National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for appalachian basin eastern

  1. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatcher, Robert D

    2005-11-30

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our

  2. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert D. Hatcher

    2003-05-31

    This report summarizes the first-year accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employs the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempts to characterize the T-P parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempts to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is working with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) is geochemically characterizing the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). First-year results include: (1) meeting specific milestones (determination of thrust movement vectors, fracture analysis, and communicating results at professional meetings and through publication). All milestones were met. Movement vectors for Valley and Ridge thrusts were confirmed to be west-directed and derived from pushing by the Blue Ridge thrust sheet, and fan about the Tennessee salient. Fracture systems developed during Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic to Holocene compressional and extensional tectonic events, and are more intense near faults. Presentations of first-year results were made at the Tennessee Oil and Gas Association meeting (invited) in June, 2003, at a workshop in August 2003 on geophysical logs in Ordovician rocks, and at the Eastern Section AAPG meeting in September 2003. Papers on thrust tectonics and a major prospect discovered during the first year are in press in an AAPG Memoir and published in the July 28, 2003, issue of the Oil and Gas Journal. (2) collaboration with industry and USGS partners. Several Middle Ordovician black shale samples were sent to USGS for organic carbon analysis. Mississippian and Middle Ordovician rock samples were collected by John Repetski (USGS) and

  3. Atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Humphreys, M.; Smosna, R.A.

    1995-06-01

    This regional study of gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin has four main objectives: to organize all of the -as reservoirs in the Appalachian basin into unique plays based on common age, lithology, trap type and other geologic similarities; to write, illustrate and publish an atlas of major gas plays; to prepare and submit a digital data base of geologic, engineering and reservoir parameters for each gas field; and technology transfer to the oil and gas industry during the preparation of the atlas and data base.

  4. Fast Track Reservoir Modeling of Shale Formations in the Appalachian Basin. Application to Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grujic, Ognjen; Mohaghegh, Shahab; Bromhal, Grant

    2010-07-01

    In this paper a fast track reservoir modeling and analysis of the Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky is presented. Unlike conventional reservoir simulation and modeling which is a bottom up approach (geo-cellular model to history matching) this new approach starts by attempting to build a reservoir realization from well production history (Top to Bottom), augmented by core, well-log, well-test and seismic data in order to increase accuracy. This approach requires creation of a large spatial-temporal database that is efficiently handled with state of the art Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining techniques (AI & DM), and therefore it represents an elegant integration of reservoir engineering techniques with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining. Advantages of this new technique are a) ease of development, b) limited data requirement (as compared to reservoir simulation), and c) speed of analysis. All of the 77 wells used in this study are completed in the Lower Huron Shale and are a part of the Big Sandy Gas field in Eastern Kentucky. Most of the wells have production profiles for more than twenty years. Porosity and thickness data was acquired from the available well logs, while permeability, natural fracture network properties, and fracture aperture data was acquired through a single well history matching process that uses the FRACGEN/NFFLOW simulator package. This technology, known as Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling, starts with performing conventional reservoir engineering analysis on individual wells such as decline curve analysis and volumetric reserves estimation. Statistical techniques along with information generated from the reservoir engineering analysis contribute to an extensive spatio-temporal database of reservoir behavior. The database is used to develop a cohesive model of the field using fuzzy pattern recognition or similar techniques. The reservoir model is calibrated (history matched) with production history from the most recently

  5. Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

  6. Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

    1992-06-01

    Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

  7. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Delaware W 28.49 W 131.87 21.6% 59 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin Florida W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W 20.35 W 64.82 31.4% 1,715 W 75.9% Northern...

  8. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Florida W 38.51 W 140.84 27.3% 134 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - W W W - W Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W 16.14 W 63.35 25.5% 1,681 W 88.5% Northern...

  9. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

  10. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

  11. The occurrence of freshwater limestones in the Upper Pennsylvanian and lower Permian of the northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggleston, J.R. ); Ferdinand, L.F. )

    1990-05-01

    Freshwater limestones comprise a significant portion of the Upper Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian strata of the northern Appalachian basin. In some areas, the Monogahela Group consists of as much as 50% freshwater limestones. These limestones are clayey to silty, iron-bearing, sparsely fossiliferous, micritic, and thinly bedded or nodular and are presumed to be lacustrine in origin. They are part of a recurring sequence of beds that include coal, sandstone, shale/clay, and marine limestone. The initial goals of this study are to develop a stratigraphic framework for these freshwater limestones and to determine, their lateral continuity, thickness variability, and relation to other beds in this section, in particular the coals, on a regional scale. The Pittsburgh coal and Ames limestone are very persistent regionally and are used as a datum. Regional correlations show that possibly 20 freshwater limestone beds are persistent and widespread; some cover at least 5,000 mi{sup 2} in eastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, northern West Virginia and western Maryland. Cross sections and fence diagrams constructed from drill logs and measured sections indicate that the thickness of these limestone beds varies laterally and between beds, ranging from less than 1 to 150 ft thick. Correlations also show stratigraphic and paleogeographic relationships between the coals and freshwater limestones. Many of the limestones underlie coal beds, directly in some places. The coals and limestones are better developed in the northern part of the Appalachian basin. These associations may hold significant clues to the depositional and the paleoclimatic setting of the freshwater limestones and the coals.

  12. Multi-scale and Integrated Characterization of the Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian Basin: From Microscopes to Mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Soeder, Daniel J; McDannell, Kalin T.; Mroz, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Historic data from the Department of Energy Eastern Gas Shale Project (ESGP) were compiled to develop a database of geochemical analyses, well logs, lithological and natural fracture descriptions from oriented core, and reservoir parameters. The nine EGSP wells were located throughout the Appalachian Basin and intercepted the Marcellus Shale from depths of 750 meters (2500 ft) to 2500 meters (8200 ft). A primary goal of this research is to use these existing data to help construct a geologic framework model of the Marcellus Shale across the basin and link rock properties to gas productivity. In addition to the historic data, x-ray computerized tomography (CT) of entire cores with a voxel resolution of 240mm and optical microscopy to quantify mineral and organic volumes was performed. Porosity and permeability measurements in a high resolution, steady-state flow apparatus are also planned. Earth Vision software was utilized to display and perform volumetric calculations on individual wells, small areas with several horizontal wells, and on a regional basis. The results indicate that the lithologic character of the Marcellus Shale changes across the basin. Gas productivity appears to be influenced by the properties of the organic material and the mineral composition of the rock, local and regional structural features, the current state of in-situ stress, and lithologic controls on the geometry of induced fractures during stimulations. The recoverable gas volume from the Marcellus Shale is variable over the vertical stratigraphic section, as well as laterally across the basin. The results from this study are expected to help improve the assessment of the resource, and help optimize the recovery of natural gas.

  13. Regional diagenetic variations in Middle Pennsylvanian foreland basin sandstones of the southern Appalachians: Comparison to passive margin Cenozoic sandstones of the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, K.L. . Dept. of Geological Science)

    1992-01-01

    Water/rock interactions recorded by authigenic phases in lithic-rich sandstones of the southern Appalachian basin, in the region of the Pine Mountain Overthrust (PMO), began with early post-depositional burial, extended through deeper burial and temperatures > 100 C during the Alleghenian orogeny, and continued through uplift and exposure at the modern weathering surface. Early-formed carbonate in the form of highly localized calcite concretions preserves IGVs greater than 30% and has widely ranging trace element concentrations. Later-formed calcite is characterized by relative low trace element concentrations in sandstones of low IGV. Precipitation of kaolinite cement and grain replacements partially overlapped formation of early carbonate and quartz cement. Dissolution and albitization of detrital feldspars are the primary types of grain alteration observed. Complete loss of the detrital feldspar assemblage is observed only around the eastern end of the PMO where a portion of the feldspar loss is recorded as quartz-replaced grains. Compaction due to ductile behavior of phyllosilicate-rich rock fragments and pressure solution of detrital quartz has reduced IGV to an average of around 11% below the PMO and 6% above the fault. In general, these foreland basin sandstones manifest authigenic phases and sequences of diagenetic events similar to those observed in the passive margin Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin. The most striking diagenetic differences between the two basins are seen in terms of the comparative amounts of compaction (greater in the foreland basin) and grain alteration (less in the foreland basin) which most likely relate to primary differences in the texture and mineralogy of the sediments.

  14. Regional geological assessment of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins relative to potential storage/disposal of radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomenick, T.F.; Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Byerly, D.

    1983-01-01

    The thick and regionally extensive sequence of shales and associated clastic sedimentary rocks of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age has been considered among the nonsalt geologies for deep subsurface containment of high-level radioactive wastes. This report examines some of the regional and basin-specific characteristics of the black and associated nonblack shales of this sequence within the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins of the north-central and eastern United States. Principal areas where the thickness and depth of this shale sequence are sufficient to warrant further evaluation are identified, but no attempt is made to identify specific storage/disposal sites. Also identified are other areas with less promise for further study because of known potential conflicts such as geologic-hydrologic factors, competing subsurface priorities involving mineral resources and groundwater, or other parameters. Data have been compiled for each basin in an effort to indicate thickness, distribution, and depth relationships for the entire shale sequence as well as individual shale units in the sequence. Included as parts of this geologic assessment are isopach, depth information, structure contour, tectonic elements, and energy-resource maps covering the three basins. Summary evaluations are given for each basin as well as an overall general evaluation of the waste storage/disposal potential of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence,including recommendations for future studies to more fully characterize the shale sequence for that purpose. Based on data compiled in this cursory investigation, certain rock units have reasonable promise for radioactive waste storage/disposal and do warrant additional study.

  15. Basin Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    43 0.0294 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida 0.0161 W W W W 0.0216 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin...

  16. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

    2005-04-01

    The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the

  17. Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-8-2015 Appalachian Basin Isotopes_7.28.15 FINAL.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H, 13 C, 18 O, 226 Ra, and 228 Ra Isotope Concentrations in the Appalachian Basin: A Review 28 July 2015 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-8-2015 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

  18. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Chris Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; James Drahovzal; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; John Bocan; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Katharine Lee Avary

    2004-10-01

    The ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' has reached the mid-point in a two-year research effort to produce a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 exploration and production companies and 6 research team members, including four state geological surveys, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks and one administrative and technology transfer task are being conducted basin-wide by research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined at least once. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 10 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York and Pennsylvania. In addition, three surfaces in that area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. In the Kentucky-Ohio-West Virginia portion of the study area, a velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Fifteen formation tops have been identified on seismic in that area. Preliminary conclusions based on the available seismic data do not support the extension of the Rome Trough into New York state. Members of the stratigraphy task team measured, described and photographed numerous cores from throughout the basin, and tied these data back to their network of geophysical log cross sections. Geophysical logs were scanned in raster files for use in detailed well examination and construction of cross sections. Logs on these cross sections that are only in raster format are being converted to vector format for final cross section displays. The petrology team measured and sampled one classic outcrop in Pennsylvania and ten cores in four states. More than 600 thin sections were prepared from samples in those four states. A seven-step procedure is being used to analyze all thin

  19. Petroleum geology of principal sedimentary basins in eastern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The principal petroliferous basins in eastern China are the Songliao, Ordos, and Sichuan basins of Mesozoic age, and the North China, Jianghan, Nanxiang, and Subei basins of Cenozoic age. These basins contain mostly continental fluvial and lacustrine detrital sediments. Four different geologic ages are responsible for the oil and gas in this region: (1) Mesozoic in the Songliao, Ordos, and Sichuan basins; (2) Tertiary in the North China, Jianghan, Nanxiang, and Subei basins; (3) Permian-Carboniferous in the southern North China basin and the northwestern Ordos basin; and (4) Sinian in the southern Sichuan basin. The most prolific oil and gas sources are the Mesozoic of the Songliao basin and the Tertiary of the North China basin. Although the major source rocks in these basins are lacustrine mudstone and shale, their tectonic settings and the resultant temperature gradients differ. For example, in the Songliao, North China, and associated basins, trapping conditions commonly are associated with block faulting of an extensional tectonic regime; the extensional tectonics in turn contribute to a high geothermal gradient (40/sup 0/-60/sup 0/C/km), which results in early maturation and migration for relatively shallow deposits. However, the Ordos and Sichuan basins formed under compressional conditions and are cooler. Hence, maturation and migration occurred late, relative to reservoir deposition and burial, the result being a poorer quality reservoir.

  20. Innovative Methodology For Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobi, Rober

    2007-03-28

    This Topical Report (#6 of 9) consists of the figures 3.6-13 to (and including) 3.6-18 (and appropriate figure captions) that accompany the Final Technical Progress Report entitled: “Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin” for DOE/NETL Award DE-AC26-00NT40698.

  1. Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobi, Rober

    2007-03-31

    This Topical Report (#6 of 9) consists of the figures 3.6-13 to (and including) 3.6-18 (and appropriate figure captions) that accompany the Final Technical Progress Report entitled: "Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin” for DOE/NETL Award DE-AC26-00NT40698.

  2. Basin Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.0323 0.0284 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida 0.0146 W W W W 0.0223 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian...

  3. SECONDARY NATURAL GAS RECOVERY IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN A FIELD DEMONSTRATION SITE, HENDERSON DOME, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOB A. HARDAGE; ELOISE DOHERTY; STEPHEN E. LAUBACH; TUCKER F. HENTZ

    1998-08-14

    The principal objectives of this project were to test and evaluate technologies that would result in improved characterization of fractured natural-gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin. The Bureau of Economic Geology (Bureau) worked jointly with industry partner Atlas Resources, Inc. to design, execute, and evaluate several experimental tests toward this end. The experimental tests were of two types: (1) tests leading to a low-cost methodology whereby small-scale microfractures observed in matrix grains of sidewall cores can be used to deduce critical properties of large-scale fractures that control natural-gas production and (2) tests that verify methods whereby robust seismic shear (S) waves can be generated to detect and map fractured reservoir facies. The grain-scale microfracture approach to characterizing rock facies was developed in an ongoing Bureau research program that started before this Appalachian Basin study began. However, the method had not been tested in a wide variety of fracture systems, and the tectonic setting of rocks in the Appalachian Basin composed an ideal laboratory for perfecting the methodology. As a result of this Appalachian study, a low-cost commercial procedure now exists that will allow Appalachian operators to use scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of thin sections extracted from oriented sidewall cores to infer the spatial orientation, relative geologic timing, and population density of large-scale fracture systems in reservoir sandstones. These attributes are difficult to assess using conventional techniques. In the Henderson Dome area, large quartz-lined regional fractures having N20E strikes, and a subsidiary set of fractures having N70W strikes, are prevalent. An innovative method was also developed for obtaining the stratigraphic and geographic tops of sidewall cores. With currently deployed sidewall coring devices, no markings from which top orientation can be obtained are made on the sidewall core itself during

  4. Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Jacobi; John Fountain; Stuart Loewenstein; Edward DeRidder; Bruce Hart

    2007-03-31

    For two consecutive years, 2004 and 2005, the largest natural gas well (in terms of gas flow/day) drilled onshore USA targeted the Ordovician Trenton/Black River (T/BR) play in the Appalachian Basin of New York State (NYS). Yet, little data were available concerning the characteristics of the play, or how to recognize and track T/BR prospects across the region. Traditional exploration techniques for entry into a hot play were of limited use here, since existing deep well logs and public domain seismic were almost non-existent. To help mitigate this problem, this research project was conceived with two objectives: (1) to demonstrate that integrative traditional and innovative techniques could be used as a cost-effective reconnaissance exploration methodology in this, and other, areas where existing data in targeted fracture-play horizons are almost non-existent, and (2) determine critical characteristics of the T/BR fields. The research region between Seneca and Cayuga lakes (in the Finger Lakes of NYS) is on strike and east of the discovery fields, and the southern boundary of the field area is about 8 km north of more recently discovered T/BR fields. Phase I, completed in 2004, consisted of integrating detailed outcrop fracture analyses with detailed soil gas analyses, lineaments, stratigraphy, seismic reflection data, well log data, and aeromagnetics. In the Seneca Lake region, Landsat lineaments (EarthSat, 1997) were coincident with fracture intensification domains (FIDs) and minor faults observed in outcrop and inferred from stratigraphy. Soil gas anomalies corresponded to ENE-trending lineaments and FIDs. N- and ENE-trending lineaments were parallel to aeromagnetic anomalies, whereas E-trending lineaments crossed aeromagnetic trends. 2-D seismic reflection data confirmed that the E-trending lineaments and FIDs occur where shallow level Alleghanian salt-cored thrust-faulted anticlines occur. In contrast, the ENE-trending FIDs and lineaments occur where Iapetan

  5. ENHANCING RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN BY IDENTIFYING TECHNICAL BARRIER AND PREFERRED PRACTICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald R. McDowell; Khashayar Aminian; Katharine L. Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Ed. Hohn; Douglas G. Patchen

    2003-09-01

    The Preferred Upstream Management Practices (PUMP) project, a two-year study sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), had three primary objectives: (1) the identification of problems, problematic issues, potential solutions and preferred practices related to oil production; (2) the creation of an Appalachian Regional Council to oversee and continue this investigation beyond the end of the project; and (3) the dissemination of investigative results to the widest possible audience, primarily by means of an interactive website. Investigation and identification of oil production problems and preferred management practices began with a Problem Identification Workshop in January of 2002. Three general issues were selected by participants for discussion: Data Management; Reservoir Engineering; and Drilling Practices. At the same meeting, the concept of the creation of an oversight organization to evaluate and disseminated preferred management practices (PMP's) after the end of the project was put forth and volunteers were solicited. In-depth interviews were arranged with oil producers to gain more insight into problems and potential solutions. Project members encountered considerable reticence on the part of interviewees when it came to revealing company-specific production problems or company-specific solutions. This was the case even though interviewees were assured that all responses would be held in confidence. Nevertheless, the following production issues were identified and ranked in order of decreasing importance: Water production including brine disposal; Management of production and business data; Oil field power costs; Paraffin accumulation; Production practices including cementing. An number of secondary issues were also noted: Problems associated with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Waterflooding; Reservoir characterization; Employee availability, training, and safety; and Sale and Purchase problems. One item was mentioned both in

  6. Appalachian Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Thermal Quality Analysis in Low-Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis (GPFA-AB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teresa E. Jordan

    2015-11-15

    This collection of files are part of a larger dataset uploaded in support of Low Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis for the Appalachian Basin (GPFA-AB, DOE Project DE-EE0006726). Phase 1 of the GPFA-AB project identified potential Geothermal Play Fairways within the Appalachian basin of Pennsylvania, West Virginia and New York. This was accomplished through analysis of 4 key criteria or ‘risks’: thermal quality, natural reservoir productivity, risk of seismicity, and heat utilization. Each of these analyses represent a distinct project task, with the fifth task encompassing combination of the 4 risks factors. Supporting data for all five tasks has been uploaded into the Geothermal Data Repository node of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS). This submission comprises the data for Thermal Quality Analysis (project task 1) and includes all of the necessary shapefiles, rasters, datasets, code, and references to code repositories that were used to create the thermal resource and risk factor maps as part of the GPFA-AB project. The identified Geothermal Play Fairways are also provided with the larger dataset. Figures (.png) are provided as examples of the shapefiles and rasters. The regional standardized 1 square km grid used in the project is also provided as points (cell centers), polygons, and as a raster. Two ArcGIS toolboxes are available: 1) RegionalGridModels.tbx for creating resource and risk factor maps on the standardized grid, and 2) ThermalRiskFactorModels.tbx for use in making the thermal resource maps and cross sections. These toolboxes contain “item description” documentation for each model within the toolbox, and for the toolbox itself. This submission also contains three R scripts: 1) AddNewSeisFields.R to add seismic risk data to attribute tables of seismic risk, 2) StratifiedKrigingInterpolation.R for the interpolations used in the thermal resource analysis, and 3) LeaveOneOutCrossValidation.R for the cross validations used in

  7. Improving the Availability and Delivery of Critical Information for Tight Gas Resource Development in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary Behling; Susan Pool; Douglas Patchen; John Harper

    2008-12-31

    To encourage, facilitate and accelerate the development of tight gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin, the geological surveys in Pennsylvania and West Virginia collected widely dispersed data on five gas plays and formatted these data into a large database that can be accessed by individual well or by play. The database and delivery system that were developed can be applied to any of the 30 gas plays that have been defined in the basin, but for this project, data compilation was restricted to the following: the Mississippian-Devonian Berea/Murrysville sandstone play and the Upper Devonian Venango, Bradford and Elk sandstone plays in Pennsylvania and West Virginia; and the 'Clinton'/Medina sandstone play in northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, some data were collected on the Tuscarora Sandstone play in West Virginia, which is the lateral equivalent of the Medina Sandstone in Pennsylvania. Modern geophysical logs are the most common and cost-effective tools for evaluating reservoirs. Therefore, all of the well logs in the libraries of the two surveys from wells that had penetrated the key plays were scanned, generating nearly 75,000 scanned e-log files from more than 40,000 wells. A standard file-naming convention for scanned logs was developed, which includes the well API number, log curve type(s) scanned, and the availability of log analyses or half-scale logs. In addition to well logs, other types of documents were scanned, including core data (descriptions, analyses, porosity-permeability cross-plots), figures from relevant chapters of the Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Plays, selected figures from survey publications, and information from unpublished reports and student theses and dissertations. Monthly and annual production data from 1979 to 2007 for West Virginia wells in these plays are available as well. The final database also includes digitized logs from more than 800 wells, sample descriptions from more than 550 wells, more than 600 digital photos

  8. File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    applicationpdf) Description Eastern Great Basin By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  9. Utilization Analysis in Low-Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis for the Appalachian Basin (GPFA-AB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teresa E. Jordan

    2015-09-30

    This submission of Utilization Analysis data to the Geothermal Data Repository (GDR) node of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) is in support of Phase 1 Low Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis for the Appalachian Basin (project DE-EE0006726). The submission includes data pertinent to the methods and results of an analysis of the Surface Levelized Cost of Heat (SLCOH) for US Census Bureau ‘Places’ within the study area. This was calculated using a modification of a program called GEOPHIRES, available at http://koenraadbeckers.net/geophires/index.php. The MATLAB modules used in conjunction with GEOPHIRES, the MATLAB data input file, the GEOPHIRES output data file, and an explanation of the software components have been provided. Results of the SLCOH analysis appear on 4 .png image files as mapped ‘risk’ of heat utilization. For each of the 4 image (.png) files, there is an accompanying georeferenced TIF (.tif) file by the same name. In addition to calculating SLCOH, this Task 4 also identified many sites that may be prospects for use of a geothermal district heating system, based on their size and industry, rather than on the SLCOH. An industry sorted listing of the sites (.xlsx) and a map of these sites plotted as a layer onto different iterations of maps combining the three geological risk factors (Thermal Quality, Natural Reservoir Quality, and Risk of Seismicity) has been provided. In addition to the 6 image (.png) files of the maps in this series, a shape (.shp) file and 7 associated files are included as well. Finally, supporting files (.pdf) describing the utilization analysis methodology and summarizing the anticipated permitting for a deep district heating system are supplied.

  10. Wolfcampian sequence stratigraphy of eastern Central Basin platform, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candelaria, M.P.; Entzminger, D.J.; Behnken, F.H. ); Sarg, J.F. ); Wilde, G.L. )

    1992-04-01

    Integrated study of well logs, cores, high-resolution seismic data, and biostratigraphy has established the sequence framework of the Atokan (Early Pennsylvanian)-Wolfcampian (Early Permian) stratigraphic section along the eastern margin of the Central Basin platform in the Permian basin. Sequence interpretation of high-resolution, high-fold seismic data through this stratigraphic interval has revealed a complex progradational/retrogradational evolution of the platform margin that has demonstrated overall progradation of at least 12 km during early-middle Wolfcampian. Sequence stratigraphic study of the Wolfcamp interval has revealed details of the internal architecture and morphologic evolution of the contemporaneous platform margin. Two generalized seismic facies assemblages are recognized in the Wolfcampian. Platform interior facies are characterized by high-amplitude, laterally continuous parallel reflections; platform margin facies consist of progradational sigmoidal to oblique clinoforms and are characterized by discontinuous, low-amplitude reflections. Sequence interpretation of carbonate platform-to-basin strata geometries helps in predicting subtle stratigraphic trapping relationships and potential reservoir facies distribution. Moreover, this interpretive method assists in describing complex reservoir heterogeneities that can contribute to significant reserve additions from within existing fields.

  11. Permian evolution of sandstone composition in a complex back-arc extensional to foreland basin: The Bowen Basin, eastern Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, J.C. . Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis); Fielding, C.R. . Dept. of Earth Sciences); Caritat, P de . Dept. of Geology); Wilkinson, M.M. )

    1993-09-01

    The Bowen Basin is a Permo-Triassic, back-arc extensional to foreland basin that developed landward of an intermittently active continental volcanic arc associated with the eastern Australian convergent plate margin. The basin has a complex, polyphase tectonic history that began with limited back-arc crustal extension during the Early Permian. This created a series of north-trending grabens and half grabens which, in the west, accommodated quartz-rich sediment derived locally from surrounding, uplifted continental basement. In the east, coeval calc-alkaline, volcanolithic-rich, and volcaniclastic sediment was derived from the active volcanic arc. This early extensional episode was followed by a phase of passive thermal subsidence accompanied by episodic compression during the late Early Permian to early Late Permian, with little contemporaneous volcanism. In the west, quartzose sediment was shed from stable, polymictic, continental basement immediately to the west and south of the basin, whereas volcanolithic-rich sediment that entered the eastern side of the basin during this time was presumably derived from the inactive, and possibly partly submerged volcanic arc. During the late Late Permian, flexural loading and increased compression occurred along the eastern margin of the Bowen Basin, and renewed volcanism took place in the arc system to the east. Reactivation of this arc led to westward and southward spread of volcanolithic-rich sediment over the entire basin. Accordingly, areas in the west that were earlier receiving quartzose, craton-derived sediment from the west and south were overwhelmed by volcanolithic-rich, arc-derived sediment from the east and north. This transition from quartz-rich, craton-derived sediments to volcanolithic-rich, arc-derived sediments is consistent with the interpreted back-arc extensional to foreland basin origin for the Bowen Basin.

  12. Appalachian State | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appalachian State Jump to: navigation, search Name Appalachian State Facility Appalachian State Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  13. Geothermal systems of the Mono Basin-Long Valley region, eastern California and western Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, C.T.; Flynn, T.; Chapman, R.H.; Trexler, D.T.; Chase, G.R.; Bacon, C.F.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The region that includes Mono Basin, Long Valley, the Bridgeport-Bodie Hills area, and Aurora, in eastern California and western Nevada was studied to determine the possible causes and interactions of the geothermal anomalies in the Mono Basin-Long Valley region as a whole. A special goal of the study was to locate possible shallow bodies of magma and to determine their influence on the hydrothermal systems in the region. (ACR)

  14. Apatite fission track evidence for post-Early Cretaceous erosional unroofing of Middle Pennsylvanian sandstones from the southern Appalachian Basin in Kentucky and Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boettcher, S.S.; Milliken, K.L. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Apatite fission track ages and mean etchable track lengths for 7 samples of Middle Pennsylvanian (Breathitt Formation) depositional age from the southern Appalachian Basin of KY and VA suggest that 3--4 km of erosional unroofing has occurred since the Early Cretaceous. The samples were collected over a 1,600 km[sup 2] area at the northern end of the Pine Mountain Overthrust southeast of Pikeville, KY. This new data set overlaps 8 published apatite fission track ages and 3 mean etchable lengths from the Cumberland Plateau and Valley and Ridge areas of WV. Because all of the apatite fission track ages are significantly younger than the depositional age, maximum burial temperatures in the area exceeded 125 C, such that fission tracks that formed in the detrital apatite prior to deposition have been totally annealed. Furthermore, mean etchable track lengths show considerable length reduction from initial values revealing that the samples resided in the zone of partial annealing on the order of 100 Ma following attainment of maximum temperatures. The burial history for these samples began with deposition and rapid burial of synorogenic sediments in front of the westward advancing Alleghenian deformation front. The fission track data are compatible with the hypothesis that maximum temperatures were attained during the Late Paleozoic as tectonically driven synorogenic fluids penetrated the foreland basin deposits. Slow erosional unroofing (< 15 m/Ma for a thermal gradient of 30 C/km) has occurred since the onset of Triassic-Jurassic rifting along the atlantic continental margin and continued into the Cenozoic.

  15. Zircon and apatite fission-track evidence for an Early Permian thermal peak and relatively rapid Late Permian cooling in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roden, M.K. . Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science); Wintsch, R.P. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    New zircon fission-track ages compliment published apatite fission-track ages in the Appalachian Basin to narrowly constrain its thermal history. Geologic evidence can only constrain timing of the thermal peak to be younger than late Pennsylvanian sediments ([approximately] 300 Ma) and older than Mesozoic sediments in the Newark and Gettysburg Basins ([approximately] 210 Ma). Apatite fission-track ages as old as 246 Ma require the Alleghanian thermal peak to have been pre-Triassic. Preliminary data on reset zircon fission-track ages from middle Paleozoic sediments range from 255 to 290 Ma. Zircon fission-track apparent ages from samples younger and structurally higher than these are not reset. Thus, the oldest reset zircon fission-track age constraints the time of the Alleghanian thermal peak to be earliest Permian. Rates of post-Alleghanian cooling have not been well-constrained by geologic data and could be very slow. The difference between apatite and zircon fission-track ages for most of the samples range from 100--120 m.y. reflecting Permo-Triassic cooling of only 1 C/m.y. However, one sample with one of the oldest apatite ages, 245 Ma, yields one of the younger zircon ages of 255 Ma. This requires cooling rates of 10 C/m.y. and uplift rates of [approximately] 0.5 mm/yr. Collectively, these data support an early Permian thermal peak and a two-stage cooling history, consisting of > 100 C cooling (> 8 km denundation) in the Permian followed by relatively slow cooling and exhumation throughout the Mesozoic.

  16. Basin Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware 26.24 - W...

  17. Basin Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware 28.49 - W...

  18. Petroleum prospects for offshore sedimentary basins in the eastern Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruns, T.R.; Vedder, J.G. )

    1990-06-01

    Intra-arc basins in the Buka-Bougainville region of Papua New Guinea and in the Solomon Islands contain thick sedimentary sequences that may be prospective for petroleum. The Queen Emma basin, between Bougainville and New Ireland, contains as much as 8 km of deformed Oligocene and younger strata. The Central Solomons Trough, which underlies New Georgia Sound, is a composite intra-arc basin that contains late Oligocene and younger strata as much as 7 km thick. Farther east, beneath Indispensable Strait, the down-faulted Indispensable basin locally contains as much as 5.4 km of Miocene( ) and younger strata, and the offshore part of Mbokokimbo basin off eastern Guadalcanal includes 6 km or more of late Miocene and younger strata. All of these basins have some of the attributes necessary to generate and trap petroleum. Structural and stratigraphic traps are common, including faulted anticlines, sedimentary wedges, and carbonate reefs and reef-derived deposits on submarine ridges and along the basin margins. The thickness of the basin deposits ensures that some strata are buried deeply enough to be within the thermal regime required for hydrocarbon generation. However, little source or reservoir rock information is available because of the lack of detailed surface and subsurface stratigraphy. Moreover, much of the basin sediment is likely to consist of volcaniclastic material, derived from uplifted volcanogenic rocks surrounding the basins, and may be poor in source and reservoir rocks. Until additional stratigraphic information is available, analysis of the petroleum potential of these basins is a matter of conjecture.

  19. Primary oil-shale resources of the Green River Formation in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudell, L.G.; Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Mason, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    Resources of potential oil in place in the Green River Formation are measured and estimated for the primary oil-shale resource area east of the Green River in Utah's Uinta Basin. The area evaluated (Ts 7-14 S, Rs 19-25 E) includes most of, and certainly the best of Utah's oil-shale resource. For resource evaluation the principal oil-shale section is divided into ten stratigraphic units which are equivalent to units previously evaluated in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. Detailed evaluation of individual oil-shale units sampled by cores, plus estimates by extrapolation into uncored areas indicate a total resource of 214 billion barrels of shale oil in place in the eastern Uinta Basin.

  20. Basin Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    10.68 12.03 13.69 14.71 16.11 19.72 20.69 9.1 4.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan 6.74 8.16 W 8.10 W W...

  1. Basin Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    11.34 12.43 13.69 14.25 15.17 18.16 18.85 6.5 3.8 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan 7.43 8.85 W 8.37 W W...

  2. Estimating Annual Precipitation in the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Previous attempts to create precipitation-elevation functions in western Nevada have been difficult and result in large uncertainty. In the WRD data analysis, the effect of geographic scale on the precipitation-elevation function was overlooked. This contributed to an erroneous Maxey-Eakin recharge estimate.

  3. Permian {open_quotes}Wolfcamp{close_quotes} limestone reservoirs: Powell Ranch field, Eastern Midland Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1996-09-01

    Deep-water carbonate channel reservoirs form important oil reservoirs along the toe of the Eastern Shelf of the Permian basin in west Texas. In northwestern Glasscock County, these `Wolfcamp` reservoirs are Leonardian (Early Permian) in age and define high-energy channels incised into surrounding carbonate detritus and basinal shale. Porous grain-flow material filling these channels, along with encasing detritus, was derived from the shallow shelf located six miles to the east. Reservoirs are in packstone and grainstone facies and have significant interparticle and moldic porosity. Relevant exploration began in the 1960s, but expanded slowly thereafter due to lack of success caused by complex patterns of channel occurrence. Results of a three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey conducted in 1990 have greatly enhanced the identification and mapping of productive channels in the Powell Ranch field complex. Wells in this complex are capable of flowing 400-1200 bbl of oil per day, and have reserves ranging from 0.2 to 1.3 MBO. The new 3-D data have improved the relevant geologic model and dramatically increased rates of drilling success. Application of such data to this setting offers a potential model for other parts of the Permian basin.

  4. A Calibrated Maxey-Eakin Curve for the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin, which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Recharge rates are estimated on the basis that some fraction of annual precipitation will recharge, and that fraction will increase with increasing elevation. This results in a hypothetical curve relating annual groundwater recharge to annual precipitation. Field validation of recharge rates is critical in order to establish credibility to any estimate. This is due to the fact that the Maxey-Eakin model is empirical. An empirical model is derived from practical experience rather than basic theory. Therefore, a validated Maxey-Eakin model in one groundwater basin does not translate to a different one. In the WRD's Maxey-Eakin model, they used a curve calibrated against

  5. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Dakota Sandstone, Eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and its Relationship to Reservoir Compartmentalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varney, Peter J.

    2002-04-23

    This research established the Dakota-outcrop sequence stratigraphy in part of the eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and relates reservoir quality lithologies in depositional sequences to structure and reservoir compartmentalization in the South Lindrith Field area. The result was a predictive tool that will help guide further exploration and development.

  6. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-08-01

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  7. Influence of Mesozoic age structure on Miocene tectonic development in NE Anzoategui, Eastern Venezuela Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadler, P.; White, S.

    1996-08-01

    Structure within and surrounding the Quiamare-La Ceiba region, Eastern Venezuela Basin, is dominated by two major thrust fault systems. They were generated during Early-Middle Miocene time in response to oblique convergence of the Caribbean and South American plates. They are. respectively, the SE vergent NE-SW oriented Anaco fault system, and the SSE vergent ENE-WSW oriented Pirital fault system. The major structural feature associated with each fault system is a basement cored ramp anticline. New seismic data provides evidence that contributes to a better understanding of the sequence of tectonic development within and surrounding the Quiamare-La Ceiba region. Compressional structures in both the hanging wall and the footwall of the Pirital fault system appear to be inverted normal faults, that were previously active during Mesozoic time along the northern South America passive margin. A conjugate set of strike-slip faults is also present. They are oriented NNW-SSE, parallel to the Urica lineation, and SSW-NNE, respectively. A Mesozoic origin for these faults is suggested. Post-compressional relaxation during Plio-Pleistocene time resulted in the development of shallow, small scale normal faults. These normal faults appear to be localized by structural adjustments along the strike-slip fault sets. Existing oil and gas production within the Quiamare-La Ceiba region is from localized structural closures. Strike-slip faults dissect the prevailing structural grain, and may provide an additional hydrocarbon trapping mechanism.

  8. Cycle stratigraphy and porosity in Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian shelf limestones, eastern Central Basin Platform, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saller, A.H.; Dickson, J.A.D.; Boyd, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    Pennyslvanian and Lower Permian shelfal limestones were studied in core and wireline logs on the eastern side of the Central Basin platform in west Texas. Sixty-three (63) cycles were delineated in the study interval, which includes 200-250 m of Canyon (Missourian), Cisco (Virgilian), and Wolfcamp strata. Four general lithofacies are present: fossiliferous wackestones and packstones, grainstones, phylloid algal boundstones, and shales. These lithologies typically occur in 1-18-m-thick cycles bounded by subaerial exposure surfaces. Grainstones in the upper part of some cycles indicate a shallowing of environments prior to subaerial exposure. Many cycles have subaerial exposure surfaces developed on subtidal fossiliferous wackestones or packstones suggesting rapid falls in sea level. Long-term transgressive intervals (transgressive systems tracts or TST) are dominated by thick (>4 m) cycles, whereas long-term regressive intervals (highstand systems tract or HST) are dominated by thinner cycles. Stable carbon isotope data suggest that thick cycles in TSTs were subjected to short periods of subaerial exposure, whereas thin cycles in the HSTs were subjected to much longer subaerial exposure. Where present, reservoir-grade porosity occurs in the upper part of cycles, 0.3-5 m below subaerial exposure surfaces. Prolonged subaerial exposure apparently reduced matrix porosity by allowing more time for calcite precipitation, which was especially effective in reducing porosity in micritic strata below exposure surfaces.

  9. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-02-28

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  10. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-05-26

    The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon

  11. Geological and geophysical evaluation of the Naricual Formation, Musipan-El Carito area, eastern Venezuela basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abud, J.; Oviedo, P.; Hernandex, J.; Garcia, E.; Escalona, N. )

    1990-05-01

    The recent giant oil discoveries in the lower Tertiary sedimentary sequence of the Monagas overthrust belt, Eastern Venezuela basin require short- and medium-term development plans based on technical production geological studies and models. The present study consists of a detailed geological and geophysical evaluation to define the reservoir in the producing Naricual Formation in the Musipan-El Carito areas, located west of El Furrial oil field. Due to its geological and reservoir characteristics, the northern Monagas area is considered as the top priority production alternative for the Venezuelan oil industry for the next 20 yr. The structural pattern of the area is related to major compressional stress applied northwest and from the northeast. Two fault systems are associated with this compression: (1) first-order, east-west-trending reverse faults dipping to the north, and (2) second-order, north-south-trending right-lateral strike-slip faults. The proposed sedimentological model is that of a paleodelta prograding from north to south. The depositional environment ranges from internal to continental shelf (barrier bars, tidal and distributary channels, lagoonal and associated facies). The STOIP in the Naricual Formation is 4.8 billion bbls, 52% of which is light-grade oil and 48% is medium-grade oil. The results of reservoir pressure analyses suggest lateral communication within the Naricual Formation between the Furrial and Musipan areas and give evidence of a permeability barrier between the Furrial-Musipan and El Carito areas. Depth vs. API gravity plots indicate a direct relationship between crude oil type and depth. The application of the results of the integrated reservoir studies gives precise answers to the production behavior of wells. An adjusted development plan is now under way to guarantee a rational, optimum recovery of the oil reserves.

  12. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

    2005-05-10

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary

  13. Sequence stratigraphic framework and exploration potential of lower Permian (Wolfcampian) gravity-flow deposits, eastern Midland Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, W.A.; Clopine, W.W. ); Kokkoros, G.F.; Wiley, B.H. )

    1996-01-01

    Eight major Wolfcampian sequences (W1-W8) have been identified on seismic data and well logs in a 1500 square mile study area along the Eastern Shelf of the Midland Basin. These sequences compose two lower frequency sequences (W1-W5 W6-W8) which are separated by a major erosional surface associated with a sea-level fall near the time of the early-middle Wolfcampian boundary. Sea-level falls associated with sequences W5 and W6 resulted in significant erosion of platform-margin deposits, incision of a submarine canyon several miles into the Eastern Shelf, and deposition of carbonate gravity flows in the Midland Basin. Gravity flows entered the basin via the submarine canyon and fed basin-floor fan systems which extend up to 25 miles basinward of the toe-of-slope. Within the study area, production from carbonate gravity-flow deposits is mostly from three submarine fan systems within sequences W5 and W6 - the Credo (10 MMBOER) fan (oldest) , the Triple M (5 MMBOER)-Howard Glasscock (7 MMBOER) fan, and the Hutto (5 MMBOER) fan (youngest). The maximum gross thickness of the fans ranges from 100 to 200 feet. Regional isolith and seismic amplitude data were used to high-grade a 70 square mile area in the vicinity of Triple M and Howard Glasscock fields. Model-based velocity inversions, constrained by sonic and density data from 52 wells, were performed utilizing a grid of 2-D seismic data and a 3-D survey. Both Triple M and Howard Glasscock fields are clearly defined by high-velocity anomalies within the productive basin-floor fan interval of sequence W6. An untested high-velocity anomaly with a velocity signature and stratal geometry similar to the two fields, and estimated reserves of 5 MMBOER, is scheduled to be drilled in 1995.

  14. Sequence stratigraphic framework and exploration potential of lower Permian (Wolfcampian) gravity-flow deposits, eastern Midland Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, W.A.; Clopine, W.W.; Kokkoros, G.F.; Wiley, B.H.

    1996-12-31

    Eight major Wolfcampian sequences (W1-W8) have been identified on seismic data and well logs in a 1500 square mile study area along the Eastern Shelf of the Midland Basin. These sequences compose two lower frequency sequences (W1-W5 & W6-W8) which are separated by a major erosional surface associated with a sea-level fall near the time of the early-middle Wolfcampian boundary. Sea-level falls associated with sequences W5 and W6 resulted in significant erosion of platform-margin deposits, incision of a submarine canyon several miles into the Eastern Shelf, and deposition of carbonate gravity flows in the Midland Basin. Gravity flows entered the basin via the submarine canyon and fed basin-floor fan systems which extend up to 25 miles basinward of the toe-of-slope. Within the study area, production from carbonate gravity-flow deposits is mostly from three submarine fan systems within sequences W5 and W6 - the Credo (10 MMBOER) fan (oldest) , the Triple M (5 MMBOER)-Howard Glasscock (7 MMBOER) fan, and the Hutto (5 MMBOER) fan (youngest). The maximum gross thickness of the fans ranges from 100 to 200 feet. Regional isolith and seismic amplitude data were used to high-grade a 70 square mile area in the vicinity of Triple M and Howard Glasscock fields. Model-based velocity inversions, constrained by sonic and density data from 52 wells, were performed utilizing a grid of 2-D seismic data and a 3-D survey. Both Triple M and Howard Glasscock fields are clearly defined by high-velocity anomalies within the productive basin-floor fan interval of sequence W6. An untested high-velocity anomaly with a velocity signature and stratal geometry similar to the two fields, and estimated reserves of 5 MMBOER, is scheduled to be drilled in 1995.

  15. Depositional environments, sequence stratigraphy, and trap configuration of lower Wolfcampian clastics along eastern edge of Midland basin, west Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, N.R.; Reuter, S.G.

    1989-03-01

    The Lower Permian (lower Wolfcampian) along the eastern edge of the Midland basin, west Texas, is characterized by ramp-type shelf margins. During eustatic lowstand, nearshore sedimentation shifted drastically to the west into a basinal setting below the Pennsylvanian (Canyon) shelf margin. Core descriptions demonstrate that lowstand systems tract (LST) and transgressive systems tract (TST) siliciclastics were deposited in deltaic and coastal-plain environments. Prodelta, delta-front, and stream-mouth bar facies are associated with the LST. Coastal-plain and distributary channels are preserved in the TST. The sequence stratigraphic framework indicates type 1 sequence boundaries at 287 Ma, 282 Ma, and 280 Ma in the lower Wolfcampian clastics. This lower Wolfcampian package of sedimentary rocks overlies the Pennsylvanian and is capped by the 279-Ma middle Wolfcampian unconformity. All three sequence boundaries and associated systems tract deposits exhibit a prograding stacking pattern within the sequence stratigraphic framework. Basinally restricted prograding LST deltaic rocks are overlain by backstepping TST deltaics and highstand systems tract (HST) outer marine shales. Production in lower Wolfcampian clastic fields is associated with fine-grained quartzarenites up to 45 ft thick which were deposited in stream-mouth bars. Delta-front and prodelta low-permeability shales encase the reservoir facies, forming lateral permeability barriers. HST outer marine shales deposited over the stream-mouth-bar sandstones act as a top seal, creating a stratigraphic trap and providing source for the high-BTU gas and oil produced from these basinally restricted LST deltaics.

  16. Permian `Wolfcamp` limestone reservoirs: Powell ranch field, eastern Midland basin: Discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzullo, S.J.

    1997-10-01

    The {open_quotes}E&P Notes{close_quotes} paper by S.L. Montgomery (1996) on Wolfcamp resedimented carbonates in the Permian basin concerns an exploration play with the potential for significant reserves; however, its economic importance and geological complexity, and the question of whether his model can be extended to other areas in the Permian basin warrant this discussion.

  17. Examples from the atlas of major Appalachian Gas Plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchen, D.G.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Nuttall, B.C.; Smosna, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of this contract are to produce a panted atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays and to compile a machine-readable database of reservoir data. The Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC or the Consortium), a partnership of the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, and the departments of Geology and Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering at West Virginia University (WVU), agrees with the need to classify gas reservoirs by geologic plays. During meetings with industry representatives, the small independents in the basin emphasized that one of their prime needs was to place each producing reservoir within a stratigraphic framework subdivided by environment of deposition to enable them to develop exploration and development strategies. The text for eight of the 31 play descriptions has been completed, drafting of illustrations for these plays is underway (or complete for some plays), and the review process is ongoing.

  18. World class Devonian potential seen in eastern Madre de Dios basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, K.E.; Wagner, J.B.; Carpenter, D.G.; Conrad, K.T.

    1997-02-17

    The Madre de Dios basin in northern Bolivia contains thick, laterally extensive, organic-rich Upper Devonian source rocks that reached the oil-generative stage of thermal maturity after trap and seal formation. Despite these facts, less than one dozen exploration wells have been drilled in the Madre de Dios basin, and no significant reserves have been discovered. Mobil geoscientists conducted a regional geological, geophysical, and geochemical study of the Madre de Dios basin. The work reported here was designed to assess the distribution, richness, depositional environment, and thermal maturity of Devonian source rocks. It is supported by data from over 3,000 m of continuous slimhole core in two of the five Mobil wells in the basin. Source potential also exists in Cretaceous, Mississippian, and Permian intervals. The results of this study have important implications for future exploration in Bolivia and Peru.

  19. Appalachian Power (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On June 24, 2015 the Virginia State Corporation Commission approved various rate-payer funding energy efficiency programs for residential Appalachian Power customers in Virginia. Appalachian Power...

  20. Appalachian Power Co (Virginia) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Co Place: Virginia Phone Number: 1-800-956-4237 Website: www.appalachianpower.com Twitter: @AppalachianPowe Facebook: https:www.facebook.comAppalachianPower Outage...

  1. 2-D computer modeling of oil generation and migration in a Transect of the Eastern Venezuela Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallango, O. ); Parnaud, F. )

    1993-02-01

    The aim of the study was a two-dimensional computer simulation of the basin evolution based on available geological, geophysical, geochemical, geothermal, and hydrodynamic data with the main purpose of determining the hydrocarbon generation and migration history. The modeling was done in two geological sections (platform and pre-thrusting) located along the Chacopata-Uverito Transect in the Eastern Venezuelan Basin. In the platform section an hypothetic source rock equivalent to the Gyayuta Group was considered in order to simulate the migration of hydrocarbons. The thermal history reconstruction of hypothetic source rock confirms that this source rock does not reach the oil window before the middle Miocene and that the maturity in this sector is due to the sedimentation of the Freites, La Pica, and Mesa-Las Piedras formations. The oil expulsion and migration from this hypothetic source rock began after middle Miocene time. The expulsion of the hydrocarbons took place mainly along the Oligocene-Miocene reservoir and do not reach at the present time zones located beyond of the Oritupano field, which imply that the oil accumulated in south part of the basin was generated by a source rock located to the north, in the actual deformation zone. Since 17 m.y. ago water migration pattern from north to south was observed in this section. In the pre-thrusting section the hydrocarbon expulsion started during the early Tertiary and took place mainly toward the lower Cretaceous (El Cantil and Barranquim formations). At the end of the passive margin the main migration occur across the Merecure reservoir, through which the hydrocarbon migrated forward to the Onado sector before the thrusting.

  2. Paleomagnetic isochrons, unsteadiness, and uniformity of sedimentation in Miocene intermontane basin sediments at Salla, eastern Andean cordillera, Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McRae, L.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Fine-scaled stratigraphic data are combined with chronologic information provided by paleomagnetic stratigraphy to document and analyze chronostratigraphic variability of the Salla Beds, a sequence of distal floodplain and lacustrine intermontane basin sediments within the eastern Andean cordillera of Bolivia. Unsteadiness in sediment accumulation is identified using a conceptual model of episodic accumulation in which simulated accumulation histories are constructed using estimated rates for various fluvial facies and taking into account gaps in deposition and possible effects of erosion. Variability in the Salla Beds is compared to that in sequence of Miocene fluvial sediments in northern Pakistan to evaluate controls on spatial and temporal stratigraphic variability. Sedimentation in the Salla sequence was generally steady over short time scales, but over longer intervals infrequent carbonates, associated with unusually long hiatuses, served to reduce the net sediment accumulation rate. In the Chinji sequence of Pakistan, unsteady accumulation evolved into a pattern of steadier sediment accumulation as recurring cycles of unsteadiness were superimposed on the overall sequence. The controls on sediment accumulation over time in these two sequences may be similarly related to the presence and extent of atypical and infrequent events of deposition, non-deposition, or erosion that exert a significant effect on net sediment accumulation. The discrepancy of short-term episodic and long-term net stratigraphic accumulation rates in both these sequences suggests that the decrease in net sediment accumulation rate with increasing time reflects the superimposed effects of different levels of local geomorphic and extrabasinal controls.

  3. Petroleum system of the sourth-eastern portion of the Maracaibo basin: Ceuta-North Andean Flank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcano, F.; Boesi, T.; Pirela, B.; Alcala, L.; Violino, R.

    1996-08-01

    The South Eastern portion of the Maracaibo basin encompasses a giant field (Ceuta) that carries ultimate recoverable oil reserves of more than 2.5 billion barrels and areas with little or no drilling. Oil in the area has been found in Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments and, in seeps along the North Andean Flank, where oil-source rock correlation based on biomarker fingerprints relates the existing crude to the Cretaceous La Luna source rock. A main tectonic constituent of the area is represented by the Merida arch, controlling the sedimentation until the end of the Cretaceous passive margin. Also, the Middle Eocone rifting and its associated structures have determined important thickness variations of deltaic eocene prograding sediments. A significant sequence boundary is associated to compression, uplifting, erosion or non deposition from the late Eocene to the early Miocene. A gradual tilting towards the southeast developed as a consequence of the Andean foredeep in the southern area. Heat flow field is found to be different from one area to another, as given by estimations taking into account well temperature measurements, rock maturity and the calculation of thermal conductivities of the rock formations as a function of their lithologies, porosities and temperature. Kinetic modelling of the hydrocarbon generation indicates a complex history starting in the northeastern area during the Eocene with the generation of oil and still ongoing nowadays in the north Andean Flank with the generation of gas.

  4. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest A.

    2003-02-06

    The project objectives are improving access to information for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the region, making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format, increasing the amount of information available on domestic sedimentary basins through a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, and enhancing the understanding of the petroleum systems operating in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  5. Appalachian Advanced Energy Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Appalachian Advanced Energy Association Address: 4 E. Hunter St. Place: Logan, Ohio Zip: 43138 Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services Phone Number:...

  6. Comparison of high-pressure CO2 sorption isotherms on Eastern and Western US coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanov, V; Hur, T -B; Fazio, J; Howard, B

    2013-10-01

    Accurate estimation of carbon dioxide (CO2) sorption capacity of coal is important for planning the CO2 sequestration efforts. In this work, we investigated sorption and swelling behavior of several Eastern and Western US coal samples from the Central Appalachian Basin and from San Juan Basin. The CO2 sorption isotherms have been completed at 55°C for as received and dried samples. The role of mineral components in coal, the coal swelling, the effects of temperature and moisture, and the error propagation have been analyzed. Changes in void volume due to dewatering and other factors such as temporary caging of carbon dioxide molecules in coal matrix were identified among the main factors affecting accuracy of the carbon dioxide sorption isotherms. The (helium) void volume in the sample cells was measured before and after the sorption isotherm experiments and was used to build the volume-corrected data plots.

  7. Appalachian Advanced Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 E Hunter Street Place: Logan, Ohio Zip: 43138 Website: www.ohioaaea.orgAAEAHome.html References: Appalachian Advanced Energy1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  8. Catagenesis of organic matter of oil source rocks in Upper Paleozoic coal formation of the Bohai Gulf basin (eastern China)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, R.X.; Li, Y.Z.; Gao, Y.W.

    2007-05-15

    The Bohai Gulf basin is the largest petroliferous basin in China. Its Carboniferous-Permian deposits are thick (on the average, ca. 600 m) and occur as deeply as 5000 m. Coal and carbonaceous shale of the Carboniferous Taiyuan Formation formed in inshore plain swamps. Their main hydrocarbon-generating macerals are fluorescent vitrinite, exinite, alginite, etc. Coal and carbonaceous shale of the Permian Shanxi Formation were deposited in delta-alluvial plain. Their main hydrocarbon-generating macerals are vitrinite, exinite, etc. The carbonaceous rocks of these formations are characterized by a high thermal maturity, with the vitrinite reflectance R{sub 0} > 2.0%. The Bohai Gulf basin has been poorly explored so far, but it is highly promising for natural gas.

  9. Precambrian basement geology of the Permian basin region of west Texas and Eastern New Mexico: A geophysical perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, D.C.; Keller, G.R.

    1996-03-01

    Because most of the Permian basin region of west Texas and southern New Mexico is covered by Phanerozoic rocks, other means must be found to examine the Precambrian upper crustal geology of the region. We have combined geologic information on the Precambrian from outcrops and wells with geophysical information from gravity and magnetic surveys in an integrated analysis of the history and structure of basement rocks in the region. Geophysical anomalies can be related to six Precambrian events: formation of the Early Proterozoic outer tectonic belt, igneous activity in the southern Granite-Rhyolite province, an episode of pre-Grenville extension, the Grenville orogeny, rifting to form the Delaware aulacogen, and Eocambrian rifting to form the early Paleozoic continental margin. Two geophysical features were studied in detail: the Abilene gravity minimum and the Central Basin platform gravity high. The Abilene gravity minimum is shown to extend from the Delaware basin across north-central Texas and is interpreted to be caused by a granitic batholith similar in size to the Sierra Nevada batholith in California and Nevada. This batholith appears to be related to formation of the southern Granite- Rhyolite province, possibly as a continental margin arc batholith. Because of this interpretation, we have located the Grenville tectonic front southward from its commonly quoted position, closer to the Llano uplift. Middle Proterozoic mafic intrusions are found to core the Central Basin platform and the Roosevelt uplift. These intrusions formed at about 1.1 Ga and are related in time to both the Mid-Continent rift system and the Grenville orogeny in Texas. Precambrian basement structures and changes in lithology have influenced the structure and stratigraphy in the overlying Permian basin, and thus have potential exploration significance.

  10. Eastern Pine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eastern Pine 1 EASTERN PINE 1 Ryerson University by True North Design Eastern Pine 2 Mark ... Eastern Pine 18 ROOF PLAN Eastern Pine 19 NORTH + SOUTH ELEVATION Eastern Pine 20 EXTERIOR ...

  11. San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior Paradox - San Juan NW (2) Uinta- Piceance Paradox - San Juan SE (2) Florida Peninsula Appalachian- NY (1) Appalachian OH-PA (2) Appalachian Eastern PA (3) Appalachian Southern OH (4) Appalachian Eastern WV (5) Appalachian WV-VA (6) Appalachian TN-KY (7) Piceance Greater Green River Eastern OR-WA Ventura Williston Williston NE (2) Williston NW (1) Williston South (3) Eastern Great Basin Ventura West, Central, East Eastern OR-WA Eastern

  12. Oil and gas production in the Amu Dar`ya Basin of Western Uzbekistan and Eastern Turkmenistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagers, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    The resource base, development history, current output, and future outlook for oil and gas production in Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan are examined by a Western specialist with particular emphasis on the most important gas-oil province in the region, the Amu Dar`ya basin. Oil and gas have been produced in both newly independent countries for over a century, but production from the Amu Dar`ya province proper dates from the post-World War II period. Since that time, however, fields in the basin have provided the basis for a substantial natural gas industry (Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan consistently have trailed only Russia among the former Soviet republics in gas output during the last three decades). Despite high levels of current production, ample oil and gas potential (Turkmenistan, for example, ranks among the top five or six countries in the world in terms of gas reserves) contributes to the region`s prominence as an attractive area for Western investors. The paper reviews the history and status of several international tenders for the development of both gas and oil in the two republics. Sections on recent gas production trends and future outlook reveal considerable differences in consumption patterns and export potential in the region. Uzbekistan consumes most of the gas it produces, whereas Turkmenistan, with larger reserves and a smaller population, exported well over 85% of its output over recent years and appears poised to become a major exporter. A concluding section examines the conditions that will affect these countries` presence on world oil and gas markets over the longer term: reserves, domestic consumption, transportation bottlenecks, the likelihood of foreign investment, and future oil and gas demand. 33 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. AEP Appalachian Power- Non-Residential Prescriptive Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Appalachian Power Commercial and Industrial Standard Program helps non-residential customers implement standard energy efficiency projects through financial incentives to offset project costs....

  14. Solar Decathlon: Appalachian State Wins People's Choice Award...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lee, right, members of Appalachian States Solar Decathlon team. | Credit: Stefano PalteraU.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon On Friday, Sept. 30, 2011, U.S. ...

  15. INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rober Jacobi

    2006-05-31

    During this reporting period, Fortuna retrieved the first oriented horizontal core from the Trenton/Black River in the northern Appalachian Basin. The core came from central New York State, the ''hottest'' play in the Appalachian Basin. A complete well log suite was also collected in the horizontal hole, including an FMI log. After reassembling the core sections, and orienting the core, we analyzed the whole core before it was cut for full-diameter core analyses (e.g., permeability) and before the core was split, in order that we did not miss any features that may be lost during cutting. We recognized and mapped along the core 43 stylolites, 99 veins and several large partially filled vugs. Kinematic indicators suggest multiple phases of strike-slip motion. Master-abutting relationships at intersections (primarily determined from which feature ''cuts'' which other feature) show three stages of stylolite growth: sub horizontal, nearly vertical, and steeply dipping. These development stages reflect vertical loading, tectonic horizontal loading, and finally oblique loading. Hydrothermal dolomite veins cut and are cut by all three stages of the stylolites. A set of horizontal veins indicates vertical unloading. Analyses of the core will continue, as well as the well logs.

  16. Alleghanian development of the Goat Rock fault zone, southernmost Appalachians: Temporal compatibility with the master decollement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steltenpohl, M.G. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States)); Goldberg, S.A. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States)); Hanley, T.B. (Columbus College, GA (United States)); Kunk, M.J. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    The Goat Rock and associated Bartletts Ferry fault zones, which mark the eastern margin of the Pine Mountain Grenville basement massif, are controversial due to the suggestion that they are rare exposed segments of the late Paleozoic southern Appalachian master decollement. The controversy in part stems from reported middle Paleozoic (Acadian) radiometric dates postulated as the time of movement along these fault zones. Ultramylonite samples from the type area at Goat Rock Dam yield a 287 [plus minus] 15 Ma Rb-Sr isochron interpreted as the time of Sr isotopic rehomgenization during mylonitization. This date is corroborated by Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar mineral ages on hornblende (297-288 Ma) and muscovite (285-278 Ma) from neomineralized and dynamically recrystallized rocks within and straddling the fault zone. These Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian dates indicate the time of right-slip movement (Alleghenian) along the Goat Rock fault zone, which is compatible with the timing suggested by COCORP for thrusting along the southern Appalachian master decollement.

  17. AEP Appalachian Power- Non-Residential Custom Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Appalachian Power Custom C&I program offers custom incentives for some of the more common energy efficiency measures. Program incentives are available under the Custom C&I program to ...

  18. Appalachian Power (Electric)- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appalachian Power provides financial incentives to its non-residential customers to promote energy efficiency in their facilities. The incentive is designed as a custom program which provides $0.05...

  19. Microsoft Word - APPALACHIAN_STATE_VolumeI-Submissionv2.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 A. Team Qualifications 8 B. Design Goals and Project Context 20 C. Envelope Durability Analysis 27 D. Indoor Air Quality Evaluation 28 E. Space Conditioning Design and Analysis 37 F. Energy Analysis 42 G. Financial Analysis 46 H. Domestic Hot Water, Lighting, and Appliances Analysis 47 I. Construction Documentation 55 J. Industry Partners 1 APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY WHO WE ARE Appalachian State University's team is composed of undergraduate and graduate students from

  20. Parana basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalan, P.V.; Wolff, S.; Conceicao, J.C.J.; Vieira, I.S.; Astolfi, M.A.; Appi, V.T.; Zanotto, O.; Neto, E.V.S.; Cerqueira, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    The Parana basin is a large intracratonic basin in South America, developed entirely on continental crust and filled with sedimentary and volcanic rocks ranging in age from Silurian to Cretaceous. It occupies the southern portion of Brazil (1,100,000 km/sup 2/ or 425,000 mi/sup 2/) and the eastern half of Paraguay (100,000 km/sup 2/ or 39,000 mi/sup 2/); its extension into Argentina and Uruguay is known as the Chaco-Parana basin. Five major depositional sequences (Silurian, Devonian, Permo-Carboniferous, Triassic, Juro-Cretaceous) constitute the stratigraphic framework of the basin. The first four are predominantly siliciclastic in nature, and the fifth contains the most voluminous basaltic lava flows of the planet. Maximum thicknesses are in the order of 6000 m (19,646 ft). The sequences are separated by basin wide unconformities related in the Paleozoic to Andean orogenic events and in the Mesozoic to the continental breakup and sea floor spreading between South America and Africa. The structural framework of the Parana basin consists of a remarkable pattern of criss-crossing linear features (faults, fault zones, arches) clustered into three major groups (N45/sup 0/-65/sup 0/W, N50/sup 0/-70/sup 0/E, E-W). The northwest- and northeast-trending faults are long-lived tectonic elements inherited from the Precambrian basement whose recurrent activity throughout the Phanerozoic strongly influenced sedimentation, facies distribution, and development of structures in the basin. Thermomechanical analyses indicate three main phases of subsidence (Silurian-Devonian, late Carboniferous-Permian, Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous) and low geothermal gradients until the beginning of the Late Jurassic Permian oil-prone source rocks attained maturation due to extra heat originated from Juro-Cretaceous igneous intrusions. The third phase of subsidence also coincided with strong tectonic reactivation and creation of a third structural trend (east-west).

  1. File:EIA-Appalach3-eastPA-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Description Appalachian Basin, Eastern Pennsylvania By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  2. Solar Decathlon Team Using Appalachian Mountain History to Model Home of the Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    See how Appalachian State University used traditional mountain life architecture to design their 2011 Solar Decathlon home.

  3. Southern Appalachian assessment. Summary report, Report 1 of 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    This final report for the Southern Appalachian Man and the Biosphere Program is comprised of two documents: (1) a brief summary of programs and projects, and (2) a more extensive summary report included as an attachment. The purpose of the program is to promote a sustainable balance between the conservation of biological diversity, compatible economic uses, and cultural values across the Southern Appalachians. Program and project areas addressing regional issues include environmental monitoring and assessment, sustainable development/sustainable technologies, conservation biology, ecosystem management, environmental education and training, cultural and historical resources, and public information and education. The attached summary report is one of five that documents the results of the Southern Appalachian Assessment; it includes atmospheric, social/cultural/economic, terrestrial, and aquatic reports.

  4. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Final Report and Topical Reports 5-8 on Smackover Petroleum system and Underdevelopment Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest A.; Puckett, T. Markham; Parcell, William C.; Llinas, Juan Carlos; Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Townsend, Roger N.

    2002-03-05

    The Smackover Formation, a major hydrocarbon-producing horizon in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin (MISB), conformably overlies the Norphlet Formation and is conformably overlain by the Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. The Norphlet-Smackover contact can be either gradational or abrupt. The thickness and lithofacies distribution of the Smackover Formation were controlled by the configuration of incipient paleotopography. The Smackover Formation has been subdivided into three informal members, referred to as the lower, middle and upper members.

  5. Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Hedin, Robert S.; Weaver, Theodore J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-04-01

    Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

  6. 2016 Race to Zero Competition: Appalachian State University Team Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appalachian State University Team (re)Connect RESILIENT HOUSE Project Summary Resilient House was born through a union of the ASU 2016 Advanced Building Science graduate course and the senior design studio to create the newest edition to a local builder's Net-Zero-Energy line. Deltec Homes, a prefabricated home builder r headquartered out of Asheville, NC, recently launched the Renew Collection of net-zero homes. A single family residence that is not only sustainable and zero-energy ready, but

  7. Bermuda and Appalachian-Labrador rises: Common non-hotspot processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Other than the Corner Rise-New England seamounts and associated White Mountains, most postbreakup intraplate igneous activity and topographic uplift in the western North Atlantic and eastern North America do not readily conform to simple hotspot models. For examples, the Bermuda Rise trends normal to its predicted hotspot trace. On continental crust, Cretaceous-Eocene igneous activity is scattered along a northeast-trending belt {approximately}500-1,000 km west of and paralleling the continent-ocean boundary. Corresponding activity in the western Atlantic generated seamounts preferentially clustered in a belt {approximately}1,000 km east of the boundary. The Eocene volcanism on Bermuda is paired with coeval magmatism of the Shenandoah igneous province, and both magmatic belts are associated with northeast-trending topographic bulges - the Appalachian-Labrador Rise to the west and the Bermuda Rise (Eocene ) to the east. The above observations suggest the existence of paired asthenosphere upwelling, paralleling and controlled by the deep thermal contrast across the northeast-trending continental margin. Such convection geometry, apparently fixed to the North American plate rather than to hotspots, is consistent with recent convection models by B. Hager. The additional importance of plate-kinematic reorganizations (causing midplate stress enhancement) is suggested by episodic igneous activity ca. 90-100 Ma and 40-45 Ma.

  8. Appalachian Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Natural Reservoir Analysis in Low-Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis for the Appalachian Basin (GPFA-AB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teresa E. Jordan

    2015-10-22

    The files included in this submission contain all data pertinent to the methods and results of this task’s output, which is a cohesive multi-state map of all known potential geothermal reservoirs in our region, ranked by their potential favorability. Favorability is quantified using a new metric, Reservoir Productivity Index, as explained in the Reservoirs Methodology Memo (included in zip file). Shapefile and images of the Reservoir Productivity and Reservoir Uncertainty are included as well.

  9. Permian basin gas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haeberle, F.R.

    1995-06-01

    Of the 242 major gas fields in the Permian basin, 67 are on the Central Basin Platform, 59 are in the Delaware basin, 44 are in the Midland basin, 28 are in the Val Verde basin, 24 are on the Eastern Shelf, 12 are in the Horshoe Atoll and eight are on the Northwest Shelf. Eleven fields have produced over one trillion cubic feet of gas, 61 have produced between 100 billion and one trillion cubic feet of gas and 170 have produced less than 100 billion cubic feet. Highlights of the study show 11% of the gas comes from reservoirs with temperatures over 300 degrees F. and 11% comes from depths between 19,000 and 20,000 feet. Twenty percent of the gas comes from reservoirs with pressures between 1000 and 2000 psi, 22% comes from reservoirs with 20-24% water saturation and 24% comes from reservoirs between 125 and 150 feet thick. Fifty-three reservoirs in the Ellenburger formation have produced 30% of the gas, 33% comes from 88 reservoirs in the Delaware basin and 33% comes from reservoirs with porosities of less than five percent. Forty percent is solution gas and 46% comes from combination traps. Over 50% of the production comes from reservoirs with five millidarcys or less permeability, and 60% of the gas comes from reservoirs in which dolomite is the dominant lithology. Over 50% of the gas production comes from fields discovered before 1957 although 50% of the producing fields were not discovered until 1958.

  10. Challenge for Mesozoic hydrocarbon exploration in the Eastern Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdullah, S.; Rukmiati, M.G.; Sitompul, N.

    1996-12-31

    The eastern part of Indonesia covers approximately 3 million square kilometers, 35 percent being landmass and 65 percent covered by ocean. Only three of 38 sedimentary basins are producing hydrocarbon (Salawati, Bintuni, and Seram Basins). Oil and gas have discovered in the Lariang, Bone, Timor, Banggai, Sula and Biak Basins, however the discoveries have not developed yet. Hydrocarbon systems in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea give the major contributions to the geological idea of Pre-Tertiary section in the less explored area in the Eastern Indonesia. The Triassic-Middle Jurassic marine carbonaceous shale sequences are the main hydrocarbon source rock in the Irian Jaya and surrounding area (Buton, gula and Seram basins). The main Mesozoic reservoir are the Kembelangan Formation in the Bintuni Basin of Irian Jaya and Bobong Formation in the North Sula Region. Exploration play types in the Eastern Indonesia can be divided into five types: 1 - Peri Cratonic, 2 - Marginal Rift Graben, 3 - Thrust Fold Belt Island Arc, 4 - Early Collision and 5 -Microcontinental Block - Advanced Collision. Recent discoveries through Mesozoic section in Eastern Indonesia are: Roabiba-1 (1990) in Bintuni Basin-Irian Jaya (Kambelangan Formation); Loku- 1 (1990) in North Sula region (Pre-Tertiary sediments); Oseil-1 (1993/94) in Bula-Seram Basin (Jurassic Manusela Formation); Elang-1 (1 994); Kakaktua-1 (1994) and Laminaria-1 in North Bonaparte Basin (Upper Jurassic Sands).

  11. Challenge for Mesozoic hydrocarbon exploration in the Eastern Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdullah, S.; Rukmiati, M.G.; Sitompul, N. )

    1996-01-01

    The eastern part of Indonesia covers approximately 3 million square kilometers, 35 percent being landmass and 65 percent covered by ocean. Only three of 38 sedimentary basins are producing hydrocarbon (Salawati, Bintuni, and Seram Basins). Oil and gas have discovered in the Lariang, Bone, Timor, Banggai, Sula and Biak Basins, however the discoveries have not developed yet. Hydrocarbon systems in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea give the major contributions to the geological idea of Pre-Tertiary section in the less explored area in the Eastern Indonesia. The Triassic-Middle Jurassic marine carbonaceous shale sequences are the main hydrocarbon source rock in the Irian Jaya and surrounding area (Buton, gula and Seram basins). The main Mesozoic reservoir are the Kembelangan Formation in the Bintuni Basin of Irian Jaya and Bobong Formation in the North Sula Region. Exploration play types in the Eastern Indonesia can be divided into five types: 1 - Peri Cratonic, 2 - Marginal Rift Graben, 3 - Thrust Fold Belt Island Arc, 4 - Early Collision and 5 -Microcontinental Block - Advanced Collision. Recent discoveries through Mesozoic section in Eastern Indonesia are: Roabiba-1 (1990) in Bintuni Basin-Irian Jaya (Kambelangan Formation); Loku- 1 (1990) in North Sula region (Pre-Tertiary sediments); Oseil-1 (1993/94) in Bula-Seram Basin (Jurassic Manusela Formation); Elang-1 (1 994); Kakaktua-1 (1994) and Laminaria-1 in North Bonaparte Basin (Upper Jurassic Sands).

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - APPALACHIAN_STATE_Presentation 4 27 2015...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY 19 April 2015 2 The App State Team Jake Smith Chris Schoonover A.J. Smith Josh Brooks Chase Ambler Brad Painting Harrison Sytz Chelsea Davis Kaitlyn ...

  13. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 Gas Reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF >100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern PA (Panel 3 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  14. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 Liquids Reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern PA (Panel 3 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  15. Gilmer Co. Rock

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern WV (Panel 5 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  16. Gilmer Co. Rock

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern WV (Panel 5 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  17. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF >100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern PA (Panel 3 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  18. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    No 2001 Liquids Reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern PA (Panel 3 of 7) Oil and Gas ...

  19. Forest stand development patterns in the southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copenheaver, C.A.; Matthews, J.M.; Showalter, J.M.; Auch, W.E.

    2006-07-01

    Composition of southern Appalachian forests are influenced by disturbance and topography. This study examined six stands in southwestern Virginia. Within each stand, a 0.3-ha plot was established, and all trees and saplings were measured and aged. Burned stands had lower densities of saplings and small trees, but appeared to have greater Quercus regeneration. Ice damage from the 1994 ice storm was most evident in Pinus strobus saplings. A stand on old coal-mine slag appeared to be experiencing a slower rate of succession than other sites. A variety of stand development patterns were observed, but one common pattern was that oak-hickory overstories had different species in their understory, which may indicate future changes in species composition.

  20. Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-8-2015 Appalachian Basin Isotopes_7...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... study with historical and modern regional geologic maps could also underline the importance that surface and subsurface geology plays when interpolating in the geological sciences. ...

  1. INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Jacobi; John Fountain

    2004-07-08

    The primary goal was to enter Phase 2 by analyzing geophysical logs and sidewall cores from a verification well drilled into the Trenton/Black River section along lineaments. However, the well has not yet been drilled; Phase 2 has therefore not been accomplished. Secondary goals in Phase I were also completed for the last reporting period. Thus, no new data were collected for this reporting period, and only soil gas surveys were reanalyzed and re-displayed in the region of the Trenton/Black River wells. The soil gas profiles in the region of the Trenton/Black River wells show that individual large-magnitude soil gas anomalies (spikes) are rarely wider than 50 m. Even clusters of soil gas spikes are only on the order of 200-250 m wide. Thus, widely-spaced sampling will not necessarily represent the actual number and location of soil gas seeps. The narrowness of the anomalies suggests that the seeps result from single fractures or narrow fracture intensification domains (FIDs). Many of the lineaments from EarthSat (1997) and straight stream segments coincide (or are very close to) soil gas spikes, but we collected many more soil gas spikes than lineaments. Among some of the soil gas box surveys, a possible ENE-trend of spikes can be discerned. This ENE-striking trend is, however, about 10{sup o} away from a nearby Earthsat (1997) trend. These data continue to demonstrate that integration of aeromagnetic and remote sensing lineaments, surface structure, soil gas and seismic allows us to extrapolate Trenton-Black River trends away from confirmatory seismic lines.

  2. INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Jacobi; John Fountain

    2001-06-30

    In the structure task, the authors completed reducing the data they had collected from a N-S transect on the east side of Seneca Lake. They have calculated the fracture frequency for all the fracture sets at each site, and constructed modified rose diagrams that summarize the fracture attributes at each site. These data indicate a N-striking fault near the southeastern shore of Seneca Lake, and also indicate NE and ENE-trending FIDs and faults north of Valois. The orientation and existence of the ENE-striking FIDs and faults are thought to be guided by faults in the Precambrian basement. These basement faults apparently were sufficiently reactivated to cause faulting in the Paleozoic section. Other faults are thrust ramps above the Silurian salt section that were controlled by a far-field Alleghanian stress field. Structure contour maps and isopach maps have been revised based on additional well log analyses. Except for the Glodes Corners Field, the well spacing generally is insufficient to definitely identify faults. However, relatively sharp elevational changes east of Keuka Lake support the contention that faults occur along the east side of Keuka Lake. Outcrop stratigraphy along the east side of Seneca Lake indicates that faults and gentle folds can be inferred from some exposures along Seneca Lake, but the lensing nature of the individual sandstones can preclude long-distance definite correlations and structure identification. Soil gas data collected during the 2000 field season was reduced and displayed in the previous semiannual report. The seismic data that Quest licensed has been reprocessed. Several grabens observed in the Trenton reflector are consistent with surface structure, soil gas, and aeromagnetic anomalies. In this report they display an interpreted seismic line that crosses the Glodes Corners and Muck Farms fields. The final report from the subcontractor concerning the completed aeromagnetic survey is included. Prominent magnetic anomalies suggest that faults in the Precambrian basement are located beneath regions where grabens in the Trenton are located. The trend and location of these faults based on aeromagnetics agrees with the location based on FIDs. These data indicate that integration of aeromagnetic and topographic lineaments, surface structure, soil gas with seismic and well logs allows them to extrapolate Trenton-Black River trends away from confirmatory seismic lines.

  3. INNOVATAIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Jacobi; John Fountain

    2002-06-30

    In the structure task, for this reporting period, the authors also edited and revised the map that displays the modified rose diagrams for the data they collected and reduced along the east side of Seneca Lake. They also revised the N-S transect that displays the frequency of ENE-striking fractures, and constructed a new N-S transect that shows the frequency of E-striking fractures. This transect compliments the earlier transect they constructed for fracture frequency of ENE-striking fractures. Significantly, the fracture frequency transect for E-W fractures shows a spike in fracture frequency in the region of the E-striking Firtree anticline that is observed on seismic reflection sections. The ENE fracture set does not exhibit an unusually high fracture frequency in this area. In contrast, the fracture frequency of the ENE-striking set is anomalously high in the region of the Trenton/Black River grabens. They have nearly completed reducing the data they collected from a NNW-SSE transect on the west side of Cayuga Lake and they have constructed modified rose diagrams for most sites. Structure contour maps and isopach maps have been revised based on additional well log analyses. Except for the Glodes Corners Field, the well spacing generally remains insufficient to identify faults or their precise locations. However, relatively sharp elevational changes east of Keuka Lake support the contention that faults occur along the east side of Keuka Lake. Similarly, a single well east of Seneca Lake shows that the Trenton there is low compared to distant wells, based on an assumed regional slope. This same area is where one of the Trenton grabens occurs. They have completed the interpretation of the reprocessed data that Quest licensed and had reprocessed. Several grabens observed in the Trenton and Black River reflectors are consistent with surface structure, soil gas, and aeromagnetic anomalies. In this report they display all four interpreted seismic lines. These data indicate that integration of aeromagnetic and topographic lineaments, surface structure, soil gas with seismic and well logs allows them to extrapolate Trenton-Black River trends away from confirmatory seismic lines.

  4. INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Jacobi; John Fountain

    2002-01-30

    In the structure task, we completed reducing the data we had collected from a N-S transect on the east of Seneca Lake. We have calculated the fracture frequency for all the fracture sets at each site, and constructed modified rose diagrams that summarize the fracture attributes at each site. These data indicate a N-striking fault near the southeastern shore of Seneca Lake, and also indicate NE and ENE-trending FIDs and faults north of Valois. The orientation and existence of the ENE-striking FIDs and faults are thought to be guided by faults in the Precambrian basement; these basement faults apparently were sufficiently reactivated to cause faulting in the Paleozoic section. Other faults are thrust ramps above the Silurian salt section that were controlled by a far-field Alleghanian stress field. Structure contour maps and isopach maps have been revised based on additional well log analyses. Except for the Glodes Corners Field, the well spacing generally is insufficient to definitively identify faults. However, relatively sharp elevational changes east of Keuka Lake support the contention that faults occur along the east side of Keuka Lake. Outcrop stratigraphy along the east side of Seneca Lake indicates that faults and gentle folds can be inferred from the some exposures along Seneca Lake, but the lensing nature of the individual sandstones can preclude long-distance definitive correlations and structure identification. Soil gas data collected during the 2000 field season was reduced and displayed in the previous semiannual report. The seismic data that Quest licensed has been reprocessed. Several grabens observed in the Trenton reflector are consistent with surface structure, soil gas, and aeromagnetic anomalies. In this report we display an interpreted seismic line that crosses the Glodes Corners and Muck Farm fields. The final report from the subcontractor concerning the completed aeromagnetic survey is included. Prominent magnetic anomalies suggest that faults in the Precambrian basement are located beneath regions where grabens in the Trenton are located. The trend and location of these faults based on aeromagnetics agrees with the location based on FIDs. These data indicate that integration of aeromagnetic and topographic lineaments, surface structure, soil gas with seismic and well logs allows us to extrapolate Trenton-Black River trends away from confirmatory seismic lines.

  5. INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Jacobi; John Fountain

    2001-02-28

    In the structure task, we completed a N-S transect east of Seneca Lake that indicated a N-striking fault near the southeastern shore of Seneca Lake, and also indicated NE and ENE-trending FIDs and faults north of Valois. The orientation and existence of the NE-striking FIDs and faults are thought to be controlled by basement faults, rather than thrust ramps above the Salina salt controlled only by a far-field Alleghanian stress field. Structure contour maps based on well log analyses have been constructed but not interpreted. Soil gas data displayed a number of ethane-charged soil gas ''spikes'' on a N-S transect from Ovid south to near Valois. The soil gas team found a larger number of spikes in the northern half of the survey, suggesting more open fractures (and faults) in the northern half of the survey. Seismic data has been purchased and reprocessed. Several grabens observed in the Trenton reflector are consistent with surface structure, soil gas, and aeromagnetic anomalies. The aeromagnetic survey is completed and the data is processed. Prominent magnetic anomalies suggest that faults in the Precambrian basement are located beneath regions where grabens in the Trenton are located.

  6. Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katie Stokes

    2012-05-03

    In December 2009, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE), through a partnership with the Appalachian Regional Commission, EKPC, Kentucky's Department for Energy Development and Independence, SACE, Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation, and TVA, and through a contract with the Department of Energy, established the Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group (TVEKWWG). TVEKWWG consists of a strong network of people and organizations. Working together, they provide information to various organizations and stakeholders regarding the responsible development of wind power in the state. Members include representatives from utility interests, state and federal agencies, economic development organizations, non-government organizations, local decision makers, educational institutions, and wind industry representatives. The working group is facilitated by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. TVEKWWG supports the Department of Energy by helping educate and inform key stakeholders about wind energy in the state of Tennessee.

  7. Appalachian appropriate technology project exhibits at 1982 World's Fair. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    The work of the Appalachian Appropriate Technology Project on seven turn-of-the-century houses for the 1982 World's Fair in Knoxville is reviewed. A work session called a Design-In to decide how to use the houses is described and correspondence related to the project is included. (MHR)

  8. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Aggett

    2003-12-15

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

  9. Assessment of Factors Influencing Effective CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity and Injectivity in Eastern Gas Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godec, Michael

    2013-06-30

    Building upon advances in technology, production of natural gas from organic-rich shales is rapidly developing as a major hydrocarbon supply option in North America and around the world. The same technology advances that have facilitated this revolution - dense well spacing, horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing - may help to facilitate enhanced gas recovery (EGR) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in these formations. The potential storage of CO {sub 2} in shales is attracting increasing interest, especially in Appalachian Basin states that have extensive shale deposits, but limited CO{sub 2} storage capacity in conventional reservoirs. The goal of this cooperative research project was to build upon previous and on-going work to assess key factors that could influence effective EGR, CO{sub 2} storage capacity, and injectivity in selected Eastern gas shales, including the Devonian Marcellus Shale, the Devonian Ohio Shale, the Ordovician Utica and Point Pleasant shale and equivalent formations, and the late Devonian-age Antrim Shale. The project had the following objectives: (1) Analyze and synthesize geologic information and reservoir data through collaboration with selected State geological surveys, universities, and oil and gas operators; (2) improve reservoir models to perform reservoir simulations to better understand the shale characteristics that impact EGR, storage capacity and CO{sub 2} injectivity in the targeted shales; (3) Analyze results of a targeted, highly monitored, small-scale CO{sub 2} injection test and incorporate into ongoing characterization and simulation work; (4) Test and model a smart particle early warning concept that can potentially be used to inject water with uniquely labeled particles before the start of CO{sub 2} injection; (5) Identify and evaluate potential constraints to economic CO{sub 2} storage in gas shales, and propose development approaches that overcome these constraints; and (6) Complete new basin

  10. Basin-centered gas evaluated in Dnieper-Donets basin, Donbas foldbelt, Ukraine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, B.E.; Ulmishek, G.F.; Clayton, J.L.; Kabyshev, B.P.; Pashova, N.T.; Krivosheya, V.A.

    1998-11-23

    An evaluation of thermal maturity, pore pressures, source rocks, reservoir quality, present-day temperatures, and fluid recovery data indicates the presence of a large basin-centered gas accumulation in the Dnieper-Donets basin (DDB) and Donbas foldbelt (DF) of eastern Ukraine. This unconventional accumulation covers an area of at least 35,000 sq km and extends vertically through as much as 7,000 m of Carboniferous rocks. The gas accumulation is similar, in many respects, to some North American accumulations such as Elmworth in the Alberta basin of western Canada, the Greater Green River basin of southwestern Wyoming, and the Anadarko basin of Oklahoma. Even though rigorous assessments of the recoverable gas have not been conducted in the region, a comparison of the dimensions of the accumulation to similar accumulations in the US indicates gas resources in excess of 100 tcf in place. The paper describes the geology, the reservoirs, source rocks, seals, and recommendations for further study.

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - APPALACHIAN_STATE_Presentation 4 27 2015 lower quality pics.pptx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mountain Laurel Home Race-to-Zero Design Competition Lena Burkett, Chase Ambler, and Brad Painting Jeff Tiller, Faculty Advisor Department of Sustainable Technology and the Built Environment APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY 19 April 2015 2 The App State Team Jake Smith Chris Schoonover A.J. Smith Josh Brooks Chase Ambler Brad Painting Harrison Sytz Chelsea Davis Kaitlyn Morgan Pedro Franco Josh Smith Jeff Tiller Brenton Faircloth David Leonard Marshall Dressler Lena Burkett Kenny High Chase Edge

  12. New basins invigorate U.S. gas shales play

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, S.R.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hill, D.G.

    1996-01-22

    While actually the first and oldest of unconventional gas plays, gas shales have lagged the other main unconventional gas resources--tight gas and coalbed methane--in production and proved reserves. Recently, however, with active drilling of the Antrim shales in Michigan and promising results from the Barnett shales of North Texas, this gas play is growing in importance. While once thought of as only an Appalachian basin Devonian-age Ohio shales play and the exclusive domain of regional independents, development of gas shales has expanded to new basins and has began to attract larger E and P firms. Companies such as Amoco, Chevron, and Shell in the Michigan basin and Mitchell Energy and Development and Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in the Fort Worth basin are aggressively pursuing this gas resource. This report, the third of a four part series assessing unconventional gas development in the US, examines the state of the gas shales industry following the 1992 expiration of the Sec. 29 Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit. The main questions being addressed are first, to what extent are these gas sources viable without the tax credit, and second, what advances in understanding of these reservoirs and what progress in extraction technologies have changed the outlook for this large but complex gas resource?

  13. Giner | Energy Systems Integration | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern WV (Panel 5 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern WV (Panel 5 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By

  14. MASK basin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MASK basin - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  15. Playa basin development, southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, T.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Holliday, V.T. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1992-01-01

    More than 20,000 playa basins have formed on fine-grained eolian sediments of the Quaternary Blackwater Draw and Tertiary Ogallala Formations on the High Plains of TX and NM. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed for the development of playa basins: (1) subsidence due to dissolution of underlying Permian bedded salt, (2) dissolution of soil carbonate and piping of clastic sediment into the subsurface, (3) animal activity, and (4) deflation. Evidence of eolian processes includes lee dunes and straightened shorelines on the eastern and southern margins of many playas. Lee dunes, which occur on the eastern side of ca 15% of playa basins and contain sediment deflated from adjacent playas, are cresentic to oval in plain view and typically account for 15--40% of the volume of the playa basin. Quaternary fossil biotas and buried calcic soils indicate that grasslands and semi-arid to aid climatic conditions prevailed as these basins formed. Evidence of fluviolacustrine processes in playa basins includes centripetal drainage leading to fan deltas at playa margins and preserved deltaic and lacustrine sediments. Playa basins expanded as fluvial processes eroded basin slopes and carried sediment to the basin floor where, during periods of minimal vegetation cover, loose sediment was removed by deflation. Other processes that played secondary roles in the development of certain playa basins include subsidence induced by dissolution of deeply buried Permian salt, dissolution of soil carbonate and piping, and animal activity. Two small lake basins in Gray County, TX, occur above strata affected by dissolution-induced subsidence. Dissolution of soil carbonate was observed in exposures and cores of strata underlying playa basins. Cattle, and in the past vast numbers of migrating buffalo, destroy soil crusts in dry playas, making these sediments more susceptible to deflation, and carry sediment out of flooded playas on their hooves.

  16. The Pleistocene biogeography of eastern North America: A nonmigration scenario for deciduous forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loehle, C.; Iltis, H.

    1998-12-31

    The current reconstruction of the vegetation of eastern North America at the last glacial maximum postulates a very wide zone of tundra and boreal forest south of the ice. This reconstruction requires that the deciduous forest retreated far to the south. The authors believe that this reconstruction is seriously in error. Geologic evidence for glacial activity or tundra is absent from the southern Appalachians. Positive evidence for boreal forest is based on pollen identifications for Picea, Betula, and Pinus, when in reality southern members of these genera have pollen that cannot be distinguished from that of northern members. Further, pollen of typical southern species such as oaks and hickories occurs throughout profiles that past authors had labeled boreal. Pollen evidence for a far southern deciduous forest refuge is lacking. Data on endemics are particularly challenging for the scenario in which deciduous forest migrated to the south and back. The southern Appalachian region is rife with endemics that are often extreme-habitat specialists unable to migrate. The previously glaciated zone is almost completely lacking in endemics. Outlier populations, range boundaries, and absence of certain hybrids all argue against a large boreal zone. The new reconstruction postulates a cold zone no more than 75--100 miles wide south of the ice in the East.

  17. Appalachian Rivers II Conference: Technology for Monitoring, Assessing, and Restoring Streams, Rivers, and Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None available

    1999-07-29

    On July 28-29, 1999, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and the WMAC Foundation co-sponsored the Appalachian Rivers II Conference in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting brought together over 100 manufacturers, researchers, academicians, government agency representatives, watershed stewards, and administrators to examine technologies related to watershed assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Sessions included presentations and panel discussions concerning watershed analysis and modeling, decision-making considerations, and emerging technologies. The final session examined remediation and mitigation technologies to expedite the preservation of watershed ecosystems.

  18. Southern Colombia's Putumayo basin deserves renewed attention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, A.J. ); Portilla, O. )

    1994-05-23

    The Putumayo basin lies in southern Colombia between the Eastern Cordillera of the Andes and the Guyana-Brazilian shield. It covers about 50,000 sq km between 0--3[degree]N. Lat. and 74--77[degree]W. Long. and extends southward into Ecuador and Peru as the productive Oriente basin. About 3,500 sq km of acreage in the basin is being offered for licensing in the first licensing round by competitive tender. A recent review of the available data from this area by Intera and Ecopetrol suggests that low risk prospects and leads remain to be tested. The paper describes the tectonic setting, stratigraphy, structure, hydrocarbon geology, reservoirs, and trap types.

  19. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  20. Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J.

    2009-11-15

    This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

  1. Risk Factor Analysis in Low-Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis for the Appalachian Basin (GPFA-AB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teresa E. Jordan

    2015-09-30

    This submission contains information used to compute the risk factors for the GPFA-AB project (DE-EE0006726). The risk factors are natural reservoir quality, thermal resource quality, potential for induced seismicity, and utilization. The methods used to combine the risk factors included taking the product, sum, and minimum of the four risk factors. The files are divided into images, rasters, shapefiles, and supporting information. The image files show what the raster and shapefiles should look like. The raster files contain the input risk factors, calculation of the scaled risk factors, and calculation of the combined risk factors. The shapefiles include definition of the fairways, definition of the US Census Places, the center of the raster cells, and locations of industries. Supporting information contains details of the calculations or processing used in generating the files. An image of the raster will have the same name except *.png as the file ending instead of *.tif. Images with “fairways” or “industries” added to the name are composed of a raster with the relevant shapefile added. The file About_GPFA-AB_Phase1RiskAnalysisTask5DataUpload.pdf contains information the citation, special use considerations, authorship, etc. More details on each file are given in the spreadsheet “list_of_contents.csv” in the folder “SupportingInfo”. Code used to calculate values is available at https://github.com/calvinwhealton/geothermal_pfa under the folder “combining_metrics”.

  2. Fragmentation of habitats used by neotropical migratory birds in Southern Appalachians and the neotropics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, S.M.; Dale, V.H.; Offerman, H.L. |

    1993-12-31

    Recent declines in North American breeding populations have sparked great concern over the effects of habitat fragmentation. Neotropical migrant birds use and are influenced by two biomes during a single life span. Yet assessment of the relative importance of changes in tropical wintering areas versus temperate breeding areas is complicated by regional variation in rates and extent of habitat change. Landscape-level measurements of forest fragmentation derived from remotely-sensed data provide a means to compare the patterns of habitat modification on the wintering and breeding grounds of migrant birds. This study quantifies patterns of forest fragmentation in the Southern Appalachian Mountains and tropical Amazon and relates these patterns to the resource needs of neotropical migrant birds. Study sites were selected from remotely-sensed images to represent a range of forest fragmentation (highly fragmented landscape to continuous forest).

  3. Eastern European risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honey, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Here the authors assess Eastern European risk management practices through the evaluation of the nuclear power plants in the region. This evaluation is limited to the Soviet-designed and -built VVER-440 pressurized water reactors (PWRs) that are currently operating in Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Russia, and the Ukraine and until recently operated at Greifswald in the former East Germany. This evaluation is based on the basic design of the plants, a safety evaluation of the Greifswald facility by representatives from the Federal Republic of Germany and personal visits by the author to Greifswald and Loviisa.

  4. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Aaron

    2014-10-21

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study process, scenarios, tools, goals, and a teaser of preliminary results.

  5. Eastern Power Customer Services Manager

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Eastern Power Services organization (PSE) of Northwest Requirements Marketing, Power Services, and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Northwest (NW) Requirements...

  6. Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly I: Root of the main crustal decollement for the Appalachian-Ouachita orogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.J. (Total Minatome Corporation, Houston, TX (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly extends for at least 4000 km from south-central Texas to offshore Newfoundland as one of the longest continuous tectonic features in North America and a major crustal element of the entire North Atlantic-Gulf Coast region. Analysis of 28 profiles spaced at 100km intervals and four computed models demonstrate that the anomaly may be explained by a thick zone of mafic and ultramafic rocks averaging 13-15 km in depth. The trend of the anomaly closely follows the trend of main Appalachian features: in the Gulf Coast of Louisiana, the anomaly is as far south of the Ouachita front as it is east of the western limit of deformation through the central Appalachians. Because the anomaly continues across well-known continental crust in northern Florida and onshore Texas, it cannot plausibly be ascribed to an edge effect at the boundary of oceanic with continental crustal compositions. The northwest-verging, deep-crustal events discovered in COCORP data from the Ouachitas and Appalachians suggest an analogy with the main suture of the Himalayan orogen in the Tibetan Plateau. In this paper the anomaly is identified with the late Paleozoic Alleghenian megasuture, in which the northwest-verging crustal-detachment surfaces ultimately root.

  7. Coal quality trends and distribution of Title III trace elements in Eastern Kentucky coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eble, C.F.; Hower, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    The quality characteristics of eastern Kentucky coal beds vary both spatially and stratigraphically. Average total sulfur contents are lowest, and calorific values highest, in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Reserve Districts. Average coal thickness is greatest in these two districts as well. Conversely, the thinnest coal with the highest total sulfur content, and lowest calorific value, on average, occurs in the Princess and Southwest Reserve Districts. Several Title III trace elements, notably arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, and nickel, mirror this distribution (lower average concentrations in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Districts, higher average concentrations in the Princess and Southwest Districts), probably because these elements are primarily associated with sulfide minerals in coal. Ash yields and total sulfur contents are observed to increase in a stratigraphically older to younger direction. Several Title III elements, notably cadmium, chromium, lead, and selenium follow this trend, with average concentrations being higher in younger coals. Average chlorine concentration shows a reciprocal distribution, being more abundant in older coals. Some elements, such as arsenic, manganese, mercury, cobalt, and, to a lesser extent, phosphorus show concentration spikes in coal beds directly above, or below, major marine zones. With a few exceptions, average Title III trace element concentrations for eastern Kentucky coals are comparable with element distributions in other Appalachian coal-producing states.

  8. Pennsylvanian-Permian Antler foreland of eastern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, W.S. . Dept. of Geosciences); Trexler, J.H. Jr. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Models for the Antler foreland generally assume that it was a Mississippian feature dominated by a single, large basin (the Antler foredeep). Recent work indicates that the foreland, as a tectonic region, is longer-lived, and is better described as a series of sub-basins separated by intervening structural highs. Long sections reveal space/time changes in depositional facies and sedimentologic features indicative or suggestive of this repeated tectonism. For example, in the southern Pancake Range, the fluvial-deltaic clastic units of the Late Mississippian-earliest Pennsylvanian Neward Canyon sequence are overlain by 540 m of cyclical Pennsylvanian Ely Limestone. The flooding event that marks the boundary between these units occurs during a long-term 2nd order eustatic low stand and thus reflects the regional tectonism that created the Ely basin'. Further, tectonically driven subsidence seems necessary to sustain deposition of the thick of marginal marine-open shelf Ely Limestone at this locality. Regionally, Early Permian deposition within the Dry Mountain trough was dominated by a complex series of local tectonic controls. Within eastern Nevada, tectonic influences on the stratigraphy continued through at least the Middle Permian, and this tectonism perhaps merged with that of the classic Late Permian-Early Triassic Sonoma orogeny. One consequence of this protracted tectonism was development or reactivation of zones of structural weakness that fragmented the foreland into a series of basins and highs and that accommodated differing geometries and styles of deformation.

  9. Modern methods wrest more gas, oil from Ukraine`s historic producing basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Texas, L.C.; Machuzhak, M.I.; Chepily, P.M.

    1998-11-23

    The major oil and gas producing area of the Republic of Ukraine is the Dnieper-Donets basin located in the eastern part of the country. The paper describes the geology of the basin, the oil and gas accumulations, field activities, and potential for further production. The paper then discusses the Precarpathian region located in western Ukraine, its oil and gas accumulation, potential, specifications of the fluids, and future outlook.

  10. Mortality in Appalachian coal mining regions: the value of statistical life lost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendryx, M.; Ahern, M.M.

    2009-07-15

    We examined elevated mortality rates in Appalachian coal mining areas for 1979-2005, and estimated the corresponding value of statistical life (VSL) lost relative to the economic benefits of the coal mining industry. We compared age-adjusted mortality rates and socioeconomic conditions across four county groups: Appalachia with high levels of coal mining, Appalachia with lower mining levels, Appalachia without coal mining, and other counties in the nation. We converted mortality estimates to VSL estimates and compared the results with the economic contribution of coal mining. We also conducted a discount analysis to estimate current benefits relative to future mortality costs. The heaviest coal mining areas of Appalachia had the poorest socioeconomic conditions. Before adjusting for covariates, the number of excess annual age-adjusted deaths in coal mining areas ranged from 3,975 to 10,923, depending on years studied and comparison group. Corresponding VSL estimates ranged from $18.563 billion to $84.544 billion, with a point estimate of $50.010 billion, greater than the $8.088 billion economic contribution of coal mining. After adjusting for covariates, the number of excess annual deaths in mining areas ranged from 1,736 to 2,889, and VSL costs continued to exceed the benefits of mining. Discounting VSL costs into the future resulted in excess costs relative to benefits in seven of eight conditions, with a point estimate of $41.846 billion.

  11. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Final report, October 10, 1994--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, R.H.; Parekh, B.K.; Meloy, T.

    1997-12-31

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium is a group comprised of representatives from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, that was formed to pursue research in areas related to the treatment and processing of fine coal. Each member performed research in their respective areas of expertise and the report contained herein encompasses the results that were obtained for the three major tasks that the Consortium undertook from October, 1994 through March, 1997. In the first task, conducted by Virginia Polytechnic Institute, novel methods (both mechanical and chemical) for dewatering fine coal were examined. In the second task, the Center for Applied Energy Research examined novel approaches for destabilization of [highly stable] flotation froths. And in the third task, West Virginia University developed physical and mathematical models for fine coal spirals. The Final Report is written in three distinctive chapters, each reflecting the individual member`s task report. Recommendations for further research in those areas investigated, as well as new lines of pursuit, are suggested.

  12. Spoil handling and reclamation costs at a contour surface mine in steep slope Appalachian topography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zipper, C.E.; Hall, A.T.; Daniels, W.L.

    1985-12-09

    Accurate overburden handling cost estimation methods are essential to effective pre-mining planning for post-mining landforms and land uses. With the aim of developing such methods, the authors have been monitoring costs at a contour surface mine in Wise County, Virginia since January 1, 1984. Early in the monitoring period, the land was being returned to its Approximate Original Contour (AOC) in a manner common to the Appalachian region since implementation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA). More recently, mining has been conducted under an experimental variance from the AOC provisions of SMCRA which allowed a near-level bench to be constructed across the upper surface of two mined points and an intervening filled hollow. All mining operations are being recorded by location. The cost of spoil movement is calculated for each block of coal mined between January 1, 1984, and August 1, 1985. Per cubic yard spoil handling and reclamation costs are compared by mining block. The average cost of spoil handling was $1.90 per bank cubic yard; however, these costs varied widely between blocks. The reasons for those variations included the landscape positions of the mining blocks and spoil handling practices. The average reclamation cost was $0.08 per bank cubic yard of spoil placed in the near level bench on the mined point to $0.20 for spoil placed in the hollow fill. 2 references, 4 figures.

  13. Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin ... Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles Source: Energy ...

  14. Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tight oil plays: production and proved reserves, 2013-14 million barrels 2013 2013 Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD 270 4,844 387 5,972 1,128 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 351 4,177 497 5,172 995 Permian Bone Spring, Wolfcamp NM, TX 21 335 53 722 387 Denver-Julesberg Niobrara CO, KS, NE, WY 2 17 42 512 495 Appalachian Marcellus* PA, WV 7 89 13 232 143 Fort Worth Barnett TX 9 58 9 47 -11 Sub-total 660 9,520 1,001 12,657 3,137 Other tight oil 41 523 56 708 185 U.S.

  15. Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Interconnection States’ Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states and other stakeholders in the Eastern Interconnection identify geographic areas suitable for the development of clean energy resources (natural gas, sequestration or utilitization locations for C02 from coal, nuclear, and renewable) which can potentially provide significant amounts of new electric power generation.

  16. Topic A Awardee: Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative Topic A Awardee: Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) was initiated by a coalition of regional Planning Authorities. These Planning Authorities are entities listed on the NERC compliance registry as Planning Authorities and represent the entire Eastern Interconnection. The EIPC was founded to be a broad-based,

  17. New interpretations of Pennsylvanian and Permian stratigraphy, San Juan basin and southeast Paradox basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, A.C. Jr.; Condon, S.M. )

    1989-09-01

    The Honaker Trail, Paradox, and Pinkerton Trail Formations of the Hermosa Group are recognized throughout most of the San Juan basin. The Paradox Formation is extended southeastward beyond the limits of its evaporite facies into the basin, where it consists of thick shelf-carbonate rocks and thin black shale, sandstone, and siltstone interbeds. Where the Hermosa Group thins onto the marginal uplifts, the Paradox loses the thick carbonate rocks and becomes indistinguishable from the rest of the Hermosa. The Hermosa is correlated in the subsurface with the Madera and Sandia Formations to the southeast. The transitional Rico Formation, between the marine Hermosa Group and the continental Cutler Formation, is identified throughout the subsurface of the San Juan basin and is correlated with similar deposits out-cropping along the northern and eastern margins. The Cutler Formation includes the Organ Rock, Cedar Mesa, and Halgaito members throughout most of the basin. In the vicinity of the Hogback monocline, the Cedar Mesa Sandstone Member undergoes a gradational eastward facies change from cyclic evaporite and sandstone to thick-bedded sandstone. The subsurface Cedar Mesa is correlated in part with similar rocks in the outcropping Abo and Supai Formations.

  18. Undrilled New Ireland basin in Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Exon, N.F.; Marlow, M.S.

    1986-07-01

    The arcuate, west-northwest-trending, mostly offshore New Ireland basin is 900 km long and about 160 km wide, and extends northeastward from Manus Island, New Hanover, and New Ireland. The basin formed in a forearc between a southerly Eocene to early Miocene volcanic arc, and a northerly outer-arc high bounding the Manus Trench. Its southern margin drops down to the back-arc Manus basin, which commenced spreading in the Pilocene. North of Manus Island, the New Ireland basin contains areas of deformed strata that have apparently been accreted to the Manus arc by south-dipping thrust faults. In places these strata are overlain by shallowly buried lava flows, which may represent attempted spreading. The sedimentary sequence in the eastern part of the basin is interpreted to contain thick Oligocene to early Miocene volcaniclastic sediments, overlain by 1000-2000 m of Miocene shelf carbonates, overlain by 2000 m of overburden. The presumed shelf carbonates could contain both source and reservoir rocks. The Lee line 401 revealed a flat, high-amplitude reflector or bright spot in an anticlinal core 1700 m beneath the seabed in water 2500 m deep off New Ireland, suggesting that hydrocarbons have been generated in New Ireland basin.

  19. Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaveBasin&oldid596392" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference...

  20. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  1. Grenville foreland thrust belt hidden beneath the eastern US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Grenville foreland thrust structures are observed beneath the eastern US midcontinent on COCORP (Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling) line OH-1 and a short seismic line in southwest Ohio. These structures represent the first evidence for a significant Grenville foreland thrust belt preserved in eastern North America. On the COCORP lines, the structures include a thrust ramp anticline and an associated asymmetric syncline. The Grenville front tectonic zone appears to truncate these foreland structures, indicating a later, second phase expressed as a deeply penetrating, out-of-sequence thrust zone associated with the main uplift of the Grenville province on the east. A short, shallow seismic line in southwestern Ohio reveals an east-dipping sequence of prominently layered rocks that may lie above a footwall ramp to a deeper Grenville thrust fault. A drill hole into the less reflective top of this dipping sequence encountered unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks like those increasingly reported from other drill holes in southwestern Ohio and adjacent states. Although possibly part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan ) rift, these clastic sedimentary rocks may instead preserve evidence of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin in eastern North America. Alternatively these Precambrian sedimentary rocks together with an underlying, but yet undrilled, strongly layered sequence may correlate with similarly layered rocks observed on COCORP and industrial seismic lines within the Middle Proterozoic granite-rhyolite province to the west in Indiana and Illinois and indicate that unmetamorphosed sedimentary material is an important constituent of the granite-rhyolite province. 25 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Sustainable Energy Fund of Central Eastern Pennsylvania | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Central Eastern Pennsylvania Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Sustainable Energy Fund of Central Eastern Pennsylvania Name: Sustainable Energy Fund of Central Eastern...

  3. Topic B Awardee: Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council Topic B Awardee: Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council The Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council (EISPC) is ...

  4. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Dyer Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Sheila Beck Plains and Eastern Clean Line ...

  5. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Change.org Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Leftwich Plains and Eastern Clean Line ...

  6. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Fallon Sanford Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Leftwich Plains and Eastern Clean ...

  7. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2006-09-30

    Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earths atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values. Improved

  8. Reserves in western basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, R.H.; Cotton, B.W.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the reserves potential of tight gas reservoirs in three Rocky Mountain basins: the Greater Green River (GGRB), Uinta and Piceance basins. The basins contain vast gas resources that have been estimated in the thousands of Tcf hosted in low permeability clastic reservoirs. This study documents the productive characteristics of these tight reservoirs, requantifies gas in place resources, and characterizes the reserves potential of each basin. The purpose of this work is to promote understanding of the resource and to encourage its exploitation by private industry. At this point in time, the GGRB work has been completed and a final report published. Work is well underway in the Uinta and Piceance basins which are being handled concurrently, with reports on these basins being scheduled for the middle of this year. Since the GGRB portion of the project has been completed, this presentation win focus upon that basin. A key conclusion of this study was the subdivision of the resource, based upon economic and technological considerations, into groupings that have distinct properties with regard to potential for future producibility, economics and risk profile.

  9. Eastern Woodlands Training and Regional Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Native Learning Center and the Seminole Tribe of Florida is pleased to announce the 2016 Eastern Woodlands ONAP Training and Regional Meeting designed to address tribal housing needs identified throughout the Eastern Woodlands region.

  10. the Central Basin Platform,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... As a result. it is believed that most of the structures formed within the context of an ... order to facilitate flexure modeling of the CBP and adjacent Delaware and Midland basins. ...

  11. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  12. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  13. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, A.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study process, scenarios, tools, and goals.

  14. ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2002-12-01

    The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that

  15. The 1-AB block fields-a giant oil accumulation in Eastern Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvis, H.A.; Lay, V. ); Orosco, C. )

    1993-02-01

    The 1-Ab block fields are located in the northeastern part of Peru. Geologically, the area is the sub-Andean Maranon Basin, a continuation of the Napo Basin from eastern Ecuador. During the 20 years that Occidental has operated Block 1-AB, approximately 11,500 km of seismic data has been recorded and 34 exploratory wells have been drilled, resulting in the discovery of 18 fields, or 53% exploration success. The 1-AB oil accumulation discovered in 1972 is a group of medium to small asymmetric anticlines distributed along six northwest-southeast trending structural alignments: North Capahuari-South Capahuari-Tambo, Carmen-North San Jaacinto and Bartra. This concentration of productive structures in a relative small area is unique within the Maranon basin. The controlling factors include exceptional pre-Cretaceous uplifting and the presence of very good to excellent Cretaceous sandstones reservoirs. The two major Cretaceous producing zones, the Chonta and Vivian sandstones, have been defined within the Coniacian and Campanian ages respectively. The Chonta sands are related to shelfal deposition across Block 1-AB, represented by strand plain and barrier island sediments. The Vivian formation is a massive fluvial sandstone covering all of the Maranon basin and ranging in thickness between 40 and 200 feet. After oil was accumulated, fresh water influxes into the reservoirs of the northern and eastern fields caused oil biodegradation and salinity variation of the reservoir waters, depending upon the intensity of biodegradation. Oil remigration also has been documented for the South Huayari field.

  16. Sediment infill within rift basins: Facies distribution and effects of deformation: Examples from the Kenya and Tanganyika Rifts, East Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiercelin, J.J.; Lezzar, K.E. ); Richert, J.P. )

    1994-07-01

    Oil is known from lacustrine basins of the east African rift. The geology of such basins is complex and different depending on location in the eastern and western branches. The western branch has little volcanism, leading to long-lived basins, such as Lake Tanganyika, whereas a large quantity of volcanics results in the eastern branch characterized by ephemeral basins, as the Baringo-Bogoria basin in Kenya. The Baringo-Bogoria basin is a north-south half graben formed in the middle Pleistocene and presently occupied by the hypersaline Lake Bogoria and the freshwater Lake Baringo. Lake Bogoria is fed by hot springs and ephemeral streams controlled by grid faults bounding the basin to the west. The sedimentary fill is formed by cycles of organic oozes having a good petroleum potential and evaporites. On the other hand, and as a consequence of the grid faults, Lake Baringo is fed by permanent streams bringing into the basin large quantities of terrigenous sediments. Lake Tanganyika is a meromictic lake 1470 m deep and 700 km long, of middle Miocene age. It is subdivided into seven asymmetric half grabens separated by transverse ridges. The sedimentary fill is thick and formed by organic oozes having a very good petroleum potential. In contrast to Bogoria, the lateral distribution of organic matter is characterized by considerable heterogeneity due to the existence of structural blocks or to redepositional processes.

  17. The Pennsylvanian and Permian Oquirrh-Wood River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geslin, J.K. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Strata of the Middle Pennsylvanian to Lower Permian Oquirrh-Wood River Basin (OWRB) lie unconformably above the Antler orogenic belt and flysch trough/starved basin in NW Utah, NE Nevada, and SC Idaho. Strata of the basin, now separated geographically by the Neogene Snake River Plain, show similar subsidence histories, identical mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sedimentary fill, and identical chert pebble conglomerate beds supplied by one or more DesMoinesian uplifts containing Lower Paleozoic strata. This conglomerate, of the lower Sun Valley Group, Snaky Canyon Formation, and parts of the Oquirrh Formation, was reworked progressively southward, to at least the Idaho-Utah border. It is present in strata as young as Virgilian. Virgilian to Leonardian rocks are ubiquitously fine-grained mixed carbonate-siliciclastic turbidites. These rocks contain cratonal, well-sorbed subarkosic and quartzose sand and silt in part derived from the Canadian Shield. This siliciclastic fraction is intimately mixed with arenaceous micritized skeletal material and peloids derived from an eastern carbonate platform represented by the Snaky Canyon Formation in east-central Idaho, an eastern facies of the Eagle Creek Member, Wood River Formation in the Boulder Mountains, and the Oquirrh Formation in the Deep Creek Mountains. Subsidence of the OWRB may have been caused by two phases (DesMoinesian and Wolfcampian to Leonardian) of crustal loading by continental margin tectonism to the west. An elevated rim separated the OWRB from coeval volcanogenic basins to the west. Earlier, Antler-age structures may have been reactivated. A new pulse of tectonism occurred in Leonardian to Guadalupian time as in most places carbonatic and phosphatic strata of the Leonardian to Guadalupian Park City and Phosphoria Formation overlie OWRB strata, with different geographic arrangement of basinal, slope, and shelf depocenters.

  18. Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin...

  19. Tectonic boundaries of the eastern Gulf Coast of North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, C. Jr.; Phillips, R.R. )

    1993-09-01

    Two Precambrian extensional fault episodes, recorded in mapping from central Arkansas across Mississippi, central Alabama, southern Georgia, and into the Atlantic Ocean affected later Pennsylvanian and Triassic tectonics. This interpretation is from magnetic anomaly data and is supported by seismic, gravity, core, and well-log data. The fault system was first suspected from an anomalous magnetic high, representing a feature that affected tectonism during the Ouachita and the Alleghenian orogenies of the eastern Gulf Coast and southeastern United States. The northernmost upthrown block is considered part of an ancient passive continental margin developed during the late Precambrian. The southern downthrown block is deformed by left-lateral transverse faults active during the Ouachita Orogeny. The Ouachita Orogeny may have deformed terrain farther east than the Black Worrior basin. These transverse fault blocks were buttressed by the footwall of the extensional fault system. These left-lateral faults extending from Florida and Georgia into Alabama, Mississippi, and southern Arkansas.

  20. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10`` to 20`` API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

  1. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

  2. Preliminary geology of eastern Umtanum Ridge, South-Central Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The basalt stratigraphy and geologic structures of eastern Umtanum Ridge have been mapped and studied in detail to help assess the feasibility of nuclear waste terminal storage on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Eastern Umtanum Ridge is an asymmetric east-west-trending anticline of Columbia River basalt that plunges 5 degrees eastward into the Pasco Basin. Geologic mapping and determination of natural remanent magnetic polarity and chemical composition reveal that flows of the Pomona and Umatilla Members (Saddle Mountains Basalt), Priest Rapids and Frenchman Springs Members (Wanapum Basalt), and Grande Ronde Basalt were erupted as fairly uniform sheets. The Wahluke and Huntzinger flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt) fill a paleovalley cut into Wanapum Basalt. No evidence was found to indicate Quaternary-age movement on any structures in the map area. The basalt strata on the south limb of the Umtanum anticline display relatively little tectonic deformation since Miocene-Pliocene time. Thus, the buried south flank of Umtanum Ridge may provide an excellent location for a nuclear waste repository beneath the Hanford Site.

  3. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527

  4. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527

  5. Inversion Breakup in Small Rocky Mountain and Alpine Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Pospichal, Bernhard; Eisenbach, Stefan; Weihs, P.; Clements, Craig B.; Steinacker, Reinhold; Mursch-Radlgruber, Erich; Dorninger, Manfred

    2004-08-01

    Comparisons are made between the post-sunrise breakup of temperature inversions in two similar closed basins in quite different climate settings, one in the eastern Alps and one in the Rocky Mountains. The small, high-altitude, limestone sinkholes have both experienced extreme temperature minima below -50C. On undisturbed clear nights, temperature inversions reach to 120 m heights in both sinkholes, but are much stronger in the drier Rocky Mountain basin (24K versus 13K). Inversion destruction takes place 2.6 to 3 hours after sunrise and is accomplished primarily by subsidence warming associated with the removal of air from the base of the inversion by the upslope flows that develop over the sidewalls. Differences in inversion strengths and post-sunrise heating rates are caused by differences in the surface energy budget, with drier soil and a higher sensible heat flux in the Rocky Mountain sinkhole.

  6. the Central Basin Platform,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Bolden, G.P., 1984, Wrench Faulting in Selected Areas of the Permian Basin, &: Moore, G. ... I I I I I 1 I I I I I I 1 I I I I Henry, C.A. and Price, J.G., 1985, Summary of ...

  7. Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) today announced that its diverse array of stakeholders has reached consensus on the final set of "resource expansion ...

  8. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    This one-page, two-sided fact sheet provides an overview of the Eastern Renewable Generation and Integration Study process.

  9. Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) is using the grant funds from the Department of Energy to complete the Energy Efficiency Improvements to seven EBCI facilities.

  10. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Washington University...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Installing electric vehicle charging stations in 2016 is one of many efforts that publically demonstrates Eastern's commitment toward sustainability and emissions reduction. Meet ...

  11. Porosity distribution in Wolfcamp strata, Palo Duro basin, Texas panhandle: implications for deep-basin ground-water flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conti, R.D.; Wirojanagud, P.

    1984-04-01

    Average-porosity distributions in the Wolfcamp deep-basin aquifer are critical to discernment of the geographic trends in effective-porosity in the Palo Duro basin. Precise data are used to improved resolution of porosity values for computer-simulated areal ground-water modeling. Assessing vertical distributions of lithology and porosity in each well studied involves analysis of crossplotted neutron- and density-porosity log responses. This method more accurately identifies lithology and porosity than does the commonly employed crossplotted neutron-porosity and sonic (interval travel time) responses. Log-derived average-porosity distributions yield information about effective pore volume (i.e., movable water) in the Wolfcamp aquifer and enhance the accuracy of estimated of travel times and velocities of brines in basinwide traverses. Mathematical analysis of average travel time and total effective pore volume yield estimates of the rates of annual discharge from the Wolfcamp aquifer in the Palo Duro basin. Based on average flush rates between 2.2 and 1.5 m.y., annual discharge rates from the Wolfcamp aquifer across the northern and eastern basin boundaries, are about 3.6 x 10/sup 5/ m/sup 3/ year/sup -1/ to 5.3 x 10/sup 5/m/sup 3/ year/sup -1/.

  12. Permian and Pennsylvanian tectonic events in eastern California in relation to major plate motions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, C.H.; Sedlock, R. ); Stone, P. )

    1993-04-01

    Northwest-trending basins cutting across older northeast-trending facies belts in eastern California opened by Middle Pennsylvanian time and continued to develop and expand into the Early Permian. Basin development was accompanied by east-vergent thrust-faulting in the Early Permian and was followed by development of northeast-trending folds and regional uplift in middle and Late Permian time. These events have been considered products of long-tern sinistral truncation of the western North American continental margin. Later, in the Late Permian, extensional faulting created small northeast-trending basins in which deposition of terrestrial and shallow-marine rocks occurred. The author consider all late Paleozoic tectonism in eastern California to have been driven by plate interactions along the western margin of North America and to be only indirectly related to the late Paleozoic collision between North America and Gondwana. They propose that the truncated part of North America was part of the Paleo-pacific plate. In Nevada the margin of this plate, along which the Havallah assemblage eventually was emplaced, was convergent, but in California the margin bent sharply and became transform. This fault continued as the Mojave-Sonora mega-shear into Mexico where the oceanic part of the Paleopacific plate was subducted under Gondwana, forming an extensive arc now represented by rocks in S. America.

  13. Structural evolution of the Permian-Triassic Cooper basin, Australia: Relation to hydrocarbon trap styles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apak, S.N.; Stuart, W.J.; Lemon, N.M.; Wood, G.

    1997-04-01

    The structural and depositional history of the Cooper basin in eastern central Australia has revealed that the basin is a mildly compressional structural depression controlled by northwestrending and northeast-trending pre-Permian basement features. Pronounced pre-Permian compressions are indicated by northeast-trending major structures, the Gidgealpa-Merrimelia-Innamincka and Murteree-Nappacoongee trends. Detailed chronostratigraphic facies analysis, with closely spaced palynological control, of the Patchawarra Formation revealed that two pronounced phases of uplift occurred during the Sakmarian. The major intrabasin highs were rejuvenated during these tectonic events, as documented by crestal unconformities (middle and upper Patchawarra unconformities). Evidence of each event is dominantly tectonic in character, with similar depositional patterns over these highs related to each event. These events are also recognizable in midflank areas and basin margins with contemporaneous deposition in deeper parts of the basin. Results from this research show potential for future hydrocarbon discoveries within structural, stratigraphic, and structural/stratigraphic traps in the Cooper basin. Various trap styles are closely associated with faults, unconformities, and lateral facies changes. Lowside fault closures, onlap plays, and unconformity traps are expected to be well developed along intrabasinal highs, basin margins, and preexisting structures. The primary reservoir targets would be deltaic sequences comprising shoreline sandstones, distributary and delta-mouth bar deposits that may be well developed in synclinal areas, and flanks of intrabasin highs in the Copper basin.

  14. Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool Now Available

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Interconnection States’ Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states and other stakeholders in the Eastern Interconnection identify geographic areas suitable for the development of clean energy resources which can potentially provide significant amounts of new electric power generation.

  15. Potiguar basin: geologic model and habitat of oil of a Brazilian equatorial basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falkenhein, F.U.; Barros, R.M.; Da Costa, I.G.; Cainelli, C.

    1984-04-01

    The Potiguar basin integrates the eastern part of the Brazilian equatorial Atlantic-type margin. The rifting stage of this basin occurred during the Neocomian and Aptian. The drifting stage and sea-floor spreading began in the Late Albian. The rifting stage clearly was intracratonic during the Neocomian and is recognized as a mosaic of half-grabens trending mostly northeast-southwest and filled with syntectonic lacustrine siliciclastics. The half-graben pattern exhibits rotation of beds into the major fault zone, and the preserved uplifted margins display either paleostructures of paleogeomorphic features with hydrocarbons. A regional pre-Aptian unconformity preceded the Aptian proto-oceanic rifting stage which was characterized by syntectonic fluvio-deltaic sediments. The Aptian tectonics were represented by reactivation of former lineaments superimposed by predominant east-west normal faulting. Structural highs during this stage are so far the most prolific oil accumulations. The most important source beds and reservoir rocks are both Neocomian and Aptian sediments. Geochemistry and hydrodynamics have shown that hydrocarbon migration was driven through fracture or fault zones in both Aptian or Albian plays. Lithofacies maps support this interpretation because pools occur whenever adjacent downthrown blocks present a high shale content.

  16. Flow of formation waters in the cretaceous-miocene succession of the Llanos basin, Colombia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villegas, M.E.; Ramon, J.C.; Bachu, S.; Underschultz, J.R.

    1994-12-01

    This study presents the hydrogeological characteristics and flow of formation waters in the post-Paleozoic succession of the Llanos basin, a mainly siliciclastic foreland sub-Andean sedimentary basin located in Columbia between the Cordillera Oriental and the Guyanan Precambrian shield. The porosity of the sandy formations is generally high, in the range of 16-20% on average, with a trend of decreasing values with depth. Permeabilities are also relatively high, in the 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 3} md range. THe salinity (total dissolved solids) of formation waters is generally low, in the 10,000-20,000 mg/L range, suggesting that at least some strata in the basin have been flushed by metoeoric water. The shaly units in the sedimentary succession are weak aquitards in the eastern and southern parts of the basin, but are strong in the central-western part. The pressure in the basin is close to or slightly subdepth, particularly in the central-western area. The flow of formation waters in the upper units is driven mainly by topography from highs in the southwest to lows in the northeast. Local systems from the foothills and from local topographic highs in the east feed into this flow system. The flow of formation waters in the lower units is driven by topography only in the southern, eastern, and northern parts of the basin. In the central-western part, the flow is downdip toward the thrust-fold belt, driven probably by pore-space rebound induced by erosional unloading, which also is the cause of underpressuring. Hydrocarbons generated in the Cretaceous organic-rich, shaly Gacheta Formation probably have migrated updip and to the north-northeast, driven by buoyancy and entrained by the topography-driven flow of formation waters in Cretaceous-Oligocene strata in the central-western part of the basin could have created conditions for hydrodynamic entrapment of hydrocarbons.

  17. PP-32 Eastern Maine Electric Cooperative Inc | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Eastern Maine Electric Cooperative Inc to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmissionf facilities at the U.S-Canada border. PDF icon PP-32 Eastern Maine Electric ...

  18. Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean ...

  19. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comment from Mr. Garrett Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Rutherford Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Campbell

  20. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Comment submitted on ...

  1. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comment from Downwind, LLC Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Sheila Beck Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Crystal Yarbrough

  2. Energy Outlook in Eastern Europe and Central Asia Region | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Asia, "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean,...

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Eastern...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Eastern North Atlantic Site (ENA), Graciosa Island, Azores Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Eastern North Atlantic Site (ENA), Graciosa Island, ...

  4. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 81 - April 28, 2015 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register ...

  5. Oil and gas potential of Tularosa basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, W.E.; Harder, V.M.

    1986-03-01

    Although the Tularosa basin of south-central New Mexico has not been extensively explored, there is a high probability of discovering commercial hydrocarbon reserves. Wells drilled along the eastern margin of the basin have been promising. Drill-stem tests of the Houston Oil and Minerals 1 Lewelling well, located near Three Rivers, indicate the possibility of significant gas reservoirs. The largest volume of gas tested was from the Desmoines (Strawn) section, where recovery was slightly more than 430 MCFGD. The same well yielded gas from the Atoka and Wolfcamp. In the Hodges 1 Houston well, located between Three Rivers and Alamogordo, a Missouri (Canyon) sandstone tested 16 mcf/day of 98% methane gas. Several other hydrocarbon shows have been recorded, mainly from upper Paleozoic rocks. Detailed cross sections and gravity data reveal the complex fault-block structure of the basin. A fault that is displaced approximately 6300 ft lies between the Houston 1 Lewelling and 2 Lewelling wells. A large fault block that is tilted to the east is defined by a cross section from the Texaco Federal (USA) F 1 and the Texaco Federal (USA) E 1 wells in the southern basin. Stratigraphic sections in the surrounding mountains substantiate the presence of source and reservoir beds. Structural and stratigraphic traps undoubtedly abound, but possible hydrodynamic flushing of reservoirs must be considered. The federal government has withdrawn this land from future exploration, primarily for the White Sands Missile Range, thus closing the inviting central and western areas of the basin for about four decades.

  6. Surface mining and reclamation effects on flood response of watersheds in the central Appalachian Plateau region - article no. W04407

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrari, J.R.; Lookingbill, T.R.; McCormick, B.; Townsend, P.A.; Eshleman, K.N.

    2009-04-15

    Surface mining of coal and subsequent reclamation represent the dominant land use change in the central Appalachian Plateau (CAP) region of the United States. Hydrologic impacts of surface mining have been studied at the plot scale, but effects at broader scales have not been explored adequately. Broad-scale classification of reclaimed sites is difficult because standing vegetation makes them nearly indistinguishable from alternate land uses. We used a land cover data set that accurately maps surface mines for a 187-km{sup 2} watershed within the CAP. These land cover data, as well as plot-level data from within the watershed, are used with HSPF (Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran) to estimate changes in flood response as a function of increased mining. Results show that the rate at which flood magnitude increases due to increased mining is linear, with greater rates observed for less frequent return intervals. These findings indicate that mine reclamation leaves the landscape in a condition more similar to urban areas rather than does simple deforestation, and call into question the effectiveness of reclamation in terms of returning mined areas to the hydrological state that existed before mining.

  7. Crosswell seismic imaging in the Permian Basin, West Texas, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langan, R.T.; Harris, J.M.; Jensen, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Crosswell seismic imaging technology has advanced rapidly over the last three years as the processing methods have become more robust, the cost of data acquisition has fallen, and the interwell distances of operation have increased. The Permian Basin of west Texas, USA is proving to be an ideal environment in which to develop this technology because of the relatively low seismic attenuation of the carbonate-dominated lithology, the moderate well spacings in the large number of mature fields, and the unusually high number of reflecting horizons. Current technology permits us to operate in carbonates at well spacings on the order of 2000 ft (650 m) and to image P- and S-wave reflecting horizons on a scale of 8 to 25 ft (2.4 to 7.6 m). Crosswell technology is not limited to carbonates, although the majority of recent applications have been in this environment. We are involved in three separate crosswell experiments in the Permian Basin, each with unique objectives. The first experiment involves a CO{sub 2} pilot project in a Grayburg Formation reservoir on the eastern edge of the Central Basin Platform. Here we are attempting to characterize the reservoir at a scale unobtainable from 3-D surface seismic data and to image CO{sub 2} fronts directly. The second experiment deals with a waterflood in a Middle Clearfork Formation reservoir on the Eastern Shelf, where we are trying to explain the erratic response of adjacent wells to water injection. In the third project we are trying to image the structure and stratigraphy of subtle {open_quotes}anomalies{close_quotes} in 3-D surface seismic images of the Wolfcamp Formation.

  8. Denver Basin Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin Map Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Denver Basin Map Abstract This webpage contains a map of the Denver Basin. Published Colorado...

  9. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-07-31

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Smackover petroleum system characterization and modeling. The necessary software applications are in the process of being acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  10. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modelling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-09-30

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Smackover petroleum system characterization and modeling. The necessary software applications have been acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  11. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-12-31

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Smackover petroleum system characterization and modeling. The necessary software applications have been acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  12. Eastern North Atlantic Site, Graciosa Island, Azores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSitesEastern North Atlantic ENA Related Links Facilities and Instruments ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site ENA Fact Sheet (PDF, 512KB) Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Eastern North Atlantic This view shows Graciosa Island, Azores, Eastern North Atlantic Facility. Graciosa Island: 39° 5' 29.68" N, 28° 1' 32.34" W Altitude: 30.48 meters The new ENA observations site will be situated near the previous AMF deployment. The

  13. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike‐slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east‐west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north‐ to northeast‐striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local‐scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  14. Wolfcampian and early Leonardian fore-shelf carbonate debris production, Permian basin, west Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becher, J.W.; Von Der Hoya, H.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Since 1980, a number of Wolfcampian and early Leonardian oil fields have been discovered in a previously unexplored carbonate environment of the Permian basin i.e. basinal fore-shelf debris. These fields range up to 25 MMBOE in size. The Permian basin formed during the Early Pennsylvanian through the earliest Leonardian. Carbonate buildups dominated shelf-edge deposition and a syntectonic wedge of shelf debris was shed into the basins during both high and low sea level stands. Combined eustatic and tectonic sea level fluctuations of over 300 ft have been documented. The geometry, texture, and seismic expression of the debris changes with depositional slope, which ranges from very steep fault-block edges on the Central Basin platform to gentle ramps on the eastern shelf. Productive, low-stand deposits derived from steep shelf edges, consist of turbidite grainstones; clean, very coarse, lithoclastic, debris flaws; and allochthonous slide blocks. These deposits were derived from point sources on the eroded shelf and have a single-lobe or multi-lobe fan geometry. Debris clasts commonly display subaerial lithification and leaching. Lowstand fans extend 4-8 mi into the basin. Productive, lowstand deposits derived from ramp settings have a submarine channel geometry and consist dominantly of grainstone and packstone. Porosity has been enhanced by late subsurface solution. Nonproductive, highstand deposits were derived from a line source and have an apron geometry. These deposits consist of thinly bedded shaly, bioclastic turbidites with no evidence of lithification before final transport.

  15. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frohne, K.H.; Boswell, R.

    1993-12-31

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  16. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great Basin Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Great Basin Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  17. Sediment Basin Flume | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sediment Basin Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sediment Basin Flume Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility...

  18. Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Enhancement Project: Annual Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    wild winter steelhead in the Fifteenmile Creek Basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The project is funded by through the Bonneville Power...

  19. Eastern Maine Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maine Electric Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Eastern Maine Electric Coop Place: Maine Phone Number: (207) 454-7555 Dial Ext. 0 Website: emec.com Facebook: https:...

  20. Eastern States Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Eastern States Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 2 -...

  1. Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 NEWS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 23, 2011 Contact: David Whiteley d.a.whiteley@att.net 314-753-6200 Eastern Interconnection Grid Planning Authorities to Study Set of Stakeholder-Identified Electric System Futures The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) today announced that its diverse array of stakeholders has reached consensus on the final set of "resource expansion futures" to be studied as part of the electric system transmission planning effort funded by

  2. Extent of water-rock interactions in Lower Permian Wolfcamp carbonates, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R.S.; Posey, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    A laterally-extensive permeable zone in upper Wolfcampian carbonate strata constitutes the first important transmissive unit below a thick evaporite sequence that is being considered for nuclear waste isolation. The extent of water-rock interaction was evaluated by comparing the chemical and isotopic composition of formation water and core collected at four DOE test wells. Wolfcamp mineralogy is dominantly calcite and dolomite with minor anhydrite at each of the four sites despite minor variations in depositional environment, diagenetic alteration, and abundance of clastic material. Isotopic compositions of calcite and dolomite and of anhydrite are within the ranges expected for Permian marine sediments altered by early diagenesis. Wolfcamp formation water compositions are more variable than host rock compositions, and are not completely controlled by local water-rock equilibria. Wolfcamp brines from two wells in the western part of the basin have depleted isotopic compositions relative to the two eastern wells and have not equilibrated with Wolfcamp carbonates, whereas the eastern fluids have. Strontium in the western samples is more radiogenic than that of the eastern samples, indicating a greater influence of clays or feldspars on the western fluids. Comparison of water and rock compositions suggests: (1) the western brines have interacted less with the carbonate host than the eastern brines due to shorter residence times or greater water: rock ratios, and (2) the minerals encountered along flow paths prior to entering the Wolfcamp are different for the western and eastern Wolfcamp brines.

  3. Depositional systems and hydrocarbon resource potential of the Pennsylvanian system, Palo Duro and Dalhart Basins, Testas Panhandle. Geological Circular 80-8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, S.P.

    1980-01-01

    Pennsylvanian clastic and carbonate strata were deposited in a variety of environments within the Palo Duro Basin. Maximum accumulation (totalling 750 m or 2400 ft) occurred along a northwest-southeast axis. Major facies include fan-delta sandstone and conglomerate, shelf and shelf-margin carbonate, deltaic sandstone and shale, and basinal shale and fine-grained sandstone. Erosion of Precambrian basement in the adjacent Amarillo and Sierra Grande Uplifts supplied arkosic sand (granite wash) to fan deltas along the northern margin of the basin. Distal fan-delta sandstones grade laterally and basinward into shallow-shelf limestone. Deep basinal shales were deposited only in a small area immediately north of the Matador Arch. Increased subsidence deepened and enlarged the basin throughout late Pennsylvanian time. Ultimately, the basin axis trended east-west with a narrow northwest extension. A carbonate shelf-margin complex having 60 to 120 m (200 to 400 ft) of depositional relief developed around the basin margin. The eastern shelf margin remained stationary, but the western shelf margin retreated landward throughout late Pennsylvanian time. Porous, dolomitized limestone occurs in a belt 16 to 32 km (10 to 20 mi) wide along the shelf margin. High-constructive elongate deltas prograded into the Palo Duro Basin from the east during late Pennsylvanian time. Prodelta mud and thin turbidite sands entered the basin through breaks in the eastern carbonate shelf margin. Potential hydrocarbon reservoirs re shelf-margin dolomite, fan-delta sandstone, and high-constructive delta sandstone. Basinal shales are fair to good hydrocarbon source rocks on the basis of total organic carbon content. Kerogen color and vitrinite reflectance data indicate that source beds may have reached the early stages of hydrocarbon maturation.

  4. Late Mesozoic crustal extension and rifting on the western edge of the Parana Basin, Paraguay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGraff, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Geophysical and geological evidence indicates that the western edge of the Parana basin in Paraguay was a site of NE-SW directed crustal extension during late Mesozoic time. Major zones of normal faulting in south-eastern Paraguay trend northwesterly on average, and mafic dikes of probable late Mesozoic age have similar orientations. At least two NW-trending zones of tectonic subsidence, each over 200 km long, are now recognized in eastern Paraguay. Most alkalic rocks of south-eastern Paraguay are concentrated along this rift, and occur as simple to composite stocks and ring complexes composed of rocks ranging from foid-syenite to essexite. NW-trending, lamprophyric to phonolitic dikes are associated with some alkalic complexes. The southern zone, located about 125 km southwest, is a composite tectonic basin about 60 km wide and nearly devoid of alkalic rocks. The timing of crustal extension and rifting in eastern Paraguay is largely based on isotopic ages of associated alkalic rocks, which cluster between 150 and 100 Ma (latest Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous). Geologic evidence for the age of faulting and subsidence is consistent with this age range; tectonic depressions were being filled in late Cretaceous to early Cenozoic time. The age range of alkalic rocks in Paraguay contain that of the Serra Geral basalts and spans the time when South America Separated from Africa. This suggests that alkalic activity and crustal extension in eastern Paraguay are grossly related to the Serra Geral extrusive event, and were a manifestation of the breakup of South America and Africa far from the site of final separation.

  5. Analysis of source spectra, attenuation, and site effects from central and eastern United States earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindley, G.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes the results from three studies of source spectra, attenuation, and site effects of central and eastern United States earthquakes. In the first study source parameter estimates taken from 27 previous studies were combined to test the assumption that the earthquake stress drop is roughly a constant, independent of earthquake size. 200 estimates of stress drop and seismic moment from eastern North American earthquakes were combined. It was found that the estimated stress drop from the 27 studies increases approximately as the square-root of the seismic moment, from about 3 bars at 10{sup 20} dyne-cm to 690 bars at 10{sup 25} dyne-cm. These results do not support the assumption of a constant stress drop when estimating ground motion parameters from eastern North American earthquakes. In the second study, broadband seismograms recorded by the United States National Seismograph Network and cooperating stations have been analysed to determine Q{sub Lg} as a function of frequency in five regions: the northeastern US, southeastern US, central US, northern Basin and Range, and California and western Nevada. In the third study, using spectral analysis, estimates have been made for the anelastic attenuation of four regional phases, and estimates have been made for the source parameters of 27 earthquakes, including the M{sub b} 5.6, 14 April, 1995, West Texas earthquake.

  6. Study of Reservoir Heterogencities and Structural Features Affecting Production in the Shallow Oil Zone, Eastern Elk Hills Area, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janice Gillespie

    2004-11-01

    Late Neogene (Plio-Pleistocene) shallow marine strata of the western Bakersfield Arch and Elk Hills produce hydrocarbons from several different reservoirs. This project focuses on the shallow marine deposits of the Gusher and Calitroleum reservoirs in the Lower Shallow Oil Zone (LSOZ). In the eastern part of the study area on the Bakersfield Arch at North and South Coles Levee field and in two wells in easternmost Elk Hills, the LSOZ reservoirs produce dry (predominantly methane) gas. In structurally higher locations in western Elk Hills, the LSOZ produces oil and associated gas. Gas analyses show that gas from the eastern LSOZ is bacterial and formed in place in the reservoirs, whereas gas associated with oil in the western part of the study area is thermogenic and migrated into the sands from deeper in the basin. Regional mapping shows that the gas-bearing LSOZ sands in the Coles Levee and easternmost Elk Hills area are sourced from the Sierra Nevada to the east whereas the oil-bearing sands in western Elk Hills appear to be sourced from the west. The eastern Elk Hills area occupied the basin depocenter, farthest from either source area. As a result, it collected mainly low-permeability offshore shale deposits. This sand-poor depocenter provides an effective barrier to the updip migration of gases from east to west. The role of small, listric normal faults as migration barriers is more ambiguous. Because our gas analyses show that the gas in the eastern LSOZ reservoirs is bacterial, it likely formed in-place near the reservoirs and did not have to migrate far. Therefore, the gas could have been generated after faulting and accumulated within the fault blocks as localized pools. However, bacterial gas is present in both the eastern AND western parts of Elk Hills in the Dry Gas Zone (DGZ) near the top of the stratigraphic section even though the measured fault displacement is greatest in this zone. Bacterial gas is not present in the west in the deeper LSOZ which

  7. Interactive geological interpretation of the El Roble oil field, eastern Venezuela basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briceno, M.A.; Joffree Arud, G.M. ); Segura, F. ); Rosario Sifontes, A.S.; Bejarano, C. )

    1990-05-01

    The El Noble oil field has been in production since May 1939, following the completion of RPN 1 well in the mid-section of the Oficina Formation. Seventy-three wells, 50% of which are producers, have been drilled as part of evaluation and appraisal-development programs. Production comes mostly from the Tertiary Oficina and Merecure formations, whose cumulative production is 45.2 MMbbl of light and condensate oil, and 74-94 bcf of gas. To date, 158 reservoirs have been identified in more than 40 sand bodies. Over 120 wells have been drilled in the study area which covers the El Roble field and its surroundings. Due to the importance of the field as a supplier to the domestic gas market, Corpoven has decided to reevaluate the area through an integrated study which takes into account all available data, including lab and sedimentological analyses, petrophysical analyses, well logs, etc., all of which have been processed through the Intergraph Gipsie system. The Intergraph Gipsie system allows the handling of data and the generation of ecological maps, sections, and graphs in a relatively short time using interactive routines, freeing the geologist for interpretations. More than 40 sand beds were reevaluated and their oil and gas volumes estimated. Further corrections and updating should be easily handled through the system.

  8. File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  9. File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  10. Webster Co. Kanawha Co. Cabell C

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Southern OH ...

  11. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin WV Appalachian Basin, OH-PA (Panel 2 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  12. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (MMcf) (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin WV Appalachian Basin, OH-PA (Panel 2 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  13. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Initial Results (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, A.; Townsend, A.; Hummon, M.; Weekley, A.; Clark, K.; King, J.

    2013-10-01

    This poster presents an overview of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study, which aims to answer critical questions about the future of the Eastern Interconnection under high levels of solar and wind generation penetration.

  14. Stormwater detention basin sediment removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, W.E.

    1995-12-31

    In the past, stormwater runoff from landfills has been treated mainly by focusing on reducing the peak storm discharge rates so as not to hydraulically impact downstream subsheds. However, with the advent of stricter water quality regulations based on the Federal Clean Water Act, and the related NPDES and SPDES programs, landfill owners and operators are now legally responsible for the water quality of the runoff once it leaves the landfill site. At the Fresh Kills Landfill in New York City, the world`s largest covering over 2000 acres, landfilling activities have been underway since 1945. With the main objective at all older landfill sites having focused on maximizing the available landfill footprint in order to obtain the most possible airspace volume, consideration was not given for the future siting of stormwater basin structures. Therefore, when SCS Engineers began developing the first comprehensive stormwater management plan for the site, the primary task was to locate potential sites for all the stormwater basins in order to comply with state regulations for peak stormwater runoff control. The basins were mostly constructed where space allowed, and were sized to be as large as possible given siting and subshed area constraints. Seventeen stormwater basins have now been designed and are being constructed to control the peak stormwater runoff for the 25-year, 24-hour storm as required by New York State. As an additional factor of safety, the basins were also designed for controlled discharge of the 100-year, 24 hour storm.

  15. Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) | Department of Energy Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) (654.41 KB) More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line

  16. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Marshall

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hughes | Department of Energy from Marshall Hughes Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Marshall Hughes Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. Comment from Marshall Hughes 07-10-15.pdf (14.91 KB) More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Mr. Dyer Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Sheila Beck Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Patti McCutchen

  17. Eastern coal spray dryer evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawyers, L.E.; Smith, P.V.; Caravano, C.; Jankura, B.J.

    1984-11-01

    Development efforts for dry scrubbing technology for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) have been geared toward utility boilers burning low-sulfur western coals rather than eastern high-sulfur coals. This has been due to the low quantity of reagent and lower SO/sub 2/ removal required with the use of western coals and has contributed to the economic attractiveness of the dry scrubber system. To evaluate the use of the dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization of eastern high-sulfur coals, the US Department of Energy contracted with the Babcock and Wilcox Company to perform a study to determine the technical and economical feasibility of such systems. The program was organized into the following tasks: (1) configuration specification and system preparation; (2) performance evaluation; (3) load-following and reliability evaluation; (4) commercial unit economic evaluation; and (5) report. The general conclusions of the program are: Effective dry scrubber operation for an eastern high-sulfur coal would include a higher stoichiometric ratio, low spray dryer approach temperature, and the optimized use of recycle material. A dry scrubber system designed for an eastern high-sulfur coal using a high-calcium lime reagent would not be economically competitive with a limestone wet scrubber system due to reagent costs. Use of an optimized furnace limestone injection system and recycle material would substantially reduce reagent costs and increase economic attractiveness of dry scrubber systems for eastern high-sulfur coals. This is in comparison to dry scrubber systems with nonlimestone injection. 10 references, 87 figures, 26 tables.

  18. EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Basin Electric Power Cooperative EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Order authorizing Basin Electric Power Cooperative to export electric energy to Canada EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative (2.8 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-64-A

  19. Tectonic Setting and Characteristics of Natural Fractures in MesaVerde and Dakota Reservoirs of the San Juan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LORENZ,JOHN C.; COOPER,SCOTT P.

    2000-12-20

    The Cretaceous strata that fill the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado were shortened in a generally N-S to NN13-SSW direction during the Laramide orogeny. This shortening was the result of compression of the strata between southward indentation of the San Juan Uplift at the north edge of the basin and northward to northeastward indentation of the Zuni Uplift from the south. Right-lateral strike-slip motion was concentrated at the eastern and western basin margins of the basin to form the Hogback Monocline and the Nacimiento Uplift at the same time, and small amounts of shear may have been pervasive within the basin as well. Vertical extension fractures, striking N-S to NNE-SSW with local variations (parallel to the Laramide maximum horizontal compressive stress), formed in both Mesaverde and Dakota sandstones under this system, and are found in outcrops and in the subsurface of the San Juan Basin. The immature Mesaverde sandstones typically contain relatively long, irregular, vertical extension fractures, whereas the quartzitic Dakota sandstones contain more numerous, shorter, sub-parallel, closely spaced, extension fractures. Conjugate shear planes in several orientations are also present locally in the Dakota strata.

  20. Magnetostratigraphic constraints on the development of paired fold-thrust belts/foreland basins in the Argentine Andes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.H. ); Damanti, J.F. ); Jordan, T.E. )

    1991-03-01

    Development of a paired fold thrust-thrust belt/foreland basin is correlated to the flattening of the subducting Nazca plate between 28-33{degree}S. Magnetostratigraphic studies in neogene basin-filling continental strata determine local basin subsidence rates and provide relatively precise chronostratigraphic correlation between different depositional environments. The data demonstrate that most existing lithostratigraphic units are diachronous and require new tectonic interpretations. Increases in sediment accumulation rates closely correspond to changes in provenance and indicate that the Frontal Cordillera, on the Chile-Argentina border was a positive topographic province by 18 Ma. The Precordillera evolved from {approx}16 Ma to the present as thrusting migrated from west to east. Published ages from intercalated airfall tuffs constrain some sedimentary sections in the eastern Sierras Pampeanas where the earliest uplift occurred since 10 Ma. The youngest uplifts are on the west side close to continuing thrusting in the Precordillera. Not all fold-thrust belt/foreland basin pairs are associated with flat subduction, suggesting that tectonic controls exceeding the scale of individual plate segments may be important. The hydrocarbon-producing Subandean fold-thrust belt/foreland basin, located in the area of 'steep' subduction that underlies northern Argentina and Bolivia (18-24{degree}S), is also believed to have evolved since middle Miocene time. Recently initiated magnetostratigraphic studies in the Subandean foreland basin will attempt to temporally constrain the Neogene tectonic evolution for comparison with the southern region.

  1. H-Area Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stejskal, G.

    1990-12-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium.

  2. Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  3. A new tectonic model for the development of the Eastern Cordillera, Altiplano, and Subandean zones, Bolivian Central Andes, 20[degrees]S latitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gubbels, T.L.; Isacks, B.L. ); Koch, R.W. )

    1993-02-01

    Construction of a regional transect across the central Andes at 20[degrees]S sheds new light on the relationship between the Altiplano, Eastern Cordillera (EC), and Subandean zones and allows us to refine the two-stage model of Isacks (1988) for the growth of the Central Andes. This new model is based on examination of the regional geology and geophysics, coupled with field investigations, satellite image analysis, and new Ar-Ar geochronology. In this model, widespread Oligocene to mid-Miocene compressional deformation in the Altiplano and EC was followed in the late-Miocene and Pliocene by thrusting localized east of the EC within the Subandean fold-thrust belt. During the first stage of deformation, the Altiplano basin underwent important subsidence and internal deformation. The EC was both deformed internally and thrust westwards over the Altiplano basin, while the present Subandean zone was the site of an early, broad foreland basin which received material eroded from the EC. During the second stage, beginning at [approximately]10 ma, deformation terminated within the EC and became concentrated within the fold-thrust belt in response to large scale overthrusting of the EC above the Brazilian shield; this resulted in major thrusting along the Cabalgamiento Frontal Principal (CFP), which soles into the master Subandean decollement, and [approximately]100 km of telescoping within the early, broad foreland basin. In the EC, this second stage is marked by the elaboration of a regionally extensive erosion surface, ponding of gravels in shallow basins, and the emplacement of giant ignimbrite sheets. The Eastern Cordillera can thus be thought of as a crustal-scale wedge which has been extruded upward and outward on alternate sides during successive stages of late Cenozoic deformation. This motion has served to drive subsidence in both the Altiplano and Subandean foreland basins, as well as shortening in the fold-thrust belt.

  4. Lithospheric flexure and composite tectonic loads in the foreland of the Marathon orogenic belt: Permian Basin, west Texas and southern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kenn Ming; Dorobek, S. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Lithospheric flexure caused by loading of orogenic belts is regarded as the main process that produces subsidence in foreland basins. However in some foreland areas, subsidence may be affected by synorogenic foreland uplifts that act as additional loads. The Permian Basin is located in the foreland area of the late Paleozoic Marathon orogenic belt (Mob). The Permian Basin consists of several sub-basins that are separated by several structurally complex uplifts. Uplift of the Central Basin Platform (CBP) and subsidence in adjacent basins were coeval with final stages of deformation in the Marathon orogen. The CBP is oriented at high angles to the Marathon orogen and consists of several blocks arranged in an en echelon pattern. Data suggest that uplift of the CBP was affected by clockwise rotation of crustal blocks between NNW-SSE trending boundary faults. Although both the Delaware Basin (DB) and Val Verde Basin (VVB) are adjacent to the Mob, the synorogenic geometries of these basins are different. The VVB has a typical flexural profile that apparently is due to loading of the Marathon orogen. However, the flexural profile becomes narrower and deeper toward the western end of the VVB where the basin is bordered by the southernmost block of the CBP. In contrast, synorogenic DB profiles have composite wavelengths which show maximum deflection next to the Mob and toward the uplifted blocks of the CBP. This suggests that synorogenic subsidence of the DB was affected by loading of the CBP. In addition, the loading geometry across the uplifted CBP is asymmetric, with greater uplift and basement shortening on the western side of the CBP and less uplift and basement shortening on the eastern side. This may explain greater synorogenic subsidence in the DB than the Midland Basin.

  5. Renewed petroleum generation related to Tertiary intrusions and increased heat flow, western Permian basin, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, C.E.; Pawlewicz, M.J.

    1989-03-01

    Higher paleogeothermal gradients, commencing in the Tertiary after maximum burial, have caused renewed petroleum generation in the western Permian basin. Evidence for this reheating is two distinct trends in the mean random vitrinite reflectance (R/sub m/) and depth data compiled from over 40 wells. One group, with a 0.7% R/sub m//km gradient, is from the western edge of the basin; the other, with a 0.5% R/sub m//km gradient, is from the central and eastern portions. Post-Mississippian tilting produced greater subsidence and a thicker, mostly uneroded sedimentary section in the eastern portion of the Permian basin. Continued tilting prior to the Cretaceous caused uplift and erosion that exposed the Upper Permian section in the western part. Potassium-argon ages of igneous intrusions along the western edge of the basin show they were emplaced about 35 Ma, followed by Miocene to Holocene basin-and-range-type block faulting and associated high heat flow. Isopach-reflectance contours confirm this renewed heating is post-tectonic - that is, it occurred after eastward tilting and erosion had reduced burial depth. Maximum temperatures computed from R/sub m/-depth relationships infer that paleogeothermal gradients exceeded 40/degrees/C/km (2.2/degrees/F/100 ft) in the Tertiary. This reheating thermally matured rocks as young as Guadalupian in the western Permian basin and apparently caused a second episode of petroleum generation. By this time, however, the potential reservoir rocks and evaporite seals had been deeply eroded, resulting in poor conditions for trapping the renewed pulse of petroleum.

  6. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2005-07-20

    has been validated for softwoods (white pine) on several reclaimed mine sites in the southern Appalachian coal region. The classification model is a viable method for classifying post-SMCRA abandoned mined lands into productivity classes for white pine. A thinning study was established as a random complete block design to evaluate the response to thinning of a 26-year-old white pine stand growing on a reclaimed surface mine in southwest Virginia. Stand parameters were projected to age 30 using a stand table projection. Site index of the stand was found to be 32.3 m at base age 50 years. Thinning rapidly increased the diameter growth of the residual trees to 0.84 cm yr{sup -1} compared to 0.58 cm yr{sup -1} for the unthinned treatment; however, at age 26, there was no difference in volume or value per hectare. At age 30, the unthinned treatment had a volume of 457.1 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} but was only worth $8807 ha{sup -1}, while the thinned treatment was projected to have 465.8 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1}, which was worth $11265 ha{sup -1} due to a larger percentage of the volume being in sawtimber size classes.

  7. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for July, August, and September 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2006-12-08

    This report provides information on groundwater monitoring at the K Basins during July, August, and September 2006. Conditions remain very similar to those reported in the previous quarterly report, with no evidence in monitoring results to suggest groundwater impact from current loss of basin water to the ground. The K Basins monitoring network will be modified in the coming quarters as a consequence of remedial action at KE Basin, i.e., removal of sludge and basin demolition.

  8. Evolution of Permian carbonate shelf and foreshelf detrital systems, Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzullo, S.J.; Reid, A.M. II; Reid, S.T.

    1986-03-01

    A major phase of shelf progradation and consequent filling of the Midland basin began in the Early Permian. Prior to this time, shelf carbonate systems were mostly ineffective in generating coarse detritus in quantities sufficient to infill adjoining basins. Beginning in the Early Permian (Wolfcampian), however, the character of shelf and basin deposition was abruptly modified, in part because of faunal changes - proliferation of rock-forming biotic communities and the consequent potential for rapid shelf-marginal oversteepening - and the effects of sea level fluctuations and periods of shale influx. Shelf systems in the northern Midland basin and Eastern shelf evolved from ramps in the lowermost Wolfcamp to steep rimmed platforms by the lower Leonard. Shelf progradation into the Midland basin was cyclic, with extensive carbonate shelves having developed during sea level highstands and massive shale wedges deposited during alternate lowstands. Coarse megabreccia with markedly little sand dominates in the lower to middle Wolfcamp systems, despite the occurrence of ramps in this section. Such an anomaly can be explained by invoking widespread shelf wastage caused by the inherent instability and failure of the shale slopes on which these ramps were deposited. In certain middle Wolfcamp zones, thin shelf-ramp sections may be recognized only because any thick shelf-marginal buildups that may have been present have been displaced into adjoining basinal tracts. The evolution to rimmed-platform shelves by the lower Leonard strata, foreshelf debris occurs mostly as complexes of megabreccia wedges and aprons, anastomosing megabreccia, and sand-channel and lobe deposits derived from adjoining rimmed-platforms. Major variations exist in the gross geometries of foreshelf units and component reservoirs even laterally within rocks of the same age.

  9. Sediment body quantification: Examples from a Late Permian mixed influence deltaic system, Bowen Basin, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falkner, A.; Fielding, C. )

    1990-05-01

    The Bowen basin open-cut coal mines of central Queensland, Australia, provide some of the best exposures of alluvial and fluviodeltaic sequences in the world. Within the Bowen basin coal is mined extensively along a strike length of 5-600 km exposing various parts of an Upper Permian terrestrial to shallow-marine sequence. Individual mines cover 10-30 km of strike and may work several different seams that are correlatable between mines. The project described here is aimed at providing a detailed database on facies geometry within coal-bearing alluvial and fluviodeltaic sequences of the Bowen basin. Data has been collected from the profusion of very large open-cut coal mine exposures in eastern Queensland, Australia, and rationalized into a form useful for hydrocarbon reservoir description. High-quality geometrical data is obtained from controlled photomosaics of highwalls supplemented by information from close-spaced borehole networks. Detailed information from core and accessible exposures allows accurate sedimentological interpretation. Interpretation of the German Creek Formation, one of the coalbearing units of the Bowen basin, suggests that accumulation occurred on an extensive lower delta plain, within a mixed (i.e., wave-tide-fluvial influenced) delta. Four facies have been identified, two of which are possible reservoirs: facies A, major channelized sandstone bodies (4-11 m thick and 0.5-5 km wide, elongate perpendicular to basin edge), interpreted as deltaic distributary channel fills; and facies B, tabular sandstone bodies (9-20 m thick tens of km in areal extent, elongate parallel to basin margin) internally dominated by hummocky cross-stratification, interpreted as proximal mouth bar deposits.

  10. Preliminary gravity inversion model of basins east of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geoffrey A. Phelps; Carter W. Roberts, and Barry C. Moring

    2006-03-17

    The Yucca Flat eastern extension study area, a 14 kilometer by 45 kilometer region contiguous to Yucca Flat on the west and Frenchman Flat on the south, is being studied to expand the boundary of the Yucca Flat hydrogeologic model. The isostatic residual gravity anomaly was inverted to create a model of the depth of the geologic basins within the study area. Such basins typically are floored by dense pre-Tertiary basement rocks and filled with less-dense Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks and Quaternary alluvium, a necessary condition for the use of gravity modeling to predict the depth to the pre-Tertiary basement rocks within the basins. Three models were created: a preferred model to represent the best estimate of depth to pre-Tertiary basement rocks in the study area, and two end-member models to demonstrate the possible range of solutions. The preferred model predicts shallow basins, generally less than 1,000m depth, throughout the study area, with only Emigrant Valley reaching a depth of 1,100m. Plutonium valley and West Fork Scarp Canyon have maximum depths of 800m and 1,000m, respectively. The end-member models indicate that the uncertainty in the preferred model is less than 200m for most of the study area.

  11. Piedmont seismic reflection study: A program integrated with tectonics to probe the cause of eastern seismicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, L. III; Coruh, C.; Costain, J.K.; Bollinger, G.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-03-01

    A new tectonic model of the Appalachian orogen indicates that one, not two or more, terrane boundaries is present in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge of the central and southern Appalachians. This terrane boundary is the Taconic suture, it has been transported in the allochthonous Blue Ridge/Piedmont crystalline thrust nappe, and it is repeated at the surface by faulting and folding associated with later Paleozoic orogenies. The suture passes through the lower crust and lithosphere somewhere east of Richmond. It is spatially associated with seismicity in the central Virginia seismic zone, but is not conformable with earthquake focal planes and appears to have little causal relation to their localization.

  12. Possible flexural mechanisms for origins of extensive, ooid-rich, carbonate environments, middle and early late Mississippian, east-central United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettensohn, F.R. )

    1989-08-01

    During the earliest Mississippian, much of east-central US was a deep-water black-shale basin formed due to subsidence accompanying Acadian tectonism; by the middle Mississippian, this basin had been transformed into a very shallow epeiric sea characterized by ooid-rich carbonates. This transformation probably occurred in two parts due to flexural mechanisms accompanying the end of the Acadian orogeny and the beginning of the Ouachita orogeny. In the eastern part of the basin, with the end of active Acadian deformational loading, lithospheric relaxation caused uplift and eastward migration of the Acadian peripheral bulge from near the Cincinnati arch into the Appalachian basin. By the middle Meramecian, this uplift and a concomitant infilling of the basin with post-orogenic clastics created an extensive shallow-water platform conducive to ooid deposition well into the Appalachian basin. In western parts of the cratonic black-shale basin, from the western flanks of the Cincinnati arch to the eastern flanks of the Transcontinental arch, any infilling with postorogenic Acadian clastics was minor. However, by the Kinderhook-Osage transition, apparent collision and subduction leading to the Ouachita orogeny had begun, and with the inception of collision, the entire foreland as far north as the Illinois basin was upwarped by the cratonward (north and northeast) migration of the accompany peripheral bulge. As a result, by the early Meramecian, shallow-water conditions favorable for oolitic-carbonate deposition prevailed throughout the area.

  13. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  14. Oil and gas developments in west Texas and eastern New Mexico in 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, D.R.; Collier, W.W.; Gail, G.J.; Gaines, G.B.; Gibson, W.R.; Miller, H.A. Jr.; Pause, P.H.; Robbins, L.D.

    1984-10-01

    7034 wells were drilled in west Texas and eastern New Mexico in 1983, 17.2% less than in 1982. The success rate for all wells was 79.8% up 1.1% from 1982. The exploratory success rate decreased to 25.4% in 1983 from 26.4% in 1982. The number of exploratory wells drilled in 1983 decreased 27.1% from 1982, and total exploratory footage decreased 30.1%. The severe decline in exploratory drilling during 1983 was anticipated because seismic crew activity had declined during the 2 preceding years. However, 1983 seismic activity increased 2.1% from 1982, reversing the trend. Therefore, because seismic crew activity is usually a reliable leading indicator of trends in exploratory drilling, an increase in Permian basin wildcat drilling is predicted for mid-1985. In 1983, the number of development wells drilled decreased 15.2% from 1982, and total development footage decreased 17.6%. Development success increased by 0.1% to 89.2%. Oil production for 1983 was 550,473,920 bbl, down 1.7% from 1982. Gas production was 1,995,555,963 mcf, down 9.5% from 1982. Overall leasing activity decreased in 1983. The land sales of New Mexico and the University of Texas received only a fraction of the attention normally paid to them. However, leasing was very aggressive in Glasscock, Midland, and Hockley Counties, Texas, of the Midland basin. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  15. Influence of Permian salt dissolution on distribution of shallow Niobrara gas fields, eastern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldham, D.W.; Smosna, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    Subsurface analysis of Permian salt and related strata in the shallow Niobrara gas area on the eastern flank of the Denver basin reveals that the location of faulted anticlines which produce gas from porous chalk is related to the occurrence of six Nippewalla Group (Leonardian) salt zones. Salt distribution is controlled by the configuration of evaporate basins during the Leonardian, truncation at a sub-Jurassic unconformity (which has completely removed Guadalupian salts), and post-Jurassic subsurface dissolution. Significant dissolution took place in response to Laramide orogeny and subsequent eastward regional groundwater flow within the Lyons (Cedar Hills) Sandstone aquifer. Initially, dissolution occurred along a regional facies change from sandstone to salt. Solution collapse allowed for cross-formational flow and removal of younger salts. Shallow Niobrara gas fields are situated above salt outliers or along regionally updip salt edges. No significant Niobrara production exists in areas where salt is absent. Structural relief across fields is related to Leonardian thickness variations, rather than subsalt offset. Seismic data reveal abrupt Leonardian thinning at the regionally updip limit of Eckley field, which has produced over 33 BCFG. Thickness of residual salt may be important in controlling the amount of gas trapped within the Niobrara. Where thick salts are preserved, structural relief is greater, the gas-water transition zone is thicker, and gas saturation is higher at the crests of faulted anticlines.

  16. Tectonic mechanisms for formation of the Central Basin platform and adjacent basinal areas, Permian basin, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kennming; Dorobek, S.L. )

    1992-04-01

    Formation of the Central Basin platform (CBP), with the Delaware basin to its west and the Midland basin to its east, has been attributed to the crustal deformation in the foreland area of the Marathon Orogen during the late Paleozoic. Because of complexities in the areal distribution and magnitudes of uplift along the length of the CBP, its formative mechanisms are still controversial. Previous interpretations about the mechanisms for uplift of the CBP are based on the characteristics of the boundary faults between the CBP and adjacent basinal areas. Here, an integrated tectonic model is proposed for formation of the uplift and adjacent basins based on studies of the structure of sedimentary layers overlying Precambrian basement rocks of the uplift and restoration of the lower Paleozoic strata in the Delaware basin.

  17. PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act 2005 » PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE On March 25, 2016, U.S. Secretary of Energy Dr. Ernest Moniz announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) will participate in the development of the Plains & Eastern Clean Line project (Project), a major clean energy infrastructure project. Through section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Congress authorized DOE to promote electric

  18. Clean Line Plains and Eastern Section 1222 Decision Documents | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Clean Line Plains and Eastern Section 1222 Decision Documents Clean Line Plains and Eastern Section 1222 Decision Documents On March 25, 2016, U.S. Secretary of Energy Dr. Ernest Moniz announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) will participate in the development of the Plains & Eastern Clean Line project (Project), a major clean energy infrastructure project. Through section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Congress authorized DOE to promote electric transmission

  19. Environmental Regulation Impacts on Eastern Interconnection Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markham, Penn N; Liu, Yilu; Young II, Marcus Aaron

    2013-07-01

    In the United States, recent environmental regulations will likely result in the removal of nearly 30 GW of oil and coal-fired generation from the power grid, mostly in the Eastern Interconnection (EI). The effects of this transition on voltage stability and transmission line flows have previously not been studied from a system-wide perspective. This report discusses the results of power flow studies designed to simulate the evolution of the EI over the next few years as traditional generation sources are replaced with environmentally friendlier ones such as natural gas and wind.

  20. ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2008 " ,"(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid" ,,,"Contiguous...

  1. ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2009 " ,"(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid" ,,,"Contiguous...

  2. Section 1222 Program - Proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section 1222 Program - Proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line ... through the Southwestern Power Administration ... NEPA Website, and through other channels of communication. ...

  3. Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states and other ...

  4. Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deep Geothermal Reservoir ...

  5. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study -- Preliminary Findings: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbus, D.; Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Schuerger, M.; Zavadil, B.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study, the development of wind datasets, the transmission analysis, and the results of wind integration analysis for four scenarios.

  6. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. PDF icon Comment from Dr. Contreras ...

  7. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ms. Callahan Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Ms. Callahan Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. PDF icon Comment from Ms. Callahan ...

  8. PP-20-1 Eastern Maine Electric Cooperative Inc

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presidential permit authorizing Eastern Maine Electric Cooperative Inc to construct, operate and maintain electric transmision facilities at the U.S-Canadian border.

  9. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) (Revised)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    EWITS was designed to answer questions about technical issues related to a 20% wind energy scenario for electric demand in the Eastern Interconnection.

  10. Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Central and Eastern United States: Volume 1: Part 2, Methodology (Revision 1): Final report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Seismic hazard methodology for the Central ...

  11. Seismic hazard methodology for the central and Eastern United...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Seismic hazard methodology for the central and Eastern United States: Volume 1, Part 1: Theory: Final report The NRC staff concludes that SOGEPRI Seismic Hazard Methodology...

  12. Eastern Iowa Light & Power Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Light & Power Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Eastern Iowa Light & Power Coop Place: Iowa Phone Number: (563) 732-2211 Website: easterniowa.com Facebook: https:...

  13. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Eastern and Western Wind...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eastern and Western Wind Integration Datasets These datasets were designed to help energy professionals perform wind ... Studies Glossary News Did you find what you needed? ...

  14. Project Reports for Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) is using the grant funds from the Department of Energy to complete the Energy Efficiency Improvements to seven EBCI facilities.

  15. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    EWITS was designed to answer questions about technical issues related to a 20% wind energy scenario for electric demand in the Eastern Interconnection.

  16. Tectonic history and analysis of structures in eastern Kansas and western Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berendsen, P.; Wilson, F.W. . Kansas Geological Survey)

    1993-03-01

    Orogenic events in and around the midcontinent in Proterozoic time were responsible for the formation of the dominant master set of younger northeast- and older northwest-trending faults that dominate the structure of the area today. Reactivation of these faults throughout geologic time gave rise to tectonic zones consisting of sets of anastomosing faults or other complex patterns. These zones are likely important in helping to determine the configuration of major uplifts and basins that involve the crust. The Nemaha tectonic zone defines the western boundary of both the Forest City and Cherokee basins, while a structural block delineated by the Chesapeake and Bolivar-Mansfield regional faults coincides with the approximate position of the Bourbon Arch, which is reflected in the thickness of Mississippian carbonate rocks. Rocks of the Ozark uplift began to be uplifted by the end of Maquoketa time. The uplift has historically been described as a landform, rather than a geologic structure. Hence, the extent and the boundaries of the uplift are ill-defined. The northeast-trending line forming the contact between Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks is commonly regarded as the western boundary. This boundary coincides with a major tectonic zone, extending northeastward from Oklahoma through Kansas and Missouri into at least southern Iowa. In the Tri-State area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri the zone is referred to as the Miami trough and features prominently in the localization of major ore deposits. This zone may then also be regarded as the eastern boundary of the Forest City and Cherokee basins.

  17. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  18. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for January, February, and March 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-04-01

    This report describes the results of groundwater monitoring near the K Basins for the period January, February, and March 2007.

  19. Coal stratigraphy of deeper part of Black Warrior basin in Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, W.A.; Womack, S.H.

    1983-09-01

    The Warrior coal field of Alabama is stratigraphically in the upper part of the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation and structurally in the eastern part of the Black Warrior foreland basin. The productive coal beds extend southwestward from the mining area downdip into the deeper part of the Black Warrior structural basin. Because the deep part of the basin is beyond the limits of conventional coal exploration, study of the stratigraphy of coal beds must rely on data from petroleum wells. Relative abundance of coal can be stated in terms of numbers of beds, but because of the limitations of the available data, thicknesses of coals presently are not accurately determined. The lower sandstone-rich coal-poor part of the Pottsville has been interpreted as barrier sediments in the mining area. To the southwest in the deeper Black Warrior basin, coal beds are more numerous within the sandstone-dominated sequence. The coal-productive upper Pottsville is informally divided into coal groups each of which includes several coal beds. The Black Creek, Mary Lee, and Utley coal groups are associated with northeast-trending delta-distributary sandstones. The areas of most numerous coals also trend northeastward and are laterally adjacent to relatively thick distributary sandstones, suggesting coal accumulation in backswamp environments. The most numerous coals in the Pratt coal group are in an area that trends northwestward parallel with and southwest of a northwest-trending linear sandstone, suggesting coal accumulation in a back-barrier environment. Equivalents of the Cobb, Gwin, and Brookwood coal groups contain little coal in the deep part of the Black Warrior basin.

  20. Late Paleozoic structural evolution of Permian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, T.E.

    1984-04-01

    The southern Permian basin is underlain by the NNW-trending Central Basin disturbed belt of Wolfcamp age (Lower Permian), the deep Delaware basin to its west, and the shallower Midland basin to its eat. The disturbed belt is highly segmented with zones of left-lateral offset. Major segments from south to north are: the Puckett-Grey Ranch zone; the Fort Stockton uplift; the Monahans transverse zone; the Andector ridges and the Eunice ridge; the Hobbs transverse zone; and the Tatum ridges, which abut the broad Roosevelt uplift to the north. The disturbed belt may have originated along rift zones of either Precambrian or Cambrian age. The extent of Lower and Middle Pennsylvanian deformation is unclear; much of the Val Verde basin-Ozona arch structure may have formed then. The main Wolfcamp deformation over thrust the West Texas crustal block against the Delaware block, with local denudation of the uplifted edge and eastward-directed backthrusting into the Midland basin. Latter in the Permian, the area was the center of a subcontinental bowl of subsidence - the Permian basin proper. The disturbed belt formed a pedestal for the carbonate accumulations which created the Central Basin platform. The major pre-Permian reservoirs of the Permian basin lie in large structural and unconformity-bounded traps on uplift ridges and domes. Further work on the regional structural style may help to predict fracture trends, to assess the timing of oil migration, and to evaluate intrareservoir variations in the overlying Permian giant oil fields.

  1. Geothermal Resources Of California Sedimentary Basins | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Resources Of California Sedimentary Basins Abstract The 2004 Department of Energy...

  2. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2001-09-28

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. EPA requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard and must consider inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  3. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-06-04

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration potential of forests growing on 14 mined sites in a seven-state region in the Midwestern and Eastern Coalfields. Carbon contents of these forests were compared to adjacent forests on non-mined land. The study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each location. The treatments include three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Analysis of soil samples was completed and these data are being used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions. Fertilizer prescripts will be developed for each site. Fertilizer will be applied during the second quarter 2004. Data are included as appendices in this report. As part of our economic analysis of mined land reforestation, we focused on the implications of a shift in reforestation burden from the landowner to the mine operator. Results suggest that the reforestation of mined lands as part of the mining operation creates a viable and profitable forest enterprise for landowners with greater potential for carbon sequestration.

  4. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for October, November, and December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-03-22

    This report provides information on groundwater monitoring at the K Basins during October, November, and December 2006. Conditions remained very similar to those reported in the previous quarterly report, with no evidence in monitoring results to suggest groundwater impact from current loss of basin water to the ground. The K Basins monitoring network will be modified in the coming months as a consequence of new wells having been installed near KW Basin as part of a pump-and-treat system for chromium contamination, and new wells installed between the KE Basin and the river to augment long-term monitoring in that area.

  5. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma | Department of Energy Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. Comment from Block Plains & Eastern Clean Line Arkansas and Oklahoma 06-08-15.pdf (1.21 MB) More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block

  6. Carboniferous-Lower Permian carbonate reservoirs of the Timan-Pechora Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhemchugova, V.A.; Schamel, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Carboniferous-Lower Permian carbonate succession of the Timan-Pechora basin is a major hydrocarbon-bearing complex, hosting about half of the oil and nearly a third of the gas reserves of the basin. The succession represents the last episode of carbonate deposition on the northeastern margin of the Russian platform before the closure of the Ural seaway in the mid-Permian. The lower part of the succession (upper Visean-Moscovian) contains three major transgressive-regressive sequences. Depositional facies ranged from nearshore carbonate-shale-evaporite through shallow shelf detrital carbonates to outer-shelf carbonate-siliceous shale. The most pronounced regression during this interval occurred during the Serpukhovian, when marine sabkhas covered vast portions of the carbonate platform. Late Carboniferous-Early Permian sedimentation was complicated by the onset of Uralian tectonism. Flysch from the encroaching orogen accumulated initially in the east, advanced westward across the passive margin, and finally covered the carbonate platform in Artinskian-Kungurian time. Simultaneously, structural inversion along the Pechora-Kolva aulacogen and elsewhere provided sites for bioherm growth, in addition to exposing parts of the lower succession to erosion and karstification. Overall polarity of the basin switched as the eastern margin was elevated in the frontal thrusts of the Urals. The carbonate succession was terminated by increased clastic input from the advancing Ural orogen. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  7. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section ...

  8. PP-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Basin Electric Power Cooperative to construct, operate, and maintain transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. PDF icon PP-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative More ...

  9. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range...

  10. Judith Basin County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6 Climate Zone Subtype B. Places in Judith Basin County, Montana Hobson, Montana Stanford, Montana Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleJudithBasinCounty,...

  11. Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio Grande and Buckman Wellfield Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio Grande and Buckman...

  12. L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers...

  13. Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (51) Power Plants (10)...

  14. Climate Change and the Macroeconomy in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis and Projections to 2099 Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change and the Macroeconomy in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis and Projections to...

  15. Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

    2009-01-30

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the “First Steps” phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribe’s plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: • Develop the Tribe’s energy goals and objectives • Establish the Tribe’s current energy usage • Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options • Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives • Create an action plan for the selected options

  16. Hazardous wastes in Eastern and Central Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, D.O.; Suk, W.A.; Blaha, K.; Cikrt, M.

    1996-03-01

    The countries of Eastern and Central Europe have emerged from a political system which for decades has ignored protection of human health from hazardous wastes. While the economies of the countries in this region are stretched, awareness and concern about hazardous waste issues are a part of the new realities. At a recent conference sponsored in part by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, representatives of seven countries in the region described the status of hazardous waste programs, issues of major concern, and steps being taken to protect human health. This report summarizes the deliberations, outlines some of the problems remaining in dealing with the legacy of the past, addressing the problems of the present, and providing a framework for future research and collaborative efforts. 30 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Delaware basin/Central basin platform margin: The development of a subthrust deep-gas province in the Permian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purves, W.J. ); Ting, S.C. )

    1990-05-01

    A deep-gas-prone province was identified along the Delaware basin/Central Basin platform margin, a margin conventionally interpreted to be bounded by high-angle normal or high-angle reverse structures. Redefinition of the tectonic style between the Delaware basin and the adjacent platform resulted in the identification of this Delaware basin/Central Basin platform subthrust province and a giant prospect within it. Definition of a giant-sized gas prospect in northern Pecos County, Texas, revealed that portions of this margin may be characterized by shingled, low-angle, eastward-dipping, basement involved thrust faults. Interpretations suggest that hidden, subthrust footwall structures may trend discontinuously for greater than 100 mi along this structural margin. Subthrust footwall structures formed as basinal buttress points for the Central Basin platform to climb over the Delaware basin. In this area, structural relief of over 19,000 ft over a 10-mi width is believed due to stacking of low-angle thrust sheets. Seismic resolution of this subthrust margin has been complexed by allochtonous hanging-wall gravity-glide blocks and folds and by velocity changes in overlying syn- and posttectonic sediments associated with basin-to-shelf lithofacies changes. Statistical studies indicate that this deep-gas province has a play potential of greater than 10 tcf of gas, with individual prospect sizes exceeding 1 tcfg. The prospects defined along this trend are deep (approximately 20,000 ft) subthrust structural traps that are indigenously sourced and reservoired by dual-matrix porosity. Vitrinite supported maturation modeling suggests that these subthrust structures formed prior to catagenic conversion of the oldest source rocks to oil and later to gas. Tectonically fractured Ordovician Ellenburger and Devonian sediments are considered the principal reservoirs. Shales overlying reservoir intervals form vertical seals.

  18. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  19. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  20. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-09-21

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  1. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    1999-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  2. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2000-09-28

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  3. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  4. 1,"John E Amos","Coal","Appalachian Power Co",2900 2,"FirstEnergy Harrison Power Station","Coal","Allegheny Energy Supply Co LLC",1954

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"John E Amos","Coal","Appalachian Power Co",2900 2,"FirstEnergy Harrison Power Station","Coal","Allegheny Energy Supply Co LLC",1954 3,"Mt Storm","Coal","Virginia Electric & Power Co",1640 4,"Mitchell (WV)","Coal","Kentucky Power

  5. K Basins isolation barriers summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, G.C., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    The 105-K East and 105-K West fuel storage basins (105-K Basins) were designed and constructed in the early 1950`s for interim storage of irradiated fuel following its discharge from the reactors. The 105-K- East and 105-K West reactor buildings were constructed first, and the associated storage basins were added about a year later. The construction joint between each reactor building structure and the basin structure included a flexible membrane waterstop to prevent leakage. Water in the storage basins provided both radiation shielding and cooling to remove decay heat from stored fuel until its transfer to the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility for chemical processing. The 105-K West Reactor was permanently shut down in February 1970; the 105-K East Reactor was permanently shut down in February 1971. Except for a few loose pieces, fuel stored in the basins at that time was shipped to the PUREX Facility for processing. The basins were then left idle but were kept filled with water. The PUREX Facility was shut down and placed on wet standby in 1972 while N Reactor continued to operate. When the N Reactor fuel storage basin began to approach storage capacity, the decision was made to modify the fuel storage basins at 105-K East and 105-K West to provide additional storage capacity. Both basins were subsequently modified (105-K East in 1975 and 105-K West in 1981) to provide for the interim handling and storage of irradiated N Reactor fuel. The PUREX Facility was restarted in November 1983 to provide 1698 additional weapons-grade plutonium for the United States defense mission. The facility was shut down and deactivated in December 1992 when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the plant was no longer needed to support weapons-grade plutonium production. When the PUREX Facility was shut down, approximately 2.1 x 1 06 kg (2,100 metric tons) of irradiated fuel aged 7 to 23 years was left in storage in the 105-K Basins pending a decision on

  6. Gene Wash and Copper Basin Dams are surviving alkali-aggregate reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Gene Wash and Copper Basin Dams were constructed in 1937 and 1938, and are owned and operated by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD). The dams are located in San Bernardino County, California, close to the Colorado River, and very close to the easternmost point of California. They form two intermediate storage facilities on the Colorado River Aqueduct system which conveys water from Lake Havasu to the Los Angeles and San Diego areas. The locations of the dams are shown. Gene Wash Dam is a concrete arch structure, with a maximum height of arch of 131 feet. There is a gravity thrust block on the right abutment and the total crest length is 430 feet. Copper Basin Dam is a concrete arch dam with a maximum height of arch of 187 feet and a crest length of 253 feet. Plans, elevations and sections for both dams. The dams are in the Whipple Mountains at the eastern edge of the Mojave Desert. Between June and October, maximum temperatures usually exceed 100 degrees Farenheit, while daily low temperatures in this period are generally in the 60`s and 70`s. Winter temperatures are mild, with daytime highs in the 70`s and 80`s, and lows only occasionally below freezing. The area is arid, with total annual rainfall generally between two and ten inches. Both dams were built in desert washes with no permanent flow. The foundation for both structures is a strong, erosion-resistant, red-brown, non-marine sandstone and conglomerate of Tertiary age known as the Copper Basin Formation (Buwalda, 1937). Spillways for both dams are ungated ogee crests, which are separate from the dams. Gene Wash Dam and Copper Basin Dam are geographically close together, are of similar design, and were constructed at the same time, using the same materials. Their performance since construction, not surprisingly, has been similar.

  7. EA-64-A Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -A Basin Electric Power Cooperative EA-64-A Basin Electric Power Cooperative Order authorizing Basin Electric Power Cooperative to export electric energy to Canada EA-64-A Basin Electric Power Cooperative (1.87 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-64

  8. K Basins Sludge Treatment Process | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process K Basins Sludge Treatment Process Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download K Basins Sludge Treatment Process (27.17 MB) Summary - K Basins Sludge Treatment Process (185.69 KB) More Documents & Publications Compilation of TRA Summaries K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide

  9. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for April, May, and June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-08-08

    This report provides information on groundwater monitoring near the K Basins during April, May, and June 2007. Conditions remained similar to those reported in the previous quarters report, with no evidence in monitoring results to suggest groundwater impact from current loss of shielding water from either basin to the ground. During the current quarter, the first results from two new wells installed between KE Basin and the river became available. Groundwater conditions at each new well are reasonably consistent with adjacent wells and expectations, with the exception of anomalously high chromium concentrations at one of the new wells. The K Basins monitoring network will be modified for FY 2008 to take advantage of new wells recently installed near KW Basin as part of a pump-and-treat system for chromium contamination, and also the new wells recently installed between the KE Basin and the river, which augment long-term monitoring capability in that area.

  10. Topic B Awardee: Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council (EISPC) is an historic endeavor initially funded by an award from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to a provision of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).

  11. North Carolina Eastern M P A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    M P A Jump to: navigation, search Name: North Carolina Eastern M P A Place: North Carolina Phone Number: 252-482-4444 Website: www.ncpublicpower.comaboutus Outage Hotline:...

  12. AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Percent) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in ... Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 -32.70 -36.20 -48.60 -41.00 ...

  13. Advanced Unit Commitment Strategies in the United States Eastern Interconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meibom, P.; Larsen, H. V.; Barth, R.; Brand, H.; Tuohy, A.; Ela, E.

    2011-08-01

    This project sought to evaluate the impacts of high wind penetrations on the U.S. Eastern Interconnection and analyze how different unit commitment strategies may affect these impacts.

  14. PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE | Department of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION LINE On March 25, 2016, U.S. Secretary of Energy Dr. Ernest Moniz announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) will participate in the ...

  15. ,"AGA Eastern Consuming Region Underground Natural Gas Storage...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...282016 11:29:24 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Underground Storage" ... Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (MMcf)","AGA Eastern Consuming Region ...

  16. Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (July 2010) PDF icon Update to Plains & Eastern Clean ...

  17. NREL Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study Redefines What's

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Possible for Renewables (Text Version) | Energy Systems Integration | NREL Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study Redefines What's Possible for Renewables (Text Version) This is a text version of the video "Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy." We started this study with a question. Can you take one of the largest power systems in the world-one that was designed to work with fossil fuels-and make it work with

  18. Wellbore and groundwater temperature distribution eastern Snake River

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plain, Idaho: Implications for groundwater flow and geothermal potential (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Wellbore and groundwater temperature distribution eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho: Implications for groundwater flow and geothermal potential Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wellbore and groundwater temperature distribution eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho: Implications for groundwater flow and geothermal potential A map of groundwater temperatures from

  19. Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line - Part 2 Application |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Transmission Line - Part 2 Application Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line - Part 2 Application In addition to conducting a NEPA review of the proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line project, DOE will also conduct due diligence on non-NEPA factors such as the project's technical and financial feasibility and whether the project is in the public interest. DOE will conduct a thorough review that includes making all required statutory

  20. Developing Generic Dynamic Models for the 2030 Eastern Interconnection Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Gefei; Hadley, Stanton W; Markham, Penn N; Liu, Yilu

    2013-12-01

    The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) has built three major power flow cases for the 2030 Eastern Interconnection (EI) based on various levels of energy/environmental policy conditions, technology advances, and load growth. Using the power flow cases, this report documents the process of developing the generic 2030 dynamic models using typical dynamic parameters. The constructed model was validated indirectly using the synchronized phasor measurements by removing the wind generation temporarily.

  1. Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14

    The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

  2. Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6.1 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features 10.7m deep x 15.2m wide trench along length of tank; the Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin is spanned...

  3. K-Basins S/RIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    The Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is a list of the Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES{ampersand}H) and Safeguards and Security (SAS) standards/requirements applicable to the K Basins facility.

  4. Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Enhancement Project: Annual Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This goal was addressed under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 703 (c) (1) - Action Item 4.2. Construction of fish habitat structures was completed on ...

  5. 183-H Basin sludge treatability test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biyani, R.K.

    1995-12-31

    This document presents the results from the treatability testing of a 1-kg sample of 183-H Basin sludge. Compressive strength measurements, Toxic Characteristic Leach Procedure, and a modified ANSI 16.1 leach test were conducted

  6. Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothermal Resources Project Officer: Eric Hass Total Project Funding: $1.2 million April 24, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Principal Investigator Stuart F Simmons Colorado School of Mines 2 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov Relevance/Impact of Research * Determine fundamental controls on fluid-mineral equilibria in six geothermal systems across the Great Basin to

  7. Past operations, results, and prospects of future petroleum explorations in the SE Pannonian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkovic, M.; Stankovic, S. )

    1991-08-01

    The long history of petroleum operations in the southeastern area of the Pannonian basin (eastern Yugoslavia) relates to successful explorations using state-of-art tools in geology, geophysics, and geochemistry, as well as in deep drilling. The paper will discuss chronologically past explorations and problems encountered in its specific stages. A comprehensive petroleum geological overview will highlight the most important features of the 30,000-km{sup 2} exploration area, including issues such as oil and gas origin, occurrence of source, reservoir, and cap rocks, hydrocarbon migration and accumulation etc. Particular attention will be devoted to the description of the applied exploration techniques and results obtained on this very interesting hydrocarbon-bearing area. Due space will be given to the application of the recent developments for assessing the potential of the deep buried, comparatively unknown targets situated in extremely complex environments under adverse temperature and pressure conditions.

  8. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Partial Basin and Range Heat and Zones of Critical Stress Maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    Interpolated maps of heat flow, temperature gradient, and quartz geothermometers are included as TIF files. Zones of critical stress map is also included as a TIF file. The zones are given a 5km diameter buffer. The study area is only a part of the Basin and Range, but it does includes the Tularosa Basin.

  9. Petrophysical characterization of the Carito Norte, Mulata and Carito fields, Norte de Monagas, Eastern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porras, J.C.; De J. Valle,

    1996-08-01

    The Norte de Monagas trend is located in the Eastern Venezuelan Basin and is characterized by high temperature, high initial pressure and production rates, variable PVT properties, GORs, and asphaltene content, and the presence of a tar mat at the base of the oil column. These reservoirs were petrophysically characterized through the integration of core and log data. Productive sands are composed of very coarse- to medium-grained sands deposited primarily in deltaic to shallow marine environments. These sands are quartz-rich, with clay matrix averaging 3% in the Oligocene and 6% in the Cretaceous. The main difference is the presence of up to 30% feldspars in the Cretaceous. Clay mineralogy is dominated by illitic material in the Cretaceous and by kaolinite in the Oligocene. Post-depositional changes dominated by cementation, mechanical compaction and subsequent dissolution processes have resulted in marked improvement or degradation of the productive characteristics of these reservoirs. Rocks were divided into four petrophysical. categories based on grain size, pore throat radius, porosity and permeability. Mercury saturation vs. mercury saturation over capillary pressure plots show the dominant interconnected pore system which controls flow rates is best defined by 50% saturation. Plots constructed using R50 pore aperture correlation indicate the pore throats to be macro to mega porous. Average log calculated water saturation is 14% compared with estimated from capillary pressure data of 12% at 1200{prime} above free water level, and 15% from relative permeability data. Relative permeability data indicate the rocks behave preferably as water-wet.

  10. Hydrogeologic subdivision of the Wolfcamp series and Pennsylvanian system of eastern Texas Panhandle, north-central Texas, and southwestern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayal, R.R.; Kistner, D.J.; Kranes, R.; Verock, F.P.

    1987-03-01

    The Pennsylvanian-Wolfcamp section in the Palo Duro Basin includes brine aquifers that are considered to be the most important ground-water flow paths in the deep-basin system. This report is the fifth in a series providing summary documentation of studies that subdivide the section into hydrogeologic units based on their judged relative capacities for transmitting water. This report extends the hydrogeologic study area to the eastern Texas Panhandle, north-central Texas, and southwestern Oklahoma. It includes 37 counties in Texas and Oklahoma. Underground patterns of rock distribution are delineated from a hydrologic perspective and at a level of detail appropriate for numerical modeling of regional ground-water flow. Hydrogeologic units are defined and characterized so that appropriate porosity and permeability values can be assigned to each unit during construction of the numerical models (not part of this study), and so that modelers can combine units where necessary. In this study, hydrogeologic units have been defined as mappable, physically continuous rock bodies that function in bulk as water-transmitting or water-retarding units relative to adjacent rocks. Interpretations are made primarily from geophysical logs. Hydrologic characteristics are assessed on the basis of properties typically associated with certain lithologies (e.g., sandstones are more pervious than shales) and on the basis of gross variations in effective porosity (particularly in carbonate sequences). 44 refs., 32 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Mississippian through Permian orogenesis in eastern Nevada: Post-Antler, pre-Sonoma tectonics of the western cordillera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, J.; Cashman, P. ); Snyder, W.; Spinoza, C.; Gallegos, D. )

    1991-02-01

    Mississippian through Permian strata in eastern Nevada document a series of tectonic events that are either generally unrecognized, or assigned to the Antler or Sonoma orogenies. Some of these events were local and some were regional in scale; none fit either the Antler or Sonoma events as normally defined: Antler orogeny (ends Late Devonian or earliest Mississippian) - emplacement of accretionary wedge on the passive margin; Wendover phase (Early Mississippian) - regional uplift, erosion; Diamond Range phase (Middle Mississippian) - folding, uplift, and erosion; Humboldt orogeny (Pennsylvanian) - uplift, tilting and erosion; Dry Mountain event (Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian) - uplift, tilting and erosion, and basin segmentation; Sonoma orogeny (Permian-Triassic) - allochthon emplacement. Each event is documented by deformation and erosional truncation of older strata, and by clastic sequences that fill newly formed basins. These tectonic events have mostly escaped notice until now for two reasons: (1) established cratonal stratigraphy, when applied to highly variable craton-edge sequences, tends to obscure important local perturbations, and (2) the assumption of only two Paleozoic orogenies leaves little room for more complexity, and inevitably leads to unresolvable arguments about timing and style. Little-used older terminology (e.g., Wendover phase') is available to describe these events in some cases; refinement or abandonment of existing terminology may be necessary in others. Careful, objective stratigraphic studies will result in a more accurate, and complex regional history.

  12. Mesozoic and cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Maranon Basin in Southeastern Columbia, Eastern Ecuador and Northeastern Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleman, A.M.; Marksteiner, M. )

    1993-02-01

    The Late Triassic to Early Jurassic in the Maranon was characterized by tectonic quiescence and carbonate shelf deposition. During Middle to Late Jurassic, a northeast-southwest extensional event occurred which is documented by the presence of northwest oriented grabens filled with red beds and volcaniclastic rocks. Cretaceous deposition commenced during the Aptian and continued to the Early Campanian within the vast South America Cretaceous Seaway (SACS) that extended from Venezuela to Central Peru. These strata comprised of shallow marine clastics sources from the Brazilian and Guyana cratons to the east. Retreat of the SACS resulted from the Late Cretaceous (Peruvian) phase of the Andean Orogeny. Deposition became largely continental with sediments derived from the west. The deformation was comtemporaneous with oblique collision and accretion of an allochthonous terrain present in Colombia and Ecuador, as well as uplift of the Putumayo, Napo, Cutucu and Cenepa (PNCC) Mountains, westward erosion of the Napo/Chonta Formations, widespread deposition of red beds, volcanic activity in the foreland and the subtle inversion of half grabens. The Middle Eocene (Inca) phase of the Andean Orogeny, correlated to a relative increase in convergence rates along the western margin of South America (SA). This orogeny was characterized by the development of folds and reverse faults within a narrow and elongated belt, the reactivation of the PNCC Uplifts, the deposition of varicolored fluviatile deposits, the renewed inversion of half grabens, and volcanic activity close to the hinterland. The three main pulses of the Late Miocene to Pliocene phase of the Andean Orogeny correlate with high rates of convergence along the SA margin. This orogenic phase was characterized by thick fluviatile deposition, reactivation of the PNCC uplifts, eastward propagation of the fold and thrust belt, renewed inversion of the half grabens and alkaline volcanism in the foreland.

  13. Sedimentology of Permian upper part of the Minnelusa Formation, eastern Powder River basin, Wyoming, and a comparison to the subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenk, C.J.; Schmoker, J.W.; Fox, J.E.

    1993-04-01

    Outcrops of the Permian upper part of the Minnelusa Formation near Beulah, Wyoming consist of dolomite, gypsum, and sandstone units deposited in transgressive-regressive cycles. Three depositional cycles are partly exposed in the Simons Ranch anticline near Beulah, and provide an opportunity to view fades of the upper Minnelusa Formation in three dimensions. The cycles observed in outcrop were informally labelled cycle 1, cycle 2, and cycle 3 in ascending stratigraphic order. Cycle 2 contains a basal, laterally extensive sabkha sandstone and an overlying, laterally restricted sandstone that represents a preserved eolian-dune complex. The eolian-dune sandstone of cycle 2 was partially reworked during the marine transgression that initiated cycle 3. The eolian-dune deposit grades laterally into an apron of contorted and massive-bedded sandstones that formed as water-saturated sands liquified and slumped from the margins of the eolian dune. The partially reworked eolian-dune topography was covered by gypsum beds of cycle 3. The sandstone of cycle 3 is interpreted as a laterally continuous sabkha sandstone. West Mellott field (secs. 8, 9, T52N, R68W) represents a subsurface example of the facies and facies relationships observed in outcrop. The eolian-dune sandstone of the C cycle, which was partially reworked by the transgression of the B cycle, produces oil at West Mellott. The draping of dolomite and anhydrite of the B cycle on the eolian-dune sandstone of the C cycle is analogous to the draping of gypsum on dune sand in cycle 2 in outcrop.

  14. RECONNAISSANCE ASSESSMENT OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL IN THE TRIASSIC AGE RIFT BASIN TREND OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND NORTHERN FLORIDA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blount, G.; Millings, M.

    2011-08-01

    A reconnaissance assessment of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration potential within the Triassic age rift trend sediments of South Carolina, Georgia and the northern Florida Rift trend was performed for the Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This rift trend also extends into eastern Alabama, and has been termed the South Georgia Rift by previous authors, but is termed the South Carolina, Georgia, northern Florida, and eastern Alabama Rift (SGFAR) trend in this report to better describe the extent of the trend. The objectives of the study were to: (1) integrate all pertinent geologic information (literature reviews, drilling logs, seismic data, etc.) to create an understanding of the structural aspects of the basin trend (basin trend location and configuration, and the thickness of the sedimentary rock fill), (2) estimate the rough CO{sub 2} storage capacity (using conservative inputs), and (3) assess the general viability of the basins as sites of large-scale CO{sub 2} sequestration (determine if additional studies are appropriate). The CO{sub 2} estimates for the trend include South Carolina, Georgia, and northern Florida only. The study determined that the basins within the SGFAR trend have sufficient sedimentary fill to have a large potential storage capacity for CO{sub 2}. The deeper basins appear to have sedimentary fill of over 15,000 feet. Much of this fill is likely to be alluvial and fluvial sedimentary rock with higher porosity and permeability. This report estimates an order of magnitude potential capacity of approximately 137 billion metric tons for supercritical CO{sub 2}. The pore space within the basins represent hundreds of years of potential storage for supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} stored in aqueous form. There are many sources of CO{sub 2} within the region that could use the trend for geologic storage. Thirty one coal fired power plants are located within 100 miles of the deepest portions of

  15. Seismicity and focal mechanisms for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: 1987 through 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmsen, S.C.; Bufe, C.G.

    1991-12-31

    For the calendar year 1987, the southern Great basin seismic network (SGBSN) recorded about 820 earthquakes in the southern Great Basin (SGB). Local magnitudes ranged from 0.2 to 4.2 (December 30, 1987, 22:50:42 UTC at Hot Creek Valley). Five earthquakes epicenters in 1987 within the detection threshold of the seismic network are at Yucca Mountain, the site of a potential national, high-level nuclear waste repository. The maximum magnitude of those five earthquakes is 1.1, and their estimated depths of focus ranged from 3.1 to 7.6 km below sea level. For the calendar year 1988, about 1280 SGB earthquakes were catalogued, with maximum magnitude-4.4 for an Owens Valley, California, earthquake on July 5, 1988. Eight earthquake epicenters in 1988 are at Yucca Mountain, with depths ranging from three to 12 km below sea level, and maximum magnitude 2.1. For the calendar year 1989, about 1190 SGB earthquakes were located and catalogued, with maximum magnitude equal to 3.5 for earthquake about ten miles north of Las Vegas, Nevada, on January 9. No Yucca Mountain earthquakes were recorded in 1989. An earthquake having a well-constrained depth of about 30 km below sea level was observed on August 21, 1989, in eastern Nevada Test Site (NTS).

  16. Independent focuses Philippines exploration on Visayan basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rillera, F.G.

    1995-08-21

    Cophil Exploration Corp., a Filipino public company, spearheaded 1995 Philippine oil and gas exploration activity with the start of its gas delineation drilling operations in Libertad, northern Cebu. Cophil and its Australian partners, Coplex Resources NL and PacRim Energy NL, have set out to complete a seven well onshore drilling program within this block this year. The companies are testing two modest shallow gas plays, Libertad and Dalingding, and a small oil play, Maya, all in northern Cebu about 500 km southeast of Manila. Following a short discussion on the geology and exploration history of the Visayan basin, this article briefly summarizes Cophil`s ongoing Cebu onshore drilling program. Afterwards, discussion focuses on identified exploration opportunities in the basin`s offshore sector.

  17. New tools attack Permian basin stimulation problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ely, J.W.; Schubarth, S.K.; Wolters, B.C.; Kromer, C. )

    1992-06-08

    This paper reports that profitable stimulation treatments in the Permian basin of the southwestern U.S. combine new tools with technology and fluids previously available. This paper reports that a wide selection of fracturing fluids and techniques needs to be considered to solve the varied problems associated with stimulating hydrocarbon reservoirs that are at diverse depths, temperatures, pressures, and lithologies. The Permian basin of West Texas and New Mexico is the most fertile ground in the U.S. for some of the newer stimulation technologies. In this basin, these new tools and techniques have been applied in many older producing areas that previously were treated with more conventional stimulation techniques, including acidizing and conventional fracturing procedures.

  18. Ground-water hydraulics of the deep-basin brine aquifer, Palo Duro Basin, Texas panhandle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Deep-Basin Brine aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin (Texas Panhandle) underlies thick Permian bedded evaporites that are being evaluated as a potential high-level nuclear waste isolation repository. Potentiometric surface maps of 5 units of the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer were drawn using drill-stem test (DST) pressure data, which were analyzed by a geostatistical technique (kriging) to smooth the large variation in the data. The potentiometric surface maps indicate that the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer could be conceptually modeled as 5 aquifer units; a Lower Permian (Wolfcamp) aquifer, upper and lower Pennsylvanian aquifers, a pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer, and a Pennsylvanian to Wolfcampian granite-wash aquifer. The hydraulic head maps indicate that ground-water flow in each of the units is west to east with a minor northerly component near the Amarillo Uplift, the northern structural boundary of the basin. The Wolfcamp potentiometric surface indicates the strongest component of northerly flow. Inferred flow direction in Pennsylvanian aquifers is easterly, and in the pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer near its pinch-out in the basin center, flow is inferred to be to the north. In the granite-wash aquifer the inferred flow direction is east across the northern edge of the basin and southeast along the Amarillo Uplift.

  19. Hazard categorization of 105-KE basin debris removal project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meichle, R.H.

    1996-01-25

    This supporting document provides the hazard categorization for 105-KE Basin Debris Removal Project activities planned in the K east Basin. All activities are categorized as less than Hazard Category 3.

  20. Colorado Division of Water Resources Denver Basin Webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Denver Basin Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Division of Water Resources Denver Basin Webpage Abstract This is the...

  1. Designated Ground Water Basin Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Designated Ground Water Basin Map Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Designated Ground Water Basin Map Abstract This webpage provides...

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shirley Basin AEC Ore Buying...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shirley Basin AEC Ore Buying Station - WY 0-05 Site ID (CSD Index Number): WY.0-05 Site Name: Shirley Basin AEC Ore Buying Station Site Summary: The history of domestic uranium ...

  3. ,"Calif--Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Calif--Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Liquids ... PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Calif--Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Liquids ...

  4. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to ...

  5. K West basin isolation barrier leak rate test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehurst, R.; McCracken, K.; Papenfuss, J.N.

    1994-10-31

    This document establishes the procedure for performing the acceptance test on the two isolation barriers being installed in K West basin. This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals.

  6. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity...

  7. Geothermal Literature Review At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  8. Data Collection and Analyses of the CHP System at Eastern Maine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data Collection and Analyses of the CHP System at Eastern Maine Medical Center - Final Report, June 2008 Data Collection and Analyses of the CHP System at Eastern Maine Medical ...

  9. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  10. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  11. Summary - K Basins Sludge Treatment Process

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessment (TRA) is tric-based process a t y Office of E dge Trea nt ging Basin or ansfer, The ding- y the ent. ch of e below: * * Th ass at t De but Th est ass con a r de dev Re ...

  12. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Water Chemistry

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Adam Brandt

    2015-12-15

    This shapefile contains 409 well data points on Tularosa Basin Water Chemistry, each of which have a location (UTM), temperature, quartz and Potassium/Magnesium geothermometer; as well as concentrations of chemicals like Mn, Fe, Ba, Sr, Cs, Rb, As, NH4, HCO3, SO4, F, Cl, B, SiO2, Mg, Ca, K, Na, and Li.

  13. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Strain Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    A DEM of the Tularosa Basin was divided into twelve zones, each of which a ZR ratio was calculated for. This submission has a TIFF image of the zoning designations, along with a table with respective ZR ratio calculations in the metadata.

  14. EIS-0390: Eastern Plains Transmission Project, Colorado and Kansas.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is for Western Area Power Administration's proposal to participate with Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Inc. (Tri-State), to construct the proposed Eastern Plains Transmission Project (Project). Western’s participation with Tri-State would be in exchange for capacity rights on the transmission lines.

  15. AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region ... 530,741 349,007 159,102 30,353 9,093 4,218 8,493 5,462 6,537 22,750 119,120 256,340 ...

  16. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study Solar Dataset (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.

    2014-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory produced solar power production data for the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (ERGIS) including "real time" 5-minute interval data, "four hour ahead forecast" 60-minute interval data, and "day-ahead forecast" 60-minute interval data for the year 2006. This presentation provides a brief overview of the three solar power datasets.

  17. NYDOCS01/1646893 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Participation Agreement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NYDOCS01/1646893 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Participation Agreement EXECUTION VERSION PARTICIPATION AGREEMENT among THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY and PLAINS AND EASTERN CLEAN LINE HOLDINGS LLC, ARKANSAS CLEAN LINE LLC, PLAINS AND EASTERN CLEAN LINE OKLAHOMA LLC and certain of their Affiliates (as set forth herein) dated as of March 25, 2016 NYDOCS01/1646893 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Participation Agreement Table of Contents Article I Defined Terms and Definitions

  18. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. Comment from Dr. Contreras 6-10-15.pdf (608.36 KB) More Documents & Publications Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Dr. Contreras

  19. Pennsylvanian-Permian tectonism in the Great Basin: The Dry Mountain trough and related basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, W.S.; Spinosa, C.; Gallegos, D.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Pennsylvanian-Permian tectonism affected the continental margin of western North America from the Yukon to the Mojave Desert. Specific signatures of this tectonism include local angular unconformities, regional disconformities, renewed outpouring of clastic debris from a reactivated Antler and related highlands, and development of deeper water basins with anoxic sediments deposited below wave base. The basins formed include Ishbel trough (Canada), the Wood River basin (Idaho), Cassia basin, Ferguson trough, Dry Mountain trough (all Nevada), and unnamed basins in Death Valley-Mojave Desert region. The Dry Mountain trough (DMT) was initiated during early Wolfcampian and received up to 1,200 m of sediment by the late Leonardian. The lower contact is a regional unconformity with the Ely Limestone, or locally with the Diamond Peak or Vinini formations. Thus, following a period of localized regional uplift that destroyed the Ely basin, portions of the uplifted and exposed shelf subsided creating the Dry Mountain trough. Evidence suggesting a tectonic origin for the DMT includes (1) high subsidence rates (60-140 m/m.y.); (2) renewed influx of coarse clastic debris from the Antler highlands: (3) possible pre-Early Permian folding, thrusting, and tilting within the highlands; and (4) differential subsidence within the Dry Mountain trough, suggesting the existence of independent fault blocks.

  20. Analysis of K west basin canister gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trimble, D.J., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    Gas and Liquid samples have been collected from a selection of the approximately 3,820 spent fuel storage canisters in the K West Basin. The samples were taken to characterize the contents of the gas and water in the canisters providing source term information for two subprojects of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) (Fulton 1994): the K Basins Integrated Water Treatment System Subproject (Ball 1996) and the K Basins Fuel Retrieval System Subproject (Waymire 1996). The barrels of ten canisters were sampled for gas and liquid in 1995, and 50 canisters were sampled in a second campaign in 1996. The analysis results from the first campaign have been reported (Trimble 1995a, 1995b, 1996a, 1996b). The analysis results from the second campaign liquid samples have been documented (Trimble and Welsh 1997; Trimble 1997). This report documents the results for the gas samples from the second campaign and evaluates all gas data in terms of expected releases when opening the canisters for SNFP activities. The fuel storage canisters consist of two closed and sealed barrels, each with a gas trap. The barrels are attached at a trunion to make a canister, but are otherwise independent (Figure 1). Each barrel contains up to seven N Reactor fuel element assemblies. A gas space of nitrogen was established in the top 2.2 to 2.5 inches (5.6 to 6.4 cm) of each barrel. Many of the fuel elements were damaged allowing the metallic uranium fuel to be corroded by the canister water. The corrosion releases fission products and generates hydrogen gas. The released gas mixes with the gas-space gas and excess gas passes through the gas trap into the basin water. The canister design does not allow canister water to be exchanged with basin water.

  1. Okanogan Basin Spring Spawner Report for 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colville Tribes, Department of Fish & Wildlife

    2007-09-01

    The Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program collected data related to spring spawning anadromous salmonid stocks across the entire Okanogan River basin. Data were collected using redd surveys, traps, underwater video, and PIT-tag technology then summarized and analyzed using simple estimate models. From these efforts we estimated that 1,266 summer steelhead spawned in the Okanogan River basin and constructed 552 redds;152 of these fish where of natural origin. Of these, 121 summer steelhead, including 29 of natural origin, created an estimated 70 redds in the Canadian portion of the Okanagan basin. We estimated summer steelhead spawner escapement into each sub-watershed along with the number from natural origin and the number and density of redds. We documented redd desiccation in Loup Loup Creek, habitat utilization in Salmon Creek as a result of a new water lease program, and 10 spring Chinook returning to Omak Creek. High water through most of the redd survey period resulted in development of new modeling techniques and allowed us to survey additional tributaries including the observation of summer steelhead spawning in Wanacut Creek. These 2007 data provide additional support that redd surveys conducted within the United States are well founded and provide essential information for tracking the recovery of listed summer steelhead. Conversely, redd surveys do not appear to be the best approach for enumerating steelhead spawners or there distribution within Canada. We also identified that spawning distributions within the Okanogan River basin vary widely and stocking location may play an over riding roll in this variability.

  2. March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Geosciences | OSTI, US Dept...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Book for Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Douglas G. Patchen; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski; David Harris; John Hickman; John Bocan; Michael Hohn (2005) ...

  3. File:EIA-shaleusa5.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Play, Appalachian Basin Sources Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-03-17 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region...

  4. File:EIA-Appalach7-TN-KY-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appalachian Basin, Kentucky and Tennessee By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  5. FELDA W SUNOCO F ELDA SEMINOLE SUNNILAND BEAR ISLAND CORKSCREW

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 1 - 10 MMCF 10 - 100 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary South Florida Peninsula Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas...

  6. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scenario A significant amount of natural gas extracted from Marcellus and Utica shale formations in the Appalachian Basin contains valuable liquids, such as propane, butane and ...

  7. FELDA W SUNOCO F ELDA SEMINOLE SUNNILAND BEAR ISLAND CORKSCREW

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 1 - 10 MMCF 10 - 100 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary South Florida Peninsula Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  8. Microsoft Word - EPAct_TRS_Greene Co Site_final_20140915.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... beds of sandstone and shale of the PennsylvanianPermian age Waynesburg Formation. ... natural gases in the Plateau Province, Central Appalachian Basin, Pennsylvania and Ohio. ...

  9. Petroleum geology of heavy oil in the Oriente basin of Ecuador: Exploration and exploitation challenge for the 1990s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leadholm, R.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Published Ecuadorian government forecasts suggest that Oriente basin light oil (21-32{degree} API) production may start to decline in the early to mid-1990s. To maintain stabilized production into the next century, heavy oil reserves (10-20{degree} API) will have to be aggressively exploited. The Oriente's undeveloped proven plus probable heavy reserves are substantial and are expected to exceed 0.5 billion bbl. A recent discovery made by Conoc Ecuador Ltd., operator of Block 16 for a group which consists of O.P.I.C., Maxus, Nomeco, Murphy and Canam, is a good model for future exploration and exploitation of heavy oil in the remote eastern regions of the basin. Amo-1 tested a low-relief anticline (less than 100 ft vertical closure) and encountered 10-20{degree} API oil in five Cretaceous sandstone reservoirs (8,000-10,000 ft depth). Cumulative test production was 1,062 BOPD. Subsequent drilling along the trend resulted in three additional discoveries. The Cretaceous sands were transported from the Brazilian shield by the westward flowing proto-Amazon River and were deposited in fluviodeltaic, tidal, and high-energy marginal marine environments. Air permeabilities are high and geometric mean values approaching several darcies. Porosities average 18-22% in generally well-consolidated sands. The heavy oils are the result of mild biodegradation and/or expulsion from a thermally immature source. Oil-to-oil correlations suggest that all of the basin oils have the same or similar origin, probably marine calcareous shales of the Cretaceous Napo formation. The Block 16 project will provide a major step toward the strategic exploitation of the Oriente basin's heavy oil reserves, when it comes on stream in the early 1990s.

  10. Origin, distribution, and movement of brine in the Permian Basin (U. S. A. ). A model for displacement of connate brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bein, A.; Dutton, A.R. )

    1993-06-01

    Na-Cl, halite Ca-Cl, and gypsum Ca-Cl brines with salinities from 45 to >300 g/L are identified and mapped in four hydrostratigraphic units in the Permian Basin area beneath western Texas and Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico, providing spatial and lithologic constraints on the interpretation of the origin and movement of brine. Na-Cl brine is derived from meteoric water as young as 5-10 Ma that dissolved anhydrite and halite, whereas Ca-Cl brine is interpreted to be ancient, modified-connate Permian brine that now is mixing with, and being displaced by, the Na-Cl brine. Displacement fronts appear as broad mixing zones with no significant salinity gradients. Evolution of Ca-Cl brine composition from ideal evaporated sea water is attributed to dolomitization and syndepositional recycling of halite and bittern salts by intermittent influx of fresh water and sea water. Halite Ca-Cl brine in the evaporite section in the northern part of the basin differs from gypsum Ca-Cl brine in the south-central part in salinity and Na/Cl ratio and reflects segregation between halite- and gypsum-precipitating lagoons during the Permian. Ca-Cl brine moved downward through the evaporite section into the underlying Lower Permian and Pennsylvanian marine section that is now the deep-basin brine aquifer, mixing there with pre-existing sea water. Buoyancy-driven convection of brine dominated local flow for most of basin history, with regional advection governed by topographically related forces dominant only for the past 5 to 10 Ma. 71 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Oil and gas developments in west Texas and eastern New Mexico in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pause, P.H.; Adams, D.R.; Collier, W.W.; Gibson, W.R.; Miller, H.A. Jr.; Robbins, L.D.; Williams, S.M.

    1985-10-01

    1984 was a surprisingly good year for drilling activity in the Permian basin. 8012 wells were drilled in west Texas and eastern New Mexico, almost 14% more than in 1983. The success rate for all wells continued to climb, reaching 83.5%, up 3.7% from 1983. Exploratory drilling was up almost 5% to 1080 wells. Total exploratory footage increased 8%, and the success rate for exploratory tests increased 1.5% to 26.9%. Development drilling also increased with 6932 wells drilled, up 15.5% from 1983. This was only 150 wells shy of the record set in 1982. The overall development success rate climbed from 89.2% to 92.4%, reflecting increased emphasis on safe drilling. These overall increases stand in sharp contrast to gas well drilling efforts. Exploratory gas completions declined 12.8%, and development gas well drilling was down 33.4%, a result of lower gas prices and a weak market. Oil and gas production in 1984 increased for the first time in 10 years. Total oil production was 551,911,001 bbl, an increase of 0.3% from 1983. Gas production was 2,006,907 mmcf, up 0.6%. Seismic activity increased in 1984, maintaining a trend started the year before. 1993 seismic crew-weeks were reported, up almost 4% from 1983. Overall leasing interest declined again for the third year in a row. Glasscock, Midland, and Hockley Counties, Texas, however, continued to be areas of vigorous activity. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Oil and gas developments in west Texas and eastern New Mexico in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pause, P.H.; Adams, D.R.; Collier, W.W.; Gibson, W.R.; Miller, H.A.; Robbins, L.D.; Williams, S.M.

    1985-10-01

    1984 was a surprisingly good year for drilling activity in the Permian basin. 8,012 wells were drilled in west Texas and eastern New Mexico, almost 14% more than in 1983. The success rate for all wells continued to climb, reaching 83.5%, up 3.7% from 1983. Exploratory drilling was up almost 5% to 1,080 wells. Total exploratory footage increased 8%, and the success rate for exploratory tests increased 1.5% to 26.9%. Development drilling also increased with 6,932 wells drilled, up 15.5% from 1983. This was only 150 wells shy of the record set in 1982. The overall development success rate climbed from 89.2% to 92.4%, reflecting increased emphasis on ''safe'' drilling. These overall increases stand in sharp contrast to gas well drilling efforts. Exploratory gas completions declined 12.8%, and development gas well drilling was down 33.4%, a result of lower gas prices and a weak market. Oil and gas production in 1984 increased for the first time in 10 years. Total oil production was 551,911,001 bbl, an increase of 0.3% from 1983. Gas production was 2,006,907 mmcf, up 0.6%. Seismic activity increased in 1984, maintaining a trend started the year before. 1,993 seismic crew-weeks were reported, up almost 4% from 1983. Overall leasing interest declined again for the third year in a row. Glasscock, Midland, and Hockley Counties, Texas, however, continued to be areas of vigorous activity.

  13. SE Great Basin Play Fairway Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a Na/K geothermometer probability greater than 200 deg C map, as well as two play fairway analysis (PFA) models. The probability map acts as a composite risk segment for the PFA models. The PFA models differ in their application of magnetotelluric conductors as composite risk segments. These PFA models map out the geothermal potential in the region of SE Great Basin, Utah.

  14. Evaluation of Sichuan Basin in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, J.G.

    1996-06-01

    Sichuan basin lies in the central-south China, in a compression tectonic regime, with an area of approximately 180,000 km{sup 2}. It is a prolific basin with a upside resource potential of gas 5045.38 billion m{sup 3}, and oil 3.56 billion tons. By year-end 1993, the possible geological reserve of gas was 676.136 billion m{sup 3}, and oil 0.14 billion tons; totally about 140 billion m{sup 3} of gas and about 3.5 million tons of oil have been produced to date; thus, there will be 4,229 billion m{sup 3} gas yet to find. During about 40 years` exploration (1950 to 1990), 81 gas/oil fields, including 245 gas pools and 15 oil pools, had been discovered through 2357 wells (total footage 5,804,094 m). 257 surface structures and 189 buried structures (by 91,136 km seismic) had been found in the basin, of which 172 structures had been drilled. The basin contains 21 gas/oil reservoirs of commercial value, distributed from Sinian to Jurassic, in the depths ranging from 7,157 m (well-Guanji) to hundreds of meters. It is evident that the gas and water distribution is not controlled by regional structures or local anticlinal structure but depends on the local development of permeability and fracture porosity in reservoir objectives. Each local occurrence of permeability and porosity functions as a trap for both gas and water, and new gas reservoirs are continuously being found on anticlinal gas fields that have been on production for years.

  15. K Basin sludge treatment process description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westra, A.G.

    1998-08-28

    The K East (KE) and K West (KW) fuel storage basins at the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site contain sludge on the floor, in pits, and inside fuel storage canisters. The major sources of the sludge are corrosion of the fuel elements and steel structures in the basin, sand intrusion from outside the buildings, and degradation of the structural concrete that forms the basins. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be treated so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the double-shell waste tanks. The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office accepted a recommendation by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., to chemically treat the sludge. Sludge treatment will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. A truck will transport the resulting slurry to an underground storage tank (most likely tank 241-AW-105). The undissolved solids will be treated to reduce the transuranic (TRU) and content, stabilized in grout, and transferred to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) for disposal. This document describes a process for dissolving the sludge to produce waste streams that meet the TWRS acceptance criteria for disposal to an underground waste tank and the ERDF acceptance criteria for disposal of solid waste. The process described is based on a series of engineering studies and laboratory tests outlined in the testing strategy document (Flament 1998).

  16. Eastern and Western Wind Integration Data Sets | Grid Modernization | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Western Wind Integration Data Sets The Eastern Wind Integration Data Set and Western Wind Integration Data Set were designed to perform wind integration studies and estimate power production from hypothetical wind power plants in the United States. These data sets can help energy professionals such as transmission planners, utility planners, project developers, and university researchers: Perform spatial and temporal comparisons of sites, including: Geographic diversity Load correlation

  17. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register Notice,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Volume 80, No. 81 - April 28, 2015 | Department of Energy Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 81 - April 28, 2015 Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 81 - April 28, 2015 The Department of Energy (DOE) requests public comment on the first complete application submitted in response to its June 10, 2010 Request for Proposals for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 in the Federal

  18. Dynamic Model Validation with Governor Deadband on the Eastern Interconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Gefei; Hadley, Stanton W; Liu, Yilu

    2014-04-01

    This report documents the efforts to perform dynamic model validation on the Eastern Interconnection (EI) by modeling governor deadband. An on-peak EI dynamic model is modified to represent governor deadband characteristics. Simulation results are compared with synchrophasor measurements collected by the Frequency Monitoring Network (FNET/GridEye). The comparison shows that by modeling governor deadband the simulated frequency response can closely align with the actual system response.

  19. Structural Inventory of Great Basin Geothermal Systems and Definition of Favorable Structural Settings

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Over the course of the entire project, field visits were made to 117 geothermal systems in the Great Basin region. Major field excursions, incorporating visits to large groups of systems, were conducted in western Nevada, central Nevada, northwestern Nevada, northeastern Nevada, east‐central Nevada, eastern California, southern Oregon, and western Utah. For example, field excursions to the following areas included visits of multiple geothermal systems: - Northwestern Nevada: Baltazor Hot Spring, Blue Mountain, Bog Hot Spring, Dyke Hot Springs, Howard Hot Spring, MacFarlane Hot Spring, McGee Mountain, and Pinto Hot Springs in northwest Nevada. - North‐central to northeastern Nevada: Beowawe, Crescent Valley (Hot Springs Point), Dann Ranch (Hand‐me‐Down Hot Springs), Golconda, and Pumpernickel Valley (Tipton Hot Springs) in north‐central to northeast Nevada. - Eastern Nevada: Ash Springs, Chimney Hot Spring, Duckwater, Hiko Hot Spring, Hot Creek Butte, Iverson Spring, Moon River Hot Spring, Moorman Spring, Railroad Valley, and Williams Hot Spring in eastern Nevada. - Southwestern Nevada‐eastern California: Walley’s Hot Spring, Antelope Valley, Fales Hot Springs, Buckeye Hot Springs, Travertine Hot Springs, Teels Marsh, Rhodes Marsh, Columbus Marsh, Alum‐Silver Peak, Fish Lake Valley, Gabbs Valley, Wild Rose, Rawhide‐ Wedell Hot Springs, Alkali Hot Springs, and Baileys/Hicks/Burrell Hot Springs. - Southern Oregon: Alvord Hot Spring, Antelope Hot Spring‐Hart Mountain, Borax Lake, Crump Geyser, and Mickey Hot Spring in southern Oregon. - Western Utah: Newcastle, Veyo Hot Spring, Dixie Hot Spring, Thermo, Roosevelt, Cove Fort, Red Hill Hot Spring, Joseph Hot Spring, Hatton Hot Spring, and Abraham‐Baker Hot Springs. Structural controls of 426 geothermal systems were analyzed with literature research, air photos, google‐Earth imagery, and/or field reviews (Figures 1 and 2). Of the systems analyzed, we were able to determine the structural settings

  20. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory

  1. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Michael Vanden; Anderson, Paul; Wallace, Janae; Morgan, Craig; Carney, Stephanie

    2012-04-30

    Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary

  2. K Basins fuel encapsulation and storage hazard categorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.

    1994-12-01

    This document establishes the initial hazard categorization for K-Basin fuel encapsulation and storage in the 100 K Area of the Hanford site. The Hazard Categorization for K-Basins addresses the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K-Basins and their supporting facilities. The Hazard Categorization covers the hazards associated with normal K-Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. The criteria categorizes a facility based on total curies per radionuclide located in the facility. Tables 5-3 and 5-4 display the results in section 5.0. In accordance with DOE-STD-1027 and the analysis provided in section 5.0, the K East Basin fuel encapsulation and storage activity and the K West Basin storage are classified as a {open_quotes}Category 2{close_quotes} Facility.

  3. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  4. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operations This report provides the results of an independent oversight review of operations...

  5. Geodetic Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity...

  6. Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity...

  7. Oregon Willamette River Basin Mitigation Agreement | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Basin Mitigation Agreement Author State of Oregon Recipient Bonneville Power Administration Published Publisher Not Provided, 10222010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  8. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

  9. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity...

  10. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  11. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOE-funding Unknown References Mark Coolbaugh, Richard Zehner, Corne Kreemer, David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin,...

  12. Isotopic Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Cole, 1983...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cole, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Cole, 1983) Exploration Activity...

  13. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nash & Johnson, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Nash &...

  14. Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt Et Al...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  15. Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  16. Field Mapping At Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    extension over broad areas of the northern Basin and Range. References Dumitru, T.; Miller, E.; Savage, C.; Gans, P.; Brown, R. (1 April 1993) Fission track evidence for...

  17. Calif--San Joaquin Basin onsh Shale Proved Reserves (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    onsh Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Calif--San Joaquin Basin onsh Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - No Data Reported; --...

  18. Contemporary Strain Rates in the Northern Basin and Range Province...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    province using data from continuous GPS (CGPS) networks, supplemented by additional campaign data from the Death Valley, northern Basin and Range, and Sierra Nevada-Great Valley...

  19. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal...

  20. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal...

  1. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  2. The petroleum geology of the sub-Andean basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathalone, J.M.P.

    1996-08-01

    The sub-Andean trend of basins spans the entire length of South America from Venezuela in the north to Argentina in the south. All the basins produce hydrocarbons with the exception of the Argentinean Bolsones complex and the Peruvian Madro de Dios which is prospective but virtually unexplored. There have been some 119 billion barrels of oil and 190 TCF of gas discovered to date, comprising 93% of the continent`s oil reserves. The basins lie immediately east of the Andes mountain range and are mainly asymmetric Upper Tertiary, westerly dipping foreland basins that overlie a series of earlier Tertiary, Mesozoic and Paleozoic depocentres. All the basins have been compressively deformed as recently as the Upper Miocene, by the eastwards growth of the Andean Cordillera. Giant oil and gas fields sourced from shales of varying age, have been found along the whole trend of basins, with a predominance of gas in the south. The rich marine Upper Cretaceous La Luna and equivalent shales of Venezuela, Colombia and Ecuador have been responsible for generating 86% of the hydrocarbons discovered to date in the sub-Andean basins. Proven sources include Devonian, Carboniferous, Permian and Triassic shales in the central area, comprising Peru, Bolivia and northern Argentina. In southern Argentina, oils have been sourced from Uppermost Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous marine and lacustrine shales. Over 7500 wildcat wells have been drilled in basins along the trend, with a 15% success rate. Many of the basins are very lightly explored, with considerable potential for future discoveries.

  3. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  4. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  5. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  6. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  7. Geothermometry At Nw Basin & Range Region (Shevenell & De Rocher...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermometry At Nw Basin & Range Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nw...

  8. Water Sampling At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  9. Water Sampling At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  10. Cold test data for equipment acceptance into 105-KE Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Packer, M.J.

    1994-11-09

    This document provides acceptance testing of equipment to be installed in the 105-KE Basin for pumping sludge to support the discharge chute barrier doors installation.

  11. EIS-0522: Melvin R. Sampson Hatchery, Yakima Basin Coho Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sampson Hatchery, Yakima Basin Coho Project; Kittitas County, Washington Contact Dave Goodman jdgoodman@bpa.gov (503) 230-4764 More Information http:efw.bpa.gov...

  12. Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, John

    2014-10-21

    This is the final technical report for the Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstrationn Project, outlining the technical aspects of the User Group System.

  13. Dixie Valley - Geothermal Development in the Basin and Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Dixie Valley - Geothermal Development in the Basin and Range Citation Dixie...

  14. Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract NA Authors Elaine J. Bell, Lawrence T. Larson and Russell W. Juncal Published U.S. Department of Energy,...

  15. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2)...

  16. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2)...

  17. Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  18. Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal...

  19. Kinematic model for postorogenic Basin and Range extension |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Article: Kinematic model for postorogenic Basin and Range extension Abstract The Raft River extensional shear zone is exposed in the Albion-Raft River-Grouse Creek...

  20. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program;...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download...

  1. Isotopic Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes...

  2. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical...

  3. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical...

  4. Isotopic Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes...

  5. Micro-Earthquake At Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Micro-Earthquake At Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At...

  6. Preparing T Plant to Store K-Basin Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCKENNEY, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper will explain the history and status of the modification of the Hanford T Plant facility for storage of K Basin sludge.

  7. Supai salt karst features: Holbrook Basin, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    More than 300 sinkholes, fissures, depressions, and other collapse features occur along a 70 km (45 mi) dissolution front of the Permian Supai Formation, dipping northward into the Holbrook Basin, also called the Supai Salt Basin. The dissolution front is essentially coincident with the so-called Holbrook Anticline showing local dip reversal; rather than being of tectonic origin, this feature is likely a subsidence-induced monoclinal flexure caused by the northward migrating dissolution front. Three major areas are identified with distinctive attributes: (1) The Sinks, 10 km WNW of Snowflake, containing some 200 sinkholes up to 200 m diameter and 50 m depth, and joint controlled fissures and fissure-sinks; (2) Dry Lake Valley and contiguous areas containing large collapse fissures and sinkholes in jointed Coconino sandstone, some of which drained more than 50 acre-feet ({approximately}6 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3}) of water overnight; and (3) the McCauley Sinks, a localized group of about 40 sinkholes 15 km SE of Winslow along Chevelon Creek, some showing essentially rectangular jointing in the surficial Coconino Formation. Similar salt karst features also occur between these three major areas. The range of features in Supai salt are distinctive, yet similar to those in other evaporate basins. The wide variety of dissolution/collapse features range in development from incipient surface expression to mature and old age. The features began forming at least by Pliocene time and continue to the present, with recent changes reportedly observed and verified on airphotos with 20 year repetition. The evaporate sequence along interstate transportation routes creates a strategic location for underground LPG storage in leached caverns. The existing 11 cavern field at Adamana is safely located about 25 miles away from the dissolution front, but further expansion initiatives will require thorough engineering evaluation.

  8. Stratigraphy of Pennsylvanian detrital reservoirs, Permian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Der Loop, M. )

    1992-04-01

    Significant oil reserves have been found to date in stratigraphic traps in Pennsylvanian detrital reservoirs on the Central Basin platform and Reagan uplift of the Permian basin. The 32 MMBOEG Arenoso field area, discovered in 1966, is the largest producing field. Along a 75 mi northwest-southeast trend, 23 other smaller fields will produce an average 850 MBOEG each, for a total estimated ultimate recovery to date in the trend of 52 MMBOEG. These stratigraphic traps are elusive and complex. However, reservoir quality is excellent, and because of the poorly understood trap types, significant reserves remain to be found in the trend. The Pennsylvanian detrital consists of chert cobble conglomerates, coarse sands, red shales, and gray limestones deposited in an environment that grades seaward from alluvial fan to braided stream to shallow marine. The chert cobble conglomerates of the alluvial fan facies and the coarse sands of the braided stream facies are the highest quality pay zones. Porosities range from 5 to 20%, with permeability ranging up to 26 d. The total unit is seldom more than 400 ft thick; reservoir rock thicknesses within the unit range up to 100 ft. Because of the complex nature of the alluvial fan and braided stream deposits, dry development wells can be expected within fields. These Strawn deposits are located adjacent to and overlying the eroded lower Paleozoic uplifts of the southern Central Basin platform. The major source of the chert cobbles is erosion of the Devonian tripolitic chert. Renewed structural uplift combined with sea level drop in the middle Wolfcampian locally truncated some Pennsylvanian detrital alluvial fan deposits, and complicated or destroyed a potential trap by depositing Wolfcamp chert conglomerates on top of the Pennsylvanian conglomerates.

  9. Enigmatic uppermost Permian-lowermost Triassic stratigraphic relations in the northern Bighorn basin of Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paull, R.A.; Paull, R.K. )

    1991-06-01

    Eighteen measured sections in the northern Bighorn basin of Wyoming and Montana provide the basis for an analysis of Permian-Triassic stratigraphic relations. This boundary is well defined to the south where gray calcareous siltstones of the Lower Triassic Dinwoody disconformably overlie the Upper Permian Ervay Member of the Park City Formation with little physical evidence of a significant hiatus. The Dinwoody is gradationally overlain by red beds of the Red Peak Formation. The Dinwoody this to zero near the state line. Northward, the erathem boundary is enigmatic because fossils are absent and there is no evidence of an unconformity. Poor and discontinuous exposures contribute to the problem. Up to 20 m of Permian or Triassic rocks or both overlie the Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone in the westernmost surface exposures on the eastern flank of the Bighorn basin with physical evidence of an unconformity. East of the exposed Tensleep, Ervay-like carbonates are overlain by about 15 m of Dinwoody-like siltstones interbedded with red beds and thin dolomitic limestone. In both areas, they are overlain by the Red Peak Formation. Thin carbonates within the Dinwoody are silty, coarse algal laminates with associated peloidal micrite. Carbonates north of the Dinwoody termination and above probably Ervay are peloidal algal laminates with fenestral fabric and sparse coated shell fragments with pisoids. These rocks may be Dinwoody equivalents or they may be of younger Permian age than the Ervay. Regardless, revision of stratigraphic nomenclature in this area may bed required.

  10. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Save The

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ozarks | Department of Energy from Save The Ozarks Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Save The Ozarks Comment submitted on updated Part 2 application. Comment by Save the Ozarks 07-13-15.pdf (112.79 KB) More Documents & Publications Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line - Part 2 Application Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Plains and

  11. EIS-0486: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of participating with Clean Line Energy Partners LLC (Clean Line) in the proposed Plains & Eastern Project. The proposed project would include an overhead ± 600 kilovolt (kV) high voltage direct current (HVDC) electric transmission system and associated facilities with the capacity to deliver approximately 3,500 megawatts (MW) primarily from renewable energy generation facilities in the Oklahoma Panhandle region to load-serving entities in the Mid-South and Southeast via an interconnection with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).

  12. Risk reduction projects in Russia, Ukraine, and eastern Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guppy, J.G.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.; Reisman, A.W. ); Spencer, B.W. )

    1993-01-01

    Assistance to Russia, Ukraine, and Central and Eastern Europe countries (CEEC) in the area of nuclear power safety has been undertaken in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for implementing the nuclear safety portion of this assistance. One aspect of this work is to provide near-term improvement to the safety of VVER and RBMK nuclear power plants (NPPs). This activity has been designated as near-term risk reduction (NTRR). This accident risk reduction effort is being conducted by utilizing teams of experts.

  13. File:EIA-Eastern-OR-WA-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    pdf) Description Eastern Oregon and Washington By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  14. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study: Executive Summary and Project Overview (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EnerNex Corporation; The Midwest ISO; Ventyx

    2011-02-01

    EWITS was designed to answer questions about technical issues related to a 20% wind energy scenario for electric demand in the Eastern Interconnection.

  15. An Updated Central and Eastern United States Ground-Motion Model |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy An Updated Central and Eastern United States Ground-Motion Model An Updated Central and Eastern United States Ground-Motion Model An Updated Central and Eastern United States Ground-Motion Model Lawrence Salomone Pinnacle Specialty Group, Inc. DOE NPH Meeting October 21-22, 2014 An Updated Central and Eastern United States Ground-Motion Model (1.89 MB) More Documents & Publications A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Update Review for Two DOE Sites and NGA-East

  16. Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

  17. Outcrop analogs for mdoeling heterogeneous restricted platform reservoirs: Grayburg Formation (Guadalupian) of the Guadalupe Mountains and subsurface Permian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Bebout, D.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Restricted platform deposits of the Permian basin have produced more than 10 billion bbl of oil, but because of complex internal facies architecture ultimate recovery rarely exceeds 30% of original oil in place. The first step in locating and exploiting the substantial unrecovered hydrocarbons in this play is developing improved development-oriented (as opposed to exploration-oriented) models of facies/permeability heterogeneity. Quantitative geologic/engineering analysis of outcrops analogous to reservoirs allows characterization of styles of variability and three-dimensional geometry at interwell, reservoir, and play scales beyond that possible using limited subsurface data. The Guadalupian Grayburg Formation is exposed in the northern Guadalupe Mountains less than 60 mi west of reservoir trends on the Northwest Shelf and Central Basin platform. These outcrops provide a test for the development of outcrop-based reservoir heterogeneity models. A 10-mi dip section of the mixed siliciclastic/carbonate Grayburg of the Guadalupes exhibits inner ramp (4-mi dip width), ramp-crest ooid shoal/tidal flat (4 mi dip width), and outer ramp fusulinid-peloid (2-mi dip width) facies tracts. Maximum facies heterogeneity occurs in upward-shallowing cycles of the ramp crest where porous ooid shoals pass laterally into tight peloid packstones in less than 1,000 ft. Siliciclastic sands are intercalated in all facies tracts typically as sheets. However, in the ramp crest they also occur as 15-ft-thick by 50-ft-wide channels dissecting ooid shoals. Grayburg reservoirs on the eastern side of the Central Basin platform contain facies tracts and styles of heterogeneity analogous to the outcrop. Production trends from these reservoirs similarly illustrate most variability in grainstone shoal complexes.

  18. Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    C e n t r a l A p p a l a c h i a n B a s i n Michigan Basin Greater Green River Basin ... Coalbed Methane Fields, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles Source: Energy ...

  19. Geodetic Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geodetic Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Nw Basin &...

  20. Calif--Los Angeles Basin Onshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Calif--Los Angeles Basin ... Proved Nonproducing Reserves of Crude Oil CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Proved ...

  1. Geologic evolution and aspects of the petroleum geology of the northern East China Sea shelf basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, G.H.; Kim, B.Y.; Shin, K.S.; Sunwoo, D.

    2006-02-15

    Analysis of multichannel seismic reflection profiles reveals that the northern East China Sea shelf basin experienced two phases of rifting, followed by regional subsidence. The initial rifting in the Late Cretaceous created a series of grabens and half grabens, filled by alluvial and fluviolacustrine deposits. Regional uplift and folding (Yuquan movement) in the late Eocene-early Oligocene terminated the initial rifting. Rifting resumed in the early Oligocene, while alluvial and fluviolacustrine deposition continued to prevail. A second phase of uplift in the early Miocene terminated the rifting, marking the transition to the postrift phase. The early postrift phase (early Miocene-late Miocene) is characterized by regional subsidence and westward and northwestward marine transgression. Inversion (Longjing movement) in the late Miocene interrupted the postrift subsidence, resulting in an extensive thrust-fold belt in the eastern part of the area. The entire area entered a stage of regional subsidence again and has become a broad continental shelf. Source rocks include synrift lacustrine facies, fluvial shales, and coal beds. Synrift fluvial, lacustrine, and deltaic deposits, postrift littoral and/or shallow-marine sandstones, and fractured basement have the potential to provide reservoirs. Various types of hydrocarbon traps (e.g., faulted anticlines, overthrusts, rollover anticlines, faults, unconformity traps, combination structural-stratigraphic traps, weathered basement, and stratigraphic traps) are recognized, but many of these traps have not been tested.

  2. Macrofossils of Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian), Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thrasher, L.; Holland, F.D. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    Results of this study of the macrofossils of the Bakken Formation in North Dakota have reinforced the suggestion, based on previous paleontological work in Saskatchewan, that the Bakken is of both Devonian and Mississippian age, rather than being entirely of Lower Mississippian age as originally considered. Increased drilling and coring activity in the North Dakota part of the Williston Basin has provided the opportunity for acquiring a larger fauna that was previously available. Based on lithologic character, the Bakken has been divided into three informal members. These consist of a calcareous siltstone unit between two lithologically similar units of carbonaceous shale. These black shales contain similar faunas distinct from that of the middle member. The black shales contain inarticulate brachiopods, conchostracans, and rare cephalopods and fish remains as well as more abundant conodonts, ostracods, and palynomorphs. The middle siltstone unit contains a more abundant and diverse fauna consisting of inarticulate and articulate brachiopods together with corals, gastropods, cephalopods, ostracods, echinoderm remains, and trace fossils. This is the first report of cephalopods, conchostracans, ostracods, corals, trace fossils, and some of the brachiopods in the Bakken, although all, except the gastropods, have been reported from stratigraphic equivalents (Exshaw Formation of south-central Montana, the Leatham Formation of northeastern Utah, and the middle member of the Pilot Shale in western Utah and eastern Nevada).

  3. Pedernales oilfield, eastern Venezuela: The first 100 years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gluyas, J.; Oliver, J.; Wilson, W.

    1996-08-01

    Petroleum seeps and surface tar mats attracted oil explorers to Pedernales in eastern Venezuela 100 years ago. Commercial production from the Pedernales Field was established by Creole in 1933. In three production periods, broken by WWII and the end of the Creole-Texaco refining contract, Creole and Lagoven produced about 60 MMSTB from about 60 wells in about 60 years. Peak production was in the late 1950s, when the field delivered 12,000 BOPD. Production was stopped in 1986. In March 1993, BP Venezuela acquired the license to reactivate Pedernales on behalf of Lagoven, and BP`s first well in the field was drilled in August 1994. A second was completed in early 1995. The production from each well was sufficiently encouraging for commerciality to be declared in March 1995. Phase 1 of the field reactivation demanded a production rate of 11,500 BOPD. As of now (September, 1995) six wells, including one gas disposal well, have been completed. Wells have been placed using a combination of old well data and mapping based on a close spaced 2D seismic survey shot in early 1994. Results from these first few wells indicate that the required production rate will be achieved despite severely depleted reservoir pressures. This paper tells the story of reactivation and re-evaluation of one of eastern Venezuela`s oldest oilfields.

  4. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 Liiquids Reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1000 Mbbl 1000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary C a n a d a N Y P A N Y U S A Appalachian Basin, NY Area (Panel 1 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  5. Lawrence Co. Scioto Co. Greenup Co. Jack

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100 .1- 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, WV-VA (Panel 6 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  6. Webster Co. Kanawha Co. Cabell C

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Southern OH (Panel 4 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  7. Lawrence Co. Scioto Co. Greenup Co. Jack

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    100 .1- 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, WV-VA (Panel 6 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  8. Webster Co. Kanawha Co. Cabell C

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Southern OH (Panel 4 of 7) Oil and Gas ...

  9. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, TN-KY (Panel 7 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of a gecko and the phylogeneticposition of the Middle Eastern teratoscincus keyserlingii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macey, J. Robert; Fong, Jonathan J.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Shafiei,Soheila; Ananjeva, Natalia B.; Papenfuss, Theodore J.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-04-22

    Sqamate reptiles are traditionally divided into six groups: Iguania, Anguimorpha, Scincomorpha, Gekkota (these four are lizards), Serpentes (snakes), and Amphisbaenia (the so-called worm lizards). Currently there are complete mitochondrial genomes from two representatives of the Iguania (Janke et al., 2001; Kumazawa, 2004), three from the Anguimorpha (Kumazawa, 2004; Kumazawa and Endo, 2004), two from the Scincomorpha (Kumazawa and Nishida, 1999; Kumazawa, 2004), two from Serpentes (Kumazawa et al., 1998; Kumazawa, 2004) and 12 from Amphisbaenia (Macey et al., 2004). The only traditional group of Squamata from which a complete mitochondrial genome has not been sequenced is the Gekkota. Here we report the complete mitochondrial genome of Teratoscincus keyserlingii, a Middle Eastern representative of the Gekkota. The gekkonid lizard genus Teratoscincus is distributed throughout the deserts of central and southwest Asia as shown in figure 1, with five species currently recognized (Macey et al. 1997a, 1999b). Included in this figure are the positions of mountain ranges discussed in the text; see also figure 1 in Macey et al. (1999b). Two species, T. bedriagai and T. microlepis, are restricted to Southwest Asia south of the Kopet Dagh and Hindu Kush in Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan (Anderson, 1999). Two species are found in the deserts of western China and Mongolia, with T. przewalskii occurring in the Taklimakan and lowland Gobi deserts, and T. roborowskii restricted to the Turpan Depression. The fifth species, T. scincus, is sometimes considered to be restricted to the Caspian Basin in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzistan, Tadjikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. Alternatively, Teratoscincus populations in Southwest Asia, primarily on the Iranian Plateau, situated directly north of the Arabian Plate, are sometimes considered to be a subspecies of T. scincus or, otherwise, to constitute a sixth species, T. keyserlingii. Macey et al. (1999b) assessed the phylogenetic

  11. Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

  12. Biothem-based Mississippian transect from the Basin and Range Province to the Anadarko basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frye, M.W. ); Lane, H.R. ); Couples, G.D. )

    1991-03-01

    A west-to-east transect, constructed using the 'Biostratigraphic Package Approach' of Lane and Frye and illustrating the biostratigraphic, lithologic, and depositional sequence relationships within the Mississippian system, extends from the basin and range province across the Transcontinental Arch (TA) and into the Anadarko basin. The transect is based on both published and proprietary biostratigraphic data. It was constructed primarily to portray the regional distribution and exploration significance of biotherms relative to the axis of the TA. These biotherms are biostratigraphic units that are wedge- or lens-shaped bodies of strata that are bounded by paleontologically recognizable unconformities in their updip extents, are conformable with underlying and overlying biothems in their maximum shelfal development, are conformable or bounded by surfaces of nondeposition and or submarine erosion in their downdip, basinal extremities, and also contain a logical sequence of depositionally related facies. An unexpected result of constructing the transect was the recognition of an apparent compensatory temporal and spatial distribution of Mississippian biothems. This distribution is interpreted to imply that biothems deposited during relative highstand events on one flank of the TA are time-equivalent to biothems deposited during relative lowstand events on the opposite flank of the TA. Platescale tilting, along with local subsidence and uplift, is suggested as the overriding mechanism controlling deposition along the extent of the transect.

  13. BASIN-CENTERED GAS SYSTEMS OF THE U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marin A. Popov; Vito F. Nuccio; Thaddeus S. Dyman; Timothy A. Gognat; Ronald C. Johnson; James W. Schmoker; Michael S. Wilson; Charles Bartberger

    2000-11-01

    The USGS is re-evaluating the resource potential of basin-centered gas accumulations in the U.S. because of changing perceptions of the geology of these accumulations, and the availability of new data since the USGS 1995 National Assessment of United States oil and gas resources (Gautier et al., 1996). To attain these objectives, this project used knowledge of basin-centered gas systems and procedures such as stratigraphic analysis, organic geochemistry, modeling of basin thermal dynamics, reservoir characterization, and pressure analysis. This project proceeded in two phases which had the following objectives: Phase I (4/1998 through 5/1999): Identify and describe the geologic and geographic distribution of potential basin-centered gas systems, and Phase II (6/1999 through 11/2000): For selected systems, estimate the location of those basin-centered gas resources that are likely to be produced over the next 30 years. In Phase I, we characterize thirty-three (33) potential basin-centered gas systems (or accumulations) based on information published in the literature or acquired from internal computerized well and reservoir data files. These newly defined potential accumulations vary from low to high risk and may or may not survive the rigorous geologic scrutiny leading towards full assessment by the USGS. For logistical reasons, not all basins received the level of detail desired or required.

  14. Source rocks of the Sub-Andean basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raedeke, L.D. )

    1993-02-01

    Seven source rock systems were mapped using a consistent methodology to allow basin comparison from Trinidad to southern Chile. Silurian and Devonian systems, deposited in passive margin and intracratonic settings, have fair-good original oil/gas potential from central and northern Bolivia to southern Peru. Kerogens range from mature in the foreland to overmature in the thrust belt. Permian to Carboniferous deposition in local restricted basins formed organic-rich shales and carbonates with very good original oil/gas potential, principally in northern Bolivia and southern Peru. Late Triassic to early Jurassic marine shales and limestones, deposited in deep, narrow, basins from Ecuador to north-central maturity. Locally, in the Cuyo rift basin of northern Argentina, a Triassic lacustrine unit is a very good, mature oil source. Early Cretaceous to Jurassic marine incursions into the back-arc basins of Chile-Argentina deposited shales and limestones. Although time transgressive (younging to the south), this system is the principal source in southern back-arc basins, with best potential in Neuquen, where three intervals are stacked A late Cretaceous marine transgressive shale is the most important source in northern South America. The unit includes the La Luna and equivalents extending from Trinidad through Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, and into northern Peru. Elsewhere in South America upper Cretaceous marine-lacustrine rocks are a possible source in the Altiplano and Northwest basins of Bolivia and Argentina. Middle Miocene to Oligocene source system includes shallow marine, deltaic, and lacustrine sediments from Trinidad to northern Peru.

  15. Structural evolution of Val Verde basin, west Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, D.E.; Petersen, N.

    1984-04-01

    The Val Verde basin is a northwest-southeast trending foreland basin contained within the southern portion of the Permian basin. The Val Verde basin has several large fields, e.g., Brown Bassett and JM, which have a combined ultimate recovery of over 1 tcf of gas. Structurally, the major fields are complexly faulted features related to differential uplift of basement blocks. Middle and Upper Permian strata are not present in the central and southern Val Verde basin. Appreciable amounts of Permian sediment were eroded prior to deposition of Cretaceous strata, thus, Cretaceous rocks unconformably overlie Wolfcamp sediments. Restored estimates for vitrinite reflectance data indicate a minimum of 8000-10,000 ft (2400-3000 m) of Permian rocks have been eroded. Therefore, in the central and southern portions of the basin, Paleozoic rocks are inferred to have occupied depths several miles deeper than present. Vitrinite reflectance values for Ellenburger (Ordovician) rocks at Brown Bassett are approximately 1.8 to 2.0% R/sub o/. Ellenburger reflectance values increase to the south and southeast to values greater than 4.5% R/sub o/. The most southerly wells also have reflectance depth trends which show a break in gradient within Wolfcamp sediments (9000-10,000 ft, 2700-3000 m). The change in gradient suggests a thermal event contemporaneous with the basin's rapid downwarping and Wolfcamp deposition. Any exploration in the basin, therefore, must recognize the unique relationships between structural timing, structural position, depth of burial, thermal pulses, and hydrocarbon mobility for a large portion of Val Verde basin.

  16. Western Gas Sands Project: stratigrapy of the Piceance Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.

    1980-08-01

    The Western Gas Sands Project Core Program was initiated by US DOE to investigate various low permeability, gas bearing sandstones. Research to gain a better geological understanding of these sandstones and improve evaluation and stimulation techniques is being conducted. Tight gas sands are located in several mid-continent and western basins. This report deals with the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado. This discussion is an attempt to provide a general overview of the Piceance Basin stratigraphy and to be a useful reference of stratigraphic units and accompanying descriptions.

  17. Oil and gas resources remaining in the Permian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    In this book the authors present a reevaluation of the oil and gas resource base remaining in existing Permian Basin reservoirs. The Permian Basin is one of the nation's premier sources of oil production, accounting for almost one quarter of the total domestic oil resource. The distribution and magnitude of oil and gas resources discovered in the basin are documented at the play and reservoir levels. Data on reservoir geology and volumetric analysis come from the oil and gas atlases published by the Bureau of Economic Geology, the Bureau's oil-reservoir data base, and NRG Associates Significant Oil and Gas Fields of the United States.

  18. Episodic response project: Wet deposition at watersheds in three regions of the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barchet, W.R.

    1991-11-01

    During the period from August 1988 to June 1990, wet-only sampling of precipitation was carried out at three Episodic Response Project sites and at one supplemental site. The three watershed sites are Moss Lake, Biscuit Brook, and Linn Run. The supplemental site was the MAP3S site at Pennsylvania State University that characterizes the central group of northern Appalachian streams. The site operators adhered by varying degrees to the sample collection protocol based on the daily sampling protocol of the MAP3S Precipitation Chemistry Network. Sulfate and nitrate ion together accounted for more than 80% of total anions (in {mu}Eq/L) in the precipitation at all sites. Wet deposition of sulfate at Moss Lake, Biscuit Brook, Penn State, and Linn Run averaged 223, 230, 253, and 402 mg/m{sup 2}/month, respectively, whereas nitrate wet deposition averaged 197, 195, 160, and 233 mg/m{sup 2}/month, respectively. Sulfate deposition was a factor of 2 to 4 higher in summer than in winter. The seasonal pattern for nitrate deposition was weak; the seasonal contrast was less than a factor of 2.5 at all sites. The association between the wet deposition and precipitation chemistry at the MAP3S monitoring site and the average for the study watersheds was dependent on the distance between the site and watershed and the intervening terrain. Precipitation chemistry at the monitoring site is representative of that at the ERP study watersheds in the Adirondack and Catskill regions and in the south-western group of watersheds in the Appalachian region. High spatial variability in precipitation amounts makes this assumption weaker for wet deposition. Chemical input to watersheds from dry deposition has not been determined at any site but could range from a factor of 0.3 to 1.0 of the wet deposition. 7 refs., 38 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 3,605,263 3,281,694 3,164,033 3,297,696 3,531,074 3,786,195 4,043,225 4,279,875 4,477,279 4,588,167 4,522,088 4,292,649 1995 3,905,789 3,514,201 3,360,765 3,369,823 3,576,559 3,812,014 3,968,751 4,159,006 4,362,855 4,483,271 4,279,539 3,905,710 1996 3,483,209 3,190,123 2,987,233

  20. AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Total Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 4,737,921 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,501 4,727,446 4,727,446 4,727,446 4,727,509 1995 4,730,109 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,647,791 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 4,593,948 1996 4,593,948

  1. AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 905,018 584,386 467,210 599,207 831,273 1,086,355 1,342,894 1,578,648 1,775,994 1,885,465 1,819,517 1,589,500 1995 1,206,116 814,626 663,885 674,424 850,290 1,085,760 1,300,439 1,487,188 1,690,456 1,811,013 1,608,177 1,232,901 1996 812,303 520,053 341,177 397,770 612,572 890,243

  2. Microbial desulfurization of Eastern oil shale: Bioreactor studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maka, A.; Akin, C.; Punwani, D.V.; Lau, F.S.; Srivastava, V.J.

    1989-01-01

    The removal of sulfur from Eastern oil shale (40 microns particle size) slurries in bioreactors by mixed microbial cultures was examined. A mixed culture that is able to remove the organic sulfur from model sulfur compounds presenting coal as well as a mixed culture isolated from oil shale enrichments were evaluated. The cultures were grown in aerobic fed-batch bioreactors where the oil shale served as the source of all nutrients except organic carbon. Glucose was added as an auxiliary carbon source. Microbial growth was monitored by plate counts, the pH was checked periodically, and oil shale samples were analyzed for sulfur content. Results show a 24% reduction in the sulfur content of the oil shale after 14 days. The settling characteristics of the oil shale in the bioreactors were examined in the presence of the microbes. Also, the mixing characteristics of the oil shale in the bioreactors were examined. 10 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Eastern Seaboard Electric Grid Fragility Maps Supporting Persistent Availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Kimberly A; Weigand, Gilbert G; Fernandez, Steven J

    2012-11-01

    Persistently available power transmission can be disrupted by weather causing power outages with economic and social consequences. This research investigated the effects on the national power grid from a specific weather event, Hurricane Irene, that caused approximately 5.7 million customer power outages along the Eastern Seaboard in August of 2011. The objective was to describe the geographic differences in the grid s vulnerability to these events. Individual factors, such as wind speed or precipitation, were correlated with the number of outages to determine the greatest mechanism of power failure in hopes of strengthening the future power grid. The resulting fragility maps not only depicted 18 counties that were less robust than the design-standard robustness model and three counties that were more robust, but also drew new damage contours with correlated wind speeds and county features.

  4. Development of Eastern Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets: March 3, 2008 -- March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brower, M.

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this project was to provide wind resource inputs to the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study.

  5. Proposals in for Czech firms; cooperation likely with eastern Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-02-10

    Two Western groups - Shell and a consortium made up of Agip, Conoco, and Total - have offered to buy the refining operations of Chemopetrol Litvinov and Kaucuk Kralupy, both in the Czech republic. Meanwhile, Amoco, Neste, and PCD are looking at the possibility of acquiring some of the plastics plants at Litvinov. Amoco is interested in the polypropylene operations, Neste in polyethylene, and PCD in both. The two Czech firms are included in the second wave of privatization, which will begin in midyear. So far, there have been no offers for the 80,000-m.t./year polystyrene and 60,000-m.t./year styrene butadiene rubber operations belonging to Kralupy, although Atochem representatives recently visited the plants. Litvinov is carrying out revamping operations at its core unit, a 12-year-old, 450,000-m.t./year ethylene plant. The plant, currently running at 400,000 m.t./year, supplies downstream plants, Neratovice, and sells on the export markets. An existing ethylene pipeline between Litvinov and Bohlen in eastern Germany, which used to supply an average 100,000 m.t./year of ethylene to Bohen in exchange for naphtha, is virtually unused. One proposal involves reactivating this exchange to secure ethylene feedstock for plants in eastern Germany. According to some sources, a preliminary decision has been made to shut down the 100,000-m.t./year ethylene plant at Leuna and possibly to expand the Bohlen cracker by 100,000 m.t./year, to 400,000 m.t./year by the late 1990s.

  6. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. ); Schultz, C.W. ); Parekh, B.K. ); Misra, M. ); Bonner, W.P. )

    1992-11-01

    The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the multi-year program, initiated in October 1987 by the US Department of Energy is to perform the research necessary to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The results of the original 3-year program, which was concluded in May 1991, have been summarized in a four-volume final report published by IGT. DOE subsequently approved a 1-year extension to the program to further develop the PFH process specifically for application to beneficiated shale as feedstock. Studies have shown that beneficiated shale is the preferred feedstock for pressurized hydroretorting. The program extension is divided into the following active tasks. Task 3. testing of process improvement concepts; Task 4. beneficiation research; Task 5. operation of PFH on beneficiated shale; Task 6. environmental data and mitigation analyses; Task 7. sample procurement, preparation, and characterization; and Task 8. project management and reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the prime contractor, worked with four other institutions: the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute (MRI), the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), the University of Nevada (UN) at Reno, and Tennessee Technological University (TTU). This report presents the work performed during the program extension from June 1, 1991 through May 31, 1992.

  7. Regional basinal sandstone depositional patterns during the Guadalupian (Late Permian), Delaware basin, west Texas-New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisen, J.H.; Scholle, P.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Examination of well logs from more than 300 Delaware basin wells penetrating the Bell Canyon and Brushy Canyon formations has allowed definition of regional depositional patterns during the Late Permian (Guadalupian). Characteristic gamma-ray hot-kicks mark thin but widespread calcareous shales or limestones representing starved basin sedimentation during sea level highstands. Correlation of such markers along three strike and ten dip lines permitted isopaching of intervening lowstand clastic wedges. The low-stand wedges typically thin significantly from basin margin to basin center and are marked by a prominent linearity oriented perpendicular to the margin. These lineations probably represent channelized turbidite and grain-flow deposits. Most intervals show dozens of such lineations indicating multiple input points for terrigenous detritus rather than just a few major point sources of debris. The resulting deposits appear to be more apron-like than fan-like and coalesce into broad, sheetlike deposits toward the basin center. Isopach thicks vary in position through time, but terrigenous sediment transport is predominantly from northerly directions throughout the analyzed interval. Thus, the filling of the Midland basin at the close of Cherry Canyon deposition did not result in a major new source of terrigenous debris from the east (Central Basin platform). The well-sorted nature of the basinal sands, their widely distributed input points, apron-like geometry, and other factors argue for migration of eolian dunes to the shelf margin during sea level lowstands. Transport of these well-sorted, unconsolidated sands into the basin was not however, mainly by direct eolian processes as has been proposed recently, but must have involved submarine current mechanisms.

  8. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: groundawater, heat flow, relief map

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    In this submission is the groundwater composite risk segment (CRS) used for play fairway analysis. Also included is a heatflow probability map, and a shaded relief map of the Tularosa Basin, NM.

  9. Adjudicated Groundwater Basins in California | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basins in CaliforniaLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014 Legal Citation Not provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online...

  10. Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the Southern Great Basin |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the Southern Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the...

  11. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Corridors About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Major Natural ...

  12. Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin and Range Province. Authors Joseph P. Colgan, Trevor A. Dumitru and Elizabeth L. Miller Published Journal Geology, 2004 DOI 10.1130G20037.1 Online Internet link for...

  13. Oil and gas resources in the West Siberian Basin, Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The primary objective of this study is to assess the oil and gas potential of the West Siberian Basin of Russia. The study does not analyze the costs or technology necessary to achieve the estimates of the ultimate recoverable oil and gas. This study uses reservoir data to estimate recoverable oil and gas quantities which were aggregated to the field level. Field totals were summed to a basin total for discovered fields. An estimate of undiscovered oil and gas, from work of the US Geological Survey (USGS), was added to give a total basin resource volume. Recent production decline points out Russia`s need to continue development of its discovered recoverable oil and gas. Continued exploration is required to discover additional oil and gas that remains undiscovered in the basin.

  14. Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17-acre basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project was safely completed at a...

  15. Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of 150-200C have been discovered in the northern Basin and Range Province of the USA. A comparison of these high and moderate temperature systems shows considerable overlap...

  16. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Pleistocene Lake Otero

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a geotiff of the geographic extent of Pleistocene Lake Otero; which was used as apart of the groundwater composite risk segment in a Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis.

  17. Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    br Brophy br Model br Moeck br Beardsmore br Type br Volume br Geothermal br Region Mean br Reservoir br Temp br Mean br Capacity Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin...

  18. Evaluation of Geothermal Potential of Rio Grande Rift and Basin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Evaluation of Geothermal Potential of Rio Grande Rift and Basin and Range Province, New Mexico Abstract A...

  19. Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Authors Deal, E. G., Elston, W.E., Erb, E. E., Peterson, S. L., & Reiter and D. E. Conference 29th Field...

  20. Illite/Smectite diagenesis in the NanXiang, Yitong, and North China Permian-carboniferous basins: Application to petroleum exploration in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xinhua Deng; Youngchuan Sun; Xinrong Lei

    1996-02-01

    The NanXiang basin in Henan Province and the Yitong basin in Jilin Province, located in the eastern part of China, are composed mainly of Tertiary nonmarine clastic sequences that thicken to more than 4000-5000 m. The North China Permian-Carboniferous basin consists of Permian-Carboniferous systems composed of marine and nonmarine coal-bearing sequences. Clay diagenesis in these basins was studied by systematic x-ray diffraction analysis. The clay mineralogy consists of illite, smectite, mixed-layered illite/smectite (I/S), kaolinite, and chlorite. The major clay reaction is the illitization of smectite with depth and temperature. The reactions generally involve discrete smectite stage to smectite, plus the randomly interstratified I/S (R = 0 in the Reichweite nomenclature), followed by the first rapid change (1) to the ordered I/S of short-range stacking (R = 1) and the second rapid change (11) to the metastable stage (with the ordered I/S of long-range stacking-R {ge}3). The first rapid change leads to the appearance of I/S-ordered I/S and disappearance of discrete smectite. The proportion of smectite layers (Ps) in the I/S in the metastable stage remained unchanged (15-20%) over a thick burial interval. The discrete illite stage finally occurs in highly mature areas. Potassium-feldspar (K-feldspar) in rocks and K ions in present formation waters are available for the I/S reactions; I/S reactions in these areas responded mainly to temperature. The I/S transition from the randomly interstratified I/S (R = 0) to the ordered I/S occurred at 80-95{degrees}C and coincided with the onset of the oil window in source rocks and with secondary porosity enhancement of sand-stones. Integrating the I/S reactions with thermal histories, hydrological regimes, structure, sedimentation, and sandstone diagenesis of each basin allows formulation of clay diagenetic models for each specific basin.

  1. Basin-Scale Opportunity Assessment Initiative Background Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saulsbury, Bo; Geerlofs, Simon H.; Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2010-10-01

    As called for in the March 24, 2010, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental stakeholders, and the hydropower industry are collaborating to identify opportunities to simultaneously increase electricity generation and improve environmental services in river basins of the United States. New analytical tools provide an improved ability to understand, model, and visualize environmental and hydropower systems. Efficiencies and opportunities that might not be apparent in site-by-site analyses can be revealed through assessments at the river-basin scale. Information from basin-scale assessments could lead to better coordination of existing hydropower projects, or to inform siting decisions (e.g., balancing the removal of some dams with the construction of others), in order to meet renewable energy production and environmental goals. Basin-scale opportunity assessments would inform energy and environmental planning and address the cumulative effects of hydropower development and operations on river basin environmental quality in a way that quantifies energy-environment tradeoffs. Opportunity assessments would create information products, develop scenarios, and identify specific actions that agencies, developers, and stakeholders can take to locate new sustainable hydropower projects, increase the efficiency and environmental performance of existing projects, and restore and protect environmental quality in our nation's river basins. Government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGO) have done significant work to understand and assess opportunities for both hydropower and environmental protection at the basin scale. Some initiatives have been successful, others less so, and there is a need to better understand the legacy of work on which this current project can build. This background literature review is intended to

  2. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

    2009-12-03

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs

  3. Repository site definition in basalt: Pasco Basin, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzowski, R.V.; Nimick, F.B.; Muller, A.B.

    1982-03-01

    Discussion of the regional setting, geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of the Pasco Basin are included in this report. Pasco basin is a structural and topographic basin of approximately 2000 mi/sup 2/ (5180 km/sup 2/) located within the Yakima Fold Belt Subprovince of the Columbia Plateau. The stratigraphic sequence within the basin consists of an undetermined thickness of lower Miocene and younger flood basalts with interbedded and overlying sedimentary units. This sequence rests upon a basement of probably diverse rock types that may range in age from precambrian through early Tertiary. Although a large amount of information is available on the hydrology of the unconfined aquifer system, ground-water flow within the basin is, in general, poorly understood. Recharge areas for the Mabton interbed and the Saddle Mountains Formation are the highlands surrounding the basin with the flow for these units toward Gable Butte - Gable Mountain and Lake Wallula. Gable Butte - Gable Mountain probably is a ground-water sink, although the vertical flow direction in this zone is uncertain. The amount of upward vertical leakage from the Saddle Mountains Formation into the overlying sediments or to the Columbia River is unknown. Units underlying the Mabton interbed may have a flow scheme similar to those higher units or a flow scheme dominated by interbasin flow. Upward vertical leakage either throughout the basin, dominantly to the Columbia River, or dominantly to Lake Wallula has been proposed for the discharge of the lower units. None of these proposals is verified. The lateral and vertical distribution of major and minor ions in solution, Eh and pH, and ion exchange between basalt and ground-water are not well defined for the basin. Changes in the redox potential from the level of the subsurface facility to the higher stratigraphic levels along with the numerous other factors influencing K/sub d/, result in a poor understanding of the retardation process.

  4. Geothermal resources of the Washakie and Great Divide basins, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    The geothermal resources of the Great Divide and Washakie Basins of southern Wyoming are described. Oil well bottomhole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data were interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. It was concluded large areas in Wyoming are underlain by water hotter than 120{sup 0}F. Isolated areas with high temperature gradients exist within each basin. 68 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  5. K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Phase 1 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 (2.34 MB) More Documents & Publications Compilation of TRA Summaries Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2011 Enterprise Assessments, Review of the Hanford Site Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis, Revision 00 - April 201

  6. Geothermal regime and thermal history of the Llanos Basin, Columbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachu, S.; Underschultz, J.R.; Ramon, J.C.; Villegas, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Llanos basin is a siliciclastic foreland sub-Andean sedimentary basin located in Columbia between the Cordillera Oriental and the Guyana Precambrian shield. Data on bottom-hole temperature, lithology, porosity, and vitrinite reflectance from all 318 wells drilled in the central and southern parts of the basin were used to analyze its geothermal regime and thermal history. Average geothermal gradients in the Llanos basin decrease generally with depth and westward toward the fold and thrust belt. The geothermal regime is controlled by a moderate, generally westward-decreasing basement heat flow, by depositional and compaction factors, and, in places, by advection by formation waters. Compaction leads to increased thermal conductivity with depth, whereas westward downdip flow in deep sandstone formations may exert a cooling effect in the central-western part of the basin. Vitrinite reflectance variation with depth shows a major discontinuity at the pre-Cretaceous unconformity. Areally, vitrinite reflectance increases southwestward in Paleozoic strata and northwestward in post-Paleozoic strata. These patterns indicate that the thermal history of the basin probably includes three thermal events that led to peaks in oil generation: a Paleozoic event in the southwest, a failed Cretaceous rifting event in the west, and an early Tertiary back-arc event in the west. Rapid cooling since the last thermal event is possibly caused by subhorizontal subduction of cold oceanic lithospheric plate.

  7. Visayan Basin - the birthplace of Philippine petroleum exploration revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rillera, F.G. ); Durkee, E.F. )

    1994-07-01

    Petroleum exploration in the Philippines has its roots in the Visayan Basin in the central Philippines. This is a Tertiary basin with up to 30,000 ft of sedimentary fill. With numerous surface oil and gas manifestations known as early as 1888, the area was the site of the first attempts to establish commercial petroleum production in the country. Over the past 100 years, more than 200 wells have been drilled in the basin. Several of these have yielded significant oil and gas shows. Production, albeit noncommercial in scale, has been demonstrated to be present in some places. A review of past exploration data reveals that many of the earlier efforts failed due to poorly located tests from both structural and stratigraphic standpoints. Poor drilling and completion technology and lack of funding compounded the problems of early explorationists. Because of this, the basin remains relatively underexplored. A recent assessment by COPLEX and E.F. Durkee and Associates demonstrates the presence of many untested prospects in the basin. These prospects may contain recoverable oil and gas potential on the order of 5 to 10 MMBO onshore and 25 to 100 MMBO offshore. With new exploration ideas, innovative development concepts, and the benefit of modern technology, commercial oil and gas production from the basin may yet be realized.

  8. Petroleum systems of Jianghan Basin, Hubel Province, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, A.E.; Schaps, S.; McGregor, D.

    1996-12-31

    The Jianghan Basin is a Cretaceous-Tertiary nonmarine rift basin superimposed on a late Precambrian to Jurassic passive margin and foreland basin succession deformed by mid-Mesozoic folding and thrusting. Hence the basin has potential for superimposed petroleum systems. Oil production is established in a Tertiary petroleum system developed in two major depocenters, the Jiangling (west) and Qianjiang (east) Depressions. Lacustrine source beds in the early Eocene Xingouzhui and late Eocene Qianjiang Formations generated hydrocarbons during local maximum basin fill in the Oligocene to present. Very early, low temperature generation of petroleum occurs where Type 1S Qianjiang Formation kerogen is present. Tertiary fluvial and deltaic sandstones form reservoirs that trap oil in highs or rollover structures formed by normal faulting and salt movement. The pre-rift section contains large folds and good source-beds, but has high exploration risk. Factors limiting effectiveness of older petroleum systems are: (1) Uplift and erosion of thrust structures; (2) Overmaturation of pre-Permian source rocks prior to folding and thrusting; (3) Limited extent of secondary maturation of Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic source beds; and (4) Disruption of older traps and seals by widespread normal faulting. Production of hydrocarbons from Permian and Triassic rocks to the west of Hubei suggests that further seismic work and drilling are merited to evaluate pre-Tertiary potential in the Jianghan Basin.

  9. Petroleum systems of Jianghan Basin, Hubel Province, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, A.E. ); Schaps, S.; McGregor, D. )

    1996-01-01

    The Jianghan Basin is a Cretaceous-Tertiary nonmarine rift basin superimposed on a late Precambrian to Jurassic passive margin and foreland basin succession deformed by mid-Mesozoic folding and thrusting. Hence the basin has potential for superimposed petroleum systems. Oil production is established in a Tertiary petroleum system developed in two major depocenters, the Jiangling (west) and Qianjiang (east) Depressions. Lacustrine source beds in the early Eocene Xingouzhui and late Eocene Qianjiang Formations generated hydrocarbons during local maximum basin fill in the Oligocene to present. Very early, low temperature generation of petroleum occurs where Type 1S Qianjiang Formation kerogen is present. Tertiary fluvial and deltaic sandstones form reservoirs that trap oil in highs or rollover structures formed by normal faulting and salt movement. The pre-rift section contains large folds and good source-beds, but has high exploration risk. Factors limiting effectiveness of older petroleum systems are: (1) Uplift and erosion of thrust structures; (2) Overmaturation of pre-Permian source rocks prior to folding and thrusting; (3) Limited extent of secondary maturation of Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic source beds; and (4) Disruption of older traps and seals by widespread normal faulting. Production of hydrocarbons from Permian and Triassic rocks to the west of Hubei suggests that further seismic work and drilling are merited to evaluate pre-Tertiary potential in the Jianghan Basin.

  10. Greater Green River Basin Production Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Lim, F.H.; Calogero, D.

    1997-10-01

    The Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming has produced abundant oil and gas out of multiple reservoirs for over 60 years, and large quantities of gas remain untapped in tight gas sandstone reservoirs. Even though GGRB production has been established in formations from the Paleozoic to the Tertiary, recent activity has focused on several Cretaceous reservoirs. Two of these formations, the Ahnond and the Frontier Formations, have been classified as tight sands and are prolific producers in the GGRB. The formations typically naturally fractured and have been exploited using conventional well technology. In most cases, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed when completing these wells to to increase gas production rates to economic levels. The objectives of the GGRB production improvement project were to apply the concept of horizontal and directional drilling to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift and to compare production improvements by drilling, completing, and testing vertical, horizontal and directionally-drilled wellbores at a common site.

  11. Data Collection and Analyses of the CHP System at Eastern Maine Medical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center - Final Report, June 2008 | Department of Energy Data Collection and Analyses of the CHP System at Eastern Maine Medical Center - Final Report, June 2008 Data Collection and Analyses of the CHP System at Eastern Maine Medical Center - Final Report, June 2008 This 2008 report describes the Eastern Maine Medical Center's installation of a Centaur 50 gas turbine and performance data for one year from December 2006 to November 2007. The turbine has a nameplate rating of 4,570 kW and can

  12. Utilization options for fly ash, bottom ash, and slag in Eastern Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manz, O.E.

    1995-12-01

    Since 1967, at least six ash utilization symposiums have been held in the United States, with papers presented by several European authors on the utilization of coal by-products in Eastern Europe. There is currently over 80,000 megawatts of installed coal-fired capacity available in that region. Unfortunately, of the 117,778,000 tonnes of fly ash, bottom ash, and slag produced in Eastern Europe in 1989, only 13% was utilized. This paper outlines the research and levels and kinds of coal by-product utilization taking place in Eastern Europe since the late 1960s.

  13. Understanding Long-Term Solute Transport in Sedimentary Basins: Simulating Brine Migration in the Alberta Basin. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alicia M. Wilson

    2009-11-30

    Mass transport in deep sedimentary basins places important controls on ore formation, petroleum migration, CO2 sequestration, and geochemical reactions that affect petroleum reservoir quality, but large-scale transport in this type of setting remains poorly understood. This lack of knowledge is highlighted in the resource-rich Alberta Basin, where geochemical and hydrogeologic studies have suggested residence times ranging from hundreds of millions of years to less than 5 My, respectively. Here we developed new hydrogeologic models that were constrained by geochemical observations to reconcile these two very different estimates. The models account for variable-density fluid flow, heat transport, solute transport, sediment deposition and erosion, sediment compressibility, and dissolution of salt deposits, including Cl/Br systematics. Prior interpretations of Cl/Br ratios in the Alberta Basin concluded that the brines were derived from evaporatively-concentrated brines that were subsequently diluted by seawater and freshwater; models presented here show that halite dissolution must have contributed strongly as well, which implies significantly greater rates of mass transport. This result confirms that Cl/Br ratios are subject to significant non-uniqueness and thus do not provide good independent indicators of the origin of brines. Salinity and Cl/Br ratios provided valuable new constraints for basin-scale models, however. Sensitivity studies revealed that permeabilities obtained from core- and field-scale tests were appropriate for basin-scale models, despite the differences in scale between the tests and the models. Simulations of groundwater age show that the residence time of porefluids in much of the basin is less than 100 My. Groundwater age increases with depth and approaches 200 My in the deepest part of the basin, but brines are significantly younger than their host rocks throughout the basin.

  14. Diagnosing isopycnal diffusivity in an eddying, idealized midlatitude ocean basin via Lagrangian, in Situ, Global, High-Performance Particle Tracking (LIGHT)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wolfram, Phillip J.; Ringler, Todd D.; Maltrud, Mathew E.; Jacobsen, Douglas W.; Petersen, Mark R.

    2015-08-01

    Isopycnal diffusivity due to stirring by mesoscale eddies in an idealized, wind-forced, eddying, midlatitude ocean basin is computed using Lagrangian, in Situ, Global, High-Performance Particle Tracking (LIGHT). Simulation is performed via LIGHT within the Model for Prediction across Scales Ocean (MPAS-O). Simulations are performed at 4-, 8-, 16-, and 32-km resolution, where the first Rossby radius of deformation (RRD) is approximately 30 km. Scalar and tensor diffusivities are estimated at each resolution based on 30 ensemble members using particle cluster statistics. Each ensemble member is composed of 303 665 particles distributed across five potential density surfaces. Diffusivity dependence upon modelmore » resolution, velocity spatial scale, and buoyancy surface is quantified and compared with mixing length theory. The spatial structure of diffusivity ranges over approximately two orders of magnitude with values of O(105) m2 s–1 in the region of western boundary current separation to O(103) m2 s–1 in the eastern region of the basin. Dominant mixing occurs at scales twice the size of the first RRD. Model resolution at scales finer than the RRD is necessary to obtain sufficient model fidelity at scales between one and four RRD to accurately represent mixing. Mixing length scaling with eddy kinetic energy and the Lagrangian time scale yield mixing efficiencies that typically range between 0.4 and 0.8. In conclusion, a reduced mixing length in the eastern region of the domain relative to the west suggests there are different mixing regimes outside the baroclinic jet region.« less

  15. Diagnosing isopycnal diffusivity in an eddying, idealized midlatitude ocean basin via Lagrangian, in Situ, Global, High-Performance Particle Tracking (LIGHT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfram, Phillip J.; Ringler, Todd D.; Maltrud, Mathew E.; Jacobsen, Douglas W.; Petersen, Mark R.

    2015-08-01

    Isopycnal diffusivity due to stirring by mesoscale eddies in an idealized, wind-forced, eddying, midlatitude ocean basin is computed using Lagrangian, in Situ, Global, High-Performance Particle Tracking (LIGHT). Simulation is performed via LIGHT within the Model for Prediction across Scales Ocean (MPAS-O). Simulations are performed at 4-, 8-, 16-, and 32-km resolution, where the first Rossby radius of deformation (RRD) is approximately 30 km. Scalar and tensor diffusivities are estimated at each resolution based on 30 ensemble members using particle cluster statistics. Each ensemble member is composed of 303 665 particles distributed across five potential density surfaces. Diffusivity dependence upon model resolution, velocity spatial scale, and buoyancy surface is quantified and compared with mixing length theory. The spatial structure of diffusivity ranges over approximately two orders of magnitude with values of O(105) m2 s–1 in the region of western boundary current separation to O(103) m2 s–1 in the eastern region of the basin. Dominant mixing occurs at scales twice the size of the first RRD. Model resolution at scales finer than the RRD is necessary to obtain sufficient model fidelity at scales between one and four RRD to accurately represent mixing. Mixing length scaling with eddy kinetic energy and the Lagrangian time scale yield mixing efficiencies that typically range between 0.4 and 0.8. In conclusion, a reduced mixing length in the eastern region of the domain relative to the west suggests there are different mixing regimes outside the baroclinic jet region.

  16. Reserve estimates in western basins: Unita Basin. Final report, Part III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, sandstone reservoirs of the Mesaverde group and Wasatch formation in the Uinta Basin, Utah. Total in-place resource is estimated at 395.5 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 3.8 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Two plays were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources; in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. About 82.1% of the total evaluated resource is contained within sandstones that have extremely poor reservoir properties with permeabilities considered too low for commerciality using current frac technology.

  17. A two-dimensional regional basin model of Williston basin hydrocarbon systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrus, J.; Wolf, S.; Doligez, B.

    1996-02-01

    Institut Francais du Petrole`s two-dimensional model, TEMISPACK, is used to discuss the functioning of petroleum systems in the Williston basin along a 330-km-long section, focusing on four regional source intervals: Ordovician Yeoman formation, Lower Devonian Winnipegosis Formation, Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation, and Mississippian Lodgepole formation. Thermal history calibration against present temperature and source rock maturity profiles suggests that the Williston basin can be divided into a region of constant heat flow of about 55 mW/m{sup 2} away from the Nesson anticline, and a region of higher heat flow and enhanced thermal maturity in the vicinity of the Nesson anticline. Original kinetic parameters used in the calibration were derived for each of the four source rocks from Rock-Eval yield curves. Bakken overpressures are entirely due to oil generation, not compaction disequilibrium. Very low Bakken vertical permeabilities range from 0.01 to 0.001 and are matched against observed overpressures, whereas Bakken porosities based on the model and confirmed by measurements are inferred to be also unusually low, around 3%.

  18. Petroleum geology of Giant oil and gas fields in Turpan Basin Xinjiang China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boliang, Hu; Jiajing, Yang,

    1995-08-01

    Turpan Basin is the smallest and the last development basin in three big basins of Xinjiang autonomous region, P.R. China. Since April, 1989, the Shanshan oilfield was discovered, the Oinling, Wenjisang, Midang, Baka, Qiudong and North Putaogou fields were discovered. In 1994, the crude oil productivity of Turpan Basin was a Million tons, with an estimated output of 3 million tons per year by 1995; obviously a key oil productive base in the west basins of China, Tarim, Jungar, Chaidam, Hexi, Erduos and Sichuan Basins. The Turpan Basin is an intermontane basin in a eugeosyncline foldbelt of the north Tianshan Mountains. The oil and gas was produced from the payzone of the Xishanyao, Sanjianfang and Qiketai Formatiosn of the Middle Jurassic series. The geochemical characteristics of the crude oil and gas indicate they derive from the Middle to Lower Jurassic coal series, in which contains the best oil-prone source rocks in the basin.

  19. Webster Co. Kanawha Co. Cabell C

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Southern OH (Panel 4 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Basin Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin OH WV The mapped oil and gas field

  20. Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Southern OH (Panel 4 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Basin Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin OH WV The mapped oil and gas field

  1. Weekly Working Gas in Underground Storage

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Southern OH (Panel 4 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Basin Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin OH WV The mapped oil and gas field

  2. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary C a n a d a U S A OH PA MI NY Lake Erie Lake St. Claire Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Basin Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Appalachian 3354 79,141 9,550,156 1,670,834 2001 Proved Reserves for Entire Applachian Basin WV Appalachian Basin, OH-PA (Panel 2 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  3. South Atlantic sag basins: new petroleum system components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, S.G. Mohriak, W.U.; Mello, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    Newly discovered pre-salt source rocks, reservoirs and seals need to be included as components to the petroleum systems of both sides of the South Atlantic. These new components lie between the pre-salt rift strata and the Aptian salt layers, forming large, post-rift, thermal subsidence sag basins. These are differentiated from the older rift basins by the lack of syn-rift faulting and a reflector geometry that is parallel to the base salt regional unconformity rather than to the Precambrian basement. These basins are observed in deep water regions overlying areas where both the mantle and the crust have been involved in the extension. This mantle involvement creates post-rift subsiding depocenters in which deposition is continuous while proximal rift-phase troughs with little or no mantle involvement are bypassed and failed to accumulate potential source rocks during anoxic times. These features have been recognized in both West African Kwanza Basin and in the East Brasil Rift systems. The pre-salt source rocks that are in the West African sag basins were deposited in lacustrine brackish to saline water environment and are geochemically distinct from the older, syn-rift fresh to brackish water lakes, as well as from younger, post-salt marine anoxic environments of the drift phase. Geochemical analyses of the source rocks and their oils have shown a developing source rock system evolving from isolated deep rift lakes to shallow saline lakes, and culminating with the infill of the sag basin by large saline lakes to a marginally marine restricted gulf. Sag basin source rocks may be important in the South Atlantic petroleum system by charging deep-water prospects where syn-rift source rocks are overmature and the post-salt sequences are immature.

  4. Tectonic evolution of Brazilian equatorial continental margin basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azevedo, R.P. )

    1993-02-01

    The structural style and stratigraphic relationships of sedimentary basins along the Brazilian Equatorial Atlantic Continental Margin were used to construct an empirical tectonic model for the development of ancient transform margins. The model is constrained by detailed structural and subsidence analyses of several basins along the margin. The structural framework of the basins was defined at shallow and deep levels by the integration of many geophysical and geological data sets. The Barreirinhas and Para-Maranhao Basins were divided in three tectonic domains: the Tutoia, Caete, and Tromai subbasins. The Caete area is characterized by northwest-southeast striking and northeast-dipping normal faults. A pure shear mechanism of basin formation is suggested for its development. The structure of the Tutoia and Tromai subbasins are more complex and indicative of a major strike-slip component with dextral sense of displacement, during early stages of basin evolution. These two later subbasins were developed on a lithosphere characterized by an abrupt transition (<50 km wide) from an unstretched continent to an oceanic lithosphere. The subsidence history of these basins do not comply with the classical models developed for passive margins or continental rifting. The thermo-mechanical model proposed for the Brazilian equatorial margin includes heterogeneous stretching combined with shearing at the plate margin. The tectonic history comprises: (1) Triassic-Jurassic limited extension associated with the Central Atlantic evolution; (2) Neocomian intraplate deformation consisting of strike-slip reactivation of preexisting shear zones; (3) Aptian-Cenomanian two-phase period of dextral shearing; and (4) Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic sea-floor spreading.

  5. Transmission Constraints and Congestion in the Western and Eastern Interconnections, 2009-2012 (January 2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The "Transmission Constraints and Congestion in the Western and Eastern Interconnections, 2009-2012" document is a compilation of publicly-available data on transmission constraints and congestion for the period 2009 through 2012.

  6. EMBARGOED FOR 1 P.M. Eastern Standard Time Wed, Feb. 4, 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome Project February 4, 2015 EMBARGOED FOR 1 P.M. Eastern Standard Time Wed, Feb. 4, 2015 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Feb. 4, 2015-More...

  7. Little Knife field - US Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittstrom, M.D.; Lindsay, R.F. )

    1991-03-01

    Little Knife field is a combination structural and stratigraphic trap located near the structural center of the Williston basin, North Dakota. The field is approximately 12 mi (19.3 km) long and 2.5 to 5.5 mi (4 to 8.9 km) wide. Little Knife was discovered by Gulf Oil in 1976 as part of a regional exploration play involving a transition from impermeable to porous carbonate rocks. In 1987, ultimate recovery from the Mission Canyon (Mississippian) reservoir was estimated to be 97.5 MMBO. This included 57.5 MMBO primary, 27 MMBO secondary, and 13 MMBO tertiary (CO{sub 2}) oil. At present the field is still under primary recovery, since utilization efforts have not been successful. Approximately one-third of Little Knife's 130 ft (39.6 m) oil column is trapped by structural closure beneath a regional anhydrite seal in a north-south-trending anticline. The remaining two-thirds of the oil column is trapped where the reservoir beds change facies from porous dolostones and dolomitic limestones to nonporous limestones. Structural entrapment accounts for approximately 50% (127 MMBO) of the OOIP, but covers only 30% of the producing area. Production is from the upper portions of the Mission Canyon Formation, a regressive, shoaling-upward carbonate-anhydrite sequence deposited in a slowly shrinking epeiric sea. The Mission Canyon in the Little Knife area is divided into six zones that record predominantly cyclic, subtidal deposition. These are overlain by prograding lagoonal, tidal flat, and sabkha beds. The source of Mission Canyon oil is thought to be the Bakken Formation, an organic-rich shale at the base of the Mississippian.

  8. Eastern Idaho Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Eastern Idaho Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Eastern Idaho

  9. Eastern Idaho Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Eastern Idaho Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us High School Regionals Eastern Idaho Regional Science Bowl Print Text

  10. Eastern Nebraska High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Eastern Nebraska High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us High School Regionals Eastern Nebraska High School Science Bowl

  11. Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 | Department of Energy Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- LASL Tracks Eastern Area No 3 - NM 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Tracks Eastern Area No 3 - NM 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: LASL TRACKS EASTERN AREA NO. 3 (NM.10 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Area No. 3 , Los Alamos County , New Mexico NM.10-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NM.10-2 Site Operations: These tracts were part of LASL and were subject to contamination from laboratory operations. NM.10-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria per environmental radiation

  13. Seismic expression of structural features on Landsat lineaments: an example from Denver basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurr, G.W.; Jenkins, J.T. Jr.; Likarish, D.M.

    1985-02-01

    Lineaments interpreted from Landsat images mark the location and trend of basement faults observed on seismic lines in the eastern Denver basin. Linear features mapped as tone and texture patterns on multispectral scanner images in northeastern Colorado and southwestern Nebraska are used to interpret regional lineaments. Individual linear features up to 25 mi (40 km) long and visible on both bands 5 and 7 define a grid of regional lineaments trending northeast and northwest. Comparisons of lineaments with aeromagnetic and gravity maps and with interpretations of basement geology suggest that lineaments are the boundaries of basement blocks with areas of about 1000 mi/sup 2/ (2590 km/sup 2/). Constituent linear features within the lineament zone probably mark boundaries of smaller blocks of about 50 mi/sup 2/ (130 km/sup 2/). Seismic lines in northeastern Sedgwick County in extreme northeastern Colorado cross linear features that are components of a broad regional lineament that trends northeast and parallels the South Platte River. Seismic data consist of a grid of about 100 mi (160 km) of multifold Vibroseis lines. Basement faults, generally with offsets of less than 100 ft (30 m), are observed in seismic lines that cross some individual linear features. Monoclines and faults are present in Pennsylvanian to Tertiary strata that overlie basement. A time-structure map on the Precambrian and an isochron map of Wolfcamp (Lower Permian) to Precambrian show that the lineament is a 7-mi (11-km) wide zone of small, downdropped basement blocks. Thickening of Permian-Pennsylvanian strata on the downthrown side of faults suggests tectonic activity. Further tectonic activity is indicated by listric faulting in the Cretaceous Niobrara Formation.

  14. Late Cenozoic paleomagnetism and chronology of Andean basins of Bolivia: Evidence for possible oroclinal bending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacFadden, B.J. ); Anaya, F.; Perez, H. ); Naeser, C.W. ); Zeitler, P.K. ); Campbell, K.E. Jr. )

    1990-07-01

    New paleomagnetic and radioisotopic data are reported from two late Tertiary high-elevation, non-marine basins in the eastern Cordillera of Bolivia. (1) Quebrada Honda, located at 22{degree}S lat., consists of a 300 m thick section containing abundant Santacrucian or Friasian (middle Miocene) fossil mammals. This locality is constrained by mean {sup 40}K/{sup 40}Ar ages of 12.83 {plus minus} 0.11 Ma and 11.96 {plus minus} 0.11 Ma, and the local magnetostratigraphy is correlated to chrons C5AA through C5A on the Magnetic Polarity Time Scale (MPTS). The fossil mammals from Quebrada Honda have an extrapolated age of about 13.0 to 12.7 Ma. (2) Micana, located at 17{degree}S lat., consists of a 205 m thick section containing late Miocene fossil mammals, including a megatheriid sloth and the tiny mesothere Microtypotherium cf. M. choquecotense. The locality is constrained by a fission-track age determination of 6.9 {plus minus} 1.1 Ma, and the local magnetostratigraphy is correlated to Chron 7 on the MPTS. The fossil mammals from this section have an extrapolated age of about 7.3 to 7.4 Ma. In conjunction with two other published data sets (Ocros, 13{degree}S, and Salla, 17{degree}S), these late Tertiary Andean localities indicate counterclockwise rotation at 13{degree}S, negligible rotation at 17{degree}S, and clockwise rotation at 22{degree}S. These data could represent local small-block rotations on a scale greater than about 6 km{sup 2}. However, these data are also consistent with a model of late Neogene bending of the Bolivian Orocline.

  15. Seismic Reflection Project Near the Southern Terminations of the Lost River and Lemhi Faults, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. M. Jackson; G. S. Carpenter; R. P. Smith; J. L. Casper

    2006-10-01

    Thirteen seismic reflection lines were processed and interpreted to determine the southern terminations of the Lost River and Lemhi faults along the northwest boundary of the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). The southernmost terminations of the Arco and Howe segments were determined to support characterization of the Lost River and Lemhi fault sources, respectively, for the INL probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. Keywords:Keywords are required forExternal Release Review*Keywords  Keywords *Contacts (Type and Name are required for each row) Type ofContactContact Name  POC Editor RecordFour commercial seismic reflection lines (Arco lines 81-1 and 81-2; Howe lines 81-3 and 82-2) were obtained from the Montana Power Company. The seismic data were collected in the early 1980’s using a Vibroseis source with station and shot point locations that resulted in 12-fold data. Arco lines 81?1 and 81?2 and Howe lines 81?3 and 82?2 are located within the basins adjacent to the Arco and Howe segments, respectively. Seven seismic lines (Arco lines A1, A2, A3, and A4 and Howe lines H1, H2, and H3) were acquired by EG&G Idaho, Inc. Geosciences for this study using multiple impacts with an accelerated weight drop source. Station and shot point locations yielded 12-fold data. The seismic reflection lines are oriented perpendicular to and at locations along the projected extensions of the Arco and Howe fault segments within the ESRP. Two seismic lines (Arco line S2 and Howe line S4) were obtained from Sierra Geophysics. In 1984, they acquired seismic reflection data using an accelerated weight drop source with station and shot point locations that yielded 6-fold data. The two seismic reflection lines are oriented perpendicular to and at locations along the projected extensions of the Arco and Howe fault segments within the ESRP. In 1992 for this study, Geotrace Technologies Inc. processed all of the seismic reflection data using industry standard processing techniques. The

  16. Williston basin oil exploration: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, A.H.

    1991-06-01

    Past: In 1951, modern oil exploration came to the Williston basin with the discovery of Paleozoic oil on the large Nesson anticline. This was quickly followed by similar discoveries on Cedar Creek and Poplar anticlines. To the north, the Canadians, lacking large structures, concentrated on Paleozoic stratigraphic traps and were highly successful. US explorationists quickly followed, finding similar traps on the basin's northeastern flank and center. The 1960s saw multiple Devonian salt dissolution structures produce on the western flank. To the northwest, shallow Mississippian and deeper Ordovician pays were found on small structural closures. These later were combined with pays in the Devonian and Silurian to give multiple pay potential. In the basin center large buried structures, visible only to seismic, were located. The 1970s revealed an Ordovician subcrop trap on the southeast flank. Centrally, a Jurassic astrobleme with Mississippian oil caused a flurry of leasing and deep drilling. The 1982 collapse of oil prices essentially halted exploration. 1987 saw a revival when horizontal drilling for the Mississippian Bakken fractured shale promised viable economics. Present: Today, emphasis is on Bakken horizontal drilling in the deeper portion of the basin. Next in importance is shallow drilling such as on the northeastern flank. Future: An estimated on billion barrels of new oil awaits discovery in the Williston basin. Additional exploration in already established production trends will find some of this oil. Most of this oil, however, will almost certainly be found by following up the numerous geological leads hinted at by past drilling.

  17. Spatial design principles for sustainable hydropower development in river basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Henriëtte I.; Efroymson, Rebecca A.; Opperman, Jeff J.; Kelly, Michael R.

    2015-02-27

    How can dams be arranged within a river basin such that they benefit society? Recent interest in this question has grown in response to the worldwide trend toward developing hydropower as a source of renewable energy in Asia and South America, and the movement toward removing unnecessary dams in the US. Environmental and energy sustainability are important practical concerns, and yet river development has rarely been planned with the goal of providing society with a portfolio of ecosystem services into the future. We organized a review and synthesis of the growing research in sustainable river basin design around four spatial decisions: Is it better to build fewer mainstem dams or more tributary dams? Should dams be clustered or distributed among distant subbasins? Where should dams be placed along a river? At what spatial scale should decisions be made? We came up with the following design principles for increasing ecological sustainability: (i) concentrate dams within a subset of tributary watersheds and avoid downstream mainstems of rivers, (ii) disperse freshwater reserves among the remaining tributary catchments, (iii) ensure that habitat provided between dams will support reproduction and retain offspring, and (iv) formulate spatial decision problems at the scale of large river basins. Based on our review, we discuss trade-offs between hydropower and ecological objectives when planning river basin development. We hope that future testing and refinement of principles extracted from our review will define a path toward sustainable river basin design.

  18. Spatial design principles for sustainable hydropower development in river basins

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jager, Henriëtte I.; Efroymson, Rebecca A.; Opperman, Jeff J.; Kelly, Michael R.

    2015-02-27

    How can dams be arranged within a river basin such that they benefit society? Recent interest in this question has grown in response to the worldwide trend toward developing hydropower as a source of renewable energy in Asia and South America, and the movement toward removing unnecessary dams in the US. Environmental and energy sustainability are important practical concerns, and yet river development has rarely been planned with the goal of providing society with a portfolio of ecosystem services into the future. We organized a review and synthesis of the growing research in sustainable river basin design around four spatialmore » decisions: Is it better to build fewer mainstem dams or more tributary dams? Should dams be clustered or distributed among distant subbasins? Where should dams be placed along a river? At what spatial scale should decisions be made? We came up with the following design principles for increasing ecological sustainability: (i) concentrate dams within a subset of tributary watersheds and avoid downstream mainstems of rivers, (ii) disperse freshwater reserves among the remaining tributary catchments, (iii) ensure that habitat provided between dams will support reproduction and retain offspring, and (iv) formulate spatial decision problems at the scale of large river basins. Based on our review, we discuss trade-offs between hydropower and ecological objectives when planning river basin development. We hope that future testing and refinement of principles extracted from our review will define a path toward sustainable river basin design.« less

  19. Seismic/Hazard Characterization in the Eastern U.S.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-11-21

    Version 00 SHC was developed as part of the Eastern United (EUS) Seismic Hazard Characterization (SHC) Project to design an SHC methodology for the region east of the Rocky Mountains in a form suitable for probabilistic risk assessment and to apply that methodology to 69 site locations, some of them with local soil conditions. The method developed uses expert opinions to obtain the input to the analysis. SHC contains four modules which calculate the seismicmore » hazard at a site located in a region of diffuse seismicity, where the seismicity is modeled by area sources. SHC integrates the opinions of 11 seismicity and five ground-motion experts. The PRDS module generates the discrete probability density functions of the distances to the site for the various seismic source zones. These probability distributions are used by the COMAP module to generate the set of all alternative maps and the discrete probability density of the seismic zonation maps for each expert. The third module, ALEAS, uses these maps and their weights to calculate the best estimate and constant percentile hazard distribution resulting from the choice of a given seismicity expert for all ground-motion experts. This module can be used alone to perform a seismic hazard analysis as well as in conjunction with the other modules. The fourth module, COMB, combines the best-estimate and constant-percentile hazard over all seismicity experts, using the set of weights calculated by ALEAS, to produce the final probability distribution of the hazard for the site under consideration so that the hazard analysis can be performed for any location in the EUS. Local geological site characteristics are incorporated in a generic fashion, and the data are developed in a generic manner.« less

  20. Background Report on Eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Tracy A

    2011-05-01

    Each month, approximately 45,000 people die from violence, hunger, disease, and other effects of displacement as a result of war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The country is often said to be plagued by a 'resource curse.' During each period in history since its discovery by the West, the DRC has possessed the resources the world craves and the world has sought these without regard for the consequences to the Congolese people. The catastrophic consequences of Congo's history of natural resource exploitation are the direct and indirect death of millions of Congolese people. The current war in Congo is multi-causal in nature but explanations are often reduced to describing it as an ethic conflict based on objective grievance. Objective grievance such as inequality, ethnic tensions, land disputes, and lack of democracy do exist, but they are neither necessary nor sufficient to explain the cause of the violent conflict, and more importantly, they fall short in explaining why this conflict has continued for years. The reality is the conflict is an economic war in which the trade of conflict minerals, gold and the 3Ts (tin, tantalum, tungsten), is directly linked to the financial sustainability of the groups fighting each other in eastern DRC. Objective grievance is a by-product of the conflict, used to create a false but plausible moral justification to continue violence. This paper examines the history of conflict in the DRC and the socio-economic variables contributing to the current war fought over conflict minerals.