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Sample records for appalachian marcellus pa

  1. Multi-scale and Integrated Characterization of the Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian Basin: From Microscopes to Mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Soeder, Daniel J; McDannell, Kalin T.; Mroz, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Historic data from the Department of Energy Eastern Gas Shale Project (ESGP) were compiled to develop a database of geochemical analyses, well logs, lithological and natural fracture descriptions from oriented core, and reservoir parameters. The nine EGSP wells were located throughout the Appalachian Basin and intercepted the Marcellus Shale from depths of 750 meters (2500 ft) to 2500 meters (8200 ft). A primary goal of this research is to use these existing data to help construct a geologic framework model of the Marcellus Shale across the basin and link rock properties to gas productivity. In addition to the historic data, x-ray computerized tomography (CT) of entire cores with a voxel resolution of 240mm and optical microscopy to quantify mineral and organic volumes was performed. Porosity and permeability measurements in a high resolution, steady-state flow apparatus are also planned. Earth Vision software was utilized to display and perform volumetric calculations on individual wells, small areas with several horizontal wells, and on a regional basis. The results indicate that the lithologic character of the Marcellus Shale changes across the basin. Gas productivity appears to be influenced by the properties of the organic material and the mineral composition of the rock, local and regional structural features, the current state of in-situ stress, and lithologic controls on the geometry of induced fractures during stimulations. The recoverable gas volume from the Marcellus Shale is variable over the vertical stratigraphic section, as well as laterally across the basin. The results from this study are expected to help improve the assessment of the resource, and help optimize the recovery of natural gas.

  2. Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Kirby, Carl S.; Hammack, Richard W.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2012-03-20

    Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of 375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (ε{sub Sr}{sup SW} = +13.8 to +41.6, where ε{sub Sr}{sup SW} is the deviation of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 10{sup 4}); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

  3. Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elizabeth C. Chapman,† Rosemary C. Capo,† Brian W. Stewart,*,† Carl S. Kirby,‡ Richard W. Hammack,§ Karl T. Schroeder,§ and Harry M. Edenborn

    2012-02-24

    Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of ∼375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (εSr SW = +13.8 to +41.6, where εSr SW is the deviation of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 104); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

  4. Preliminary effects of Marcellus shale drilling on Louisiana waterthrush in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, D.; Sheehan, J.; Wood, P.B.; Edenborn, H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary effects of Marcellus shale drilling on Louisiana Waterthrush in West Virginia Page 1 of 1 Doug Becker and James Sheehan, WV Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV 26506, USA; Petra Bohall Wood, U.S. Geological Survey, WV Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV 26506, USA; Harry Edenborn, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236, USA. Spurred by technological advances and high energy prices, extraction of natural gas from Marcellus shale is increasing in the Appalachian Region. Because little is known about effects on wildlife populations, we studied immediate impacts of oil and gas CO&G) extraction on demographics and relative abundance of Louisiana Waterthrush'CLOWA), a riparian obligate species, to establish a baseline for potential future changes. Annually in 2008-2010, we conducted point counts, monitored Mayfield nesting success, spotted-mapped territories, and measured habitat quality using the EPA Rapid Bioassessment protocol for high gradient streams and a LOWA Habitat Suitability Index CHSI) on a 4,100 ha study area in northern West Virginia. On 11 streams, the stream length affected by O&G activities was 0-58%. Relative abundance, territory denSity, and nest success varied annually but were not significantly different across years. Success did not differ between impacted and unimpacted nests, but territory density had minimal correlation with percent of stream impacted by O&G activities. Impacted nests had lower HSI values in 2010 and lower EPA indices in 2009. High site fidelity could mask the immediate impacts of habitat disturbance from drilling as we measured return rates of 57%. All returning individuals were on the same stream they were banded and 88% were within 250 m of their territory from the previous year. We also observed a spatial shift in LOWA territories, perhaps in response to drilling activities

  5. QER- Comment of Marcellus Shale Coalition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached please find the Marcellus Shale Coalition’s comments with regard to the U.S. Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Hearing - Natural Gas Transmission, Storage and Distribution. Thank you

  6. Appalachian State | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appalachian State Jump to: navigation, search Name Appalachian State Facility Appalachian State Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  7. shaleusa5.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... NY PA NJ OH DC DE WV MD KY VA NC TN SC MI CANADA 2 0 0 1 0 0 Marcellus Shale Gas Play, Appalachian Basin Source: US Energy Information Administration based on data from WVGES , PA ...

  8. Pores in Marcellus Shale: A Neutron Scattering and FIB-SEM Study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gu, Xin; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; Mildner, David F. R.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2015-01-26

    The production of natural gas has become more and more important in the United States because of the development of hydraulic fracturing techniques, which significantly increase the permeability and fracture network of black shales. The pore structure of shale is a controlling factor for hydrocarbon storage and gas migration. In this work, we investigated the porosity of the Union Springs (Shamokin) Member of the Marcellus Formation from a core drilled in Centre County, PA, USA, using ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), and nitrogen gas adsorption. The scattering of neutrons bymore » Marcellus shale depends on the sample orientation: for thin sections cut in the plane of bedding, the scattering pattern is isotropic, while for thin sections cut perpendicular to the bedding, the scattering pattern is anisotropic. The FIB-SEM observations allow attribution of the anisotropic scattering patterns to elongated pores predominantly associated with clay. The apparent porosities calculated from scattering data from the bedding plane sections are lower than those calculated from sections cut perpendicular to the bedding. A preliminary method for estimating the total porosity from the measurements made on the two orientations is presented. This method is in good agreement with nitrogen adsorption for both porosity and specific surface area measurements. Neutron scattering combined with FIB-SEM reveals that the dominant nanosized pores in organic-poor, clay-rich shale samples are water-accessible sheetlike pores within clay aggregates. In contrast, bubble-like organophilic pores in kerogen dominate organic-rich samples. Lastly, developing a better understanding of the distribution of the water-accessible pores will promote more accurate models of water–mineral interactions during hydrofracturing.« less

  9. Pores in Marcellus Shale: A Neutron Scattering and FIB-SEM Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Xin; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; Mildner, David F. R.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2015-01-26

    The production of natural gas has become more and more important in the United States because of the development of hydraulic fracturing techniques, which significantly increase the permeability and fracture network of black shales. The pore structure of shale is a controlling factor for hydrocarbon storage and gas migration. In this work, we investigated the porosity of the Union Springs (Shamokin) Member of the Marcellus Formation from a core drilled in Centre County, PA, USA, using ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), and nitrogen gas adsorption. The scattering of neutrons by Marcellus shale depends on the sample orientation: for thin sections cut in the plane of bedding, the scattering pattern is isotropic, while for thin sections cut perpendicular to the bedding, the scattering pattern is anisotropic. The FIB-SEM observations allow attribution of the anisotropic scattering patterns to elongated pores predominantly associated with clay. The apparent porosities calculated from scattering data from the bedding plane sections are lower than those calculated from sections cut perpendicular to the bedding. A preliminary method for estimating the total porosity from the measurements made on the two orientations is presented. This method is in good agreement with nitrogen adsorption for both porosity and specific surface area measurements. Neutron scattering combined with FIB-SEM reveals that the dominant nanosized pores in organic-poor, clay-rich shale samples are water-accessible sheetlike pores within clay aggregates. In contrast, bubble-like organophilic pores in kerogen dominate organic-rich samples. Lastly, developing a better understanding of the distribution of the water-accessible pores will promote more accurate models of water–mineral interactions during hydrofracturing.

  10. Appalachian Power (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On June 24, 2015 the Virginia State Corporation Commission approved various rate-payer funding energy efficiency programs for residential Appalachian Power customers in Virginia. Appalachian Power...

  11. Appalachian Power Co (Virginia) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Co Place: Virginia Phone Number: 1-800-956-4237 Website: www.appalachianpower.com Twitter: @AppalachianPowe Facebook: https:www.facebook.comAppalachianPower Outage...

  12. Appalachian Advanced Energy Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Appalachian Advanced Energy Association Address: 4 E. Hunter St. Place: Logan, Ohio Zip: 43138 Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services Phone Number:...

  13. New York Marcellus Shale: Industry boom put on hold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercurio, Angelique

    2012-01-16

    Key catalysts for Marcellus Shale drilling in New York were identified. New York remains the only state in the nation with a legislative moratorium on high-volume hydraulic fracturing, as regulators and state lawmakers work to balance the advantages of potential economic benefits while protecting public drinking water resources and the environment. New York is being particularly careful to work on implementing sufficiently strict regulations to mitigate the environmental impacts Pennsylvania has already seen, such as methane gas releases, fracturing fluid releases, flowback water and brine controls, and total dissolved solids discharges. In addition to economic and environmental lessons learned, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) also acknowledges impacts to housing markets, security, and other local issues, and may impose stringent measures to mitigate potential risks to local communities. Despite the moratorium, New York has the opportunity to take advantage of increased capital investment, tax revenue generation, and job creation opportunities by increasing shale gas activity. The combination of economic benefits, industry pressure, and recent technological advances will drive the pursuit of natural gas drilling in New York. We identify four principal catalysts as follows: Catalyst 1: Pressure from Within the State. Although high-volume hydraulic fracturing has become a nationally controversial technology, shale fracturing activity is common in every U.S. state except New York. The regulatory process has delayed potential economic opportunities for state and local economies, as well as many industry stakeholders. In 2010, shale gas production accounted for $18.6 billion in federal royalty and local, state, and federal tax revenues. (1) This is expected to continue to grow substantially. The DEC is under increased pressure to open the state to the same opportunities that Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Montana

  14. Appendix PA: Performance Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Appendix PA-2014 Performance Assessment United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Appendix PA Table of Contents PA-1.0 Introduction PA-1.1 Changes since the CRA-2009 PA PA-1.1.1 Replacement of Option D with the ROMPCS PA-1.1.2 Additional Mined Volume in the Repository North End PA-1.1.3 Refinement to the Probability of Encountering Pressurized Brine

  15. Appalachian Advanced Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 E Hunter Street Place: Logan, Ohio Zip: 43138 Website: www.ohioaaea.orgAAEAHome.html References: Appalachian Advanced Energy1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  16. An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Bruff; Ned Godshall; Karen Evans

    2011-04-30

    This Final Scientific/ Technical Report submitted with respect to Project DE-FE0000833 titled 'An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale' in support of final reporting requirements. This final report contains a compilation of previous reports with the most current data in order to produce one final complete document. The goal of this research was to provide an integrated approach aimed at addressing the increasing water resource challenges between natural gas production and other water stakeholders in shale gas basins. The objective was to demonstrate that the AltelaRain{reg_sign} technology could be successfully deployed in the Marcellus Shale Basin to treat frac flow-back water. That objective has been successfully met.

  17. Rare earth element geochemistry of outcrop and core samples from the Marcellus Shale

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Noack, Clinton W.; Jain, Jinesh C.; Stegmeier, John; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Karamalidis, Athanasios K.

    2015-06-26

    In this paper, we studied the geochemistry of the rare earth elements (REE) in eleven outcrop samples and six, depth-interval samples of a core from the Marcellus Shale. The REE are classically applied analytes for investigating depositional environments and inferring geochemical processes, making them of interest as potential, naturally occurring indicators of fluid sources as well as indicators of geochemical processes in solid waste disposal. However, little is known of the REE occurrence in the Marcellus Shale or its produced waters, and this study represents one of the first, thorough characterizations of the REE in the Marcellus Shale. In thesemore » samples, the abundance of REE and the fractionation of REE profiles were correlated with different mineral components of the shale. Namely, samples with a larger clay component were inferred to have higher absolute concentrations of REE but have less distinctive patterns. Conversely, samples with larger carbonate fractions exhibited a greater degree of fractionation, albeit with lower total abundance. Further study is necessary to determine release mechanisms, as well as REE fate-and-transport, however these results have implications for future brine and solid waste management applications.« less

  18. Rare earth element geochemistry of outcrop and core samples from the Marcellus Shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noack, Clinton W.; Jain, Jinesh C.; Stegmeier, John; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Karamalidis, Athanasios K.

    2015-06-26

    In this paper, we studied the geochemistry of the rare earth elements (REE) in eleven outcrop samples and six, depth-interval samples of a core from the Marcellus Shale. The REE are classically applied analytes for investigating depositional environments and inferring geochemical processes, making them of interest as potential, naturally occurring indicators of fluid sources as well as indicators of geochemical processes in solid waste disposal. However, little is known of the REE occurrence in the Marcellus Shale or its produced waters, and this study represents one of the first, thorough characterizations of the REE in the Marcellus Shale. In these samples, the abundance of REE and the fractionation of REE profiles were correlated with different mineral components of the shale. Namely, samples with a larger clay component were inferred to have higher absolute concentrations of REE but have less distinctive patterns. Conversely, samples with larger carbonate fractions exhibited a greater degree of fractionation, albeit with lower total abundance. Further study is necessary to determine release mechanisms, as well as REE fate-and-transport, however these results have implications for future brine and solid waste management applications.

  19. Atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Humphreys, M.; Smosna, R.A.

    1995-06-01

    This regional study of gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin has four main objectives: to organize all of the -as reservoirs in the Appalachian basin into unique plays based on common age, lithology, trap type and other geologic similarities; to write, illustrate and publish an atlas of major gas plays; to prepare and submit a digital data base of geologic, engineering and reservoir parameters for each gas field; and technology transfer to the oil and gas industry during the preparation of the atlas and data base.

  20. Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

  1. Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

    1992-06-01

    Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

  2. AEP Appalachian Power- Non-Residential Prescriptive Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Appalachian Power Commercial and Industrial Standard Program helps non-residential customers implement standard energy efficiency projects through financial incentives to offset project costs....

  3. Solar Decathlon: Appalachian State Wins People's Choice Award...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lee, right, members of Appalachian States Solar Decathlon team. | Credit: Stefano PalteraU.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon On Friday, Sept. 30, 2011, U.S. ...

  4. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Delaware W 28.49 W 131.87 21.6% 59 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin Florida W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W 20.35 W 64.82 31.4% 1,715 W 75.9% Northern...

  5. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Florida W 38.51 W 140.84 27.3% 134 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - W W W - W Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W 16.14 W 63.35 25.5% 1,681 W 88.5% Northern...

  6. AEP Appalachian Power- Non-Residential Custom Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Appalachian Power Custom C&I program offers custom incentives for some of the more common energy efficiency measures. Program incentives are available under the Custom C&I program to ...

  7. Appalachian Power (Electric)- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appalachian Power provides financial incentives to its non-residential customers to promote energy efficiency in their facilities. The incentive is designed as a custom program which provides $0.05...

  8. Microsoft Word - APPALACHIAN_STATE_VolumeI-Submissionv2.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 A. Team Qualifications 8 B. Design Goals and Project Context 20 C. Envelope Durability Analysis 27 D. Indoor Air Quality Evaluation 28 E. Space Conditioning Design and Analysis 37 F. Energy Analysis 42 G. Financial Analysis 46 H. Domestic Hot Water, Lighting, and Appliances Analysis 47 I. Construction Documentation 55 J. Industry Partners 1 APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY WHO WE ARE Appalachian State University's team is composed of undergraduate and graduate students from

  9. Solar Decathlon Team Using Appalachian Mountain History to Model Home of the Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    See how Appalachian State University used traditional mountain life architecture to design their 2011 Solar Decathlon home.

  10. Quantification of Organic Porosity and Water Accessibility in Marcellus Shale Using Neutron Scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gu, Xin; Mildner, David F. R.; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; Slingerland, Rudy; Brantley, Susan L.

    2016-04-28

    Pores within organic matter (OM) are a significant contributor to the total pore system in gas shales. These pores contribute most of the storage capacity in gas shales. Here we present a novel approach to characterize the OM pore structure (including the porosity, specific surface area, pore size distribution, and water accessibility) in Marcellus shale. By using ultrasmall and small-angle neutron scattering, and by exploiting the contrast matching of the shale matrix with suitable mixtures of deuterated and protonated water, both total and water-accessible porosity were measured on centimeter-sized samples from two boreholes from the nanometer to micrometer scale withmore » good statistical coverage. Samples were also measured after combustion at 450 °C. Analysis of scattering data from these procedures allowed quantification of OM porosity and water accessibility. OM hosts 24–47% of the total porosity for both organic-rich and -poor samples. This porosity occupies as much as 29% of the OM volume. In contrast to the current paradigm in the literature that OM porosity is organophilic and therefore not likely to contain water, our results demonstrate that OM pores with widths >20 nm exhibit the characteristics of water accessibility. In conclusion, our approach reveals the complex structure and wetting behavior of the OM porosity at scales that are hard to interrogate using other techniques.« less

  11. A5 PA Addendum 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Performance Assessment for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test ... Nevada Operations Office NTS Nevada Test Site PA Performance Assessment RWMS ...

  12. Southern Appalachian assessment. Summary report, Report 1 of 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    This final report for the Southern Appalachian Man and the Biosphere Program is comprised of two documents: (1) a brief summary of programs and projects, and (2) a more extensive summary report included as an attachment. The purpose of the program is to promote a sustainable balance between the conservation of biological diversity, compatible economic uses, and cultural values across the Southern Appalachians. Program and project areas addressing regional issues include environmental monitoring and assessment, sustainable development/sustainable technologies, conservation biology, ecosystem management, environmental education and training, cultural and historical resources, and public information and education. The attached summary report is one of five that documents the results of the Southern Appalachian Assessment; it includes atmospheric, social/cultural/economic, terrestrial, and aquatic reports.

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Springdale PA - PA 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FACT SHEET This fact sheet provides information about the Springdale, Pennsylvania, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. PA.11-1 ...

  14. PaR-PaR Laboratory Automation Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linshiz, G; Stawski, N; Poust, S; Bi, CH; Keasling, JD; Hilson, NJ

    2013-05-01

    Labor-intensive multistep biological tasks, such as the construction and cloning of DNA molecules, are prime candidates for laboratory automation. Flexible and biology-friendly operation of robotic equipment is key to its successful integration in biological laboratories, and the efforts required to operate a robot must be much smaller than the alternative manual lab work. To achieve these goals, a simple high-level biology-friendly robot programming language is needed. We have developed and experimentally validated such a language: Programming a Robot (PaR-PaR). The syntax and compiler for the language are based on computer science principles and a deep understanding of biological workflows. PaR-PaR allows researchers to use liquid-handling robots effectively, enabling experiments that would not have been considered previously. After minimal training, a biologist can independently write complicated protocols for a robot within an hour. Adoption of PaR-PaR as a standard cross-platform language would enable hand-written or software-generated robotic protocols to be shared across laboratories.

  15. Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Lixin; Ryan, Mathur; Rother, Gernot; Cole, David; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina; Williams, Jennifer; Alex, Carone; Brantley, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt.% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are eitherfilled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7% while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered

  16. Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Lixin; Mathur, Ryan; Rother, Gernot; Cole, David; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina; Williams, Jennifer; Carone, Alex; Brantley, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are either filled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7 % while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the

  17. Examples from the atlas of major Appalachian Gas Plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchen, D.G.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Nuttall, B.C.; Smosna, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of this contract are to produce a panted atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays and to compile a machine-readable database of reservoir data. The Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC or the Consortium), a partnership of the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, and the departments of Geology and Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering at West Virginia University (WVU), agrees with the need to classify gas reservoirs by geologic plays. During meetings with industry representatives, the small independents in the basin emphasized that one of their prime needs was to place each producing reservoir within a stratigraphic framework subdivided by environment of deposition to enable them to develop exploration and development strategies. The text for eight of the 31 play descriptions has been completed, drafting of illustrations for these plays is underway (or complete for some plays), and the review process is ongoing.

  18. 2016 Race to Zero Competition: Appalachian State University Team Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appalachian State University Team (re)Connect RESILIENT HOUSE Project Summary Resilient House was born through a union of the ASU 2016 Advanced Building Science graduate course and the senior design studio to create the newest edition to a local builder's Net-Zero-Energy line. Deltec Homes, a prefabricated home builder r headquartered out of Asheville, NC, recently launched the Renew Collection of net-zero homes. A single family residence that is not only sustainable and zero-energy ready, but

  19. Comparative study of microfacies variation in two samples from the Chittenango member, Marcellus shale subgroup, western New York state, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balulla, Shama Padmanabhan, E.; Over, Jeffrey

    2015-07-22

    This study demonstrates the significant lithologic variations that occur within the two shale samples from the Chittenango member of the Marcellus shale formation from western New York State in terms of mineralogical composition, type of lamination, pyrite occurrences and fossil content using thin section detailed description and field emission Scanning electron microscope (FESEM) with energy dispersive X-Ray Spectrum (EDX). This study is classified samples as laminated clayshale and fossiliferous carbonaceous shale. The most important detrital constituents of these shales are the clay mineral illite and chlorite, quartz, organic matter, carbonate mineral, and pyrite. The laminated clayshale has a lower amount of quartz and carbonate minerals than fossiliferous carbonaceous shale while it has a higher amount of clay minerals (chlorite and illite) and organic matter. FESEM analysis confirms the presence of chlorite and illite. The fossil content in the laminated clayshale is much lower than the fossiliferous carbonaceous shale. This can provide greater insights about variations in the depositional and environmental factors that influenced its deposition. This result can be compiled with the sufficient data to be helpful for designing the horizontal wells and placement of hydraulic fracturing in shale gas exploration and production.

  20. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scenario A significant amount of natural gas extracted from Marcellus and Utica shale formations in the Appalachian Basin contains valuable liquids, such as propane, butane and ...

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - APPALACHIAN_STATE_Presentation 4 27 2015...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY 19 April 2015 2 The App State Team Jake Smith Chris Schoonover A.J. Smith Josh Brooks Chase Ambler Brad Painting Harrison Sytz Chelsea Davis Kaitlyn ...

  2. Forest stand development patterns in the southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copenheaver, C.A.; Matthews, J.M.; Showalter, J.M.; Auch, W.E.

    2006-07-01

    Composition of southern Appalachian forests are influenced by disturbance and topography. This study examined six stands in southwestern Virginia. Within each stand, a 0.3-ha plot was established, and all trees and saplings were measured and aged. Burned stands had lower densities of saplings and small trees, but appeared to have greater Quercus regeneration. Ice damage from the 1994 ice storm was most evident in Pinus strobus saplings. A stand on old coal-mine slag appeared to be experiencing a slower rate of succession than other sites. A variety of stand development patterns were observed, but one common pattern was that oak-hickory overstories had different species in their understory, which may indicate future changes in species composition.

  3. US MidAtl PA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MidAtl PA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl PA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Pennsylvania households consume an average of 96 million Btu per year, 8% more than the U.S. average. Pennsylvania residents also

  4. Palmetto Clean Energy (PaCE) Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    PaCE funding comes from the customers of participating utilities who voluntarily choose to support the program through an additional charge on their monthly utility bills. Of the $4, $3.50 goes t...

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Aeroprojects Inc - PA 22

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Aeroprojects Inc - PA 22 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Aeroprojects, Inc. (PA.22 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Sonabound Ultrasonics PA.22-1 Location: 200-T E. Rosedale Avenue , West Chester , Pennsylvania PA.22-3 Evaluation Year: Circa 1990 PA.22-1 PA.22-2 Site Operations: Research/Development including investigation of the use of ultrasonic energy. PA.22-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Conditions at site meet current

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sharples Corp - PA 29

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sharples Corp - PA 29 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SHARPLES CORP. (PA.29 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 201 Spring Garden Street , Philadelphia , Pennsylvania & Philadelphia , Pennsylvania PA.29-2 PA.29-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 PA.29-1 Site Operations: Producer/broker of special chemicals - major MED supplier. PA.29-2 PA.29-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive materials were used

  7. File:EIA-Appalach3-eastPA-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Description Appalachian Basin, Eastern Pennsylvania By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  8. PaTu Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PaTu Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name PaTu Wind Farm Facility PaTu Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer...

  9. NUG Meeting November 9, 2004 (Pittsburgh, PA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NUG Meeting November 9, 2004 (Pittsburgh, PA) Dates November 9, 2004 Location SuperComputing 2004 (SC2004) David L. Lawrence Convention Center Room 319/320 Pittsburgh, PA Agenda NERSC User Group (NUG) Meeting, Tuesday November 9th 2004 5:30 - 07:00 PM at SC2004 in Pittsburgh, Room 319/320 The NERSC User Group (NUG) is composed of all NERSC users to provide guidance in provision of center services and future development. NUG holds annual meetings, including BoFs at SC meetings, to discuss topics

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Philadelphia Navy Yard - PA 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Philadelphia Navy Yard - PA 08 Site ID (CSD Index Number): PA.08 / PA.26 Site Name: PHILADELPHIA NAVY YARD Site Summary: This site was mistakenly assigned two numbers during FUSRAP's initial evaluation in the 1980s and 1990s. PA.26 was later removed from the site documents, and only PA.08 was used. Site Link: External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Naval Boiler and Turbine Lab Alternate Name Documents: Location: Philadelphia , Pennsylvania Location Documents: PA.08-1 Historical Operations

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Superior Steel Co - PA 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Superior Steel Co - PA 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Superior Steel, PA Alternate Name(s): Copper Weld, Inc. Superbolt Location: Carnegie, Pennsylvania PA.03-1 Historical Operations: Milled uranium metal for AEC. PA.03-4 Eligibility Determination: Eligible Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Survey PA.03-4 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to Superior Steel, PA

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Try Street Terminal - PA 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Try Street Terminal - PA 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TRY STREET TERMINAL (PA.14 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Try Street Terminal , Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania PA.14-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.14-1 Site Operations: Circa 1943 - facility used to store 20 plus drums of uranium slag. PA.14-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual radioactive contamination considered remote PA.14-1 Radioactive

  13. Appalachian appropriate technology project exhibits at 1982 World's Fair. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    The work of the Appalachian Appropriate Technology Project on seven turn-of-the-century houses for the 1982 World's Fair in Knoxville is reviewed. A work session called a Design-In to decide how to use the houses is described and correspondence related to the project is included. (MHR)

  14. Innovative Methodology For Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobi, Rober

    2007-03-28

    This Topical Report (#6 of 9) consists of the figures 3.6-13 to (and including) 3.6-18 (and appropriate figure captions) that accompany the Final Technical Progress Report entitled: “Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin” for DOE/NETL Award DE-AC26-00NT40698.

  15. Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobi, Rober

    2007-03-31

    This Topical Report (#6 of 9) consists of the figures 3.6-13 to (and including) 3.6-18 (and appropriate figure captions) that accompany the Final Technical Progress Report entitled: "Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin” for DOE/NETL Award DE-AC26-00NT40698.

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Heppanstall Co - PA 19

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Tippens Inc. PA.19-1 Location: 4620 Hatfield Street , Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania PA.19-4...

  17. PA Sangli Bundled Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PA Sangli Bundled Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name: PA Sangli Bundled Wind Project Place: Maharashtra, India Zip: 416115 Sector: Wind energy Product:...

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Carpenter Steel Co - PA...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Carpenter Steel Co - PA 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Carpenter Steel Co. (PA.12 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate ...

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Jessop Steel Co - PA 17

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Jessop Steel Co - PA 17 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: JESSOP STEEL CO. (PA.17 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: ...

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Beryllium Corp - PA 39

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Beryllium Corp - PA 39 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: BERYLLIUM CORP. (PA.39 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Brush Beryllium PA.39-1 Location: Reading , Pennsylvania PA.39-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.39-1 Site Operations: Production of Beryllium circa late 1940s - 50s. PA.39-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive material handled at this site, only Beryllium PA.39-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No PA.39-1 Primary

  1. Technical Insights for Saltstone PA Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.; Sarkar, S.; Mahadevan, S.; Kosson, D.

    2011-07-20

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is a collaborative program sponsored by the US DOE Office of Waste Processing. The objective of the CBP is to develop a set of computational tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic, and chemical performance of cementitious barriers and waste forms used in nuclear applications. CBP tools are expected to better characterize and reduce the uncertainties of current methodologies for assessing cementitious barrier performance and increase the consistency and transparency of the assessment process, as the five-year program progresses. In September 2009, entering its second year of funded effort, the CBP sought opportunities to provide near-term tangible support to DOE Performance Assessments (PAs). The Savannah River Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) was selected for the initial PA support effort because (1) cementitious waste forms and barriers play a prominent role in the performance of the facility, (2) certain important long-term behaviors of cementitious materials composing the facility are uncertain, (3) review of the SDF PA by external stakeholders is ongoing, and (4) the DOE contractor responsible for the SDF PA is open to receiving technical assistance from the CBP. A review of the current (SRR Closure & Waste Disposal Authority 2009) and prior Saltstone PAs (e.g., Cook et al. 2005) suggested five potential opportunities for improving predictions. The candidate topics considered were (1) concrete degradation from external sulfate attack, (2) impact of atmospheric exposure to concrete and grout before closure, such as accelerated slag and Tc-99 oxidation, (3) mechanistic prediction of geochemical conditions, (4) concrete degradation from rebar corrosion due to carbonation, and (5) early age cracking from drying and/or thermal shrinkage. The candidate topics were down-selected considering the feasibility of addressing each issue within approximately six months, and

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Koppers Co Inc - PA 25

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Koppers Co Inc - PA 25 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: KOPPERS CO., INC. (PA.25 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania PA.25-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.25-2 Site Operations: Conducted pilot-scale studies on the commercial production of UF4 and UF6. PA.25-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Facility was licensed to handle nuclear materials PA.25-2 PA.25-3 Radioactive Materials Handled:

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Catalytic Co - PA 40

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Catalytic Co - PA 40 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Catalytic Co. (PA.40 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Philadelphia , Pennsylvania PA.40-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 PA.40-1 Site Operations: Prime contractor for construction of the Fernald facility. Records indicate one time shipment of a very small quantity (4 lbs) of uranium metal to this site. PA.40-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Construction contractor -

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Foote Mineral Co - PA 27

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Foote Mineral Co - PA 27 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Foote Mineral Co. (PA.27 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Exton , Pennsylvania PA.27-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.27-1 Site Operations: Processed rare earth, principally zirconium and monazite sand was processed on a pilot-plant scale. PA.27-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Limited quantity of material handled - Potential for contamination considered remote

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Heppenstall Co - PA 19

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Heppenstall Co - PA 19 Site ID (CSD Index Number): PA.19 Site Name: Heppenstall Co. Site Summary: Site Link: External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Tippens Inc. Alternate Name Documents: PA.19-1 Location: 4620 Hatfield Street , Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania Location Documents: PA.19-4 Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Forged approximately 100,000 pounds of uranium during a six month period in 1955. Historical Operations Documents: PA.19-1 Eligibility Determination: Eliminated -

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shippingport Atomic Power Plant - PA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    13 Shippingport Atomic Power Plant - PA 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SHIPPINGPORT ATOMIC POWER PLANT (PA.13 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP. Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Duquesne Light Company PA.13-1 Location: 25 miles west of Pittsburgh in Beaver County , Shippingport , Pennsylvania PA.13-2 Evaluation Year: circa 1987 PA.13-3 Site Operations: First commercially operated nuclear power reactor. Joint project (Federal Government an Duquesne Light

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Summerville Tube Co - PA 24

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Summerville Tube Co - PA 24 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SUMMERVILLE TUBE CO. (PA.24) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Bridgeport , Pennsylvania PA.24-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.24-1 Site Operations: Metal fabrication research and development on uranium metal in the early 1940s - Cold drawing of tuballoy aluminum sheathing. PA.24-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual radioactive contamination

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - APPALACHIAN_STATE_Presentation 4 27 2015 lower quality pics.pptx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mountain Laurel Home Race-to-Zero Design Competition Lena Burkett, Chase Ambler, and Brad Painting Jeff Tiller, Faculty Advisor Department of Sustainable Technology and the Built Environment APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY 19 April 2015 2 The App State Team Jake Smith Chris Schoonover A.J. Smith Josh Brooks Chase Ambler Brad Painting Harrison Sytz Chelsea Davis Kaitlyn Morgan Pedro Franco Josh Smith Jeff Tiller Brenton Faircloth David Leonard Marshall Dressler Lena Burkett Kenny High Chase Edge

  9. DOE-RL FOIA/PA Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2/03 FRI 10:02 FAX 1 509 376 9704 DOE-RL FOIA/PA Office [41002 .,UU".. ...,. '.1..1 Department of Energy .Rlchland Operations Office P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 993.52 APR. 4 2fJOa ( 03~PRO.O389 Mr. D. B. Van Leuven, President and Chief Executive Officer Fluor Hanford, Inc. Richland, Washington 993~2 DearMr; Van Leuven: CONTRACT NO. DB-ACO6-96RL13200 -REDUCTION IN LONG-TERM LIABll..ITIES The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). is C1UTCntly reviewing the

  10. PaSol Italia SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: PaSol Italia SpA Place: Varallo Pombia, Italy Zip: 28040 Sector: Solar Product: PA.SOL was formed by local private investors in order to initiate local PV module...

  11. Meeting Summary for HTF PA Scoping | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for HTF PA Scoping Meeting Summary for HTF PA Scoping Meeting Notes for the Savannah River Site H-Area Tank Farm Performance Assessment Scoping Meeting PDF icon Savannah River Site...

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Frankford Arsenal - PA 21

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOD PA.21-2 Also see Documents Related to Frankford Arsenal PA.21-1 - AEC Memorandum; Smith to Hughes; Subject: Shipment of Uranium Metal to Frankfort Arsenal; June 23, 1952 ...

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bettis Atomic Power Laboratories - PA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    44 Bettis Atomic Power Laboratories - PA 44 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bettis Atomic Power Laboratories (PA.44 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Allegheny County , West Mifflin , Pennsylvania PA.44-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 PA.44-2 Site Operations: Conducted activities directed toward the design, development, testing, and operational follow of nuclear reactor propulsion plants for Naval surface and

  14. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

  15. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

  16. Appalachian Rivers II Conference: Technology for Monitoring, Assessing, and Restoring Streams, Rivers, and Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None available

    1999-07-29

    On July 28-29, 1999, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and the WMAC Foundation co-sponsored the Appalachian Rivers II Conference in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting brought together over 100 manufacturers, researchers, academicians, government agency representatives, watershed stewards, and administrators to examine technologies related to watershed assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Sessions included presentations and panel discussions concerning watershed analysis and modeling, decision-making considerations, and emerging technologies. The final session examined remediation and mitigation technologies to expedite the preservation of watershed ecosystems.

  17. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: Philadelphia, PA

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: Philadelphia, PA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: Philadelphia, PA For this demonstration assessment, 10 different groups of LED luminaires were installed at three sites in Philadelphia, PA. Each of the three sites represented a different set of conditions, most importantly with regard to the incumbent HPS luminaires, which were nominally 100 W,

  18. INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rober Jacobi

    2006-05-31

    During this reporting period, Fortuna retrieved the first oriented horizontal core from the Trenton/Black River in the northern Appalachian Basin. The core came from central New York State, the ''hottest'' play in the Appalachian Basin. A complete well log suite was also collected in the horizontal hole, including an FMI log. After reassembling the core sections, and orienting the core, we analyzed the whole core before it was cut for full-diameter core analyses (e.g., permeability) and before the core was split, in order that we did not miss any features that may be lost during cutting. We recognized and mapped along the core 43 stylolites, 99 veins and several large partially filled vugs. Kinematic indicators suggest multiple phases of strike-slip motion. Master-abutting relationships at intersections (primarily determined from which feature ''cuts'' which other feature) show three stages of stylolite growth: sub horizontal, nearly vertical, and steeply dipping. These development stages reflect vertical loading, tectonic horizontal loading, and finally oblique loading. Hydrothermal dolomite veins cut and are cut by all three stages of the stylolites. A set of horizontal veins indicates vertical unloading. Analyses of the core will continue, as well as the well logs.

  19. Alleghanian development of the Goat Rock fault zone, southernmost Appalachians: Temporal compatibility with the master decollement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steltenpohl, M.G. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States)); Goldberg, S.A. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States)); Hanley, T.B. (Columbus College, GA (United States)); Kunk, M.J. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    The Goat Rock and associated Bartletts Ferry fault zones, which mark the eastern margin of the Pine Mountain Grenville basement massif, are controversial due to the suggestion that they are rare exposed segments of the late Paleozoic southern Appalachian master decollement. The controversy in part stems from reported middle Paleozoic (Acadian) radiometric dates postulated as the time of movement along these fault zones. Ultramylonite samples from the type area at Goat Rock Dam yield a 287 [plus minus] 15 Ma Rb-Sr isochron interpreted as the time of Sr isotopic rehomgenization during mylonitization. This date is corroborated by Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar mineral ages on hornblende (297-288 Ma) and muscovite (285-278 Ma) from neomineralized and dynamically recrystallized rocks within and straddling the fault zone. These Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian dates indicate the time of right-slip movement (Alleghenian) along the Goat Rock fault zone, which is compatible with the timing suggested by COCORP for thrusting along the southern Appalachian master decollement.

  20. Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J.

    2009-11-15

    This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Canonsburg Industrial Park - PA 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Canonsburg Industrial Park - PA 05 Site ID (CSD Index Number): PA.05 Site Name: Canonsburg Industrial Park Site Summary: Site Link: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Alternate Name Documents: Location: Location Documents: Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Historical Operations Documents: Eligibility Determination: Eligibility Determination Documents: Radiological Surveys Conducted (List of different Rad Surveys): Radiological Surveys

  2. Fragmentation of habitats used by neotropical migratory birds in Southern Appalachians and the neotropics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, S.M.; Dale, V.H.; Offerman, H.L. |

    1993-12-31

    Recent declines in North American breeding populations have sparked great concern over the effects of habitat fragmentation. Neotropical migrant birds use and are influenced by two biomes during a single life span. Yet assessment of the relative importance of changes in tropical wintering areas versus temperate breeding areas is complicated by regional variation in rates and extent of habitat change. Landscape-level measurements of forest fragmentation derived from remotely-sensed data provide a means to compare the patterns of habitat modification on the wintering and breeding grounds of migrant birds. This study quantifies patterns of forest fragmentation in the Southern Appalachian Mountains and tropical Amazon and relates these patterns to the resource needs of neotropical migrant birds. Study sites were selected from remotely-sensed images to represent a range of forest fragmentation (highly fragmented landscape to continuous forest).

  3. ENHANCING RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN BY IDENTIFYING TECHNICAL BARRIER AND PREFERRED PRACTICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald R. McDowell; Khashayar Aminian; Katharine L. Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Ed. Hohn; Douglas G. Patchen

    2003-09-01

    The Preferred Upstream Management Practices (PUMP) project, a two-year study sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), had three primary objectives: (1) the identification of problems, problematic issues, potential solutions and preferred practices related to oil production; (2) the creation of an Appalachian Regional Council to oversee and continue this investigation beyond the end of the project; and (3) the dissemination of investigative results to the widest possible audience, primarily by means of an interactive website. Investigation and identification of oil production problems and preferred management practices began with a Problem Identification Workshop in January of 2002. Three general issues were selected by participants for discussion: Data Management; Reservoir Engineering; and Drilling Practices. At the same meeting, the concept of the creation of an oversight organization to evaluate and disseminated preferred management practices (PMP's) after the end of the project was put forth and volunteers were solicited. In-depth interviews were arranged with oil producers to gain more insight into problems and potential solutions. Project members encountered considerable reticence on the part of interviewees when it came to revealing company-specific production problems or company-specific solutions. This was the case even though interviewees were assured that all responses would be held in confidence. Nevertheless, the following production issues were identified and ranked in order of decreasing importance: Water production including brine disposal; Management of production and business data; Oil field power costs; Paraffin accumulation; Production practices including cementing. An number of secondary issues were also noted: Problems associated with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Waterflooding; Reservoir characterization; Employee availability, training, and safety; and Sale and Purchase problems. One item was mentioned both in

  4. Palmco Power PA, LLC (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pennsylvania) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Palmco Power PA, LLC Place: Pennsylvania Phone Number: (877) 726-5862 Website: www.palmcoenergy.com Outage Hotline: (877) 726-5862...

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Aliquippa - PA 07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. PA.07-1 - DOE Memorandum; Coffman to LaGrone; Designation of Universal Cyclops, Inc., Titusville ...

  6. Hanford Site Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment (PA) Current

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Status | Department of Energy Assessment (PA) Current Status Hanford Site Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment (PA) Current Status Marcel Bergeron Washignton River Protection Solutions Alaa Aly INTERA Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange December 11-12, 2014 To view all the P&RA CoP 2014 Technical Exchange Meeting videos click here. Video Presentation - Part 1 Video Presentation - Part 2 Hanford Site Waste Management Area C Performance

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pennsylvania Disposal Site - PA 43

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Disposal Site - PA 43 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Pennsylvania Disposal Site (PA.43) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 77 FUSRAP considered sites for which few, if any records are available in their respective site files to provide an historical account of past operations and their relationship, if

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pennsylvania Ordnance Works - PA 32

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ordnance Works - PA 32 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Pennsylvania Ordnance Works (PA.32 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 77 FUSRAP considered sites for which few, if any records are available in their respective site files to provide an historical account of past operations and their relationship,

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Bureau of Mines - PA 36

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    PA 36 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: U. S. BUREAU OF MINES (PA.36) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Bruceton , Pennsylvania PA.36-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.36-2 Site Operations: Conducted studied on explosiveness of Uranium, Thorium and Beryllium. PA.36-1 PA.36-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Small amounts of radioactive materials used - Potential for residual radioactive contamination considered remote PA.36-2

  10. Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly I: Root of the main crustal decollement for the Appalachian-Ouachita orogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.J. (Total Minatome Corporation, Houston, TX (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly extends for at least 4000 km from south-central Texas to offshore Newfoundland as one of the longest continuous tectonic features in North America and a major crustal element of the entire North Atlantic-Gulf Coast region. Analysis of 28 profiles spaced at 100km intervals and four computed models demonstrate that the anomaly may be explained by a thick zone of mafic and ultramafic rocks averaging 13-15 km in depth. The trend of the anomaly closely follows the trend of main Appalachian features: in the Gulf Coast of Louisiana, the anomaly is as far south of the Ouachita front as it is east of the western limit of deformation through the central Appalachians. Because the anomaly continues across well-known continental crust in northern Florida and onshore Texas, it cannot plausibly be ascribed to an edge effect at the boundary of oceanic with continental crustal compositions. The northwest-verging, deep-crustal events discovered in COCORP data from the Ouachitas and Appalachians suggest an analogy with the main suture of the Himalayan orogen in the Tibetan Plateau. In this paper the anomaly is identified with the late Paleozoic Alleghenian megasuture, in which the northwest-verging crustal-detachment surfaces ultimately root.

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shallow Land Disposal Area - PA 45 FUSRAP Considered Sites Shallow Land Disposal Area, PA Alternate Name(s): Parks Township Shallow Land Disposal Area Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) Babcock and Wilcox Parks Facilities PA.45-1 PA.45-5 PA.45-6 Location: PA Route 66 and Kissimere Road, Parks Township, Apollo, Pennsylvania PA.45-1 Historical Operations: Fabricated nuclear fuel under an NRC license as an extension of NUMEC Apollo production facilities. PA.45-1 PA.45-5 Eligibility

  12. Morphological studies on block copolymer modified PA 6 blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poindl, M. E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de; Bonten, C. E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de

    2014-05-15

    Recent studies show that compounding polyamide 6 (PA 6) with a PA 6 polyether block copolymers made by reaction injection molding (RIM) or continuous anionic polymerization in a reactive extrusion process (REX) result in blends with high impact strength and high stiffness compared to conventional rubber blends. In this paper, different high impact PA 6 blends were prepared using a twin screw extruder. The different impact modifiers were an ethylene propylene copolymer, a PA PA 6 polyether block copolymer made by reaction injection molding and one made by reactive extrusion. To ensure good particle matrix bonding, the ethylene propylene copolymer was grafted with maleic anhydride (EPR-g-MA). Due to the molecular structure of the two block copolymers, a coupling agent was not necessary. The block copolymers are semi-crystalline and partially cross-linked in contrast to commonly used amorphous rubbers which are usually uncured. The combination of different analysis methods like atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) gave a detailed view in the structure of the blends. Due to the partial cross-linking, the particles of the block copolymers in the blends are not spherical like the ones of ethylene propylene copolymer. The differences in molecular structure, miscibility and grafting of the impact modifiers result in different mechanical properties and different blend morphologies.

  13. Appendix SCR: Feature, Event, and Process Screening for PA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SCR-2014 Feature, Event, and Process Screening for PA United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Appendix SCR-2014 Feature, Event, and Process Screening for PA Table of Contents SCR-1.0 Introduction SCR-2.0 Basis for FEPs Screening Process SCR-2.1 Requirement for FEPs SCR-2.2 FEPs List Development for the CCA SCR-2.3 Criteria for Screening of FEPs and Categorization of Retained FEPs

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Babcock and Wilcox Co - PA 18

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Babcock and Wilcox Co - PA 18 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Babcock and Wilcox Co (PA 18) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Tubular Products Division PA.18-1 Location: Beaver Falls , Pennsylvania PA.18-1 Evaluation Year: 1990 PA.18-1 Site Operations: Performed development work to pierce uranium billets for extrusion to tubes. No indication that the piercing operation was conducted. PA.18-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bartol Research Foundation - PA 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bartol Research Foundation - PA 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bartol Research Foundation (PA 0-02) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: The Franklin Institute PA.0-02-1 Location: Swathmore , Pennsylvania PA.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.0-02-1 Site Operations: Research organization. Possibly performed radiation monitoring and possibly supplied monitoring equipment to Monsanto Chemical Company. PA.0-02-1 Site Disposition:

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Curtiss-Wright Corp - PA 37

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - PA 37 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Curtiss-Wright Corp. ( PA.37 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, Bureau of Radiation Protection Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Quehanna Site Quehanna Radioisotopes Pilot Plant Radiation Process Center PA.37-1 Location: Northwest Clearfield County , Quehanna , Pennsylvania PA.37-2 PA.37-3 Evaluation Year: Circa 1990 PA.37-1 Site Operations: 1955-1960

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Landis Machine Tool Co - PA 34

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Landis Machine Tool Co - PA 34 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: LANDIS MACHINE TOOL CO. (PA.34 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Teledyne Landis Machine PA.34-1 Location: Waynesboro , Pennsylvania PA.34-2 Evaluation Year: 1991 PA.34-1 Site Operations: Manufactured metal fabrication equipment for machining uranium metal slugs. PA.34-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Limited scope of activities performed quantities of radioactive

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Roberts and Manders Corp - PA 28

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Roberts and Manders Corp - PA 28 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ROBERTS AND MANDERS CORP. (PA.28 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Hatboro , Pennsylvania PA.28-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.28-2 Site Operations: Research/Development operation. Company was considered a candidate for work with beryllium metal - but rejected the opportunity. PA.28-2 PA.28-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rohm and Hass Co - PA 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Rohm and Hass Co - PA 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ROHM & HASS CO. (PA.02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 5000 Richmond Street , Philadelphia , Pennsylvania PA.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 PA.02-2 Site Operations: Research and development on uranium recovery from carbonate leach liquors in the mid-1950s. PA.02-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria PA.02-4 Radioactive Materials Handled:

  20. WC_1992_002_CLASS_WAIVER_of_the_Government_US_and_Foreign_Pa...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2002CLASSWAIVERoftheGovernmentUSandForeignPa.pdf WC1992002CLASSWAIVERoftheGovernmentUSandForeignPa.pdf WC1992002CLASSWAIVERoftheGovernmentUSandForeig...

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Meili and Worthington - PA 0-04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Meili and Worthington - PA 0-04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MEILI & WORTHINGTON (PA.0-04 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Hatboro , Pennsylvania PA.0-04-1 PA.0-04-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.0-04-1 Site Operations: Manufacturing facility. PA.0-04-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication radioactive material was used on this site PA.0-04-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated PA.0-04-1 Primary

  2. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Final report, October 10, 1994--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, R.H.; Parekh, B.K.; Meloy, T.

    1997-12-31

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium is a group comprised of representatives from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, that was formed to pursue research in areas related to the treatment and processing of fine coal. Each member performed research in their respective areas of expertise and the report contained herein encompasses the results that were obtained for the three major tasks that the Consortium undertook from October, 1994 through March, 1997. In the first task, conducted by Virginia Polytechnic Institute, novel methods (both mechanical and chemical) for dewatering fine coal were examined. In the second task, the Center for Applied Energy Research examined novel approaches for destabilization of [highly stable] flotation froths. And in the third task, West Virginia University developed physical and mathematical models for fine coal spirals. The Final Report is written in three distinctive chapters, each reflecting the individual member`s task report. Recommendations for further research in those areas investigated, as well as new lines of pursuit, are suggested.

  3. Spoil handling and reclamation costs at a contour surface mine in steep slope Appalachian topography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zipper, C.E.; Hall, A.T.; Daniels, W.L.

    1985-12-09

    Accurate overburden handling cost estimation methods are essential to effective pre-mining planning for post-mining landforms and land uses. With the aim of developing such methods, the authors have been monitoring costs at a contour surface mine in Wise County, Virginia since January 1, 1984. Early in the monitoring period, the land was being returned to its Approximate Original Contour (AOC) in a manner common to the Appalachian region since implementation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA). More recently, mining has been conducted under an experimental variance from the AOC provisions of SMCRA which allowed a near-level bench to be constructed across the upper surface of two mined points and an intervening filled hollow. All mining operations are being recorded by location. The cost of spoil movement is calculated for each block of coal mined between January 1, 1984, and August 1, 1985. Per cubic yard spoil handling and reclamation costs are compared by mining block. The average cost of spoil handling was $1.90 per bank cubic yard; however, these costs varied widely between blocks. The reasons for those variations included the landscape positions of the mining blocks and spoil handling practices. The average reclamation cost was $0.08 per bank cubic yard of spoil placed in the near level bench on the mined point to $0.20 for spoil placed in the hollow fill. 2 references, 4 figures.

  4. Mortality in Appalachian coal mining regions: the value of statistical life lost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendryx, M.; Ahern, M.M.

    2009-07-15

    We examined elevated mortality rates in Appalachian coal mining areas for 1979-2005, and estimated the corresponding value of statistical life (VSL) lost relative to the economic benefits of the coal mining industry. We compared age-adjusted mortality rates and socioeconomic conditions across four county groups: Appalachia with high levels of coal mining, Appalachia with lower mining levels, Appalachia without coal mining, and other counties in the nation. We converted mortality estimates to VSL estimates and compared the results with the economic contribution of coal mining. We also conducted a discount analysis to estimate current benefits relative to future mortality costs. The heaviest coal mining areas of Appalachia had the poorest socioeconomic conditions. Before adjusting for covariates, the number of excess annual age-adjusted deaths in coal mining areas ranged from 3,975 to 10,923, depending on years studied and comparison group. Corresponding VSL estimates ranged from $18.563 billion to $84.544 billion, with a point estimate of $50.010 billion, greater than the $8.088 billion economic contribution of coal mining. After adjusting for covariates, the number of excess annual deaths in mining areas ranged from 1,736 to 2,889, and VSL costs continued to exceed the benefits of mining. Discounting VSL costs into the future resulted in excess costs relative to benefits in seven of eight conditions, with a point estimate of $41.846 billion.

  5. Bermuda and Appalachian-Labrador rises: Common non-hotspot processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Other than the Corner Rise-New England seamounts and associated White Mountains, most postbreakup intraplate igneous activity and topographic uplift in the western North Atlantic and eastern North America do not readily conform to simple hotspot models. For examples, the Bermuda Rise trends normal to its predicted hotspot trace. On continental crust, Cretaceous-Eocene igneous activity is scattered along a northeast-trending belt {approximately}500-1,000 km west of and paralleling the continent-ocean boundary. Corresponding activity in the western Atlantic generated seamounts preferentially clustered in a belt {approximately}1,000 km east of the boundary. The Eocene volcanism on Bermuda is paired with coeval magmatism of the Shenandoah igneous province, and both magmatic belts are associated with northeast-trending topographic bulges - the Appalachian-Labrador Rise to the west and the Bermuda Rise (Eocene ) to the east. The above observations suggest the existence of paired asthenosphere upwelling, paralleling and controlled by the deep thermal contrast across the northeast-trending continental margin. Such convection geometry, apparently fixed to the North American plate rather than to hotspots, is consistent with recent convection models by B. Hager. The additional importance of plate-kinematic reorganizations (causing midplate stress enhancement) is suggested by episodic igneous activity ca. 90-100 Ma and 40-45 Ma.

  6. Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-8-2015 Appalachian Basin Isotopes_7.28.15 FINAL.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H, 13 C, 18 O, 226 Ra, and 228 Ra Isotope Concentrations in the Appalachian Basin: A Review 28 July 2015 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-8-2015 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

  7. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatcher, Robert D

    2005-11-30

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Aluminum Co of America - PA 23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    PA 23 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Aluminum Company of America (ALCOA) ( PA.23 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: ALCOA Research Laboratory ALCOA New Kensington Works PA.23-3 PA.23-4 Location: 600 Freeport Road and Pine and Ninth Streets , New Kensington , Pennsylvania PA.23-1 PA.23-4 Evaluation Year: Circa 1993 PA.23-1 Site Operations: Research/Development and Production activities in support of the MED uranium slug canning and

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Palmerton Ore Buying Site - PA 33

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Palmerton Ore Buying Site - PA 33 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PALMERTON ORE BUYING SITE (PA.33) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: New Jersey Zinc Company PA.33-1 Location: Palmerton , Pennsylvania PA.33-2 Evaluation Year: 1994 PA.33-3 Site Operations: Mid-1950s - AEC leased the New Jersey Zinc Company property and established a uranium ore stockpile on the property in the vicinity of Palmerton, PA. PA.33-4 Site Disposition:

  10. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: Philadelphia, PA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Tuenge, Jason R.; Poplawski, Michael E.

    2012-09-01

    For this demonstration assessment, 10 different groups of LED luminaires were installed at three sites in Philadelphia, PA. Each of the three sites represented a different set of conditions, most importantly with regard to the incumbent HPS luminaires, which were nominally 100 W, 150 W, and 250 W. The performance of each product was evaluated based on manufacturer data, illuminance calculations, field measurements of illuminance, and the subjective impressions of both regular and expert observers.

  11. QER Public Meeting in Pittsburgh, PA: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Distribution | Department of Energy 21, 2014 - 10:00 A.M. EDT Rashid Auditorium Hillman Center Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Parking is available for attendees in Carnegie Mellon University's East Campus Garage, accessible using the entrance at the intersection of Forbes Avenue and Devon Street. For additional information about visiting Carnegie Mellon University's campus, Click Here Meeting Information Click here to comment on the QER Public Meeting,

  12. Privacy Act (PA) of 1974 | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Privacy Act (PA) of 1974 The purpose of the Privacy Act of 1974 (Act), Title 5, United States Code, Section 552a, is to balance the government's need to maintain information about individuals with the rights of individuals to be protected against unwarranted invasions of their privacy stemming from federal agencies' collection, maintenance, use, and disclosure of personal information about them. Therefore, unlike the Freedom of Information Act, the Act is not a disclosure Act and is

  13. MINING PENNSYLVANIA NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB - PA POC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MINING PENNSYLVANIA NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB - PA POC Larry Sullivan Telephone (412) 386-6115 Email larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov Support Activities for Oil and Gas Operations 213112 WEST VIRGINIA NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB -WV POC Larry Sullivan Telephone (412) 386-6115 Email larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov Support Activities for Oil and Gas Operations 213112 WYOMING ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER POC Jenny Krom Telephone (307) 233-4818 Email jenny.krom@rmotc.doe.gov Support Activities for

  14. Designation Survey - Palmerton, Pa. Ore Storage Site William Bibb

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Designation Survey - Palmerton, Pa. Ore Storage Site William Bibb Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the information furnished in Aerospace's Review of the.subject site (Attachment 1) and the ORKL/RASA (Attachment 2), it Is requested that designation survey of the Palmerton Ore Storage Pennsylvania. The survey should be detailed to and subsurface data to make up for the lack of the previous AEC surveys and in keeping with ORNL/RASA group should furnish a draft survey approval prior to

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Pennsylvania - PA 0-06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pennsylvania - PA 0-06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA (PA.0-06 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Philadelphia , Pennsylvania PA.0-06-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.0-06-1 Site Operations: Research activities involving small quantities of radioactive materials in a controlled environment. PA.0-06-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual radioactive contamination considered remote

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Pittsburgh - PA 0-07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pittsburgh - PA 0-07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH (PA.0-07) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania PA.0-07-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.0-07-1 Site Operations: Research activities involving small quantities of radioactive materials in a controlled environment. PA.0-07-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual radioactive contamination considered remote

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Westinghouse Atomic Power Div - PA 16

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Power Div - PA 16 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DIV. (PA.16 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Route 30 (Forrest Hills) , Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania PA.16-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 PA.16-1 Site Operations: Processed uranium metal for research and development and pilot-scale production of uranium oxide fuel elements. Prepared uranium metal for Enrico Fermi's Stagg Field experiment. PA.16-1 Site

  18. Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Hedin, Robert S.; Weaver, Theodore J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-04-01

    Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Paul and Beekman - PA 0-05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Paul and Beekman - PA 0-05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PAUL AND BEEKMAN (PA.0-05) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Philadelphia , Pennsylvania PA.0-05-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.0-05-1 Site Operations: Produced aluminum cans for AEC slug development program. PA.0-05-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication radioactive material was used at the site PA.0-05-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated

  20. ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2002-12-01

    The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that

  1. State College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National Science Bowl State College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National Science Bowl May 1, ...

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Vanadium Corp of America - PA 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Vanadium Corp of America - PA 15 Site ID (CSD Index Number): PA.15 Site Name: Vanadium Corp. of America Site Summary: Site Link: http://www.lm.doe.gov/canonsburg/Sites.aspx External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): UMTRAP Vicinity Property No. CA-401 Vanadium Corp of America Alternate Name Documents: PA.15-5 Location: Mayer Street - Collier Township , Bridgeville , Pennsylvania Location Documents: PA.15-1 Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Faclility used to grind pitchblende ore during

  3. SECONDARY NATURAL GAS RECOVERY IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN A FIELD DEMONSTRATION SITE, HENDERSON DOME, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOB A. HARDAGE; ELOISE DOHERTY; STEPHEN E. LAUBACH; TUCKER F. HENTZ

    1998-08-14

    The principal objectives of this project were to test and evaluate technologies that would result in improved characterization of fractured natural-gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin. The Bureau of Economic Geology (Bureau) worked jointly with industry partner Atlas Resources, Inc. to design, execute, and evaluate several experimental tests toward this end. The experimental tests were of two types: (1) tests leading to a low-cost methodology whereby small-scale microfractures observed in matrix grains of sidewall cores can be used to deduce critical properties of large-scale fractures that control natural-gas production and (2) tests that verify methods whereby robust seismic shear (S) waves can be generated to detect and map fractured reservoir facies. The grain-scale microfracture approach to characterizing rock facies was developed in an ongoing Bureau research program that started before this Appalachian Basin study began. However, the method had not been tested in a wide variety of fracture systems, and the tectonic setting of rocks in the Appalachian Basin composed an ideal laboratory for perfecting the methodology. As a result of this Appalachian study, a low-cost commercial procedure now exists that will allow Appalachian operators to use scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of thin sections extracted from oriented sidewall cores to infer the spatial orientation, relative geologic timing, and population density of large-scale fracture systems in reservoir sandstones. These attributes are difficult to assess using conventional techniques. In the Henderson Dome area, large quartz-lined regional fractures having N20E strikes, and a subsidiary set of fractures having N70W strikes, are prevalent. An innovative method was also developed for obtaining the stratigraphic and geographic tops of sidewall cores. With currently deployed sidewall coring devices, no markings from which top orientation can be obtained are made on the sidewall core itself during

  4. Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tight oil plays: production and proved reserves, 2013-14 million barrels 2013 2013 Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD 270 4,844 387 5,972 1,128 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 351 4,177 497 5,172 995 Permian Bone Spring, Wolfcamp NM, TX 21 335 53 722 387 Denver-Julesberg Niobrara CO, KS, NE, WY 2 17 42 512 495 Appalachian Marcellus* PA, WV 7 89 13 232 143 Fort Worth Barnett TX 9 58 9 47 -11 Sub-total 660 9,520 1,001 12,657 3,137 Other tight oil 41 523 56 708 185 U.S.

  5. Biofuels Issues and Trends - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    tight oil plays: production and proved reserves, 2013-14 million barrels 2013 2013 Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD 270 4,844 387 5,972 1,128 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 351 4,177 497 5,172 995 Permian Bone Spring, Wolfcamp NM, TX 21 335 53 722 387 Denver-Julesberg Niobrara CO, KS, NE, WY 2 17 42 512 495 Appalachian Marcellus* PA, WV 7 89 13 232 143 Fort Worth Barnett TX 9 58 9 47 -11 Sub-total 660 9,520 1,001 12,657 3,137 Other tight oil 41 523 56 708 185 U.S.

  6. The occurrence of freshwater limestones in the Upper Pennsylvanian and lower Permian of the northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggleston, J.R. ); Ferdinand, L.F. )

    1990-05-01

    Freshwater limestones comprise a significant portion of the Upper Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian strata of the northern Appalachian basin. In some areas, the Monogahela Group consists of as much as 50% freshwater limestones. These limestones are clayey to silty, iron-bearing, sparsely fossiliferous, micritic, and thinly bedded or nodular and are presumed to be lacustrine in origin. They are part of a recurring sequence of beds that include coal, sandstone, shale/clay, and marine limestone. The initial goals of this study are to develop a stratigraphic framework for these freshwater limestones and to determine, their lateral continuity, thickness variability, and relation to other beds in this section, in particular the coals, on a regional scale. The Pittsburgh coal and Ames limestone are very persistent regionally and are used as a datum. Regional correlations show that possibly 20 freshwater limestone beds are persistent and widespread; some cover at least 5,000 mi{sup 2} in eastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, northern West Virginia and western Maryland. Cross sections and fence diagrams constructed from drill logs and measured sections indicate that the thickness of these limestone beds varies laterally and between beds, ranging from less than 1 to 150 ft thick. Correlations also show stratigraphic and paleogeographic relationships between the coals and freshwater limestones. Many of the limestones underlie coal beds, directly in some places. The coals and limestones are better developed in the northern part of the Appalachian basin. These associations may hold significant clues to the depositional and the paleoclimatic setting of the freshwater limestones and the coals.

  7. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Chris Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; James Drahovzal; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; John Bocan; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Katharine Lee Avary

    2004-10-01

    The ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' has reached the mid-point in a two-year research effort to produce a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 exploration and production companies and 6 research team members, including four state geological surveys, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks and one administrative and technology transfer task are being conducted basin-wide by research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined at least once. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 10 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York and Pennsylvania. In addition, three surfaces in that area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. In the Kentucky-Ohio-West Virginia portion of the study area, a velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Fifteen formation tops have been identified on seismic in that area. Preliminary conclusions based on the available seismic data do not support the extension of the Rome Trough into New York state. Members of the stratigraphy task team measured, described and photographed numerous cores from throughout the basin, and tied these data back to their network of geophysical log cross sections. Geophysical logs were scanned in raster files for use in detailed well examination and construction of cross sections. Logs on these cross sections that are only in raster format are being converted to vector format for final cross section displays. The petrology team measured and sampled one classic outcrop in Pennsylvania and ten cores in four states. More than 600 thin sections were prepared from samples in those four states. A seven-step procedure is being used to analyze all thin

  8. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

    2005-04-01

    The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the

  9. Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Jacobi; John Fountain; Stuart Loewenstein; Edward DeRidder; Bruce Hart

    2007-03-31

    For two consecutive years, 2004 and 2005, the largest natural gas well (in terms of gas flow/day) drilled onshore USA targeted the Ordovician Trenton/Black River (T/BR) play in the Appalachian Basin of New York State (NYS). Yet, little data were available concerning the characteristics of the play, or how to recognize and track T/BR prospects across the region. Traditional exploration techniques for entry into a hot play were of limited use here, since existing deep well logs and public domain seismic were almost non-existent. To help mitigate this problem, this research project was conceived with two objectives: (1) to demonstrate that integrative traditional and innovative techniques could be used as a cost-effective reconnaissance exploration methodology in this, and other, areas where existing data in targeted fracture-play horizons are almost non-existent, and (2) determine critical characteristics of the T/BR fields. The research region between Seneca and Cayuga lakes (in the Finger Lakes of NYS) is on strike and east of the discovery fields, and the southern boundary of the field area is about 8 km north of more recently discovered T/BR fields. Phase I, completed in 2004, consisted of integrating detailed outcrop fracture analyses with detailed soil gas analyses, lineaments, stratigraphy, seismic reflection data, well log data, and aeromagnetics. In the Seneca Lake region, Landsat lineaments (EarthSat, 1997) were coincident with fracture intensification domains (FIDs) and minor faults observed in outcrop and inferred from stratigraphy. Soil gas anomalies corresponded to ENE-trending lineaments and FIDs. N- and ENE-trending lineaments were parallel to aeromagnetic anomalies, whereas E-trending lineaments crossed aeromagnetic trends. 2-D seismic reflection data confirmed that the E-trending lineaments and FIDs occur where shallow level Alleghanian salt-cored thrust-faulted anticlines occur. In contrast, the ENE-trending FIDs and lineaments occur where Iapetan

  10. Improving the Availability and Delivery of Critical Information for Tight Gas Resource Development in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary Behling; Susan Pool; Douglas Patchen; John Harper

    2008-12-31

    To encourage, facilitate and accelerate the development of tight gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin, the geological surveys in Pennsylvania and West Virginia collected widely dispersed data on five gas plays and formatted these data into a large database that can be accessed by individual well or by play. The database and delivery system that were developed can be applied to any of the 30 gas plays that have been defined in the basin, but for this project, data compilation was restricted to the following: the Mississippian-Devonian Berea/Murrysville sandstone play and the Upper Devonian Venango, Bradford and Elk sandstone plays in Pennsylvania and West Virginia; and the 'Clinton'/Medina sandstone play in northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, some data were collected on the Tuscarora Sandstone play in West Virginia, which is the lateral equivalent of the Medina Sandstone in Pennsylvania. Modern geophysical logs are the most common and cost-effective tools for evaluating reservoirs. Therefore, all of the well logs in the libraries of the two surveys from wells that had penetrated the key plays were scanned, generating nearly 75,000 scanned e-log files from more than 40,000 wells. A standard file-naming convention for scanned logs was developed, which includes the well API number, log curve type(s) scanned, and the availability of log analyses or half-scale logs. In addition to well logs, other types of documents were scanned, including core data (descriptions, analyses, porosity-permeability cross-plots), figures from relevant chapters of the Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Plays, selected figures from survey publications, and information from unpublished reports and student theses and dissertations. Monthly and annual production data from 1979 to 2007 for West Virginia wells in these plays are available as well. The final database also includes digitized logs from more than 800 wells, sample descriptions from more than 550 wells, more than 600 digital photos

  11. Local Teams from PA, WV Travel to Washington D.C. for National Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | netl.doe.gov Regional News Local Teams from PA, WV Travel to Washington D.C. for National Science Bowl Pittsburgh, Pa. - The National Energy Technology Laboratory have sent the regional winners of the southwestern Pennsylvania (SWPA) and West Virginia Science Bowls off to compete in the U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl April 28-May 2, 2016, in Washington, D.C. By winning their regional tournaments, the Marshall Middle School (Wexford, PA), Morgantown High School (Morgantown,

  12. Appalachian Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Thermal Quality Analysis in Low-Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis (GPFA-AB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teresa E. Jordan

    2015-11-15

    This collection of files are part of a larger dataset uploaded in support of Low Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis for the Appalachian Basin (GPFA-AB, DOE Project DE-EE0006726). Phase 1 of the GPFA-AB project identified potential Geothermal Play Fairways within the Appalachian basin of Pennsylvania, West Virginia and New York. This was accomplished through analysis of 4 key criteria or ‘risks’: thermal quality, natural reservoir productivity, risk of seismicity, and heat utilization. Each of these analyses represent a distinct project task, with the fifth task encompassing combination of the 4 risks factors. Supporting data for all five tasks has been uploaded into the Geothermal Data Repository node of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS). This submission comprises the data for Thermal Quality Analysis (project task 1) and includes all of the necessary shapefiles, rasters, datasets, code, and references to code repositories that were used to create the thermal resource and risk factor maps as part of the GPFA-AB project. The identified Geothermal Play Fairways are also provided with the larger dataset. Figures (.png) are provided as examples of the shapefiles and rasters. The regional standardized 1 square km grid used in the project is also provided as points (cell centers), polygons, and as a raster. Two ArcGIS toolboxes are available: 1) RegionalGridModels.tbx for creating resource and risk factor maps on the standardized grid, and 2) ThermalRiskFactorModels.tbx for use in making the thermal resource maps and cross sections. These toolboxes contain “item description” documentation for each model within the toolbox, and for the toolbox itself. This submission also contains three R scripts: 1) AddNewSeisFields.R to add seismic risk data to attribute tables of seismic risk, 2) StratifiedKrigingInterpolation.R for the interpolations used in the thermal resource analysis, and 3) LeaveOneOutCrossValidation.R for the cross validations used in

  13. EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA DFTFnIINATION RECIPIENT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Il.II.': , u.s. DEPARTMENT OFFNERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NlPA DFTFnIINATION ... publication, and distribution: and classroom training and informational programs), ...

  14. Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release Reference Case

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CO, WY) Haynesville Utica (OH, PA & WV) Marcellus (PA,WV,OH & NY) Woodford (OK) Granite Wash (OK & TX) Austin Chalk (LA & TX) Monterey (CA) U.S. tight oil production...

  15. Surface mining and reclamation effects on flood response of watersheds in the central Appalachian Plateau region - article no. W04407

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrari, J.R.; Lookingbill, T.R.; McCormick, B.; Townsend, P.A.; Eshleman, K.N.

    2009-04-15

    Surface mining of coal and subsequent reclamation represent the dominant land use change in the central Appalachian Plateau (CAP) region of the United States. Hydrologic impacts of surface mining have been studied at the plot scale, but effects at broader scales have not been explored adequately. Broad-scale classification of reclaimed sites is difficult because standing vegetation makes them nearly indistinguishable from alternate land uses. We used a land cover data set that accurately maps surface mines for a 187-km{sup 2} watershed within the CAP. These land cover data, as well as plot-level data from within the watershed, are used with HSPF (Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran) to estimate changes in flood response as a function of increased mining. Results show that the rate at which flood magnitude increases due to increased mining is linear, with greater rates observed for less frequent return intervals. These findings indicate that mine reclamation leaves the landscape in a condition more similar to urban areas rather than does simple deforestation, and call into question the effectiveness of reclamation in terms of returning mined areas to the hydrological state that existed before mining.

  16. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Aggett

    2003-12-15

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

  17. Utilization Analysis in Low-Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis for the Appalachian Basin (GPFA-AB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teresa E. Jordan

    2015-09-30

    This submission of Utilization Analysis data to the Geothermal Data Repository (GDR) node of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) is in support of Phase 1 Low Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis for the Appalachian Basin (project DE-EE0006726). The submission includes data pertinent to the methods and results of an analysis of the Surface Levelized Cost of Heat (SLCOH) for US Census Bureau ‘Places’ within the study area. This was calculated using a modification of a program called GEOPHIRES, available at http://koenraadbeckers.net/geophires/index.php. The MATLAB modules used in conjunction with GEOPHIRES, the MATLAB data input file, the GEOPHIRES output data file, and an explanation of the software components have been provided. Results of the SLCOH analysis appear on 4 .png image files as mapped ‘risk’ of heat utilization. For each of the 4 image (.png) files, there is an accompanying georeferenced TIF (.tif) file by the same name. In addition to calculating SLCOH, this Task 4 also identified many sites that may be prospects for use of a geothermal district heating system, based on their size and industry, rather than on the SLCOH. An industry sorted listing of the sites (.xlsx) and a map of these sites plotted as a layer onto different iterations of maps combining the three geological risk factors (Thermal Quality, Natural Reservoir Quality, and Risk of Seismicity) has been provided. In addition to the 6 image (.png) files of the maps in this series, a shape (.shp) file and 7 associated files are included as well. Finally, supporting files (.pdf) describing the utilization analysis methodology and summarizing the anticipated permitting for a deep district heating system are supplied.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: BatPaC Model Development |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy BatPaC Model Development Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: BatPaC Model Development Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries es228_ahmed_2016_o_web.pdf (1.17 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: BatPaC Model Development Vehicle Technologies Office Merit

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: BatPaC Model Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about BatPaC model...

  20. 01 Team Black_Presentation _LANL?s PaScalBB IO.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    multiple 10-Gigabit Ethernet bonding Small-scale PaScalBB test bed and conduct a sequence of IO node performance tests. Discovery of enhanced IO node network...

  1. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-PA.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PA.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Pennsylvania Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275...

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Penn Central Transportation Co - PA 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Central Transportation Co - PA 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Penn Central Transportation Co. (PA.06) Licensed to DOE for long-term custody and managed by the Office of Legacy Management. Designated Name: Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Site Alternate Name: Penn Central Transportation Co. Location: Blairsville, Pennsylvania Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I site. Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive

  3. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTACTS J. Alexandra Hakala Geosciences Division Engineered Natural Systems Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5487 Alexandra.Hakala@netl.doe.gov George Guthrie Geological and Environmental Sciences Focus Area Leader Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6571 George.Guthrie@netl.doe.gov PARTNERS Carnegie

  4. San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior Paradox - San Juan NW (2) Uinta- Piceance Paradox - San Juan SE (2) Florida Peninsula Appalachian- NY (1) Appalachian OH-PA (2) Appalachian Eastern PA (3) Appalachian Southern OH (4) Appalachian Eastern WV (5) Appalachian WV-VA (6) Appalachian TN-KY (7) Piceance Greater Green River Eastern OR-WA Ventura Williston Williston NE (2) Williston NW (1) Williston South (3) Eastern Great Basin Ventura West, Central, East Eastern OR-WA Eastern

  5. State College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science Bowl® | Department of Energy College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National Science Bowl® State College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National Science Bowl® May 1, 2006 - 10:34am Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - State College Area High School from State College, Pennsylvania, today won the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Science Bowl®. Teams representing 65 schools from across the United States competed in this "Science Jeopardy"

  6. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert D. Hatcher

    2003-05-31

    This report summarizes the first-year accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employs the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempts to characterize the T-P parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempts to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is working with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) is geochemically characterizing the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). First-year results include: (1) meeting specific milestones (determination of thrust movement vectors, fracture analysis, and communicating results at professional meetings and through publication). All milestones were met. Movement vectors for Valley and Ridge thrusts were confirmed to be west-directed and derived from pushing by the Blue Ridge thrust sheet, and fan about the Tennessee salient. Fracture systems developed during Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic to Holocene compressional and extensional tectonic events, and are more intense near faults. Presentations of first-year results were made at the Tennessee Oil and Gas Association meeting (invited) in June, 2003, at a workshop in August 2003 on geophysical logs in Ordovician rocks, and at the Eastern Section AAPG meeting in September 2003. Papers on thrust tectonics and a major prospect discovered during the first year are in press in an AAPG Memoir and published in the July 28, 2003, issue of the Oil and Gas Journal. (2) collaboration with industry and USGS partners. Several Middle Ordovician black shale samples were sent to USGS for organic carbon analysis. Mississippian and Middle Ordovician rock samples were collected by John Repetski (USGS) and

  7. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2005-07-20

    has been validated for softwoods (white pine) on several reclaimed mine sites in the southern Appalachian coal region. The classification model is a viable method for classifying post-SMCRA abandoned mined lands into productivity classes for white pine. A thinning study was established as a random complete block design to evaluate the response to thinning of a 26-year-old white pine stand growing on a reclaimed surface mine in southwest Virginia. Stand parameters were projected to age 30 using a stand table projection. Site index of the stand was found to be 32.3 m at base age 50 years. Thinning rapidly increased the diameter growth of the residual trees to 0.84 cm yr{sup -1} compared to 0.58 cm yr{sup -1} for the unthinned treatment; however, at age 26, there was no difference in volume or value per hectare. At age 30, the unthinned treatment had a volume of 457.1 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} but was only worth $8807 ha{sup -1}, while the thinned treatment was projected to have 465.8 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1}, which was worth $11265 ha{sup -1} due to a larger percentage of the volume being in sawtimber size classes.

  8. Graphene oxide-silica nanohybrids as fillers for PA6 based nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maio, A.; Fucarino, R.; Khatibi, R.; Botta, L.; Scaffaro, R.; Rosselli, S.; Bruno, M.

    2014-05-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) was prepared by oxidation of graphite flakes by a mixture of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and KMnO{sub 4} based on Marcano's method. Two different masterbatches containing GO (33.3%) and polyamide-6 (PA6) (66.7%) were prepared both via solvent casting in formic acid and by melt mixing in a mini-extruder (Haake). The two masterbatches were then used to prepare PA6-based nanocomposites with a content of 2% in GO. For comparison, a nanocomposite by direct mixing of PA6 and GO (2%) and PA6/graphite nanocomposites were prepared, too. The oxidation of graphite into GO was assessed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. All these techniques demonstrated the effectiveness of the graphite modification, since the results put into evidence that, after the acid treatment, interlayer distance, oxygen content and defects increased. SEM micrographs carried out on the nanocomposites, showed GO layers totally surrounded by polyamide-6, this feature is likely due to the strong interaction between the hydrophilic moieties located both on GO and on PA6. On the contrary, no interactions were observed when graphite was used as filler. Mechanical characterization, carried out by tensile and dynamic-mechanical tests, marked an improvement of the mechanical properties observed. Photoluminescence and EPR measurements were carried out onto nanoparticles and nanocomposites to study the nature of the interactions and to assess the possibility to use this class of materials as semiconductors or optical sensors.

  9. Project Plan 7930 Cell G PaR Remote Handling System Replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, Kathryn A

    2009-10-01

    For over 40 years the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have made Californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) available for a wide range of industries including medical, nuclear fuels, mining, military and national security. The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) located within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) processes irradiated production targets from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Operations in Building 7930, Cell G provide over 70% of the world's demand for {sup 252}Cf. Building 7930 was constructed and equipped in the mid-1960s. Current operations for {sup 252}Cf processing in Building 7930, Cell G require use of through-the-wall manipulators and the PaR Remote Handling System. Maintenance and repairs for the manipulators is readily accomplished by removal of the manipulator and relocation to a repair shop where hands-on work can be performed in glove boxes. Contamination inside cell G does not currently allow manned entry and no provisions were created for a maintenance area inside the cell. There has been no maintenance of the PaR system or upgrades, leaving operations vulnerable should the system have a catastrophic failure. The Cell G PaR system is currently being operated in a run to failure mode. As the manipulator is now 40+ years old there is significant risk in this method of operation. In 2006 an assessment was completed that resulted in recommendations for replacing the manipulator operator control and power centers which are used to control and power the PaR manipulator in Cell G. In mid-2008 the chain for the bridge drive failed and subsequent examinations indicated several damaged links (see Figure 1). To continue operations the PaR manipulator arm is being used to push and pull the bridge as a workaround. A retrieval tool was fabricated, tested and staged inside Cell G that will allow positioning of the bridge and manipulator arm for removal from the cell should the PaR system completely fail. A fully

  10. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2006-09-30

    Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earths atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values. Improved

  11. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training Center CONTACTS Traci Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Andrea Dunn Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-7594 andrea.dunn@netl.doe.gov Hilary Olson Project Director/Principal Investigator University of Texas at Austin 1 University Station, C0300 Austin, TX

  12. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gov William Aljoe Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6569 william.aljoe@netl.doe.gov Lee Spangler Principal Investigator Montana State University P.O. Box 173905 Bozeman, MT 59717-3905 406-994-4399 spangler@montana.edu PARTNERS Altamont Oil & Gas Inc. Barnard College Columbia University Idaho National Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Schlumberger Carbon

  13. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin WV Appalachian Basin, OH-PA (Panel 2 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  14. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (MMcf) (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin WV Appalachian Basin, OH-PA (Panel 2 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  15. Determination of the structure of the X(3872) in anti pA collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Larionov, A. B.; Strikman, M.; Bleicher, M.

    2015-07-22

    The structure of the X(3872) meson is unknown. Different competing models of the cc exotic state X(3872) exist, including the possibilities that this state is either a mesonic molecule with dominating D0D*0 + c.c. composition, a ccqq tetraquark, or a cc-gluon hybrid state. It is expected that the X(3872) state is rather strongly coupled to the pp channel and, therefore, can be produced in pp and pA collisions at PANDA. We propose to test the hypothetical molecular structure of X(3872) by studying the D or D* source stripping reactions on a nuclear residue.

  16. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTACTS Traci Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Andrea Dunn Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-7594 andrea.dunn@netl.doe.gov Marte Gutierrez Principal Investigator Colorado School of Mines 1600 Illinois Street Golden, CO 80401 303-273-3468 Fax: 303-273-3602

  17. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Bruce Brown Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-7313 bruce.brown@netl.doe.gov Kathryn Baskin Principal Investigator Managing Director Southern States Energy Board 6325 Amherst Court Norcross, GA 30092 770-242-7712 baskin@sseb.org PARTNERS

  18. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Andrea Dunn Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road PO Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-7594 andrea.dunn@netl.doe.gov Charles D. Gorecki Technical Contact Deputy Associate Director for Research Energy & Environmental Research Center University of North Dakota 15 North 23 rd Street, Stop 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 701-777-5355 cgorecki@undeerc.org Edward N. Steadman

  19. 18 MILES NORTH OF PHlLADEl.PHlA HATBORO, PA. August

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    8 MILES NORTH OF PHlLADEl.PHlA HATBORO, PA. August 27, 1948 ! ! Frank Giaccio' Commission / I This follows my letter of August ZOth, in which I promised to advise you of our thoughts concerning beryllium, after I had completed a series of con- tacts with both.Government and private,grou?s and had an opportunity to evaluate the possibilities of using our process from the point of view of industrial research. By this, I meanthe possibility of the research leading into substantial production of

  20. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-06-08

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these

  1. 1,"John E Amos","Coal","Appalachian Power Co",2900 2,"FirstEnergy Harrison Power Station","Coal","Allegheny Energy Supply Co LLC",1954

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"John E Amos","Coal","Appalachian Power Co",2900 2,"FirstEnergy Harrison Power Station","Coal","Allegheny Energy Supply Co LLC",1954 3,"Mt Storm","Coal","Virginia Electric & Power Co",1640 4,"Mitchell (WV)","Coal","Kentucky Power

  2. Regional geological assessment of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins relative to potential storage/disposal of radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomenick, T.F.; Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Byerly, D.

    1983-01-01

    The thick and regionally extensive sequence of shales and associated clastic sedimentary rocks of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age has been considered among the nonsalt geologies for deep subsurface containment of high-level radioactive wastes. This report examines some of the regional and basin-specific characteristics of the black and associated nonblack shales of this sequence within the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins of the north-central and eastern United States. Principal areas where the thickness and depth of this shale sequence are sufficient to warrant further evaluation are identified, but no attempt is made to identify specific storage/disposal sites. Also identified are other areas with less promise for further study because of known potential conflicts such as geologic-hydrologic factors, competing subsurface priorities involving mineral resources and groundwater, or other parameters. Data have been compiled for each basin in an effort to indicate thickness, distribution, and depth relationships for the entire shale sequence as well as individual shale units in the sequence. Included as parts of this geologic assessment are isopach, depth information, structure contour, tectonic elements, and energy-resource maps covering the three basins. Summary evaluations are given for each basin as well as an overall general evaluation of the waste storage/disposal potential of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence,including recommendations for future studies to more fully characterize the shale sequence for that purpose. Based on data compiled in this cursory investigation, certain rock units have reasonable promise for radioactive waste storage/disposal and do warrant additional study.

  3. Apatite fission track evidence for post-Early Cretaceous erosional unroofing of Middle Pennsylvanian sandstones from the southern Appalachian Basin in Kentucky and Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boettcher, S.S.; Milliken, K.L. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Apatite fission track ages and mean etchable track lengths for 7 samples of Middle Pennsylvanian (Breathitt Formation) depositional age from the southern Appalachian Basin of KY and VA suggest that 3--4 km of erosional unroofing has occurred since the Early Cretaceous. The samples were collected over a 1,600 km[sup 2] area at the northern end of the Pine Mountain Overthrust southeast of Pikeville, KY. This new data set overlaps 8 published apatite fission track ages and 3 mean etchable lengths from the Cumberland Plateau and Valley and Ridge areas of WV. Because all of the apatite fission track ages are significantly younger than the depositional age, maximum burial temperatures in the area exceeded 125 C, such that fission tracks that formed in the detrital apatite prior to deposition have been totally annealed. Furthermore, mean etchable track lengths show considerable length reduction from initial values revealing that the samples resided in the zone of partial annealing on the order of 100 Ma following attainment of maximum temperatures. The burial history for these samples began with deposition and rapid burial of synorogenic sediments in front of the westward advancing Alleghenian deformation front. The fission track data are compatible with the hypothesis that maximum temperatures were attained during the Late Paleozoic as tectonically driven synorogenic fluids penetrated the foreland basin deposits. Slow erosional unroofing (< 15 m/Ma for a thermal gradient of 30 C/km) has occurred since the onset of Triassic-Jurassic rifting along the atlantic continental margin and continued into the Cenozoic.

  4. Regional diagenetic variations in Middle Pennsylvanian foreland basin sandstones of the southern Appalachians: Comparison to passive margin Cenozoic sandstones of the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, K.L. . Dept. of Geological Science)

    1992-01-01

    Water/rock interactions recorded by authigenic phases in lithic-rich sandstones of the southern Appalachian basin, in the region of the Pine Mountain Overthrust (PMO), began with early post-depositional burial, extended through deeper burial and temperatures > 100 C during the Alleghenian orogeny, and continued through uplift and exposure at the modern weathering surface. Early-formed carbonate in the form of highly localized calcite concretions preserves IGVs greater than 30% and has widely ranging trace element concentrations. Later-formed calcite is characterized by relative low trace element concentrations in sandstones of low IGV. Precipitation of kaolinite cement and grain replacements partially overlapped formation of early carbonate and quartz cement. Dissolution and albitization of detrital feldspars are the primary types of grain alteration observed. Complete loss of the detrital feldspar assemblage is observed only around the eastern end of the PMO where a portion of the feldspar loss is recorded as quartz-replaced grains. Compaction due to ductile behavior of phyllosilicate-rich rock fragments and pressure solution of detrital quartz has reduced IGV to an average of around 11% below the PMO and 6% above the fault. In general, these foreland basin sandstones manifest authigenic phases and sequences of diagenetic events similar to those observed in the passive margin Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin. The most striking diagenetic differences between the two basins are seen in terms of the comparative amounts of compaction (greater in the foreland basin) and grain alteration (less in the foreland basin) which most likely relate to primary differences in the texture and mineralogy of the sediments.

  5. Zircon and apatite fission-track evidence for an Early Permian thermal peak and relatively rapid Late Permian cooling in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roden, M.K. . Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science); Wintsch, R.P. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    New zircon fission-track ages compliment published apatite fission-track ages in the Appalachian Basin to narrowly constrain its thermal history. Geologic evidence can only constrain timing of the thermal peak to be younger than late Pennsylvanian sediments ([approximately] 300 Ma) and older than Mesozoic sediments in the Newark and Gettysburg Basins ([approximately] 210 Ma). Apatite fission-track ages as old as 246 Ma require the Alleghanian thermal peak to have been pre-Triassic. Preliminary data on reset zircon fission-track ages from middle Paleozoic sediments range from 255 to 290 Ma. Zircon fission-track apparent ages from samples younger and structurally higher than these are not reset. Thus, the oldest reset zircon fission-track age constraints the time of the Alleghanian thermal peak to be earliest Permian. Rates of post-Alleghanian cooling have not been well-constrained by geologic data and could be very slow. The difference between apatite and zircon fission-track ages for most of the samples range from 100--120 m.y. reflecting Permo-Triassic cooling of only 1 C/m.y. However, one sample with one of the oldest apatite ages, 245 Ma, yields one of the younger zircon ages of 255 Ma. This requires cooling rates of 10 C/m.y. and uplift rates of [approximately] 0.5 mm/yr. Collectively, these data support an early Permian thermal peak and a two-stage cooling history, consisting of > 100 C cooling (> 8 km denundation) in the Permian followed by relatively slow cooling and exhumation throughout the Mesozoic.

  6. Oxidation of zirconium alloys in 2.5 kPa water vapor for tritium readiness.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Bernice E.

    2007-11-01

    A more reactive liner material is needed for use as liner and cruciform material in tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBAR) in commercial light water nuclear reactors (CLWR). The function of these components is to convert any water that is released from the Li-6 enriched lithium aluminate breeder material to oxide and hydrogen that can be gettered, thus minimizing the permeation of tritium into the reactor coolant. Fourteen zirconium alloys were exposed to 2.5 kPa water vapor in a helium stream at 300 C over a period of up to 35 days. Experimental alloys with aluminum, yttrium, vanadium, titanium, and scandium, some of which also included ternaries with nickel, were included along with a high nitrogen impurity alloy and the commercial alloy Zircaloy-2. They displayed a reactivity range of almost 500, with Zircaloy-2 being the least reactive.

  7. Multiscale Modeling of the Orthotropic Behaviour of PA6-6 overmoulded Composites using MMI Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bikard, Jerome; Robert, Gilles; Moulinjeune, Olivier [RHODIA ENGINEERING PLASTICS, Technyl Application Center Avenue Ramboz, BP 64, 69192 Saint FONS CEDEX (France)

    2011-05-04

    In this study the MMI ConfidentDesign multiscale approach (consisting in a non-linear multiscale simulation based on DIGIMAT registered including the injection modeling of the filled polymer and a multiscale mechanical model using the fiber orientation tensor resulting from the injection) has been combined with an orthotropic damageable elastic simulation. The anisotropic properties (including rupture criterion) are estimated and a multiscale simulation including the heterogeneous material properties issued from injection process is done. The impact of fiber ratios is then investigated. The structural simulation predicts stresses localized close to the punch, as well in injected PA66 than in composite part. Greater the fiber volume ratio, greater the modulus and more brittle the composite.

  8. Dynamic impact and pressure analysis of the insensitive munitions container PA103 with modified design features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handy, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents analytical analyses of the insensitive munitions container PA103, with modified design features for a static internal pressure of 500 psi and for a dynamic impact resulting from a 7-ft free fall onto a rigid surface. The modified design features addressed by the analyses were the inclusion of a score pattern on the container cylindrical body and a plastic plate (fuse) sandwiched between metal flanges on the container end. The objectives of both the pressure and impact analyses were to determine if the induced stresses at the score patterns in the cylindrical body of the container were sufficient to induce failure. Analytical responses of the container to the imposed loads were obtained with finite element analysis methodology. The computer codes ABAQUS and VEC/DYNA3D were used to obtain the results. Results of the pressure analysis indicate that failure of the container body would be expected to occur at the score pattern for a static internal pressure of 500 psi. Also, results from three impact orientations for a 7-ft drop indicate that membrane stresses in the vicinity of the score pattern are above critical crack growth stress magnitudes, especially at low ([minus]60[degrees]F) temperatures.

  9. Dynamic impact and pressure analysis of the insensitive munitions container PA103 with modified design features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handy, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents analytical analyses of the insensitive munitions container PA103, with modified design features for a static internal pressure of 500 psi and for a dynamic impact resulting from a 7-ft free fall onto a rigid surface. The modified design features addressed by the analyses were the inclusion of a score pattern on the container cylindrical body and a plastic plate (fuse) sandwiched between metal flanges on the container end. The objectives of both the pressure and impact analyses were to determine if the induced stresses at the score patterns in the cylindrical body of the container were sufficient to induce failure. Analytical responses of the container to the imposed loads were obtained with finite element analysis methodology. The computer codes ABAQUS and VEC/DYNA3D were used to obtain the results. Results of the pressure analysis indicate that failure of the container body would be expected to occur at the score pattern for a static internal pressure of 500 psi. Also, results from three impact orientations for a 7-ft drop indicate that membrane stresses in the vicinity of the score pattern are above critical crack growth stress magnitudes, especially at low ({minus}60{degrees}F) temperatures.

  10. Characterization, organic modification of wollastonite coated with nano-Mg(OH){sub 2} and its application in filling PA6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Caili; Wang, Dong; Zheng, Shuilin

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Wollastonite is first inorganic modified by coating nano-Mg(OH){sub 2} and then organic modified with silane. • Filling 30% of this composite powder in PA6 the mechanical properties, the heat distortion temperature and oxygen index of the PA6 composites were notably enhanced. - Abstract: Nano-Mg(OH){sub 2} was deposited on the surface of wollastonite (MW) powder with heterogeneous nucleation method and then modified with silane. The microstructure and surface properties of wollastonite (W) and MW powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The microstructure of W, MW and silane modified MW (SMW) powders were characterized by Fourier translation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The mechanical properties, heat distortion temperature (HDT) and oxygen index (OI) of PA6 composites having different fillers were discussed. It was shown that the surface of wollastonite was coated with a layer of 33 nm thickness of Mg(OH){sub 2} grains and the distribution of which was uniform. The number of the hydroxyl groups on the surface of wollastonite powder increased after coated with Mg(OH){sub 2}. Filling 30% of SMW powder in PA6 the mechanical properties, HDT and OI were notably enhanced.

  11. Intercomparison of the seasonal cycle in 200 hPa kinetic energy in AMIP GCM simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    The 200 hPa kinetic energy is represented by means of the spherical harmonic components for the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations, the National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast Reanalysis (ERA). The data used are the monthly mean wind fields from 1979 to 1988. The kinetic energy is decomposed into the divergent (DKE) and rotational (RKE) components and emphasis is placed on examining the former. The two reanalysis data sets show reasonable agreement that is best for the rotational kinetic energy. The largest difference in the divergent kinetic energy occurs during the northern summer. As might be expected, the two analyses are closet in regions where there are sufficient observations such that the effect of the model used in the assimilation cycle are minimized. The observed RKE show only a slight seasonal cycle with a maximum occuring during the northern winter. The DKE, on the other hand, has a very pronounced seasonal cycle with maxima at the solsticial seasons and minima during the equinoctial seasons. The model results show a very large spread in the magnitudes of the RKE and DKE although the models all evince a seasonal variation in phase with that observed. The median values of the seasonal cycle of RKE and DKE for the models are usually superior to those of any individual model. Results are also presented for simulation following the AMIP protocol but using updated versions of the original AMIP entries. In most cases these new integrations show better agreement with the observations.

  12. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    | Department of Energy Newly Released Study Highlights Significant Utica Shale Potential Results from NETL-Sponsored Study Now Publically Available A pioneering study led by West Virginia University, and financially supported by the Energy Department's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and 14 industry members of the Utica Shale Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium, indicates that the newly explored Utica Shale, which underlies the better-known Marcellus Shale, could hold far

  13. Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-07-30

    Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

  14. Depositional Model of the Marcellus Shale in West Virginia Based...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    To the contrary, our sedimentary data suggest a rather shallow water depth, intermittent ... most simply by fluctuations in water depth coupled with fluctuations in sediment supply. ...

  15. Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Washington, DC - A water treatment system that can turn wastewater into clean water has been shown to reduce potential environmental impacts associated with producing natural gas ...

  16. Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... the drilling effort in Washington County, WVU had been testing the remote, wireless system for the past year. Its success during testing demonstrates its ability to be a cost-effec...

  17. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: High Performance Homes, Chamberlain Court #75, Gettysburg, PA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance Homes Chamberlain Court #75 Gettysburg, PA DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are

  18. NETL'S DAVID MILLER RECEIVES 2014 ARTHUR S. FLEMMING AWARD Pittsburgh, Pa. - The Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DAVID MILLER RECEIVES 2014 ARTHUR S. FLEMMING AWARD Pittsburgh, Pa. - The Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration has selected David Miller of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as a recipient of the 2014 Arthur S. Flemming Award recognizing outstanding men and women in the federal government. Dr. Miller was chosen in recognition of his innovative leadership as Technical Director of the Department of Energy's Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI). The

  19. UNREVIEWED DISPOSAL QUESTION EVALUATION: IMPACT OF NEW INFORMATION SINCE 2008 PA ON CURRENT LOW-LEVEL SOLID WASTE OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.; Smith, F.; Hamm, L.; Butcher, T.

    2014-10-06

    Solid low-level waste disposal operations are controlled in part by an E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) Performance Assessment (PA) that was completed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in 2008 (WSRC 2008). Since this baseline analysis, new information pertinent to disposal operations has been identified as a natural outcome of ongoing PA maintenance activities and continuous improvement in model simulation techniques (Flach 2013). An Unreviewed Disposal Question (UDQ) Screening (Attachment 1) has been initiated regarding the continued ability of the ELLWF to meet Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 performance objectives in light of new PA items and data identified since completion of the original UDQ Evaluation (UDQE). The present UDQE assesses the ability of Solid Waste (SW) to meet performance objectives by estimating the influence of new information items on a recent sum-of-fractions (SOF) snapshot for each currently active E-Area low-level waste disposal unit. A final SOF, as impacted by this new information, is projected based on the assumptions that the current disposal limits, Waste Information Tracking System (WITS) administrative controls, and waste stream composition remain unchanged through disposal unit operational closure (Year 2025). Revision 1 of this UDQE addresses the following new PA items and data identified since completion of the original UDQE report in 2013:  New K{sub d} values for iodine, radium and uranium  Elimination of cellulose degradation product (CDP) factors  Updated radionuclide data  Changes in transport behavior of mobile radionuclides  Potential delay in interim closure beyond 2025  Component-in-grout (CIG) plume interaction correction Consideration of new information relative to the 2008 PA baseline generally indicates greater confidence that PA performance objectives will be met than indicated by current SOF metrics. For SLIT9, the previous prohibition of non-crushable containers in

  20. Exchanges of Energy, Water and Carbon Dioxide Xuhui Lee (Yale University) and Edward Pa:on (NCAR)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Influences of the Boundary Layer Flow on Vegeta8on-Air Exchanges of Energy, Water and Carbon Dioxide Xuhui Lee (Yale University) and Edward Pa:on (NCAR) * Summarize your projects and its scienFfic objecFves for the next 3-5 years The objecFve of this project is to establish a mechanisFc understanding of the interplay between flow heterogeneity in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), land surface heterogeneity, and vegetaFon-air exchange of energy, water and CO 2 . The project will invesFgate

  1. D"E(:pa

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    JUN 4 1992 DATE: REPLY TO ATTN OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: ... DuPont placed Purchase Order RPG-4018 l2 with this firm in May 1944 to machine unbonded ...

  2. ZERH Training PA Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... You will receive an email with a login password asking you to confirm your participation. ... You may use your password to login anytime to change contact information or remove ...

  3. ZERH Builder PA Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... You will receive an email with a login password asking you to confirm your participation. ... You may use your password to login anytime to change contact information or remove ...

  4. ZERH Verifier PA Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... You will receive an email with a login password asking you to confirm your participation. ... You may use your password to login anytime to change contact information or remove ...

  5. Using FEP's List and a PA Methodology for Evaluating Suitable Areas for the LLW Repository in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Risoluti, P.; Ciabatti, P.; Mingrone, G.

    2002-02-26

    In Italy following a referendum held in 1987, nuclear energy has been phased out. Since 1998, a general site selection process covering the whole Italian territory has been under way. A GIS (Geographic Information System) methodology was implemented in three steps using the ESRI Arc/Info and Arc/View platforms. The screening identified approximately 0.8% of the Italian territory as suitable for locating the LLW Repository. 200 areas have been identified as suitable for the location of the LLW Repository, using a multiple exclusion criteria procedure (1:500,000), regional scale (1:100.000) and local scale (1:25,000-1:10,000). A methodology for evaluating these areas has been developed allowing, along with the evaluation of the long term efficiency of the engineered barrier system (EBS), the characterization of the selected areas in terms of physical and safety factors and planning factors. The first step was to identify, on a referenced FEPs list, a group of geomorphological, geological, hydrogeological, climatic and human behavior caused process and/or events, which were considered of importance for the site evaluation, taking into account the Italian situation. A site evaluation system was established ascribing weighted scores to each of these processes and events, which were identified as parameters of the new evaluation system. The score of each parameter is ranging from 1 (low suitability) to 3 (high suitability). The corresponding weight is calculated considering the effect of the parameter in terms of total dose to the critical group, using an upgraded AMBER model for PA calculation. At the end of the process an index obtained by a score weighted sum gives the degree of suitability of the selected areas for the LLW Repository location. The application of the methodology to two selected sites is given in the paper.

  6. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF >100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern PA (Panel 3 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  7. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    No 2001 Liquids Reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern PA (Panel 3 of 7) Oil and Gas ...

  8. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 Gas Reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF >100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern PA (Panel 3 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  9. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 Liquids Reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern PA (Panel 3 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  10. Measurement of cross sections for the {sup 232}Th(P,4n){sup 229}Pa reaction at low proton energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jost, C. U.; Griswold, J. R.; Bruffey, S. H.; Mirzadeh, S.; Stracener, D. W.; Williams, C. L.

    2013-04-19

    The alpha-emitters {sup 225}Ac and {sup 213}Bi are of great interest for alpha-radioimmunotherapy which uses radioisotopes attached to cancer-seeking antibodies to efficiently treat various types of cancers. Both radioisotopes are daughters of the long-lived {sup 229}Th(t{sub 1/2} = 7880y). {sup 229}Th can be produced by proton irradiation of {sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th, either directly or through production of isobars that beta-decay into {sup 229}Th. To obtain excitation functions, {sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th have been irradiated at the On-Line Test Facility at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at ORNL. Benchmark tests conducted with Cu and Ni foils show very good agreement with literature results. The experiments with thorium targets were focused on the production of {sup 229}Pa and its daughter {sup 225}Ac from both {sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th. Differential cross-sections for production of {sup 229}Pa and other Pa isotopes have been obtained.

  11. Ganodermanontriol (GDNT) exerts its effect on growth and invasiveness of breast cancer cells through the down-regulation of CDC20 and uPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Jiahua; Jedinak, Andrej; Sliva, Daniel; Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma mushroom alcohol, inhibits growth of breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors but not in the tumor surrounding tissue in breast cancer patients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits expression of CDC20 in breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits cell adhesion, cell migration and cell invasion of breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits secretion of uPA and down-regulates expression of uPAR in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal mushroom that has been recognized by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Although some of the direct anticancer activities are attributed to the presence of triterpenes-ganoderic and lucidenic acids-the activity of other compounds remains elusive. Here we show that ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma alcohol, specifically suppressed proliferation (anchorage-dependent growth) and colony formation (anchorage-independent growth) of highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. GDNT suppressed expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein CDC20, which is over-expressed in precancerous and breast cancer cells compared to normal mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we found that CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors when compared to the tissue surrounding the tumor in specimens from breast cancer patients. GDNT also inhibited invasive behavior (cell adhesion, cell migration, and cell invasion) through the suppression of secretion of urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and inhibited expression of uPA receptor. In conclusion, mushroom GDNT is a natural agent that has potential as a therapy for invasive breast cancers.

  12. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Appalachian State University...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The University's transportation department has installed two charging stations on campus and a plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) is available to all campus members. The university has ...

  13. Appalachian recapitalization: United Coal comes full circle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2006-05-15

    The article recounts the recent history of the United Coal Co. which exited from the coal business between 1992 and 1997 and has recently returned. More coal reserves have been added by its four companies Sapphire Coal, Carter Roag Coal, Pocahontas Coal and Wellmore, bringing the grand total to 222.6 Mtons. United Coal's developments and investment strategy are discussed. The company headquarters are in Bristol, Va., USA. 1 tab., 7 photos.

  14. APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY MOUNTAIN LAUREL HOME Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced framing techniques along with an efficient layout reduced material requirements while increasing our mechanical systems' efficiencies. The Mountain Laurel design creates ...

  15. Appalachian Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1,982 20,801 6,092 556 7,469 7 7,464 82,766 44,667 2008-06 4,039 44,033 38,537 1,783 18,403 6,082 462 5,979 8 6,284 68,415 44,627 2008-05 3,367 35,348 38,466 1,632 16,744 6,081...

  16. Appalachian Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 733 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  17. Corrosion and hydriding performance evaluation of three Zircaloy-2 clad fuel assemblies after continuous exposure in PWR cores 1 and 2 at Shippingport, PA. Addendum. LWBR Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillner, E.

    1983-12-01

    The cladding from one additional Zircaloy-2 clad fuel rod from the pressurized water reactor at Shippingport, Pa. was destructively examined for corrosion film thickness and hydrogen accumulation. These additional examinations were conducted primarily to determine whether or not the hydrogen pickup ratio (..delta..H/..delta..O) increased with increasing neutron exposure, as had been suggested by the results from earlier studies on these fuel rods. The current results indicate that the hydrogen pickup ratio for Zircaloy-2 does not change with increasing neutron exposure and suggest that some of the earlier reported data may be anomolous.

  18. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary C a n a d a U S A OH PA MI NY Lake Erie Lake St. Claire Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Basin Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin WV Appalachian Basin, OH-PA (Panel 2 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  19. PA_11-6.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  20. PA_11-8.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  1. PA_45-7.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  2. Training Session: West Chester, PA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 3.5-hour training provides builders with a comprehensive review of zero net-energy-ready home construction including the business case, detailed specifications, and opportunities to be...

  3. Sustainable Management of Flowback Water during Hydraulic Fracturing of Marcellus Shale for Natural Gas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vidic, Radisav

    2015-01-24

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using abandoned mine drainage (AMD) as make- up water for the reuse of produced water for hydraulic fracturing. There is an abundance of AMD sources near permitted gas wells as documented in this study that can not only serve as makeup water and reduce the demand on high quality water resources but can also as a source of chemicals to treat produced water prior to reuse. The assessment of AMD availability for this purpose based on proximity and relevant regulations was accompanied by bench- and pilot-scale studies to determine optimal treatment to achieve desired water quality for use in hydraulic fracturing. Sulfate ions that are often present in AMD at elevated levels will react with Ba²⁺ and Sr²⁺ in produced water to form insoluble sulfate compounds. Both membrane microfiltration and gravity separation were evaluated for the removal of solids formed as a result of mixing these two impaired waters. Laboratory studies revealed that neither AMD nor barite formed in solution had significant impact on membrane filtration but that some produced waters contained submicron particles that can cause severe fouling of microfiltration membrane. Coagulation/flocculation was found to be an effective process for the removal of suspended solids and both bench- and pilot-scale studies revealed that optimal process conditions can consistently achieve the turbidity of the finished water below 5 NTU. Adjusting the blending ratio of AMD and produced water can achieve the desired effluent sulfate concentration that can be accurately predicted by chemical thermodynamics. Co-treatment of produced water and AMD will result in elevated levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the solid waste generated in this process due to radium co-precipitation with barium sulfate. Laboratory studies revealed that the mobility of barite that may form in the subsurface due to the presence of sulfate in the fracturing fluid can be controlled by the addition of appropriate antiscalants.

  4. The northern wintertime divergence extrema at 200 hPa and surface cyclones as simulated in the AMIP integration of the ECMWF general circulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.S.

    1994-11-01

    Divergence and convergence centers at 200 hPa and mean sea level pressure (MSLP) cyclones were located every 6 hr for a 10-yr general circulation model (GCM) simulation with the ECMWF (Cycle 36) for the boreal winters from 1980 to 1988. The simulation used the observed monthly mean sea surface temperature (SST) for the decade. Analysis of the frequency, location, and strength of these centers and cyclones gives insight into the dynamical response of the model to the varying SST. The results indicate that (1) the model produces reasonable climatologies of upper-level divergence and MSLP cyclones; (2) the model distribution of anomalies of divergence and convergence centers and MSLP cyclones is consistent with observations for the 1982-83 and 1986-87 El Nifio events; (3) the tropical Indian Ocean is the region of greatest divergence activity and interannual variability in the model; (4) the variability of the divergence centers is greater than that of the convergence centers; (5) strong divergence centers occur chiefly over the ocean in the midlatitudes but are more land-based in the tropics, except in the Indian Ocean; and (6) locations of divergence and convergence centers can be a useful tool for the intercomparison of global atmospheric simulations.

  5. fe0013590-PSU | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Continuous, Regional Methane Emissions Estimates in Northern Pennsylvania Gas Fields Using Atmospheric Inversions Last Reviewed 6/13/2016 DE-FE0013590 Goal The goal of this project is to quantify fugitive and total emissions of methane from the Marcellus gas production region of north-central Pennsylvania, with an emphasis on detecting changes in emissions over time caused by changing gas production activity. Performers The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State), University Park, PA

  6. ORISE: Graduate Student Research Experiences - Benjamin Snyder

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Snyder Graduate student experiences computing in the fast lane Benjamin Snyder Benjamin Snyder, a graduate in geography, is using his stint at the National Energy and Technology Laboratory in Pittsburgh, Pa., to develop his skills in geographic information systems. Using mapping, he helps locate the best sites for natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale. Benjamin Snyder eagerly takes his coffee with creamer and just as readily without it. "I did not think I was that hard of a person to

  7. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of...

  8. Appalachian Power Co (West Virginia) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    16,852 292,636 65,166 26,044 668,683 2,440 76,489 1,506,453 440,542 2008-02 37,005 607,454 373,082 16,900 289,006 65,070 26,146 652,684 2,447 80,051 1,549,144 440,599 2008-01...

  9. Appalachian Power Co (West Virginia) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    20,286 341,611 65,256 29,505 682,188 2,451 82,168 1,489,050 438,960 2008-06 26,853 403,428 371,335 19,210 332,786 65,126 27,454 697,302 2,445 73,517 1,433,516 438,906 2008-05...

  10. Overcoming Barriers to Wind Development in Appalachian Coal Country

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Bailey; Evan Hansen

    2012-10-09

    This research project synthesizes existing data and communication from experts to assess barriers to wind development in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, and Kentucky, and makes recommendations where feasible to reduce or eliminate those barriers.

  11. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary C a n a d a U S A OH PA MI NY Lake Erie Lake St. Claire Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Basin Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin WV Appalachian Basin, OH-PA (Panel 2 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By

  12. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

    2012-03-31

    Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make

  13. Westin Convention Center Hotel, Pittsburgh, PA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... ultra-supercritical steam turbine, and desalination systems. * Mechanical Wear in Gas ... development of manufacture-able products such gas turbines and desalination systems. ...

  14. Microsoft Word - PA MP FY02.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site Prepared by Prepared for U.S. ... Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site Prepared by for the U.S. Department ...

  15. Additional Information on the ERDF PA approach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    potential is eliminated upon completion of grouting - Curing process is complete in seven days * Waste handling is at absolute minimum - one time * Room to work - Disposal...

  16. US MidAtl PA Site Consumption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    consumed in their homes. * Average electricity consumption in Pennsylvania homes is 10,402 kWh ... CONSUMPTION BY END USE Half the energy consumed in Pennsylvania homes is for space ...

  17. Palmco Power PA, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    York Phone Number: (877) 726-5862 Website: www.palmcoenergy.com Twitter: @PALMco Facebook: https:www.facebook.comPALMcoUSA Outage Hotline: (877) 726-5862 References: EIA...

  18. finalPA_june_04.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  19. Additional Information on the ERDF PA approach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with long-term performance objectives provided in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management - All Pathway (Standard: 25 mremyr Total Effective Dose Equivalent) - ...

  20. PA.03 A' EROSPACE~CORPORATI'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 1. Estimated Cost 2. Commission.Obligations PAYMENTS 1. Payment of the, Fixed Fee. c. L. Reixhrsement of C&t Final Payment i: Discounts 5. Revenues 6. Direct' Payment of Charges - ...

  1. ZERH Arch Designer PA rev (2)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    You will receive an email with a login password asking you to confirm your participation. ... You may use your password to login anytime to change contact information or remove ...

  2. Additional Information on the ERDF PA approach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waste characteristics * Long Length Pumps, Thermocouples, Screens, Risers, Sluicers, Dip Tubes, etc. from Tank Farms * Heavy (50 tons after encapsulation) concrete vaults,...

  3. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and Texas, and the Marcellus play in Pennsylvania. In the Marcellus play, despite reduced drilling activity, production increased by almost 70 percent in 2012 over year-ago levels....

  4. Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subject: Marcellus Shale Gas Development and Production in West Virginia By: Anthony Cugini, Director National energy Technology Laboratory

  5. Appalachian Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Natural Reservoir Analysis in Low-Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis for the Appalachian Basin (GPFA-AB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teresa E. Jordan

    2015-10-22

    The files included in this submission contain all data pertinent to the methods and results of this task’s output, which is a cohesive multi-state map of all known potential geothermal reservoirs in our region, ranked by their potential favorability. Favorability is quantified using a new metric, Reservoir Productivity Index, as explained in the Reservoirs Methodology Memo (included in zip file). Shapefile and images of the Reservoir Productivity and Reservoir Uncertainty are included as well.

  6. Property:Incentive/ImplSector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Efficiency Programs (Texas) + Utility + AEP Appalachian Power - Commercial and Industrial Rebate Programs (West Virginia) + Utility + AEP Appalachian Power - Residential Energy...

  7. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    samples. With scan times lasting only seconds, the system can capture, in real time, the migration of fluids and changes in rock material at in-situ petroleum and CO 2 storage ...

  8. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Successful implementation of portfolio research objectives will ultimately increase America's domestic oil and gas supply, reduce our nation's dependency on foreign imports, and ...

  9. Existing Homes Retrofit Case Study: Asdal Builders, LLC, Pittsburgh, PA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-01

    This Building America fact sheet describes a retrofit to improve efficiency of a 1930s era bungalow in Pittsburgh.

  10. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of recoverable petroleum within a reservoir, as well as the modeling of the flow of these fluids within the porous media and in wellbore. These properties are also used to design...

  11. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Conversion Model allows for the transfer of elements from the JetPlume and Transport models, taking care to best amalgamate the two contrasting approaches in each, while...

  12. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geomechanical Impacts of Shale Gas Activities Background Hydraulic fracturing of gas shale is the injection of large volumes of fluid at high pressures in low permeability shale to ...

  13. QER- Comment of PA Chamber of Business and Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On behalf of Gene Barr, President & CEO of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry, please find attached our comments regarding Natural Gas Transmission, Storage & Distribution, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania July 21, 2014. Thanks in advance for the attention to our comments and for holding a hearing today in our state. All the best, Kevin

  14. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which can be then used in an inexpensive "breathalyzer" to test for and monitor diabetes. The NETLSC has also greatly accelerated progress on the development of...

  15. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The facility was originally used to study the fate of CO 2 in the deep ocean, released ... Goals and Objectives The goal of the current research is to obtain fundamental, ...

  16. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil and natural gas fuel America's economy and account for more than 60 percent of the energy ... The results can also be used to identify requirements for new materials with superior ...

  17. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Transfer at NETL Carbon capture, quantum mechanical simulations, integrated gasification, and clean power-words like these mean the future of energy to NETL's in-house...

  18. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lower heat capacity, and reduced heat of reaction. The result is a lower overall cost for CO 2 capture and separation. Many different types of solid materials have been...

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Curtis-Wright Corp - PA...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    electronics, chemicals and plastics - work for AEC primarily isotope separation and heat sources for space application. Also work for U.S. Air Force. AEC licensed facility. ...

  20. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov Jennifer Bauer Geospatial Researcher 541-918-4507 ... These interpretations support geospatial and geo-statistical evaluations associated with ...

  1. Albany, OR * Archorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

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    Jennifer Bauer Geospatial Researcher 541-918-4507 jennifer.bauer@contr.netl.doe.gov ... The original databook was started by NETL's Geology and Geospatial (G&G) team for the U.S. ...

  2. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov Jennifer Bauer Geospatial Researcher 541-918-4507 ... The original databook was started by NETL's Geology and Geospatial (G&G) team for the U.S. ...

  3. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and model data on high performance computers with pre-loaded software, such as ArcGIS, Petra, EarthVision, GoldSim, MATLAB, and other advanced analytical, statistical and...

  4. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    their datasets using top-of-the-line research computers with key software, such as ArcGIS, Petra, GoldSim, and Earthvision, among other advanced geostatistical and analytical...

  5. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

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    quantifiable and relevant para- meters, while leaving the sample available for further testing. Facilities Medical CT Scanner Core-scale Characterization and Fluid Flow The...

  6. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Inc. Equitable Resources Exxon Mobile Florida Municipal ... to monitor injection operations and to ensure public safety. ... to collect data on the performance of the lower part of the ...

  7. Albany, OR * Archorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cynthia Powell Director 541-967-5803 cynthia.powell@netl.doe.gov Grant Bromhal Technical Portfolio Lead National Risk Assessment Program 304-285-4688 grant.bromhal@netl.doe.gov ...

  8. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Baltrus Acting Division Director Molecular Science Division 412-386-4570 john.baltrus@netl.doe.gov Paul Turner Division Director Materials Characterization Division...

  9. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

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    Carbon capture, quantum mechanical simulations, integrated gasification, and clean ... And, as technology transfer cutting-edge inventions to present a wide energy research ...

  10. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Structural Materials are being developed for use in extreme environments associated with combustion, turbine, gasification, drilling, and other applications. Research focuses on ...