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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Energies 2010, 3, 899-919; doi:10.3390/en3050899 ISSN 1996-1073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a thermophilic beta-glucosidase for cellulosic bioethanol production. Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 161, 301-312. (5

Lovley, Derek

2

How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acid pretreatment of biomass. Biotechnol. Bioeng. Symp. 15,that limit enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass. Appl. Biochem.hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass. Biofuels 2(4):421-450.

Tam, Jerry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (2004) 65: 620626 DOI 10.1007/s00253-004-1684-5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-forming industries require the use of greases to lubricate metal surfaces during manufacturing operations as a sole carbon and energy source (=0.05±0.01 h-1 at 0.5 vol% lubricant concentration). The active bacteria product has been shifted to pre- treatment, the cleaning process to remove lubricant greases and oils

Wood, Thomas K.

4

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (1995) 43:850-855 Springer-Verlag 1995 N. Padukone K. W. Evans J. D. McMillan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Springer, New York, Berlin Heidelberg, pp 210-280 Hahn-H~igerdal B, Hallborn J, Jeppson H, Olsson L, Skoog

California at Riverside, University of

5

Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of a novel erythrose reductase from Candida magnoliae JH110  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trichosporonoides megachiliensis SNG-42). Biosci BiotechnolTrichosporonoides megachiliensis SNG-42. The intact codingan Trichosporonoides megachiliensis SNG-42 that produces

Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Ye-Ji; Ryu, Yeon-Woo; Seo, Jin-Ho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the transposable element (te) by a cut-and-paste mechanism 1, 18, usually generating a target site duplication (tsDs) at the site of insertion 1. Is elements also have many...

7

Stratospheric Changes and Climate Coordinating Lead Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Flaherty, B. J. Appl. Chem. Biotechnol. 1971, 21 (May), 144- 148. (38) Srivastava, S. P.; Tandon, R. S

8

DEC Asset Rating | CUBIC APPLE LTD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

NON-DOMESTIC ENERGY ... if you are worried about the DEC asset rating for your public building why not get in contact with Cubic Apple on 01529 300 ...

9

EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE FUNGICIDES FOR ORGANIC APPLE PRODUCTION IN VERMONT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A major challenge in organic apple production in Vermont is the available fungicide options for apple scab management. The standard lime sulfur/sulfur fungicide program used… (more)

Cromwell, Morgan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Biochemical transformation of coals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed. 7 figs.

Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Codling Moth or Apple Worm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and expense before he harvests the first apple. Ever after his trees are grown and a crop can be expected, bad weather, diseases and pests, or marketing troubles, often throw...

12

Evolution and biochemical similarities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

eat is because all living things are biochemically similar, we share the same nutrient stock. That alone is a striking support. Opposing evidence? I can't think of anything worth...

13

Appling County Pellets | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Appling County Pellets Appling County Pellets Jump to: navigation, search Name Appling County Pellets Place Graham, Georgia Zip 31513 Sector Biomass Product Producer of wood pellets and other biomass products located in Georgia. Coordinates 47.055765°, -122.294774° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.055765,"lon":-122.294774,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

14

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

15

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

16

Light brown apple moth’s arrival in California worries commodity groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DG. 1991. Integrated control of light brown apple moth, Epi-and Ag- riculture. 2007a. Light brown apple moth host list.6 p. CDFA. 2007b. Light brown apple moth project:

Varela, Lucia G.; Johnson, Marshall W; Strand, Larry; Wilen, Cheryl A; Pickel, Carolyn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

T-529: Apple Mac OS PackageKit Distribution Script Remote Code...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 6, 2011 - 2:53pm Addthis PROBLEM: Apple Mac OS PackageKit Distribution Script Remote Code Execution Vulnerability PLATFORM: Apple Mac OS X Server 10.6 - 10.6.5, Apple...

18

Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant capabilities and resources at NREL.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

April through June 2008 update on activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project.

Not Available

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Property:Incentive/ApplDsc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ApplDsc ApplDsc Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/ApplDsc Property Type String Description Applicable Sector. Pages using the property "Incentive/ApplDsc" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2003 Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy-Down Program (Federal) + Commercial +, Nonprofit +, Schools +, ... 3 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) + Commercial +, Industrial + 4 401 Certification (Vermont) + Utility +, Industrial + A AEP (Central and North) - CitySmart Program (Texas) + Commercial +, Industrial +, Institutional +, ... AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) + Construction +, Installer/Contractor +, Multi-Family Residential + AEP (Central and SWEPCO) - Coolsaver A/C Tune Up (Texas) + Commercial +, Installer/Contractor +, Residential +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

BEST: Biochemical Engineering Simulation Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The idea of developing a process simulator that can describe biochemical engineering (a relatively new technology area) was formulated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) during the late 1980s. The initial plan was to build a consortium of industrial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partners to enhance a commercial simulator with biochemical unit operations. DOE supported this effort; however, before the consortium was established, the process simulator industry changed considerably. Work on the first phase of implementing various fermentation reactors into the chemical process simulator, ASPEN/SP-BEST, is complete. This report will focus on those developments. Simulation Sciences, Inc. (SimSci) no longer supports ASPEN/SP, and Aspen Technology, Inc. (AspenTech) has developed an add-on to its ASPEN PLUS (also called BioProcess Simulator [BPS]). This report will also explain the similarities and differences between BEST and BPS. ASPEN, developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for DOE in the late 1970s, is still the state-of-the-art chemical process simulator. It was selected as the only simulator with the potential to be easily expanded into the biochemical area. ASPEN/SP, commercially sold by SimSci, was selected for the BEST work. SimSci completed work on batch, fed-batch, and continuous fermentation reactors in 1993, just as it announced it would no longer commercially support the complete ASPEN/SP product. BEST was left without a basic support program. Luckily, during this same time frame, AspenTech was developing a biochemical simulator with its version of ASPEN (ASPEN PLUS), which incorporates most BEST concepts. The future of BEST will involve developing physical property data and models appropriate to biochemical systems that are necessary for good biochemical process design.

Not Available

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Synthesizing stochasticity in biochemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Randomness is inherent to biochemistry: at each instant, the sequence of reactions that fires is a matter of chance. Some biological systems exploit such randomness, choosing between different outcomes stochastically - in effect, hedging their bets with ... Keywords: biochemical reactions, computational biology, markov processes, random processes, stochasticity, synthesis, synthetic biology

Brian Fett; Jehoshua Bruck; Marc D. Riedel

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Apples and Other Fruits of the Rose Family  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apples and Other Fruits of the Rose Family Apples and Other Fruits of the Rose Family Nature Bulletin No. 277-A October 7, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation APPLES AND OTHER FRUITS OF THE ROSE FAMILY Bread, meat and potatoes, with vegetables and green salads, may satisfy the inner man and keep us healthy but much of the fun of eating is provided by the rose family. The rose, itself, is the flower of chivalry and love but its relative, the apple, king of the fruits, has been cultivated since prehistoric times. The members of the Rose Family give us more pleasure than we get from any other group of plants. Apples, quinces, pears, peaches, plums, apricots, cherries, blackberries, raspberries and strawberries -- whether wild or cultivated -- are all relatives of the roses. Their fruits, raw or cooked, give us desserts, pleasant drinks, and many a between-meal delicacy. Typically, they have showy flowers with five equal petals arranged around a central cup bearing one or more fruit-forming pistils and a large number of pollen-bearing stamens. Their leaves are placed alternately on the twigs or stalks -- some of them simple leaves; some of them compound leaves divided into three, five or more leaflets like the rose itself. Some are trees, some are shrubs, and some are vining herbs.

24

U-239: Apple iPhone SMS Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Spoof...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Apple iPhone SMS Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Spoof SMS Source Addresses U-239: Apple iPhone SMS Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Spoof SMS Source Addresses August 20,...

25

V-020: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-020: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code November 9, 2012 - 6:00am...

26

V-164: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-164: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code May 27, 2013 - 12:23am...

27

U-240: Apple Remote Desktop Encryption Failure Lets Remote Users Obtain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Apple Remote Desktop Encryption Failure Lets Remote Users 0: Apple Remote Desktop Encryption Failure Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information U-240: Apple Remote Desktop Encryption Failure Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information August 21, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple Remote Desktop Encryption Failure Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information PLATFORM: Apple Remote Desktop after 3.5.1 and prior to 3.6.1 ABSTRACT: A remote user can monitor potentially sensitive information. reference LINKS: Apple.com Apple Article: HT5433 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027420 CVE-2012-0681 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in Apple Remote Desktop. When a user connects to a third-party VNC server with the 'Encrypt all network data' setting enabled, network data is not encrypted. A remote user monitoring the

28

AMR Power Private Ltd APPL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AMR Power Private Ltd APPL AMR Power Private Ltd APPL Jump to: navigation, search Name AMR Power Private Ltd. (APPL) Place Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip 560 034 Sector Hydro Product Hyderabad-based small hydro project developer. Coordinates 17.6726°, 77.5971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":17.6726,"lon":77.5971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

29

V-137: Apple Mac OS X update for Java | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Apple Mac OS X update for Java V-137: Apple Mac OS X update for Java April 18, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple Mac OS X update for Java PLATFORM: Mac OS X 10.6, OS X Lion...

30

NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Capabilities Biochemical Conversion Capabilities NREL researchers are working to improve the efficiency and economics of the biochemical conversion process by focusing on the most challenging steps in the process. Biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels involves three basic steps: Converting biomass to sugar or other fermentation feedstock through: Pretreatment Conditioning and enzymatic hydrolysis Enzyme development. Fermenting these biomass-derived feedstocks using: Microorganisms for fermentation. Processing the fermentation product to produce fuel-grade ethanol and other fuels, chemicals, heat, and electricity by: Integrating the bioprocess. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This video is a narrated animation that explains the biochemical conversion

31

U-121: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Conduct  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, 21: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks, and Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information U-121: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks, and Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information March 9, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks, and Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information PLATFORM: Apple iOS Version(s): prior to 5.1 ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in Apple iOS. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026774 Apple Security Updates About the security content of iOS 5.1 Software Update CVE-2012-0641, CVE-2012-0642, CVE-2012-0643, CVE-2011-3453, CVE-2012-0644,

32

V-171: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code 1: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-171: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks June 5, 2013 - 1:05am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks PLATFORM: Apple Safari prior to 6.0.5 ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities were reported in Apple Safari. REFERENCE LINKS: Apple Article: HT5785 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028627 CVE-2013-0926 CVE-2013-1009 CVE-2013-1012 CVE-2013-1013 CVE-2013-1023 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A remote user can create specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a memory corruption error and execute arbitrary

33

U-022: Apple QuickTime Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Apple QuickTime Multiple Vulnerabilities 2: Apple QuickTime Multiple Vulnerabilities U-022: Apple QuickTime Multiple Vulnerabilities October 28, 2011 - 8:15am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple QuickTime Multiple Vulnerabilities. PLATFORM: Apple QuickTime prior to 7.7.1 ABSTRACT: A remote user can create a file that, when loaded by the target user, will execute arbitrary code on the target user's system. reference LINKS: Apple Product Security Article: HT5016 Secunia Advisory SA46618 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026251 CVE-2011-3218, CVE-2011-3219, CVE-2011-3220 CVE-2011-3221, CVE-2011-3222, CVE-2011-3223 CVE-2011-3228, CVE-2011-3247, CVE-2011-3248 CVE-2011-3249, CVE-2011-3250, CVE-2011-3251 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in Apple Quicktime, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system.

34

V-020: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute 20: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-020: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code November 9, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: Versions prior to QuickTime 7.7.3 are vulnerable on Windows 7, Vista and XP. ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in Apple QuickTime. REFERENCE LINKS: Apple Security Article: HT5581 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027737 Bugtraq ID: 56438 Secunia Advisory SA51226 CVE-2011-1374 CVE-2012-3751 CVE-2012-3752 CVE-2012-3753 CVE-2012-3754 CVE-2012-3755 CVE-2012-3756 CVE-2012-3757 CVE-2012-3758 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in Apple QuickTime, which can

35

V-015: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Local Users  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, 5: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Local Users Bypass the Screen Lock, and Applications Obtain Kernel Address Information V-015: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Local Users Bypass the Screen Lock, and Applications Obtain Kernel Address Information November 2, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Local Users Bypass the Screen Lock, and Applications Obtain Kernel Address Information PLATFORM: Apple iOS prior to 6.0.1 ABSTRACT: Three vulnerabilities were reported in Apple iOS. REFERENCE LINKS: Apple Article: HT5567 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027716 Bugtraq ID: 56363 CVE-2012-3748 CVE-2012-3749 CVE-2012-3750 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A remote user can create specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the

36

From: Nicholas Ammann [mailto:nammann@apple.com]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 8:12 AM Wednesday, June 20, 2012 8:12 AM To: Exparte Communications Subject: Energy Conservation Standards for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies; Proposed Rule Making - Ex Parte Communication Apple Inc. met with DOE to discuss the notice of proposed rule making the Department sent out regarding battery chargers and external power supplies. Below is a list of topics that Apple discussed with DOE. - Discussion regarding Battery Charger product Class 8 and that it does not scale with battery capacity. Class 8 is for DC-DC battery chargers. - Timeline for the effective date of the DOE battery charger efficiency regulation and the external power supply regulation. - Flexibility of DOE Battery Charger efficiency mark to be placed on the retail

37

Apple Valley, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apple Valley, California: Energy Resources Apple Valley, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.5008311°, -117.1858759° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.5008311,"lon":-117.1858759,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

V-191: Apple Mac OS X Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: Apple Mac OS X Multiple Vulnerabilities 1: Apple Mac OS X Multiple Vulnerabilities V-191: Apple Mac OS X Multiple Vulnerabilities July 3, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple has issued a security update for Mac OS X PLATFORM: Apple Macintosh OS X ABSTRACT: The vulnerabilities are caused due to a bundled version of QuickTime REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54049 APPLE-SA-2013-07-02-1 Security Update 2013-003 CVE-2013-1018 CVE-2013-1019 CVE-2013-1022 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A boundary error when parsing compressed data within H.264 encoded movie files can be exploited to cause a buffer overflow A boundary error when handling the Sorenson Video 3 "mdat" section within a MOV file can be exploited to cause a buffer overflow A boundary error when handling "mvhd" atoms can be exploited to cause a

39

T-529: Apple Mac OS PackageKit Distribution Script Remote Code Execution  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29: Apple Mac OS PackageKit Distribution Script Remote Code 29: Apple Mac OS PackageKit Distribution Script Remote Code Execution Vulnerability T-529: Apple Mac OS PackageKit Distribution Script Remote Code Execution Vulnerability January 6, 2011 - 2:53pm Addthis PROBLEM: Apple Mac OS PackageKit Distribution Script Remote Code Execution Vulnerability PLATFORM: Apple Mac OS X Server 10.6 - 10.6.5, Apple Mac OS X 10.6 - 10.6.5 Vulnerable Platforms Details ABSTRACT: A format string issue exists in PackageKit's handling of distribution scripts. A man-in-the-middle attacker may be able to cause an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution when Software Update checks for new updates. This issue is addressed through improved validation of distribution scripts. This issue does not affect systems prior to Mac OS

40

V-191: Apple Mac OS X Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Apple Mac OS X Multiple Vulnerabilities 1: Apple Mac OS X Multiple Vulnerabilities V-191: Apple Mac OS X Multiple Vulnerabilities July 3, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple has issued a security update for Mac OS X PLATFORM: Apple Macintosh OS X ABSTRACT: The vulnerabilities are caused due to a bundled version of QuickTime REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54049 APPLE-SA-2013-07-02-1 Security Update 2013-003 CVE-2013-1018 CVE-2013-1019 CVE-2013-1022 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A boundary error when parsing compressed data within H.264 encoded movie files can be exploited to cause a buffer overflow A boundary error when handling the Sorenson Video 3 "mdat" section within a MOV file can be exploited to cause a buffer overflow A boundary error when handling "mvhd" atoms can be exploited to cause a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

V-113: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code 3: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-113: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code March 18, 2013 - 1:53am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: Version(s): prior to 6.0.3 ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in Apple Safari. REFERENCE LINKS: Apple security update, Article: HT1222 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028292 CVE-2013-0960 CVE-2013-0961 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A remote user can create specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the target user, will execute arbitrary code on the target system. The code will run with the privileges of the target user. IMPACT: A remote user can create HTML that, when loaded by the target user, will execute arbitrary code on the target user's system.

42

T-684: Apple QuickTime Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Apple QuickTime Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute 4: Apple QuickTime Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-684: Apple QuickTime Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code August 4, 2011 - 3:33pm Addthis PROBLEM: Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in QuickTime. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. PLATFORM: Apple Quick Time prior to 7.7 ABSTRACT: Apple QuickTime Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. reference LINKS: Apple security updates SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025884 Mac OS X: Updating your software Support Downloads QuickTime 7.7 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A specially crafted PICT file can trigger a buffer overflow [CVE-2011-0245]. Mac OS X version 10.7 is not affected. A specially crafted GIF image can trigger a heap overflow [CVE-2011-0246].

43

U-222: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Spoof the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, 2: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Spoof the URL Address Bar, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks, and Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information U-222: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Spoof the URL Address Bar, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks, and Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information July 27, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Spoof the URL Address Bar, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks, and Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information PLATFORM: Version(s):Apple Safari prior to 6.0 ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in Apple Safari. reference LINKS: The Vendor's Advisory Bugtraq ID: 54683 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027307 IMPACT ASSESSMENT:

44

U-239: Apple iPhone SMS Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Spoof SMS Source  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

39: Apple iPhone SMS Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Spoof SMS 39: Apple iPhone SMS Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Spoof SMS Source Addresses U-239: Apple iPhone SMS Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Spoof SMS Source Addresses August 20, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple iPhone SMS Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Spoof SMS Source Addresses PLATFORM: Version(s): 6 beta 4 and prior versions ABSTRACT: A remote user can spoof SMS source addresses. Reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027410 Apple.com PCMag.com The original advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medum Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in Apple iPhone. A remote user can send an SMS message with a specially crafted User Data Header (UDH) value that specifies an alternate reply address. The recipient's iPhone will display the reply address as the source of the SMS.

45

T-654: Apple QuickTime Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Apple QuickTime Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Execute 4: Apple QuickTime Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary T-654: Apple QuickTime Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary June 24, 2011 - 4:39am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in QuickTime. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. PLATFORM: Version(s): prior to QuickTime 7.6.8 ABSTRACT: A remote user can create a specially crafted file that, when loaded by the target user, will execute arbitrary code on the target system. The code will run with the privileges of the target user. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025705 Apple Security Article: HT4339 Apple Security Article: HT4723 Apple Security Article: HT1222 CVE-2011-0213 Secunia Advisory: SA45054 IMPACT ASSESSMENT High Discussion:

46

U-222: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Spoof the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, 2: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Spoof the URL Address Bar, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks, and Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information U-222: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Spoof the URL Address Bar, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks, and Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information July 27, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Spoof the URL Address Bar, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks, and Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information PLATFORM: Version(s):Apple Safari prior to 6.0 ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in Apple Safari. reference LINKS: The Vendor's Advisory Bugtraq ID: 54683 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027307 IMPACT ASSESSMENT:

47

V-113: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code 3: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-113: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code March 18, 2013 - 1:53am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: Version(s): prior to 6.0.3 ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in Apple Safari. REFERENCE LINKS: Apple security update, Article: HT1222 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028292 CVE-2013-0960 CVE-2013-0961 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A remote user can create specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the target user, will execute arbitrary code on the target system. The code will run with the privileges of the target user. IMPACT: A remote user can create HTML that, when loaded by the target user, will execute arbitrary code on the target user's system.

48

Modeling biochemical pathways using an artificial chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artificial chemistries are candidates for methodologies that model and design biochemical systems. If artificial chemistries can deal with such systems in beneficial ways, they may facilitate activities in the new area of biomolecular engineering. In ... Keywords: Artificial chemistry, biochemical pathways, biomolecular engineering, modularity, reasoning, scalability

Kazuto Tominaga; Yoshikazu Suzuki; Keiji Kobayashi; Tooru Watanabe; Kazumasa Koizumi; Koji Kishi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Appl Phys A DOI 10.1007/s00339-012-6920-8  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1882 (2005) 26. S. Sapp, S. Nuebben, Y.B. Losovyj, P. Jeppson, D.L. Schulz, A.N. Caruso, Appl. Phys

Yoon, Jun-Bo

50

T-676: Apple iOS Certificate Chain Validation Flaw Lets Certain...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HT4825 Apple Product Security CVE-2011-0228 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A remote user in a privileged network position can exploit a certificate chain validation...

51

Activity and Diet of Bats in Apple Orchards of Southern Michigan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I studied activity and diet of bats in apple orchards in southern Michigan. There was no difference between organic and conventional orchards in number and… (more)

Smith, Brenna Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

V-080: Apple iOS Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Apple iOS Multiple Vulnerabilities 0: Apple iOS Multiple Vulnerabilities V-080: Apple iOS Multiple Vulnerabilities January 30, 2013 - 12:56am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple iOS Multiple Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Apple iOS 6.x for iPhone 3GS and later Apple iOS for iPad 6.x Apple iOS for iPod touch 6.x ABSTRACT: Two security issues and multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in Apple iOS REFERENCE LINKS: Article: HT5642 APPLE-SA-2013-01-28-1 iOS 6.1 Software Update Secunia Advisory SA52002 CVE-2011-3058 CVE-2012-2619 CVE-2012-2824 CVE-2012-2857 CVE-2012-2889 CVE-2012-3606 CVE-2012-3607 CVE-2012-3621 CVE-2012-3632 CVE-2012-3687 CVE-2012-3701 CVE-2013-0948 CVE-2013-0949 CVE-2013-0950 CVE-2013-0951 CVE-2013-0952 CVE-2013-0953 CVE-2013-0954 CVE-2013-0955 CVE-2013-0956 CVE-2013-0958 CVE-2013-0959 CVE-2013-0962 CVE-2013-0963 CVE-2013-0964

53

NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Projects Biochemical Conversion Projects A photo of a woman looking at the underside of a clear plastic tray. The tray has a grid of small holes to hold sample tubes. An NREL researcher examines a sample tray used in the BioScreen C, an instrument used to monitor the growth of microorganisms under different conditions. NREL's projects in biochemical conversion involve three basic steps to convert biomass feedstocks to fuels: Converting biomass to sugar or other fermentation feedstock Fermenting these biomass intermediates using biocatalysts (microorganisms including yeast and bacteria) Processing the fermentation product to yield fuel-grade ethanol and other fuels. Among the current biochemical conversion RD&D projects at NREL are: Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis

54

V-164: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute 4: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-164: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code May 27, 2013 - 12:23am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: Apple QuickTime prior to 7.7.4. ABSTRACT: Apple QuickTime Multiple Vulnerabilities REFERENCE LINKS: Apple Article: HT5770 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028589 Secunia Advisory SA53520 CVE-2013-0986, CVE-2013-0987, CVE-2013-0988 CVE-2013-0989, CVE-2013-1015, CVE-2013-1016 CVE-2013-1017, CVE-2013-1018, CVE-2013-1019 CVE-2013-1020, CVE-2013-1021, CVE-2013-1022 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in Apple QuickTime, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system.

55

U-264: Apple OS X Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Apple OS X Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and 4: Apple OS X Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-264: Apple OS X Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges September 20, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis U-264: Apple OS X Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges September 20, 2012 - 6:00am PROBLEM: Apple OS X Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: Apple OS X ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities were reported in Apple OS X. reference LINKS: Apple Security Article: HT5501 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027551 CVE-2012-0650 CVE-2012-3716 CVE-2012-3718 CVE-2012-3719 CVE-2012-3720 CVE-2012-3721 CVE-2012-3722 CVE-2012-3723 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: If the DirectoryService Proxy is used, a remote user can trigger a buffer

56

U-264: Apple OS X Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Apple OS X Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and 4: Apple OS X Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-264: Apple OS X Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges September 20, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis U-264: Apple OS X Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges September 20, 2012 - 6:00am PROBLEM: Apple OS X Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: Apple OS X ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities were reported in Apple OS X. reference LINKS: Apple Security Article: HT5501 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027551 CVE-2012-0650 CVE-2012-3716 CVE-2012-3718 CVE-2012-3719 CVE-2012-3720 CVE-2012-3721 CVE-2012-3722 CVE-2012-3723 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: If the DirectoryService Proxy is used, a remote user can trigger a buffer

57

T-673: Apple Safari Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Apple Safari Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute 3: Apple Safari Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-673: Apple Safari Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks July 21, 2011 - 1:27am Addthis PROBLEM: Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in Apple Safari. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks. A remote user can obtain potentially sensitive information. A remote user can bypass a certificate validation control. PLATFORM: Safari 5.1 and Safari 5.0.6 Products Affected: Safari 5 (Mac OS X 10.6), Safari 5 (Mac OS X 10.5), Product Security, Safari 5.1 (OS X Lion) ABSTRACT: Apple Safari Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code,

58

U-170: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

70: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute 70: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-170: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code May 16, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: prior to 7.7.2 ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in Apple QuickTime. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. Reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027065 CVE-2012-0265 CVE-2012-0663 CVE-2012-0664 CVE-2012-0665 CVE-2012-0666 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted file that, when loaded by the target user, will execute arbitrary code on the target system. The code will run with the privileges of the target user. Only Windows-based systems

59

T-634: Apple Mac OS X MacDefender Fake Antivirus Malicious Software |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

34: Apple Mac OS X MacDefender Fake Antivirus Malicious Software 34: Apple Mac OS X MacDefender Fake Antivirus Malicious Software T-634: Apple Mac OS X MacDefender Fake Antivirus Malicious Software June 1, 2011 - 3:35pm Addthis PROBLEM: Apple Mac OS X versions 10.4, 10.5, and 10.6 are the targets of a new campaign of phishing attacks that aim to infect systems with a fake antivirus application called MacDefender. PLATFORM: Mac OS X 10.4, Mac OS X 10.6, Mac OS X 10.5 ABSTRACT: Apple Mac OS X users could infect their systems after visiting a malicious web page. Reports suggest that the Apple Safari web browser could allow automatic download and execution of the JavaScript-based malware because of an incorrectly set security option in Safari. reference LINKS: Security Article: HT4650 IntelliShield ID: 23239 Apple Insider Article

60

From: Nicholas Ammann [mailto:nammann@apple.com]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tuesday, July 16, 2013 4:35 PM Tuesday, July 16, 2013 4:35 PM To: Exparte Communications Subject: Request for Information on Evaluating New Products for the Battery Chargers and External Power Supply Rulemaking - Ex Parte Communication Below are a list of topics that Apple Inc. discussed with DOE. - Timeline for the effective date of the DOE battery charger efficiency regulation and the external power supply regulation. - Flexibility of DOE Battery Charger efficiency mark, including using software or package as an alternate to marking the product surface. - Discussion of replacement parts and refurbished products produced prior to the DOE effective date. - Discussion of DOE proposed EPS Level VI efficiency criteria as compared to that of Level V and how the implementation date

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

ENERGY COMMISSION APPL.lCATION FOR SOURCE MATERIAL LICENSE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

COMMISSION COMMISSION APPL.lCATION FOR SOURCE MATERIAL LICENSE Pursuant to the rcgu!ations in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, Part 40, application is hereby made for a license to receive, possess, use, transfer, deliver or import into the United Stat-, source material for the activity or activities described. 1. (check ooa) 2. NAME OF APPLICANT W. R. GRACE 6 Co. 0 (a) New Iicense 0 (b) Amendment to License No.- Davison Chemical Division STA-422 3. Q (c) Renewal of Licensr No. 0 (d) Previous License No. Pompton Plains, N. J. 4. ST,.TE THE AOORESS(ES) AT WHICH SOURCE MATERIAL WILL BE POSSESSED OR USED 868 Black Oak Ridge Road, Wayne, fi. J. a*ocY s up/'l File IF 5. BUSINESS OR OCCUPATION I 6. (a) IF APPLICANT IS AN INDIVIDUAL. STATE CITIZENSHIP

62

U-202: Apple QuickTime Multiple Stack Overflow Vulnerabilities | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Apple QuickTime Multiple Stack Overflow Vulnerabilities 2: Apple QuickTime Multiple Stack Overflow Vulnerabilities U-202: Apple QuickTime Multiple Stack Overflow Vulnerabilities June 29, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple QuickTime is prone to multiple stack-based buffer-overflow vulnerabilities. PLATFORM: Version(s): prior to 7.7.2 ABSTRACT: Visiting a maliciously crafted website may lead to an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution. Reference links: Vendor Advisory Security Focus ID 53571 CVE-2012-0663 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: These issues arise when the application handles specially crafted files. Successful exploits may allow attackers to execute arbitrary code in the context of the currently logged-in user; failed exploit attempts will cause denial-of-service conditions.Versions prior to

63

AEO2011: Oil and Gas Supply Apple-style-span  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Supply Apple-style-span" style"line-height: 16px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 2px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 2px; ">This dataset comes from...

64

U-202: Apple QuickTime Multiple Stack Overflow Vulnerabilities | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

202: Apple QuickTime Multiple Stack Overflow Vulnerabilities 202: Apple QuickTime Multiple Stack Overflow Vulnerabilities U-202: Apple QuickTime Multiple Stack Overflow Vulnerabilities June 29, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple QuickTime is prone to multiple stack-based buffer-overflow vulnerabilities. PLATFORM: Version(s): prior to 7.7.2 ABSTRACT: Visiting a maliciously crafted website may lead to an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution. Reference links: Vendor Advisory Security Focus ID 53571 CVE-2012-0663 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: These issues arise when the application handles specially crafted files. Successful exploits may allow attackers to execute arbitrary code in the context of the currently logged-in user; failed exploit attempts will cause denial-of-service conditions.Versions prior to

65

V-115: Apple iOS Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Apple iOS Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges 5: Apple iOS Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-115: Apple iOS Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges March 20, 2013 - 12:08am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple iOS Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: Version(s): prior to 6.1.3 ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities were reported in Apple iOS REFERENCE LINKS: Apple security Article: HT1222 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028314 CVE-2013-0977 CVE-2013-0978 CVE-2013-0979 CVE-2013-0981 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A local user can exploit a flaw in the handling of Mach-O executable files with overlapping segments to execute unsigned code on the target system [CVE-2013-0977]. A local user can exploit a flaw in the ARM prefetch abort handling to determine the address of structures in the kernel [CVE-2013-0978].

66

U-036: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code 6: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-036: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code November 15, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Obtain Information and Let Local Users Bypass Authentication. PLATFORM: iOS 3.0 through 5.0 for iPhone 3GS iPhone 4 and iPhone 4S iOS 3.1 through 5.0 for iPod touch (3rd generation) and later iOS 3.2 through 5.0 for iPad, iOS 4.3 through 5.0 for iPad 2 ABSTRACT: A remote user can create content that, when loaded by the target user, will execute arbitrary code on or obtain potentially sensitive information from the target user's system. reference LINKS: Apple Security Article: HT5052 Apple Product Security SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026311 IMPACT ASSESSMENT:

67

Studies on the Effects of Inorganic Salts on Biochemical Treatment ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of two inorganic salts (sodium chloride and sodium sulphate) on biochemical ... Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer Characteristics in Microwave ...

68

T-676: Apple iOS Certificate Chain Validation Flaw Lets Certain Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Apple iOS Certificate Chain Validation Flaw Lets Certain 6: Apple iOS Certificate Chain Validation Flaw Lets Certain Remote Users Access or Modify SSL/TLS Sessions T-676: Apple iOS Certificate Chain Validation Flaw Lets Certain Remote Users Access or Modify SSL/TLS Sessions July 26, 2011 - 1:06am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Apple iOS. A remote user with the ability to conduct a man-in-the-middle attack can access or modify SSL/TLS sessions. PLATFORM: iOS 4.2.5 through 4.2.9 for iPhone 4 (CDMA) iOS 3.0 through 4.3.4 for iPhone 3GS and iPhone 4 (GSM) iOS 3.1 through 4.3.4 for iPod touch (3rd generation) and later iOS 3.2 through 4.3.4 for iPad ABSTRACT: Apple iOS Certificate Chain Validation Flaw Lets Certain Remote Users Access or Modify SSL/TLS Sessions. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025837

69

U-165: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Spoof  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and 5: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Spoof Address Bar URLs U-165: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Spoof Address Bar URLs May 9, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Spoof Address Bar URLs PLATFORM: prior to 5.1.1; iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPod touch (3rd generation) and later, iPad, iPad 2 ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in Apple iOS. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. A remote user can spoof the address bar URL. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027028 CVE-2012-0672 CVE-2012-0674 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted file that, when loaded by the

70

U-165: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Spoof  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and 5: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Spoof Address Bar URLs U-165: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Spoof Address Bar URLs May 9, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Spoof Address Bar URLs PLATFORM: prior to 5.1.1; iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPod touch (3rd generation) and later, iPad, iPad 2 ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in Apple iOS. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. A remote user can spoof the address bar URL. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027028 CVE-2012-0672 CVE-2012-0674 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted file that, when loaded by the

71

T-676: Apple iOS Certificate Chain Validation Flaw Lets Certain Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

76: Apple iOS Certificate Chain Validation Flaw Lets Certain 76: Apple iOS Certificate Chain Validation Flaw Lets Certain Remote Users Access or Modify SSL/TLS Sessions T-676: Apple iOS Certificate Chain Validation Flaw Lets Certain Remote Users Access or Modify SSL/TLS Sessions July 26, 2011 - 1:06am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Apple iOS. A remote user with the ability to conduct a man-in-the-middle attack can access or modify SSL/TLS sessions. PLATFORM: iOS 4.2.5 through 4.2.9 for iPhone 4 (CDMA) iOS 3.0 through 4.3.4 for iPhone 3GS and iPhone 4 (GSM) iOS 3.1 through 4.3.4 for iPod touch (3rd generation) and later iOS 3.2 through 4.3.4 for iPad ABSTRACT: Apple iOS Certificate Chain Validation Flaw Lets Certain Remote Users Access or Modify SSL/TLS Sessions. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025837

72

T-675: Apple Laptop Battery Interface Lets Local Users Deny Service |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7:03am 7:03am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in the battery interface used in Apple laptop models. A local user can cause denial of service conditions. PLATFORM: Mac OS X ABSTRACT: Apple Laptop Battery Interface Lets Local Users Deny Service reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025831 Apple Article: HT1222 Forbes Article IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The battery microcontroller interfaces uses common API keys. A local user with knowledge of the keys can control the microcontroller functions. This can be exploited to prevent the battery from being charged, interfere with battery heat regulation, or cause the battery to stop functioning. Impact: A local user can prevent the battery from charging, interfere with the battery heat regulation, or cause the battery to become unusable. Modern

73

T-675: Apple Laptop Battery Interface Lets Local Users Deny Service |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3:15pm 3:15pm Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in the battery interface used in Apple laptop models. A local user can cause denial of service conditions. PLATFORM: Mac OS X ABSTRACT: Apple Laptop Battery Interface Lets Local Users Deny Service reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025831 Apple Article: HT1222 Forbes Article IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The battery microcontroller interfaces uses common API keys. A local user with knowledge of the keys can control the microcontroller functions. This can be exploited to prevent the battery from being charged, interfere with battery heat regulation, or cause the battery to stop functioning. Impact: A local user can prevent the battery from charging, interfere with the battery heat regulation, or cause the battery to become unusable. Modern

74

Impostazioni Google Apps con client Mail di Apple Mac per l'account di fantasia pinco.panco@uniroma1.it  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impostazioni Google Apps con client Mail di Apple Mac per l'account di fantasia pinco è ospitato sui server google.com) #12;Impostazioni Google Apps con client Mail di Apple Mac per l Google Apps con client Mail di Apple Mac per l'account di fantasia pinco.panco@uniroma1.it Pag. 3

Di Pillo, Gianni

75

BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR GEOTHERMAL BRINE TREATMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL's Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

PREMUZIC,E.T.; LIN,M.S.; BOHENEK,M.; JOSHI-TOPE,G.; ZHOU,W.; SHELENKOVA,L.; WILKE,R.

1998-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

76

Biochemical processes for geothermal brine treatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL`s Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines, (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Zhou, W.; Shelenkova, L.; Wilke, R.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Prickett and Lonnquist aquifer simulation program for the Apple II minicomputer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Prickett and Lonnquist two-dimensional groundwater model has been programmed for the Apple II minicomputer. Both leaky and nonleaky confined aquifers can be simulated. The model was adapted from the FORTRAN version of Prickett and Lonnquist. In the configuration presented here, the program requires 64 K bits of memory. Because of the large number of arrays used in the program, and memory limitations of the Apple II, the maximum grid size that can be used is 20 rows by 20 columns. Input to the program is interactive, with prompting by the computer. Output consists of predicted lead values at the row-column intersections (nodes).

Hull, L.C.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2008 State...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10-46214 August 2009 Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2008 State of Technology Model D. Humbird and A. Aden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole...

79

Modeling Tomorrow's Biorefinery--the NREL Biochemical Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brochure describing the capabilities of NREL's Biochemical Pilot Plant. In this facility, researchers test ideas for creating high-value products from cellulosic biomass.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

PROGRESS IN PHOTOVOLTAICS: RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS Prog. Photovolt: Res. Appl. (in press)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the controlled experiments, and the chemical equilibria and chemical kinetics of the separation processesPROGRESS IN PHOTOVOLTAICS: RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS Prog. Photovolt: Res. Appl. (in press 1Á0 to 4Á0 M. Kinetic studies of leaching were conducted in constant solid-to-liquid ratios

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Determination of freeze-drying behaviors of apples by artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freeze drying is the best drying technology regarding quality of the end product but it is an expensive method and the high costs of process limit its application to industrial scale. At the same time, the freeze-drying process is based on different ... Keywords: ANN, Apple, Drying, Freeze drying, Modeling

Tayfun Menlik; Mustafa Bahad?r Özdemir; Volkan Kirmaci

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

CellDesigner: a modeling tool for biochemical networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding of logic and dynamics of gene-regulatory and biochemical networks is a major challenge of systems biology. To facilitate this research topic, we have developed CellDesigner, a modeling tool of gene-regulatory and biochemical networks. CellDesigner ...

Akira Funahashi; Yukiko Matsuoka; Akiya Jouraku; Hiroaki Kitano; Norihiro Kikuchi

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

Dovichi, Norman J. (Edmonton, CA); Zhang, Jian Z. (Edmonton, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

85

Application of an Apple-II Computer in Real-Time Data Processing of Microwave Radiation Attenuation by Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using an Apple-II microcomputer, real-time data acquisition, processing, staring and display of 12 GHz microwave radiation attenuation by rain have been implemented. The computer-radiometer interface consists of an address decoder, two three-...

Song Qian

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Study of Row Phase Dependent Skew Quadrupole Fields in Apple-II Type EPUs at the ALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPLE-II TYPE EPUs AT THE ALS ? C. Steier † , S. Marks, S.very successfully at the ALS to generate high brightnessswitching, the EPUs at the ALS pro- vide the capability to

Steier, C.; Marks, S.; Prestemon, Soren; Robin, David; Schlueter, Ross; Wolski, Andrzej

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Simulation of biochemical networks using COPASI: a complex pathway simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation and modeling is becoming one of the standard approaches to understand complex biochemical processes. Therefore, there is a big need for software tools that allow access to diverse simulation and modeling methods as well as support for the ...

Sven Sahle; Ralph Gauges; Jürgen Pahle; Natalia Simus; Ursula Kummer; Stefan Hoops; Christine Lee; Mudita Singhal; Liang Xu; Pedro Mendes

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A mathematical model for the branched chain amino acid biosynthetic pathways of Escherichia coli K12  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biotechnol 19, 125-130 Herring, P. A. , McKnight, B. L. ,1257-1265 Jackson, J. H. , Herring, P. A. , Patterson, E.250: 4477-85, 1975 17 Herring P.A. et al. Biochem. Biophy.

Yang, C R; Shapiro, B E; Hung, S P; Mjolsness, E D; Hatfield, G W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #20, July-September 2008  

SciTech Connect

July to September, 2008 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

Schell, D. J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #22, January - March 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

January to March, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

Not Available

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #24, July-September 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

July to September, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

Schell, D.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #25, October - December 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

October to December, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

Schell, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #23, April-June 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

April to June, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

Schell, D.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #17, October-December 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

October to December, 2007 edition of the newsletter of the Biochemical Platform Process Integration project.

Schell, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Computational Modeling of Biochemical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Modeling of Biochemical Pathways Linking Ionizing Computational Modeling of Biochemical Pathways Linking Ionizing Radiation to Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and Tumor Incidence Authors: Yuchao Maggie Zhao and Rory Conolly Institutions: Center for Computational Systems Biology CIIT Centers for Health Research Long-Range Goal: To develop an integrated, computational framework for the prediction of low-dose-response to ionizing radiation (IR) in people. Methodology: To provide a flexible framework to evaluate mechanisms of cellular adaptive responses after exposure to IR, three progressively more complicated descriptions of biochemical pathways linking DNA damage with cell-cycle checkpoint control and apoptosis were developed. These descriptions focus on p53-dependent checkpoint arrest and apoptosis, p73-dependent apoptosis, and Chk2-dependent checkpoint arrest,

96

Application And Evaluation Of Biomagnetic And Biochemical Monitoring Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluation Of Biomagnetic And Biochemical Monitoring Of The Evaluation Of Biomagnetic And Biochemical Monitoring Of The Dispersion And Deposition Of Volcanically-Derived Particles At Mt Etna, Italy Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Application And Evaluation Of Biomagnetic And Biochemical Monitoring Of The Dispersion And Deposition Of Volcanically-Derived Particles At Mt Etna, Italy Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Biomagnetic monitoring, using tree leaves as passive surfaces for particle collection, has been shown to be a promising technique for assessing the dispersion and deposition of particles in the context of anthropogenic pollution. By comparing leaves' magnetic properties with trace metal levels measured in the leaves, we here assess the utility of

97

Extracting biochemical reaction kinetics from time series data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We consider the problem of inferring kinetic mechanisms for biochemical reactions from time series data. Using a priori knowledge about the structure of chemical reaction kinetics we develop global nonlinear models which use elementary reactions as a basis set, and discuss model construction using top-down and bottom-up approaches. 1

Edmund J. Crampin; Patrick E. Mcsharry; Santiago Schnell

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Characterization and application of vortex flow adsorption for simplification of biochemical product downstream processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One strategy to reduce costs in manufacturing a biochemical product is simplification of downstream processing. Biochemical product recovery often starts from fermentation broth or cell culture. In conventional downstream ...

Ma, Junfen, 1972-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Erratum: ``Nitrogen diffusion mechanism in the R2Fe17 lattice'' [Appl. Phys. Lett. 67, 208 (1995)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Erratum: ``Nitrogen diffusion mechanism in the R2Fe17 lattice'' [Appl. Phys. Lett. 67, 208 (1995 Center for Precision Manufacturing and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs concentration distribution in the hollow can be obtained by solving Eq. 8 whose solution is1 cf r,t cf0R r­R0 cf

Yang, De-Ping

100

SEARCHING FOR VIDEOS ON APPLE IPAD AND IPHONE Colum Foley, Jinlin Guo, David Scott, Paul Ferguson, Cathal Gurrin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the performance of novice versus expert users. Index Terms-- Video search, iPad, iPhone 1. INTRODUCTION Content system with the iPad app. On the iPad, using simple touch commands users can enter search queriesSEARCHING FOR VIDEOS ON APPLE IPAD AND IPHONE Colum Foley, Jinlin Guo, David Scott, Paul Ferguson

Lee, Hyowon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #13, October-December 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume 13 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Processing Integration Task.

Schell, D. J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #21, October - December 2008  

SciTech Connect

October to December, 2008 edition of the National Bioenergy Center?s Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

Schell, D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #14, January - March 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume 14 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Processing Integration Task.

Schell, D.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Process Integration Project: Quarterly Update #18, January-March 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

January-March, 2008 edition of the quarterly update for the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project.

Schell, D.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #24, July-September 2009  

SciTech Connect

July to September, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

Schell, D.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The computation of stability boundaries in state space for a class of biochemical engineering systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability of a class of biochemical processes defined by a set of m biochemical reactions involving n components is analysed. The processes operate in a continuous mode and possess at least two stable equilibrium states: the normal operating point ... Keywords: 92-08, 92C45, 93D20, Biochemical processes, Convergence, Nonlinearity, Stability boundaries, Visualization

Mihaela Sbarciog; Mia Loccufier; Erik Noldus

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Control of Noise in Chemical and Biochemical Information Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review models and approaches for error-control in order to prevent the buildup of noise when gates for digital chemical and biomolecular computing based on (bio)chemical reaction processes are utilized to realize stable, scalable networks for information processing. Solvable rate-equation models illustrate several recently developed methodologies for gate-function optimization. We also survey future challenges and possible new research avenues.

Vladimir Privman

2010-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

108

Effects of applied sewage sludge compost and fluidized bed material on apple seedling growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two waste products, composted sewage sludge and fluidized bed material (FBM, a coal/limestone combustion byproduct) were used as soil amendments for apple seedlings (Malus domestica) grown in the greenhouse. Compost was applied at rates equivalent to 0, 25 and 50 dry metric tons/ha and FBM was applied at levels of 1 and 2 times the soil lime requirement on a weight basis (12.5 and 25.0 metric tons/ha). Plant growth was significantly increased by compost or FBM additions. Tissue Ca was increased by both waste, reflecting the high Ca inputs to the low fertility Arendtsville soil. Potentially high soil Mn levels were reduced by both wastes due to their neutralizing effect on soil pH. Root Cd levels were increased by compost additions even though soil pH was maintained above 6.3. Tissue Zn, Cu and Ni were not consistently affected by waste additions.

Korcak, R.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Technical and economic feasibility of utilizing apple pomace as a boiler feedstock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Apple pomace or presscake, was evaluated for suitability as a boiler feedstock for Michigan firms processing apple juice. Based upon the physical and chemical characteristics of pomace, handling/direct combustion systems were selected to conform with operating parameters typical of the industry. Fresh pomace flow rates of 29,030 and 88,998 kg/day (64,000 and 194,000 lb/day) were considered as representative of small and large processors, respectively, and the material was assumed to be dried to 15% moisture content (wet basis) prior to storage and combustion. Boilers utilizing pile-burning, fluidized-bed-combustion, and suspension-firing technologies were sized for each flow rate, resulting in energy production of 2930 and 8790 kW (10 and 30 million Btu/h), respectively. A life-cycle cost analysis was performed giving Average Annual Costs for the three handling/combustion system combinations (based on the Uniform Capital Recovery factor). An investment loan at 16% interest with a 5-year payback period was assumed. The break-even period for annual costs was calculated by anticipated savings incurred through reduction of fossil-fuel costs during a 5-month processing season. Large processors, producing more than 88,998 kg pomace/day, could economically convert to a suspension-fired system substituting for fuel oil, with break-even occurring after 4 months of operation of pomace per year. Small processors, producing less than 29,030 kg/day, could not currently convert to pomace combustion systems given these economic circumstances. A doubling of electrical-utility costs and changes in interest rates from 10 to 20% per year had only slight effects on the recovery of Average Annual Costs. Increases in fossil-fuel prices and the necessity to pay for pomace disposal reduced the cost-recovery period for all systems, making some systems feasible for small processors. 39 references, 13 figures, 10 tables.

Sargent, S.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

First Report of Nectria galligena Causing European Canker of Apple Trees in Ontario. A. R. Biggs, Agriculture Canada Research Station, Vineland Station, Ontario LOR 2EO. Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First Report of Nectria galligena Causing European Canker of Apple Trees in Ontario. A. R. Biggs, Agriculture Canada Research Station, Vineland Station, Ontario LOR 2EO. Plant Disease 69:1007, 1985. Accepted

Biggs, Alan R.

111

Coarse-graining stochastic biochemical networks: adiabaticity and fast simulations  

SciTech Connect

We propose a universal approach for analysis and fast simulations of stiff stochastic biochemical kinetics networks, which rests on elimination of fast chemical species without a loss of information about mesoscoplc, non-Poissonian fluctuations of the slow ones. Our approach, which is similar to the Born-Oppenhelmer approximation in quantum mechanics, follows from the stochastic path Integral representation of the cumulant generating function of reaction events. In applications with a small number of chemIcal reactions, It produces analytical expressions for cumulants of chemical fluxes between the slow variables. This allows for a low-dimensional, Interpretable representation and can be used for coarse-grained numerical simulation schemes with a small computational complexity and yet high accuracy. As an example, we derive the coarse-grained description for a chain of biochemical reactions, and show that the coarse-grained and the microscopic simulations are in an agreement, but the coarse-gralned simulations are three orders of magnitude faster.

Nemenman, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sinitsyn, Nikolai [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hengartner, Nick [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant A pilot-scale conversion plant for researchers, industry partners, and stakeholders to test a variety of biochemical conversion processes and technologies. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. In the biochemical conversion pilot plant, NREL's engineers and scientists focus on all aspects of the efficiency and cost reduction of biochemical conversion processes. Our capabilities accommodate research from bench-scale to pilot-scale (up to one ton per day). NREL's biochemical conversion pilot plant is located in the Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF). Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL/PIX 20248

113

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #16, July-September 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly update contains information on the National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project, R&D progress and related activities.

Schell, D.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model  

SciTech Connect

An update to the FY 2005 assessment of the state of technical research progress toward biochemical process goals. This assessment contains research results from 2006 and 2007.

Aden, A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2008 State of Technology Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An update to the FY 2007 assessment of the state of technical research progress toward biochemical process goals, quantified in terms of Minimum Ethanol Selling Price.

Humbird, D.; Aden, A.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Process Integration Project: Quarterly Update #18, January-March 2008  

SciTech Connect

January-March, 2008 edition of the quarterly update for the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project.

Schell, D.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Microfabricated devices for performing chemical and biochemical analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is growing interest in microfabricated devices that perform chemical and biochemical analysis. The general goal is to use microfabrication tools to construct miniature devices that can perform a complete analysis starting with an unprocessed sample. Such devices have been referred to as lab-on-a-chip devices. Initial efforts on microfluidic laboratory-on-a-chip devices focused on chemical separations. There are many potential applications of these fluidic microchip devices. Some applications such as chemical process control or environmental monitoring would require that a chip be used over an extended period of time or for many analyses. Other applications such as forensics, clinical diagnostics, and genetic diagnostics would employ the chip devices as single use disposable devices.

Ramsey, J.M.; Jacobson, S.C.; Foote, R.S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Comparison of biochemical microbial effects in enhanced oil recovery (MEOR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental data dealing with the interactions between certain microbial species and crude oils indicates that these interactions are selective and occur via biochemical pathways which can be characterized by the chemical composition of the initial crude oil and that of the end products. In the studies discussed in this paper, the microbial species used were thermophilic and/or thermoadapted microorganisms which thrive in harsh environments (e.g., pH, temperature, pressure, salinity). Crude oils chosen for biotreatment represented a wide range of oils, which varied from relatively light oils to heavy, high sulfur content oils. The crude oils used have also been distinguished in terms of their geological history, i.e., heavy, because they are immature or heavy, because they have been biodegraded. The significance of biodegraded'' vs. biotreated'' crude oil in MEOR also discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Manowitz, B.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Comparison of biochemical microbial effects in enhanced oil recovery (MEOR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental data dealing with the interactions between certain microbial species and crude oils indicates that these interactions are selective and occur via biochemical pathways which can be characterized by the chemical composition of the initial crude oil and that of the end products. In the studies discussed in this paper, the microbial species used were thermophilic and/or thermoadapted microorganisms which thrive in harsh environments (e.g., pH, temperature, pressure, salinity). Crude oils chosen for biotreatment represented a wide range of oils, which varied from relatively light oils to heavy, high sulfur content oils. The crude oils used have also been distinguished in terms of their geological history, i.e., heavy, because they are immature or heavy, because they have been biodegraded. The significance of ``biodegraded`` vs. ``biotreated`` crude oil in MEOR also discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Manowitz, B.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines current developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which deals with the development and application of processes for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges has led to the identification and design of cost-efficient and environmentally friendly treatment methodology. Initially the primary goal of the processing was to convert geothermal wastes into disposable materials whose chemical composition would satisfy environmental regulations. An expansion of the R&D effort allowed to identify a combination of biochemical and chemical processes which became a basis for the development of a technology for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges. The new technology satisfies environmental regulatory requirements and concurrently converts the geothermal brines and sludges into commercially promising products. Because the chemical composition of geothermal wastes depends on the type of the resource and therefore differs, the emerging technology has to be also flexible so that it can be readily modified to suit the needs of a particular type of resource. Recent conceptional designs for the processing of hypersaline and low salinity brines and sludges will be discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.

1997-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines: Current developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which deals with the development and application of processes for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges has led to the identification and design of cost-efficient and environmentally friendly treatment methodology. Initially the primary goal of the processing was to convert geothermal wastes into disposable materials whose chemical composition would satisfy environmental regulations. An expansion of the r and D effort identified a combination of biochemical and chemical processes which became the basis for the development of a technology for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges. The new technology satisfies environmental regulatory requirements and concurrently converts the geothermal brines and sludges into commercially promising products. Because the chemical composition of geothermal wastes depends on the type of the resource, the emerging technology has to be flexible so that it can be readily modified to suit the needs of a particular type of resource. Recent conceptional designs for the processing of hypersaline and low salinity brines and sludges will be discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Energy Science and Technology Div.; Bajsarowicz, V. [CET Environmental Services, Inc., Richmond, CA (United States); McCloud, M. [C.E. Holt/California Energy, Pasadena, CA (United States)

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

122

Work with Apple's Rhapsody Operating System which Allows Simultaneous UNIX Program Development, UNIX Program Execution, and PC Application Execution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past decade, UNIX workstations have provided a very powerful program development environment. However, workstations are more expensive than PCs and Macintoshes and require a system manager for day-to-day tasks such as disk backup, adding users, and setting up print queues. Native commercial software for system maintenance and "PC applications" has been lacking under UNIX. Apple's new Rhapsody operating system puts the current MacOS on a NeXT UNIX foundation and adds an enhanced NeXTSTEP object oriented development environment called Yellow Box. Rhapsody simultaneously runs UNIX and commercial Macintosh applications such as word processing or spreadsheets. Thus a UNIX detector Monte Carlo can run for days in the background at the same time as a commercial word processing program. And commercial programs such as Dantz Retrospect are being made available to make disk backup easy under Rhapsody. Apple has announced that in 1999 they intend to be running Rhapsody, or MacOS X as it will be called in the commercial release, on all their newer computers. MacOS X may be of interest to those who have trouble hiring expert UNIX system managers; and to those who would prefer to have a single computer and operating system on their desktop that serves both the needs of UNIX program development and running commercial applications, simultaneously. We present our experiences running UNIX programs and Macintosh applications under the Rhapsody DR2 Developer Release.

Don Summers; Chris Riley; Lucien Cremaldi; David Sanders

2001-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

123

National Bioenergy Center, Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Winter 2011-2012 (Newsletter)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Winter 2011-2012 issue of the National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly update. Issue topics: 34th Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals; feasibility of NIR spectroscopy-based rapid feedstock reactive screening; demonstrating integrated pilot-scale biomass conversion. The Biochemical Process Integration Task focuses on integrating the processing steps in enzyme-based lignocellulose conversion technology. This project supports the U.S. Department of Energy's efforts to foster development, demonstration, and deployment of 'biochemical platform' biorefineries that economically produce ethanol or other fuels, as well as commodity sugars and a variety of other chemical products, from renewable lignocellulosic biomass.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Roadmaps for All Atoms in Biochemical Reactions | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Roadmaps for All Atoms in Biochemical Reactions Roadmaps for All Atoms in Biochemical Reactions Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » September 2012 Roadmaps for All Atoms in Biochemical Reactions How atoms move in biochemical reactions - a fast and accurate method to model all the atoms. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo

125

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & EChapter 3 Biochemical and Physiological Interactions of Vitamin C and Iron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & E The Antioxidant Vitamins C & E Chapter 3 Biochemical and Physiological Interactions of Vitamin C and Iron eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter

126

Journal Review: Biomolecular Engineering, Bioengineering, Biochemicals, and Food Directed Evolution: Past, Present, and Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal Review: Biomolecular Engineering, Bioengineering, Biochemicals, and Food Directed Evolution online January 18, 2013 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) Directed evolution evolution, modern directed evolution came of age 20 years ago with the demonstration of repeated rounds

Zhao, Huimin

127

Project summary Improving the Productivity of Algal Bioreactors for Biofuel and Biochemical Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project summary Improving the Productivity of Algal Bioreactors for Biofuel and Biochemical-derived fuels, or biofuels, are seen as a substantial portion of a sustainable energy portfolio. Aquatic algal biofuel production currently exist. Many private companies are currently attempting

Walter, M.Todd

128

National Bioenergy Center--Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Fall 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fall 2010 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: rapid analysis models for compositional analysis of intermediate process streams; engineered arabinose-fermenting Zymomonas mobilis strain.

Schell, D.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Biotechnology DOI 10.1002/biot.201000171 Biotechnol. J. 2010, 5, 716725  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Centre for Genomics of Industrial Fermentation, Delft, The Netherlands 5 Netherlands Proteomics Centre. cerevisiae, such as the leavening of bread, beer brewing and bioethanol production, occur under essentially is then reprogrammed to optimize yeast cells for fermentative dissimilation of the carbon source in order to conserve

Maranas, Costas

130

Biotechnology DOI 10.1002/biot.201000129 Biotechnol. J. 2010, 5, 660670  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Solarvest BioEnergy pluvialis [10, 73]a) Seambiotic Inventure Chemical Solazyme [72] -Carotene Western

131

Influences of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages on the land surface fluxes and radiative temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influences of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages on the land surface fluxes and radiative energy storages for land-atmosphere interactions, an issue that has been largely neglected so far. We the representation of biomass energy storages against measurements of surface energy and CO2 fluxes. We

132

National Bioenergy Center, Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Summer 2011 (Newsletter)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summer 2011 issue of the National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly update. Issue topics: evaluating new analytical techniques for measuring soluble sugars in the liquid portion of biomass hydrolysates, and measurement of the fraction of insoluble solids in biomass slurries.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Molecular C dynamics downstream: The biochemical decomposition sequence and its impact on soil organic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular C dynamics downstream: The biochemical decomposition sequence and its impact on soil chemistry. As a result, the molecular characteristics of soil C are now known for a range of ecosystems research. Here we present a conceptual model of molecular soil C dynamics to stimulate inter- disciplinary

Neff, Jason

134

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #28, Spring 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spring 2011 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: 33rd Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals program sessions and special topic sessions; assessment of waste water treatment needs; and an update on new arabinose-to-ethanol fermenting Zymomonas mobilis strains.

Schell, D. J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #27, April - June 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

April-June, 2010 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: understanding performance of alternative process configurations for producing ethanol from biomass; investigating Karl Fischer Titration for measuring water content of pretreated biomass slurries.

Schell, D.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

National Bioenergy Center - Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Winter 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Winter 2011 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: 33rd Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals program topic areas; results from reactive membrane extraction of inhibitors from dilute-acid pretreated corn stover; list of 2010 task publications.

Schell, D.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sugar Yields for Biofuel Production. Nat. Biotechnol. 2007;Lignin's Grip on Biofuel Production. Nat. Biotechnol. 2007;Sugar Yields for Biofuel Production. Nat. Biotechnol. 2007;

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Proteomic and Biochemical Studies of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proteomic and Biochemical Studies of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Proteomic and Biochemical Studies of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Deok-Jin Jang 1 , Mingquan Guo 1 , Julia S.F.Chu 2 , Kyle T. Kurpinski 2 , Bjorn Rydberg 1 , Song Li 2 , and Daojing Wang 1 1. Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 2. Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 We will present data obtained during the first year of our DOE/NASA Low Dose Radiation Research program. We utilized a comprehensive approach including transcriptomics, proteomics, phosphoproteomics, and biochemistry to characterize human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in response to low dose ionizing radiation. We first determined the cell survival, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of

139

Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochemical Scenarios for Production of Cellulosic Ethanol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 June 2010 Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochemical Scenarios for Production of Cellulosic Ethanol F. Kabir Kazi, J. Fortman, and R. Anex Iowa State University G. Kothandaraman ConocoPhillips Company D. Hsu, A. Aden, and A. Dutta National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46588 June 2010 Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochemical Scenarios for Production of Cellulosic Ethanol F. Kabir Kazi, J. Fortman, and R. Anex

140

Recent developments in parameter estimation and structure identification of biochemical and genomic systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Recent developments in parameter estimation and structure identification of biochemical and genomic systems I-Chun Chou * , Eberhard O. Voit Integrative BioSystems Institute and The Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, 313 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 2 October 2008 Received in revised form 6 March 2009 Accepted 15 March 2009 Available online 25 March 2009 Keywords: Parameter estimation Network identification Inverse modeling Biochemical Systems Theory a b s t r a c t The organization, regulation and dynamical responses of biological systems are in many cases too com- plex to allow intuitive predictions and require the support of mathematical modeling for quantitative assessments and a reliable understanding of system functioning. All steps of constructing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines: Annual operating plan, FY 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An R and D program to identify methods for the utilization and/or low cost of environmentally acceptable disposal of toxic geothermal residues has been established at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Laboratory work has shown that a biochemical process developed at BNL, would meet regulatory costs and environmental requirements. In this work, microorganisms which can convert insoluble species of toxic metals, including radionuclides, into soluble species, have been identified. These organisms serve as models in the development of a biochemical process in which toxic metals present in geothermal residual sludges are converted into water soluble species. The produced solution can be reinjected or processed further to concentrate and recover commercially valuable metals. After the biochemical detoxification of geothermal residual sludges, the end-products are non-toxic and meet regulatory requirements. The overall process is a technically and environmentally acceptable cost-efficient process. It is anticipated that the new biotechnology will reduce the cost of surface disposal of sludges derived from geothermal brines by 25% or better.

Premuzic, E.T.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Biochemical technology for the detoxification of geothermal brines and the recovery of trace metals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies conducted at BNL, have shown that a cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable biochemical technology for detoxification of geothermal sludges is most satisfactory, as well as technically achievable. This technology is based on biochemical reactions by which certain extremophilic microorganisms interact with inorganic matrices of geothermal origin. The biochemical treatment of wastes generated by power plants using geothermal energy is a versatile technology adaptable to several applications beyond that of rendering hazardous and/or mixed wastes to non-hazardous by products, which meet regulatory requirements. This technology may be used for solubilization or recovery of a few metals to the isolation of many metals including radionuclides. In the metal recovery mode, an aqueous phase is generated which meets regulatory standards. The resulting concentrate contains valuable trace metals and salts which can be further converted into income generating products which can off-set the initial investment costs associated with the new biotechnology. In this paper, recent developments in this emerging technology will be discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Lian, Hsienjen

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Biochem. J.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

29, 29, 533-543 (Printed in Great Britain) doi:10.1042/BJ20100238 533 Identification of a novel UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase with a broad substrate specificity in Trypanosoma cruzi Ting YANG*† and Maor BAR-PELED†‡ 1 *Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, U.S.A., †Complex Carbohydrate Research Center (CCRC), University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, U.S.A., and ‡Department of Plant Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, U.S.A. The diverse types of glycoconjugates synthesized by trypanoso- matid parasites are unique compared with the host cells. These glycans are required for the parasite survival, invasion or evasion of the host immune system. Synthesis of those glycoconjugates requires a constant supply of nucleotide-sugars (NDP-sugars), yet little is known about how these NDP-sugars are made

144

Influences of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages on the land surface fluxes and radiative temperature  

SciTech Connect

We conducted observations and modeling at a forest site to assess importance of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages for land-atmosphere interactions. We used the terrestrial ecosystem Fluxes And Pools Integrated Simulator (FAPIS). We first examined FAPIS performance by testing its predictions with and without biomass energy storages against measurements of surface energy and CO2 fluxes. We then evaluated the magnitudes and temporal patterns of the calculated biomass energy storages. Effects of energy storages on flux exchanges and variations of radiative temperature were investigated by contrasting FAPIS simulations with and without the storages. We found that with the storages, FAPIS predictions agreed with measurements well; without them, FAPIS performance deteriorated for all surface energy fluxes. The biomass heat storage and biochemical energy storage had clear diurnal patterns with typical ranges from -50 to 50 and -3 to 20 Wm-2, respectively; these typical ranges were exceeded substantially when there were sudden changes in atmospheric conditions. Without-storage simulations produced larger sensible and latent heat fluxes during the day but smaller fluxes (more negative values) at night as compared with with-storage simulations. Similarly, without-storage simulations had higher surface radiative temperature during the day but lower radiative temperature at night, indicating that the biomass energy storages act to dampen diurnal temperature range. Therefore, biomass heat and biochemical energy storages are an integral and substantial part of the surface energy budget and play a role in modulating land surface temperatures and must be considered in studies of land - atmosphere interactions and climate modeling.

Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Meyers, T. P. [NOAA ATDD; Pallardy, Stephen G. [University of Missouri; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL; Heuer, Mark [ATDD, NOAA; Hosman, K. P. [University of Missouri; Liu, Qing [ORNL; Riggs, Jeffery S [ORNL; Sluss, Daniel Wayne [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Type-dependent irreversible stochastic spin models for biochemical reaction networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe an approach to model biochemical reaction networks at the level of promotion-inhibition circuitry through a class of stochastic spin models that depart from the usual chemical kinetics setup and includes spatial and temporal density fluctuations in a most natural way. A particular but otherwise generally applicable choice for the microscopic transition rates of the models also makes them of independent interest. To illustrate the formalism, we investigate some stationary state properties of the repressilator, a synthetic three-gene network of transcriptional regulators that possesses a rich dynamical behaviour.

Mendonça, J Ricardo G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines FY 1998 annual operating plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the overall Geothermal Energy Research which is aimed at the development of economical geothermal resources production systems, the aim of the Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) effort is the development of economic and environmentally acceptable methods for disposal of geothermal wastes and conversion of by-products to useful forms. Methods are being developed for dissolution, separation and immobilization of geothermal wastes suitable for disposal, usable in inert construction materials, suitable for reinjection into the reservoir formation, or used for recovery of valuable metals.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Method and apparatus for energy efficient self-aeration in chemical, biochemical, and wastewater treatment processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a pulse spilling self-aerator (PSSA) that has the potential to greatly lower the installation, operation, and maintenance cost associated with aerating and mixing aqueous solutions. Currently, large quantities of low-pressure air are required in aeration systems to support many biochemical production processes and wastewater treatment plants. Oxygen is traditionally supplied and mixed by a compressor or blower and a mechanical agitator. These systems have high-energy requirements and high installation and maintenance costs. The PSSA provides a mixing and aeration capability that can increase operational efficiency and reduce overall cost.

Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

148

MHK Projects/Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.9,"lon":158.75,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

149

Use of the electrically-driven emulsion phase contactor in chemical and biochemical processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electrically driven liquid-liquid contactor has been developed to enhance the efficiency of chemical and biochemical processes. A uniform electric field is utilized to induce a drop dispersion- coalescence cycle, producing high surface area for interfacial mass transfer under continuous-countercurrent-flow conditions. The mass- transport capability of this system has been analyzed by observing the extraction of acetic acid from water (dispersed phase) into methyl isobutyl ketone. Results showed that, due to increased efficiency of mass transfer, the electrically-driven device could be an order of magnitude smaller than a conventional contactor accomplishing the same level of separation. In the case of biochemical processes within non-aqueous environments, a biocatalyst (enzymes or bacteria) is introduced in the aqueous (dispersed) phase. The biocatalyst uses nutrients and other reactants to selectively transform species transferred from the continuous (organic) phase to the interior of the drops. An example of such system that has been investigated is the oxidation of p-cresol dissolved in toluene by aqueous-phase horseradish peroxidase.

Tsouris, C; DePaoli, D.W.; Scott, T.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Coarse-graining stochastic biochemical networks: quasi-stationary approximation and fast simulations using a stochastic path integral technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a universal approach for analysis and fast simulations of stiff stochastic biochemical kinetics networks, which rests on elimination of fast chemical species without a loss of information about mesoscopic, non-Poissonian fluctuations of the slow ones. Our approach, which is similar to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in quantum mechanics, follows from the stochastic path integral representation of the full counting statistics of reaction events (also known as the cumulant generating function). In applications with a small number of chemical reactions, this approach produces analytical expressions for moments of chemical fluxes between slow variables. This allows for a low-dimensional, interpretable representation of the biochemical system, that can be used for coarse-grained numerical simulation schemes with a small computational complexity and yet high accuracy. As an example, we consider a chain of biochemical reactions, derive its coarse-grained description, and show that the Gillespie simulat...

Sinitsyn, N A; Nemenman, Ilya

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Two poplar methyl salicylate esterases display comparable biochemical properties but divergent expression patterns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Two poplar methyl salicylate esterases display comparable biochemical properties but divergent expression patterns Nan Zhao a , Ju Guan a , Farhad Forouhar b , Timothy J. Tschaplinski c , Zong-Ming Cheng a , Liang Tong b , Feng Chen a, * a Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, 252 Ellington Plant Science Bldg., 2431 Joe Johnson Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA b Department of Biological Sciences, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA c Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 3 June 2008 Received in revised form 27 October 2008 Available online 10 January 2009 Keywords: Black cottonwood Populus trichocarpa Methyl esterase SABP2 Methyl salicylate Salicylic acid Gene family Molecular modeling a b s t r a c t Two genes encoding proteins

152

Modeling Tomorrow's Biorefinery - the NREL Biochemical Pilot Plant; Biomass Program (Brochure)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

great ideas into viable solutions great ideas into viable solutions requires the ability to test theories under real world conditions. Few companies have the resources to build pilot-scale processing plants to test their ideas. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) helps by sharing its world-class equipment and expertise with industry and other research organizations through a variety of contractual arrangements. At the NREL campus in Golden, Colo., researchers use state-of-the-art laboratories to develop and improve the technologies that convert biomass to fuels, chemicals, and materials. One of the most important tools available to biomass researchers is the Biochemical Pilot Plant housed in the Alternative Fuels User Facility (AFUF). In this facility,

153

Recent advances in biochemical technology for the processing of geothermal byproducts  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory studies has shown the biochemical technology for treating brines/sludges generated in geothermal electric powerproduction to be promising, cost-efficient, and environmentally acceptable. For scaled-up field use, the new technology depends on the chemistry of the geothermal resources which influences choice of plant design and operating strategy. Latter has to be adaptable to high/low salinity, temperatures, quantity to be processed, and chemistry of brines and byproducts. These variables are of critical and economic importance in areas such as the Geysers and Salton Sea. The brines/sludges can also be converted into useful products. In a joint effort between industrial collaborators and BNL, several engineered processes for treating secondary and other byproducts from geothermal power production are being tested. In terms of field applications, there are several options. Some of these options are presented and discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Lian, L.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Relationships between Beef Postharvest Biochemical Factors and Warner-Bratzler Shear Force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biochemical changes in muscle postmortem have been associated with initial beef tenderness early postmortem, and with improvements in tenderness during postmortem storage, defined as meat aging. Differences in the initial contractile state of the sarcomere, the ionic environment of the sarcoplasm including pH, the activity of neutral proteolytic enzymes, and collagen content and solubility have been associated with beef tenderness. In Phase I, steaks from four genetic lines of steers and heifers were used to understand the biochemical differences between tough and tender steaks. The most tender ( 0.05) between tough and tender steaks. Sodium concentration at 10 d was higher (P = 0.03) in tough steaks, but only account for 0.05% of the variation in WBS at 3d. Tender steaks had less (P = 0.04) intact desmin at 24h, but intact desmin was not correlated (P > 0.05) with WBS. In Phase II, tough steaks after 3, 10, and 17d postmortem had higher (P 0.05) between tough and tender steaks. Tender steaks had less (P < 0.0001) intact desmin at 17d postmortem than tough steaks. Intact desmin at 17d was responsible for 4%, 47%, and 30% of WBS variation after 3, 10, and 17d postmortem, respectively. The slight difference in marbling and quality grade did not account for a significant amount of variation in WBS. However, meat color and pH accounted for variation in shear WBS. Calcium flux may have influenced meat tenderness by activation of calpains and may have altered protein to protein interactions. Results suggested that marbling, µ calpain activity, and desmin degradation, and to a lesser extent pH and meat color contributed to meat tenderness.

Orozco Hernandez, Pilar

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol (2011) 38:873890 DOI 10.1007/s10295-011-0970-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dedicated to break- ing down the crystalline structure of cellulose to release the fermentable­substrate synergistic eVects. As a result, recombinant strains can simultaneously break down and ferment PASC to ethanol in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates is one of the major causes of elevated bioethanol produc- tion cost, making

Zhao, Huimin

156

Identification of Catalysts and Materials for a High-Energy Density Biochemical Fuel Cell: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-345  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed research attempted to identify novel biochemical catalysts, catalyst support materials, high-efficiency electron transfer agents between catalyst active sites and electrodes, and solid-phase electrolytes in order to maximize the current density of biochemical fuel cells that utilize various alcohols as substrates.

Ghirardi, M.; Svedruzic, D.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Biochemical Control With Radiotherapy Improves Overall Survival in Intermediate and High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Who Have an Estimated 10-Year Overall Survival of >90%  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To identify subgroups of patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated with radical radiotherapy that have improved overall survival when disease is biochemically controlled. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 1,060 prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy was divided into nine subgroups based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk category and estimated 10-year overall survival (eOS 10y) derived from the age adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index. Patients with and without biochemical control were compared with respect to overall survival. Actuarial estimates of overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis of overall survival. Results: Median follow-up was 125 months (range, 51-176 months). Only the subgroups with high or intermediate risk disease and an eOS 10y of >90% had a statistically significantly improved overall survival when prostate cancer was biochemically controlled. In all other groups, biochemical control made no significant difference to overall survival. In the subgroup with high-risk disease and eOS 10y >90%, actuarial overall survival was 86.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.5%-94.1%) and 62.1% (95% CI 52.9%-71.3%) for patients with biochemical control and biochemical relapse respectively (p = 0.002). In the intermediate risk group with eOS >90%, actuarial overall survival was 95.3% (95% CI 89.0%-100%) and 79.8% (95% CI 68.0%-91.6%) for biochemically controlled and biochemically relapsed patients (p = 0.033). On multivariate analysis, National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = 0.005), biochemical control (p = 0.033) and eOS 10y (p < 0.001) were statistically significant. Conclusion: Biochemical control translates into improved overall survival in patients with high or intermediate risk disease and an estimated 10-year overall survival of >90%.

Herbert, Christopher, E-mail: cherbert@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott; Morris, W. James [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Joffres, Michel [Department of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC (Canada); Khaira, Mandip; Kwan, Winkle [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Pickles, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Molecular and Biochemical Characterization of Hydrocarbon Production in the Green Microalga Botryococcus braunii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Botryococcus braunii (Chlorophyta, Botryococcaceae) is a colony-forming green microalga that produces large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons, which can be converted into transportation fuels. While B. braunii has been well studied for the chemistry of the hydrocarbon production, very little is known about the molecular biology of B. braunii. As such, this study developed both apparatus and techniques to culture B. braunii for use in the genetic and biochemical characterization. During genetic studies, the genome size was determined of a representative strain of each of the three races of B. braunii, A, B, and L, that are distinguished based on the type of hydrocarbon each produces. Flow cytometry analysis indicates that the A race, Yamanaka strain, of B. braunii has a genome size of 166.0 +/- 0.4 Mb, which is similar to the B race, Berkeley strain, with a genome size of 166 +/- 2.2 Mb, while the L race, Songkla Nakarin strain, has a substantially larger genome size at 211.3 +/- 1.7 Mb. Phylogenetic analysis with the nuclear small subunit (18S) rRNA and actin genes were used to classify multiple strains of A, B, and L races. These analyses suggest that the evolutionary relationship between B. braunii races is correlated with the type of liquid hydrocarbon they produce. Biochemical studies of B. braunii primarily focused on the B race, because it uniquely produces large amounts of botryococcenes that can be used as a fuel for internal combustion engines. C30 botryococcene is metabolized by methylation to generate intermediates of C31, C32, C33, and C34. Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the structure of botryococcenes. The spectral region from 1600?1700 cm^-1 showed v(C=C) stretching bands specific for botryococcenes. Distinct botryococcene Raman bands at 1640 and 1647 cm^-1 were assigned to the stretching of the C=C bond in the botryococcene branch and the exomethylene C=C bonds produced by the methylations, respectively. A Raman band at 1670 cm^-1 was assigned to the backbone C=C bond stretching. Finally, confocal Raman microspectroscopy was used to map the presence and location of methylated botryococcenes within a living colony of B. braunii cells.

Weiss, Taylor Leigh

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Supplementation with xylanase and beta-xylosidase to reduce xylo-oligomer and xylan inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and pretreated corn stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pretreatment technologies to corn stover. Bioresourcerelationship to features of corn stover solids produced byexplosion treatment of corn stover. Appl Biochem Biotech

Qing, Qing; Wyman, Charles E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Method for detection of long-lived radioisotopes in small biochemical samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for detection of long-lived radioisotopes in small bio-chemical samples, comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering said chemical specie to said biologist host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system thereof, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of said chemical specie with said host throughout said biological system of said host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from said host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of said substance from extraneous sources, f. converting said fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in said material by means of direct isotopic counting.

Turteltaub, Kenneth W. (Livermore, CA); Vogel, John S. (Union City, CA); Felton, James S. (Danville, CA); Gledhill, Barton L. (Alamo, CA); Davis, Jay C. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus fusion core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) is one of the most destructive agents, responsible for the enteric infections that are lethal for suckling piglets, causing enormous economic loss to the porcine fostering industry every year. Although it has been known that TGEV spiker protein is essential for the viral entry for many years, the detail knowledge of the TGEV fusion protein core is still very limited. Here, we report that TGEV fusion core (HR1-SGGRGG-HR2), in vitro expressed in GST prokaryotic expression system, shares the typical properties of the trimer of coiled-coil heterodimer (six {alpha}-helix bundle), which has been confirmed by a combined series of biochemical and biophysical evidences including size exclusion chromatography (gel-filtration), chemical crossing, and circular diagram. The 3D homologous structure model presents its most likely structure, extremely similar to those of the coronaviruses documented. Taken together, TGEV spiker protein belongs to the class I fusion protein, characterized by the existence of two heptad-repeat (HR) regions, HR1 and HR2, and the present knowledge about the truncated TGEV fusion protein core may facilitate in the design of the small molecule or polypeptide drugs targeting the membrane fusion between TGEV and its host.

Ma Guangpeng [Department of Preventive Veterinary, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agriculture University, 150030 Harbin (China); Feng Youjun [Laboratory of Molecular Immunology and Molecular Virology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Gao Feng [Laboratory of Molecular Immunology and Molecular Virology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Wang Jinzi [China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Liu Cheng [China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Li Yijing [Department of Preventive Veterinary, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agriculture University, 150030 Harbin (China)]. E-mail: yijingli@163.com

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

162

Biochemical and molecular analysis of a transmembrane protein kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have isolated genomic and cDNA clones encoding a novel receptor-like protein kinase from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This kinase is being studied by combining biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches. Domain-specific antibodies immunodecorate a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 120,000 daltons in extracts of Arabidopsis, where it has been found in all portions of the plant examined including root, stem, leaf, flower, and silique. Cytochemical analysis and initial studies using the kinase promoter with the GUS reporter gene system also indicate that the kinase is present throughout the plant. The kinase is glycosylated, like animal receptor kinases, and has been partially purified from Arabidopsis by using lectin columns. The kinase has been expressed in E coli, purified, and found to autophosphorylate on serine and threonine residues, but not on tyrosine residues. As such, it belongs to the small family of receptor-like kinases with serine/threonine specificity. Transgenic plants are now being produced that either overexpress or carry altered forms of the protein kinase gene. These experiments will help determine the natural role the kinase plays in a pathway of signal transduction.

Bleecker, A.B.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Application of Biochemical and Physiological Indicators for Assessing Recovery of Fish Populations in a Disturbed Stream  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery dynamics in a previously disturbed streamwere investigated to determine the influence of a series of remedial actions on stream recovery and to evaluate the potential application of bioindicators as an environmental management tool. A suite of bioindicators, representing five different functional response groups, were measured annually for a sentinel fish species over a 15 year period during which a variety of remedial and pollution abatement actions were implemented. Trends in biochemical, physiological, condition, growth, bioenergetic, and nutritional responses demonstrated that the health status of a sentinel fish species in the disturbed stream approached that of fish in the reference stream by the end of the study. Two major remedial actions, dechlorination and water flow management, had large effects on stream recovery resulting in an improvement in the bioenergetic, disease, nutritional, and organ condition status of the sentinel fish species. A subset of bioindicators responded rather dramatically to temporal trends affecting all sites, but some indicators showed little response to disturbance or to restoration activities. In assessing recovery of aquatic systems, application of appropriate integrative structural indices along with a variety of sensitive functional bioindicators should be used to understand the mechanistic basis of stress and recovery and to reduce the risk of false positives. Understanding the mechanistic processes involved between stressors, stress responses of biota, and the recovery dynamics of aquatic systems reduces the uncertainty involved in environmental management and regulatory decisions resulting in an increased ability to predict the consequences of restoration and remedial actions for aquatic systems.

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Ham, Kenneth [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Application of Biochemical and Physiological Indicators for Assessing Recovery of Fish Populations in a Disturbed Stream  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery dynamics in a previously disturbed streamwere investigated to determine the influence of a series of remedial actions on stream recovery and to evaluate the potential application of bioindicators as an environmental management tool. A suite of bioindicators, representing five different functional response groups, were measured annually for a sentinel fish species over a 15 year period during which a variety of remedial and pollution abatement actions were implemented. Trends in biochemical, physiological, condition, growth, bioenergetic, and nutritional responses demonstrated that the health status of a sentinel fish species in the disturbed stream approached that of fish in the reference stream by the end of the study. Two major remedial actions, dechlorination and water flow management, had large effects on stream recovery resulting in an improvement in the bioenergetic, disease, nutritional, and organ condition status of the sentinel fish species. A subset of bioindicators responded rather dramatically to temporal trends affecting all sites, but some indicators showed little response to disturbance or to restoration activities. In assessing recovery of aquatic systems, application of appropriate integrative structural indices along with a variety of sensitive functional bioindicators should be used to understand the mechanistic basis of stress and recovery and to reduce the risk of false positives. Understanding the mechanistic processes involved between stressors, stress responses of biota, and the recovery dynamics of aquatic systems reduces the uncertainty involved in environmental management and regulatory decisions resulting in an increased ability to predict the consequences of restoration and remedial actions for aquatic systems.

Adams, S. M.; Ham, Kenneth D.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Modified biochemical methane potential (BMP) assays to assess biodegradation potential of landfilled refuse  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modified Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) assays were used to assess biogas production potential of solid landfill samples. In landfill samples with visible soil content, moisture addition alone was generally as effective at stimulating biogas production as the addition of a comprehensive nutrient media. In a variety of samples from humid and semiarid landfills, addition of an aqueous nutrient media was the most effective stimulant for biogas production; however, moisture addition was almost as effective for most samples, suggesting that water addition would be the most cost-effective field approach. Onset of methanogenesis was slower in fresh refuse samples (even when inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge) than in landfill samples, indicating that the soil into which materials are landfilled is a major source of microorganisms. High volatile solids loading in fresh refuse and landfill assays retarded methanogenesis. A comparison of anaerobic and aerobic sample handling techniques showed no significant differences with regard to onset of methanogenesis and total gas production. The technique shows initial promise with regard to replication and reproducibility of results and could be a meaningful addition to landfill site evaluations where commercial gas recovery is anticipated. The BMP technique could also be adapted to assess anaerobic biodegradability of other solid waste materials for conventional anaerobic digestion applications. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Bogner, J.E.; Rose, C.; Piorkowski, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Method for detection of long-lived radioisotopes in small biochemical samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for detection of long-lived radioisotopes in small biochemical samples, comprising: a. selecting a biological host in which radioisotopes are present in concentrations equal to or less than those in the ambient biosphere, b. preparing a long-lived radioisotope labeled reactive chemical specie, c. administering the chemical specie to the biologist host in doses sufficiently low to avoid significant overt damage to the biological system, d. allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and interaction of the chemical specie with the host throughout the biological system of the host, e. isolating a reacted fraction of the biological substance from the host in a manner sufficient to avoid contamination of the substance from extraneous sources, f. converting the fraction of biological substance by suitable means to a material which efficiently produces charged ions in at least one of several possible ion sources without introduction of significant isotopic fractionation, and, g. measuring the radioisotope concentration in the material by means of direct isotopic counting. 5 figs.

Turteltaub, K.W.; Vogel, J.S.; Felton, J.S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Davis, J.C.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

167

Mutational and Biochemical Analysis of the DNA-entry Nuclease EndA from Streptococcus pneumoniae  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EndA is a membrane-attached surface-exposed DNA-entry nuclease previously known to be required for genetic transformation of Streptococcus pneumoniae. More recent studies have shown that the enzyme also plays an important role during the establishment of invasive infections by degrading extracellular chromatin in the form of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), enabling streptococci to overcome the innate immune system in mammals. As a virulence factor, EndA has become an interesting target for future drug design. Here we present the first mutational and biochemical analysis of recombinant forms of EndA produced either in a cell-free expression system or in Escherichia coli. We identify His160 and Asn191 to be essential for catalysis and Asn182 to be required for stability of EndA. The role of His160 as the putative general base in the catalytic mechanism is supported by chemical rescue of the H160A variant of EndA with imidazole added in excess. Our study paves the way for the identification and development of protein or low-molecular-weight inhibitors for EndA in future high-throughput screening assays.

M Midon; P Schafer; A Pingoud; M Ghosh; A Moon; M Cuneo; R London; G Meiss

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Biochemical and molecular analysis of a transmembrane protein kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana. Progress report, January 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have isolated genomic and cDNA clones encoding a novel receptor-like protein kinase from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This kinase is being studied by combining biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches. Domain-specific antibodies immunodecorate a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 120,000 daltons in extracts of Arabidopsis, where it has been found in all portions of the plant examined including root, stem, leaf, flower, and silique. Cytochemical analysis and initial studies using the kinase promoter with the GUS reporter gene system also indicate that the kinase is present throughout the plant. The kinase is glycosylated, like animal receptor kinases, and has been partially purified from Arabidopsis by using lectin columns. The kinase has been expressed in E coli, purified, and found to autophosphorylate on serine and threonine residues, but not on tyrosine residues. As such, it belongs to the small family of receptor-like kinases with serine/threonine specificity. Transgenic plants are now being produced that either overexpress or carry altered forms of the protein kinase gene. These experiments will help determine the natural role the kinase plays in a pathway of signal transduction.

Bleecker, A.B.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Monolithic piezoelectric sensor (MPS) for sensing chemical, biochemical and physical measurands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piezoelectric sensor and assembly for measuring chemical, biochemical and physical measurands is disclosed. The piezoelectric sensor comprises a piezoelectric material, preferably a crystal, a common metal layer attached to the top surface of the piezoelectric crystal, and a pair of independent resonators placed in close proximity on the piezoelectric crystal such that an efficacious portion of acoustic energy couples between the resonators. The first independent resonator serves as an input port through which an input signal is converted into mechanical energy within the sensor and the second independent resonator serves an output port through which a filtered replica of the input signal is detected as an electrical signal. Both a time delay and an attenuation at a given frequency between the input signal and the filtered replica may be measured as a sensor output. The sensor may be integrated into an assembly with a series feedback oscillator and a radio frequency amplifier to process the desired sensor output. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, a selective film is disposed upon the grounded metal layer of the sensor and the resonators are encapsulated to isolate them from the measuring environment. In an alternative embodiment of the invention, more than two resonators are used in order to increase the resolution of the sensor.

Andle, Jeffrey C. (Bangor, ME); Lec, Ryszard M. (Orono, ME)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF EQUIPMENT FOR BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSING OF GEOTHERMAL RESIDUES: PROGRESS REPORT FY 97  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) and ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), spray-and-bake ETFE and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and brushable ceramic-epoxy coatings were evaluated for corrosion protection in a biochemical process to treat geothermal residues. The findings are also relevant to other moderate temperature brine environments where corrosion is a problem. Coupon, Atlas cell, peel strength, cathodic disbondment and abrasion tests were performed in aggressive environments including geothermal sludge, hypersaline brine and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobadus ferrooxidans) to determine suitability for protecting storage tanks and reaction vessels. It was found that all of the coatings were resistant to chemical attack and biodegradation at the test temperature of 55 C. The EMAA coatings protected 316L stainless steel from corrosion in coupon tests. However, corrosion of mild steel substrates thermal sprayed with EMAA and ETFE occurred in Atlas cell tests that simulated a lined reactor operating environment and this resulted in decreased adhesive strength. Peel tests to measure residual adhesion revealed that failure mode was dependent on exposure conditions. Long-term tests on the durability of ceramic-epoxy coatings in brine and bacteria are ongoing. Initial indications are that this coating has suitable characteristics. Abrasion tests showed that the ceramic-epoxy had good resistance to the abrasive effects of sludge. Thermal sprayed EMAA coatings also displayed abrasion resistance. Cathodic disbondment tests in brine at room temperature indicated that EMAA coatings are resistant to disbondment at applied potentials of {minus}780 to {minus}1,070 mV SCE for the test conditions and duration. Slight disbondment of one specimen occurred at a potential of {minus}1,500 mV SCE. The EMAA may be suited to use in conjunction with cathodic protection although further long-term, higher temperature testing would be needed.

ALLAN,M.L.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Coatings for protection of equipment for biochemical processing of geothermal residues: Progress report FY`97  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) and ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), spray-and-bake ETFE and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and brushable ceramic-epoxy coatings were evaluated for corrosion protection in a biochemical process to treat geothermal residues. Coupon, Atlas cell, peel strength, cathodic disbondment and abrasion tests were performed in aggressive environments including geothermal sludge, hypersaline brine and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus ferrooxidans) to determine suitability for protecting storage tanks and reaction vessels. It was found that all of the coatings were resistant to chemical attack and biodegradation at the test temperature of 55 C. The EMAA coatings protected 316L stainless steel from corrosion in coupon tests. However, corrosion of mild steel substrates thermal sprayed with EMAA and ETFE occurred in Atlas cell tests that simulated a lined reactor operating environment and this resulted in decreased adhesive strength. Peel tests to measure residual adhesion revealed that failure mode was dependent on exposure conditions. Abrasion tests showed that the ceramic-epoxy had good resistance to the abrasive effects of sludge. Thermal sprayed EMAA coatings also displayed abrasion resistance. Cathodic disbondment tests in brine at room temperature indicated that EMAA coatings are resistant to disbondment at applied potentials of {minus}780 to {minus}1,070 mV SCE for the test conditions and duration. Slight disbondment of one specimen occurred at a potential of {minus}1,500 mV SCE. The EMAA may be suited to use in conjunction with cathodic protection although further long-term, higher temperature testing would be needed.

Allan, M.L.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

How Can Men Destined for Biochemical Failure After Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy Be Identified Earlier?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The significance of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) increases during the recovery of androgen after androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and radiotherapy for prostate cancer is not well understood. This study sought to determine whether the initial PSA increase from undetectable after completion of all treatment predicts for eventual biochemical failure (BF). Methods and Materials: Between July 1992 and March 2004, 163 men with a Gleason score of 8-10 or initial PSA level >20 ng/mL, or Stage T3 prostate cancer were treated with radiotherapy (median dose, 76 Gy) and ADT and achieved an undetectable PSA level. The first detectable PSA level after the cessation of ADT was defined as the PSA sentinel rise (SR). A PSA-SR of >0.25, >0.5, >0.75, and >1.0 ng/mL was studied as predictors of BF (nadir plus 2 ng/mL). Cox proportional hazards models were used for univariate and multivariate analyses for BF adjusting for pretreatment differences in Gleason score, stage, PSA level (continuous), dose (continuous), and ADT duration (<12 vs. {>=}12 months). Results: Of the 163 men, 41 had BF after therapy. The median time to BF was 25 months (range, 4-96). The 5-year BF rate stratified by a PSA-SR of {<=}0.25 vs. >0.25 ng/mL was 28% vs. 43% (p = 0.02), {<=}0.5 vs. >0.5 ng/mL was 30% vs. 56% (p = 0.0003), {<=}0.75 vs. >0.75 ng/mL was 29% vs. 66% (p < 0.0001), and {<=}1.0 vs. >1.0 ng/mL was 29% vs. 75% (p < 0.0001). All four PSA-SRs were independently predictive of BF on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The PSA-SR predicts for BF. A PSA-SR of >0.5 ng/mL can be used for early identification of men at greater risk of BF.

D'Ambrosio, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ruth, Karen [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M.; Uzzo, Robert G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pollack, Alan [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)], E-mail: mark.buyyounouski@fccc.edu

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-selective channels in planar 43. Ogunjimi AA, Chandler JM, Gbenle GO, Olukoya DK, Akinrimisi EO: Heterologous expression of cry2 gene from a local strain of Bacillus thuringiensis isolated in Nigeria. Biotechnol Appl Bio- chem 2002, 36:241-246. 44. Sreekrishna K... ral ssBioMed CentMicrobial Cell Factories Open AcceReview Recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris Cemal Gurkan*1,2 and David J Ellar1 Address: 1Department of Biochemistry...

Gurkan, Cemal; Ellar, David J

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

Application of the comprehensive set of heterozygous yeast deletion mutants to elucidate the molecular basis of cellular chromium toxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

individually in YEPD or YNB media [45,46]. Where specified, organisms were cultured in 300 ?l volumes in 48-well plates (Greiner Bio-One, Stone- house, Gloucestershire, UK) with shaking at 30°C in a BioTek Powerwave microplate reader (BioTek, Vinooski, VT, USA... . Nature Biotechnol 1998, 16:572-575. 5. Avery SV: Metal toxicity in yeasts and the role of oxidative stress. Adv Appl Microbiol 2001, 49:111-142.Genome Biology 2007, 8:R268 ml of cells were pelleted by centrifugation and resuspended in 60 ?l of Passive...

Holland, Sara; Lodwig, Emma; Sideri, Theodora; Reader, Tom; Clarke, Ian; Gkargkas, Konstantinos; Hoyle, David C; Delneri, Daniela; Oliver, Stephen G; Avery, Simon V

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

175

Please cite this article in press as: J. Shaw-Stewart, et al., The optimisation of the laser-induced forward transfer process for fabrication of polyfluorene-based organic light-emitting diode pixels, Appl. Surf. Sci. (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-induced forward transfer process for fabrication of polyfluorene-based organic light-emitting diode pixels, Appl-induced forward transfer process for fabrication of polyfluorene-based organic light-emitting diode pixels James been used to fabricate various types of organic light- emitting diodes (OLEDs), and the process itself

176

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How biotech can transform biofuels. Nat. Biotechnol. 26:169-How biotech can transform biofuels. Nat. Biotechnol. 26:169-How biotech can transform biofuels. Nat. Biotechnol. 26:169-

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Appliances by Climate Zone, a. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total .................................................. 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven .............................................. 101.7 9.1 27.9 23.1 19.4 22.2 7.8 1 ................................................... 95.2 8.7 26.0 21.6 17.7 21.2 7.9 2 or More ..................................... 6.5 0.4 1.9 1.5 1.7 1.0 14.7 Most Used Oven ........................... 101.7 9.1 27.9 23.1 19.4 22.2

178

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 1 .............................................................. 95.2 18.2 13.3 4.9 1.1 2 or More ................................................. 6.5 1.4 1.1 0.3 11.7 Most Used Oven ...................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 Electric .....................................................

179

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, 4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.6 1.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 1 ................................................ 95.2 63.7 8.9 16.2 6.3 4.3 2 or More .................................. 6.5 5.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 15.9 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 Electric ...................................... 63.0 43.3 5.2 10.9 3.6

180

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.1 3.1 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 1 ................................................ 62.9 54.1 2.0 1.6 5.2 7.1 2 or More .................................. 5.4 5.0 Q Q 0.2 22.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 68.3 59.1 2.0 1.7 5.4 7.0 Electric ......................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Appliances by West Census Region, 2a. Appliances by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.7 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 1 .............................................................. 95.2 20.9 6.4 14.5 1.1 2 or More ................................................. 6.5 1.2 0.2 1.0 14.6 Most Used Oven ...................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 Electric .....................................................

182

Cynthia Sandberg: Love Apple Farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a tomato that somebody loves in Iran, I’ll acquire that seeda fabulous tomato seed from Iran. I got it from a friend ofthe kind of tomato we have in Iran. We only have one kind of

Rabkin, Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Cynthia Sandberg: Love Apple Farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

So I had dinner at the restaurant. It was fabulous. It was ado even more stuff for the restaurant. So that’s been great.harvest we do for the restaurant, every bed that we remove

Rabkin, Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Cynthia Sandberg: Love Apple Farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

That manure goes into the compost piles. That decomposes,classes and beekeeping and compost and vermiculture. So weor can I produce enough compost and worm castings here so

Rabkin, Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Cynthia Sandberg: Love Apple Farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volunteers, interns and apprentices. People love to come inInterns, Volunteers, and Apprentices And going to a systeminterns and volunteers and apprentices keeps my labor costs

Rabkin, Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

appl_household2001.pdf  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... Q Q Q Q Q NF Other Appliances Automobile BlockEngine Battery Heater ... 0.5 0.3 Q 0.1 Q 37.2 Ceiling Fans...

187

appl_household2001.pdf  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Very Large (23 or More cf) ... 5.3 0.3 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.6 18.3 Through-the-Door IceWater Service Yes ... 22.1 1.2 5.1 4.4 5.4 5.9 9.6...

188

appl_household2001.pdf  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Units ... 11.9 8.7 1.5 1.5 0.2 14.9 Heaters (other) Hot Tub or Spa (heaters) ... 4.4 1.6 0.6 1.2 1.0 14.8 Electric...

189

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

or More Units ... 11.9 2.3 2.0 0.4 19.8 Heaters (other) Hot Tub or Spa (heaters) ... 4.4 0.6 0.4 0.2 19.5 Electric...

190

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

More Units ... 11.9 1.9 0.9 Q 0.8 24.6 Heaters (other) Hot Tub or Spa (heaters) ... 4.4 1.5 0.6 0.2 0.8 12.2 Electric...

191

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Units ... 11.9 2.6 1.9 0.8 0.2 15.2 Heaters (other) Hot Tub or Spa (heaters) ... 4.4 0.2 0.9 0.6 Q 14.6 Electric...

192

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Appliances by Household Income, 3a. Appliances by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.5 1.4 1.1 1.0 0.8 1.6 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 18.0 22.0 26.1 35.6 14.4 32.6 3.2 1 ................................................ 95.2 17.3 21.1 24.8 32.0 13.8 31.1 3.4 2 or More .................................. 6.5 0.8 0.9 1.3 3.6 0.6 1.5 13.1 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 18.0 22.0 26.1 35.6 14.4 32.6 3.2

193

appl_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, 2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.5 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 1 ................................................ 95.2 13.1 16.3 16.6 12.1 12.7 24.3 4.4 2 or More .................................. 6.5 1.2 0.9 1.1 0.7 1.0 1.6 14.8 Most Used Oven ........................ 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 Electric ......................................

194

Research on: A. Reclamation of borrow pits and denuded lands; B. Biochemical aspects of mycorrhizae of forest trees  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report furnishes a list of compiled and ongoing studies and a list of publications which resulted from the research accomplished by Institute scientists and other collaborators. The research accomplished can be placed in four categories: I. Research on borrow pit rehabilitation with 12 publications; II. Research on artificial regeneration of southern pines with 34 publications; III. Research on artificial regeneration of eastern hardwoods with 16 publications; and IV. Cooperative research with the University of Georgia on biochemical aspects of mycorrhizae with 5 publications. Major accomplishments of this research are: 1. Procedures to successfully reclaim borrow pits with sludge, subsoiling and seedlings with specific mycorrhizae. 2. Protocols to successfully artificially regenerate southern pines (particularly ling leaf pine) and certain eastern hardwoods. 3. Basic understanding of the biochemistry of mycorrhizae and the discovery of a new pathway for sucrose utilization in plants. 67 refs.

Marx, D.H. (comp.)

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wheat Straw Pretreated for Bioethanol Production. BiotechnolWheat Straw Pretreated for Bioethanol Production. Biotechnol1996) Handbook on Bioethanol: Production and Utilization (

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plants and Enzymes for Biofuels Production. Science. 2007;Lignocellulose. Biotechnol. for Biofuels 2009; 2:11. KumarPretreatment. Biotechnol. for Biofuels 2010; 3:27. Lionetti

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Metabolic engineering of microorganisms for biofuels production: from bugs to synthetic biology to fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of microbial hosts for biofuels production. Metab Eng 2008,delivers next-generation biofuels. Nat Biotechnol 27.furfural (HMF). Biotechnol Biofuels 2008, 1:12. 40. Trinh

Kuk Lee, Sung

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Economic feasibility of biochemical processes for the upgrading of crudes and the removal of sulfur, nitrogen, and trace metals from crude oil -- Benchmark cost establishment of biochemical processes on the basis of conventional downstream technologies. Final report FY95  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), systematic studies have been conducted which dealt with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several chemical and physical properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent reduction in the concentration of trace metals; and (6) the qualitative and quantitative changes appear to be microbial species dependent; and (7) there is a distinction between biodegraded and biotreated oils. The downstream biotechnological crude oil processing research performed thus far is of laboratory scale and has focused on demonstrating the technical feasibility of downstream processing with different types of biocatalysts under a variety of processing conditions. Quantitative economic analysis is the topic of the present project which investigates the economic feasibility of the various biochemical downstream processes which hold promise in upgrading of heavy crudes, such as those found in California, e.g., Monterey-type, Midway Sunset, Honda crudes, and others.

Premuzic, E.T.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion of Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover D. Humbird, R. Davis, L. Tao, C. Kinchin, D. Hsu, and A. Aden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P. Schoen, J. Lukas, B. Olthof, M. Worley, D. Sexton, and D. Dudgeon Harris Group Inc. Seattle, Washington and Atlanta, Georgia Technical Report NREL/TP-5100-47764 May 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

200

[14] a) H. Jia, G. Zhu, B. Vugrinovich, W. Kataphinan, D. H. Reneker, P. Wang, Biotechnol. Prog. 2002, 18, 1027. b) M. M. Demir, M. A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and efficient energy sources/carriers to replace fossil fuels. Seeking renewable energy sources/car- riers of hydro- gen becomes a key issue that must be addressed if the hydro- gen economy is to be developed

Li, Jing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Dosimetric parameters as predictive factors for biochemical control in patients with higher risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze the role of dosimetric quality parameters in maximizing cancer eradication in higher risk prostate cancer patients treated with palladium (Pd)-103 and supplemental beam radiation. Methods: One-hundred-seventy-nine patients treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation, with minimum 2 years follow-up prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and posttreatment computed tomography scans were analyzed. Dosimetric parameters included the V100 (percent of the postimplant volume covered by the prescription dose), the D90 (the minimum dose that covered 90% of the post implant volume), and the treatment margins (the radial distance between the prostatic edge and the prescription isodose). Treatment margins (TMs) were calculated using premarket software. Results: Freedom from biochemical failure was 79% at 3 years, with 92 of the 179 patients (51%) followed beyond 3 years. In comparing patients who did or did not achieve biochemical control, the most striking differences were in biologic factors of pretreatment PSA and Gleason score. The V100, D90, and average TM all showed nonsignificant trends to higher values in patients with biochemical control. In multivariate analysis of each of the three dosimetric parameters against PSA and Gleason score, TM showed the strongest correlation with biochemical control (p = 0.19). Conclusions: For patients with intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 brachytherapy and external beam radiation, biologic factors (PSA and Gleason score) were the most important determinants of cancer eradication. However, there is a trend to better outcomes among patients with higher quality implant parameters, suggesting that attention to implant quality will maximize the likelihood of cure.

Orio, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Wallner, Kent [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States) and Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States) and Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA (United States)]. E-mail: kent.Wallner@med.va.gov; Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Herstein, Andrew [Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Mitsuyama, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Thornton, Ken [Varian Medical Systems, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Butler, Wayne [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Sutlief, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States)

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

15-Year biochemical relapse free survival in clinical Stage T1-T3 prostate cancer following combined external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy; Seattle experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Long-term biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS) rates in patients with clinical Stages T1-T3 prostate cancer continue to be scrutinized after treatment with external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We report 15-year BRFS rates on 223 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer that were consecutively treated with I{sup 125} or Pd {sup 103} brachytherapy after 45-Gy neoadjuvant EBRT. Multivariate regression analysis was used to create a pretreatment clinical prognostic risk model using a modified American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition (two consecutive serum prostate-specific antigen rises) as the outcome. Gleason scoring was performed by the pathologists at a community hospital. Time to biochemical failure was calculated and compared by using Kaplan-Meier plots. Results: Fifteen-year BRFS for the entire treatment group was 74%. BRFS using the Memorial Sloan-Kettering risk cohort analysis (95% confidence interval): low risk, 88%, intermediate risk 80%, and high risk 53%. Grouping by the risk classification described by D'Amico, the BRFS was: low risk 85.8%, intermediate risk 80.3%, and high risk 67.8% (p = 0.002). Conclusions: I{sup 125} or Pd{sup 103} brachytherapy combined with supplemental EBRT results in excellent 15-year biochemical control. Different risk group classification schemes lead to different BRFS results in the high-risk group cohorts.

Sylvester, John E. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)]. E-mail: johnsylvester@seattleprostate.com; Grimm, Peter D. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Blasko, John C. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Millar, Jeremy [Department Radiation Oncology, William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Orio, Peter F. [Department Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Skoglund, Scott [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Galbreath, Robert W. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Ohio University Eastern, St. Clairsville, OH (United States); Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibers to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands. 21 figs.

Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

204

Assessment of Cerebellar and Hippocampal Morphology and Biochemical Parameters in the Compound Heterozygous, Tottering/leaner Mouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to two different mutations in the gene that encodes the a1A subunit of voltage-activated CaV 2.1 calcium ion channels, the compound heterozygous tottering/leaner (tg/tgla) mouse exhibits numerous neurological deficits. Human disorders that arise from mutations in this voltage dependent calcium channel are familial hemiplegic migraine, episodic ataxia-2, and spinocerebellar ataxia 6. The tg/tgla mouse exhibits ataxia, movement disorders and memory impairment, suggesting that both the cerebellum and hippocampus are affected. To gain greater understanding of the many neurological abnormalities that are exhibited by the 90-120 day old tg/tgla mouse the following aspects were investigated: 1) the morphology of the cerebellum and hippocampus, 2) proliferation and death in cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and 3) changes in basic biochemical parameters in granule cells of the cerebellum and hippocampus. This study revealed no volume abnormalities within the hippocampus of the mutant mice, but a decrease in cell density with the pyramidal layer of CA3 and the hilus of the dentate gyrus. Cell size in the CA3 region was unaffected, but cell size in the hilus of the dentate gyrus did not exhibit the gender difference seen in the wild type mouse. The cerebellum showed a decrease in volume without any decrease in cerebellar cellular density. Cell proliferation and differentiation in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus remained normal. This region also revealed a decrease in cell death in the tg/tgla mice. Basal intracellular calcium levels in granule cells show no difference within the hippocampus, but an increase in the tg/tgla male cerebellum compared to the wild type male cerebellum. There was no significant difference in granule cell mitochondrial membrane potential within the wild type and mutant animals in either the hippocampus or cerebellum. The rate of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in granule cells revealed no variation within the hippocampus or cerebellum. The amount of ROS was decreased in cerebellar granule cells, but not granule cells of the hippocampus. Inducing ROS showed no alteration in production or amount of ROS produced in the hippocampus, but did show a ceiling in the amount of ROS produced, but not rate of production, in the cerebellum.

Murawski, Emily M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from microalgae beats bioethanol. Trends Biotechnol 4. Scotta renewable source for bioethanol. Bioresour Technol 2011,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

207

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton ( 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

208

PSA Bounce and Biochemical Failure After Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Study of 820 Patients With a Minimum of 3 Years of Follow-Up  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine clinical or dosimetric factors associated with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce, as well as an association between a PSA bounce and biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), in patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A variety of clinical and treatment factors were examined in 820 patients who had a minimum of 3 years of PSA follow-up with T1-T2cN0M0 prostate cancer. Four different PSA threshold values were used for defining a PSA bounce: a PSA rise of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL. Results: A PSA bounce of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL was noted in 247 patients (30.1%), 161 (19.6%), 105 (12.8%), and 78 (9.5%), respectively. The median time to the first PSA rise was 17.4, 16.25, 16.23, and 15.71 months, respectively, vs. 34.35 months for a biochemical failure (p < 0.0001). A PSA rise of {>=}0.2 ng/mL was the only definition for which there was a significant difference in bRFS between bounce and non-bounce patients. The 5-year bRFS rate of patients having a PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 was 97.7% vs. 91% for those who did not have a PSA bounce (p = 0.0011). On univariate analysis for biochemical failure, age, risk group, and PSAs per year had a statistically significant correlation with PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 ng/mL. On multivariate analysis, age and PSAs per year remained statistically significant (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0456, respectively). Conclusions: A bounce definition of a rise {>=}0.2 ng/mL is a reliable definition among several other definitions. The time to first PSA rise is the most valuable factor for distinguishing between a bounce and biochemical failure.

Caloglu, Murat, E-mail: caloglumurat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya University, Edirne (Turkey); Ciezki, Jay P.; Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Angermeier, Kenneth; Ulchaker, James [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chehade, Nabil; Altman, Andrew [Department of Urology, Kaiser Permanente-Ohio, Parma, OH (United States); Magi-Galuzzi, Christina [Department of Anatomic Pathology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Klein, Eric A. [Glickman Urologic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes one potential biochemical ethanol conversion process, conceptually based upon core conversion and process integration research at NREL. The overarching process design converts corn stover to ethanol by dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, and co-fermentation. Building on design reports published in 2002 and 1999, NREL, together with the subcontractor Harris Group Inc., performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process. This update reflects NREL's current vision of the biochemical ethanol process and includes the latest research in the conversion areas (pretreatment, conditioning, saccharification, and fermentation), optimizations in product recovery, and our latest understanding of the ethanol plant's back end (wastewater and utilities). The conceptual design presented here reports ethanol production economics as determined by 2012 conversion targets and 'nth-plant' project costs and financing. For the biorefinery described here, processing 2,205 dry ton/day at 76% theoretical ethanol yield (79 gal/dry ton), the ethanol selling price is $2.15/gal in 2007$.

Humbird, D.; Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Kinchin, C.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.; Olthof, B.; Worley, M.; Sexton, D.; Dudgeon, D.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Three distinct stages of apoptotic nuclear condensation revealed by time-lapse imaging, biochemical and electron microscopy analysis of cell-free apoptosis  

SciTech Connect

During apoptotic execution, chromatin undergoes a phase change from a heterogeneous, genetically active network to an inert highly condensed form that is fragmented and packaged into apoptotic bodies. We have previously used a cell-free system to examine the roles of caspases or other proteases in apoptotic chromatin condensation and nuclear disassembly. But so far, the role of DNase activity or ATP hydrolysis in this system has not yet been elucidated. Here, in order to better define the stages of nuclear disassembly in apoptosis, we have characterized the apoptotic condensation using a cell-free system and time-lapse imaging. We demonstrated that the population of nuclei undergoing apoptosis in vitro appears to follow a reproducible program of nuclear condensation, suggesting the existence of an ordered biochemical pathway. This enabled us to define three stages of apoptotic chromatin condensation: stage 1 ring condensation; stage 2 necklace condensation; and stage 3 nuclear collapse/disassembly. Electron microscopy revealed that neither chromatin nor detectable subnuclear structures were present inside the stage 1 ring-condensed structures. DNase activity was not essential for stage 1 ring condensation, which could occur in apoptotic extracts depleted of all detectable DNase activity. However, DNase(s) were required for stage 2 necklace condensation. Finally, we demonstrated that hydrolyzable ATP is required for stage 3 nuclear collapse/disassembly. This requirement for ATP hydrolysis further distinguished stage 2 from stage 3. Together, these experiments provide the first steps towards a systematic biochemical characterization of chromatin condensation during apoptosis.

Tone, Shigenobu [Department of Biochemistry, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan)], E-mail: tone@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp; Sugimoto, Kenji [Laboratory of Applied Molecular Biology, Division of Bioscience and Informatics, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Tanda, Kazue [Department of Biochemistry, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan); Suda, Taiji; Uehira, Kenzo [Electron Microscope Center, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan); Kanouchi, Hiroaki [Department of Biochemistry, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan); Samejima, Kumiko [Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, ICMB, King's Buildings, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH93JR, Scotland (United Kingdom); Minatogawa, Yohsuke [Department of Biochemistry, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan); Earnshaw, William C. [Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, ICMB, King's Buildings, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH93JR, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Bill.Earnshaw@ed.ac.uk

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to the fact that large amounts of cellulases are required to breakdown cellulose to fermentable. Directed evolution of a thermophilic beta-glucosidase for cellulosic bioethanol production. Appl. Biochem

Zhao, Huimin

212

Is Biochemical Response More Important Than Duration of Neoadjuvant Hormone Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer? An Analysis of the 3- Versus 8-Month Randomized Trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To ascertain whether biochemical response to neoadjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) before radiotherapy (RT), rather than duration, is the critical determinant of benefit in the multimodal treatment of localized prostate cancer, by comparing outcomes of subjects from the Canadian multicenter 3- vs 8-month trial with a pre-RT, post-hormone PSA (PRPH-PSA) <=0.1 ng/ml vs those >0.1 ng/ml. Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2001, 378 men with localized prostate cancer were randomized to 3 or 8 months of neoadjuvant ADT before RT. On univariate analysis, survival indices were compared between those with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml vs >0.1 ng/ml, for all patients and subgroups, including treatment arm, risk group, and gleason Score. Multivariate analysis identified independent predictors of outcome. Results: Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was significantly higher for those with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml compared with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml (55.3% vs 49.4%, p = 0.014). No difference in survival indices was observed between treatment arms. There was no difference in bDFS between patients in the 3- and 8-month arms with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml nor those with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml. bDFS was significantly higher for high-risk patients with PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml compared with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml (57.0% vs 29.4%, p = 0.017). Multivariate analysis identified PRPH-PSA (p = 0.041), Gleason score (p = 0.001), initial PSA (p = 0.025), and T-stage (p = 0.003), not ADT duration, as independent predictors of outcome. Conclusion: Biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT before RT, not duration, appears to be the critical determinant of benefit in the setting of combined therapy. Individually tailored ADT duration based on PRPH-PSA would maximize therapeutic gain, while minimizing the duration of ADT and its related toxicities.

Alexander, Abraham, E-mail: aalexander3@bccancer.bc.c [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Crook, Juanita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jones, Stuart [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Malone, Shawn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Regional Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bowen, Julie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northeastern Ontario Regional Cancer Center, Sudbury, ON (Canada); Truong, Pauline; Pai, Howard; Ludgate, Charles [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Development of On-Line High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)-Biochemical Detection Methods as Tools in the Identification of Bioactives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Biochemical detection (BCD) methods are commonly used to screen plant extracts for specific biological activities in batch assays. Traditionally, bioactives in the most active extracts were identified through time-consuming bio-assay guided fractionation until single active compounds could be isolated. Not only are isolation procedures often tedious, but they could also lead to artifact formation. On-line coupling of BCD assays to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is gaining ground as a high resolution screening technique to overcome problems associated with pre-isolation by measuring the effects of compounds post-column directly after separation. To date, several on-line HPLC-BCD assays, applied to whole plant extracts and mixtures, have been published. In this review the focus will fall on enzyme-based, receptor-based and antioxidant assays.

Christiaan J. Malherbe; Dalene De Beer; Elizabeth Joubert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Hypodensity/Hyperdensity ; or, Apple skies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hypodensity/Hyperdensity is a reaction to the paradoxical modern urban condition of emptiness: the 'ring of drek,' left like a smear around Boston by post-industrial deflation. This area is close to both the crowded city ...

Cira, Gabriel (Gabriel Blue)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Performance Calculations of APPLE II Undulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Photon Source (formerly MD-TN-2008-001) R. Dejus - MD GroupASD S. Sasaki - Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-0046, Japan Rev. 3, November...

216

how to prepare Apple-Cabbage Slaw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, celery, and onions. In a separate bowl, combine ingredients for pineapple yogurt dressing and mix. Gently Extension, 1990) Reivsed By Lillian Occeña-Po, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Dept. of Food Science & Human

217

The proportion of prostate biopsy tissue with Gleason pattern 4 or 5 predicts for biochemical and clinical outcome after radiotherapy for prostate cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the prognostic utility of the proportion of prostate biopsy tissue containing Gleason pattern 4 or 5 (GP4/5) after definitive radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 568 patients with T1c-3 Nx/0 prostate cancer who received three-dimensional conformal RT alone between May 1989 and August 2001 were studied. There were 161 men with Gleason score 7-10 disease. The GP4/5 was defined as the percentage of biopsy tissue containing Gleason pattern 4 or 5. A Cox proportional hazards model was used for univariate and multivariate analyses (MVA) for biochemical failure (BF) (American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition) and distant metastasis (DM). A recursive partitioning analysis was done using the results of the MVA to identify a cutpoint for GP4/5. Results: The median follow-up was 46 (range, 13-114) months and median RT dose was 76 (range, 65-82) Gy. On MVA, increasing initial prostate-specific antigen (p = 0.0248) decreasing RT dose (continuous, p = 0.0022), T stage (T1/2 vs. T3) (p = 0.0136) and GP4/5 (continuous, p < 0.0001) were significant predictors of BF in a model also containing GS. GP4/5 was the only significant predictor of DM in the same model (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The GP4/5 in prostate biopsy specimens is a predictor of BF and DM after RT independent of Gleason score. This parameter should be reported by the pathologist when reviewing prostatic biopsy specimens.

D'Ambrosio, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hanlon, Alexandra L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Al-Saleem, Tahseen [Department of Pathology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Feigenberg, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Uzzo, Robert G. [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pollack, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)]. E-mail: mark.buyyounouski@fccc.edu

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Chemical/Biochemical Microsensor Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (b) An example of the power of the Event ... stability, speed and reproducibility of sensing materials are critical to next-generation chemical sensing ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

219

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Biochemical Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

production; developing and scaling catalytic systems for producing hydrocarbons and fuel-blend oxygenates from lignocellulosic material; and utilizing and valorizing lignin...

220

Thermal analysis of biochemical systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientists, both academic and industrial, develop two main types of drugs: 1) small molecule drugs, which are usually chemically synthesized and are taken orally and 2) large molecule, biotherapeutic, or protein-based ...

McEuen, Scott Jacob

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How biotech can transform biofuels. Nat Biotechnol 26(2):J Somerville C. 2007. Biofuels. Curr Biol 17(4):R115–9.biomass characteristics for biofuels. Curr Opin Biotechnol

Bartley, Laura E; Ronald, Pamela C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

High Occurrence of Aberrant Lymph Node Spread on Magnetic Resonance Lymphography in Prostate Cancer Patients With a Biochemical Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the pattern of lymph node spread in prostate cancer patients with a biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy, eligible for salvage radiotherapy; and to determine whether the clinical target volume (CTV) for elective pelvic irradiation in the primary setting can be applied in the salvage setting for patients with (a high risk of) lymph node metastases. Methods and Materials: The charts of 47 prostate cancer patients with PSA recurrence after prostatectomy who had positive lymph nodes on magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) were reviewed. Positive lymph nodes were assigned to a lymph node region according to the guidelines of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) for delineation of the CTV for pelvic irradiation (RTOG-CTV). We defined four lymph node regions for positive nodes outside this RTOG-CTV: the para-aortal, proximal common iliac, pararectal, and paravesical regions. They were referred to as aberrant lymph node regions. For each patient, clinical and pathologic features were recorded, and their association with aberrant lymph drainage was investigated. The distribution of positive lymph nodes was analyzed separately for patients with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <1.0 ng/mL. Results: MRL detected positive aberrant lymph nodes in 37 patients (79%). In 20 patients (43%) a positive lymph node was found in the pararectal region. Higher PSA at the time of MRL was associated with the presence of positive lymph nodes in the para-aortic region (2.49 vs. 0.82 ng/mL; p = 0.007) and in the proximal common iliac region (1.95 vs. 0.59 ng/mL; p = 0.009). There were 18 patients with a PSA <1.0 ng/mL. Ten of these patients (61%) had at least one aberrant positive lymph node. Conclusion: Seventy-nine percent of the PSA-recurrent patients had at least one aberrant positive lymph node. Application of the standard RTOG-CTV for pelvic irradiation in the salvage setting therefore seems to be inappropriate.

Meijer, Hanneke J.M., E-mail: H.Meijer@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lin, Emile N. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Debats, Oscar A. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Witjes, J. Alfred [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barentsz, Jelle O. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Structural, Biochemical, and Phylogenetic Analyses Suggest That Indole-3-Acetic Acid Methyltransferase Is an Evolutionarily Ancient Member of the SABATH Family  

SciTech Connect

The plant SABATH protein family encompasses a group of related small-molecule methyltransferases (MTs) that catalyze the S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methylation of natural chemicals encompassing widely divergent structures. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) methyltransferase (IAMT) is a member of the SABATH family that modulates IAA homeostasis in plant tissues through methylation of IAA's free carboxyl group. The crystal structure of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) IAMT (AtIAMT1) was determined and refined to 2.75 Angstroms resolution. The overall tertiary and quaternary structures closely resemble the two-domain bilobed monomer and the dimeric arrangement, respectively, previously observed for the related salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase from Clarkia breweri (CbSAMT). To further our understanding of the biological function and evolution of SABATHs, especially of IAMT, we analyzed the SABATH gene family in the rice (Oryza sativa) genome. Forty-one OsSABATH genes were identified. Expression analysis showed that more than one-half of the OsSABATH genes were transcribed in one or multiple organs. The OsSABATH gene most similar to AtIAMT1 is OsSABATH4. Escherichia coli-expressed OsSABATH4 protein displayed the highest level of catalytic activity toward IAA and was therefore named OsIAMT1. OsIAMT1 exhibited kinetic properties similar to AtIAMT1 and poplar IAMT (PtIAMT1). Structural modeling of OsIAMT1 and PtIAMT1 using the experimentally determined structure of AtIAMT1 reported here as a template revealed conserved structural features of IAMTs within the active-site cavity that are divergent from functionally distinct members of the SABATH family, such as CbSAMT. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that IAMTs from Arabidopsis, rice, and poplar (Populus spp.) form a monophyletic group. Thus, structural, biochemical, and phylogenetic evidence supports the hypothesis that IAMT is an evolutionarily ancient member of the SABATH family likely to play a critical role in IAA homeostasis across a wide range of plants.

Zhao,N.; Ferrer, J.; Ross, J.; Guan, J.; Yang, Y.; Pichersky, E.; Noel, J.; Chen, F.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Available at www.sciencedirect.com journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/watres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Nitrosococcus mobilis. J Biotechnol Bioeng 99(5):1085­1095. Schmidt I, Steenbakkers PJM, op den Camp HJM

Nerenberg, Robert

225

Apple-to-Apple: A Common Framework for Energy-Efficiency in Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

linecard chassis is in use (i.e., Ii>0). The resulting power profiling, for both Cisco CRS-1 and Ju- niper

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

226

Apples-to-apples: a framework analysis for energy-efficiency in networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on energy-efficiency of communication networks has already gained the attention of a broad research community. Specifically, we consider efforts towards improving environmental sustainability by making networks energyaware. An important step ...

Aruna Prem Bianzino; Anand Kishore Raju; Dario Rossi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Fifteen-Year Biochemical Relapse-Free Survival, Cause-Specific Survival, and Overall Survival Following I{sup 125} Prostate Brachytherapy in Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Seattle Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report 15-year biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) outcomes of patients treated with I{sup 125} brachytherapy monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer early in the Seattle experience. Methods and Materials: Two hundred fifteen patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were consecutively treated from 1988 to 1992 with I{sup 125} monotherapy. They were prospectively followed as a tight cohort. They were evaluated for BRFS, CSS, and OS. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate outcomes by pretreatment clinical prognostic factors. BRFS was analyzed by the Phoenix (nadir + 2 ng/mL) definition. CSS and OS were evaluated by chart review, death certificates, and referring physician follow-up notes. Gleason scoring was performed by general pathologists at a community hospital in Seattle. Time to biochemical failure (BF) was calculated and compared by Kaplan-Meier plots. Results: Fifteen-year BRFS for the entire cohort was 80.4%. BRFS by D'Amico risk group classification cohort analysis was 85.9%, 79.9%, and 62.2% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively. Follow-up ranged from 3.6 to 18.4 years; median follow-up was 15.4 years for biochemically free of disease patients. Overall median follow-up was 11.7 years. The median time to BF in those who failed was 5.1 years. CSS was 84%. OS was 37.1%. Average age at time of treatment was 70 years. There was no significant difference in BRFS between low and intermediate risk groups. Conclusion: I{sup 125} monotherapy results in excellent 15-year BRFS and CSS, especially when taking into account the era of treatment effect.

Sylvester, John E., E-mail: js@drjohnsylvester.com [Lakewood Ranch Oncology, Lakewood Ranch, FL (United States); Prostate Cancer Treatment Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Grimm, Peter D. [Lakewood Ranch Oncology, Lakewood Ranch, FL (United States); Wong, Jason [University California, Irvine, CA (United States); Galbreath, Robert W. [Ohio University Eastern, St. Clairsville, OH (United States); Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Blasko, John C.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Biofuel production by in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway biotransformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

49; 49; NO. OF PAGES 7 Please cite this article in press as: Zhang Y-H P., et al. Biofuel production by in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway biotransformation, Curr Opin Biotechnol (2010), doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2010.05.005 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Biofuel production by in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway biotransformation Y-H Percival Zhang 1,2,3 , Jibin Sun 4 and Jian-Jiang Zhong 5 Cell-free synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB) is the implementation of complicated biochemical reactions by in vitro assembling a number of enzymes or their complexes and coenzymes. Assembly of numerous enzymes without cellular membrane, gene regulation, or undesired pathway can circumvent some of the obstacles to modifying living microorganisms. Several synthetic pathways for the production of liquid biofuels - alcohols and hydrocarbon precursors (polyols)

229

Early Salvage Hormonal Therapy for Biochemical Failure Improved Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients After Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Plus Radiation Therapy-A Secondary Analysis of Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the survival benefit of early vs late salvage hormonal therapy (HT), we performed a secondary analysis on patients who developed recurrence from Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01, a randomized trial comparing 4 vs 8 months neoadjuvant HT plus radiation therapy (RT) in intermediate- and high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 patients from the trial who recurred were analyzed at a median follow-up of 8.5 years. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the timing of salvage HT: 57 patients had prostate-specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 1, early), 21 patients had PSA >10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 2, late), and 24 patients had distant metastases (group 3, late). The endpoint analyzed was overall survival (OS) calculated from 2 different time points: date of enrolment in the trial (OS1) and date of initiation of salvage HT (OS2). Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves and a Cox regression model. Results: The OS1 differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS1 at 10 years was 78% in group 1, 42% in group 2, and 29% in group 3. The OS2 also differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS2 at 6 years was 70% in group 1, 47% in group 2, and 22% in group 3. Group 1 had the longest median time from end of RT to biochemical failure compared with groups 2 and 3 (3.3, 0.9, and 1.7 years, respectively; P<.0005). Group 1 also had the longest median PSA doubling time compared with groups 2 and 3 (9.9, 3.6, and 2.4 months, respectively; P<.0005). On multivariate analysis, timing of salvage HT, time from end of RT to biochemical failure, and PSA nadir on salvage HT were significant predictors of survival. Conclusion: Early salvage HT based on PSA {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases improved survival in patients with prostate cancer after failure of initial treatment with neoadjuvant HT plus RT.

Mydin, Aminudin R., E-mail: aminudinrahman@googlemail.com [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Kuala Lumpur Hospital, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Dunne, Mary T.; Finn, Marie A. [Clinical Trials Resource Unit, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)] [Clinical Trials Resource Unit, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Armstrong, John G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Directed enzyme evolution: beyond the low-hanging fruit Moshe Goldsmith and Dan S Tawfik  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the ratio of conversion rates at all substrate concentrations, and therefore comprises the stan- dard the nucleotide and sugar 1-phosphate promiscuity of nucleotidyltransferase RmlA via directed evolution. J Biol: Directed evolution of a thermophilic beta-glucosidase for cellulosic bioethanol production. Appl Biochem

Tawfik, Dan S.

231

Appling County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

712238°, -82.2583297° 712238°, -82.2583297° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.712238,"lon":-82.2583297,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

232

CB ENCIi TEC APPL SCI Stuctual Dynamic Systems Computational Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airport Terminal, Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Facility in Greece, C-1 Computer Center Building in Japan of the layout of 212 isolation bearings of one of two identical LNG storage tanks during construction in Greece in 1995. The isolation system is located about 20 m under the ground surface. It supports the steel LNG

Nagarajaiah, Satish

233

ANALOG-DIGITAL INPUT OUTPUT SYSTEM FOR APPLE CO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

floating point values. However, to use these system calls you will need to use the mfc1 and mtc1 round down. However, for up to 20% extra credit, you can implement rounding (using the guard, round

Groppi, Christopher

234

Commercial Reference Building: Large Hotel Apple...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

descriptions for whole building energy analysis using 

239

Fungicide control of apple scab: 2010 field trial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Manzate 4 lb + Vangard 4 oz (2x) then Flint 2 oz (3x) thenManzate 6 lb (1x) Flint 2.5 oz alt Procure 12 fl oz Rally+ Vangard, 4 oz (2x) then Flint, 2 oz (3x) then Manzate, 6

Eynard, James; Wunderlich, Lynn; Gubler, W D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Fungicide control of apple scab: 2007 trial results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Endorse 11.3DF Evito 480SC Flint 50WG JMS Stylet-oil LEM17Sovran, Evito, Endorse, Flint, the organic Champion ++ Topguard Dithane then Flint Dithane then Dithane + A7402

Janousek, Christopher N; Lorber, Jacob D; Wunderlich, Lynn; Gubler, W D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fungicide control of apple scab: 2007 trial results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lynn Wunderlich 2 and W. Douglas Gubler 1 Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis,

Janousek, Christopher N; Lorber, Jacob D; Wunderlich, Lynn; Gubler, W D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

AEO2011: Electricity Trade Apple-style-span  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

trade, gross domestic sales, international electricity trade, imports and exports to Canada and Mexico. 
2011-08-01T19:29:49Z 2011-08-04T15:35:21Z http:...

243

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gas-fired and renewable generation Mark Bolinger and Ryannatural gas prices, renewable energy resources – which bygas-fired generation, renewable generation, such as wind or

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fixed-price gas supply contracts and natural gas storage. Asnatural gas prices, rather than on prices that can be locked in through futures, swap, or fixed- price physical supplySupply, Renewable Energy Gas Options, Gas Storage Option Premium or Storage Cost Gas Price Falls Gas Price Rises Natural

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operating costs, long-term fixed-price renewable energyRenewable Energy Gas Options, Gas Storage Option Premium or Storage Costrenewable power is more cost- competitive than previously believed’, Renewable Energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas supply contracts and natural gas storage. As is shown inor Storage Cost Gas Price Falls Gas Price Rises Natural Gas

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the market, allowing natural gas price volatility to flowClearly, the variability of gas prices poses a major risk toincreasingly volatile natural gas prices, renewable energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

considering that natural gas prices (and gas pricein the market, allowing natural gas price volatility to flowincreasingly volatile natural gas prices, renewable energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

common practice of using gas price forecasts in long-rangeit is likely that gas prices in the US will continue to bethat natural gas prices (and gas price volatility) have a

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For better or worse, natural gas has become the fuel of choice for new power plants being built across the United States. According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), natural gas combined-cycle and combustion turbine power plants accounted for 96% of the total generating capacity added in the US between 1999 and 2002--138 GW out of a total of 144 GW. Looking ahead, the EIA expects that gas-fired technology will account for 61% of the 355 GW new generating capacity projected to come on-line in the US up to 2025, increasing the nationwide market share of gas-fired generation from 18% in 2002 to 22% in 2025. While the data are specific to the US, natural gas-fired generation is making similar advances in other countries as well. Regardless of the explanation for (or interpretation of) the empirical findings, however, the basic implications remain the same: one should not blindly rely on gas price forecasts when comparing fixed-price renewable with variable-price gas-fired generation contracts. If there is a cost to hedging, gas price forecasts do not capture and account for it. Alternatively, if the forecasts are at risk of being biased or out of tune with the market, then one certainly would not want to use them as the basis for resource comparisons or investment decisions if a more certain source of data (forwards) existed. Accordingly, assuming that long-term price stability is valued, the most appropriate way to compare the levelized cost of these resources in both cases would be to use forward natural gas price data--i.e. prices that can be locked in to create price certainty--as opposed to uncertain natural gas price forecasts. This article suggests that had utilities and analysts in the US done so over the sample period from November 2000 to November 2003, they would have found gas-fired generation to be at least 0.3-0.6 cents/kWh more expensive (on a levelized cost basis) than otherwise thought. With some renewable resources, in particular wind power, now largely competitive with gas-fired generation in the US (including the impact of the federal production tax credit and current high gas prices), a margin of 0.3-0.6 cents/kWh may in some cases be enough to sway resource decisions in favor of renewables.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas combined-cycle and combustion turbine power plantsnatural gas has become the fuel of choice for new power plants

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are heated in green condition in a large microwave heater. The logs are compressed in this heated and moist

Mosegaard, Klaus

253

Bone Demineralization and Deproteination Studies: A Biochemical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activation energy for demineralization increased with increasing HCl ... Bactericidal Effect of Silver Reinforced Hydroxyapatite and Carbon Nanotubes ... Microstructural and Mechanical Investigation of Macadamia Nutshells on Different ...

254

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Microsoft Word - Plant_Biochem_Hildebrand.doc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spring 2007 Course Title: Plant Biochemistry, BCH/PLS/PPA 609 Instructors: David Hildebrand, 403 PSB, 257-5020x80760, dhild@uky.edu Robert Houtz, 401 PSB, 257-1982, rhoutz@uky.edu George Wagner, 202D KTRDC, 257-5974, gwagner@uky.edu

256

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

257

Stochastic Control Analysis for Biochemical Reaction Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate how stochastic reaction processes are affected by external perturbations. We describe an extension of the deterministic metabolic control analysis (MCA) to the stochastic regime. We introduce stochastic sensitivities for mean and covariance values of reactant concentrations and reaction fluxes and show that there exist MCA-like summation theorems among these sensitivities. The summation theorems for flux variances are shown to depend on the size of the measurement time window ($\\epsilon$), within which reaction events are counted for measuring a single flux. The degree of the $\\epsilon$-dependency can become significant for processes involving multi-time-scale dynamics and is estimated by introducing a new measure of time scale separation. This $\\epsilon$-dependency is shown to be closely related to the power-law scaling observed in flux fluctuations in various complex networks. We propose a systematic way to control fluctuations of reactant concentrations while minimizing changes in mean concentration levels. Such orthogonal control is obtained by introducing a control vector indicating the strength and direction of parameter perturbations leading to a sensitive control. We also propose a possible implication in the control of flux fluctuation: The control distribution for flux fluctuations changes with the measurement time window size, $\\epsilon$. When a control engineer applies a specific control operation on a reaction system, the system can respond contrary to what is expected, depending on the time window size $\\epsilon$.

Kyung Hyuk Kim; Herbert M. Sauro

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

258

Algebraic methods for biochemical reaction network theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

theory [BBCQ04, CFR08]. Convex geometry and differential geometry have also played a role in chemical reactor

Shiu, Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Influence of organic liquids on the nanostructure of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Liq. 2010, 156, 76. 6. Suvorov, M.; Kumar, R.; Zhang, H.; Hutcheson, S. Biofuels 2010, 2, 59. 7 ... Biotechnol. Biofuels 2010, 3, 10. 25. ...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

260

Dieselzymes: development of a stable and methanol tolerant lipase for biodiesel production by directed evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J, Campelo JM, Romero AA: Biodiesel as feasible petrol fueltowards ever greener biodiesel production. Biotechnol Adv 3.T, Bielecki S: Enzymatic biodiesel synthesis - key factors

Korman, Tyler P; Sahachartsiri, Bobby; Charbonneau, David M; Huang, Grace L; Beauregard, Marc; Bowie, James U

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Advanced genetic tools for plant biotechnology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

marker genes from transgenic plants. BMC Biotechnol. 13, 36 (2013). 107. Akbudak, M. A. & Srivastava, V. Improved FLP recombinase, FLPe, efficiently removes marker gene from...

262

Technoeconomic analysis of a lignocellulosic ethanol biorefinery ...  

poplar wood. Biotechnol Progr 25(2):323–332 (2009). 6. Zhao X, Cheng K and Liu D, Organosolv pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass for enzymatic hydrolysis.

263

gkq948 1..9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(2002) An algorithm for finding protein-DNA binding sites with applications to chromatin-immunoprecipitation microarray experiments. Nat. Biotechnol., 20, 835-839. 21....

264

Booly : a new data integration platform for systems biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for enabling conceptual biology. Bioinformatics 2005, 21for data integration in biology. Trends Biotechnol 1999, 17(the unification of biology. The Gene Ontology Consortium.

Do, Long Hoang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Manipulation of the Carbon Storage Regulator System for Metabolite Remodeling and Biofuel Production in Escherichia coli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

remodeling and biofuel production in Escherichia coli.JD: Advanced biofuel production in microbes. Biotechnol JJM, Gonzalez R: Biofuel production in Escherichia coli: the

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Genetic and biotechnological approaches for biofuel crop improvement.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engineering for biofuel production: towards affordablebiomass feedstocks for biofuel production. Genome Biol 2008,sugar yields for biofuel production. Nat Biotechnol 2007,

Vega-Sánchez, Miguel E; Ronald, Pamela C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sugar yields for biofuel production. Nat Biotechnol 25(7):research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose A keylignocellulosic biofuel production and highlight scientific

Bartley, Laura E; Ronald, Pamela C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How biotech can transform biofuels. Nat. Biotechnol. , 26(of cellulosic biomass. Biofuels 2(4):421-450. Yang, B. ,cost cellulosic ethanol. Biofuels, Bioprod. Biorefin. , 2(

Tam, Jerry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Impact of surfactants on pretreatment of corn stover Qing Qing, Bin Yang 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The primary obstacle to producing liquid transportation fuels by bio- conversion methods is the release. Nat Biotechnol 25:759­761. 9. Dien BS, et al. (2009) Improved sugar conversion and ethanol yield release. Biotechnol Bioeng 105: 231­238. 19. Wyman C, ed (1996) Handbook on Bioethanol: Production

California at Riverside, University of

270

Did Apple’s refusal to license proprietary information enabling interoperability with its iPod music player constitute an abuse under Article 82 of the EC Treaty?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

duplicated [..]” The essential facilities doctrine has itsrelating to the essential facilities doctrine, it has nevercase law on the essential facilities doctrine leads us to

Mazziotti, Giuseppe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Transcriptome and Biochemical Analyses of Fungal Degradation of Wood  

SciTech Connect

Lignocellulosic accounts for a large percentage of material that can be utilized for biofuels. The most costly part of lignocellulosic material processing is the initial hydrolysis of the wood which is needed to circumvent the lignin barrier and the crystallinity of cellulose. Enzymes will play an increased role in this conversion in that they potentially provide an alternative to costly and caustic high temperature and acid treatment. The increasing use of enzymes in biotechnology is facilitated by both continued improvements in enzyme technology but also in the discovery of new and novel enzymes. The present proposal is aimed at identifying the enzymes which are known to depolymerize woody biomass. Fundamental understanding of how nature gains access to cellulose and hemicellulose will impact all applications. Because fungi are the only known microbes capable of circumventing the lignin barrier, knowledge of the enzyme they use is of great potential for biofuel processing. Nature has evolved different fungal mechanisms for enzymatic hydrolysis of wood. Most notable are the white-rot fungi (wrf) and the brown-rot fungi (brf). This proposed research aims at determining the complete transcriptome of three wrf and two brf to determine the enzymes involved in lignocellulose degradation. The transcriptome work will be supported by enzyme characterization (and zymograms) and finally analysis of the lignin component to determine the mode of lignin modification. In this proposed research, we hypothesize that: 1) Determination of the complete transcriptome of closely related white and brown rot fungi will lead to knowledge of the relevant enzymes involved in wood degradation. 2) Knowledge of the extracellular transcriptome and the mechanism of wood decay can only be obtained if the products of the decay are known. As such, characterization of the lignin oxidation products will correlate the enzymes involved (obtained from the transcriptome) to the lignin oxidation products. The Department of Energy has sequenced the P. chrysosporium genome and has approved the sequencing of the genome of the closely-related brown rot fungus P. placenta. This comparative genomics approach will yield important information on differences between these two fungi. Analysis of gene unique to each fungus (which have been lost or gained) can potentially lead to determining the enzymes which are responsible for each type of decay. This comparison, however, would not be complete without comparing the transcriptome and the proteome/enzymes. Comparative genomics may tell us which genes may be important, but it will not tell us when these genes are expressed, at what levels and will not necessarily tell us what these genes do.

Tien, Ming

2009-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

Application And Evaluation Of Biomagnetic And Biochemical Monitoring...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Author(s): B. M. Quayle, T. A. Mather, M. L. I. Witt, B. A. Maher, R. Mitchell, R. S. Martin, S. Calabrese Published: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 2010 Document...

273

MHK Projects/Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

conference *3102012 Determine pilot plant and 100 MW plant parameters with Lockheed Martin Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return...

274

A biochemical investigation of the sea urchin clotting response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of clot-inhibiting medium (CIM; 100 mM Hepes, 360 mM NaCl,The isosmolarity with seawater of CIM was veri?ed by vaporequal portions of WCF and CIM the resultant pH was 7.5.

Hillier, Brian J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Bio-chemical Sensing for Smart (and Healthy) Room electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O) Nanoparticles for Ultraviolet Photodetection SOPO Conference 2010 Ultraviolet Photodetection based on Zn

Lü, James Jian-Qiang

276

Towards on-Chip, Integrated Chalcogenide Glass Based Biochemical Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews ongoing progress in the development of novel on-chip planar molecular sensors in infrared-transparent chalcogenide glasses. We demonstrate on-chip cavity-enhanced refractometry and infrared absorption ...

Hu, Juejun

277

Chip Scale Interferometry A micro fluidic platform for biochemical sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sørensen Department of Optics and Plasma Research, Risø National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark

278

Fluidic Microvalve Digital Processors for Automated Biochemical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are immune to electromagnetic interference. 2.2 Introductionor pulsed electromagnetic interference. 84 Such computing

Jensen, Erik Christian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Clinical Study The Auxological and Biochemical Continuum of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2010 Janina Caliebe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Objective. Retrospective single-centre analysis of growth characteristics in 182 healthy short children born small for gestational age (SGA) or appropriate for gestational age (idiopathic short stature, ISS). Methods. Birth size references from the USA and Sweden were compared, and for the classification as SGA or ISS the Swedish reference was chosen. Height, target height (TH), bone age (BA), predicted adult height (PAH), IGF-I and IGFBP-3 values were compared between SGA and ISS. Results. In the combined group, birth weight and length showed a symmetric Gaussian distribution. The American reference overestimates the percentage of short birth length and underestimates that of low birth weight. In childhood, SGA children were shorter than ISS (?3.1 versus ?2.6 SDS, P<.001), also in comparison to TH (?2.6 versus ?1.9 SDS, P<.001). TH, height SDS change over time, BA delay, and PAH were similar. IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were lower in ISS (P =.03 and.09). Conclusions. SGA children represent the left tail of the Gaussian distribution of birth size in short children. The distinction between SGA and ISS depends on birth size reference. Childhood height of SGA is lower than of ISS, but the other auxological features are similar. 1.

Janina Caliebe; David D. Martin; Michael B. Ranke; Jan M. Wit

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Biochemical Mechanisms and Energy Strategies of Geobacter Sulfurreducens  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

by organisms such as Geobacter sulfurreducens to maintain steady state populations in the subsurface.

Tien, Ming; Brantley, Susan L.

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Proteomic and Biochemical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

proteomic changes including protein expression levels and post-translational modification due to low dose-rate ionizing radiation Expected Outcomes Increased differentiation...

282

Molecular & Biochemical Parasitology 131 (2003) 6575 Functional expression and characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gel electrophoresis; PCR, polymerase chain reaction; PMSF, phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride; Nle is available, concerns over possible drug resistance encourage the search for new drug targets. One group

Bogyo, Matthew

283

Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellul...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

conversion, and sustainability. As part of its involvement in the program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) investigates the production economics of these...

284

Chemical and biochemical studies of ubiquitin conjugation machinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The post-translational modification of proteins is a major mechanism employed in eukaryotic cells to expand the functional diversity of the proteome. Covalent modification of amino acid side chains confers new or altered ...

Pandya, Renuka K. (Renuka Kuchibhotla)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

CSL Model Checking of Biochemical Networks with Interval Decision Diagrams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an Interval Decision Diagram based approach to symbolic CSL model checking of Continuous Time Markov Chains which are derived from stochastic Petri nets. Matrix-vector and vector-matrix multiplication are the major tasks of exact ...

Martin Schwarick; Monika Heiner

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellul...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sheehan, J.; Wallace, B.; Montague, L.; Slayton, A.; Lukas, J. Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and...

287

MBI Biorefinery: Corn to Biomass, Ethanol to Biochemicals and Biomaterials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project is a continuation of DOE-funded work (FY02 and FY03) that has focused on the development of the ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment technology, fermentation production of succinic acid and new processes and products to enhance dry mill profitability. The primary objective for work beginning in April 2004 and ending in November 2005 is focus on the key issues related to the: (1) design, costing and construction plan for a pilot AFEX pretreatment system, formation of a stakeholder development team to assist in the planning and design of a biorefinery pilot plant, continued evaluation of corn fractionation technologies, corn oil extraction, AFEX treatment of corn fiber/DDGs; (2) development of a process to fractionate AFEX-treated corn fiber and corn stover--cellulose and hemicellulose fractionation and sugar recovery; and (3) development of a scalable batch succinic acid production process at 500 L at or below $.42/lb, a laboratory scale fed-batch process for succinic acid production at or below $.40/lb, a recovery process for succinic acid that reduces the cost of succinic acid by $.02/lb and the development of an acid tolerant succinic acid production strain at lab scale (last objective not to be completed during this project time period).

None

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fluidic Microvalve Digital Processors for Automated Biochemical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

106 A.1 Pneumatic Logic Truth Tables and Dynamic Responseon- chip tasks. Table 1.1: “Truth table” for pneumatic logicthe logic diagram and truth table of a binary full adder.

Jensen, Erik Christian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Structure and Biochemical Characterization of Protein Acetyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sulfolobus solfataricus protein acetyltransferase (PAT) acetylates ALBA, an abundant nonspecific DNA-binding protein, on Lys{sup 16} to reduce its DNA affinity, and the Sir2 deacetylase reverses the modification to cause transcriptional repression. This represents a 'primitive' model for chromatin regulation analogous to histone modification in eukaryotes. We report the 1.84-{angstrom} crystal structure of PAT in complex with coenzyme A. The structure reveals homology to both prokaryotic GNAT acetyltransferases and eukaryotic histone acetyltransferases (HATs), with an additional 'bent helix' proximal to the substrate binding site that might play an autoregulatory function. Investigation of active site mutants suggests that PAT does not use a single general base or acid residue for substrate deprotonation and product reprotonation, respectively, and that a diffusional step, such as substrate binding, may be rate-limiting. The catalytic efficiency of PAT toward ALBA is low relative to other acetyltransferases, suggesting that there may be better, unidentified substrates for PAT. The structural similarity of PAT to eukaryotic HATs combined with its conserved role in chromatin regulation suggests that PAT is evolutionarily related to the eukaryotic HATs.

Brent, Michael M.; Iwata, Ayaka; Carten, Juliana; Zhao, Kehao; Marmorstein, Ronen; (UPENN)

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

290

Numerical Simulation and Modelling of Electronic and Biochemical Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulation and modelling are witnessing a resurgence. Designing systems with integrated wireless components, mixed-signal blocks and nanoscale, multi-GHz "digital" circuits is requiring extensive low-level modelling and simulation. Analysis ...

Jaijeet Roychowdhury

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Feedstock handling and processing effects on biochemical conversion to biofuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abating the dependence of the United States on foreign oil by reducing oil consumption and increasing biofuels usage will have far-reaching global effects. These include reduced greenhouse gas emissions and an increased demand for biofuel feedstocks. To support this increased demand, cellulosic feedstock production and conversion to biofuels (e.g. ethanol, butanol) is being aggressively researched. Thus far, research has primarily focused on optimizing feedstock production and ethanol conversion, with less attention given to the feedstock supply chain required to meet cost, quality, and quantity goals. This supply chain comprises a series of unit operations from feedstock harvest to feeding the conversion process. Our objectives in this review are (i) to summarize the peer-reviewed literature on harvest-to-reactor throat variables affecting feedstock composition and conversion to ethanol; (ii) to identify knowledge gaps; and (iii) to recommend future steps.

Daniel Inman; Nick Nagle; Jacob Jacobson; Erin Searcy; Allison Ray

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Genetic and biochemical analysis of solvent formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The anaerobic organism Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used for commercial production of important organic solvents due to its ability to convert a wide variety of crude substrates to acids and alcohols. Current knowledge concerning the molecular genetics, cell regulation and metabolic engineering of this organism is still rather limited. The objectives are to improve the knowledge of the molecular genetics and enzymology of Clostridia in order to make genetic alterations which will more effectively channel cell metabolism toward production of desired products. Two factors that limit butanol production in continuous cultures are: (1) The degeneration of the culture, with an increase in the proportion of cells which are incapable of solvent production. Currently isolated degenerate strains are being evaluated to analyze the molecular mechanism of degeneration to determine if it is due to a genetic loss of solvent related genes, loss of a regulatory element, or an increase in general mutagenesis. Recent studies show two general types of degenerates, one which seems to have lost essential solvent pathway genes and another which has not completely lost all solvent production capability and retains the DNA bearing solvent pathway genes. (2) The production of hydrogen which uses up reducing equivalents in the cell. If the reducing power were more fully directed to the reduction reactions involved in butanol production, the process would be more efficient. The authors have studied oxidation reduction systems related to this process. These studies focus on ferredoxin and rubredoxin and their oxidoreductases.

Bennett, G.N.; Rudolph, F.B.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Mechanical and biochemical properties of human cervical tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mechanical integrity of cervical tissue is crucial for maintaining a healthy gestation. Altered tissue biochemistry can cause drastic changes in the mechanical properties of the cervix and contribute to premature ...

Myers, Kristin M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Glycans in host-pathogen interactions : an integrated biochemical investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The epithelial cell-extracellular matrix interface primarily comprises of complex glycans and glycoconjugates. The widespread distribution of these glycans on the epithelial cell surface makes them ideal targets for ...

Chandrasekaran, Aarthi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Oilseeds for Biofuels and Biochemicals in Texas BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the state. Candidate crops include perennial oilseeds (jatropha, Chinese tallow), summer annuals (peanut Station TX 77843 Ph: 979.845.4808 | E-mail: td-miller@tamu.edu Tallow tree with immature seed Safflower

296

EVect of aromatic compounds on the production of laccase and ...  

J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol (2010) 37:1091–1096 DOI 10.1007/s10295-010-0757-y 123 ORIGINAL PAPER EVect of aromatic compounds on the production of ...

297

Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

554–564. 2. Chisti Y: Biodiesel from microalgae. Biotechnol25(3):294–306. 3. Chisti Y: Biodiesel from microalgae beatsLea-Smith DJ, Smith AG: Biodiesel from algae: challenges and

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(23); pp. 3810-3817. Donohoe, B.S., et al. (2009). "Detecting Cellulase Penetration into Corn Stover Cell Walls by Immuno-Electron Microscopy." Biotechnol. Bioeng. (103); pp....

299

Dieselzymes: development of a stable and methanol tolerant lipase for biodiesel production by directed evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of desirable biodiesel production properties. Keywords:time to improve properties of a lipase for biodiesel produc-biodiesel production. J Biotechnol 2009, Arpigny JL, Jaeger KE: Bacterial lipolytic enzymes: classification and properties.

Korman, Tyler P; Sahachartsiri, Bobby; Charbonneau, David M; Huang, Grace L; Beauregard, Marc; Bowie, James U

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of cellulosic biomass: an update. Curr.Opin.Biotechnol.16:Stokes, and D. C. Erbach. 2005. Biomass as a feedstock for a2002. Energy production from biomass (part 1): overview of

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sugar yields for biofuel production. Nat Biotechnol 25(7):Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production fromA key strategy for biofuel produc- tion is making use of the

Bartley, Laura E; Ronald, Pamela C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Addition of a carbohydrate-binding module enhances cellulase penetration into cellulose substrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

substrates. Biotechnology for Biofuels 2013 6:93. Page 13 ofOrtiz et al. Biotechnology for Biofuels 2013, 6:93 http://of lignocellulosic biofuels. Biotechnol Bioeng 2012, 109:

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S. (2006) Bonkers about biofuels. Nat. Biotechnol. 24, 755–Schubert, C. (2006) Can biofuels finally take center stage?

Fortman, J. L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Composition and hydrothermal pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification performance of grasses and legumes from a mixed species prairie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J, Lehman C: Carbon-negative biofuels from low-input high-hydrolysis. Biotechnol for Biofuels 18. Anderson WF, Dienprairie. Biotechnology for Biofuels 2011 4:52. Submit your

DeMartini, Jaclyn D; Wyman, Charles E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Appl. Phys. 18, 271 274 (1979) 9 bySpringer-Verlag1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in thermally depoled La-doped lead zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics of composition 8/65/35 and 9/65/35 has on temperature-dependent optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) in ther- mally depoled samples, mainly performed at room temperature, by incomplete ther- mal depoling of the sample and by internal strain. 1

Osnabrück, Universität

306

Pure Appl. Chem., Vol. 77, No. 11, pp. 19051921, 2005. DOI: 10.1351/pac200577111905  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applicable to both chemical and biological entities, becomes kinetically less stable to kinetically more of stability, whether biological or chemical, requires definitive physicochemical characterization. Kinetic be- cause it is the high kinetic barrier to reaction that prevents the chemical reaction from taking

Pross, Addy

307

Apples and oranges: don't compare levelized cost of renewables: Joskow  

SciTech Connect

MIT Prof. Paul Joskow points out that the levelized metric is inappropriate for comparing intermittent generating technologies like wind and solar with dispatchable generating technologies like nuclear, gas combined cycle, and coal. The levelized comparison fails to take into account differences in the production profiles of intermittent and dispatchable generating technologies and the associated large variations in the market value of the electricity they supply. When the electricity is produced by an intermittent generating technology, the level of output and the value of the electricity at the times when the output is produced are key variables that should be taken into account.

NONE

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Rotten Apples: An Investigation of the Prevalence and Predictors of Teacher Cheating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

then “clean” the answer keys, erasing stray pencil marks,deliver the completed answer keys and exams to the CPSin the middle of the answer key, making it more difficult to

Jacob, Brian A.; Levitt, Steve

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

DOI: 10.1007/s00339-006-3758-y Appl. Phys. A 86, 275281 (2007)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational framework Cluster formation has been investigated by means of tight-binding molecular dynamics-empirical #12;276 Applied Physics A ­ Materials Science & Processing tight-binding (TB) model. Assuming a frozen to study systems involving more than a thou- sand atoms, we have switched from TB to model potential

Powles, Rebecca

310

U.S. State Wind Resource Potential Apple-style-span...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from development of the "available" windy land area after exclusions.  The "Installed Capacity" shows the potential megawatts (MW) of rated capacity that could be...

311

J. Math. Anal. Appl. 372 (2010) 208223 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a School of Mathematical Sciences, Fudan University Shanghai, PR China, 200433 b Department of Mathematics the spread of infectious diseases: pharmaceu- tical interventions (drugs, vaccines) and non

Arino, Julien

312

AEO2011: Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition Apple...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dataset uses million barrels per day. The data is broken down into crude oil, other petroleum supply, other non petroleum supply and liquid fuel consumption.
...

313

0301 1-5 KEY VISUAL CUES: man-orange outfit, apple, black ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... RossInKansasJune2007._-o-_.2007_arrangement_of_districts143_512kb. mp4 0306 QUERY: Find the video of Lions banquet that includes a skit ...

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

314

eGRID2007 Version 1.1 - All Files Apple-style-span  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

attributes of electricity generation. eGRID also provides aggregated data by state, U.S. total, company, and by three different sets of electric grid boundaries.<...

315

Hydrocol. Appl. (2010) Tome 17, pp.1776 http://www.hydroecologie.org c EDF, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on fish communities were widely debated at the end of the seventies, as large thermal power plants were warming period and especially the 2003 heat-wave event have placed again the thermal biology at the front

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

316

Mobile Netw Appl DOI 10.1007/s11036-012-0370-6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

divide these predictors into different power states (e.g., idle state and high clock rate state for CPU control the transition between different power states. When the DCH state starts, the protocol initiates consumption corre- sponding to different power states of the smartphone's components (e.g., CPU, memory, WNIC

Stojmenovic, Ivan

317

Peer-to-Peer Netw. Appl. DOI 10.1007/s12083-010-0084-0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

helped found the Program in Science, Technology and Society, and later joined the STS faculty. He came's programs in health sciences and biomedical engi- neering and developing collaborations with other.Ung Wong '04 (vice chair). The MIT Wind Ensemble wowed its audience with a program of modern music Friday

Ramkumar, Mahalingam

318

research papers 448 doi:10.1107/S0021889813001362 J. Appl. Cryst. (2013). 46, 448460  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unit-cell volumes as a function of pressure and temperature are parameterized in the form of a Birch curve. Additional data obtained during this work, concerning the elastic properties of deuterated ice IV phase in contact with an equilibrium mixture of Na2SO4 and H2O at room pressure between a eutectic

Vocadlo, Lidunka

319

T-673: Apple Safari Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

validate remote certificates and may ignore that a system root certificate has been disabled and incorrectly accept certificates signed by that root server CVE-2011-0214. On...

320

U-222: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

input elements may be autocompleted even if the site specifies that autocomplete be disabled CVE-2012-0680. A remote user can create specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

AEO2011: Natural Gas Imports and Exports Apple-style...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

is Table 135, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. 
2011-07-29T20:40:33Z 2011-08-23T20:46:28Z http:...

322

Pure Appl. Chem., Vol. 71, No. 12, pp. 23332348, 1999. Printed in Great Britain.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. THE�VENOT1 , KLARA TOTH2 , RICHARD A. DURST3 AND GEORGE S. WILSON4 1 Universite� Paris XII-Val de for the present project during 1993±1999 was as follows: D. R. The�venot, R. P. Buck, K. Cammann, R. A. Durst, K

Recanati, Catherine

323

research papers J. Appl. Cryst. (2007). 40, 489495 doi:10.1107/S0021889807011387 489  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Union of Crystallography Printed in Singapore ­ all rights reserved Low-background single-crystal, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada K0J 1J0, and b Physics Department and the Centre on inexpensive single-crystal silicon are described. One uses a conventional cylindrical geometry

Ryan, Dominic

324

Pure Appl. Chem., Vol. 77, No. 2, pp. 379389, 2005. DOI: 10.1351/pac200577020379  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ecules (like disilane) even in small quantities. There is an optimum pressure, determined by primary

325

Comput Optim Appl DOI 10.1007/s10589-010-9329-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was supported in part by a Research and Creative Activities Grant from UM-Flint. F. Gao Department of Mathematics, University of Michigan-Flint, Flint, MI 48502, USA e-mail: lxhan@umflint.edu #12;F. Gao, L. Han

Gao, Frank

326

Simultaneous synthesis of flexible heat exchanger network. Appl Thermal Eng 2002;22:907–18  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BSTRACT In industry there is still lot of potential to make an energy system more efficient and thereby reduce the waste heat available. On the other hand there is an option to export the waste heat to another industry or to society. When the use of a heat exchanger network is considered for these tasks the optimization framework developed in this work can be implemented to calculate the cost of optimal investments. This thesis presents a framework for generating flexible heat exchanger networks (HEN) over a specified range of variations in the flow rates and temperatures of the streams, so that the total annual costs (TAC) as a result of utility charges, exchanger areas and selection of matches are minimized. The proposed framework includes (i) an initialization stage to reduce the problem size, (ii) a multiperiod simultaneous MINLP model to synthesize a flexible HEN configuration, (iii) a multiperiod LP feasibility test model to check the operability and identify critical conditions which are to be included in the possible resolve stage of the MINLP model, and (iv) an NLP improvement model for further optimization

Juha Aaltola; Juha Aaltola; Otamedia Oy

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

T-673: Apple Safari Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

hidden, auto-filled forms on the target user's browser CVE-2011-0217. With a certain Java configuration, a remote user can create a specially crafted web site that, when loaded...

328

Appl Phys A DOI 10.1007/s00339-010-5735-8  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and engineering, but many of these systems are complex with little or no symmetry and are difficult to fabri- cate]. Complex 3D microstructures, devices, and optics have been fabricated by 2PP, such as a microgear-wheel [8-expansion model is presented to explain the distortion caused by axial load- ings of the walls. 1 Introduction Two

Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.

329

PROGRESS IN PHOTOVOLTAICS: RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS Prog. Photovolt: Res. Appl. 2009; 17:1133  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on PV magazine PHOTON International.3 The modules in reliability by government laboratories, third-plate terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) modules. An important facet of this subject is the standard module test of photovoltaics (PV) following such as accelerated temperature and humidity stresses the invention of the silicon

330

Eur. J Appl Physiol (1986) 55:457--464 EuropeanJournalof  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstrates that continued preferential usage of a muscle is asso- ciated with altered electrical properties. (1984) arrived at the same conclusion by noting that the electrically induced twitch response time. Upper limb muscles may be more predis- posed to modifications than lower limb muscles (Schantz et

De Luca, Carlo J.

331

V-015: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ID: 56363 CVE-2012-3748 CVE-2012-3749 CVE-2012-3750 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A remote user can create specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the target user, will...

332

Appl Phys A DOI 10.1007/s00339-012-6958-7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Devices such as flat panel displays, solar pho- tovoltaics, and energy efficient building materials all, deposited by spin coating, is exposed to monochromatic UV pulsed laser processing near a plasmonic resonance nanowire network are in competition over the density of the wires in the network [2]. A dense coating

Arnold, Craig B.

333

annual report of giving WINTER 2005 NEWSLETTER LEHIGH UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF ADVANCEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..........................................98 Rust Disease of Apple.....................................................98 Sooty Blotch...........................................................102 Apple Maggot...............................................................102 Apple Rust Mite....................................................................116 Pearleaf Blister Mite and Pear Rust Mite .....................116 Periodical Cicada

Napier, Terrence

334

Undergraduate Alumni LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 1 Brooke R. Hartman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..........................................98 Rust Disease of Apple.....................................................98 Sooty Blotch...........................................................102 Apple Maggot...............................................................102 Apple Rust Mite....................................................................116 Pearleaf Blister Mite and Pear Rust Mite .....................116 Periodical Cicada

Gilchrist, James F.

335

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

®Adobedÿí ®Adobedÿí<TPhotoshop 3.08BIM%8BIMê°<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> com.apple.print.PageFormat.PMHorizontalRes com.apple.print.ticket.creator com.apple.printingmanager com.apple.print.ticket.itemArray com.apple.print.PageFormat.PMHorizontalRes 72 com.apple.print.ticket.client com.apple.printingmanager

336

SIAM J. APPL. MATH. c 2006 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Vol. 66, No. 6, pp. 20852106  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the computational cost by several orders of magni- tude with respect to the global energy-norm-based hp.1137/050631732 1. Introduction. A plethora of energy-norm-based algorithms intended to gen- erate optimal grids) to accurately solve a large class of engineering prob- lems. However, the energy-norm is a quantity of limited

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

337

Appl Phys A (2011) 105:713722 DOI 10.1007/s00339-011-6583-x  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) [9], organic thin-film transistors [10], ceramics [11], 3-D interconnects

338

SIAM J. APPL. MATH. c 2007 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Vol. 67, No. 3, pp. 777791  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the time reversal operator) is explored numerically. In particular, we show that selective focusing, which is known to occur for small and distant enough scatterers, holds when the wavelength and the size] and confirmed by experiments that for ideally resolved or pointlike and distant enough scatterers with different

Ramdani, Karim - Institut de Mathématiques �lie Cartan, Université Henri Poincaré

339

Appl. Phys. A 74, 345348 (2002) / Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/s003390201275 Applied Physics A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on aerogel-supported catalyst B. Zheng, Y. Li, J. Liu Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC monoxide on an aerogel-supported Fe/Mo catalyst. A simple acidic treat- ment followed by an oxidation of amorphous-carbon coating. Several fac- tors that affect the yield and the quality of the SWNTs were also

Liu, Jie

340

Gus Pabon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Apple, Inc. During a majority of his tenure at Apple he was responsible for all AC-DC power system development in the Apple product line. Under his leadership, Gus group...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

int.PageFormat.PMHorizontalRes com.apple.print.ticket.creator com.apple.printingmanager com.apple.print.ticket.itemArray ...

342

Engineering model reduction of bio-chemical kinetic David Csercsik, Katalin M. Hangos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Hydrosystems Chemical and Thermal Non-Equilibrium: Kinetic Mass & Energy Transfer Motivation Modeling Non is actually driven by difference in chemical potential influence of thermal non-equilibrium on kinetic mass situation of clear non-equilibrium extending range of applicability Support of the German Research

Gorban, Alexander N.

343

Annu. Rev. Biochem. 1998. 67:693720 Copyright c 1998 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. These kinetic isotope effects provide proof that the chemical mechanism of SAM synthetase at limiting K@aecom.yu.edu KEY WORDS: catalysis, isotope effects, inhibitor, enzymes, inhibitor design ABSTRACT All chemical the chemical structures of the substrates and products. The transition states for chemical reactions

Nielsen, Steven O.

344

Structural and biochemical studies of the regulation and catalytic mechanism of ATP synthase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Almost all energetic processes within biological cells require ATP, mostly produced by the membrane bound multimeric complex ATP synthase. This complex, and the complexes associated with the production of energy... folded inner membrane (Mannella et al., 1997). The outer membrane is freely permeable to ions and small molecules via a non-specific channel VDAC [voltage dependent anion channel...

Bowler, Matthew William

345

I . . . . . Comp. Biochem. Physiol. Vol. 75A, No. 3, pp. 397-400, 1983  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the same temperature (Fish, 1979) and faster swimming speeds would necessitate in- creased convective heat by a platic grid in con- junction with a 5cm wide grid of plastic straws, both of which removed turbulence electric grid which stimulated swimming by the muskrat. Wires attached to the grid ran along the floor

Fish, Frank

346

Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochemical Scenarios for Production of Cellulosic Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A techno-economic analysis on the production of cellulosic ethanol by fermentation was conducted to understand the viability of liquid biofuel production processes within the next 5-8 years. Initially, 35 technologies were reviewed, then a two-step down selection was performed to choose scenarios to be evaluated in a more detailed economic analysis. The lignocellulosic ethanol process was selected because it is well studied and portions of the process have been tested at pilot scales. Seven process variations were selected and examined in detail. Process designs were constrained to public data published in 2007 or earlier, without projecting for future process improvements. Economic analysis was performed for an 'nth plant' (mature technology) to obtain total investment and product value (PV). Sensitivity analysis was performed on PV to assess the impact of variations in process and economic parameters. Results show that the modeled dilute acid pretreatment process without any downstream process variation had the lowest PV of $3.40/gal of ethanol ($5.15/gallon of gasoline equivalent) in 2007 dollars. Sensitivity analysis shows that PV is most sensitive to feedstock and enzyme costs.

Kazi, F. K.; Fortman, J.; Anex, R.; Kothandaraman, G.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Dutta, A.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Structural, Biochemical, and in Vivo Characterization of the First Virally Encoded Cyclophilin from the Mimivirus  

SciTech Connect

Although multiple viruses utilize host cell cyclophilins, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and human immunodeficiency virus type-1(HIV-1), their role in infection is poorly understood. To help elucidate these roles, we have characterized the first virally encoded cyclophilin (mimicyp) derived from the largest virus discovered to date (the Mimivirus) that is also a causative agent of pneumonia in humans. Mimicyp adopts a typical cyclophilin-fold, yet it also forms trimers unlike any previously characterized homologue. Strikingly, immunofluorescence assays reveal that mimicyp localizes to the surface of the mature virion, as recently proposed for several viruses that recruit host cell cyclophilins such as SARS and HIV-1. Additionally mimicyp lacks peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity in contrast to human cyclophilins. Thus, this study suggests that cyclophilins, whether recruited from host cells (ie HIV-1 and SARS) or virally encoded (ie Mimivirus), are localized on viral surfaces for at least a subset of viruses.

Thai,V.; Renesto, P.; Fowler, C.; Brown, D.; Davis, T.; Gu, W.; Pollock, D.; Kern, D.; Raoult, D.; Eisenmesser, E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Biochemical Characterization of ?-Xylan Acting Glycoside Hydrolases from the Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor Saccharolyticus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fossil fuels have been the dominant source for energy around the world since the industrial revolution, however, with the increasing demand for energy and decreasing… (more)

Cao, Jin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

An isoperibol calorimeter for the investigation of biochemical kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isothermal titration calorimetry is a technique used to measure the enthalpy change associated with a molecular binding interaction. From these data, the binding constant for the reaction can be determined. In the scope ...

Amadi, Ovid Charles

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Chemical, biochemical and molecular genetic interrogation of biosynthetically robust marine cyanobacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmethylation catalyzed by catechol O-methyltransferase."transfer catalyzed by catechol-O-methyl-transferase." J Amtransmethylation catalyzed by catechol O-methyltransferase."

Grindberg, Rashel Vina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Comparative biochemical and genetic analysis of naphthalene degradation among Pseudomonas stutzeri strains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Of a 49-strain collection of Pseudomonas stutzeri species, 11 isolates were able to degrade naphthalene and 1 isolate was able to use m- and p-toluate as sole carbon and energy sources. Of these 12 strains, 10 shared a highly homologous set of naphthalene catabolic genes, even though they belong to four different genomovars. These genes differed from the present in plasmid NAH7. In only one of these degraders could a plasmid-encoded pathway be demonstrated, and a chromosome-encoded pathway is proposed for the remaining strains. meta cleavage of catechol was only observed in those strains able to metabolize alkyl derivatives of catechol. 59 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Rossello-Mora, R.A.; Lalucat, J.; Garcia-Valdes, E. (Universitat de les Illes Balears Institut d'Estudis Avancats, Palma de Mallorca (Spain))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Structural and Biochemical Studies of Origin Opening by Bacterial Replication Initiators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the replicative helicase from the structure of anis an ATP-dependent DNA helicase. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.structural basis for MCM2-7 helicase activation by GINS and

Duderstadt, Karl Edward

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Biochemical Investigations of Environmental Changes on Structure and Function of Subtilisins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sharma S, Gupta MN. 2004. Biodiesel Preparation by Lipase-of the current state of biodiesel production using enzymatic

Liszka, Michael Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Biochemical removal of HAP precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Shake flask tests were completed of microbial pyrite and HAP precursor removal from Rosebud subbituminous coal. Significant amounts of Ni, F, Mn, Cd, Co and Be were removed from this coal. Analyses in connection with leach column tests of Pittsburgh coal were completed and confirmed significant removal of Ni, F, Mn, Cd, Co and As from this coal. Although Hg was not removed from Pittsburgh coal by microbial attack, there was a correlation between HCl leaching of Hg from this coal and the extent of depyritization. Since HgS is soluble in HCl, the results suggest HgS is exposed by chemical and microbial dissolution of coal pyrite. Column tests with cleaned Indiana No. 5 coal are in progress and show significant early dissolution of Ni, Mn, Cd, Co and As. A final shake flask test with Kentucky No. 9 coal was begun. Pittsburgh coal with a low content of fines was shipped to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in preparation for slurry column tests of HAP precursor removal. Project results were presented at the PETC contractor`s conference held in Pittsburgh. A project progress review meeting was also held with the PETC technical project monitor.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Recent Progress in Physical and Bio-chemical Sensor Research at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote and unobtrusive detection of the presence of dangerous chemical and ... Present security sensing and monitoring technologies often fail to provide ...

356

Biochemical, Cell Biological, and Genetic Assays to Analyze Amyloid and Prion Aggregation in Yeast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protein aggregates are associated with a variety of debilitating human diseases, but they can have functional roles as well. Both pathological and nonpathological protein aggregates display tremendous diversity, with ...

Alberti, Simon

357

Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the manganese transport regulator (MntR) from Bacillus subtilis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Role for Iron in the Lyme Disease Pathogen. Sciencewas noted by discovery of the Lyme disease pathogen Borrelia

Golynskiy, Misha

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Chemical, biochemical and molecular genetic interrogation of biosynthetically robust marine cyanobacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

molecular genetics and genome sequencing which utilizes and108 vi 4.3.3 GENOME SEQUENCING ANDDNA required for genome sequencing. The amplified DNA was

Grindberg, Rashel Vina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Biochemical Genetics, Vol. 14, Nos. 3/4, 1976 Evidence for the Adaptive Significance of Enzyme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in determining rates of substrate breakdown This research was supported by Contract AT(04-3)-34 200 with ERDA, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, microfilming, recording, or otherwise

Avise, John

360

Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis beta-Lactamase with the Carbapenems Ertapenem and Doripenem  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Despite the enormous success of {beta}-lactams as broad-spectrum antibacterials, they have never been widely used for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) due to intrinsic resistance that is caused by the presence of a chromosomally encoded gene (blaC) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our previous studies of TB BlaC revealed that this enzyme is an extremely broad-spectrum {beta}-lactamase hydrolyzing all {beta}-lactam classes. Carbapenems are slow substrates that acylate the enzyme but are only slowly deacylated and can therefore act also as potent inhibitors of BlaC. We conducted the in vitro characterization of doripenem and ertapenem with BlaC. A steady-state kinetic burst was observed with both compounds with magnitudes proportional to the concentration of BlaC used. The results provide apparent K{sub m} and k{sub cat} values of 0.18 {micro}M and 0.016 min{sup -1} for doripenem and 0.18 {micro}M and 0.017 min{sup -1} for ertapenem, respectively. FTICR mass spectrometry demonstrated that the doripenem and ertapenem acyl-enzyme complexes remain stable over a time period of 90 min. The BlaC-doripenem covalent complex obtained after a 90 min soak was determined to 2.2 {angstrom}, while the BlaC-ertapenem complex obtained after a 90 min soak was determined to 2.0 {angstrom}. The 1.3 {angstrom} diffraction data from a 10 min ertapenem-soaked crystal revealed an isomerization occurring in the BlaC-ertapenem adduct in which the original {Delta}2-pyrroline ring was tautomerized to generate the {Delta}1-pyrroline ring. The isomerization leads to the flipping of the carbapenem hydroxyethyl group to hydrogen bond to carboxyl O2 of Glu166. The hydroxyethyl flip results in both the decreased basicity of Glu166 and a significant increase in the distance between carboxyl O2 of Glu166 and the catalytic water molecule, slowing hydrolysis.

L Tremblay; F Fan; J Blanchard

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Research Article Open Access Brigham et al., J Microbial Biochem Technol 2011, S3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

million barrels/day (215 trillion gallons/yr) of crude oil used for transportation vegetable oils is Camelina sativa. One of the major advantages to this species pretreatment. Round III Biofuel Seed Grants Molecular Diagnostics for Algae

Sinskey, Anthony J.

362

Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed, The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts, For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

363

Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed. The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts. For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates. 54 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

364

Aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism by Rhodococcus sp. I24 : computational, biochemical and transcriptional analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rhodococcus sp. 124 is a Gram-positive soil bacterium being developed for the manufacture of (-)cis-(1S,2R)-1-aminoindan-2-ol, a key precursor in the production of the HIV-1 protease inhibitor CrixivanTM, from the aromatic ...

Parker, Jefferson A. (Jefferson Alexander), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Tissue Engineering Approaches for Studying the Effect of Biochemical and Physiological Stimuli on Cell Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tissue engineering (TE) approaches have emerged as an alternative to traditional tissue and organ replacements. The aim of this work was to contribute to the understanding of the effects of cell-material and endothelial cell (EC) paracrine signaling on cell responses using poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels as a material platform. Three TE applications were explored. First, the effect of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) identity was evaluated for vocal fold restoration. Second, the influence of GAG identity was explored and a novel approach for stable endothelialization was developed for vascular graft applications. Finally, EC paracrine signaling in the presence of cyclic stretch, and hydrophobicity and inorganic content were studied for osteogenic applications. In terms of vocal fold restoration, it was found that vocal fold fibroblast (VFF) phenotype and extracellular matrix (ECM) production were impacted by GAG identity. VFF phenotype was preserved in long-term cultured hydrogels containing high molecular weight hyaluronan (HAHMW). Furthermore, collagen I deposition, fibronectin production and smooth muscle alpha-actin (SM-alpha-actin) expression in PEG-HA, PEG-chondroitin sulfate C and PEG- heparan sulfate (HS) gels suggest that CSC and HS may be undesirable for vocal fold implants. Regarding vascular graft applications, the impact of GAG identity on smooth muscle cell (SMC) foam cell formation was explored. Results support the increasing body of literature that suggests a critical role for dermatan sulfate (DS)-bearing proteoglycans in early atherosclerosis. In addition, an approach for fabricating bi-layered tissue engineering vascular grafts (TEVGs) with stable endothelialization was validated using PEGDA as an intercellular "cementing" agent between adjacent endothelial cells (ECs). Finally, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation toward osteogenic like cells was evaluated. ECM and cell phenotypic data showed that elevated scaffold inorganic content and hydrophobicity were indeed correlated with increased osteogenic differentiation. Moreover, the present results suggest that EC paracrine signaling enhances MSC osteogenesis in the presence of cyclic stretch.

Jimenez Vergara, Andrea

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Carrier-free $sup 11$C-labeled catecholamines in nuclear medicine and biochemical research  

SciTech Connect

The catecholamines, dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine, are synthesized and secreted by tissues such as brain, sympathetic nerve endings, and chromaffin cells. Dopamine and norepinephrine are primarily neurotransmitters while epinephrine functions mainly as a hormone. The biosynthesis of the catecholamines from tyrosine is reviewed. Abnormalities in the quantities and metabolism of these compounds are associated with many pathological conditions such as hypertension, Parkinsonism, and chromaffin tissue tumors. Rapid synthetic methods (for the preparation off)/sup 11/C-labeled catecholamines have been developed. The potential use of these labeled catecholamines as scanning agents for the adrenal glands and heart myocardium was evaluated in dogs. (CH)

Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.; Christman, D.R.; MacGregor, R.R.; Ansari, A.; Atkins, H.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Fabrication of a microfluidic platform for investigating dynamic biochemical processes in living samples by FTIR microspectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here we present the optimization of fabrication steps for realizing an infrared-visible microfluidic chip to study single-living cell behaviour in physiological environment by synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy. We optimized subtractive and ... Keywords: FTIR microspectroscopy, Living-cells, Microfabrication, Microfluidic

Giovanni Birarda; Gianluca Grenci; Luca Businaro; Benedetta Marmiroli; Sabrina Pacor; Lisa Vaccari

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Enhancing parameter estimation of biochemical networks by exponentially scaled search steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fundamental problem of modelling in Systems Biology is to precisely characterise quantitative parameters, which are hard to measure experimentally. For this reason, it is common practise to estimate these parameter values, using evolutionary and other ...

Hendrik Rohn; Bashar Ibrahim; Thorsten Lenser; Thomas Hinze; Peter Dittrich

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Biochemical Systematics and Ecology 32 (2004) 11371144 www.elsevier.com/locate/biochemsyseco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The steam distilled (24 h) oil of the roots from tissue cultured (cleansed) vetiver yielded 0.02% clear oil) appears to enhance the oil production in normal vetiver by both increasing yield and by the gener- ation with the `Sunshine' group, indicating that the vetiver cultivars used for commercial essential oil production

Adams, Robert P.

370

Reprinted from BIOCHEMICAL AND BIOPHYSICAL RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS Volume 52, Number 3, June 8, 1973  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Ce-Zr #12;Novel Water Gas Shift Catalysts Au/Ag/Ru on Reducible Oxides · Au/MOx highly active Stephanopoulus

Allen, John F.

371

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Biochemical Investigations of Environmental Changes on Structure and Function of Subtilisins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transesteri?cations for biofuel production, which has beendown costs and make biofuel production more economicallytemperatures for biofuel production. For example, three

Liszka, Michael Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Lysophosphatidic Acid Binding by a Humanized Monoclonal Antibody  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a common product of glycerophospholipid metabolism and an important mediator of signal transduction. Aberrantly high LPA concentrations accompany multiple disease states. One potential approach for treatment of these diseases, therefore, is the therapeutic application of antibodies that recognize and bind LPA as their antigen. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of an anti-LPA antibody (LT3015) Fab fragment in its antigen-free form to 2.15 {angstrom} resolution and in complex with two LPA isotypes (14:0 and 18:2) to resolutions of 1.98 and 2.51 {angstrom}, respectively. The variable CDR (complementarity-determining region) loops at the antigen binding site adopt nearly identical conformations in the free and antigen-bound crystal structures. The crystallographic models reveal that the LT3015 antibody employs both heavy- and light-chain CDR loops to create a network of eight hydrogen bonds with the glycerophosphate head group of its LPA antigen. The head group is almost completely excluded from contact with solvent, while the hydrocarbon tail is partially solvent-exposed. In general, mutation of amino acid residues at the antigen binding site disrupts LPA binding. However, the introduction of particular mutations chosen strategically on the basis of the structures can positively influence LPA binding affinity. Finally, these structures elucidate the exquisite specificity demonstrated by an anti-lipid antibody for binding a structurally simple and seemingly unconstrained target molecule.

J Fleming; J Wojciak; M Campbell; T Huxford

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Agronomical, physiological and biochemical approaches to characterize sweet sorghum genotypes for biofuel production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) is an important bioenergy crop. There is a wide array of genetic diversity in sweet sorghum germplasm collections. However,… (more)

Subramanian, Satheesh K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

[Signal transduction in plant development: Chemical and biochemical approaches to receptor identification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have pursued inhibitor development and found that the inhibitors both the cyclopropyl- and oxiranequinones are intolerant of other substituents on the quinone nucleus and are only marginally tolerant to substitution on the three-membered rings. The tritiated cyclopropane and oxirane benzoquinones were prepared as labeled inhibitors. The material from each step of the fractionation procedure were evaluated for NAD(P)H 2,6-DMBQ oxidoreductase activity that was inhibited by the cyclopropyl and oxirane compounds. A single activity was identified; one that fractionated not with the plasma membranes. It required several hours of incubation to inhibit the activity with the cyclopropylquinone, similar to the time dependence for the in vivo inhibition.

Lynn, D.G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Structural and biochemical studies of the yeast linker histone, Hho1p  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gratefully acknowledge the BBSRC, the Board of Graduate Studies Hardship Award Scheme and the Access to Learning Fund for financial aid. Warmest thanks must go to my family and friends who have supported me throughout this endeavour. I thank my parents... , upon increasing the ionic strength, and led to a solenoid model being proposed (Finch and Klug, 1976). The solenoid model describes one strand of nucleosomes that coil into a helix with about six nucleosomes per turn. The adjacent nucleosomes...

Osmotherly, Lara May

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

376

Design of a micro-interdigitated electrode for impedance measurement performance in a biochemical assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of interdigitated electrodes for impedance measurements is dependent upon the geometric design of the electrode pattern and can be significantly impacted by manufactured variability or defects. For processes ...

Donoghue, Linda (Linda Marie)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Urban waste compost: Effects on physical, chemical, and biochemical soil properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-term field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of the additions of urban waste compost on the physical and chemical properties and enzymatic activities in a calcareous soil (Fluventic Xerochrept). Total Porosity (pores >50 pm measured on thin soil sections from undisturbed samples by image analysis) was greater in the plots treated with compost than the control plots due to a larger amount of elongated pores. In the amended plots total and humified organic C, Pb, Cu, and Zn showed a significant increase compared with nonamended plots. Enzymatic activities (L-asparaginase, arylsulphatase, dehydrogenase, phosphodiesterase, and alkaline phosphomonoesterase) were significantly enhanced by the compost addition thus indicating no inhibiting influence of the heavy metals present. The increased levels of the arylsulphatase, dehydrogenase, phosphodiesterase, and phosphomonoesterase activities were significantly correlated with total porosity: the first three with pores ranging from 50 to 1000 {mu}m, mainly with pores 50 to 200 {mu}m in size and phosphomonoesterase only with pores whose size was <500 {mu}m. L-asparaginase activity was not correlated with porosity. Only arylsulphatase, dehydrogenase, and phosphodiesterase were negatively correlated with bulk density. 44 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Giusquiani, P.L.; Gigliotti, G.; Businelli, D. [Istituto di Chimica Agraria dell`Universita, Perugia (Italy)] [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Dependence of local electronic structure in p-type GaN on crystal polarity and presence of inversion domain boundaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. Smith, E. T. Yu, J. M. Redwing, and K. S. Boutros, Appl.Miller, E. T. Yu, and J. M. Redwing, Appl. Phys. Lett. 78,

Zhou, X; Yu, E T; Green, D S; Speck, J S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Coordinated development of leading biomass pretreatment technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and xylose yields increased with increasing xyla- nase supplementation. Glucan conversion was almost doubled conversion (y)/% increase in xylan conversion (x). nd, not determined. 310 Biotechnol. Prog., 2009, Vol. 25 concentrations in a simultane- ous-saccharification-and-fermentation-based bioethanol process: technical

California at Riverside, University of

380

StemCells2005;23:13331342 www.StemCells.com Original Article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- gates settled via gravity and the supernatant was aspirated. The aggregates were trypsinized for 1 aggre- gates were allowed to settle via gravity, the supernatant was removed, and the aggregates were, Sayre ES, Wang DIC. Viscous reduction of turbulent dam- ageinanimalcellculture.BiotechnolBioeng1989

Zandstra, Peter W.

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Pennsylvania Act 38/Nutrient Management Program/Technical Manual January 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;[10]. Wu L, Mashego MR, van Dam JC, Proell AM, Vinke JL, Ras C, van Winden WA, van Gulik WM, Heijnen JJ profiling for analysis of yeast stress response during very high gravity ethanol fermentations. Biotechnol]. de Koning W, van Dam K. A method for the determination of changes of glycolytic metabolites in yeast

Guiltinan, Mark

382

 

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383

 

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384

 

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385

 

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386

 

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387

 

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388

 

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389

 

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390

 

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391

 

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392

 

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393

 

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394

 

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395

 

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396

 

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397

IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS D: APPLIED PHYSICS J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 (2007) 43764381 doi:10.1088/0022-3727/40/14/037  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and pulsed operation are used. 1. Introduction Thermoelectric coolers can pump heat using electricity without any moving parts. They are lightweight, small and inexpensive. The steady-state cooling temperature while Joule heating is distributed in the body of the thermoelectric element. The Joule heating takes

398

* This chapter is based on: A. Morelli, Sriram Venkatesan, B. J. Kooi, G. Palasantzas, J. Th. M. De Hosson, J. Appl. Phys. 105, 064106 (2009)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 'i5. E c:t 5 UJ 0 W A 100 Hz Voltagtt-clamp 100 Hz + DepoL illlllWlUllIr . ..., - L lw20mV J L- 20mV c 0.5 nA L Depol. Alone .. 40msec 100 Hz + Voltage- Clamp .. 2.0nAL 40 msec 100 Hz + Voltage- Clamp .. 100 Hz + Depol. .. '-A B Control 20 minutes Posttetanus . . "........ · I V......... · ..· V

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

399

Copyright by SIAM. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. SIAM J. APPL. MATH. c 2008 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and stability of certain chemical networks and applications to the kinetic proofreading model of T-cell receptor action kinetics. A chemical reaction system is said to have mass action kinetics if (2) Ryy (x) = kyy xy1 reversible, deficiency zero, chemical reaction system with mass action kinetics, each semilocking set

Anderson, David F.

400

Pure Appl. Chem., Vol. 83, No. 2, pp. 359396, 2011. doi:10.1351/PAC-REP-10-09-14  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, -252, -253, and -254, curium-240, -241, -242, -243, -244, -245, -246 and -247, einsteinium-252, - 253, -254 and -255, fermium-257, gadolinium-148, mendelevium-258, neptunium-235 and - 237, polonium-210

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS D: APPLIED PHYSICS J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 (2012) 175204 (14pp) doi:10.1088/0022-3727/45/17/175204  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the way to VRF + |Vdc|, the sum of the peak RF voltage and the absolute value of the applied dc bias

Economou, Demetre J.

402

r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/am101012c |ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces XXXX, XXX, 000000 RESEARCH ARTICLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. where they report that the essential work of fracture (EWF) can be used to study ductile fracture under fracture is required.) The load-displacement curves and underlying phe- nomena of EWF-type analyses can be categorized into two components, the essential work of fracture (EWF) and nones- sential work of fracture (non-EWF

Mather, Patrick T.

403

Copyright by SIAM. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. SIAM J. APPL. MATH. c 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is required in the applied conservation and renewable resource contexts. Key words. predator-prey model on the dynamics of predator-prey systems and the role of harvesting in the management of renewable resources; see Natural Science Foundation of China (11228104). School of Mathematics and Statistics, Central China Normal

Ruan, Shigui

404

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS D: APPLIED PHYSICS J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 36 (2003) 31563167 PII: S0022-3727(03)65940-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Y Choueiri Electric Propulsion and Plasma Dynamics Laboratory (EPPDyL), Mechanical and Aerospace is dedicated to Professor Harvey Lam on the occasion of his recovery. 1. Introduction 1.1. Historical) and derived an equation for the steady-state volume flow rate based on the radial velocity profile for a fully

Choueiri, Edgar

405

Department of Civil Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.1 GeoTDR, Inc., 297 Pinewood Drive, Apple Valley, MN 55124.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. These examples include, 1) cables in roadways above possible coal mine subsidence, 2) cables through scour in March 1995. Subsidence was initiated in response to dewatering of an underlying abandoned coal mine OKVKICVG FCOCIG TDR monitoring of cables embedded in strata overlying abandoned mines provides a means

406

Limits to the potential distribution of light brown apple moth in Arizona–California based on climate suitability and host plant availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and host plant availability Andrew Paul Gutierrez • Nicholasthrough host plant availability. Outside of irrigated crops,non limiting host plant availability. A regional analysis of

Gutierrez, Andrew Paul; Mills, Nicholas J.; Ponti, Luigi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS D: APPLIED PHYSICS J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 (2008) 035212 (9pp) doi:10.1088/0022-3727/41/3/035212  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,2,4,5], this is not the case for BDs in SD arrangement and especially CD configuration. The history of the coplanar discharge, an advanced technology with addressing electrodes was used. The history of the coplanar configuration current and voltage measurement f = 10.2 kHz U = 24 kV oil as an insulator discharge area ...side view

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

408

J. Phys. D:Appl. Phys. 20 (1987) 151-161. Printedinthe UK Studsvik Energiteknik AB, S-611 82 Nykoping, Sweden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,itobeysboththeforwardandbackward forms (Bell and Glasstone 1970). From that, the mean particle number in a given volume can be obtained- tuations in cosmic showers (JAnossy 1950a, b), neutron noise in amultiplyingmedium (PA1 1958,1962,Bell 1963

Pázsit, Imre

409

Laser Anemometry In Fluid Mechanics Selected Papers from the First Intl. Symp. On Appl. Of Laser-doppler Anemometry to Fluid Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-doppler Anemometry to Fluid Mechanics Editors: R.J. Adrian, D.F.G. Durão, F. Durst, H. Mishina and J.H. Whitelaw.C. Hastings and K.G. Moreton. · Laser-Doppler and numerical studies of backward-facing step flows. By F. Durst range wind velocity measurements using visible laser radiation. By F. Durst and G. Richter. · Fiber

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

410

Laser Anemometry In Fluid Mechanics-IV Selected Papers from the Fourth Intl. Symp. On Appl. Of Laser-doppler Anemometry to Fluid Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Of Laser-doppler Anemometry to Fluid Mechanics Editors: R.J. Adrian, D.F.G. Durão, F. Durst, T. Asanuma. Bopp, F. Durst, R. Muller, A. Naqwi, C. Tropea and H. Weber. · Battery-driven miniature LDA

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

411

Laser Anemometry In Fluid Mechanics-III Selected Papers from the Third Intl. Symp. On Appl. Of Laser-doppler Anemometry to Fluid Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Of Laser-doppler Anemometry to Fluid Mechanics Editors: R.J. Adrian, D.F.G. Durão, F. Durst, H. Mishina. Durst. · Measurement and prediction of air flow in building joints. By A. Aroussi, S.A. Ferris and I

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

412

Laser Anemometry In Fluid Mechanics-II Selected Papers from the Second Intl. Symp. On Appl. Of Laser-doppler Anemometry to Fluid Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Of Laser-doppler Anemometry to Fluid Mechanics Editors: R.J. Adrian, D.F.G. Durão, F. Durst, H. Mishina of separated flow behind a circular cylinder. By A. McKillop and F. Durst. · Separated turbulent flow over

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

413

Published: January 24, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 309 dx.doi.org/10.1021/am100943f |ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2011, 3, 309316  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Polymer Light-Emitting Diode Pixels with Increased Charge Injection James Shaw-Stewart,, Thomas Lippert light- emitting diode (PLED) pixels with poly[2-methoxy, 5-(2- ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene at a brightness of 400 cd/m2 . A similar increase is obtained for the polymer light- emitting diode (PLED) pixels

414

IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS D: APPLIED PHYSICS J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 (2012) 012001 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0022-3727/45/1/012001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) doi:10.1088/0022-3727/45/1/012001 FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Aerogel and ferroelectric dielectric permittivity as dielectric barrier discharge actuators. Specifically, the use of silica aerogels manifests itself primarily as heat generation with no measurable thrust. The silica aerogel, however, has

Roy, Subrata

415

J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 33 (2000) 27312746. Printed in the UK PII: S0022-3727(00)14861-2 Modelling of silicon hydride clustering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to deposit layers of thin silicon films using silane or disilane precursor gases. This process suffers from

Swihart, Mark T.

416

Limits to the potential distribution of light brown apple moth in Arizona–California based on climate suitability and host plant availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press, Can- berra, pp 3–26 Fowler G, Garrett L, Neeley A,orange and pear production (Fowler et al. 2009). In responseassessment of risk (e.g. , Fowler et al. 2009; Migeon et al.

Gutierrez, Andrew Paul; Mills, Nicholas J.; Ponti, Luigi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Magnetic Resonance Lymphography Findings in Patients With Biochemical Recurrence After Prostatectomy and the Relation With the Stephenson Nomogram  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To estimate the occurrence of positive lymph nodes on magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) in patients with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence after prostatectomy and to investigate the relation between score on the Stephenson nomogram and lymph node involvement on MRL. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five candidates for salvage radiation therapy were referred for an MRL to determine their lymph node status. Clinical and histopathologic features were recorded. For 49 patients, data were complete to calculate the Stephenson nomogram score. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine how well this nomogram related to the MRL result. Analysis was done for the whole group and separately for patients with a PSA <1.0 ng/mL to determine the situation in candidates for early salvage radiation therapy, and for patients without pathologic lymph nodes at initial lymph node dissection. Results: MRL detected positive lymph nodes in 47 patients. ROC analysis for the Stephenson nomogram yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.93). Of 29 patients with a PSA <1.0 ng/mL, 18 had a positive MRL. Of 37 patients without lymph node involvement at initial lymph node dissection, 25 had a positive MRL. ROC analysis for the Stephenson nomogram showed AUCs of 0.84 and 0.74, respectively, for these latter groups. Conclusion: MRL detected positive lymph nodes in 72% of candidates for salvage radiation therapy, in 62% of candidates for early salvage radiation therapy, and in 68% of initially node-negative patients. The Stephenson nomogram showed a good correlation with the MRL result and may thus be useful for identifying patients with a PSA recurrence who are at high risk for lymph node involvement.

Meijer, Hanneke J.M., E-mail: H.Meijer@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Debats, Oscar A. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Span, Paul N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Witjes, J. Alfred [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barentsz, Jelle O. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Guiding optimal biofuels : a comparative analysis of the biochemical production of ethanol and fatty acid ethyl esters from switchgrass.  

SciTech Connect

In the current study, processes to produce either ethanol or a representative fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) via the fermentation of sugars liberated from lignocellulosic materials pretreated in acid or alkaline environments are analyzed in terms of economic and environmental metrics. Simplified process models are introduced and employed to estimate process performance, and Monte Carlo analyses were carried out to identify key sources of uncertainty and variability. We find that the near-term performance of processes to produce FAEE is significantly worse than that of ethanol production processes for all metrics considered, primarily due to poor fermentation yields and higher electricity demands for aerobic fermentation. In the longer term, the reduced cost and energy requirements of FAEE separation processes will be at least partially offset by inherent limitations in the relevant metabolic pathways that constrain the maximum yield potential of FAEE from biomass-derived sugars.

Paap, Scott M.; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka; Dibble, Dean C.; Simmons, Blake Alexander; Steen, Eric J. [Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA; Beller, Harry R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA; Keasling, Jay D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA; Chang, Shiyan [Tsinghua University, Beijing, PR China

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Biochemical characterization of the E. coli Very Short Patch Repair pathway and its coordination with methyltransferase repair of 0?-methylguanine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The E. coli Very Short Patch Repair (VSPR) system corrects T:G mismatches that arise through Dcm-mediated methylation and subsequent deamination of the underlined cytosine residue in the palindromic sequence 5'-CCWGG-3' ...

Rye, Peter Thomas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Human Adenylosuccinate Lyase (ADSL) and the R303C ADSL Deficiency-Associated Mutation  

SciTech Connect

Adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, which causes a defect in purine metabolism resulting in neurological and physiological symptoms. ADSL executes two nonsequential steps in the de novo synthesis of AMP: the conversion of phosphoribosylsuccinyl-aminoimidazole carboxamide (SAICAR) to phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxamide, which occurs in the de novo synthesis of IMP, and the conversion of adenylosuccinate to AMP, which occurs in the de novo synthesis of AMP and also in the purine nucleotide cycle, using the same active site. Mutation of ADSL's arginine 303 to a cysteine is known to lead to ADSL deficiency. Interestingly, unlike other mutations leading to ADSL deficiency, the R303C mutation has been suggested to more significantly affect the enzyme's ability to catalyze the conversion of succinyladenosine monophosphate than that of SAICAR to their respective products. To better understand the causation of disease due to the R303C mutation, as well as to gain insights into why the R303C mutation potentially has a disproportional decrease in activity toward its substrates, the wild type (WT) and the R303C mutant of ADSL were investigated enzymatically and thermodynamically. Additionally, the X-ray structures of ADSL in its apo form as well as with the R303C mutation were elucidated, providing insight into ADSL's cooperativity. By utilizing this information, a model for the interaction between ADSL and SAICAR is proposed.

Ray, Stephen P.; Deaton, Michelle K.; Capodagli, Glenn C.; Calkins, Lauren A.F.; Sawle, Lucas; Ghosh, Kingshuk; Patterson, David; Pegan, Scott D. (Denver)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Training Signaling Pathway Maps to Biochemical Data with Constrained Fuzzy Logic: Quantitative Analysis of Liver Cell Responses to Inflammatory Stimuli  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predictive understanding of cell signaling network operation based on general prior knowledge but consistent with empirical data in a specific environmental context is a current challenge in computational biology. Recent ...

Morris, Melody Kay

422

Effects of biochemical and mechanical stimulation of articular chondrocytes in collagen-GAG scaffolds : extracellular matrix biosynthesis and scaffold stiffness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the incidence of osteoarthritis and other degenerative joint conditions continues to grow, rehabilitation via tissue engineering is becomingly increasingly attractive as an alternative to traditional surgical interventions. ...

Gordon, Timothy D., 1971-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Biochemical characterization of the kinase domain of the rice disease resistance receptor-like kinase XA21.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

32 P-labeled fusion protein was oxidized in 50 ? l of coldg of fusion protein was incubated with 0.1–50 ? M cold ATP

Liu, Guo-Zhen; Pi, Li-Ya; Walker, John C; Ronald, Pamela C; Song, Wen-Yuan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

[Signal transduction in plant development: Chemical and biochemical approaches to receptor identification]. [Annual report, May 15, 1991--May 14, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have pursued inhibitor development and found that the inhibitors both the cyclopropyl- and oxiranequinones are intolerant of other substituents on the quinone nucleus and are only marginally tolerant to substitution on the three-membered rings. The tritiated cyclopropane and oxirane benzoquinones were prepared as labeled inhibitors. The material from each step of the fractionation procedure were evaluated for NAD(P)H 2,6-DMBQ oxidoreductase activity that was inhibited by the cyclopropyl and oxirane compounds. A single activity was identified; one that fractionated not with the plasma membranes. It required several hours of incubation to inhibit the activity with the cyclopropylquinone, similar to the time dependence for the in vivo inhibition.

Lynn, D.G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

22 Moore, S.C. et al. (2002) The elusive structural role of ubiquitinated histones. Biochem. Cell Biol. 80, 311319  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flynn Soil Scientist NMSU's Extension Plant Sciences Lupe Garcia Owner Garcia Farms Ed Hughs Research in Chile Peppers Report 20: Using a Color Sorter to Remove Sticks from Mechanically Harvested Red Chile

Campbell, Robert E.

426

Microfluidic-based 3D cell culture for studies of biophysical and biochemical regulation of endothelial function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New and more biologically relevant in vitro models are needed for use in drug development, regenerative medicine, and fundamental scientific investigations. The ultimate challenge lies in replicating the native cell/tissue ...

Vickerman, Vernella V. V. (Vernella Velonie Verlin)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fish Bulletin No. 64. The Biology of the Soupfin Galeorhinus zyopterus and Biochemical Studies of the Liver  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the embryos develop, oil reserves are withdrawn and thegradual withdrawing of oil reserves as gestation ad- vances.draws heavily upon the oil reserves of the parent liver at

Staff of the Bureau of Marine Fisheries

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Substitute natural gas (SNG) Hydrogen Biochemical Biosolidssubsti- tute natural gas (SNG) and hydrogen. Biochemical

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the intermediate band solar cell under nonideal spaceefficient InGaP/GaAs tandem solar cells,” Appl. Phys. Lett.band impact ionization and solar cell efficiency,” J. Appl.

Shao, Qinghui

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Scanned probe characterization of semiconductor nanostructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. Smith, E. T. Yu, J. M. Redwing, and K. S. Boutros, Appl.Miller, E. T. Yu, and J. M. Redwing, Appl. Phys. Lett. 78 ,J. Van Hove, and J. M. Redwing, Electron. Lett. 33 , 1230 (

Law, James Jeremy MacDonald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

5 ILLUMINATING DISCOVERY Researcher warns of high  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-pick, wholesale, processing, juice, organic, and export sectors of the apple industry. Cornell apple breeder Susan, biofuel feedstock labeling, and germination issues and seed treatments and their potential phytotoxic

Keinan, Alon

432

How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and utilization of bioethanol fuel. Appl. Energy 86:2273–and utilization of bioethanol fuel. Appl Energy 86:2273–and sucrose yields for bioethanol production. Plant J 54:

Tam, Jerry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Synthesis and photovoltaic application of coper (I) sulfide nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

polymer hybrid photovoltaic cells. Appl. Phys. Lett. 88,S-CdS heterojunction photovoltaic cells. J. Appl. Phys. 45,photovoltaic devices, such as dye-sensitized solar cells 1-

Wu, Yue

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apple Valley, Dakota County, MN Minnesota E85 Fueling Network Expansion Project NEPA review for the installation of E-85 infrastructure at 7545 145th Street Apple Valley, MN 55124...

435

EIA Data: 2011 United States Oil and Gas Supply  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

small;" class"Apple-style-span">This dataset is the 2011 United States Oil and Gas Supply, Apple-style-span"><...

436

Alta Vista: Simple Query "merde d'alors" - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tip: To use all these apples: +apple pie tart cookie torte muffin. Ignored: merde d alors:0. No documents match the query. The term does not appear in the index.

437

Forecasting the Locations of Future Large Earthquakes: An Analysis and Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

its uses in earthquake forecasting, Pure Appl. Geophys. 162,D.L. (2005), Earthquake forecasting and its veri?ca- tion,hazard assessment and forecasting, Pure Appl. Geophys. 157,

Shcherbakov, Robert; Turcotte, Donald L.; Rundle, John B.; Tiampo, Kristy F.; Holliday, James R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

MSU Extension Publication Archive Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations. Up-to-date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diet, remember cabbage is low in sodium and fat. Red Cabbage with Apples 2 tart apples, sliced 3 to cooked cabbage and heat to serving temperature. Sweet-sour red cabbage is good with chicken or beef

439

Computational Nano-Materials Design for Spinodal Nanotechnology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Express 3, (2010) 101201.(3). Nguyen Dang Vu, et al., Appl. Phys. Express, 4, ( 2011) 015203.(4). M. Oshitani, et al., Appl. Phys. Express, 4, (2011) 022302.(5).

440

OVERVIEW OF TRADEMARK PROTECTION IN THE UNITED ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Arbitrary APPLE Merely Descriptive COASTER-CARDS Fanciful EXXON Page 10. Part II: LIFE OF A TRADEMARK SCREENING and CLEARANCE ...

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

MINORITY CARRIER TRAP MEASUREMENTS IN SCHOTTKY BARRIER S ON N-TYPE LPE GaAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, T. and JEPPSON, B., Japan J. Appl. Phys. 12 (1973) 7. [6] HASEGAWA, F. and MAJERFELD, A., Electron

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

442

TABLE OF CONTENTS (TOC) Facile Fabrication of All-SWNT Field-Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for future via interconnects. Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 2005, 44, 1626-1628. [32] Wang, T.; Jeppson, K.; Olofsson

Maruyama, Shigeo

443

Lockheed Martin Advanced Nanotechnology Center Of Excellence at Rice University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sanchez, J. Fontcuberta, R. Cordoba, B. G. Mendis and A. L. Bleloch, Appl. Phys. Lett., 2009, 95, 072507

444

Promoting Diversity and Equal Opportunity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.; Herranz, G.; Sanchez, F.; Fontcuberta, J.; Cordoba, R.; Mendis, B. G.; Bleloch, A. L. Appl. Phys. Lett

445

Author's personal copy Do environmental management systems improve business performance in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrolyte solutions. Pure & Appl. Chem. 1993, 65, 2613­2640. (5) Guillen, G.; Hoek, E. M. V. Modeling

Darnall, Nicole

446

Geophys. J. Int. (2006) 167, 543556 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2006.03179.x GJIGeodesy,potentialfieldandappliedgeophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Appl. Polym. Sci. 1969, 13 (8), 1741-1747. (26) Hurwitz, G.; Guillen, G. R.; Hoek, E. M. V. Probing

447

DISK CHOPPER TIME-OF-FLIGHT SPECTROMETER (DCS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... JG Barker, DFR Mildner, JA Rodriguez, and P. Thiyagarajan, "Neutron transmission of single-crystal magnesium fluoride", J. Appl. Cryst. ...

448

Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uranium reduction in uranium mine sediment. Appl Environspp. can be stimulated in uranium mine sediments (Suzuki et

Hwang, Chiachi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

10 Weeks to TREC: STIRS Siena?s Twitter Information ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Russian diplomat • Myanmar President Candidates • Sabres sale agreement • Hydrofracking diesel fuel • Apple e-book purchases • Fernando ...

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

450

NIST Online Museum of Quantum Voltage Standards, 1990s  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (Artifact 7, Citation: SP Benz, "Superconductor-normal-superconductor junctions for programmable voltage standards," Appl. Phys. Lett., vol. 67, pp. ...

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

452

Light trapping beyond the 4n2 limit in thin waveguides Jeremy N. Munday, Dennis M. Callahan, and Harry A. Atwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of guided light in light-emitting diodes Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 171105 (2012) Nonreciprocal optical Bloch

Heaton, Thomas H.

453

EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES, BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pome and stone fruit crops including almond; pistachio,NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS ALMOND APPLE/PEAR APRICOTCrops ..

Adaskaveg, James E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES,BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010 (rev. April 1, 2010)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pome and stone fruit crops including almond; pistachio,NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS ALMOND APPLE/PEAR APRICOTCrops ..

Adaskaveg, J E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Diapositive 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dynamical Occupancy Correction Fox Symmetry analysis EPCryst - J. Appl. Cryst. (2011) 44, 230–237 Bonding constraints all Crystal energy: ...

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

456

Polarization engineering via staggered InGaN quantum wells for radiative efficiency enhancement of light emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of light emitting diodes Ronald A. Arif, Yik-Khoon Ee, and Nelson Tansu Citation: Appl. Phys. Lett. 91 extraction in GaN-based light emitting diodes Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 061107 (2012) Electrically driven nanopyramid green light emitting diode Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 061106 (2012) Ultraviolet electroluminescence

Gilchrist, James F.

457

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

¯Â¯Ã¿Ã­6DPhotoshop 3.08BIM8BIM%èñ\ó/Á¡¢{g-ÅdÕº8BIMê° ¯Â¯Ã¿Ã­6DPhotoshop 3.08BIM8BIM%èñ\ó/Á¡¢{g-ÅdÕº8BIMê°<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> com.apple.print.PageFormat.PMHorizontalRes com.apple.print.ticket.creator com.apple.printingmanager com.apple.print.ticket.itemArray com.apple.print.PageFormat.PMHorizontalRes 72 com.apple.print.ticket.client com.apple.printingmanager

458

Twelve-Month Prostate-Specific Antigen Values and Perineural Invasion as Strong Independent Prognostic Variables of Long-Term Biochemical Outcome After Prostate Seed Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether post-treatment prostate-specific antigen (ptPSA) values at 12 months and other clinical parameters predict long-term PSA relapse-free survival (PRFS) following prostate seed brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Records of 204 hormone-naieve patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated at St. Mary's Regional Medical Center in Reno, NV, and at Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center in Carson City, NV, between 1998 and 2003, using I-125 or Pd-103 seed brachytherapy, were retrospectively analyzed. Treatment planning was done using a preplanned, modified peripheral loading technique. A total of 185 of 204 patients had PSA records at 12 months after implant. Variables included were age, initial pretreatment PSA, Gleason score, T stage, National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk group (RG), perineural invasion (PNI), external beam boost, dose, and ptPSA levels at 12 months with cutpoints at {<=}1, 1.01 to 2.00, 2.01 to 3.00, and >3.00 ng/ml. Results: Median follow-up was 80 months, and median age was 69 years. The numbers of patients stratified by NCCN low, intermediate, and high RG were 110:65:10, respectively. Monotherapy and boost prescription doses were 145 Gy and 110 Gy for I-125, and 125 Gy and 100 Gy for Pd-103 seeds, respectively. The median dose (D90) was 95.4% of the prescribed dose. The 5-year PRFS at the 12-months ptPSA levels of {<=}1, 1.01 to 2.00, 2.01 to 3.00, and >3.00 ng/ml were 98.5%, 85.7%, 61.5%, and 22.2%, respectively. The 10-year PRFS at the 12-months ptPSA levels of {<=}1 and 1.01 to 2.00 ng/ml were 90.5% and 85.7%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, both ptPSA and PNI were significant independent predictors of PRFS. Hazard ratios (HR) for ptPSA levels at {<=}1, 1.01 to 2.00, 2.01 to 3.00, and >3.00 ng/ml at 12 months were 1, 4.96, 27.57, and 65.10, respectively. PNI had an HR of 6.1 (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Presence of PNI and ptPSA values at 12 months are strong prognostic variables for long-term PRFS after definitive prostate brachytherapy seed implantation.

Ding, William, E-mail: billyding888@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Lee, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Chamberlain, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (United States); Cunningham, James [Carson Urology, Carson City, Nevada (United States)] [Carson Urology, Carson City, Nevada (United States); Yang Lixi [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Tay, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Biochem. J. (2003) 373, 583591 (Printed in Great Britain) 583 Mutational analysis of ribosomal S6 kinase 2 shows differential regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renders the kinase fully active. This activity was resistant to the effects of rapamycin or wortmannin in cellular proliferation, and it controls not only S6K1 but also other proteins, including initiation factor kinase 2 shows differential regulation of its kinase activity from that of ribosomal S6 kinase 1 Sopheap

460

1991 Harwood Academic Publishers GmbH Printed in the United Kingdom THE VALUE OF ROUTINE BIOCHEMICAL TESTS IN DISCRIMINATING BETWEEN MALIGNANT AND BENIGN PANCREATIC TUMOURS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The probability that routine hematological laboratory tests of liver and pancreatic function can discriminate between malignant and benign pancreatic tumours, incidentally detected during operation, was investigated. The records of 53 patients with a verified diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and 19 patients with chronic pancreatitis were reviewed with regard to preoperative total bilirubin, direct reacting bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, glutamyltranspeptidase, aminotransferases, lactic dehydrogenase and amylase. Multivariate and discriminant analysis were performed to calculate the predictive value for cancer, using SYSTAT statistical package in a Macintosh II computer. Total and direct reacting bilirubin and glutamyltranspeptidase were significantly higher in patients with pancreatic carcinoma. However, only considerably increased levels of direct reating bilirubin were predictive of pancreatic carcinoma. KEY WORDS: Pancreas carcinoma, chronic pancreatitis, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, glutamyltranspeptidase, aminotransferases, lactic dehydrogenase, amylase

L. Athlin; P-j Blind; S. Eriksson

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "appl biochem biotechnol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Biochemical Characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ni(II) Sensor NmtR and Streptococcus pneumoniae Zn(II) Sensor AdcR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NmtR and AdcR belong to two structural and functional classes of transcriptional metalloregulators. The present study shows that AdcR is a novel Zn(II) dependent repressor and the first ever metalloregulator of the MarR family. In contrast, NmtR is a repressor that is inactivated by Ni(II) binding. NmtR is a member of the extensively characterized ArsR/SmtB family. Two Ni(II) ions bind to the NmtR dimer in an octahedral coordination complex with stepwise binding affinities of KNi1 = 1.2 (±0.1) x 10¹? and KNi2 = 0.7 (±0.4) x 10¹? M?¹ (pH 7.0). A glutamine scanning mutagenesis approach reveals that Asp 91, His 93, His 104 and His 107 in the [alpha]5 helix and His 3 at the extreme N-terminal contribute to KNi. In contrast residues from the C-terminal tail (H109, D114 and H116), previously implicated in NmtR binding, are characterized by near wild-type KMe and allosteric coupling free energies. However, deletion of most of the C-terminal tail to create ?111 NmtR reduce Ni(II) binding stoichiometry to one per dimer and greatly reduced Ni(II) responsiveness. H3Q and ?111 NmtR also show important perturbations in the rank order of metal responsiveness, with both different from wild-type NmtR. The use of both presumably unstructured N- and C- terminal extensions is a unique property relative to other members of the ArsR/SmtB family previously characterized and provides a distinct metal specificities profile. AdcR binds two regulatory Zn(II) ions per dimer in an unusual five coordinate geometry as determined by X-ray and electronic absorption spectroscopy. Functional characterization of single residue substitution mutants identified His 108 and His 112 in [alpha]5 helix and His 42 in [alpha]2 helix, as residues essential for allosteric activation of DNA operator binding by AdcR as revealed by fluorescence anisotropy experiments. The stability constant for the regulatory site, KZn, is sensitive to pH and range from ~10¹? M?¹ at pH 6.0 to ~10¹? M?¹ at pH 8.0. Zn(II) binds to an additional one to two pairs of ancillary sites per dimer depending on the pH. A novel feature not shared by other Zn(II) regulators is an apparent reduced metal specificity, since non-cognate metals Mn(II) and Co(II) activate AdcR to the same extent than Zn(II) does. However, each non-cognate metal binds with very low affinity (

Reyes Caballero, Hermes

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Structure and Activity Analyses of Escherichia coli K-12 NagD Provide Insight into the Evolution of Biochemical Function in the Haloakanoic Acid Dehlogenase Superfamily  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HAD superfamily is a large superfamily of proteins which share a conserved core domain that provides those active site residues responsible for the chemistry common to all family members. The superfamily is further divided into the four subfamilies I, IIA, IIB, and III, based on the topology and insertion site of a cap domain that provides substrate specificity. This structural and functional division implies that members of a given HAD structural subclass may target substrates that have similar structural characteristics. To understand the structure/function relationships in all of the subfamilies, a type IIA subfamily member, NagD from Escherichia coli K-12, was selected (type I, IIB, and III members have been more extensively studied). The structure of the NagD protein was solved to 1.80 Angstroms with R{sub work} = 19.8% and R{sub free} = 21.8%. Substrate screening and kinetic analysis showed NagD to have high specificity for nucleotide monophosphates with kcat/Km = 3.12 x 10{sup 4} and 1.28 x 10{sup 4} {micro}M{sup -1} s{sup -1} for UMP and GMP, respectively. This specificity is consistent with the presence of analogues of NagD that exist as fusion proteins with a nucleotide pyrophosphatase from the Nudix family. Docking of the nucleoside substrate in the active site brings it in contact with conserved residues from the cap domain that can act as a substrate specificity loop (NagD residues 144-149) in the type IIA subfamily. NagD and other subfamily IIA and IIB members show the common trait that substrate specificity and catalytic efficiencies (k{sub cat}/K{sub m}) are low (1 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}) and the boundaries defining physiological substrates are somewhat overlapping. The ability to catabolize other related secondary metabolites indicates that there is regulation at the genetic level.

Tremblay,L.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Allen, K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The X-ray Crystallographic Structure and Activity Analysis of a Pseudomonas-Specific Subfamily of the HAD Enzyme Superfamily Evidences a Novel Biochemical Function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily is a large family of proteins dominated by phosphotransferases. Thirty-three sequence families within the HAD superfamily (HADSF) have been identified to assist in function assignment. One such family includes the enzyme phosphoacetaldehyde hydrolase (phosphonatase). Phosphonatase possesses the conserved Rossmanniod core domain and a C1-type cap domain. Other members of this family do not possess a cap domain and because the cap domain of phosphonatase plays an important role in active site desolvation and catalysis, the function of the capless family members must be unique. A representative of the capless subfamily, PSPTO{_}2114, from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, was targeted for catalytic activity and structure analyses. The X-ray structure of PSPTO{_}2114 reveals a capless homodimer that conserves some but not all of the intersubunit contacts contributed by the core domains of the phosphonatase homodimer. The region of the PSPTO{_}2114 that corresponds to the catalytic scaffold of phosphonatase (and other HAD phosphotransfereases) positions amino acid residues that are ill suited for Mg+2 cofactor binding and mediation of phosphoryl group transfer between donor and acceptor substrates. The absence of phosphotransferase activity in PSPTO{_}2114 was confirmed by kinetic assays. To explore PSPTO{_}2114 function, the conservation of sequence motifs extending outside of the HADSF catalytic scaffold was examined. The stringently conserved residues among PSPTO{_}2114 homologs were mapped onto the PSPTO{_}2114 three-dimensional structure to identify a surface region unique to the family members that do not possess a cap domain. The hypothesis that this region is used in protein-protein recognition is explored to define, for the first time, HADSF proteins which have acquired a function other than that of a catalyst. Proteins 2008.

Peisach,E.; Wang, L.; Burroughs, A.; Aravind, L.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Allen, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the major outer surface protein, OSP-A from North American and European isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lyme borreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common vector-borne disease in North America and Western Europe. As the major delayed immune response in humans, a better understanding of the major outer surface lipoproteins OspA and OspB are of much interest. These proteins have been shown to exhibit three distinct phylogenetic genotypes based on their DNA sequences. This paper describes the cloning of genomic DNA for each variant and amplification of PCR. DNA sequence data was used to derive computer driven phylogenetic analysis and deduced amino acid sequences. Overproduction of variant OspAs was carried out in E. coli using a T7-based expression system. Circular dichroism and fluorescence studies was carried out on the recombinant B31 PspA yielding evidence supporting a B31 protein containing 11% alpha-helix, 34% antiparallel beta-sheet, 12% parallel beta sheet.

McGrath, B.C.; Dunn, J.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); France, L.L. [Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY (United States); Jaing, W.; Polin, D.; Gorgone, G.; Luft, B.; Dykhuizen, D. [SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Biochem. J. (2008) 411, 531541 (Printed in Great Britain) doi:10.1042/BJ20071534 531 Endosomal NADPH oxidase regulates c-Src activation following  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Center for Gene Therapy, The College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, U.S.A. c-Src has been shown to activate NF-B (nuclear factor B) following H/R (hypoxia/reoxygenation) by acting participate in the initial redox activation of c-Src following H/R. In summary, our results suggest that Rac1

Engelhardt, John F.

466

Complete detoxification of short chain chlorinated aliphatic compounds: Isolation of halorespiring organisms and biochemical studies of the dehalogenating enzyme systems. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

'Widespread use and careless handling, storage and disposal practices, have lead to the dissemination of chlorinated short chain aliphatics into groundwater systems. These compounds are toxic and the presence of chlorinated ethenes and chlorinated propanes in the environment is of public concern. Halorespiration is a newly recognized anaerobic process by which certain bacteria use chlorinated compounds as terminal electron acceptors in their energy metabolism. In contrast to co-metabolic dechlorination, which is fortuitous, slow, and without benefit to the organisms, halorespiration, characterized by high dechlorination rates, is a specific metabolic process beneficial to the organism. The goals are to isolate and characterize organisms which use chlorinated ethenes (including tetrachloroethene [PCE], trichloroethene [TCE], cis-dichloroethene [cis-DCE], and vinyl chloride [VC], or 1,2-dichloropropane [1,2-D]) as electron acceptors in their energy metabolism. Better understanding of the physiology and phylogeny of the halorespiring organisms as well as the biochemistry of the dehalogenating enzyme systems, will greatly enhance the authors knowledge of how these organisms can successfully be employed in the bioremediation of contaminated sites. This report summarizes the results of 1.5 years of a 2-year project. Anaerobic microcosms were established using a variety of geographically distinct sediments. In several microcosms complete dechlorination of PCE to ethene (ETH), and 1,2-D to propene was observed. Upon subsequent transfers to anaerobic medium, four sediment-free, methanogenic enrichment cultures were obtained that dechlorinated PCE to ETH, and two cultures that dechlorinated 1,2-D to propene. 2-Bromoethanesulfonate (BES), a well known inhibitor of methanogens, did not inhibit the dechlorination of 1,2-D to propene or the dechlorination of PCE to cis-DCE. However, the complete dechlorination of PCE to VC and ETH was severely inhibited. They could also show that BES inhibited the dechlorination of chloroethenes in cultures without methanogens. Therefore, BES should not be used to attribute dechlorination activities to methanogens.'

Tiedje, J.M.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Augmentation of alignment and differentiation in C2C12 skeletal myoblasts through use of nano-to-microscale biochemical patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

glycol) films on indium tin oxide substrates." Langmuir500 nm gaps created on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coated glassInc. (Morrisville, PA). Indium-Tin-Oxide coated microscope

Chung, Kevin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Complete Detoxification of Short Chain Chlorinated Aliphatic Compounds: Isolation of Halorespiring Organisms and Biochemical Studies of the Dehalogenating Enzyme Systems - Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work focused on the isolation and characterization of halorespiring populations, and the initial investigation of the dechlorinating enzyme systems. In addition, tools to evaluate the presence/activity to halorespiring populations in the environment were developed. The tools developed in this work (measurements of hydrogen consumption thresholds, molecular probes) are relevant for regulatory agencies in order to facilitate decisions on which bioremediation technology (biostimulation or bioaugmentation) is most promising at a particular site. In addition, a better understanding of the physiology of the halorespiring organisms as well as the biochemistry of the dehalogenating enzyme systems enhances our knowledge of how these organisms can successfully be employed in the bioremediation of contaminated sites.

Tiedje, J.M.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Structural and biochemical study of leaves of jatobas Hymenaea coutbaril L. and H. stigonocarpa Mart. exposed to elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide atmosphere.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A concentração atmosférica de dióxido de carbono (CO2) aumentou de 280 ppm, à época da Revolução Industrial, para cerca de 370 ppm atualmente, e continua… (more)

Marcelo Rubens Machado

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

A biosynthetic approach to the discovery of novel bioactive peptides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, A. (2012). Recombinant production of cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptides in Escherichia coli using an inducible autocleaving enzyme tag. New Biotechnol 29 (3): 352-8, doi:10.1016/j.nbt.2011.11.001 • Wright, O., Yoshimi, T. and Tunnacliffe, A... variants 3.2.3.1 Design of AMP variants 81 3.2.3.1.1 K2C18 analogues 82 3.2.3.1.2 MCC18 analogues 84 3.2.3.2 Construction and expression of AMP variants 85 3.2.4 Purification of AMP variants 3.2.4.1 Polishing of AMPs by C...

Wright, Oliver Evan

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

471

JC3 Bulletin Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26, 2011 26, 2011 T-676: Apple iOS Certificate Chain Validation Flaw Lets Certain Remote Users Access or Modify SSL/TLS Sessions Apple iOS Certificate Chain Validation Flaw Lets Certain Remote Users Access or Modify SSL/TLS Sessions. July 25, 2011 T-675: Apple Laptop Battery Interface Lets Local Users Deny Service Apple Laptop Battery Interface Lets Local Users Deny Service July 22, 2011 T-674: Drupal Secure Password Hashes Module Security Bypass Vulnerability The Secure Password Hashes module for Drupal is prone to a security-bypass vulnerability. July 21, 2011 T-673: Apple Safari Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks Apple Safari Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

472

PDF File  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 28, 2010 ... ping and characterization of new EST-derived microsatellites for potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Theor Appl Genet 111:456–466. Frary A, Xu Y, ...

473

SPECIATION AND RELEASE KINETICS OF CADMIUM AND ZINC IN PADDY SOILS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(III) reducers. Appl Environ Microbiol 58: 3205­3206. Manz W, Wendt-Potthoff K, Neu TR, Szewzyk U & Lawrence JR

Sparks, Donald L.

474

Morphology and Charge Transport in Conjugated Polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in regioregular poly(thio- phene) thin film transistors", J. Appl. Phys. 2004, 96 (4), 2063­2070. 12. Basescu, N

McGehee, Michael

475

Nitride semiconductor Surface and interface characterization and device design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dev. 48 , 444 (2001) J. M. Redwing, M. A. Tischler, J. S.K. S. Boutros, and J. M. Redwing, Appl. Phys. Lett. 73 ,

Zhang, Hongtao

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

A SECOND DERIVATIVE SQP METHOD : LOCAL CONVERGENCE ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... development; the small size of the problems allows for relatively careful inspection of each ..... positive definite linear systems, Linear Algebra Appl., 28 (

477

NIVEAUX PROFONDS DANS LES DIODES LECTROLUMINESCENTES GaAs-GaAlAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JEPPSON, B., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 12 (1973) 1011. [15] LANG, D. V., CHO, A. Y., GOSSARD, A. C. et WIEGMANN

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

478

DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800951 Dipolar Chromophore Functional Layers in Organic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Semiconductor Devices, 2nd ed., Wiley, New York 1981. [14] K. O. Jeppson, C. M. Svensson, J. Appl. Phys. 1977

Evans, Paul G.

479

Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005), Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. ,Pryor (2003), Can satellite sampling of offshore wind speedsrealistically represent wind speed distributions? , J. Appl.

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Desert Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Desert Solar Place Apple Valley, California Zip 92308 Sector Renewable Energy, Solar Product Selling and installing commercial renewable energy projects, mainly...

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481

State of the InstituteState of the Institute --Today,Today, October 16, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methanotrophs. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 2008, 74 (5), 1305-1315. (33) DeVaull, G.; McHugh, T. E.; Newberry, P

Li, Mo

482

The Bright Lights in New York Could Be Solar | Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Broadway. The Big Apple also is increasingly aglow with solar power, particularly from rooftop photovoltaic (PV) solar. Earlier this year, the city unveiled the New York City...

483

NSTIC White House Colloquium 05/23/12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Paul De Graaff AIG Teresa Carlson Amazon Peter Lurie American Express Ronald Baklarz Amtrak Nicholas Ammann Apple, Inc. Ed Amoroso AT&T ...

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

484

The Thirteen Spheres: A New Proof  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Standards Appl. Math Series 55, U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Washington DC, 1972. [2] M. Aigner and G. Ziegler, Proofs from THE BOOK. Springer, Berlin, 1998  ...

485

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council Northwest Power Pool Area Apple-style-span" style"line-height: 16px; ">This...

486

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hall Cafe Monday, Jan. 28 - Breakfast: apple cinnamon multigrain pancakes - Spicy Thai beef noodle soup - Bayou tuna chicken sandwich - Garam masala salmon - Smart cuisine:...

487

Artificial Cellulosomes and Arsenic Cleanup: From Single Cell Programming to Synthetic Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bioprocessing for bioethanol production using Saccharomyceson cellulosic biomass for bioethanol production, p. 12-14.beta-glucosidase for cellulosic bioethanol production. Appl

Tsai, Shen-Long

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular-beam mass-spectrometric analysis of lignocellulosic materials, I. Herbaceous biomass. J. Anal. Appl. Pyrolysis 30: 125-144. Table 3 Depth, footprint, and volume...

489

Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

credited. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks Referencesfor a class of nonlinear chemical equations. SIAM J. Appl.to persistence analysis in chemical reaction networks. In:

Shiu, Anne; Sturmfels, Bernd

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafe Thursday, Jan. 14 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine-grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo krispy chicken wrap...

491

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafe Thursday, Oct. 21 - Breakfast: apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - *Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo krispy chicken...

492

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hall Cafe Thursday, July 1 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice wchicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo crispy chicken wrap...

493

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hall Cafe Thursday, June 4 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice wchicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo crispy chicken wrap...

494

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafe Thursday, June 16 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Smart cuisine: Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo...

495

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafe Thursday, July 14 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Smart Cuisine: Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo...

496

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hall Cafe Thursday, Nov. 3 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Smart cuisine: Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo...

497

Download PDF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 9, 2008 ... Both ACS and ACO enzymes are encoded by multi- gene families in many plants (Barry et al. 2000; Bleecker and Kende 2000). In the apple ...

498

NIST CNR SANS Bonze-Hart Perfect Crystal Diffractometer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 8, Neutron transmission of single-crystal magnesium fluoride, JG Barker, DF Mildner, JA Rodriguez, P. Thiyagarajan, J Appl. Cryst. 41, 6, 1003, 2008 ...

499

NIST CNR SANS NG3 30 Meter SANS Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 31, Neutron transmission of single-crystal magnesium fluoride, JG Barker, DF Mildner, JA Rodriguez, P. Thiyagarajan, J Appl. Cryst. 41, 6, 1003, 2008 ...

500

SANS Publications - 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 52, Neutron transmission of single-crystal magnesium fluoride, JG Barker, DF Mildner, JA Rodriguez, P. Thiyagarajan, J Appl. Cryst. 41, 6, 1003, 2008 ...