches to achieve the nationally desired end-state. Crucial to successful and compliant operation in this regulatory environment is early and sustained engagement of the contractor with the regulator. There must be a 'no-surprises' culture to engender regulatory confidence early in a project. The paper considers some of the challenges facing international prime and lower tier contractors when undertaking D and D contracts in the UK, and emphasizes the importance of constructive and transparent dialogue with all regulators to sustain confidence at all stages of a major decommissioning project. The paper will also articulate ONR's strategy to increase collaboration with the US Department of Energy in light of increasing UK-US synergy in the area of waste management and to benchmark respective regulatory approaches. (authors)

Maitland, R.P.; Senior, D. [Office for Nuclear Regulation, Redgrave Court, Liverpool L20 7HS (United Kingdom)] [Office for Nuclear Regulation, Redgrave Court, Liverpool L20 7HS (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PLANNING Guiding Principles Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is conducted in a timely manner, in accordance with statutory, regulatory,...

195

Microsoft Word - AcqGuide7pt1.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Coordination Guiding Principles Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is conducted in a timely manner, in accordance with statutory, regulatory,...

196

Microsoft Word - Rockwood _CFC_ Silver Peak Area Final EA V4...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BLM's need is to comply with its Statutory and regulatory obligations to respond to the Operations Plan submitted by Rockwood to conduct geothermal exploration and either approve...

197

Presentation to the EAC - Microgrids and DoD Facilities - Jeffrey...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of critical missions at serious and growing risk 1 Statutory and regulatory goals for energy intensity, renewable energy and GHGs 1 Defense Science Board, "More Fight - Less...

198

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha-bearing radioactive waste Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Statutory and Regulatory Categories of Radioactive Waste... Disposal Restrictions LLRWPAA Low-level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 LLW Low-level Waste... of ......

199

Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate HOX gene clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to their high degree of conservation, comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly-related genomes permit to identify functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are optimal candidate sequences for comparative genome analyses, because they are extremely conserved in vertebrates and occur in clusters. We aligned (Pipmaker) the nucleotide sequences of HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human and mouse (over 500 million years of evolutionary distance). We identified several highly conserved intergenic sequences, likely to be important in gene regulation. Only a few of these putative regulatory elements have been previously described as being involved in the regulation of Hox genes, while several others are new elements that might have regulatory functions. The majority of these newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac). The conserved intergenic regions located between the most rostrally expressed genes in the developing embryo are longer and better retained through evolution. We document that presumed regulatory sequences are retained differentially in either A or A clusters resulting from a genome duplication in the fish lineage. This observation supports both the hypothesis that the conserved elements are involved in gene regulation and the Duplication-Deletion-Complementation model.

Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Corrective action, updated as of July 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The module reviews the regulatory and statutory requirements and authorities governing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act correction action process. It lists the statutory authorities for correction action and explains their application and identifies the existing regulatory authorities for corrective action and explains their application. It describes the four primary triggers for corrective action and describes the six main stages of the corrective action process. It defines terms that are specific to the corrective action process (e.g., solid waste management unit, action levels). It identifies the proposed corrective action regulations and the schedule for final rulemaking. It assesses whether or not financial assurance is required for corrective action. It describes how the corrective action program can apply to generators and other facilities that do not require a permit.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest 1992 edition. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, the activities NRC licenses, and general information on domestic and worldwide nuclear energy. This digest is a compilation of nuclear- and NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1991, with exceptions noted. Information on generating capacity and average capacity factor for operating US commercial nuclear power reactors is obtained from monthly operating reports that are submitted directly to the NRC by the licensee. This information is reviewed by the NRC for consistency only and no independent validation and/or verification is performed.

Olive, K [ed.] [ed.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Compendium of Regulatory Requirements Governing Underground Injection of Drilling Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive compendium of the regulatory requirements governing the injection processes used for disposing of drilling wastes; in particular, for a process referred to in this report as slurry injection. The report consists of a narrative discussion of the regulatory requirements and practices for each of the oil- and gas-producing states, a table summarizing the types of injection processes authorized in each state, and an appendix that contains the text of many of the relevant state regulations and policies.

Puder, Markus G.; Bryson, Bill; Veil, John A.

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

203

Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress, Volume 1, No. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Atomic Energy Act, Energy Reorganization Act, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act, and Nuclear Waste Policy Act. Other information included in this volume pertains to NRC user fees, NRC authorizations, the Inspector General Act, and the Administrative Procedure Act.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Regulatory Response to Carbon Starvation in Caulobacter crescentus. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONewsRegulatoryRegulatory Response to

205

Regulatory practices in India for establishing nuclear power stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) of India was established as an independent regulatory authority charged with regulating radiation protection and nuclear safety. This article reviews the current state of India`s nuclear power reactor program and discusses the makeup of functions of the AERB, including the preparation of issuance of safety codes, guides, and other standards, with special recent emphasis on pressurized-heavy-water reactors (PHWRs). The AERB`s relationship to nuclear plant owners is discussed, as are the inspection and control functions the AERB performs, both for the construction and operation of nuclear plants and the licensing of operating personnel. 8 refs., 2 figs.

De, A.K. [Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Calcutta (India); Singh, S.P. [Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Bombay (India)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Inside the hotline: A compilation of 1992 monthly hotline reports. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document is a compilation of questions and answers, Federal Register summaries from individual monthly Hotline reports for the period of January to December 1992. It includes indices arranged by subject, regulatory citation, and statutory citation. The reader can use the document to explore the application of the regulations to different scenarios or to shed light on complex issues. Neither the answers to questions nor the Federal Register summaries are intended to fully represent or to be used in place of the regulations.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Essays on Energy and Regulatory Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the 10-second moving average readings for the three regulated gases (hydrocarbons, nitric oxide, and carbon monoxide) must be below the applicable test standard, which varies by vehicle, vehicle year and weight. The test takes 90 seconds, though a 15...-test) 65.53 39.60 34.19 35.99 Carbon monoxide 0.0056 0.0028 0.0029 0.0031 23.61 12.19 13.03 13.77 Nitric oxide 0.0240 0.0107 0.0112 0.0118 33.71 15.30 16.37 17.12 Carbon dioxide 0.3109 0.1605 0.0466 0.0475 329.70 183.25 85.62 72.25 Fixed e ects...

Cancho Diez, Cesar

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

208

Carbon capture retrofits and the cost of regulatory uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generation firms confront impending replacement of an aging coal-fired fleet in a business environment characterized by volatile natural gas prices and uncertain carbon regulation. We develop a stochastic dynamic programming model of firm investment decisions that minimizes the expected present value of future power generation costs under uncertain natural gas and carbon prices. We explore the implications of regulatory uncertainty on generation technology choice and the optimal timing of investment, and assess the implications of these choices for regulators. We find that interaction of regulatory uncertainty with irreversible investment always raises the social cost of carbon abatement. Further, the social cost of regulatory uncertainty is strongly dependent on the relative competitiveness of IGCC plants, for which the cost of later carbon capture retrofits is comparatively small, and on the firm's ability to use investments in natural gas generation as a transitional strategy to manage carbon regulation uncertainty. Without highly competitive IGCC or low gas prices, regulatory uncertainty can increase the expected social cost of reducing emissions by 40 to 60%.

Reinelt, P.S.; Keith, D.W. [SUNY College of Fredonia, Fredonia, NY (United States). Dept. of Economics

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

argentine nuclear regulatory: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

argentine nuclear regulatory First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 UNITED STATES NUCLEAR...

210

Natural Gas: Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This special report Web-based product presents a chronology of some of the key federal legislative and regulatory actions that have helped shape the natural gas market, with particular emphasis on policy directives from 1978 to October 2008. Separate reports provide brief descriptions of specific legislation, regulations, or policies, and their impacts on the natural gas market.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION Before Commissioners: Joseph T of Energy and Ancillary Services Investigation of the Practices of the California Independent System of Electric and Natural Gas Prices Enron Power Marketing, Inc. and Enron Energy Services, Inc. Enron Power

Laughlin, Robert B.

212

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION Before Commissioners: Joseph T Company v. Sellers of Energy and Ancillary Services Investigation of Practices of the California Independent System Operator and the California Power Exchange Puget Sound Energy, Inc. v. Sellers of Energy

Laughlin, Robert B.

213

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION Before Commissioners: Joseph T Company v. Sellers of Energy and Ancillary Services Into Markets Operated by the California Independent.; Avista Energy, Inc.(Avista); Calpine Energy Services, L.P. (Calpine); El Paso Marketing, LP (f/k/a El

Laughlin, Robert B.

214

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION Before Commissioners: Joseph T 18 C.F.R. § 385.602 (2006). 4 The Settlement defines the Western Energy Markets as those markets Company v. Sellers of Energy and Ancillary Services Investigation of Practices of the California

Laughlin, Robert B.

215

Report on the Workshop on Regulatory Approaches to Smart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report on the Workshop on Regulatory Approaches to Smart Grid Investment and Deployment May APEC Secretariat APEC#212-CT-04.2 #12;SCSC Smart Grid Workshop 2012 Page 1 Grid Investment and Deployment May 16-17, 2012 Quebec City, Canada #12;SCSC Smart Grid Workshop 2012

216

Leptin and regulatory T lymphocytes in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leptin and regulatory T lymphocytes in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension Alice Huertas1 Centre National de Référence de l'Hypertension Pulmonaire Sévère, Service de Pneumologie et Réanimation Respiratoire, Hôpital Antoine Béclère, AP-HP, Clamart, F- 92140; 3 INSERM U999 Hypertension Artérielle

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

217

Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

permit regulations are designed to track, record, and control air pollutants belonging to severalAir Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference Department: Chemical on chemical classifications. This reference outlines major categories of air pollutants found at SLAC

Wechsler, Risa H.

218

Metabolism and proliferation share common regulatory pathways in cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metabolism and proliferation share common regulatory pathways in cancer cells. Vanessa Fritz, proliferation, and cancer inserm-00491405,version1-11Jun2010 Author manuscript, published in "Oncogene 2010;29(31):4369-77" DOI : 10.1038/onc.2010.182 #12;Metabolism, proliferation and cancer Fritz and Fajas 2 Abstract Cancer

Boyer, Edmond

219

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Identification of lignin genes and regulatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Identification of lignin genes and regulatory sequences involved analysis revealed 18 lignin isoforms for each species. We also identified five contigs homologous to R2R3 wall formation and lignin deposition. We searched the contigs against public microRNA database

220

DEVELOPING A SET OF REGULATORY ANALOGS FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPING A SET OF REGULATORY ANALOGS FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION D.M. Reiner1 , H.J. Herzog2 1 Judge Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA, email: hjherzog@mit.edu ABSTRACT Carbon capture and sequestration variables critical for determining the success of carbon sequestration as a viable climate policy option

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A SEARCH FOR REGULATORY ANALOGS TO CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SEARCH FOR REGULATORY ANALOGS TO CARBON SEQUESTRATION D.M. Reiner and H.J. Herzog1 1 Laboratory for Energy and the Environment, M.I.T., Cambridge, MA. 02139, USA ABSTRACT Carbon capture and sequestration for determining the success of carbon sequestration as a viable climate policy option. INTRODUCTION To date

222

ERDC/ELTR-08-28 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-08-28 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Arid West Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 2008 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands

US Army Corps of Engineers

223

ERDC/ELTR-07-24 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-07-24 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Alaska Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 2007 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands

US Army Corps of Engineers

224

Synthetic Biology and the U.S. Biotechnology Regulatory System: Challenges and Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthetic Biology and the U.S. Biotechnology Regulatory System: Challenges and Options Sarah R. Carter, Ph.D., J. Craig Venter Institute; Michael Rodemeyer, J.D., University of Virginia; Michele S. Garfinkel, Ph.D., EMBO; Robert M. Friedman, Ph.D., J. Craig Venter Institute In recent years, a range of genetic engineering techniques referred to as synthetic biology has significantly expanded the tool kit available to scientists and engineers, providing them with far greater capabilities to engineer organisms than previous techniques allowed. The field of synthetic biology includes the relatively new ability to synthesize long pieces of DNA from chemicals, as well as improved methods for genetic manipulation and design of genetic pathways to achieve more precise control of biological systems. These advances will help usher in a new generation of genetically engineered microbes, plants, and animals. The JCVI Policy Center team, along with researchers at the University of Virginia and EMBO, examined how well the current U.S. regulatory system for genetically engineered products will handle the near-term introduction of organisms engineered using synthetic biology. In particular, the focus was on those organisms intended to be used or grown directly in the environment, outside of a contained facility. The study concludes that the U.S. regulatory agencies have adequate legal authority to address most, but not all, potential environmental, health and safety concerns posed by these organisms. Such near-term products are likely to represent incremental changes rather than a marked departure from previous genetically engineered organisms. However, the study also identified two key challenges for the regulatory system, which are detailed in the report. First, USDAs authority over genetically engineered plants depends on the use of an older engineering technique that is no longer necessary for many applications. The shift to synthetic biology and other newer genetic engineering techniques will leave many engineered plants without any pre-market regulatory review. Second, the number and diversity of engineered microbes for commercial use will increase in the near future, challenging EPAs resources, expertise, and perhaps authority to regulate them. For each of these challenges, the report sets out a series of options, including an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of each option from a variety of perspectives, for policy makers to consider. Policy responses will depend on the trade-offs chosen among competing considerations. This report, funded by the Department of Energy with additional funds from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, is the result of a two-year process that included interviews, commissioned background papers, discussions, and two workshops that sought input from a wide range of experts, including U.S. federal agency regulators, legal and science policy experts, representatives from the biotechnology industry, and non-governmental organizations. This cross-section of views informed this report, but the conclusions are solely those of the authors. An Executive Summary, full Report, and background papers are available at: http://www.jcvi.org/cms/research/projects/synthetic-biology-and-the-us-biotechnology-regulatory-system/overview/

Carter, Sarah R. [J. Craig Venter Institute; Rodemeyer, Michael [University of Virginia; Garfinkel, Michele S. [EMBO; Friedman, Robert M [J. Craig Venter Institute

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Environmental Policy Factors in the Maritime Industry and Anticipated Regulatory Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increased environmental regulatory policy has been put in place by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in response to waterborne oil pollution events. We examine the IMO regulatory response to these incidences. This paper covers literature...

Hayes, Richard D.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

226

Possible Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc Transport Protein, ZnuA. Possible Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc Transport Protein, ZnuA. Abstract:...

227

Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal): Annual compilation for 1996, Volume 21, No. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation is the annual cumulation of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors.

Sheehan, M.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Systematic dissection of regulatory motifs in 2000 predicted human enhancers using a massively parallel reporter assay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome-wide chromatin annotations have permitted the mapping of putative regulatory elements across multiple human cell types. However, their experimental dissection by directed regulatory motif disruption has remained ...

Kheradpour, Pouya

229

Regulatory compliance in the design of packages used to transport radioactive materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shipments of radioactive materials within the regulatory jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy (DOE) must meet the package design requirements contained in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71, and DOE Order 5480.3. These regulations do not provide design criteria requirements, but only detail the approval standards, structural performance criteria, and package integrity requirements that must be met during transport. The DOE recommended design criterion for high-level Category I radioactive packagings is Section III, Division 1, of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. However, alternative design criteria may be used if all the design requirements are satisfied. The purpose of this paper is to review alternatives to the Code criteria and discuss their applicability to the design of containment vessels in packages for high-level radioactive materials. Issues such as design qualification by physical testing, the use of scale models, and problems encountered using a non-ASME design approach are addressed.

Raske, D.T.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - agr regulatory mutants Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . 214 B. Regulatory Genes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 X. Cercosporin Degradation... directly tested with cercosporin- deficient mutants. UV-generated ......

231

Regulatory analysis for amendments to regulations for the environmental review for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This regulatory analysis provides the supporting information for a proposed rule that will amend the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s environmental review requirements for applications for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. The objective of the proposed rulemaking is to improve regulatory efficiency by providing for the generic evaluation of certain environmental impacts associated with nuclear plant license renewal. After considering various options, the staff identified and analyzed two major alternatives. With Alternative A, the existing regulations would not be amended. This option requires that environmental reviews be performed under the existing regulations. Alternative B is to assess, on a generic basis, the environmental impacts of renewing the operating license of individual nuclear power plants, and define the issues that will need to be further analyzed on a case-by-case basis. In addition, Alternative B removes from NRC`s review certain economics-related issues. The findings of this assessment are to be codified in 10 CFR 51. The staff has selected Alternative B as the preferred alternative.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Motivation Influences Choice in the Exploration/ Exploitation Dilemma: Regulatory Fit Effects in a Gambling Task  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, D.A., Maddox, W.T., & Markman, A.B. (in press). Regulatory Fit Effects in a choice task. PsychonomicMotivation Influences Choice in the Exploration/ Exploitation Dilemma: Regulatory Fit Effects appealing options. In category learning, a regulatory fit has been shown to increase exploration

Maddox, W. Todd

233

OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT APPROACHES: CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineered barriers including cementitious barriers are used at sites disposing or contaminated with low-level radioactive waste to enhance performance of the natural environment with respect to controlling the potential spread of contaminants. Drivers for using cementitious barriers include: high radionuclide inventory, radionuclide characteristics (e.g., long half-live, high mobility due to chemical form/speciation, waste matrix properties, shallow water table, and humid climate that provides water for leaching the waste). This document comprises the first in a series of reports being prepared for the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. The document is divided into two parts which provide a summary of: (1) existing experience in the assessment of performance of cementitious materials used for radioactive waste management and disposal and (2) sensitivity and uncertainty analysis approaches that have been applied for assessments. Each chapter is organized into five parts: Introduction, Regulatory Considerations, Specific Examples, Summary of Modeling Approaches and Conclusions and Needs. The objective of the report is to provide perspective on the state of the practice for conducting assessments for facilities involving cementitious barriers and to identify opportunities for improvements to the existing approaches. Examples are provided in two contexts: (1) performance assessments conducted for waste disposal facilities and (2) performance assessment-like analyses (e.g., risk assessments) conducted under other regulatory regimes. The introductory sections of each section provide a perspective on the purpose of performance assessments and different roles of cementitious materials for radioactive waste management. Significant experience with assessments of cementitious materials associated with radioactive waste disposal concepts exists in the US Department of Energy Complex and the commercial nuclear sector. Recently, the desire to close legacy facilities has created a need to assess the behavior of cementitious materials for applications in environmental remediation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) applications. The ability to assess the use and benefits of cementitious materials for these applications can significantly affect decisions related to cleanup activities. For example the need for costly remedial actions may not be necessary if existing or new cementitious barriers were adequately represented. The sections dealing with regulatory considerations include summaries of the different regulations that are relevant for various applications involving cementitious materials. A summary of regulatory guidance and/or policies pertaining to performance assessment of cementitious materials and sensitivity and uncertainty analyses is also provided in the following chapters. Numerous examples of specific applications are provided in each report. The examples are organized into traditional waste disposal applications (performance assessments), applications related to environmental remediation and D&D, and reactor and spent fuel related assessments. Sections that discuss specific facilities or sites contain: (1) descriptions of the role of the cementitious barriers or sensitivity/uncertainty analysis, (2) parameter assumptions and conceptual models, and (3) a relative discussion of the significance in the context of the assessment. Examples from both the U.S. Department of Energy Sites and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission are provided to illustrate the variety of applications and approaches that have been used. In many cases, minimal credit was taken for cementitious barriers. However, in some of those cases, benefits of being able to take credit for barriers were identified. The examples included: (1) disposal facilities (vaults, trenches, tank closures, cementitious waste forms and containers, etc.), (2) environmental remediation (old disposal facilities), (3) reactor and large structure decommissioning, and (4) spent fuel pools. These examples were selected to provide a perspective on the various ne

Langton, C.; Burns, H.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

234

Comparison and Analysis of Regulatory and Derived Requirements for Certain DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments; Lessons Learned for Future Spent Fuel Transportation Campaigns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive materials transportation is stringently regulated by the Department of Transportation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to protect the public and the environment. As a Federal agency, however, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must seek State, Tribal and local input on safety issues for certain transportation activities. This interaction has invariably resulted in the imposition of extra-regulatory requirements, greatly increasing transportation costs and delaying schedules while not significantly enhancing the level of safety. This paper discusses the results an analysis of the regulatory and negotiated requirements established for a July 1998 shipment of spent nuclear fuel from foreign countries through the west coast to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Staff from the INEEL Nuclear Materials Engineering and Disposition Department undertook the analysis in partnership with HMTC, to discover if there were instances where requirements derived from stakeholder interactions duplicate, contradict, or otherwise overlap with regulatory requirements. The study exhaustively lists and classifies applicable Department of Transportation (DOT) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. These are then compared with a similarly classified list of requirements from the Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) and those developed during stakeholder negotiations. Comparison and analysis reveals numerous attempts to reduce transportation risk by imposing more stringent safety measures than those required by DOT and NRC. These usually took the form of additional inspection, notification and planning requirements. There are also many instances of overlap with, and duplication of regulations. Participants will gain a greater appreciation for the need to understand the risk-oriented basis of the radioactive materials regulations and their effectiveness in ensuring safety when negotiating extra-regulatory requirements.

Kramer, George L., Ph.D.; Fawcett, Rick L.; Rieke, Philip C.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

235

LBB application in the US operating and advanced reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The regulatory application of leak before break (LBB) for operating and advanced reactors in the U.S. is described. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved the application of LBB for six piping systems in operating reactors: reactor coolant system primary loop piping, pressurizer surge, safety injection accumulator, residual heat removal, safety injection, and reactor coolant loop bypass. The LBB concept has also been applied in the design of advanced light water reactors. LBB applications, and regulatory considerations, for pressurized water reactors and advanced light water reactors are summarized in this paper. Technology development for LBB performed by the NRC and the International Piping Integrity Research Group is also briefly summarized.

Wichman, K.; Tsao, J.; Mayfield, M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress. Volume 2, No. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the second of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, various acts pertaining to low-level radioactive waste, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act, the West Valley Demonstration Project Act, Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Export Licensing Statutes, and selected treaties, agreements, and executive orders. Other information provided pertains to Commissioner tenure, NRC appropriations, the Chief Financial Officers Act, information technology management reform, and Federal civil penalties.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission fiscal year 1997 annual financial statements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Federal Energy Regulatory commission`s statements of financial position, and the related statements of operations and changes in net position. The auditors` work was conducted in accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards. An independent public accounting firm conducted the audit. The auditors` reports on the Commission`s internal control structure and compliance with laws and regulations disclosed no reportable conditions or instances of noncompliance.

NONE

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

239

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, January 1997. Volume 45, Number 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains issuances of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board, Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Director`s Decision for January 1997. The issuances concern Sequoyah Fuels Corporation and General Atomics Gore, Oklahoma Site decontamination and decommissioning funding; Louisiana Energy Services, Claiborne Enrichment Center denies appeal to review emergency planning; General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation, Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating station, challenges to technical specifications concerning spent fuel pool; and Consumers Power Company, Palisades Nuclear Plant dry cask storage of spent nuclear fuel.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Variable Renewable Energy: a Regulatory Roadmap (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is not a one-size-fits-all approach to the regulation of variable renewable energy (VRE), but international experience reveals many approaches that are proving successful. Drawing upon research and experiences from various international contexts, the 21st Century Power Partnership in conjunction with the Clean Energy Solutions Center and Clean Energy Regulators Initiative identified key issues and ideas that have emerged as variable deployment has grown. The Power Partnership research, published in 2014, identified four broad categories of regulatory issues.

Not Available

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

HANFORD REGULATORY EXPERIENCE REGULATION AT HANFORD A CASE STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford has played a pivotal role in the United States' defense for more than 60 years, beginning with the Manhattan Project in the 1940s. During its history, the Hanford Site has had nine reactors producing plutonium for the United States' nuclear weapons program. All the reactors were located next to the Columbia River and all had associated low-level radioactive and hazardous waste releases. Site cleanup, which formally began in 1989 with the signing of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement, involves more than 1,600 waste sites and burial grounds, and the demolition of more than 1,500buildings and structures, Cleanup is scheduled to be complete by 2035. Regulatory oversight of the cleanup is being performed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology(Ecology) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Revised Code of Washington, 'Hazardous Waste Management.' Cleanup of the waste sites and demolition of the many buildings and structures generates large volumes of contaminated soil, equipment, demolition debris, and other wastes that must be disposed of in a secure manner to prevent further environmental degradation. From a risk perspective, it is essential the cleanup waste be moved to a disposal facility located well away from the Columbia River. The solution was to construct very large engineered landfill that meets all technical regulatory requirements, on the Hanford Site Central Plateau approximately 10kilometers from the river and 100metersabovegroundwater. This landfill, called the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility or ERDF is a series of cells, each 150x 300 meters wide at the bottom and 20 meters deep. This paper looks at the substantive environmental regulations applied to ERDF, and how the facility is designed to protect the environment and meet regulatory requirements. The paper describes how the U.S. Department of Energy(DOE),EPA, and Ecology interact in its regulation. In addition, the response to a recent $1 million regulatory fine is described to show actual interactions and options in this aspect of the regulatory process. The author acknowledges the significant contributions by Messrs. Clifford Clark and Owen Robertson. Ms. Nancy Williams provided graphics support and Ms. Laurie Kraemer edited the report.

HAWKINS AR

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

242

Enhanced IGCC regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control strategies for improving power ramp rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of ongoing R&D activities at the National Energy Technology Laboratorys (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training & Research (AVESTAR) Center, this paper highlights strategies for enhancing low-level regulatory control and system-wide coordinated control strategies implemented in a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon capture. The underlying IGCC plant dynamic model contains 20 major process areas, each of which is tightly integrated with the rest of the power plant, making individual functionally-independent processes prone to routine disturbances. Single-loop feedback control although adequate to meet the primary control objective for most processes, does not take into account in advance the effect of these disturbances, making the entire power plant undergo large offshoots and/or oscillations before the feedback action has an opportunity to impact control performance. In this paper, controller enhancements ranging from retuning feedback control loops, multiplicative feed-forward control and other control techniques such as split-range control, feedback trim and dynamic compensation, applicable on various subsections of the integrated IGCC plant, have been highlighted and improvements in control responses have been given. Compared to using classical feedback-based control structure, the enhanced IGCC regulatory control architecture reduces plant settling time and peak offshoots, achieves faster disturbance rejection, and promotes higher power ramp-rates. In addition, improvements in IGCC coordinated plant-wide control strategies for Gasifier-Lead, GT-Lead and Plantwide operation modes have been proposed and their responses compared. The paper is concluded with a brief discussion on the potential IGCC controller improvements resulting from using advanced process control, including model predictive control (MPC), as a supervisory control layer.

Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

PUBLIC AND REGULATORY ACCEPTANCE OF BLENDING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE VS DILUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On April 21, 2009, the Energy Facilities Contractors Group (EFCOG) Waste Management Working Group (WMWG) provided a recommendation to the Department of Energy's Environmental Management program (DOE-EM) concerning supplemental guidance on blending methodologies to use to classify waste forms to determine if the waste form meets the definition of Transuranic (TRU) Waste or can be classified as Low-Level Waste (LLW). The guidance provides specific examples and methods to allow DOE and its Contractors to properly classify waste forms while reducing the generation of TRU wastes. TRU wastes are much more expensive to characterize at the generator's facilities, ship, and then dispose at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) than Low-Level Radioactive Waste's disposal. Also the reduction of handling and packaging of LLW is inherently less hazardous to the nuclear workforce. Therefore, it is important to perform the characterization properly, but in a manner that minimizes the generation of TRU wastes if at all possible. In fact, the generation of additional volumes of radioactive wastes under the ARRA programs, this recommendation should improve the cost effective implementation of DOE requirements while properly protecting human health and the environment. This paper will describe how the message of appropriate, less expensive, less hazardous blending of radioactive waste is the 'right' thing to do in many cases, but can be confused with inappropriate 'dilution' that is frowned upon by regulators and stakeholders in the public. A proposal will be made in this paper on how to communicate this very complex and confusing technical issue to regulatory bodies and interested stakeholders to gain understanding and approval of the concept. The results of application of the proposed communication method and attempt to change the regulatory requirements in this area will be discussed including efforts by DOE and the NRC on this very complex subject.

Goldston, W.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

Statutory Rules and Authorities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on Energy andDepartmentDepartment of EnergyDavis

245

Statutory and Legislative Requirements | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on Energy andDepartmentDepartment of

246

Development of Regulatory Technical Requirements for the Advanced Integral Type Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the current status of the study on the development of regulatory technical requirements for the licensing review of an advanced integral type research reactor of which the license application is expected in a few years. According to the Atomic Energy Act of Korea, both research and education reactors are subject to the technical requirements for power reactors in the licensing review. But, some of the requirements may not be applicable or insufficient for the licensing reviews of reactors with unique design features. Thus it is necessary to identify which review topics or areas can not be addressed by the existing requirements and to develop the required ones newly or supplement appropriately. Through the study performed so far, it has been identified that the following requirements need to be developed newly for the licensing review of SMART-P: the use of proven technology, the interfacial facility, the non-safety systems, and the metallic fuels. The approach and basis for the development of each of the requirements are discussed. (authors)

Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Woong Sik; Kim, Hho Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Kusung-dong, Yusung-ku, Taejon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Regulatory Policy and Markets for Energy Storage in North America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The last 5 years have been one of the most exciting times for the energy storage industry. We have seen significant advancements in the regulatory process to make accommodations for valuing and monetizing energy storage for what it provides to the grid. The most impactful regulatory decision for the energy storage industry has come from California, where the California Public Utilities Commission issued a decision that mandates procurement requirements of 1.325 GW for energy storage to 3 investor-own utilities in 4 stages: in 2014, 2016, 2018, and 2020. Furthermore, at the Federal level, FERCs Order 755, requires the transmission operators to develop pay for performance tariffs for ancillary services. This has had direct impact on the market design of US competitive wholesale markets and the monetization of fast responding grid assets. While this order is technology neutral, it clearly plays into the fast-responding capability of energy storage technologies. Today PJM, CAISO, MISO, NYISO, and NE-ISO have implemented Order 755 and offer new tariff for regulation services based on pay-for-performance principles. Furthermore, FERC Order 784, issued in July 2013 requires transmission providers to consider speed and accuracy in determining the requirements for ancillary services. In November 2013, FERC issued Order 972, which revises the small generator interconnection agreement which declares energy storage as a power source. This order puts energy storage on par with existing generators. This paper will discuss the implementation of FERCs Pay for Performance Regulation order at all ISOs in the U.S. under FERC regulatory authority (this excludes ERCOT). Also discussed will be the market impacts and overall impacts on the NERC regulation performance indexes. The paper will end with a discussion on the California and Ontario, Canada procurement mandates and the opportunity that it may present to the energy storage industry.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

248

Nuclear Regulatory legislation: 103d Congress. Volume 1, No. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 103d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Legal, regulatory & institutional issues facing distributed resources development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes legal, regulatory, and institutional considerations likely to shape the development and deployment of distributed resources. It is based on research co-sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and four investor-owned utilities (Central & South West Services, Cinergy Corp., Florida Power Corporation, and San Diego Gas & Electric Company). The research was performed between August 1995 and March 1996 by a team of four consulting firms experienced in energy and utility law, regulation, and economics. It is the survey phase of a project known as the Distributed Resources Institutional Analysis Project.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nuclear regulatory legislation: 102d Congress. Volume 1, No. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 102d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include: The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Nuclear regulatory legislation, 102d Congress. Volume 2, No. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 102d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Nuclear Regulatory legislation: 103d Congress. Volume 2, No. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 103d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Reducing Regulatory Burden EO 13563 Third RFI | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |Rebecca MatulkaDeliveryUpdatedRFI Reducing Regulatory

254

Regulatory Burden RFI Executive Order 13563 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |RebeccaRegional StandardsExecutive Order 13563 Regulatory

255

Regulatory Impacts on Indian Lands Webinar | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |RebeccaRegional StandardsExecutiveWatchdog |Regulatory

256

DOE Comments Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmartDepartment of1 Ingrid A.C.ofComments Regulatory Burden RFI

257

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalancedDepartment ofColumbusReport #Study |Regional SmallVisitors CanRegulatory

258

Texas - PUC - Public Utility Regulatory Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump Jump to: navigation, searchTetra Sun Jump to:Regulatory Act

259

Regulatory Interactions in ProKaryotes from RegTransBase  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

RegTransBase, a manually curated database of regulatory interactions in prokaryotes, captures the knowledge in published scientific literature using a controlled vocabulary. RegTransBase describes a large number of regulatory interactions reported in many organisms and contains various types of experimental data, in particular: the activation or repression of transcription by an identified direct regulator determining the transcriptional regulatory function of a protein (or RNA) directly binding to DNA or RNA mapping or prediction of binding sites for a regulatory protein characterization of regulatory mutations Currently, the RegTransBase content is derived from about 3000 relevant articles describing over 7000 experiments in relation to 128 microbes. It contains data on the regulation of about 7500 genes and evidence for 6500 interactions with 650 regulators. RegTransBase also contains manually created position weight matrices (PWM) that can be used to identify candidate regulatory sites in over 60 species. (Specialized Interface)

Dubchak, Inna; Gelfand, Mikhail

260

Integrated Approach to Reconstruction of Microbial Regulatory Networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had the goal(s) of development of integrated bioinformatics platform for genome-scale inference and visualization of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) in bacterial genomes. The work was done in Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (SBMRI, P.I. D.A. Rodionov) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, co-P.I. P.S. Novichkov). The developed computational resources include: (1) RegPredict web-platform for TRN inference and regulon reconstruction in microbial genomes, and (2) RegPrecise database for collection, visualization and comparative analysis of transcriptional regulons reconstructed by comparative genomics. These analytical resources were selected as key components in the DOE Systems Biology KnowledgeBase (SBKB). The high-quality data accumulated in RegPrecise will provide essential datasets of reference regulons in diverse microbes to enable automatic reconstruction of draft TRNs in newly sequenced genomes. We outline our progress toward the three aims of this grant proposal, which were: Develop integrated platform for genome-scale regulon reconstruction; Infer regulatory annotations in several groups of bacteria and building of reference collections of microbial regulons; and Develop KnowledgeBase on microbial transcriptional regulation.

Rodionov, Dmitry A [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute] [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute; Novichkov, Pavel S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Confidential data in a competitive utility environment: A regulatory perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, the electric utility industry has been regarded as one of the most open industries in the United States in sharing information but their reputation is being challenged by competitive energy providers, the general public, regulators, and other stakeholders. As the prospect of competition among electricity power providers has increased in recent years, many utilities have been requesting that the data they submit to their utility regulatory commissions remain confidential. Withholding utility information from the public is likely to have serious and significant policy implications with respect to: (1) consumer education, the pursuit of truth, mutual respect among parties, and social cooperation; (2) the creation of a fair market for competitive energy services; (3) the regulatory balance; (4) regional and national assessments of energy-savings opportunities; (5) research and development; and (6) evaluations of utility programs, plans, and policies. In a telephone survey of all public utility commissions (PUCs) that regulate electric and gas utilities in the U.S., we found that almost all PUCs have received requests from utility companies for data to be filed as confidential, and confidential data filings appear to have increased (both in scope and in frequency) in those states where utility restructuring is being actively discussed. The most common types of data submitted as confidential by utilities dealt with specific customer data, market data, avoided costs, and utility costs.

Vine, E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

FOUR ESSAYS ON OFFSHORE WIND POWER POTENTIAL, DEVELOPMENT, REGULATORY FRAMEWORK, AND INTEGRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOUR ESSAYS ON OFFSHORE WIND POWER POTENTIAL, DEVELOPMENT, REGULATORY FRAMEWORK, AND INTEGRATION 2010 Amardeep Dhanju All Rights Reserved #12;FOUR ESSAYS ON OFFSHORE WIND POWER POTENTIAL, DEVELOPMENT

Firestone, Jeremy

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - allogeneic immune regulatory Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hematology, and Blood and Marrow Transplant Programs. Summary: of Post Transplant Infusion of Allogeneic Regulatory T Cells Simultaneously with Allogeneic Conventional... with...

264

Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

"Remedying Undue Discrimination through Open Access Transmission Service and Standard Electricity Market Design." Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory...

265

Regulatory Reform in the Wake of the Financial Crisis of 20072008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to analyse regulatory reform in the wake of the financial crisis of 2007-2008.

Lo, Andrew W.

266

Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The study entitled, Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input, focuses on the issue of showing compliance with given...

267

Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Undine Shoop, Chief, Health Physics and Human Performance Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

268

E-Print Network 3.0 - autonomous cholesterol regulatory Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: autonomous cholesterol regulatory Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Cholesterol Depletion Results in...

269

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zhongguo dianli chanye (Chinas Electricity Industry at themulti_page.pdf. State Electricity Regulatory Commission.The Annual Report on Electricity Regulation (2006). Beijing:

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

UNIT NAME -C-340 PCB Spill Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NAME -C-340 PCB Spill Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION C-340 Transformer area (Map locat1on 74 )- APPROXIMATE DIMENSIDNS Unnown - FUNCTION Scill site- OPERATIONAL STATUS NA...

271

A safety and regulatory assessment of generic BWR and PWR permanently shutdown nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term availability of less expensive power and the increasing plant modification and maintenance costs have caused some utilities to re-examine the economics of nuclear power. As a result, several utilities have opted to permanently shutdown their plants. Each licensee of these permanently shutdown (PSD) plants has submitted plant-specific exemption requests for those regulations that they believe are no longer applicable to their facility. This report presents a regulatory assessment for generic BWR and PWR plants that have permanently ceased operation in support of NRC rulemaking activities in this area. After the reactor vessel is defueled, the traditional accident sequences that dominate the operating plant risk are no longer applicable. The remaining source of public risk is associated with the accidents that involve the spent fuel. Previous studies have indicated that complete spent fuel pool drainage is an accident of potential concern. Certain combinations of spent fuel storage configurations and decay times, could cause freshly discharged fuel assemblies to self heat to a temperature where the self sustained oxidation of the zircaloy fuel cladding may cause cladding failure. This study has defined four spent fuel configurations which encompass all of the anticipated spent fuel characteristics and storage modes following permanent shutdown. A representative accident sequence was chosen for each configuration. Consequence analyses were performed using these sequences to estimate onsite and boundary doses, population doses and economic costs. A list of candidate regulations was identified from a screening of 10 CFR Parts 0 to 199. The continued applicability of each regulation was assessed within the context of each spent fuel storage configuration and the results of the consequence analyses.

Travis, R.J.; Davis, R.E.; Grove, E.J.; Azarm, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA corrective action updated July 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The module discusses the regulatory and statutory requirements and authorities governing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action process. There are minimal regulatory requirements at present, but the Agency has issued a proposed rule (55 FR 30798; July 27, 1990) that would establish a comprehensive regulatory framework for implementing the corrective action program. This proposed rule and other guidance developed pursuant to statutory authorities are used to structure corrective action requirements in facility permits and orders. This module describes the current statutory and regulatory structure and discusses the future of the proposed rule.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

THE APPLICATION OF HISTONE ANALYSIS FOR IDENTIFYING DISTAL REGULATORY ELEMENTS - REGULATION OF FSHR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 4-?17. Footprints and potential GATA binding sites within EMSA ..................... probe 3.2... ............................................................................................... 2 FSHR Expression ........................................................................................................................ 4 FSHR/Fshr Transcription...

Dille, Elizabeth A.

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Application of Logic Synthesis Toward the Inference and Control of Gene Regulatory Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This technique determines a BN (or family of BNs) to describe the GRN and is validated on a synthetic network and the p53 network. The first two techniques assume binary valued gene expression data. In the third technique, we utilize continuous (analog...

Lin, Pey Chang K

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

275

Learning Dynamic Systems From Time-Series Data - An Application to Gene Regulatory Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the second half of the time-series data provided; that is, from the point when the pertur- bation is lifted, as we do not know the exact nature of the perturbation. The DREAM4 Challenge evaluated performance using the p-values for the area under the ROC curve... ., and Druzdzel, M. (2010). Learn- ing why things change: The difference-based causal- ity learner. In Proceedings of the Twenty-Sixth An- nual Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelli- gence (UAI). Yip, K., Alexander, R., Yan, K., and Gerstein, M. (2010...

Timoteo, Ivo J. P. M.; Holden, Sean B.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Application of comparative genomics for detection of genomic features and transcriptional regulatory elements.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the wake of advanced DNA sequencing technology, a large number of bacterial, animal, and plant genomes have now been completely sequenced and deposited into (more)

Lu, Hong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket37963 Vol. 79, No.and/or8-458-DEC. 17,U.S.1,Energy

278

Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | Department ofThatGrid3ofBuildingsEnergy Policy Act of

279

7/24/2014 DOE Natural Gas Regulatory E-filing Application  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe Office of FossilMembership |9 TABLE 10 COSTSDr.Department

280

Digital upgrade issues and the evolving regulatory environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper deals with the qualification of an Instrumentation and Control (I and C) upgrade for Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) in the plant, focusing on the interpretation of the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.180 Revision 1, 'Guidelines for Evaluating Electromagnetic and Radio-Frequency Interference in Safety-Related Instrumentation and Control Systems.' Options presented by Reg. Guide 1.180 are discussed along with alternative EMC Guidelines being used by nuclear power plants. Problems commonly encountered during the EMC qualification process are discussed and suggestions presented on how to deal with these common problems. Also included is a discussion of an emerging issue of how to address the issue of EMC of replacement discrete modules or printer circuit (PC) boards in a system that was either previously qualified or never qualified for EMC. (authors)

Meininger, R. D. [CHAR Services, Inc., 400 E. Main St., Annville, PA 17003 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Regulatory and technical reports: (Abstract index journal). Compilation for first quarter 1997, January--March  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation consists of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors. This compilation is published quarterly and cummulated annually. Reports consist of staff-originated reports, NRC-sponsored conference reports, NRC contractor-prepared reports, and international agreement reports.

Sheehan, M.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Regulatory Issues Controlling Carbon Capture and Storage B.S. Environmental Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory Issues Controlling Carbon Capture and Storage by Adam Smith B.S. Environmental Science and Astronautics #12;2 Regulatory Issues Controlling Carbon Capture and Storage by Adam Smith Submitted, terrestrial CO2 sequestration, and geologic CO2 capture and storage (CCS) are the major efforts underway

283

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review FOR AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN it would conflict with the Bering Sea non-roe season. At its January 1996 meeting, the Council considered/C Regulatory Areas must be made. Amendment 19 to the FMP, implemented as a measure to prevent roe stripping

284

Unintended Consequences of Regulatory Takings Reform on the SDCP and Arizona Water Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a property owners to just compensation if the value of a person's property is reduced by the enactmentUnintended Consequences of Regulatory Takings Reform on the SDCP and Arizona Water Management Fellowship Program #12;Introduction: Regulatory laws are often passed with the best intentions

Fay, Noah

285

NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) perspective of software QA (quality assurance) in the nuclear history  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer technology has been a part of the nuclear industry since its inception. However, it is only recently that computers have been integrated into reactor operations. During the early history of commercial nuclear power in the United States, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) discouraged the use of digital computers for real-time control and monitoring of nuclear power plant operation. At the time, this position was justified since software engineering was in its infancy, and horror stories on computer crashes were plentiful. Since the advent of microprocessors and inexpensive computer memories, significant advances have been made in fault-tolerant computer architecture that have resulted in highly reliable, durable computer systems. The NRC's requirement for safety parameter display system (SPDS) stemmed form the results of studies and investigations conducted on the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. An NRC contractor has prepared a handbook of software QA techniques applicable to the nuclear industry, published as NUREG/CR-4640 in August 1987. Currently, the NRC is considering development of an inspection program covering software QA. Future efforts may address verification and validation as applied to expert systems and artificial intelligence programs.

Weiss, S.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 3 contains copies of two reports that document the DOE/ORO regulatory oversight inspection and enforcement history for each gaseous diffusion plant site. Each report provides a formal mechanism by which DOE/ORO could communicate the inspection and enforcement history to NRC. The reports encompass the inspection activities that occurred during July 1, 1993 through March 2, 1997.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

WIPP WAC REV. 5 applicability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing for disposal operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in 1998. WIPP is a deep geological repository designed for the safe and efficient disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes. The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for WIPP were initially developed by a DOE steering committee in 1980. Revision 5 reflects the latest negotiations and permit requirements from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the State of New Mexico Environment Department (NMED), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The regulatory requirements are combined with the requirements derived from the WIPP safety analysis performed for disposal operations and the original criteria established for safe waste handling operations. The WIPP WAC provides a comprehensive overview of the requirements and basis for developing waste acceptance criteria to meet today`s rules and regulations for transportation and disposal of TRU wastes. The authors believe that it is a comprehensive criteria and a guidance manual for generator/storage sites who must characterize and certify TRU waste for disposal at WIPP. It also provides valuable insight to future projects that may develop their own waste acceptance criteria. The WIPP WAC presents the requirements from the following sources: 1) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit Application; 2) Land Disposal No-migration Variance Petition; 3) 40 CFR 191 Draft Compliance Certification Application; 4) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) from the NRC for a Type B shipping container; 5) Federal Land Withdrawal Act for WIPP; WIPP Safety Analysis Report; 7) WIPP System Design Descriptions (SDDs). The WIPP WAC combines operations and nuclear safety requirements with transportation and hazardous waste regulatory requirements to provide a comprehensive set of criteria and requirements that ensure the safe disposal of TRU waste.

Bisping, R.L. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Kelley, C.R.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Below regulatory concern owners group: Individual and population impacts from BRC (below regulatory concern) waste treatment and disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the IMPACTS-BRC and PRESTO-EPA-POP codes, researchers calculated potential individual and population doses for routine and unexpected radiation exposures resulting from the transportation and disposal of BRC nuclear power plant wastes. These calculations provided a basis for establishing annual curie and radionuclide concentration limits for BRC treatment and disposal. EPRI has initiated a program to develop a petition for rulemaking to NRC that would allow management of certain very low activity nuclear power plant waste types as below regulatory concern (BRC), thus exempting these wastes from requirements for burial at licensed low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The technical information required to support the BRC petition includes an assessment of radiologic impacts resulting from the proposed exemption, based on estimated individual and population doses that might result from BRC treatment and disposal of nuclear power plant wastes. 13 figs., 31 tabs.

Murphy, E.S.; Rogers, V.C.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Regulatory Reform to Promote Clean Energy: The Potential of Output-Based Emissions Standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Barriers to industrial energy-efficient technologies hinder their use. A number of EPA analyses and industrial experts have found that the utilization of input-based emissions standards (measured in parts-per-million or pounds/MMBtu) in the Clean Air Act creates a regulatory barrier to the installation and deployment of technologies that emit fewer criteria pollutants and use energy more efficiently. Changing emission management strategies to an output-based emissions standard (measured in tons of pollutant emitted) is a way to ameliorate some of these barriers. Combined heat and power (CHP) is one of the key technologies that would see increased industrial application if the emissions standards were modified. Many states have made this change since the EPA first approved it in 2000, although direction from the Federal government could speed implementation modifications. To analyze the national impact of accelerated state adoption of output-based standards on CHP technologies, this paper uses detailed National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and spreadsheet analysis illustrating two phased-in adoption scenarios for output-based emissions standards in the industrial sector. Benefit/cost metrics are calculated from a private and public perspective, and also a social perspective that considers the criteria and carbon air pollution emissions. These scenarios are compared to the reference case of AEO 2010 and are quite favorable, with a social benefit-cost ratio of 16.0 for a five-year phase-in scenario. In addition, the appropriateness of the Federal role, applicability, technology readiness, and administrative feasibility are discussed.

Cox, Matthew [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Brown, Dr. Marilyn Ann [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation and source list of nuclear safety criteria that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) applies to licensed reactors; it can be used by DOE and DOE contractors to identify NRC criteria to be evaluated for application to the DOE reactors under their cognizance. The criteria listed are those that are applied to the areas of nuclear safety addressed in the safety analysis report of a licensed reactor. They are derived from federal regulations, USNRC regulatory guides, Standard Review Plan (SRP) branch technical positions and appendices, and industry codes and standards.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The social cost of carbon (SCC) is a monetized metric for evaluating the benefits associated with marginal reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. It represents the expected welfare loss from the future damages caused by the release of one tonne of CO2 in a given year, expressed in consumption equivalent terms. It is intended to be a comprehensive measure, taking into account changes in agricultural productivity, human health risks, loss of ecosystem services and biodiversity, and the frequency and severity of flooding and storms, among other possible impacts. Estimating the SCC requires long-term modeling of global economic activity, the climate system, and the linkages between the two through anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the effects of changing climatic conditions on economic activity and human well-being. The United States government currently uses the SCC in regulatory benefit-cost analyses to assess the welfare effects of changes in CO2 emissions. Consistent application of the SCC to federal rulemaking analyses began in 2009-2010 with the development of a set of global SCC estimates that employed three prominent integrated assessment models (IAMs) -- DICE, FUND, and PAGE. The U.S. government report identified a number of limitations associated with SCC estimates in general and its own assumptions in particular: an incomplete treatment of damages, including potential catastrophic impacts; uncertainty regarding the extrapolation of damage functions to high temperatures; incomplete treatment of adaptation and technological change; and the evaluation of uncertain outcomes in a risk-neutral fashion. External experts have identified other potential issues, including how best to model long-term socio-economic and emissions pathways, oversimplified physical climate and carbon cycle modeling within the IAMs, and an inconsistency between non-constant economic growth scenarios and constant discount rates. The U.S. government has committed to updating the estimates regularly as modeling capabilities and scientific and economic knowledge improves. To help foster further improvements in estimating the SCC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a pair of workshops on Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis. The first focused on conceptual and methodological issues related to integrated assessment modeling and the second brought together natural and social scientists to explore methods for improving damage assessment for multiple sectors. These two workshops provide the basis for the 13 papers in this special issue.

Marten, Alex; Kopp, Robert E.; Shouse, Kate C.; Griffiths, Charles; Hodson, Elke L.; Kopits, Elizabeth; Mignone, Bryan K.; Moore, Chris; Newbold, Steve; Waldhoff, Stephanie T.; Wolverton, Ann

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Mapping cis-Regulatory Domains in the Human Genome UsingMulti-Species Conservation of Synteny  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our inability to associate distant regulatory elements with the genes that they regulate has largely precluded their examination for sequence alterations contributing to human disease. One major obstacle is the large genomic space surrounding targeted genes in which such elements could potentially reside. In order to delineate gene regulatory boundaries we used whole-genome human-mouse-chicken (HMC) and human-mouse-frog (HMF) multiple alignments to compile conserved blocks of synteny (CBS), under the hypothesis that these blocks have been kept intact throughout evolution at least in part by the requirement of regulatory elements to stay linked to the genes that they regulate. A total of 2,116 and 1,942 CBS>200 kb were assembled for HMC and HMF respectively, encompassing 1.53 and 0.86 Gb of human sequence. To support the existence of complex long-range regulatory domains within these CBS we analyzed the prevalence and distribution of chromosomal aberrations leading to position effects (disruption of a genes regulatory environment), observing a clear bias not only for mapping onto CBS but also for longer CBS size. Our results provide a genome wide data set characterizing the regulatory domains of genes and the conserved regulatory elements within them.

Ahituv, Nadav; Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Rubin, EdwardM.; Couronne, Olivier

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

293

Regulatory Considerations Associated with the Expanded Adoption of Distributed Solar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increased adoption of distributed PV, and other forms of distributed generation, have the potential to affect utility-customer interactions, system costs recovery, and utility revenue streams. If a greater number of electricity customers choose to self-generate, demand for system power will decrease and utility fixed costs will have to be recovered over fewer kilowatt hours of sales. As such, regulators will need to determine the value and cost of additional distributed PV and determine the appropriate allocation of the costs and benefits among consumers. The potential for new business models to emerge also has implications for regulation and rate structures that ensure equitable solutions for all electricity grid users. This report examines regulatory tools and rate designs for addressing emerging issues with the expanded adoption of distributed PV and evaluates the potential effectiveness and viability of these options going forward. It offers the groundwork needed in order for regulators to explore mechanisms and ensure that utilities can collect sufficient revenues to provide reliable electric service, cover fixed costs, and balance cost equity among ratepayers -- while creating a value proposition for customers to adopt distributed PV.

Bird, L.; McLaren, J.; Heeter, J.; Linvill, C.; Shenot, J.; Sedano, R.; Migden-Ostrander, J.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Carbon Capture and Sequestration: A Regulatory Gap Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Though a potentially significant climate change mitigation strategy, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) remains mired in demonstration and development rather than proceeding to full-scale commercialization. Prior studies have suggested numerous reasons for this stagnation. This Report seeks to empirically assess those claims. Using an anonymous opinion survey completed by over 200 individuals involved in CCS, it concludes that there are four primary barriers to CCS commercialization: (1) cost, (2) lack of a carbon price, (3) liability risks, and (4) lack of a comprehensive regulatory regime. These results largely confirm previous work. They also, however, expose a key barrier that prior studies have overlooked: the need for comprehensive, rather than piecemeal, CCS regulation. The survey data clearly show that the CCS community sees this as one of the most needed incentives for CCS deployment. The community also has a relatively clear idea of what that regulation should entail: a cooperative federalism approach that directly addresses liability concerns and that generally does not upset traditional lines of federal-state authority.

Lincoln Davies; Kirsten Uchitel; John Ruple; Heather Tanana

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Overview of Variable Renewable Energy Regulatory Issues: A Clean Energy Regulators Initiative Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This CERI report aims to provide an introductory overview of key regulatory issues associated with the deployment of renewable energy -- particularly variable renewable energy (VRE) sources such wind and solar power. The report draws upon the research and experiences from various international contexts, and identifies key ideas that have emerged from the growing body of VRE deployment experience and regulatory knowledge. The report assumes basic familiarity with regulatory concepts, and although it is not written for a technical audience, directs the reader to further reading when available. VRE deployment generates various regulatory issues: substantive, procedural, and public interest issues, and the report aims to provide an empirical and technical grounding for all three types of questions as appropriate.

Miller, M.; Cox, S.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Deregulating and regulatory reform in the U.S. electric power sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses the evolution of wholesale and retail competition in the U.S electricity sector and associated industry restructuring and regulatory reforms. It begins with a discussion of the industry structure and ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The future of nuclear power in the United States : economic and regulatory challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper examines the economic and regulatory challenges that must be faced by potential investors in new nuclear power plants in the United States. The historical development of the existing fleet of over 100 nuclear ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Regulatory T Cells Expanded from Hiv-1-Infected Individuals Maintain Phenotype, Tcr Repertoire and Suppressive Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While modulation of regulatory T cell (Treg) function and adoptive Treg transfer are being explored as therapeutic modalities in the context of autoimmune diseases, transplantation and cancer, their role in HIV-1 pathogenesis ...

Angin, Mathieu

299

Molecular cloning and characterization of important stress and redox regulatory genes from Hydra vulgaris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this research, important stress and redox regulatory genes present in Hydra vulgaris were isolated and characterized to facilitate our understanding of the evolution and mechanisms of stress response. H. vulgaris heat shock protein 70 (HvHSP70...

Dash, Bhagirathi

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

300

Optimizing a protein-RNA aptamer gene regulatory system using an engineered peptide library  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For this project, N-terminal and C-terminal peptide library fusions were designed,bconstructed, and screened in order to improve the repression achievable with a novel gene regulatory system. This system, based on the ...

Wong, Jessica Karen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Seattle Regulatory Pathways to Net Zero Water Phase 1 status RePoRt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that re- quire low impact development techniques, provides permitting guidance for rainwater harvesting-site water collection, use, reuse, storage, on-site treatment and release, and identify regulatory authority

302

Chemical genetic manipulation of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) using synthetic biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), the founding member of IRF family, is a nuclear transcription factor first described as a transcription factor that binds to the upstream region of interferon induced genes following ...

Al Samman, Khaldoon Mohammed A; Alsamman, Khaldoon

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

INFORMATIVE STRUCTURE PRIORS: JOINT LEARNING OF DYNAMIC REGULATORY NETWORKS FROM MULTIPLE TYPES OF DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFORMATIVE STRUCTURE PRIORS: JOINT LEARNING OF DYNAMIC REGULATORY NETWORKS FROM MULTIPLE TYPES operating in three phases of the cycle as shown in Figure 2. This synthetic cell cycle consists of cell

Hartemink, Alexander

304

The Michigan regulatory incentives study for electric utilities. Phase 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of Phase I of the Michigan Regulatory Incentives Study for Electric Utilities, a three-phase review of Michigan`s regulatory system and its effects on resource selection by electric utilities. The goal of Phase I is to identify and analyze financial incentive mechanisms that encourage selection of resources in accord with the principles of integrated resource planning (IRP) or least-cost planning (LCP). Subsequent study phases will involve further analysis of options and possibly a collaborative formal effort to propose regulatory changes. The Phase I analysis proceeded in three steps: (1) identification and review of existing regulatory practices that affect utilities; selection of resources, particularly DSM; (2) preliminary analysis of ten financial mechanisms, and selection of three for further study; (3) detailed analysis of the three mechanisms, including consideration of how they could be implemented in Michigan and financial modeling of their likely impacts on utilities and ratepayers.

Reid, M.W.; Weaver, E.M. [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)] [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

1991-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

305

New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory RNA structures are often members of families with multiple paralogous instances across the genome. Family members share functional and structural properties, which allow them to be studied as a whole, facilitating ...

Kellis, Manolis

306

Regulatory compliance guide for DOT-7A type A packaging design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this guide is to provide instruction for assuring that the regulatory design requirements for a DOT-7A Type A packaging are met. This guide also supports the testing and evaluation activities that are performed on new packaging designs by a DOE-approved test facility through the DOE`s DOT-7A Test Program. This Guide was updated to incorporate regulatory changes implemented by HM-169A (49 CFR, `Transportation`).

Kelly, D.L.

1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

307

Privatization and regulatory oversight of commercial wildlife control activities in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Regulatory Oversight of Commercial Wildlife Control Activities in the United States. (August 2007) Kieran J. Lindsey, B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Commite: Dr. Clark E. Adams Urbanization decreases... PRIVATIZATION AND REGULATORY OVERSIGHT OF COMERCIAL WILDLIFE CONTROL ACTIVITIES IN THE UNITED STATES A Disertation by KIERAN J. LINDSEY Submited to the Ofice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

Lindsey, Kieran J.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff practice and procedure digest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Revision 9 of the fifth edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to September 30, 1990 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This Revision 9 replaces in part earlier editions and revisions and includes appropriate changes reflecting the amendments to the Rules of Practice effective through September 30, 1990. This edition of the Digest was prepared by attorneys from Aspen Systems Corporation pursuant to Contract number 18-89-346. Persons using this Digest are placed on notice that it may not be used as an authoritative citation in support of any position before the Commission or any of its adjudicatory tribunals. Persons using this Digest are also placed on notice that it is intended for use only as an initial research tool, that it may, and likely does, contain errors, including errors in analysis and interpretation of decisions, and that the user should not rely on the Digest analyses and interpretations but must read, analyze and rely on the user's own analysis of the actual Commission, Appeal Board and Licensing Board decisions cited. Further, neither the United States, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Aspen Systems Corporation, nor any of their employees makes any expressed or implied warranty or assumes liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any material presented in the Digest. The Digest is roughly structured in accordance with the chronological sequence of the nuclear facility licensing process as set forth in Appendix A to 10 CFR Part 2. Those decisions which did not fit into that structure are dealt with in a section on general matters. Where appropriate, particular decisions are indexed under more than one heading. (JF)

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Plan and schedule for disposition and regulatory compliance for miscellaneous streams. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 23, 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) agreed to adhere to the provisions of Department of Ecology Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 (Consent Order). The Consent Order lists regulatory milestones for liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site to comply with the permitting requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-216 (State Waste Discharge Permit Program) or WAC 173-218 (Washington Underground Injection Control Program) where applicable. Hanford Site liquid effluent streams discharging to the soil column have been categorized in the Consent Order as follows: Phase I Streams Phase II Streams Miscellaneous Streams. Phase I and Phase II Streams are addressed in two RL reports: {open_quotes}Plan and Schedule to Discontinue Disposal of Contaminated Liquids into the Soil Column at the Hanford Site{close_quotes} (DOE-RL 1987), and {open_quotes}Annual Status of the Report of the Plan and Schedule to Discontinue Disposal of Contaminated Liquids into the Soil Column at the Hanford Site{close_quotes}. Miscellaneous Streams are those liquid effluent streams discharged to the ground that are not categorized as Phase I or Phase II Streams. Miscellaneous Streams discharging to the soil column at the Hanford Site are subject to the requirements of several milestones identified in the Consent Order. This document provides a plan and schedule for the disposition of Miscellaneous Streams. The disposition process for the Miscellaneous Streams is facilitated using a decision tree format. The decision tree and corresponding analysis for determining appropriate disposition of these streams is presented in this document.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the RO program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These activities were performed under the authority of the lease agreement between DOE and USEC until NRC issued a Certificate of Compliance or approved a Compliance Plan pursuant to Section 1701 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and assumed regulatory responsibility. This report chronicles the formal development, operation and key activities of the RO organization from its beginning in July 1993, until the turnover of the regulatory oversight responsibility to the NRC on March 3, 1997. Through its evolution to closure, the RO program was a formal, proceduralized effort designed to provide consistent regulation and to facilitate transition to NRC. The RO Program was also a first-of-a-kind program for DOE. The process, experience, and lessons learned summarized herein should be useful as a model for transition of other DOE facilities to privatization or external regulation.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, January 1995. Volume 41, Number 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains issuances of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards for January 1995. The issuances include Babcock and Wilcox Company materials license; Hydro Resources, Inc. application for uranium mining; low-level waste storage in Utah; communication of emerging and existing generic, technical issues with PWR owners groups; and radioactive waste management by Sierra Nuclear Corporation.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Innovative Regulatory and Technical Approaches for the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers' Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) created the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1974 to identify, investigate, and cleanup or control radiological contamination at sites used by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from the 1940s through the 1960s. The USDOE had identified 46 sites in the program and finished remediation at 24 of the smaller ones before the end of 1997. With the passage of the Energy and Water Resources Appropriation Act of 1998 the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) was designated by Congress with responsibility to manage and execute the FUSRAP. The Linde Site located in Tonawanda, New York was operated by the MED from 1942-1946 to extract uranium from several high-grade ores. This natural uranium was subsequently enriched in U-235 elsewhere in the United States and ultimately used to produce energy or weapons. Though in the process of reviewing alternative disposal options by 1995, the USDOE had operated FUSRAP with a strategy requiring virtually all materials remediated be disposed of at only one Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensed facility. The change in management of the FUSRAP in 1997 allowed the disposal policy of low levels of radioactively contaminated materials found at the remaining sites to be reexamined. This paper presents some of the innovative regulatory and technical approaches employed at the Linde Site that are resulting in project cost savings while meeting applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements as well as fulfilling commitments made to the local community.

Pitts, J. T.; Coutts, P. W.; Franz, J.; Boyle, J. D.; Rogers, B. C.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

313

Advanced regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control strategies for IGCC targeted towards improving power ramp-rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of ongoing R&D activities at the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training & Research (AVESTAR) Center, this paper highlights strategies for enhancing low-level regulatory control and system-wide coordinated control strategies implemented in a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon capture. The underlying IGCC plant dynamic model contains 20 major process areas, each of which is tightly integrated with the rest of the power plant, making individual functionally-independent processes prone to routine disturbances. Single-loop feedback control although adequate to meet the primary control objective for most processes, does not take into account in advance the effect of these disturbances, making the entire power plant undergo large offshoots and/or oscillations before the feedback action has an opportunity to impact control performance. In this paper, controller enhancements ranging from retuning feedback control loops, multiplicative feed-forward control and other control techniques such as split-range control, feedback trim and dynamic compensation, applicable on various subsections of the integrated IGCC plant, have been highlighted and improvements in control responses have been given. Compared to using classical feedback-based control structure, the enhanced IGCC regulatory control architecture reduces plant settling time and peak offshoots, achieves faster disturbance rejection, and promotes higher power ramp-rates. In addition, improvements in IGCC coordinated plant-wide control strategies for Gasifier-Lead, GT-Lead and Plantwide operation modes have been proposed and their responses compared. The paper is concluded with a brief discussion on the potential IGCC controller improvements resulting from using advanced process control, including model predictive control (MPC), as a supervisory control layer.

Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders, July 1, 1995--December 31, 1995. Volume 42, Pages 1-258  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the 42nd volume of issuances of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, Administrative Law Judges, and Office Directors. This book is a reprinting, containing corrections of numerous printing errors in a previously distributed book. It covers the period from July 1, 1995 to December 31, 1995. Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards conduct adjudicatory hearings on applications to construct and operate nuclear power plants and related facilities, and issue initial decisions which, subject to internal review and appellate procedures, become the final Commission action with respect to those applications. The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a 6-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly editions and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The Regulatory Challenges of Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants in Korea - 13101  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As of 2012, 23 units of nuclear power plants are in operation, but there is no experience of permanent shutdown and decommissioning of nuclear power plant in Korea. It is realized that, since late 1990's, improvement of the regulatory framework for decommissioning has been emphasized constantly from the point of view of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)'s safety standards. And it is known that now IAEA prepare the safety requirement on decommissioning of facilities, its title is the Safe Decommissioning of Facilities, General Safety Requirement Part 6. According to the result of IAEA's Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission to Korea in 2011, it was recommended that the regulatory framework for decommissioning should require decommissioning plans for nuclear installations to be constructed and operated and these plans should be updated periodically. In addition, after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan in March of 2011, preparedness for early decommissioning caused by an unexpected severe accident became also important issues and concerns. In this respect, it is acknowledged that the regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Korea need to be improved. First of all, we identify the current status and relevant issues of regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear power plants compared to the IAEA's safety standards in order to achieve our goal. And then the plan is to be established for improvement of regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear power plants in Korea. After dealing with it, it is expected that the revised regulatory framework for decommissioning could enhance the safety regime on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants in Korea in light of international standards. (authors)

Lee, Jungjoon; Ahn, Sangmyeon; Choi, Kyungwoo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Juyoul; Kim, Juyub [FNC Technology, 46 Tabsil-ro, Giheung-gu, Yongin 446-902 (Korea, Republic of)] [FNC Technology, 46 Tabsil-ro, Giheung-gu, Yongin 446-902 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Identification of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes Controlling Biomass Characteristics and Yield in Rice (Oryza Sativa)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project aims to identify the regulatory genes of rice cell wall synthesis pathways using a cell wall removal and regeneration system. We completed the gene expression profiling studies following the time course from cell wall removal to cell wall regeneration in rice suspension cells. We also completed, total proteome, nuclear subproteome and histone modification studies following the course from cell wall removal and cell wall regeneration process. A large number of differentially expressed regulatory genes and proteins were identified. Meanwhile, we generated RNAi and over-expression transgenic rice for 45 genes with at least 10 independent transgenic lines for each gene. In addition, we ordered T-DNA and transposon insertion mutants for 60 genes from Korea, Japan, and France and characterized the mutants. Overall, we have mutants and transgenic lines for over 90 genes, exceeded our proposed goal of generating mutants for 50 genes. Interesting Discoveries a) Cell wall re-synthesis in protoplasts may involve a novel cell wall synthesis mechanism. The synthesis of the primary cell wall is initiated in late cytokinesis with further modification during cell expansion. Phragmoplast plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis. It services as a scaffold for building the cell plate and formation of a new cell wall. Only one phragmoplast and one new cell wall is produced for each dividing cell. When the cell wall was removed enzymatically, we found that cell wall re-synthesis started from multiple locations simultaneously, suggesting that a novel mechanism is involved in cell wall re-synthesis. This observation raised many interesting questions, such as how the starting sites of cell wall synthesis are determined, whether phragmoplast and cell plate like structures are involved in cell wall re-synthesis, and more importantly whether the same set of enzymes and apparatus are used in cell wall re-synthesis as during cytokinesis. Given that many known cell wall synthesis pathway genes are induced by removal of cell wall, some cell wall synthesis apparatus must be shared in both cases. The cell wall re-synthesis mechanism may have broad application because our preliminary assay indicates that the cell wall characteristics are highly different from those produced during cytokinesis. A thorough understanding on the regulation of cell wall re-synthesis may lead to improvement of cell wall characteristics. b) Removal of cell wall results in chromatin decondensation Another interesting observation was that removal of cell wall was associated with substantial chromatin change. Our DNA DAPI stain, chromatin MNase digestion, histone modification proteomics, protein differential expression analysis, and DNA oligo array studies all supported that substantial chromatin change was associated with removal of cell wall treatment. It is still under investigation if the chromatin change is associated with activation of cell wall synthesis genes, in which chromatin remodeling is required. Another possibility is that the cell wall is required for stabilizing the chromatin structure in plant cells. Given that spindle fiber is directly connected with both chromatin structure and cell wall synthesis, it is possible that there is an intrinsic connection between cell wall and chromatin.

Peng, Zhaohua PEng [Mississippi State University; Ronald, Palmela [UC-Davis; Wang, Guo-Liang [The Ohio State University

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

317

Streamlining the Title V application process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Companies in some US states face 1997 deadlines to apply for permits required by Title V of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Consultants assisting in the preparation of these applications for a variety of facilities have gleaned numerous cost-effective, time-saving approaches for performing the task. Some of the lessons that have been learned are given. Title V applications are often prepared by teams composed of members of a facility`s corporate environmental staff, plant environment staff, plant production staff and an outside consultant. Understanding the role of each team member and delineating lines of communication are keys to working efficiently. Because the focus is on demonstrating existing and future compliance, applicants should define at the outset which regulatory requirements apply to each emissions unit.

Fisher, P. [Dames and Moore, Rolling Meadows, IL (United States); DeCesar, R. [Dames and Moore, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center was initiated to significantly improve market and regulatory conditions for the implementation of combined heat and power technologies. The GC CEAC was responsible for the development of CHP in Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. Through this program we employed a variety of outreach and education techniques, developed and deployed assessment tools and conducted market assessments. These efforts resulted in the growth of the combined heat and power market in the Gulf Coast region with a realization of more efficient energy generation, reduced emissions and a more resilient infrastructure. Specific t research, we did not formally investigate any techniques with any formal research design or methodology.

Dillingham, Gavin

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

319

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control technology.1 46 sions from the list of regulated hazardous air pollutantsAir Act includes "only those pollutants subject to a statutory or regulatory provision that requires actual control

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances. Volume 44, Number 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes issuances received during September 1996. After reviewing in detail each of the claims made in this informal proceeding the presiding officer sustained the staff of the USNRC in its determination that the applicant did not pass the written portion of his examination to become a licensed operator of a nuclear power plant. In the proceeding concerning citizen group challenges to the decommissioning plan for the Rowe Yankee power station, the licensing board grants licensee Yankee Atomic Electric Company`s motion for summary disposition.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Body Position in the Transport of Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes safety requirements for transport of radioactive waste in Slovakia and the role of regulatory body in the transport licensing and assessment processes. Importance of radioactive waste shipments have been increased since 1999 by starting of NPP A-1 decommissioning and operation of near surface disposal facility. Also some information from history of shipment as well as future activities are given. Legal basis for radioactive waste transport is resulting from IAEA recommendations in this area. Different types of transport equipment were approved by regulatory body for both liquid and solid waste and transportation permits were issued to their shipment. Regulatory body attention during evaluation of transport safety is focused mainly on ability of individual packages to withstand different transport conditions and on safety analyses performed for transport equipment for liquid waste with high frequency of shipments. During past three years no event was occurred in connection with radioactive waste transport in Slovakia.

Homola, J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

322

Regulatory Concerns on the In-Containment Water Storage System of the Korean Next Generation Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The in-containment water storage system (IWSS) is a newly adopted system in the design of the Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). It consists of the in-containment refueling water storage tank, holdup volume tank, and cavity flooding system (CFS). The IWSS has the function of steam condensation and heat sink for the steam release from the pressurizer and provides cooling water to the safety injection system and containment spray system in an accident condition and to the CFS in a severe accident condition. With the progress of the KNGR design, the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety has been developing Safety and Regulatory Requirements and Guidances for safety review of the KNGR. In this paper, regarding the IWSS of the KNGR, the major contents of the General Safety Criteria, Specific Safety Requirements, Safety Regulatory Guides, and Safety Review Procedures were introduced, and the safety review items that have to be reviewed in-depth from the regulatory viewpoint were also identified.

Ahn, Hyung-Joon; Lee, Jae-Hun; Bang, Young-Seok; Kim, Hho-Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (Korea, Republic of)

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

William J. ODonnell; Donald S. Griffin

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Renewal Application  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewal Individual Permit Renewal Application The Permit expires March 31, 2014 and existing permit conditions will be in effect until a new permit is issued. The Permittees...

325

Draft regulatory analysis: Notice of proposed rulemaking for the allocation and pricing of gasohol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The three principal problem areas addressed are: how to price unleaded blend stock and gasohol; how blenders are to obtain unleaded blend stock to blend with ethanol to produce gasohol; and how gasohol suppliers may distribute gasohol to purchasers. The proposed pricing and allocation rules, if adopted as final rules, would be in effect for about a year, because the statutory authority for gasoline price and allocation controls has an expiration date of September 30, 1981. The principal issues addressed are: what volume of ethanol and gasohol production can be expected between now and the end of 1981; what prices these products are likely to reach, independent of the rule and its alternative; what effect the rule and its alternative may have on the price and distribution of ethanol and gasohol; and what effect the rule and its alternative may have on motor vehicle misfueling and competition in the motor gasoline industry. On supply issues, it is concluded that by December, 1981, ethanol and gasohol production should increase by a factor of 3 or 4 above present levels, enough to meet the President's goals, without requiring additional corn acreage or adversely affecting food production. Ethanol production should increase from its present level of about 92 million gallons per year (6062 B/D) to the 3, 4, and 7 hundred million gallons per year levels (20,000, 30,000, and 45,000 B/D) necessaryto produce gasohol at year-end rates of 200,000 B/D in 1980, 300,000 B/D in 1981 and 450,000 B/D in 1982. In 1980 gasohol will represent about 3.2 percent of the total gasoline market, and 7.9 percent of the total unleaded market. Gasohol should help extend, rather than adversely affect, unleaded supplies. 30 references, 8 tables.

None,

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal): Annual compilation for 1994. Volume 19, Number 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation consists of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors. It is NRC`s intention to publish this compilation quarterly and to cumulate it annually. The main citations and abstracts in this compilation are listed in NUREG number order. These precede the following indexes: secondary report number index, personal author index, subject index, NRC originating organization index (staff reports), NRC originating organization index (international agreements), NRC contract sponsor index (contractor reports), contractor index, international organization index, and licensed facility index. A detailed explanation of the entries precedes each index.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A search for regulatory mutants of the nitrate utilization pathway of Neurospora Crassa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SEARCH FOR REGULATORI MUTANTS OF THE NITRATE UTILIZATION PATHWAl OF NEUROSPORA CRASSA A Thesis by CLAUDE STEVEN MCDANIEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fu1fillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject: Genetics A SEARCH FOR REGULATORY MUTANTS OF THE NITRATE U1'IIIZA1'ION PA1'NNAY OF ~N A Thesis by CLAUDE STEVEN MCDANIEL Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ e) (Head oi' epar...

McDaniel, Claude Steven

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Guidelines for preparing and reviewing applications for the licensing of non-power reactors: Format and Content. NUREG-1537, Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NUREG - 1537, Part 1 gives guidance to non-power reactor licensees and applicants on the format and content of applications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for licensing actions. These licensing actions include construction permits and initial operating licenses, license renewals, amendments, conversions from highly enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium, decommissioning, and license termination.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Seismic Analysis Issues in Design Certification Applications for New Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The licensing framework established by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 52, Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants, provides requirements for standard design certifications (DCs) and combined license (COL) applications. The intent of this process is the early reso- lution of safety issues at the DC application stage. Subsequent COL applications may incorporate a DC by reference. Thus, the COL review will not reconsider safety issues resolved during the DC process. However, a COL application that incorporates a DC by reference must demonstrate that relevant site-specific de- sign parameters are within the bounds postulated by the DC, and any departures from the DC need to be justified. This paper provides an overview of several seismic analysis issues encountered during a review of recent DC applications under the 10 CFR Part 52 process, in which the authors have participated as part of the safety review effort.

Miranda, M.; Morante, R.; Xu, J.

2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

330

Structural Design Challenges in Design Certification Applications for New Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The licensing framework established by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 52, Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants, provides requirements for standard design certifications (DCs) and combined license (COL) applications. The intent of this process is the early reso- lution of safety issues at the DC application stage. Subsequent COL applications may incorporate a DC by reference. Thus, the COL review will not reconsider safety issues resolved during the DC process. However, a COL application that incorporates a DC by reference must demonstrate that relevant site-specific de- sign parameters are confined within the bounds postulated by the DC, and any departures from the DC need to be justified. This paper provides an overview of structural design chal- lenges encountered in recent DC applications under the 10 CFR Part 52 process, in which the authors have participated as part of the safety review effort.

Miranda, M.; Braverman, J.; Wei, X.; Hofmayer, C.; Xu, J.

2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

331

Regulatory instrument review: Aging management of LWR cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of Stage 2 of the Regulatory Instrument Review are presented in this volume. Selected regulatory instruments, such as the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Regulatory Guides, and ASME Codes, were investigated to determine the extent to which these regulations apply aging management to selected safety-related components in nuclear power plants. The Regulatory Instrument Review was funded by the NRC under the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Stage 2 of the review focused on four safety-related structures and components; namely, cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves. The review suggests that the primary-emphasis of the regulatory instruments was on the design, construction, start-up, and operation of a nuclear power plant, and that aging issues were primarily addressed after an aging-related problem was recognized. This Stage 2 review confirms the results of the prior review; (see Regulatory Instrument Review: Management of Aging of LWR Major Safety-Related Components NUREG/CR-5490. The observations indicate that the regulations generally address management of age-related degradation indirectly. Specific age-related degradation phenomena frequently are dealt with in bulletins and notices or through generic issues, letters, etc. The major recommendation of this report, therefore, is that the regulatory instruments should more directly and explicitly address the aging phenomenon and the management of the age-related degradation process.

Werry, E.V.; Somasundaram, S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal). Volume 20, No. 2: Compilation for second quarter April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation consists of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors. It is NRC`s intention to publish this compilation quarterly and to cumulate it annually.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Extremely Low Probability of Rupture pilot study : xLPR framework model user's guide.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Extremely Low Probability of Rupture (xLPR) pilot study, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was tasked to develop and evaluate a probabilistic framework using a commercial software package for Version 1.0 of the xLPR Code. Version 1.0 of the xLPR code is focused assessing the probability of rupture due to primary water stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metal welds in pressurizer surge nozzles. Future versions of this framework will expand the capabilities to other cracking mechanisms, and other piping systems for both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The goal of the pilot study project is to plan the xLPR framework transition from Version 1.0 to Version 2.0; hence the initial Version 1.0 framework and code development will be used to define the requirements for Version 2.0. The software documented in this report has been developed and tested solely for this purpose. This framework and demonstration problem will be used to evaluate the commercial software's capabilities and applicability for use in creating the final version of the xLPR framework. This report details the design, system requirements, and the steps necessary to use the commercial-code based xLPR framework developed by SNL.

Kalinich, Donald A.; Sallaberry, Cedric M.; Mattie, Patrick D.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Advanced Inverter Functions to Support High Levels of Distributed Solar: Policy and Regulatory Considerations (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper explains how advanced inverter functions (sometimes called 'smart inverters') contribute to the integration of high levels of solar PV generation onto the electrical grid and covers the contributions of advanced functions to maintaining grid stability. Policy and regulatory considerations associated with the deployment of advanced inverter functions are also introduced.

Not Available

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Regulatory Guidance Letter 92-02 SUBJECT: Water Dependency and Cranberry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory Guidance Letter 92-02 SUBJECT: Water Dependency and Cranberry Production DATE: June 26/Environmental Protection Agency Memorandum to the Field on water dependency and cranberry production. This guidance MEMORANDUM TO THE FIELD SUBJECT: Water Dependency and Cranberry Production 1. The purpose of this memorandum

US Army Corps of Engineers

336

State Regulatory Framework Will Most Likely Result in Robust CO2 Pipeline System, New Study Says  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A private sector model with a state rather than Federal-based regulatory framework is the approach that will "most likely result in a robust CO2 pipeline system" in the United States, according to a new report developed with funding from the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory.

337

Project Information Form Project Title Program for Vehicle Regulatory Reform: Assessing Life Cycle-Based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,931.44 Total Project Cost $98,931.44 Agency ID or Contract Number DTRT13-G-UTC29 Start and End Dates November 1Project Information Form Project Title Program for Vehicle Regulatory Reform: Assessing Life Cycle, 2014 ­ October 31, 2015 Brief Description of Research Project Current greenhouse gas emissions

California at Davis, University of

338

CSB1 -Computational systems biology and regulatory genomics Supervisors: Harri Lhdesmki and Antti Larjo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSB1 - Computational systems biology and regulatory genomics Supervisors: Harri Lähdesmäki and Antti Larjo Contact information: harri.lahdesmaki@aalto.fi antti.larjo@aalto.fi Job description: Massive and machine learning, programming skills (e.g. R/Python) and interest in epigenetics. Possibility to extend

Kaski, Samuel

339

Lessons Learned... and Not Learned: A Case Study in Regulatory Evolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'Are you better off than you were four years ago?' 'You've come a long way, baby.' Eschewing politics and advertising, these idioms are applied to the evolution of regulatory processes for Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. We use a case study of a (nearly) completed D and D project at a large nuclear fuel manufacturing facility, to chronicle one licensee's experience with US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) D and D regulations from the 1990's to the present. Historical milestones include the birth of a D and D project, a false start and resultant consequences, a D and D 'moratorium' with subsequent planning and stakeholder integration, a second start which included the challenge of parallel path D and D physical work and regulatory processes, and the 'lessons learned' contributions to timely project progress. Further discussion includes a look at the 'declaration of victory' and examines what it really means to be finished. The rich contextual experience from the case study and the observations of other industry members provides the basis for answers to several key questions: How far has the regulatory process for D and D really evolved, and in what direction? Are licensees generally satisfied or dissatisfied with the methods? What has not improved? Which improvements looked promising, but languished in recent years? How far have we really come and are we better off? What are the opportunities for further improvement? The summary answer to each question, using compendious engineering terms is... 'it depends'. (authors)

Conant, J. F. [ABB Inc., 2000 Day Hill Road, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States); Woodard, R. C. [TLG Services/Entergy, 148 New Milford Road East, Bridgewater, CT 06752 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: RETHINKING STANDBY & FIXED COST CHARGES REGULATORY & RATE DESIGN PATHWAYS TO DEEPER SOLAR PV COST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be recovered through variable, volume-based charges per kilowatt-hour (kWh). At the same time, however, someEXECUTIVE SUMMARY: RETHINKING STANDBY & FIXED COST CHARGES REGULATORY & RATE DESIGN PATHWAYS TO DEEPER SOLAR PV COST REDUCTIONS The Current Terrain In recent years, electric utilities have experienced

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA105 FERC 61,307 FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA105 FERC ¶ 61,307 FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION Before Commissioners manipulated short-term prices for electric energy or natural gas in the West or otherwise exercised undue investigatory agencies, including the Department of Justice, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission

Laughlin, Robert B.

342

Non-regulatory Market-based Environmental Policy Per capita fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-regulatory Market-based Environmental Policy #12;Per capita fish consumption... ..almost's marine fish resources are either fully exploited or in decline. ...." (Duke). According to statistics, the tonnage of fish caught in American fisheries from 1950 to 2006 has nearly doubled to more than 4.3 million

Callender, Craig

343

Regulatory issues and assumptions associated with barriers in the vadose zone surrounding buried waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the options for control of contaminant migration from buried waste sites is the construction of a subsurface barrier that consists of a wall of low permeability material. The barrier material should be compatible with soil and waste conditions specific to the site and have as low an effective diffusivity as is reasonably achievable to minimize or inhibit transport of moisture and contaminants. This report addresses the regulatory issues associated with the use of non-traditional organic polymer barriers as well as the use of soil-bentonite or cement-bentonite mixtures for such barriers, considering barriers constructed from these latter materials to be a regulatory baseline. The regulatory issues fall into two categories. The first category consists of issues associated with the acceptability of such barriers to the EPA as a method for achieving site or performanceimprovement. The second category encompasses those regulatory issues concerning health, safety and the environment which must be addressed regarding barrier installation and performance, especially if non-traditional materials are to be used.

Siskind, B.; Heiser, J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Inferring Regulatory Elements from a Whole Genome. An Analysis of Helicobacter pylori sss80  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inferring Regulatory Elements from a Whole Genome. An Analysis of Helicobacter pylori sss80 Family, France Helicobacter pylori is adapted to life in a unique niche, the gastric epi- thelium of primates inference; promoter; Helicobacter pylori; prokaryotes*Corresponding author Introduction Helicobacter pylori

Marsan, Laurent

345

Distributed Solar PV for Electricity System Resiliency: Policy and Regulatory Considerations (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed Solar PV systems have the potential of increasing the grid's resiliency to unforeseen events, such as extreme weather events and attacks. This paper presents the role that distributed PV can play in electric grid resiliency, introduces basic system design requirements and options, and discusses the regulatory and policy options for supporting the use of distributed PV for the purpose of increased electricity resiliency.

Not Available

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Bitcoin: a regulatory nightmare to a libertarian dream Internet Policy Review, 3(2).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bitcoin: a regulatory nightmare to a libertarian dream Internet Policy Review, 3(2). Author and current discussions on the regulation of bitcoin in Europe and beyond. After presenting the potential by a central server, bitcoin is a distributed, worldwide, decentralised cryptocurrency that is managed solely

Boyer, Edmond

347

Nitrate-responsive miR393/AFB3 regulatory module controls root system architecture in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental conditions is the modulation of root system architecture (RSA) in response to nitrate supplyNitrate-responsive miR393/AFB3 regulatory module controls root system architecture in ArabidopsisR393/AFB3 is a unique N- responsive module that controls root system architecture in response

Green, Pamela

348

Does the management of regulatory compliance and occupational risk have an impact on safety culture?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Does the management of regulatory compliance and occupational risk have an impact on safety culture of safety culture has progressively taken hold in organizations. The idea has numerous benefits and can the nature and strength of relationships between safety culture and two explanatory variables; namely

Boyer, Edmond

349

Structural Studies of the Catalytic and Regulatory Mechanisms of Phenylalanine Hydroxylase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with phenylalanine activation. The isolated regulatory domain (PheH1-117) was expressed and purified using a QSepharose column followed by a gel filtration column. Analytical gel filtration shows that PheH1-117 exists as a dimer in solution. In the presence...

Li, Jun

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

350

Novel regulatory cascades controlling expression of nitrogen-fixation genes in Geobacter sulfurreducens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in these environments. Moreover, Geobacter species show promise for harvesting electricity from waste organic matterNovel regulatory cascades controlling expression of nitrogen-fixation genes in Geobacter Geobacter species often play an important role in bioremediation of environments contaminated with metals

Lovley, Derek

351

PREDetector: A new tool to identify regulatory elements in bacterial genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREDetector: A new tool to identify regulatory elements in bacterial genomes Samuel Hiard, The Netherlands Received 27 March 2007 Available online 12 April 2007 Abstract In the post-genomic area Elements Detector), a tool developed for predicting regulons of DNA-binding proteins in bacterial genomes

Wehenkel, Louis

352

Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bacterial survival in hydro- environmental systems such as sunlight, temperature, soil moisture conditions1559 Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management of impaired streams. Novel statistical time series analyses of coliform data can

Perfect, Ed

353

Regulatory Guidance Letter 90-06 SUBJECT: Expiration Dates for Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory Guidance Letter 90-06 SUBJECT: Expiration Dates for Wetlands Jurisdictional Delineations the length of time that wetlands jurisdictional delineations remain valid. In light of the need for national to the provisions in paragraphs 5., 6., and 7. 2. Since wetlands are affected over time by both natural and man

US Army Corps of Engineers

354

Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC TN-WRAP-12-1 August 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC TN-WRAP-12-1 August 2012 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Updating Regional Supplements to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual by Jacob F. Berkowitz PURPOSE: Regional supplements to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual

US Army Corps of Engineers

355

Regulatory basis for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the first operational repository designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste from the defense programs of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for certifications and regulation of the WIPP facility for the radioactive components of the waste. The EPA has promulgated general radioactive waste disposal standards at 40 CFR Part 191. and WIPP-specific criteria to implement and interpret the generic disposal standards at 40 CFR Part 194. In October 1996. the DOE submitted its Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the EPA to demonstrate compliance with the disposal standards at Subparts B and C of 40 CFR Part 191. This paper summarizes the development of the overall legal framework for radioactive waste disposal at the WIPP, the parallel development of the WIPP performance assessment (PA), and how the EPA disposal standards and implementing criteria formed the basis for the CCA WIPP PA. The CCA resulted in a certification in May 1998 by the EPA of the WIPP'S compliance with the EPA's disposal standard, thus enabling the WIPP to begin radioactive waste disposal.

HOWARD,BRYAN A.; CRAWFORD,M.B.; GALSON,D.A.; MARIETTA,MELVIN G.

2000-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

356

Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants.

NONE

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Public-private regulatory complementarities in a world of fragmented production : labor regulation in the electronics industry of Eastern Central Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The central argument of my dissertation is that national labor relation institutions where transnational private regulatory efforts are implemented influence the extent and manner of public-private regulatory complementarities. ...

Pal, Timea

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

COL Application Content Guide for HTGRs: Revision to RG 1.206, Part 1 - Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined license (COL) application is required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for all proposed nuclear plants. The information requirements for a COL application are set forth in 10 CFR 52.79, Contents of Applications; Technical Information in Final Safety Analysis Report. An applicant for a modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) must develop and submit for NRC review and approval a COL application which conforms to these requirements. The technical information necessary to allow NRC staff to evaluate a COL application and resolve all safety issues related to a proposed nuclear plant is detailed and comprehensive. To this, Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.206, Combined License Applications for Nuclear Power Plants (LWR Edition), was developed to assist light water reactor (LWR) applicants in incorporating and effectively formatting required information for COL application review (Ref. 1). However, the guidance prescribed in RG 1.206 presumes a LWR design proposal consistent with the systems and functions associated with large LWR power plants currently operating under NRC license.

Wayne Moe

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

EMI/RFI and Power Surge Withstand Guidance for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the regulatory guidance implemented by U.S. NRC for minimizing malfunctions and upsets in safety-related instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants caused by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio-frequency interference (RFI), and power surges. The engineering design, installation, and testing practices deemed acceptable to U.S. NRC are described in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.180, ''Guidelines for Evaluating Electromagnetic and Radio-Frequency in Safety-Related Instrumentation and Control Systems'' (January 2000) and in a Safety Evaluation Report (SER) endorsing EPRI TR-102323, ''Guidelines for Electromagnetic Interference Testing in Power Plants,'' (April 1996). These engineering practices provide a well-established, systematic approach for ensuring electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and surge withstand capability (SWC).

Ewing, PD

2001-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

US Department of Energy wind turbine candidate site program: the regulatory process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sites selected in 1979 as tentative sites for installation of a demonstration MOD-2 turbine are emphasized. Selection as a candidate site in this program meant that the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the site as eligible for a DOE-purchased and installed meteorological tower. The regulatory procedures involved in the siting and installation of these meteorological towers at the majority of the candidate sites are examined. An attempt is also made, in a preliminary fashion, to identify the legal and regulatory procedures that would be required to put up a turbine at each of these candidate sites. The information provided on each of these sites comes primarily from utility representatives, supplemented by conversations with state and local officials. The major findings are summarized on the following: federal requirements, state requirements, local requirements, land ownership, wind rights, and public attitudes.

Greene, M.R.; York, K.R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances: Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders. Progress report, January 1, 1996--June 30, 1996. Volume 43, pages 1-358  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all legal precedents for the agency within a six month period. This is the forty-third volume of issuances.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Investigation of regulatory efficiency with reference to the EU Water Framework Directive: an application to Scottish agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Water Framework Directive (WFD) has the stated objective of delivering good status (GS) for Europes surface waters and groundwaters. But meeting GS is cost dependent, and in some water bodies pollution abatement ...

Lago Aresti, Manuel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Productivity and Efficiency of US Gas Transmission Companies: A European Regulatory Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the long- standing regime of cost-plus regulation was complemented by increasing pipe- to-pipe competition, most European countries moved towards incentive regulation complemented by market integration. We study the impact of US regulatory reform using a... by complementing cost- of-service regulation with institutions fostering competition and market integration (O'Neill, 2005), European regulators treat gas transmission as incentive-regulated franchise monopolies (Makholm, 2007). Both, traditional US cost...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.; Triebs, T

365

Nevada Test Site Decontamination and Decommissioning Program History, Regulatory Framework, and Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of radiologically and/or chemically contaminated facilities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. Facilities identified for D&D are listed in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and closed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act process. This paper discusses the NTS D&D program, including facilities history, D&D regulatory framework, and valuable lessons learned.

Michael R. Kruzic, Bechtel Nevada; Patrick S. Morris, Bechtel Nevada; Jerel G. Nelson, Polestar Applied Technology, Inc.

2005-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

Goal pursuit is more than planning: the moderating role of regulatory fit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in goal pursuit, and are more open to changes as well as activity and object substitutions in satisfactory situations. Regulatory orientation moderates the sunk cost effects associated with unsatisfactory situations (Higgins et al. 2001). Sunk cost... investments or costs than the previous plan. Promotion-focused individuals are less likely than prevention-focused individuals to demonstrate sunk cost effects when the sunk cost error is framed as an error of omission (e.g., the error of missing a great...

Tam, Wing Yin Leona

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

Optimal Use of Information in Litigation: Should Regulatory Information Be Withheld to Deter Frivolous Suits?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

after victims bring lawsuits induces them to utilize their private information better in their litigation decisions, and thus may be socially desirable. 1. Introduction Uncovering truth is an essential part of court proceedings. In tort cases, for ex... information." According to the manner in which regulatory information is revealed and used, we distinguish three regimes: (1) simple rule, (2) ex ante rule, and (3) ex post rule. The "simple rule" is the benchmark rule in which the court simply bases its...

Che, Yeon-Koo; Earnhart, Dietrich H.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

TANK FARM REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT AN EXERCISE IN TECHNICAL & REGULATORY COLLABORATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tank Farm Remediation Technology Development Project at the Hanford Site focuses on waste storage tanks, pipelines and associated ancillary equipment that are part of the C-200 single-shell tank (SST) farm system located in the C Tank Farm. The purpose of the project is to obtain information on the implementation of a variety of closure activities and to answer questions on technical, operational and regulatory issues associated with closure.

JARAYSI, M.N.

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

369

Geothermal direct heat applications program summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1978, the Department of Energy Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies initiated a program to accelerate the direct use of geothermal energy, in which 23 projects were selected. The projects, all in the western part of the US, cover the use of geothermal energy for space conditioning (heating and cooling) and agriculture (aquaculture and greenhouses). Initially, two projects were slated for industrial processing; however, because of lack of geothermal resources, these projects were terminated. Of the 23 projects, seven were successfully completed, ten are scheduled for completion by the end of 1983, and six were terminated for lack of resources. Each of the projects is being documented from its inception through planning, drilling, and resource confirmation, design, construction, and one year of monitoring. The information is being collected, evaluated, and will be reported. Several reports will be produced, including detailed topical reports on economics, institutional and regulatory problems, engineering, and a summary final report. To monitor progress and provide a forum for exchange of information while the program is progressing, semiannual or annual review meetings have been held with all project directors and lead engineers for the past four years. This is the sixth meeting in that series. Several of the projects which have been terminated are not included this year. Overall, the program has been very successful. Valuable information has been gathered. problems have been encountered and resolved concerning technical, regulatory, and institutional constraints. Most projects have been proven to be economical with acceptable pay-back periods. Although some technical problems have emerged, they were resolved with existing off-the-shelf technologies and equipment. The risks involved in drilling for the resource, the regulatory constraints, the high cost of finance, and large front-end cost remain the key obstacles to the broad development of geothermal direct use applications.

None

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Bioengineering and Coordination of Regulatory Networks and Intracellular Complexes to Maximize Hydrogen Production by Phototrophic Microorganisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the Principal Investigator, F.R. Tabita has teemed up with J. C. Liao from UCLA. This project's main goal is to manipulate regulatory networks in phototrophic bacteria to affect and maximize the production of large amounts of hydrogen gas under conditions where wild-type organisms are constrained by inherent regulatory mechanisms from allowing this to occur. Unrestrained production of hydrogen has been achieved and this will allow for the potential utilization of waste materials as a feed stock to support hydrogen production. By further understanding the means by which regulatory networks interact, this study will seek to maximize the ability of currently available unrestrained organisms to produce hydrogen. The organisms to be utilized in this study, phototrophic microorganisms, in particular nonsulfur purple (NSP) bacteria, catalyze many significant processes including the assimilation of carbon dioxide into organic carbon, nitrogen fixation, sulfur oxidation, aromatic acid degradation, and hydrogen oxidation/evolution. Moreover, due to their great metabolic versatility, such organisms highly regulate these processes in the cell and since virtually all such capabilities are dispensable, excellent experimental systems to study aspects of molecular control and biochemistry/physiology are available.

Tabita, F. Robert [The Ohio State University] [The Ohio State University

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Regulatory Initiatives for Control and Release of Technologically Enhanced Naturally-Occurring Radioactive Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current drafts of proposed standards and suggested State regulations for control and release of technologically-enhanced naturally-occurring radioactive material (TENORM), and standards for release of volumetrically-contaminated material in the US are reviewed. These are compared to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Safety Series and the European Commission (EC) proposals. Past regulatory efforts with respect to TENORM in the US dealt primarily with oil-field related wastes. Currently, nine states (AK, GA, LA, MS, NM, OH, OR SC, TX) have specific regulations pertaining to TENORM, mostly based on uranium mill tailings cleanup criteria. The new US proposals are dose- or risk-based, as are the IAEA and EC recommendations, and are grounded in the linear no threshold hypothesis (LNT). TENORM wastes involve extremely large volumes, particularly scrap metal and mine wastes. Costs to control and dispose of these wastes can be considerable. The current debate over the validity of LNT at low doses and low dose rates is particularly germane to this discussion. Most standards setting organizations and regulatory agencies base their recommendations on the LNT. The US Environmental Protection Agency has released a draft Federal Guidance Report that recommends calculating health risks from low-level exposure to radionuclides based on the LNT. However, some scientific and professional organizations are openly questioning the validity of LNT and its basis for regulations, practices, and costs to society in general. It is not clear at this time how a non-linear regulatory scheme would be implemented.

Egidi, P.V.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

372

Solar PV Project Financing: Regulatory and Legislative Challenges for Third-Party PPA System Owners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential and commercial end users of electricity who want to generate electricity using on-site solar photovoltaic (PV) systems face challenging initial and O&M costs. The third-party ownership power purchase agreement (PPA) finance model addresses these and other challenges. It allows developers to build and own PV systems on customers? properties and sell power back to customers. However, third-party electricity sales commonly face five regulatory challenges. The first three challenges involve legislative or regulatory definitions of electric utilities, power generation equipment, and providers of electric services. These definitions may compel third-party owners of solar PV systems to comply with regulations that may be cost prohibitive. Third-party owners face an additional challenge if they may not net meter, a practice that provides significant financial incentive to owning solar PV systems. Finally, municipalities and cooperatives worry about the regulatory implications of allowing an entity to sell electricity within their service territories. This paper summarizes these challenges, when they occur, and how they have been addressed in five states. This paper also presents alternative to the third-party ownership PPA finance model, including solar leases, contractual intermediaries, standardized contract language, federal investment tax credits, clean renewable energy bonds, and waived monopoly powers.

Kollins, K.; Speer, B.; Cory, K.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. Annual report to Congress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Titles I and III of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) establish retail regulatory policies for electric and natural gas utilities, respectively, aimed at achieving three purposes: conservation of energy supplied by electric and gas utilities; efficiency in the use of facilities and resources by these utilities; equitable rates to electricity and natural gas consumers. PURPA also continues the pilot utility implementation program, authorized under Title II of the Energy Conservation and Production ACT (ECPA), to encourage adoption of cost-based rates and efficient energy-management practices. The purpose of this report is twofold: (1) to summarize and analyze the progress that state regulatory authorities and certain nonregulated utilities have made in their consideration of the PURPA standards; and (2) to summarize the Department of Energy (DOE) activities relating to PURPA and ECPA. The report provides a broad overview and assessment of the status of electric and gas regulation nationwide, and thus helps provide the basis for congressional and DOE actions targeted on the utility industry to address pressing national energy problems.

None,

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Preservation and Implementation of Decommissioning Lessons Learned in the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has actively worked to capture and preserve lessons learned from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. More recently, NRC has involved industry groups, the Organization of Agreement States (OAS), and the Department of Energy (DOE) in the effort to develop approaches to capture, preserve and disseminate decommissioning lessons learned. This paper discusses the accomplishments of the working group, some lessons learned by the NRC in the recent past, and how NRC will incorporate these lessons learned into its regulatory framework. This should help ensure that the design and operation of current and future nuclear facilities will result in less environmental impact and more efficient decommissioning. In summary, the NRC will continue capturing today's experience in decommissioning so that future facilities can take advantage of lessons learned from today's decommissioning projects. NRC, both individually and collectively with industry groups, OAS, and DOE, is aggressively working on the preservation and implementation of decommissioning lessons learned. The joint effort has helped to ensure the lessons from the whole spectrum of decommissioning facilities (i.e., reactor, fuel cycle, and material facilities) are better understood, thus maximizing the amount of knowledge and best practices obtained from decommissioning activities. Anticipated regulatory activities at the NRC will make sure that the knowledge gained from today's decommissioning projects is preserved and implemented to benefit the nuclear facilities that will decommission in the future.

Rodriguez, Rafael L. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Federal and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

A Novel Nodal Enhancer Dependent on Pluripotency Factors and Smad2/3 Signaling Conditions a Regulatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Regulatory Switch During Epiblast Maturation Costis Papanayotou1 *, Ataaillah Benhaddou1 , Anne Camus1 on how pluripotency factors achieve their function. Citation: Papanayotou C, Benhaddou A, Camus A, Perea

376

Quarterly project status report, October-December 1981. [Implementation of PURPA by state regulatory authorities and nonregulated utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economic Regulatory Administration (ERA) has a requirement to report to Congress on determinations made by State regulatory authorities and nonregulated utilities regarding their purposes of Title I and III of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act, (PURPA) of 1978. The purposes stated in PURPA are to promote conservation of energy supplied by utilities, efficiency in use of utilities, and equitable rates for utility consumers. ERA is also required to assist State regulatory authorities and nonregulated utilities in carrying out their PURPA responsibilities by implementing information dissemination activities. This report summarizes contractual support to ERA in implementing its information data base to its clientele. Progress is reported on: information acquisition/dissemination; information analysis and retrieval; information storage, and information maintenance. (MCW)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Project Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an evaluation of the Project Plan. The Project Plan is intended to provide the high-level direction that documents the required software activities to meet the contractual commitments prepared by the sponsor; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Carl Wharton; Kent Norris

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Curated collection of yeast transcription factor DNA binding specificity data reveals novel structural and gene regulatory insights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in regulating gene expression by interacting with cis-regulatory DNA elements associated with their target genes. Recent surveys have examined the DNA binding ...

Gordan, Raluca

379

Waste management regulatory compliance issues related to D&D activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste management activities at ORNL related to the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of radioactively contaminated buildings are divided into four categories: Operational facilities, inactive or surplus facilities, future facilities planning, and D&D activities. This paper only discusses regulatory issues related to inactive or surplus facilities. Additionally, rather than attempting to address all resulting waste streams and related regulations, this paper highlights only a few of the ORNL waste streams that present key regulatory issues.

Hitch, J.P.; Arnold, S.E.; Burwinkle, T.; Daugherty, D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A site-directed mutation in the regulatory subunit of aspartate transcarbamoylase: effects on allosteric and catalytic response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the effectors CTP, UTP and ATP. The first published mutation in the regulatory subunit of ATCase, PARS, was a substitution of the carboxy-terminal eight residues (6). This substitution resulted in the loss of homotropic cooperativity and CIP effector... of alanine for lysine at position 56 of the regulatory polypeptide of aspartate transcarbamoylase affected both homotropic and heterotropic characteristics. In the absence of effectors, ALAr56 lost the homotropic cooperativity observed for aspartate...

Corder, Timothy Scott

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances: Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders, July 1--December 31, 1996. Volume 44, Pages 1--432  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a six-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly softbounds and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition. Cross references in the text and indexes are to the NRCI page numbers which are the same as the page numbers in this publication. Issuances are referred to as follows: Commission--CLI, Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards--LBP, Administrative Law Judges--ALJ, Directors` Decisions--DD, and Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking--DPRM.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances. Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders, July 1, 1994--December 31, 1994. Volume 40, Pages 1--387  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a six-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly softbounds and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition. Cross references in the text and indexes are to the NRCI page numbers which are the same as the page numbers in this publication. This book covers the following: issuances of the NRC; issuances of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards; and issuances of Directors` decisions.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Legal obstacles and incentives to the third development of small-scale hydroelectric potential in the six New England states: executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This executive summary describes the relationship of Federal law and regulation to state law and regulation of small-scale hydroelectric facilities. It also highlights important features of the constitutional law, statutory law, case law, and regulations of each of the six New England states. The summary may serve as a concise overview of and introduction to the detailed reports prepared by the Energy Law Institute on the legal and regulatory systems of each of the six states. The dual regulatory system is a function of the federalist nature of our government. This dual system is examined from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, i.e., the law of pre-emption, and the application of this law to the case of hydroelectric development. The regulation of small dams are discussed and flow diagrams of the regulations are presented for each of the six states - Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Connecticut.

None,

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Statutory Authorities, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite ForPropertiestoDept ofEnergy,C.F.f!\Jl~~

385

Application Acceleration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication Acceleration on Current and Future Cray

386

Distributed Solar Photovoltaics for Electric Vehicle Charging: Regulatory and Policy Considerations (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasing demand for electric vehicle (EV) charging provides an opportunity for market expansion of distributed solar technology. A major barrier to the current deployment of solar technology for EV charging is a lack of clear information for policy makers, utilities and potential adopters. This paper introduces the pros and cons of EV charging during the day versus at night, summarizes the benefits and grid implications of combining solar and EV charging technologies, and offers some regulatory and policy options available to policy makers and regulators wanting to incentivize solar EV charging.

Not Available

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Modular Semantic Tagging of Medline Abstracts and its Use in Inferring Regulatory Networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe MedstractPlus, a resource for mining relations from the Medline bibliographic database that is currently under construction. It was built on the remains of Medstract, a previously created resource that included a biorelation server and an acronym database. MedstractPlus uses simple and scalable natural language processing modules to structure text, is designed with reusability and extendibility in mind, and adheres to the philosophy of the Linguistic Annotation Framework. We show how MedstractPlus has been used to provide seeds for a novel approach to inferring transcriptional regulatory networks from gene expression data.

Verhagen, Marc; Pustejovsky, James; Taylor, Ronald C.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

388

Report on the establishment and operation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Daycare Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have completed an inspection of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) Daycare Center (Center). The purpose of the inspection was to review for efficiency, economy and compliance with laws and regulations, FERC's establishment and operation of the Center. The inspection objectives were to review: (1) FERC's compliance with Federal laws and requirements of the General Services Administration and the District of Columbia; (2) the source and amount of funds for establishing and operating the Center; and (3) the organizational relationships between FERC, the Center and the contractor operating the Center.

Not Available

1991-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

389

Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |Rebecca MatulkaDeliveryUpdatedRFI Reducing RegulatoryRFI,

390

Regulatory issues associated with closure of the Hanford AX Tank Farm ancillary equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid mixed, high-level radioactive waste has been stored in underground single-shell tanks at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site. After retrieval of the waste from the single-shell tanks, the DOE will proceed with closure of the tank farm. The 241-AX Tank Farm includes four one-million gallon single-shell tanks in addition to sluice lines, transfer lines, ventilation headers, risers, pits, cribs, catch tanks, buildings, well and associated buried piping. This equipment is classified as ancillary equipment. This document addresses the requirements for regulatory close of the ancillary equipment in the Hanford Site 241-AX Tank Farm. The options identified for physical closure of the ancillary equipment include disposal in place, disposal in place after treatment, excavation and disposal on site in an empty single-shell tank, and excavation and disposal outside the AX Tank Farm. The document addresses the background of the Hanford Site and ancillary equipment in the AX Tank Farm, regulations for decontamination and decommissioning of radioactively contaminated equipment, requirements for the cleanup and disposal of radioactive wastes, cleanup and disposal requirements governing hazardous and mixed waste, and regulatory requirements and issues associated with each of the four physical closure options. This investigation was conducted by the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, during Fiscal Year 1998 for the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project.

Becker, D.L.

1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

391

Regulatory Closure Options for the Residue in the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid, mixed, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been stored in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTS) located in tank farms on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The DOE is developing technologies to retrieve as much remaining HLW as technically possible prior to physically closing the tank farms. In support of the Hanford Tanks Initiative, Sandia National Laboratories has addressed the requirements for the regulatory closure of the radioactive component of any SST residue that may remain after physical closure. There is significant uncertainty about the end state of each of the 149 SSTS; that is, the nature and amount of wastes remaining in the SSTS after retrieval is uncertain. As a means of proceeding in the face of these uncertainties, this report links possible end-states with associated closure options. Requirements for disposal of HLW and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) are reviewed in detail. Incidental waste, which is radioactive waste produced incidental to the further processing of HLW, is then discussed. If the low activity waste (LAW) fraction from the further processing of HLW is determined to be incidental waste, then DOE can dispose of that incidental waste onsite without a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC). The NRC has proposed three Incidental Waste Criteria for determining if a LAW fraction is incidental waste. One of the three Criteria is that the LAW fraction should not exceed the NRC's Class C limits.

Cochran, J.R. Shyr, L.J.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

392

The U.S. regulatory framework for long-term management of uranium mill tailings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US established the regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of uranium mill tailings in 1978 with the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (Pub. L. 95-604). This legislation has governed the cleanup and disposal of uranium tailings at both inactive and active sites. The passage of the UMTRCA established a federal regulatory program for the cleanup and disposal of uranium mill tailings in the US. This program involves the DOE, the NRC, the EPA, various states and tribal governments, private licensees, and the general public. The DOE has completed surface remediation at 14 sites, with the remaining sites either under construction or in planning. The DOE`s UMTRA Project has been very successful in dealing with public and agency demands, particularly regarding disposal site selection and transportation issues. The active sites are also being cleaned up, but at a slower pace than the inactive sites, with the first site tentatively scheduled for completion in 1996.

Smythe, C. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bierley, D.; Bradshaw, M. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Special committee review of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's severe accident risks report (NUREG--1150)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) published a draft report Severe Accident Risks: An Assessment for Five US Nuclear Power Plants,'' NUREG-1150. This report updated, extended and improved upon the information presented in the 1974 Reactor Safety Study,'' WASH-1400. Because the information in NUREG-1150 will play a significant role in implementing the NRC's Severe Accident Policy, its quality and credibility are of critical importance. Accordingly, the Commission requested that the RES conduct a peer review of NUREG-1150 to ensure that the methods, safety insights and conclusions presented are appropriate and adequately reflect the current state of knowledge with respect to reactor safety. To this end, RES formed a special committee in June of 1989 under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The Committee, composed of a group of recognized national and international experts in nuclear reactor safety, was charged with preparing a report reflecting their review of NUREG-1150 with respect to the adequacy of the methods, data, analysis and conclusions it set forth. The report which precedes reflects the results of this peer review.

Kouts, H.J.C. (Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (USA)); Apostolakis, G.; Kastenberg, W.E. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA)); Birkhofer, E.H.A. (Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany, F.R.)); Hoegberg, L.G. (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)); LeSage, L.G. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Rasmussen, N.C. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Camb

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Low-rank coal study. Volume 4. Regulatory, environmental, and market analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The regulatory, environmental, and market constraints to development of US low-rank coal resources are analyzed. Government-imposed environmental and regulatory requirements are among the most important factors that determine the markets for low-rank coal and the technology used in the extraction, delivery, and utilization systems. Both state and federal controls are examined, in light of available data on impacts and effluents associated with major low-rank coal development efforts. The market analysis examines both the penetration of existing markets by low-rank coal and the evolution of potential markets in the future. The electric utility industry consumes about 99 percent of the total low-rank coal production. This use in utility boilers rose dramatically in the 1970's and is expected to continue to grow rapidly. In the late 1980's and 1990's, industrial direct use of low-rank coal and the production of synthetic fuels are expected to start growing as major new markets.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

State Electricity Regulatory Policy and Distributed Resources: Accommodating Distributed Resources in Wholesale Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed resources can provide cost-effective reliability and energy services - in many cases, obviating the need for more expensive investments in wires and central station electricity generating facilities. Given the unique features of distributed resources, the challenge facing policymakers today is how to restructure wholesale markets for electricity and related services so as to reveal the full value that distributed resources can provide to the electric power system (utility grid). This report looks at the functions that distributed resources can perform and examines the barriers to them. It then identifies a series of policy and operational approaches to promoting DR in wholesale markets. This report is one in the State Electricity Regulatory Policy and Distributed Resources series developed under contract to NREL (see Annual Technical Status Report of the Regulatory Assistance Project: September 2000-September 2001, NREL/SR-560-32733). Other titles in this series are: (1) Distributed Resource Distribution Credit Pilot Programs - Revealing the Value to Consumers and Vendors, NREL/SR-560-32499; (2) Distributed Resources and Electric System Reliability, NREL/SR-560-32498; (3) Distribution System Cost Methodologies for Distributed Generation, NREL/SR-560-32500; (4) Distribution System Cost Methodologies for Distributed Generation Appendices, NREL/SR-560-32501

Weston, F.; Harrington, C.; Moskovitz, D.; Shirley, W.; Cowart, R.; Sedano, R.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

An HIV Feedback-Resistor: Auto-Regulatory Circuit Deactivator and Noise Buffer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many viruses have the cunning ability to enter a hibernative or off state, termed latency or lysogeny. When in a latent state, the virus is unable to replicate, and its gene expression program is largely shut down. This facility for lying dormant typically ensures lifelong persistence of the virus in the host; it is also a particularly problematic obstacle in the treatment of HIV. For most viruses, the molecular regulation of entry into latency is not completely understood, but it is believed that viral gene expression must be deactivated in some way. In this study, we introduce a new regulatory motif, the feedback resistor, that enables a genetic circuit to shut off without the need for an active repressor molecule. We first show that many animal viruses might encode feedback resistors in their regulatory circuits. Then, by using a combination of mathematical theory and single-cell real-time imaging experiments, we show that a feedback resistor in the HIV Tat transcriptional circuit likely allows the HIV virus to enter into latency. We postulate that feedback resistors may give increased stability and control in the complex noisy signaling environment of the cell.

Leor S. Weinberger; Thomas Shenk

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

397

Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Emissions trading laws and regulations in China's pilot programs: an examination on the regulatory design and its implications for policy making .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis examines the regulatory design of local pilot programs for emissions trading laws and regulations in China. The central investigation is to examine the (more)

ZHANG, HAO

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Summary and analysis of public comments on NUREG-1317: Regulatory options for nuclear plant license renewal: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On August 29, 1988, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on nuclear plant license renewal and solicited public comments on NUREG-1317, ''Regulatory Options for Nuclear Plant License Renewal.'' NUREG-1317 presents a discussion of fifteen topics involving technical, environmental, and procedural issues and poses a set of related questions. As part of its ongoing task for the NRC, The MITRE Corporation has summarized and analyzed the public comments received. Fifty-three written comments were received. Of these, 83 percent were from nuclear industry representatives; the remaining comments represented federal and state agencies, public interest groups, and a private citizen.

Ligon, D.M.; Seth, S.S.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume II of III: user's guide. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is a User's Guide to the National Utility Regulatory Model (NUREG) and its implementation of the National Coal Model. This is the second of three volumes provided by ICF under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. These three volumes are: a manual describing the NUREG methodology; a users guide; and a description of the software. This manual provides a brief introduction to the National Utility Regulation Model, describes the various programs that comprise the National Utility Regulatory Model, gives sample input files, and provides information needed to run the model.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Knowledge Management Initiatives Used to Maintain Regulatory Expertise in Transportation and Storage of Radioactive Materials - 12177  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was established in 1974 with the mission to license and regulate the civilian use of nuclear materials for commercial, industrial, academic, and medical uses in order to protect public health and safety, and the environment, and promote the common defense and security. Currently, approximately half (?49%) of the workforce at the NRC has been with the Agency for less than six years. As part of the Agency's mission, the NRC has partial responsibility for the oversight of the transportation and storage of radioactive materials. The NRC has experienced a significant level of expertise leaving the Agency due to staff attrition. Factors that contribute to this attrition include retirement of the experienced nuclear workforce and mobility of staff within or outside the Agency. Several knowledge management (KM) initiatives have been implemented within the Agency, with one of them including the formation of a Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation (SFST) KM team. The team, which was formed in the fall of 2008, facilitates capturing, transferring, and documenting regulatory knowledge for staff to effectively perform their safety oversight of transportation and storage of radioactive materials, regulated under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 71 and Part 72. In terms of KM, the SFST goal is to share critical information among the staff to reduce the impact from staff's mobility and attrition. KM strategies in place to achieve this goal are: (1) development of communities of practice (CoP) (SFST Qualification Journal and the Packaging and Storing Radioactive Material) in the on-line NRC Knowledge Center (NKC); (2) implementation of a SFST seminar program where the seminars are recorded and placed in the Agency's repository, Agency-wide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS); (3) meeting of technical discipline group programs to share knowledge within specialty areas; (4) development of written guidance to capture 'administrative and technical' knowledge (e.g., office instructions (OIs), generic communications (e.g., bulletins, generic letters, regulatory issue summary), standard review plans (SRPs), interim staff guidance (ISGs)); (5) use of mentoring strategies for experienced staff to train new staff members; (6) use of Microsoft SharePoint portals in capturing, transferring, and documenting knowledge for staff across the Division from Division management and administrative assistants to the project managers, inspectors, and technical reviewers; and (7) development and implementation of a Division KM Plan. A discussion and description of the successes and challenges of implementing these KM strategies at the NRC/SFST will be provided. (authors)

Lindsay, Haile; Garcia-Santos, Norma; Saverot, Pierre; Day, Neil; Gambone Rodriguez, Kimberly; Cruz, Luis; Sotomayor-Rivera, Alexis; Vechioli, Lucieann; Vera, John; Pstrak, David [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop EBB-03D-02M, 6003 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Geosynthetic Clay Liner applications in waste disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geosynthetic Clay Liners (GCLs) are becoming a popular alternative to compacted clay barrier layers, and represent the state of the art in waste disposal facility design. They possess many of the same qualities of compacted clay barrier layers while occupying only a small fraction of the airspace. This is a very attractive feature to waste disposal facility owners and operators. There are many manufacturers of GCLs in the marketplace, providing numerous products that can be used in a wide variety of applications. Designing for the constructing with a GCL an be a challenging task; stability issues must be evaluated, selecting the appropriate product should be considered, comprehensive specifications are needed to ensure proper product selection and installation, and steps must be taken during installation to prevent damage to the GCL. Perhaps most importantly, state regulatory agencies must be convinced that GCLs will provide long-term protection equivalent to a clay barrier layer. This paper will discuss design considerations, specification guidelines, installation criteria, construction quality assurance guidelines and regulatory issues pertaining to GCL. The paper will also present three brief case histories of relevant GCL applications in waste disposal facility design and construction. The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate that GCLs are a viable alternative to compacted clay barrier layers and to provide useful information in designing, specifying and installing them in waste disposal facilities.

McGrath, L.T.; Creamer, P.D. [RMT, Inc., Madison, WI (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

LWRS II&C Industry and Regulatory Engagement Activities for FY 11  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To ensure broad industry support and coordination for the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Controls (II&C) Systems Technologies research pathway, an engagement process will be continually pursued with nuclear asset owners, vendors, and suppliers, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the major industry support organizations of Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO), and Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). Nuclear asset owner engagement is a necessary and enabling activity to obtain data and accurate characterization of long-term operational challenges, assess the suitability of proposed research for addressing long-term needs, and gain access to data and representative infrastructure and expertise needed to ensure success of the proposed research and development (R&D) activities. Engagement with vendors and suppliers will ensure that vendor expectations and needs can be translated into requirements that can be met through technology commercialization.

Ken Thomas

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Regulatory, technical pressures prompt more U. S. salt-cavern gas storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural-gas storage in US salt caverns is meeting the need for flexible, high delivery and injection storage following implementation Nov. 1, 1993, of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Order 636. This ruling has opened the US underground natural-gas storage market to more participants and created a demand for a variety of storage previously provided by pipelines as part of their bundled sales services. Many of these new services such as no-notice and supply balancing center on use of high-delivery natural gas storage from salt caverns. Unlike reservoir storage, nothing restricts flow in a cavern. The paper discusses the unique properties of salt that make it ideal for gas storage, choosing a location for the storage facility, cavern depth and shape, cavern size, spacing, pressures, construction, conversion or brine or LPG storage caverns to natural gas, and operation.

Barron, T.F. (PB-KBB Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

405

Characterizing the interplay betwen mulitple levels of organization within bacterial sigma factor regulatory networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bacteria contain multiple sigma factors, each targeting diverse, but often overlapping sets of promoters, thereby forming a complex network. The layout and deployment of such a sigma factor network directly impacts global transcriptional regulation and ultimately dictates the phenotype. Here we integrate multi-omic data sets to determine the topology, the operational, and functional states of the sigma factor network in Geobacter sulfurreducens, revealing a unique network topology of interacting sigma factors. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network shows a highly modular structure with sN being the major regulator of energy metabolism. Surprisingly, the functional state of the network during the two most divergent growth conditions is nearly static, with sigma factor binding profiles almost invariant to environmental stimuli. This first comprehensive elucidation of the interplay between different levels of the sigma factor network organization is fundamental to characterize transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in bacteria.

Yu, Qiu [University of California, San Diego; Nagarajan, Harish [University of California, San Diego; Embree, Mallory [University of California, San Diego; Shieu, Wendy [University of California, San Diego; Abate, Elisa [University of California, San Diego; Juarez, Katy [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM); Cho, Byung-Kwan [University of California, San Diego; Elkins, James G [ORNL; Nevin, Kelly P. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Barrett, Christian [University of California, San Diego; Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Palsson, Bernhard O. [University of California, San Diego; Zengler, Karsten [University of California, San Diego

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during calendar year 1986. Comments and observations are provided on operating experience at nuclear power plants and other NRC licensees, including results from selected AEOD studies; summaries of abnormal occurrences involving US nuclear plants; reviews of licensee event reports and their quality, reactor scram experience from 1984 to 1986, engineered safety features actuations, and the trends and patterns analysis program; and assessments of nonreactor and medical misadministration events. In addition, the report provides the year-end status of all recommendations included in AEOD studies, and listings of all AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1986.

none,

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Regulatory tools for overcoming barriers to the resale and redevelopment of contaminated properties: A Michigan model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential contamination in urban industrial areas has created a significant barrier to the resale and redevelopment of prime metropolitan sites. Development is forced from existing industrial areas to ``greenfield`` sites. The State of Michigan has developed an innovative program to facilitate the redevelopment of these contaminated ``brownfield`` sites. This comprehensive program includes flexible, land-use based cleanup standards; liability protection for local units of government, covenants not to sue for buyers and potentially responsible parties and State funded grants` and loans for site investigation and reclamation. Each of these regulatory tools and their strengths and weaknesses are discussed. Several examples of the implementation of Michigan`s site reclamation program are also provided.

Lynnes, K.D. [Berlin, Lynnes and Davidson, Inc., Grand Rapids, MI (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Draft regulatory analysis: notice of proposed rulemaking motor gasoline allocation revisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Draft Regulatory Analysis is prepared for those proposed regulations which either may have a major impact on the general economy, individual industries, or geographic regions and levels of government, or may be significant in that they affect important DOE policy concerns and are the object of public interest. The problems and proposed solutions for the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Public Hearings on the Motor Gasoline Allocation Program are examined. The ERA's mandate for this program is set out in the Emergency Petroleum Allocation Act of 1973. Under this Act, the President is empowered to enforce, at his discretion, price and allocation controls on petroleum and petroleum products, including gasoline, through September 30, 1981. The Act sets the following allocation goals: protect public health; maintain public services and agricultural operations; foster competition in the petroleum industry; distribute petroleum among industry sectors and US regions equitably; and minimize economic disruption and unnecessary interference wth market mechanisms.

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Accident Conditions versus Regulatory Test for NRC-Approved UF6 Packages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approves new package designs for shipping fissile quantities of UF{sub 6}. Currently there are three packages approved by the NRC for domestic shipments of fissile quantities of UF{sub 6}: NCI-21PF-1; UX-30; and ESP30X. For approval by the NRC, packages must be subjected to a sequence of physical tests to simulate transportation accident conditions as described in 10 CFR Part 71. The primary objective of this project was to relate the conditions experienced by these packages in the tests described in 10 CFR Part 71 to conditions potentially encountered in actual accidents and to estimate the probabilities of such accidents. Comparison of the effects of actual accident conditions to 10 CFR Part 71 tests was achieved by means of computer modeling of structural effects on the packages due to impacts with actual surfaces, and thermal effects resulting from test and other fire scenarios. In addition, the likelihood of encountering bodies of water or sufficient rainfall to cause complete or partial immersion during transport over representative truck routes was assessed. Modeled effects, and their associated probabilities, were combined with existing event-tree data, plus accident rates and other characteristics gathered from representative routes, to derive generalized probabilities of encountering accident conditions comparable to the 10 CFR Part 71 conditions. This analysis suggests that the regulatory conditions are unlikely to be exceeded in real accidents, i.e. the likelihood of UF{sub 6} being dispersed as a result of accident impact or fire is small. Moreover, given that an accident has occurred, exposure to water by fire-fighting, heavy rain or submersion in a body of water is even less probable by factors ranging from 0.5 to 8E-6.

MILLS, G. SCOTT; AMMERMAN, DOUGLAS J.; LOPEZ, CARLOS

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Regulatory and institutional issues impending cleanup at US Department of Energy sites: Perspectives gained from an office of environmental restoration workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear weapons and energy operations are conducted across a nation-wide industrial complex engaged in a variety of manufacturing, processing, testing, and research and development activities. The overall mission of DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is to protect workers, the public, and the environment from waste materials generated by past, current, and future DOE activities and to bring the DOE complex into compliance with all applicable laws, regulations, and agreements related to health, safety, and the environment. EM addresses this broad mandate through related and interdependent programs that include corrective actions, waste operations, environmental restoration, and technology development. The EM Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) recognizes the importance of implementing a complex-wide process to identify and resolve those issues that may impede progress towards site cleanup. As a first step in this process, FM-40 sponsored an exercise to identify and characterize major regulatory and institutional issues and to formulate integrated action steps towards their resolution. This report is the first product of that exercise. It is intended that the exercise described here will mark the beginning of an ongoing process of issue identification, tracking, and resolution that will benefit cleanup activities across the DOE complex.

Fallon, W E; Gephart, J M; Gephart, R E; Quinn, R D; Stevenson, L A

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

IB Peer Advisor Application Dear Applicant,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IB Peer Advisor Application 2014-2015 Dear Applicant, Thank you for your interest in being an IB Peer Advisor for the 2014-15 academic year. These positions provide valuable opportunities for students all of the components of the peer advisor position before applying, · a one page application form

California at Berkeley, University of

412

Reducing biosolids disposal costs using land application in forested areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Switching biosolids land application from a reclamation site to a forested site significantly reduced the cost of biosolids disposal at the Savannah River Site. Previous beneficial reuse programs focused on reclamation of existing borrow pits. While extremely beneficial, this program became very costly due to the regulatory requirements for groundwater monitoring, soil monitoring and frequent biosolids analyses. A new program was developed to reuse biosolids in forested areas where the biosolids could be used as a soil conditioner and fertilizer to enhance timber yield. The forested land application site was designed so that groundwater monitoring and soil monitoring could be eliminated while biosolids monitoring and site maintenance were minimized. Monitoring costs alone were reduced by 80%. Capital costs for site preparation were also significantly reduced since there was no longer a need for expensive groundwater monitoring wells.

Huffines, R.L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2065816 Ultimate Ownership Structure and Bank Regulatory Capital Adjustment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their capital structure (debt/equity), firms in general and banks more specifically take control dilution costs into consideration, beyond the asymmetric information and transaction costs considered in prior research on capital and Bank Regulatory Capital Adjustment: Evidence from European Commercial Banks Laetitia Lepetita , Amine

Boyer, Edmond

414

Do Markets Reduce Costs? Assessing the Impact of Regulatory Restructuring on U.S. Electric Generation Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Do Markets Reduce Costs? Assessing the Impact of Regulatory Restructuring on U.S. Electric-of-service regulation to market-oriented environments for many U.S. electric generating plants. Our estimates of input their wholesale electricity markets improved the most. The results suggest modest medium-term efficiency benefits

Kammen, Daniel M.

415

Getting to the Root of Things: Spatiotemporal Regulatory Networks (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Siobhan Brady from University of California, Davis, gives a talk titled "tGetting to the Root of things: Spatiotemporal Regulatory Networks" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

Brady, Siobhan [UC Davis] [UC Davis

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

416

HOME TRENDS/ISSUES LOGISTICS MANUFACTURING SOURCING REVERSE SUPPLY CHAIN GOVT/REGULATORY RESOURCES SCDIGEST WEBSITE The Green Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HOME TRENDS/ISSUES LOGISTICS MANUFACTURING SOURCING REVERSE SUPPLY CHAIN GOVT/REGULATORY RESOURCES SCDIGEST WEBSITE The Green Supply Chain Says: The company does not plan to actually produce the pallets themselves, but rather to offer these biodegradable planks that pallet manufacturers around the world would

417

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long economic lifetime and development lead-time of many electric infrastructure investments requires that utility resource planning consider potential costs and risks over a lengthy time horizon. One long-term -- and potentially far-reaching -- risk currently facing the electricity industry is the uncertain cost of future carbon dioxide (CO2) regulations. Recognizing the importance of this issue, many utilities (sometimes spurred by state regulatory requirements) are beginning to actively assess carbon regulatory risk within their resource planning processes, and to evaluate options for mitigating that risk. However, given the relatively recent emergence of this issue and the rapidly changing political landscape, methods and assumptions used to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of this analysis on the selection of a preferred resource portfolio, vary considerably across utilities. In this study, we examine the treatment of carbon regulatory risk in utility resource planning, through a comparison of the most-recent resource plans filed by fifteen investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities in the Western U.S. Together, these utilities account for approximately 60percent of retail electricity sales in the West, and cover nine of eleven Western states. This report has two related elements. First, we compare and assess utilities' approaches to addressing key analytical issues that arise when considering the risk of future carbon regulations. Second, we summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by these fifteen utilities and compare them to potential CO2 emission benchmark levels.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainty surrounding the nature and timing of future carbon regulations poses a fundamental and far-reaching financial risk for electric utilities and their ratepayers. Long-term resource planning provides a potential framework within which utilities can assess carbon regulatory risk and evaluate options for mitigating exposure to this risk through investments in energy efficiency and other low-carbon resources. In this paper, we examine current resource planning practices related to managing carbon regulatory risk, based on a comparative analysis of the most-recent long-term resource plans filed by fifteen major utilities in the Western U.S. First, we compare the assumptions and methods used by utilities to assess carbon regulatory risk and to evaluate energy efficiency as a risk mitigation option. Although most utilities have made important strides in beginning to address carbon regulatory risk within their resource plan, we also identify a number of opportunities for improvement and offer recommendations for resource planners and state regulators to consider. We also summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by the fifteen Western utilities, highlighting the contribution of energy efficiency and its impact on the carbon intensity of utilities' proposed resource strategies. Energy efficiency and renewables are the dominant low-carbon resources included in utilities' preferred portfolios. Across the fifteen utilities, energy efficiency constitutes anywhere from 6percent to almost 50percent of the preferred portfolio energy resources, and represents 22percent of all incremental resources in aggregate.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

419

Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainty surrounding the nature and timing of future carbon regulations poses a fundamental and far-reaching financial risk for electric utilities and their ratepayers. Long-term resource planning provides a potential framework within which utilities can assess carbon regulatory risk and evaluate options for mitigating exposure to this risk through investments in energy efficiency and other low-carbon resources. In this paper, we examine current resource planning practices related to managing carbon regulatory risk, based on a comparative analysis of the most-recent long-term resource plans filed by fifteen major utilities in the Western U.S. First, we compare the assumptions and methods used by utilities to assess carbon regulatory risk and to evaluate energy efficiency as a risk mitigation option. Although most utilities have made important strides in beginning to address carbon regulatory risk within their resource plan, we also identify a number of opportunities for improvement and offer recommendations for resource planners and state regulators to consider. We also summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by the fifteen Western utilities, highlighting the contribution of energy efficiency and its impact on the carbon intensity of utilities' proposed resource strategies. Energy efficiency and renewables are the dominant low-carbon resources included in utilities' preferred portfolios. Across the fifteen utilities, energy efficiency constitutes anywhere from 6percent to almost 50percent of the preferred portfolio energy resources, and represents 22percent of all incremental resources in aggregate.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nkx6.1 Controls a Gene Regulatory Network Required for Establishing and Maintaining Pancreatic Beta Cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nkx6.1 Controls a Gene Regulatory Network Required for Establishing and Maintaining Pancreatic Beta and sufficient to specify insulin-producing beta cells. Heritable expression of Nkx6.1 in endocrine precursors of mice is sufficient to respecify non-beta endocrine precursors towards the beta cell lineage, while

Sander, Maike

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Proceedings of the tenth annual DOE low-level waste management conference: Session 1: Institutional and regulatory issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains eleven papers on various aspects of low-level radioactive waste regulation. Topics include: EPA environmental standards; international exemption principles; the concept of below regulatory concern; envirocare activities in Utah; mixed waste; FUSRAP and the Superfund; and a review of various incentive programs. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

CONSTRUCTION GUIDE FOR FOOD FACILITIES County of Orange Health Care Agency/Regulatory Health Services/Environmental Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION GUIDE FOR FOOD FACILITIES County of Orange Health Care Agency/Regulatory Health-6074 Fax (714) 433-6424 I. INTRODUCTION A. This Construction Guide is available to any person intending to construct or remodel a food facility in Orange County. It is intended to serve as a general overview

de Lijser, Peter

423

Getting to the Root of Things: Spatiotemporal Regulatory Networks (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Siobhan Brady from University of California, Davis, gives a talk titled "tGetting to the Root of things: Spatiotemporal Regulatory Networks" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

Brady, Siobhan [UC Davis

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

Molecular Cell, Vol. 16, 929941, December 22, 2004, Copyright 2004 by Cell Press Revealing Global Regulatory Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is known to play numerous critical2 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering roles in regulatory and Cooper, 2003; Smith and Valcar-Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L6 cel, 2000). A major goal of the postgenomic era these occur, what their specific roles are, and how they are regulated. In con-Summary trast

Frey, Brendan J.

425

Simulating Insulin Infusion Pump Risks by In-Silico Modeling of the Insulin-Glucose Regulatory System.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulating Insulin Infusion Pump Risks by In-Silico Modeling of the Insulin-Glucose Regulatory for simulating risks due to insulin infusion pump us- age by diabetic patients. Insulin infusion pumps allow-regulate their blood glucose levels. However, the use of infusion pumps and continuous glucose monitors can pose risks

Fainekos, Georgios E.

426

Application Process and Eligibility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Application Process and Eligibility Application Process and Eligibility Both US and non-US citizens are eligible to apply, but US citizenship may be required for some...

427

SAGE Application Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Application Process SAGE Application Process A National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program Contacts Institute Director Harald Dogliani-Los Alamos...

428

Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities in Support of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fiscal year 2011 progress report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power Task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Objectives for Task 2.1.7 are the following: to work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process to work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development to communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders to engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which is described in this report: 2.1.7.1Regulatory Assistance 2.1.7.2Stakeholder Outreach 2.1.7.3Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning. As MHK industry partners work with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit, and license MHK technologies, they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under Task 2.1.7 is to understand and work to address these varied interests, reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 10  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site environment and is numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in Hanford Site NEPA related documents. The document is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many NEPA documents that are being prepared by contractors. The two chapters in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered this way to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Site-related NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes the Hanford Site environment, and includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes applicable federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site.

Neitzel, D.A. [ed.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A. [and others

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Identification of functional elements and regulatory circuits by Drosophila modENCODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To gain insight into how genomic information is translated into cellular and developmental programs, the Drosophila model organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is comprehensively mapping transcripts, histone modifications, chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, replication proteins and intermediates, and nucleosome properties across a developmental time course and in multiple cell lines. We have generated more than 700 data sets and discovered protein-coding, noncoding, RNA regulatory, replication, and chromatin elements, more than tripling the annotated portion of the Drosophila genome. Correlated activity patterns of these elements reveal a functional regulatory network, which predicts putative new functions for genes, reveals stage- and tissue-specific regulators, and enables gene-expression prediction. Our results provide a foundation for directed experimental and computational studies in Drosophila and related species and also a model for systematic data integration toward comprehensive genomic and functional annotation. Several years after the complete genetic sequencing of many species, it is still unclear how to translate genomic information into a functional map of cellular and developmental programs. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) (1) and model organism ENCODE (modENCODE) (2) projects use diverse genomic assays to comprehensively annotate the Homo sapiens (human), Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), and Caenorhabditis elegans (worm) genomes, through systematic generation and computational integration of functional genomic data sets. Previous genomic studies in flies have made seminal contributions to our understanding of basic biological mechanisms and genome functions, facilitated by genetic, experimental, computational, and manual annotation of the euchromatic and heterochromatic genome (3), small genome size, short life cycle, and a deep knowledge of development, gene function, and chromosome biology. The functions of {approx}40% of the protein and nonprotein-coding genes [FlyBase 5.12 (4)] have been determined from cDNA collections (5, 6), manual curation of gene models (7), gene mutations and comprehensive genome-wide RNA interference screens (8-10), and comparative genomic analyses (11, 12). The Drosophila modENCODE project has generated more than 700 data sets that profile transcripts, histone modifications and physical nucleosome properties, general and specific transcription factors (TFs), and replication programs in cell lines, isolated tissues, and whole organisms across several developmental stages (Fig. 1). Here, we computationally integrate these data sets and report (i) improved and additional genome annotations, including full-length proteincoding genes and peptides as short as 21 amino acids; (ii) noncoding transcripts, including 132 candidate structural RNAs and 1608 nonstructural transcripts; (iii) additional Argonaute (Ago)-associated small RNA genes and pathways, including new microRNAs (miRNAs) encoded within protein-coding exons and endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) from 3-inch untranslated regions; (iv) chromatin 'states' defined by combinatorial patterns of 18 chromatin marks that are associated with distinct functions and properties; (v) regions of high TF occupancy and replication activity with likely epigenetic regulation; (vi)mixed TF and miRNA regulatory networks with hierarchical structure and enriched feed-forward loops; (vii) coexpression- and co-regulation-based functional annotations for nearly 3000 genes; (viii) stage- and tissue-specific regulators; and (ix) predictive models of gene expression levels and regulator function.

Roy, Sushmita; Ernst, Jason; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Kheradpour, Pouya; Negre, Nicolas; Eaton, Matthew L.; Landolin, Jane M.; Bristow, Christopher A.; Ma, Lijia; Lin, Michael F.; Washietl, Stefan; Arshinoff, Bradley I.; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E.; Robine, Nicolas; Washington, Nicole L.; Stefano, Luisa Di; Berezikov, Eugene; Brown, Christopher D.; Candeias, Rogerio; Carlson, Joseph W.; Carr, Adrian; Jungreis, Irwin; Marbach, Daniel; Sealfon, Rachel; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Will, Sebastian; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Artieri, Carlo; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brooks, Angela N.; Dai, Qi; Davis, Carrie A.; Duff, Michael O.; Feng, Xin; Gorchakov, Andrey A.; Gu, Tingting; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Kapranov, Philipp; Li, Renhua; MacAlpine, Heather K.; Malone, John; Minoda, Aki; Nordman, Jared; Okamura, Katsutomo; Perry, Marc; Powell, Sara K.; Riddle, Nicole C.; Sakai, Akiko; Samsonova, Anastasia; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Schwartz, Yuri B.; Sher, Noa; Spokony, Rebecca; Sturgill, David; van Baren, Marijke; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Yu, Charles; Feingold, Elise; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Lowdon, Rebecca; Ahmad, Kami; Andrews, Justen; Berger, Bonnie; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Lucy; Elgin, Sarah C. R.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Grossman, Robert; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Kent, William; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Perrimon, Norbert; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Posakony, James W.; Ren, Bing; Russell, Steven; Cherbas, Peter; Graveley, Brenton R.; Lewis, Suzanna; Micklem, Gos; Oliver, Brian; Park, Peter J.; Celniker, Susan E.; Henikoff, Steven; Karpen, Gary H.; Lai, Eric C.; MacAlpine, David M.; Stein, Lincoln D.; White, Kevin P.; Kellis, Manolis

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

431

Regulatory Framework for Salt Waste Disposal and Tank Closure at the Savannah River Site - 13663  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War has left a legacy of approximately 37 million gallons of radioactive waste in the aging waste tanks at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). A robust program is in place to remove waste from these tanks, treat the waste to separate into a relatively small volume of high-level waste and a large volume of low-level waste, and to actively dispose of the low-level waste on-site and close the waste tanks and associated ancillary structures. To support performance-based, risk-informed decision making and to ensure compliance with all regulatory requirements, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its current and past contractors have worked closely with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop and implement a framework for on-site low-level waste disposal and closure of the SRS waste tanks. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides DOE the authority to manage defense-related radioactive waste. DOE Order 435.1 and its associated manual and guidance documents detail this radioactive waste management process. The DOE also has a requirement to consult with the NRC in determining that waste that formerly was classified as high-level waste can be safely managed as either low-level waste or transuranic waste. Once DOE makes a determination, NRC then has a responsibility to monitor DOE's actions in coordination with SCDHEC to ensure compliance with the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61 (10CFR61), Subpart C performance objectives. The management of hazardous waste substances or components at SRS is regulated by SCDHEC and the EPA. The foundation for the interactions between DOE, SCDHEC and EPA is the SRS Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). Managing this array of requirements and successfully interacting with regulators, consultants and stakeholders is a challenging task but ensures thorough and thoughtful processes for disposing of the SRS low-level waste and the closure of the tank farm facilities. (authors)

Thomas, Steve; Dickert, Ginger [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Allowance trading activity and state regulatory rulings : evidence from the U.S. Acid Rain Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The U.S. Acid Rain Program is one of the first, and by far the most extensive, applications of a market based approach to pollution control. From the beginning, there has been concern whether utilities would participate ...

Bailey, Elizabeth M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Allowance trading activity and state regulatory rulings : evidence from the U.S. Acid Rain Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The U.S. Acid Rain Program is one of the first, and by far the most extensive, applications of a market based approach to pollution control. From the beginning, there has been concern whether utilities would participate ...

Bailey, Elizabeth M.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2010, Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, May 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2010 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no NRC-licensed low-level waste disposal facilities currently in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Annual reports for 2010 were received from a total of 190 NRC licensees. The summation of reports submitted by the 190 licensees indicated that 192,424 individuals were monitored, 81,961 of whom received a measurable dose. When adjusted for transient workers who worked at more than one licensee during the year, there were actually 142,471 monitored individuals and 62,782 who received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 10,617 person-rem, which represents a 12% decrease from the 2009 value. This decrease was primarily due to the decrease in collective dose at commercial nuclear power reactors, as well as a decrease in the collective dose for most of the other categories of NRC licensees. The number of individuals receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in an average measurable dose of 0.13 rem for 2010. The average measurable dose is defined as the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) divided by the number of individuals receiving a measurable dose. In calendar year 2010, the average annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor (LWR) licensees was 83 person-rem. This represents a 14% decrease from the value reported for 2009 (96 person-rem). The decrease in collective dose for commercial nuclear power reactors was due to an 11% decrease in total outage hours in 2010. During outages, activities involving increased radiation exposure such as refueling and maintenance are performed while the reactor is not in operation. The average annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 137 personrem for 35 BWRs, and 55 person-rem for 69 pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analyses of transient individual data indicate that 29,333 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient individuals by multiple licensees. The adjustment to account for transient individuals has been specifically noted in footnotes in the figures and tables for commercial nuclear power reactors. In 2010, the average measurable dose per individual for all licensees calculated from reported data was 0.13 rem. Although the average measurable dose per individual from data submitted by licensees was 0.13 rem, a corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose per individual of 0.17 rem.

D. E. Lewis D. A. Hagemeyer Y. U. McCormick

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

435

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission accountability report, fiscal year 1995. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is one of six Federal agencies participating in a pilot project to streamline financial management reporting. The goal of this pilot is to consolidate performance-related reporting into a single accountability report. The project, which is being carried out under the guidance of the Chief Financial Officers Council, was undertaken in accordance with the Government Management Reform Act (GMRA) of 1994. The GMRA permits the streamlining of financial management reports in consultation with the appropriate Congressional Committees through a liaison in the US Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The results of the pilot project will determine the method to be used for reporting financial management information for fiscal year (FY) 1996. This report consolidates the information previously reported in the following documents: (1) the NRC`s annual financial statement required by the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990; (2) the Chairman`s annual report to the President and the Congress, required by the Federal Managers` Financial Integrity Act of 1982; (3) the Chairman`s semiannual report to the Congress on management decisions and final actions on Office of Inspector General audit recommendations, required by the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. This report also includes performance measures, as required by the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Synthetic fuels and the environment: an environmental and regulatory impacts analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since July 1979 when DOE/EV-0044 report Environmental Analysis of Synthetic Liquid fuels was published the synthetic fuels program proposals of the Administration have undergone significant modifications. The program year for which the development goal of 1.5 million barrels per day is to be reached has been changed from 1990 to 1995. The program plan is now proposed to have two stages to ensure, among other things, better environmental protection: an initial stage emphasizing applied research and development (R and D), including environmental research, followed by a second stage that would accelerate deployment of those synthetic fuel technologies then judged most ready for rapid deployment and economic operation within the environmental protection requirements. These program changes have significantly expanded the scope of technologies to be considered in this environmental analysis and have increased the likelihood that accelerated environmental R and D efforts will be successful in solving principal environmental and worker safety concerns for most technologies prior to the initiation of the second stage of the accelerated deployment plan. Information is presented under the following section headings: summary; study description; the technologies and their environmental concerns (including, coal liquefaction and gasification, oil shale production, biomass and urban waste conversion); regulatory and institutional analyses; and environmental impacts analysis (including air and water quaility analyses, impacts of carbon dioxide and acid rain, water availability, solid and hazardous wastes, coal mining environmental impacts, transportation issues, community growth and change, and regional impacts). Additional information is presented in seventeen appendixes. (JGB)

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

438

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

439

A regulatory analysis on emergency preparedness for fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The question this Regulatory Analysis sought to answer is: should the NRC impose additional emergency preparedness requirements on certain fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees for dealing with accidents that might have offsite releases of radioactive material. To answer the question, we analyzed potential accidents for 15 types of fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees. An appropriate plan would: (1) identify accidents for which protective actions should be taken by people offsite; (2) list the licensee's responsibilities for each type of accident, including notification of local authorities (fire and police generally); and (3) give sample messages for local authorities including protective action recommendations. This approach more closely follows the approach used for research reactors than for power reactors. The low potential offsite doses (acute fatalities and injuries not possible except possibly for UF/sub 6/ releases), the small areas where actions would be warranted, the small number of people involved, and the fact that the local police and fire departments would be doing essentially the same things they normally do, are all factors that tend to make a simple plan adequate. This report discusses the potentially hazardous accidents, and the likely effects of these accidents in terms of personnel danger.

McGuire, S.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Dangerous Waste Sampling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes sampling and analytical requirements needed to meet state and federal regulations for dangerous waste (DW). The River Protection Project (RPP) is assigned to the task of storage and interim treatment of hazardous waste. Any final treatment or disposal operations, as well as requirements under the land disposal restrictions (LDRs), fall in the jurisdiction of another Hanford organization and are not part of this scope. The requirements for this Data Quality Objective (DQO) Process were developed using the RPP Data Quality Objective Procedure (Banning 1996), which is based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process (EPA 1994). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the DW DQO. Federal and state laws and regulations pertaining to waste contain requirements that are dependent upon the composition of the waste stream. These regulatory drivers require that pertinent information be obtained. For many requirements, documented process knowledge of a waste composition can be used instead of analytical data to characterize or designate a waste. When process knowledge alone is used to characterize a waste, it is a best management practice to validate the information with analytical measurements.

MULKEY, C.H.

1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Methodology guideline for risk-based application of quality assurance requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Augmentation of traditional engineering and safety evaluation methods with probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) models can result in improved safety and more cost-effective operation of commercial nuclear power stations. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has recently published an assessment of the potential for use of PSA methods to assist in focusing utility and NRC staff resources on the areas most critical to overall plant safety. This NRC assessment outlines the current state of PSA technology and its application to regulatory decision making, including the potential for use of PSA for implementation of graded quality assurance. During 1993, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) began work on a project focused on the application of PSA to programmatic areas of nuclear power plant operations, maintenance, and regulation. The project is a broad-scope effort starting with identification of major cost drivers in the nuclear industry and culminating in the application of PSA to selected areas to reduce cost while maintaining or reducing the level of plant risk. This paper summarizes a portion of the EPRI project dealing with the risk ranking of nuclear plant systems, structures, and components (SSCs) and application of graded quality assurance (QA) based on risk significance. The graded QA task was jointly sponsored by EPRI and Entergy`s Grand Gulf nuclear power station.

Bouchey, G.D.; Parkinson, W.J.; Meisner, M.J.; Rahn, F.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal): Compilation for third quarter 1996 July--September. Volume 21, Number 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation consists of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors. It is NRC`s intention to publish this compilation quarterly and to cumulate it annually. The main citations and abstracts in this compilation are listed in NUREG number order: NUREG-XXXX, NUREG/CP-XXXX, NUREG/CR-XXXX, and NUREG/IA-XXXX. These precede the following indexes: secondary report number index; personal author index; subject index; NRC originating organization index (staff reports); NRC originating organization index (international agreements); NRC contract sponsor index (contractor reports); contractor index; international organization index; and licensed facility index. A detailed explanation of the entries precedes each index.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal): Compilation for third quarter 1994, July--September. Volume 19, Number 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation consists of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issues by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors. It is NRC`s intention to publish this compilation quarterly and to cumulate it annually. The main citations and abstracts in this compilation are listed in NUREG number order: NUREG-XXXX, NUREG/CP-XXXX, NUREG/CR-XXXX, and NUREG/IA-XXXX. These precede the following indexes: Secondary Report Number Index, Personal Author Index, Subject Index, NRC Originating Organization Index (Staff Reports), NRC Originating Organization Index (International Agreements), NRC Contract Sponsor Index (Contractor Reports) Contractor Index, International Organization Index, Licensed Facility Index. A detailed explanation of the entries precedes each index.

none,

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants. Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-informed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and.lor confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go farther by focusing on the design of new plants.

Ritterbusch, S.E.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Thermo-mechanical study of bare 48Y UF6 containers exposed to the regulatory fire environment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the regulatory agencies world-wide require that containers used for the transportation of natural UF6 and depleted UF6 must survive a fully-engulfing fire environment for 30 minutes as described in 10CFR71 and in TS-R-1. The primary objective of this project is to examine the thermo-mechanical performance of 48Y transportation cylinders when exposed to the regulatory hypothetical fire environment without the thermal protection that is currently used for shipments in those countries where required. Several studies have been performed in which UF6 cylinders have been analyzed to determine if the thermal protection currently used on UF6 cylinders of type 48Y is necessary for transport. However, none of them could clearly confirm neither the survival nor the failure of the 48Y cylinder when exposed to the regulatory fire environment without the additional thermal protection. A consortium of five companies that move UF6 is interested in determining if 48Y cylinders can be shipped without the thermal protection that is currently used. Sandia National Laboratories has outlined a comprehensive testing and analysis project to determine if these shipping cylinders are capable of withstanding the regulatory thermal environment without additional thermal protection. Sandia-developed coupled physics codes will be used for the analyses that are planned. A series of destructive and non-destructive tests will be performed to acquire the necessary material and behavior information to benchmark the models and to answer the question about the ability of these containers to survive the fire environment. Both the testing and the analysis phases of this project will consider the state of UF6 under thermal and pressure loads as well as the weakening of the steel container due to the thermal load. Experiments with UF6 are also planned to collect temperature- and pressure-dependent thermophysical properties of this material.

Ammerman, Douglas James; Lopez, Carlos; Morrow, Charles; Korbmacher, Tim (Urenco Enrichment Co. Ltd., Gronau, Germany); Charette, Marc-Andre (Cameco Corporation, Port Hope, ON, Canada)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume III of III: software description. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is the software description for the National Utility Regulatory Model (NUREG). This is the third of three volumes provided by ICF under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. These three volumes are: a manual describing the NUREG methodology; a users guide; and a description of the software. This manual describes the software which has been developed for NUREG. This includes a listing of the source modules. All computer code has been written in FORTRAN.

None

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

447

Characterization of salA, syrF, and syrG Regulatory Networks Involved in Plant Pathogenesis by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a, causal agent of brown spot on bean, is an economically important plant pathogen that utilizes extracellular signaling to initiate a lifestyle change from an epiphyte to a pathogen. LuxR regulatory proteins...

Vaughn, Vanessa Lynn

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

448

APPLICATION CONSTRUCTION LEADERSHIP COURSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATION CONSTRUCTION LEADERSHIP COURSE RECOMMENDATION FORM CON464 Construction Leadership: __________________________ To be considered for the Construction Leadership course submit the following: Application with description in the construction industry 5) If your GPA

Stephens, Graeme L.

449

Applications (Grid Tools)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grid Fabric Software Grid Applications Core Grid Middleware User-Level Middleware (Grid Tools) !"# $ %& ' ( ) * #& + '& ' , - . / # ) ) 0 # * 1 PDB CDB Grid Fabric Hardware &+ '' + ) , '1 '1 ' % - * # ( Grid Fabric Software Grid Applications Core Grid Middleware User-Level Middleware (Grid Tools) !"# $ %& ' ( ) * #& + '& ' , - . / # ) ) 0

Buyya, Rajkumar

450

Engineering and Coordination of Regulatory Networks and Intracellular Complexes to Maximize Hydrogen Production by Phototrophic Microorganisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is a collaboration with F. R. Tabita of Ohio State. Our major goal is to understand the factors and regulatory mechanisms that influence hydrogen production. The organisms to be utilized in this study, phototrophic microorganisms, in particular nonsulfur purple (NSP) bacteria, catalyze many significant processes including the assimilation of carbon dioxide into organic carbon, nitrogen fixation, sulfur oxidation, aromatic acid degradation, and hydrogen oxidation/evolution. Our part of the project was to develop a modeling technique to investigate the metabolic network in connection to hydrogen production and regulation. Organisms must balance the pathways that generate and consume reducing power in order to maintain redox homeostasis to achieve growth. Maintaining this homeostasis in the nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacteria is a complex feat with many avenues that can lead to balance, as these organisms possess versatile metabolic capabilities including anoxygenic photosynthesis, aerobic or anaerobic respiration, and fermentation. Growth is achieved by using H{sub 2} as an electron donor and CO{sub 2} as a carbon source during photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic growth, where CO{sub 2} is fixed via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle. Photoheterotrophic growth can also occur when alternative organic carbon compounds are utilized as both the carbon source and electron donor. Regardless of the growth mode, excess reducing equivalents generated as a result of oxidative processes, must be transferred to terminal electron acceptors, thus insuring that redox homeostasis is maintained in the cell. Possible terminal acceptors include O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, organic carbon, or various oxyanions. Cells possess regulatory mechanisms to balance the activity of the pathways which supply energy, such as photosynthesis, and those that consume energy, such as CO{sub 2} assimilation or N{sub 2} fixation. The major route for CO{sub 2} assimilation is the CBB reductive pentose phosphate pathway, whose key enzyme is ribulose 1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). In addition to providing virtually all cellular carbon during autotrophic metabolism, RubisCO-mediated CO{sub 2} assimilation is also very important for nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacteria under photoheterotrophic growth conditions since CO{sub 2} becomes the major electron sink under these conditions. In this work, Ensemble Modeling (EM) was developed to examine the behavior of CBB-compromised RubisCO knockout mutant strains of the nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Mathematical models of metabolism can be a great aid in studying the effects of large perturbations to the system, such as the inactivation of RubisCO. Due to the complex and highly-interconnected nature of these networks, it is not a trivial process to understand what the effect of perturbations to the metabolic network will be, or vice versa, what enzymatic perturbations are necessary to yield a desired effect. Flux distribution is controlled by multiple enzymes in the network, often indirectly linked to the pathways of interest. Further, depending on the state of the cell and the environmental conditions, the effect of a perturbation may center around how it effects the carbon flow in the network, the balancing of cofactors, or both. Thus, it is desirable to develop mathematical models to describe, understand, and predict network behavior. Through the development of such models, one may gain the ability to generate a set of testable hypotheses for system behavior.

James C. Liao

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

451

EXPERIENCE FROM TWO SMALL QUANTITY RH-TRU WASTE SITES IN NAVIGATING THROUGH AN EVOLVING REGULATORY LANDSCAPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two small quantity transuranic (TRU) waste generator sites have gained considerable experience in navigating through a changing regulatory landscape in their efforts to remove the TRU waste from their sites and proceed with site remediation. The Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) has the objectives of decontaminating nuclear research buildings and associated grounds and remediating to a level of residual contamination allowing future use without radiological restrictions. As directed by Congress, BCLDP must complete decontamination and decommissioning activities by the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2006. This schedule requires the containerization of all TRU waste in 2002. BCLDP will generate a total of approximately 27 cubic meters (m3) of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. Similarly, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) is scheduled to close in 2006 pursuant to an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Boeing Canoga Park, the management and operating contractor for ETEC. ETEC had 11.0 m3 of RH-TRU and contact-handled (CH) TRU waste in storage, with the requirement to remove this waste in 2002 in order to meet their site closure schedule. The individual milestones for BCLDP and ETEC necessitated the establishment of site-specific programs to direct packaging and characterization of RH-TRU waste before the regulatory framework for the WIPP disposal of RH-TRU waste is finalized. The lack of large infrastructure for characterization activities, as well as the expedited schedules needed to meet regulatory milestones, provided both challenges and opportunities that are unique to small quantity sites. Both sites have developed unique programs for waste characterization based on the same premise, which directs comprehensive waste data collection efforts such that additional characterization will not be required following the finalization of the WIPP RH-TRU waste program requirements. This paper details the BCLDP program evolution in terms of strategy, innovative solutions to waste characterization, and development of alternative transportation options. Preliminary indications from various regulatory and oversight agencies and professional organizations are that the BCLDP RH-TRU waste characterization program is the ''model WIPP certification program'' and will satisfy anticipated regulatory expectations. This paper also summarizes how BCLDP lessons learned and their development of new resources were applied to the RH-TRU waste characterization and disposition program at ETEC.

Biedscheid, Jennifer; Devarakonda, Murthy; Eide, Jim; Kneff, Dennis

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

452

The low-low-level mixed waste regulatory gap: A disposal and recycle impasse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small steel mills in the United States receive and melt scrap steel in electric arc furnaces. The off-gas from these furnaces carries dust to the bag house where the dust is trapped and recovered. The EAF (Electric Arc Furnace) dust contains hazardous components lead, cadmium and chromium, causing it to be designated as U.S. EPA hazardous waste K061. The dust also carries about 20% zinc, a valuable byproduct for recovery. The EAF dust is normally either disposed of at a landfill licensed for hazardous wastes, or sent to a High Temperature Metal Recovery (HTMR) facility for recycle processing. During the past few years, there have been a number of incidents in which an industrial gauge source, containing the radioisotope Cs-137, has been inadvertently included in a load of scrap steel charged to an arc furnace. In each incident, the cesium and its encapsulation and holder melted, releasing the cesium into the off-gas system where it became distributed in hundreds of tons of EAF dust in the ducts and in the bag house. The contaminated dust, having both hazardous and radioactive components is a mixed waste. A regulatory gap exists that prevents disposition of this material, through it has only a low-low-level of radioactivity. A risk assessment was conducted for a midwest steel company that experienced a cesium meltdown incident. Most of the stored dust from this incident has an activity level less than the limit for the lowest category of LLW by a factor of 5,800, and some is only slightly above background. The significant pathways calculated include direct exposure to masses of the dust, ingestion of leachate and groundwater at a hazardous waste landfill, and potential releases to air and water during HTMR recycle processing.

Logan, S.E. [S.E. Logan and Associates, Inc., Sante Fe, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

The regulatory divide: Federal and state jurisdiction in a restructured electricity industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In any restructuring, close attention should be paid to how transactions are characterized. The approach adopted in California tends to minimize jurisdictional complications and preserve state jurisdiction over local distribution, while a retail wheeling approach may raise preemption and Commerce Clause concerns. In the United States, the wholesale electricity market and the interstate transmission of electricity have been subject to exclusive federal jurisdiction, while the retail sale and local distribution of electricity have been subject to the jurisdiction of the separate states. Until recently, the jurisdictional dividing line has been relatively clear. Indeed, Congress intended to establish a {open_quotes}bright line{close_quotes} between state and federal jurisdiction. This bright line, however, is becoming blurred by proposals to allow retail customers direct access to competitive generation markets. Regulation of transactions relating to the transmission and sale of electricity at wholesale is within the exclusive jurisdiction of the federal government. Thus, historically, {open_quotes}transmission{close_quotes} has coincided precisely with wholesale transactions, while {open_quotes}local distribution{close_quotes} has coincided precisely with retail transactions. Since 1978, Congress and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) have promulgated statutes and regulations to enhance the competitiveness of the wholesale generation market. As a consequence, there are many more non-utility entities competing as sellers of wholesale electricity. Now the push is on at the state level to introduce retail competition in the generation supply side of the electricity market. Introduction of retail competition has the potential to upset, if not extinguish, the traditional bright line between federal and state jurisdiction.

Jubien, S.M.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

PEER ADVISING APPLICATION PACKET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resume and the following application to 203 Peterson by Noon on Friday, October 10, 2014. Name: Student us about yourself? Applications and Resume Due: October 10, 2014 by Noon. Return completed Application & Resume to: Undergraduate Advising Office, 203 Peterson Hall #12;

455

COST EFFECTIVE REGULATORY APPROACHES TO ENHANCE DOMESTIC OIL & GAS PRODUCTION AND ENSURE THE PROTECTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Information Management Suite/Risk Based Data Management System (EIMS/RBDMS) and Cost Effective Regulatory Approach (CERA) programs continue to be successful. All oil and gas state regulatory programs participate in these efforts. Significant accomplishments include: streamline regulatory approaches, enhancing environmental protection, and making oil and gas data available via the Internet. Oil and gas companies worldwide now have access to data on state web sites. This reduces the cost of exploration and enables companies to develop properties in areas that would have been cost prohibited for exploration. Early in project, GWPC and State Oil and Gas agencies developed the EIMS and CERA strategic plan to prioritize long term development and implementation. The planning process identifies electronic commerce and coal bed methane as high priorities. The group has involved strategic partners in industry and government to develop a common data exchange process. Technical assistance to Alaska continues to improve their program management capabilities. New initiatives in Alaska include the development of an electronic permit tracking system. This system allows managers to expedite the permitting process. Nationwide, the RBDMS system is largely completed with 22 states and one Indian Nation now using this nationally accepted data management system. Additional remaining tasks include routine maintenance and the installation of the program upon request for the remaining oil and gas states. The GWPC in working with the BLM and MMS to develop an XML schema to facilitate electronic permitting and reporting (Appendix A, B, and C). This is a significant effort and, in years to come, will increase access to federal lands by reducing regulatory barriers. The new initiatives are coal bed methane and e-commerce. The e-commerce program will provide industry and BLM/MMS access to the millions of data points housed in the RBDMS system. E-commerce will streamline regulatory approaches and allow small operators to produce energy from areas that have become sub-economic for the major producers. The GWPC is working with states to develop a coal bed methane program, which will both manage the data and develop a public education program on the benefits of produced water. The CERA program benefits all oil and gas states by reducing the cost of regulatory compliance, increasing environmental protection, and providing industry and regulatory agencies a discussion forum. Activities included many small and large group forum settings for discussions of technical and policy issues as well as the ongoing State Class II UIC peer review effort. The accomplishments detailed in this report will be the basis for the next initiative which is RBDMS On-Line. RBDMS On-Line will combine data mining, electronic permitting and electronic reporting with .net technology. Industry, BLM, GWPC and all Oil and Gas states are partnering this effort.

Ben Grunewald; Paul Jehn; Tom Gillespie; Ben Binder

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

456

Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants (Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-99SF21902, Am. M004) Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Research under this project addresses the barriers to long term use of nuclear-generated electricity in the United States. It was agreed that a very basic and significant change to the current method of design and regulation was needed. That is, it was believed that the cost reduction goal could not be met by fixing the current system (i.e., an evolutionary approach) and a new, more advanced approach for this project would be needed. It is believed that a completely new design and regulatory process would have to be developed--a ''clean sheet of paper'' approach. This new approach would start with risk-based methods, would establish probabilistic design criteria, and would implement defense-in-depth only when necessary (1) to meet public policy issues (e.g., use of a containment building no matter how low the probability of a large release is) and (2) to address uncertainties in probabilistic methods and equipment performance. This new approach is significantly different from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) current risk-informed program for operating plants. For our new approach, risk-based methods are the primary means for assuring plant safety, whereas in the NRC's current approach, defense-in-depth remains the primary means of assuring safety. The primary accomplishments in the first year--Phase 1 were (1) the establishment of a new, highly risk-informed design and regulatory framework, (2) the establishment of the preliminary version of the new, highly risk-informed design process, (3) core damage frequency predictions showing that, based on new, lower pipe rupture probabilities, the design of the emergency core cooling system equipment can be simplified without reducing plant safety, and (4) the initial development of methods for including uncertainties in a new integrated structures-systems design model. Under the new regulatory framework, options for the use of ''design basis accidents'' were evaluated. It is expected that design basis accidents would be an inherent part of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment for the plant and their evaluation would be probabilistic. Other first year accomplishments include (1) the conversion of an NRC database for cross-referencing NRC criteria and industry codes and standards to Microsoft 2000 software, (2) an assessment of the NRC's hearing process which concluded that the normal cross-examination during public hearings is not actually required by the U.S. Administrative Procedures Act, (3) the identification and listing of reliability data sources, and (4) interfacing with other industry groups (e.g., NEI and IAEA) and NRC at workshops for risk-informing regulations. The major accomplishments during the second year consisted of (1) issuance of the final report for Subtask 1.1, ''Identify Current Applicable Regulatory Requirements [and Industry Standards],'' (2) issuance of the final report for Subtask 1.2,'' Identify Structures, Systems, and Components and Their Associate d Costs for a Typical Plant,'' (3) extension of the new, highly risk-informed design and regulatory framework to non-light-water-reactor technology, (4) completion of more detailed thermal-hydraulic and probabilistic analyses of advanced conceptual reactor system/component designs, (6) initial evaluation and recommendations for improvement of the NRC design review process, and (7) initial development of the software format, procedures and statistical routines needed to store, analyze and retrieve the available reliability data. Final reports for Subtasks 1.1 (regulatory and design criteria) and 1.2 (costs for structures, systems, and components) were prepared and issued. A final report for Subtask 1.3 (Regulatory Framework) was drafted with the aim to issue it in Phase 3 (Year 3). One technical report was produced for Subtask 1.4 (methods development) and two technical reports were produced for Subtask 1.6 (sample problem analysis). An interim report on the NRC design review process (Subtask 1.7) was prepared and issued. Finally, a report on Subtask 2.2 (database weaknesses) addressed the i

Stanley E. Ritterbusch, et. al.

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

457

Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules (Released in the STEO January 1998)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On August 27, 1997, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an individual refinery baseline is not available to domestic refiners.) If a foreign refiner did not establish and use an individual baseline, the gasoline they export to the United States would be regulated through the importer, and subject to the importer's baseline (most likely the statutory baseline). Specific regulatory provisions are implemented to ensure that the option to use an individual baseline would not lead to adverse environmental impacts. This involves monitoring the average quality of imported gasoline, and if a specified benchmark is exceeded, remedial action would be taken by adjusting the requirements applicable to imported gasoline.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ninth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. Not all of the sections have been updated for this revision. The following lists the updated sections: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); culture, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; all of Chapter 6.

Neitzel, D.A. [ed.] [ed.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J. [and others] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

LBB application in Swedish BWR design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions.

Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P. [ABB Atom, Vaesteras (Sweden)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Application Protocol Reference Architecture Application Protocol Reference Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application Protocol Reference Architecture 165 Chapter 7 Application Protocol Reference Architecture This chapter proposes an alternative reference architecture for application protocols. The proposed reference architecture consists of the set of possible architectures for application protocols

van Sinderen, Marten

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ERIP application instructions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides background information and instructions to assist applicants in writing Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP) applications. Initial feedback fro usage for the new instructions shows that the best instructions would not be read and followed by all applicants. Applications from more than thirty applicants who have received the new instructions indicated that few had read the instructions. Based on this feedback, the instructions have been further revised to include a title page and table of contents. A warning was also added to advise applicants of the potential penalty of delayed review if these instructions are not followed. This revision was intended to address the possibility that some applicants did not see or bother to follow the instructions which followed the background information about ERIP. Included are two examples of ERIP applications which have been prepared for handout at workshops or mailing to applicants. Writing of example applications was time consuming and more difficult than expected for several reasons: (1) Full disclosures can be lengthy, very detailed, and technical. This contrasts with the desire to prepare examples which are comparatively short and easy for the non-technical person to read. (2) Disclosures contain confidential information which should not be published. (3) It is difficult to imagine that applicants will study examples when they do not bother to read the basic instructions.

Watt, D.M.

1992-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

462

Multi-agent cooperative systems applied to precision applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regulatory agencies are imposing limits and constraints to protect the operator and/or the environment. While generally necessary, these controls also tend to increase cost and decrease efficiency and productivity. Intelligent computer systems can be made to perform these hazardous tasks with greater efficiency and precision without danger to the operators. The Idaho national Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Center for Self-Organizing and Intelligent Systems at Utah State University have developed a series of autonomous all-terrain multi-agent systems capable of performing automated tasks within hazardous environments. This paper discusses the development and application of cooperative small-scale and large-scale robots for use in various activities associated with radiologically contaminated areas, prescription farming, and unexploded ordinances.

McKay, M.D.; Anderson, M.O. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gunderson, R.W.; Flann, N.; Abbott, B. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Psychological scaling of expert estimates of human error probabilities: application to nuclear power plant operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Sandia National Laboratories sponsored a project to evaluate psychological scaling techniques for use in generating estimates of human error probabilities. The project evaluated two techniques: direct numerical estimation and paired comparisons. Expert estimates were found to be consistent across and within judges. Convergent validity was good, in comparison to estimates in a handbook of human reliability. Predictive validity could not be established because of the lack of actual relative frequencies of error (which will be a difficulty inherent in validation of any procedure used to estimate HEPs). Application of expert estimates in probabilistic risk assessment and in human factors is discussed.

Comer, K.; Gaddy, C.D.; Seaver, D.A.; Stillwell, W.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Burnup Credit Approach Used in the Yucca Mountain License Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy has submitted a license application (LA) for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The license application is currently under review by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This paper will describe the methodology and approach used in the LA to address the issue of criticality and the role of burnup credit during the postclosure period. The most significant and effective measures for prevention of criticality in the repository include multiple redundant barriers that act to isolate fissionable material from water (which can act as a moderator, corrosive agent, and transporter of fissile material); inherent geometry of waste package internals and waste forms; presence of fixed neutron absorbers in waste package internals; and fuel burnup for commercial spent nuclear fuel. A probabilistic approach has been used to screen criticality from the total system performance assessment. Within the probabilistic approach, criticality is considered an event, and the total probability of a criticality event occurring within 10,000 years of disposal is calculated and compared against the regulatory criterion. The total probability of criticality includes contributions associated with both internal (within waste packages) and external (external to waste packages) criticality for each of the initiating events that could lead to waste package breach. The occurrence of and conditions necessary for criticality in the repository have been thoroughly evaluated using a comprehensive range of parameter distributions. A simplified design-basis modeling approach has been used to evaluate the probability of criticality by using numerous significant and conservative assumptions. Burnup credit is used only for evaluations of in-package configurations and uses a combination of conservative and bounding modeling approximations to ensure conservatism. This paper will review the NRC regulatory criteria relevant to postclosure criticality, explain the role of criticality within the overall repository performance assessment, describe the strategy for preventing criticality via design features and waste form properties, and discuss the numerous considerations relevant to criticality and burnup credit for spent nuclear fuel disposed of in a geologic repository, with emphasis on the burnup credit approach and analyses.

Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Microsoft Word - CX_HatRockEquipmentDisposition.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moreover, the proposed action would not (i) threaten a violation of DOE F 1325.8 e Electronic Form Approved by CGIR - 012095 (8-89) memorandum TO : 2 applicable statutory,...

466

Microsoft Word - Longview-WashWay Acquisition CX.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moreover, the proposed action would not (i) threaten a violation of DOE F 1325.8 e Electronic Form Approved by CGIR - 012095 (8-89) memorandum TO : applicable statutory,...

467

Microsoft Word - FAA Augspurger CX.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moreover, the proposed action would not (i) threaten a violation of DOE F 1325.8 e Electronic Form Approved by CGIR - 012095 (8-89) memorandum TO : applicable statutory,...

468

Induction of T helper 3 regulatory cells by dendritic cells infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Delayed development of virus-specific immune response has been observed in pigs infected with the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Several studies support the hypothesis that the PRRSV is capable of modulating porcine immune system, but the mechanisms involved are yet to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the induction of T regulatory cells by PRRSV-infected dendritic cells (DCs). Our results showed that PRRSV-infected DCs significantly increased Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells, an effect that was reversible by IFN-alpha treatment, and this outcome was reproducible using two distinct PRRSV strains. Analysis of the expressed cytokines suggested that the induction of Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells is dependent on TGF-beta but not IL-10. In addition, a significant up-regulation of Foxp3 mRNA, but not TBX21 or GATA3, was detected. Importantly, our results showed that the induced Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells were able to suppress the proliferation of PHA-stimulated PBMCs. The T cells induced by the PRRSV-infected DCs fit the Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T helper 3 (Th3) regulatory cell phenotype described in the literature. The induction of this cell phenotype depended, at least in part, on PRRSV viability because IFN-alpha treatment or virus inactivation reversed these effects. In conclusion, this data supports the hypothesis that the PRRSV succeeds to establish and replicate in porcine cells early post-infection, in part, by inducing Th3 regulatory cells as a mechanism of modulating the porcine immune system.

Silva-Campa, Erika; Flores-Mendoza, Lilian; Resendiz, Monica; Pinelli-Saavedra, Araceli; Mata-Haro, Veronica [Centro de Investigacion en Alimentacion y Desarrollo, A.C. Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Mwangi, Waithaka [Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Hernandez, Jesus, E-mail: jhdez@ciad.m [Centro de Investigacion en Alimentacion y Desarrollo, A.C. Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

469

Application of USNRC NUREG/CR-6661 and draft DG-1108 to evolutionary and advanced reactor designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the seismic design of evolutionary and advanced nuclear reactor power plants, there are definite financial advantages in the application of USNRC NUREG/CR-6661 and draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108. NUREG/CR-6661, 'Benchmark Program for the Evaluation of Methods to Analyze Non-Classically Damped Coupled Systems', was by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the USNRC, and Draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 is the proposed revision to the current Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.92, Revision 1, 'Combining Modal Responses and Spatial Components in Seismic Response Analysis'. The draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 is available at http://members.cox.net/apolloconsulting, which also provides a link to the USNRC ADAMS site to search for NUREG/CR-6661 in text file or image file. The draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 removes unnecessary conservatism in the modal combinations for closely spaced modes in seismic response spectrum analysis. Its application will be very helpful in coupled seismic analysis for structures and heavy equipment to reduce seismic responses and in piping system seismic design. In the NUREG/CR-6661 benchmark program, which investigated coupled seismic analysis of structures and equipment or piping systems with different damping values, three of the four participants applied the complex mode solution method to handle different damping values for structures, equipment, and piping systems. The fourth participant applied the classical normal mode method with equivalent weighted damping values to handle differences in structural, equipment, and piping system damping values. Coupled analysis will reduce the equipment responses when equipment, or piping system and structure are in or close to resonance. However, this reduction in responses occurs only if the realistic DG-1108 modal response combination method is applied, because closely spaced modes will be produced when structure and equipment or piping systems are in or close to resonance. Otherwise, the conservatism in the current Regulatory Guide 1.92, Revision 1, will overshadow the advantage of coupled analysis. All four participants applied the realistic modal combination method of DG-1108. Consequently, more realistic and reduced responses were obtained. (authors)

Chang 'Apollo', Chen [Apollo Consulting, Inc., Surprise, AZ 85374-4605 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Geosynthetic clay liner applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) are becoming a popular alternative to compacted clay barrier layers at sanitary landfills. They possess many of the same qualities of compacted clay barrier layers while occupying only a small fraction of the airspace. This is a very attractive feature to waste disposal facility owners and operators. Designing for, and constructing with, a GCL can be a challenging task--stability issues must be evaluated, selecting the appropriate product should be considered, comprehensive specifications are needed to ensure proper product selection and installation, and steps must be taken during installation to prevent damage to the GCL. Perhaps most importantly, state regulatory agencies must be convinced that GCLs will provide long-term protection that is equivalent to a clay barrier layer.

McGrath, L.T.; Creamer, P.D. [RMT, Inc., Madison, WI (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume I of III: methodology. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report develops and demonstrates the methodology for the National Utility Regulatory (NUREG) Model developed under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. It is accompanied by two supporting volumes. Volume II is a user's guide for operation of the NUREG software. This includes description of the flow of software and data, as well as the formats of all user data files. Finally, Volume III is a software description guide. It briefly describes, and gives a listing of, each program used in NUREG.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

472

Technical applications of aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerogel materials posses such a wide variety of exceptional properties that a striking number of applications have developed for them. Many of the commercial applications of aerogels such as catalysts, thermal insulation, windows, and particle detectors are still under development and new application as have been publicized since the ISA4 Conference in 1994: e.g.; supercapacitors, insulation for heat storage in automobiles, electrodes for capacitive deionization, etc. More applications are evolving as the scientific and engineering community becomes familiar with the unusual and exceptional physical properties of aerogels, there are also scientific and technical application, as well. This paper discusses a variety of applications under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for which several types of aerogels are formed in custom sizes and shapes. Particular discussions will focus on the uses of aerogels for physics experiments which rely on the exceptional, sometimes unique, properties of aerogels.

Hrubesh, L.W.

1997-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

473

Space Science and Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Space Science and Applications Applying world-class expertise in space sciences and associated technologies to detect and characterize national security threats Contacts Group...

474

Computational Optimization and Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pitman Advanced Publishing Program, Boston, 1984. [10] M. Hanke, Regularizing Levenberg-Marquardt scheme, with applications to inverse groundwater. 19. 1.

15

2015-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

475

Application of solar energy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of the project is to learn the principle and application of solar energy and to know the situation of solar energy in China (more)

Li, Jingcheng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Application Power Signature Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high-performance computing (HPC) community has been greatly concerned about energy efficiency. To address this concern, it is essential to understand and characterize the electrical loads of HPC applications. In this work, we study whether HPC applications can be distinguished by their power-consumption patterns using quantitative measures in an automatic manner. Using a collection of 88 power traces from 4 different systems, we find that basic statistical measures do a surprisingly good job of summarizing applications' distinctive power behavior. Moreover, this study opens up a new area of research in power-aware HPC that has a multitude of potential applications.

Hsu, Chung-Hsing [ORNL] [ORNL; Combs, Jacob [Sonoma State University] [Sonoma State University; Nazor, Jolie [Sonoma State University] [Sonoma State University; Santiago, Fabian [Sonoma State University] [Sonoma State University; Thysell, Rachelle [Sonoma State University] [Sonoma State University; Rivoire, Suzanne [Sonoma State University] [Sonoma State University; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in the United States. Preliminary background report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United States and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. This report describes laws and regulatory programs in the United States. Subsequent reports will (1) describe public utility rate regulatory procedures and practices as they might affect an ICES, (2) analyze each of the aforementioned regulatory programs to identify impediments to the development of ICES, and (3) recommend potential changes in legislation and regulatory practices and procedures to overcome such impediments.

Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Uranium recovery research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Annual progress report, May 1982-May 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is currently conducting research for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on uranium recovery process wastes for both active and inactive operations. NRC-sponsored uranium recovery research at PNL is focused on NRC regulatory responsibilities for uranium-recovery operations: license active milling and in situ extraction operations; concur on the acceptability of DOE remedial-action plans for inactive sites; and license DOE to maintain inactive sites following remedial actions. PNL's program consists of four coordinated projects comprised of a program management task and nine research tasks that address the critical technical and safety issues for uranium recovery. Specifically, the projects endeavor to find and evaluate methods to: prevent erosion of tailings piles and prevent radon release from tailings piles; evaluate the effectiveness of interim stabilization techniques to prevent wind erosion and transport of dry tailings from active piles; estimate the dewatering and consolidation behavior of slurried tailings to promote early cover placement; design a cover-protection system to prevent erosion of the cover by expected environmental stresses; reduce seepage into ground water and prevent ground-water degradation; control solution movement and reaction with ground water in in-situ extraction operations; evaluate natural and induced restoration of ground water in in-situ extraction operations; and monitor releases to the environment from uranium recovery facilities.

Foley, M.G.; Opitz, B.E.; Deutsch, W.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.; Serne, R.J.; Hartley, J.N.; Thomas, V.W.; Kalkwarf, D.R.; Walters, W.H.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Authority of states of use section 401 water quality certification to deny or condition Federal Energy Regulatory Commission licenses. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis discusses a recent United States Supreme Court case that will have a profound influence on the licensure of hydroelectric projects and the related ability of States to protect the quality of their waters. On October 4, 1993, the Supreme Court granted a Writ of Certiorari to resolve a conflict among the state courts of last resort. This case involves two fundamental and competing national interests: the nation's thirst for cheap, dependable power versus its equally strong desire to improve the quality of its water resources. It also involves two underlying regulatory regimes that overlap and conflict with each other in some ways. This case illustrates how those two national interests and their underlying regulatory regimes cannot always be reconciled. It also demonstrates how Congress, with its muddled ways of passing legislation, can create conflicts between federal and state regulatory agencies.

Hart, E.O.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Regulatory impacts and affects of emissions of the combustion of scrap tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scrap tires have several advantages as a fuel for combustion. Combustion of scrap tires as a supplement to existing fuel is an economically viable alternative. In addition, policies that would reduce the growing stockpiles of scrap tires would also reduce its potential environmental hazards (emissions of toxic compounds from arson-caused fires and breeding ground for disease-carrying insects). The growing number of industrial applications as a supplemental fuel include cement kilns, the pulp and paper industry, and utility boilers. A growing body of studies of air emissions from scrap tire and tire-derived fuel (TDF-) supplemented combustion has been conducted over the past decade. For some pollutants and applications, co-combustion with TDF has been shown to decrease emissions. This paper summarizes trends in the effects of supplementing combustion with TDF on emissions of different pollutants. At the same time, scrap tire and TDF combustion are not currently regulated by a specific NSPS or MACT standard because these standards typically regulate an emission unit, not a fuel type. The USEPA is currently debating how to regulate facilities which supplement their combustion with scrap tires. This paper discusses some options that the USEPA is considering.

Karell, M.A.; Blumenthal, M.H.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "applicable statutory regulatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Wind energy applications guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The brochure is an introduction to various wind power applications for locations with underdeveloped transmission systems, from remote water pumping to village electrification. It includes an introductory section on wind energy, including wind power basics and system components and then provides examples of applications, including water pumping, stand-alone systems for home and business, systems for community centers, schools, and health clinics, and examples in the industrial area. There is also a page of contacts, plus two specific example applications for a wind-diesel system for a remote station in Antarctica and one on wind-diesel village electrification in Russia.

anon.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Alternative technologies to optical monitoring systems relating to regulatory compliance (Title V)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the development of Title III and Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments and public awareness of environmentally safe processes, particulate emissions monitoring has become a subject of great importance to the manufacturing sector. An increasing number of monitoring devices are available, and when used in the correct applications, can accurately monitor particulate emissions. This allows identification of a system problem before emissions can reach the stack and trigger non-compliance. This paper focuses on the most widely used technologies for continuous particulate monitoring, specifically the CPM product line, which has been developed to overcome common problems associated with emissions monitoring equipment. Technical data is presented in regard to the CPM operation as well as a case study of a CPM monitor in the asphalt industry.

Craney, B. [BHA Group, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

Regulatory Perspective on Potential Fuel Reconfiguration and Its Implication to High Burnup Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation - 13042  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent experiments conducted by Argonne National Laboratory on high burnup fuel cladding material property show that the ductile to brittle transition temperature of high burnup fuel cladding is dependent on: (1) cladding material, (2) irradiation conditions, and (3) drying-storage histories (stress at maximum temperature) [1]. The experiment results also show that the ductile to brittle temperature increases as the fuel burnup increases. These results indicate that the current knowledge in cladding material property is insufficient to determine the structural performance of the cladding of high burnup fuel after it has been stored in a dry cask storage system for some time. The uncertainties in material property and the elevated ductile to brittle transition temperature impose a challenge to the storage cask and transportation packaging designs because the cask designs may not be able to rely on the structural integrity of the fuel assembly for control of fissile material, radiation source, and decay heat source distributions. The fuel may reconfigure during further storage and/or the subsequent transportation conditions. In addition, the fraction of radioactive materials available for release from spent fuel under normal condition of storage and transport may also change. The spent fuel storage and/or transportation packaging vendors, spent fuel shippers, and the regulator may need to consider this possible fuel reconfiguration and its impact on the packages' ability to meet the safety requirements of Part 72 and Part 71 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is working with the scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to assess the impact of fuel reconfiguration on the safety of the dry storage systems and transportation packages. The NRC Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation has formed a task force to work on the safety and regulatory concerns in relevance to high burnup fuel storage and transportation. This paper discusses the staff's preliminary considerations on the safety implication of fuel reconfiguration with respect to nuclear safety (subcriticality control), radiation shielding, containment, the performance of the thermal functions of the packages, and the retrievability of the contents from regulatory perspective. (authors)

Li, Zhian; Rahimi, Meraj; Tang, David; Aissa, Mourad; Flaganan, Michelle [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission - NRC, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States)] [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission - NRC, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States); Wagner, John C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Inside the hotline: A compilation of 1995 monthly hotline reports. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of questions and answers and federal register summaries of individual RCRA/UST, Superfund & EPCRA monthly hotline reports for the period of January through December 1995. It includes indices arranged by subject, regulatory citation, and statutory citation.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Department of Energy Privacy Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes Departmental implementation of agency statutory and regulatory requirements for privacy, specifically those provided in the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended at Title 5 United States Code (U.S.C.) 552a, Section 208 of the E Government Act of 2002, and Office of Management and Budget directives. Cancels DOE N 206.5.

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

486

MSW Application Checklist IMPORTANT NOTES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSW Application Checklist IMPORTANT NOTES 1. Please submit all Application Materials and Fees SUBMIT Application for Admission to Graduate Studies Statement of Academic Interests (1-2 pages) MSW

Northern British Columbia, University of

487

Heat Pumps - Theory and Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compressors (heat pumps) with actual applications in Monsanto. Guidelines for possible application areas are drawn from the analysis, and conclusions are drawn both about the usefulness of exergy analysis and about the heat pump application areas....

Altin, M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

OPS Application Requisition #: Job Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to my application and resume. I certify that the application and/or resume submitted are a complete statements or omissions made by me on this form, my application, my resume, or any supplementary

Mazzotti, Frank

489

Relative risk analysis in regulating the use of radiation-emitting medical devices. A preliminary application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a preliminary application of an analysis approach for assessing relative risks in the use of radiation- emitting medical devices. Results are presented on human-initiated actions and failure modes that are most likely to occur in the use of the Gamma Knife, a gamma irradiation therapy device. This effort represents an initial step in a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) plan to evaluate the potential role of risk analysis in regulating the use of nuclear medical devices. For this preliminary application of risk assessment, the focus was to develop a basic process using existing techniques for identifying the most likely risk contributors and their relative importance. The approach taken developed relative risk rankings and profiles that incorporated the type and quality of data available and could present results in an easily understood form. This work was performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the NRC.

Jones, E.D.; Banks, W.W.; Altenbach, T.J.; Fischer, L.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

State waste discharge permit application: Hydrotest, maintenance and construction discharges. Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 23, 1991, the US DOE< Richland Operation Office (RL) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) agreed to adhere to the provisions of the Department of Ecology Consent Order No. DE91NM-177 (216 Consent Order) (Ecology and US DOE 1991). The 216 Consent Order list regulatory milestones for liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site and requires compliance with the permitting requirements of Washington Administrative Code. Hanford Site liquid effluent streams discharging to the soil column have been categorized on the 216 Consent Order as follows: Phase I Streams; Phase II Streams; Miscellaneous Streams. Phase I and Phase II Streams were initially addressed in two report. Miscellaneous Streams are subject to the requirements of several milestones identified in the 216 Consent Order. This document constitutes the Categorical State Waste Discharge Permit application for hydrotest,maintenance and construction discharges throughout the Hanford Site. This categorical permit application form was prepared and approved by Ecology.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Neutron sources and applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

web identity application sectioneleven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

web identity application sectioneleven 99 contents elements of webpage design......................................................................... 100-101 web development and design considerations web banners is required for all official UCSF webpages. This banner includes a required link

Derisi, Joseph

493

Applications of cavity optomechanics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cavity-optomechanics aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

Metcalfe, Michael [Booz Allen Hamilton, 3811 Fairfax Drive, Arlington, Virginia 22203 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

494

Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on analysis and evaluation of operational data - 1987: Power reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1987. The report is published in two volumes. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 1, covers Power Reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry, with comments regarding the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year, and summarizes information from Licensee Event Reports, the NRC's Operations Center, and Diagnostic Evaluations. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 2, covers Nonreactors and presents a review of the nonreactors events and misadministration reports that were reported in 1987 and a brief synopsis of AEOD studies published in 1987. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD Reports issued for 1980-1987.

none,

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Principles and Tasks of the New Regulatory System for Radioactive Waste Management in the Russian Federation - 12020  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This year the Federal Law 'On Radioactive Waste management' was adopted in the Russian Federation. The law significantly changes the existing radioactive waste management regulatory system and assigns a lot of new tasks in order to implement new principles and overcome inevitable respective difficulties. Nuclear Safety Institute was largely involved in the process of the development of the law as well as its further co-ordination among the stakeholders, during which some important initial provisions were excluded. In the paper special features of the Russian safety regulation system for radioactive waste management are analyzed. Most significant requirements adopted by the law as well as tasks and expected difficulties related to its implementation are discussed. (authors)

Bolshov, L.A.; Linge, I.I.; Kovalchuk, V.D.; Utkin, S.S. [Nuclear Safety Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)