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1

Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

Jefferson, A

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

2

ARM AOS Processing Status and Aerosol Intensive Properties VAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Andrews, and P. J. Sheridan National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado Abstract The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Observing System (AOS)...

3

Aerosol Observing Systems (AOS), New Capabilities for ASR Researchers Stephen R. Springston (srs@bnl.gov)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of remote access over the internet allows mentors complete control over AOS infrastructure components to erect railing, sampling mast and instrument turn on) o Tolerance for heat/cold, wind o `Turtle' mode/off all subsystems allowing both remote and autonomous restart and shutdown of unit in graded steps o

4

ARM - Mobile Aerosol Observing System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Aerosol Observing System Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, New York, using the ARM Mobile Aerosol Observing System. Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven

5

ARM - Surface Aerosol Observing System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Surface Aerosol Observing System The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is equipped to quantify the interaction between clouds and aerosol particles. A counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI) is used to selectively sample cloud drops. The CVI takes advantage of the

6

BNL | Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) The Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) is a platform and instrument suite for Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs) to conduct in situ measurements of aerosols and their precursors. MAOS is part of the ARM Climate Research Facility. Physically MAOS is contained in two 20' SeaTainers custom adapted to provide a sheltered laboratory environment for operators and instruments even under harsh conditions. The two structures are designated MAOS-A and MAOS-C for Aerosol and Chemistry respectively. Although independent, with separate data systems, inlets and power distribution, the two structures are normally a single operating unit. The two enclosures comprising MAOS are designed for rapid deployment. All components (except for the Radar Wind Profiler) are transported internally

7

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

8

AO02 -Aerosol Inlet Design Candidate 44263 Supervisor: Dr. Daniel Peters Word Count:3812  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are suggested. A field test investigating the size distribution of tyre smoke aerosols from airplane landings is conducted using the suggested designs. No significant tyre smoke is observed despite the designs being of the aerosol must be drawn through an inlet and transported to the collection or mea- surement device

Oxford, University of

9

ARM - Instrument - aos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsaos govInstrumentsaos Documentation AOS : Handbook AOS : Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary (IMMS) reports AOS : Data Quality Assessment (DQA) reports ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Beneficiary of Recovery Act funding. Instrument Categories Aerosols General Overview The aerosol observing system (AOS) is the primary Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) platform for in situ aerosol measurements at the surface. The principal measurements are those of the aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients as a function of the particle size and radiation wavelength. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration, size distribution, hygroscopic growth, and inorganic

10

On surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols: models and observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and sulphate aerosols on near-surface temperature is investigated using a version of the Hadley Centre atmospheric model coupled to a mixed layer ocean. The scattering of sunlight by sulphate aerosols is represented by appropriately enhancing the surface albedo. On doubling atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, the global mean temperature increases by 5.2 K. An integration with a 39% increase in CO{sub 2}, giving the estimated change in radiative heating due to increases in greenhouse gases since 1900, produced an equilibrium warming of 2.3 K, which, even allowing for oceanic inertia, is significantly higher than the observed warming over the same period. Furthermore, the simulation suggests a substantial warming everywhere, whereas the observations indicate isolated regions of cooling, including parts of the northern midlatitude continents. The addition of an estimate of the effect of scattering by current industrial aerosols (uncertain by a factor of at least 3) leads to improved agreement with the observed pattern of changes over the northern continents and reduces the global mean warming by about 30%. Doubling the aerosol forcing produces patterns that are still compatible with the observations, but further increase leads to unrealistically extensive cooling in the midlatitudes. The diurnal range of surface temperature decreases over most of the northern extratropics on increasing CO{sub 2}, in agreement with recent observations. The addition of the current industrial aerosol had little detectable effect on the diurnal range in the model because the direct effect of reduced solar heating at the surface is approximately balanced by the indirect effects of cooling. Thus, the ratio of the reduction in diurnal range to the mean warming is increased, in closer agreement with observations. Results from further sensitivity experiments with larger increases in aerosol and CO{sub 2} are presented.

Mitchell, J.F.B.; Davis, R.A.; Ingram, W.J.; Senior, C.A. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Observations of the first aerosol indirect effect in shallow cumuli  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) are used to estimate the impact of both aerosol indirect effects and cloud dynamics on the microphysical and optical properties of shallow cumuli observed in the vicinity of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Not surprisingly, we find that the amount of light scattered by the clouds is dominated by their liquid water content (LWC), which in turn is driven by cloud dynamics. However, removing the effect of cloud dynamics by examining the scattering normalized by LWC shows a strong sensitivity of scattering to pollutant loading. These results suggest that even moderately sized cities, like Oklahoma City, can have a measureable impact on the optical properties of shallow cumuli.

Berg, Larry K.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Barnard, James C.; Senum, Gunar; Springston, Stephen R.

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

12

An Observed Signature of Aerosol Effect on Cloud Droplet Radii from a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Observed Signature of Aerosol Effect on Cloud Droplet Radii from a An Observed Signature of Aerosol Effect on Cloud Droplet Radii from a Decade of Observations at a Mid-Continental Site Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Duan, Minzheng State University of New York at Albany Harrison, Lee State University of New York Joseph, Everette Howard University Category: Aerosols Continuing observations of aerosol and cloud optical property have been made using MFRSR and MWR at the ARM SGP site since 1993. Diurnal, monthly, seasonal and interannual variability of aerosol (optical depth and Angstrom coefficient) and cloud (optical depth and effective radius) have been analyzed. We have correlated an "aerosol index" computed from clear-sky observations of MFRSR with cloud droplet mean effective radius to study the

13

Quantifying the Hygroscopic Growth of Marine Boundary Layer Aerosols by Satellite-base and Buoy Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, collocated satellite and buoy observations as well as satellite observations over an extended region during 2006-2010 were used to quantify the humidity effects on marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosols. Although the near-surface ...

Tao Luo; Renmin Yuan; Zhien Wang; Damao Zhang

14

Ground-truth aerosol lidar observations: can the Klett solutions obtained from ground and space be equal for the same aerosol case?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Upcoming multiyear satellite lidar aerosol observations need strong support by a worldwide ground-truth lidar network. In this context the question arises as to whether the ground...

Ansmann, Albert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol absorption  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

absorption absorption ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol absorption The process in which radiation energy is retained by aerosols. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) PSAP : Particle Soot Absorption Photometer PASS : Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer External Instruments OMI : Ozone Monitoring Instrument

16

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol concentration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

concentration concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol concentration A measure of the amount of aerosol particles (e.g. number, mass, volume) per unit volume of air. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer CPC : Condensation Particle Counter IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer

17

Determination of particulate lead using aerosol mass spectrometry: MILAGRO/MCMA-2006 observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first measurements of particulate lead (Pb) from Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers, which were deployed in and around Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations ...

Salcedo, D.

18

Constraining cloud lifetime effects of aerosols using A-Train satellite observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosol indirect effects have remained the largest uncertainty in estimates of the radiative forcing of past and future climate change. Observational constraints on cloud lifetime effects are particularly challenging since it is difficult to separate aerosol effects from meteorological influences. Here we use three global climate models, including a multi-scale aerosol-climate model PNNL-MMF, to show that the dependence of the probability of precipitation on aerosol loading, termed the precipitation frequency susceptibility (S{sub pop}), is a good measure of the liquid water path response to aerosol perturbation ({lambda}), as both Spop and {lambda} strongly depend on the magnitude of autoconversion, a model representation of precipitation formation via collisions among cloud droplets. This provides a method to use satellite observations to constrain cloud lifetime effects in global climate models. S{sub pop} in marine clouds estimated from CloudSat, MODIS and AMSR-E observations is substantially lower than that from global climate models and suggests a liquid water path increase of less than 5% from doubled cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. This implies a substantially smaller impact on shortwave cloud radiative forcing (SWCF) over ocean due to aerosol indirect effects than simulated by current global climate models (a reduction by one-third for one of the conventional aerosol-climate models). Further work is needed to quantify the uncertainties in satellite-derived estimates of S{sub pop} and to examine S{sub pop} in high-resolution models.

Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ecuyer, Tristan L.; Zhang, Kai; Morrison, H.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.; Marchand, Roger; Chand, Duli; Qian, Yun; Penner, Joyce E.

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N – tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

20

Retrieval of Intensive Aerosol Properties from MFRSR observations: Partly Cloudy Cases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An approach for the obtaining column intensive aerosol properties, namely the single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASP), from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) spectral observations under partly cloudy conditions is described. The approach involves the MFRSR-based aerosol retrieval for clear-sky periods and an interpolation of the retrieved column aerosol properties for cloudy periods. The observed weak diurnal variability of SSA and ASP at the surface and the close association of the surface intensive aerosol properties with their column counterparts form the basis of such interpolation. The approach is evaluated by calculating the corresponding clear-sky total, direct and diffuse fluxes at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673 and 870 nm) and compare them with the observed fluxes. The aerosol properties provided by this approach are applied for (i) an examination of the statistical relationship between spectral (visible spectral range) and broadband values of the total normalized cloud radiative forcing and (ii) an estimation of the fractional sky cover. Data collected during 13 days with single-layer cumulus clouds observed at U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during summer 2007 are applied to illustrate the performance and application of this approach.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor J.; Long, Charles N.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Multi-year Satellite and Surface Observations of AOD in support of Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Field Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use combined multi-year measurements from the surface and space for assessing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol properties within a large (~400x400 km) region centered on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, along the East Coast of the United States. The ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements at Martha’s Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO) site and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensors on board the Terra and Aqua satellites provide horizontal and temporal variations of aerosol optical depth, while the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) offers the altitudes of aerosol-layers. The combined ground-based and satellite measurements indicated several interesting features among which were the large differences in the aerosol properties observed in July and February. We applied the climatology of aerosol properties for designing the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The TCAP field campaign involves 12-month deployment (started July 1, 2012) of the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod and complimentary aerosol observations from two research aircraft: the DOE Gulfstream-1 (G-1) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) B200 King Air. Using results from the coordinated G-1 and B200 flights during the recent (July, 2012) Intensive Observation Period, we demonstrated that the G-1 in situ measurements and B200 active remote sensing can provide complementary information on the temporal and spatial changes of the aerosol properties off the coast of North America.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observations Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects Sylwester Arabas 1 , Joanna Slawinska 1 , Wojciech Grabowski 2 , Hugh Morrison 2 , Hanna Pawlowska 1 1 : Institute of Geophysics, University of Warsaw, Poland 2 : National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA 348 constants for reference state and lateral boundary conditions 349 ibcx=icyx 350 ibcy=icyy*j3 351 ibcz=icyz 352 irlx=irelx 353 irly=irely*j3 354 irdbc=0 355 fcr0=fcr0*icorio 356 itdl=0 357 tdt=40.*3600. 358 u0tdl=u00 359 360 361 constants for thermodynamics 362 c bv=sqrt(st*g) 363 bv=st 364 st=bv**2/g 365 cp=3.5*rg 366 cap=rg/cp 367 pr00=rg*rh00*tt00

23

Observations of Secondary Organic Aerosol Production and Soot Aging under Atmospheric Conditions Using a Novel Environmental Aerosol Chamber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, heterogeneous surface reactions, cloud processing, and gas-to-particle partitioning through the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) by organic gases (Pankow 1994). Moreover, SOA has been linked to adverse health effects as they typically contain... 1985; Ng et al. 2006; Presto et al. 2005; Saathoff et al. 2003). Such classes include cycloalkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons, and terpenes, most of which are cyclic compounds. When these compounds undergo atmospheric oxidation, 3 they produce first-generation...

Glen, Crystal

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

24

Global observations and spectral characteristics of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quantity, but a radiation difference in the UV. Its main advantages are its insensitivity to scattering in climate physics today is the effect of aerosols on the global energy budget. The amount and sign of the effect of aerosols on the incoming solar radiation are unknown and produce a large uncertainty

Graaf, Martin de

25

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol backscattered radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

backscattered radiation backscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System MPL : Micropulse Lidar NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer

26

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao-assisted integral-field observations...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

assisted integral-field spectroscopy will play... for INtegral Field Observation in the Near-Infrared") in October 1997. The instrument was conceived... of the integral ......

27

Retrieval of Non-Spherical Dust Aerosol Properties from Satellite Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 4.2 Comparison between the MODIS RGB image (left panel) and aerosol optical depth derived in the MODIS Deep Blue product (right panel) over the Sahara Desert on April 1, 2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 xii 4.3 Comparison between.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 4.2 Comparison between the MODIS RGB image (left panel) and aerosol optical depth derived in the MODIS Deep Blue product (right panel) over the Sahara Desert on April 1, 2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 xii 4.3 Comparison between...

Huang, Xin

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Limits to the Aerosol Indirect Radiative Effect Derived from Observations of Ship Tracks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reflectivities. #12;3 In recent years, simulations of the aerosol indirect effect in general circulation models in satellite imagery data. Images at 3.7 µm are used in a semi-automated procedure for identifying polluted concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and more cloud droplets. Because droplet formation is rapid

29

Stratospheric background aerosol and polar cloud observations by laser backscattersonde within the framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'Atmosfera'' launched nine laser backscattersondes (LABS) on board stratospheric balloons to make observations

30

Observations of new aerosol particle formation in a tropical urban Raghu Betha a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fires were observed during the course of air sampling due to a prolonged dry spell in the months particles are also formed in the atmosphere through gas-to-particle conversion; this phenomenon is often on climate, especially on the number of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the resulting ef- fects on cloud

Spracklen, Dominick

31

Limits to the Aerosol Indirect Radiative Effect Derived from Observations of Ship Tracks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations of the effects of ships on low-level clouds off the west coast of the United States are used to derive limits for the degree to which clouds might be altered by increases ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Christopher D. Walsh

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

aerosols | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aerosols aerosols Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate material for...

33

Factors influencing the microphysics and radiative properties of liquid-dominated Arctic clouds: insight from observations of aerosol and clouds during ISDAC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aircraft measurements during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 are used to investigate aerosol indirect effects in Arctic clouds. Two aerosol-cloud regimes are considered in this analysis: single-layer stratocumulus cloud with below-cloud aerosol concentrations (N{sub a}) below 300 cm{sup -3} on April 8 and April 26-27 (clean cases); and inhomogeneous layered cloud with N{sub a} > 500 cm{sup -3} below cloud base on April 19-20, concurrent with a biomass burning episode (polluted cases). Vertical profiles through cloud in each regime are used to determine average cloud microphysical and optical properties. Positive correlations between the cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and cloud optical depth ({tau}) are observed for both clean and polluted cases, which are characteristic of optically-thin, non-precipitating clouds. Average Re values for each case are {approx} 6.2 {mu}m, despite significantly higher droplet number concentrations (Nd) in the polluted cases. The apparent independence of Re and Nd simplifies the description of indirect effects, such that {tau} and the cloud albedo (A) can be described by relatively simple functions of the cloud liquid water path. Adiabatic cloud parcel model simulations show that the marked differences in Na between the regimes account largely for differences in droplet activation, but that the properties of precursor aerosol also play a role, particularly for polluted cases where competition for vapour amongst the more numerous particles limits activation to larger and/or more hygroscopic particles. The similarity of Re for clean and polluted cases is attributed to compensating droplet growth processes for different initial droplet size distributions.

Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Strapp, J. Walter; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; McFarquhar, Greg; Shantz, Nicole C.; Leaitch, W. R.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

34

BNL | Aerosol Lifecycle IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program Aerosol Life Cycle IOP The primary objectives that make up the Aerosol Life Cycle IOP can be broken down into three categories: Scientific; Logistical; and GVAX preparation. Scientific Objectives The science goals are to conduct intensive aerosol observations in a region exposed to anthropogenic, biogenic, and marine emissions with atmospheric processing times depending on air mass trajectories and time of day. Take advantage of new instruments in the MAOS (e.g., SP2, HR-PTRMS, ACSM, Trace Gas Suite, PASS-3, Aethelometer, UHSAS). Within this broad umbrella are embedded three main foci: Aerosol light absorption: How does the aerosol mass absorption coefficient (absorption per unit mass of BC) vary with atmospheric processing? Do observations agree with a shell-core model?

35

ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Satellite Observation CAS Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer CCN Cloud Condensation Nuclei CIP Cloud Imaging Probe CPC Condensation Particle Counter CSPHOT Cimel sunphotometer CVI...

36

ARM - Campaign Instrument - aos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate Download Data Hyytiala, Finland; Mobile Facility, 2014.02.01 - 2014.09.13 Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiation Effects...

37

EMSL: Science: Atmospheric Aerosol Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Atmospheric Aerosol Systems atmospheric logo Nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC Observed nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC, showed evidence of being formed by reactions that transform carbonyls into imines. The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model parameterization to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations and develop a predictive understanding of climate. By elucidating the role of natural and anthropogenic regional and global climate forcing mechanisms, EMSL can provide DOE and others with the ability to develop cost-effective strategies to monitor, control and mitigate them.

38

2, 20952131, 2002 Below-cloud aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). In addition, the understanding of wet removal processes remains crucial in local and regional pollutionACPD 2, 2095­2131, 2002 Below-cloud aerosol removal C. Andronache Title Page Abstract Introduction-cloud aerosol removal by rainfall for observed aerosol size distributions C. Andronache Boston College, Chestnut

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

39

HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO): fine-grained, global-scale measurements of climatically important atmospheric gases and aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...emissions to human activity or natural processes, in a variety...new features of trace gas and aerosol emissions...surface fluxes of trace gases and aerosols. 2. HIAPER...sensor drift. The quantum cascade laser spectrometer (QCLS...CO2 sensor using an IR gas analyser (IRGA), which...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical depth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

depth depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol optical depth A measure of how much light aerosols prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments HSRL : High Spectral Resolution Lidar MPL : Micropulse Lidar MFRSR : Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer NIMFR : Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer Field Campaign Instruments AOS-PMFOV : Acoustical Optical Spectrometer-Photometer with Multiple

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical properties  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

properties properties ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol optical properties The optical properties of aerosols, including asymmetry factor, phase-function, single-scattering albedo, refractive index, and backscatter fraction. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer Field Campaign Instruments AOS-PMFOV : Acoustical Optical Spectrometer-Photometer with Multiple

42

Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in the Trade Wind Boundary Layer.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This dissertation includes an overview of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation properties associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed during the Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment (BACEX,… (more)

Jung, Eunsil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL Campaign Links Images Wiki 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Sedlacek 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Springston 2010 ASR Fall Meeting: Sedlacek News, June 14, 2011: Next-generation Aerosol-sampling Stations to Head for India Related Campaigns Aerosol Life Cycle: Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer - CIMS 2011.07.10, Lee, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: HR-ToF-AMS 2011.06.15, Zhang, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: ARM Mobile Facility 2 Aerosol Observing System 2011.06.15, Sedlacek, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: UV-APS and Nano-SMPS 2011.06.10, Hallar, OSC Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL 2011.06.01 - 2011.08.31 Lead Scientist : Arthur Sedlacek For data sets, see below.

44

Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes Title Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Novakov, Tihomir, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Surabi Menon, and Jeffery Aguiar Journal Geophysical Research Letters Volume 35 Issue 19 Abstract In this paper, we compare constructed records of concentrations of black carbon (BC) - an indicator of anthropogenic aerosols - with observed surface temperature trends in California. Annual average BC concentrations in major air basins in California significantly decreased after about 1990, coincident with an observed statewide surface temperature increase. Seasonal aerosol concentration trends are consistent with observed seasonal temperature trends. These data suggest that the reduction in anthropogenic aerosol concentrations contributed to the observed surface temperature increase. Conversely, high aerosol concentrations may lower surface temperature and partially offset the temperature increase of greenhouse gases.

45

Improving aerosol distributions below clouds by assimilating satellite-retrieved cloud droplet number  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...remainder of the map to the...distributions for mass, number, composition...such as vertical velocity and aerosol composition...updated aerosol mass for each compound...aerosols in trade wind cumulus observed by...spectrum of updraft velocities and the internally...Starting from aerosol mass (M) and number...

Pablo E. Saide; Gregory R. Carmichael; Scott N. Spak; Patrick Minnis; J. Kirk Ayers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

AO Core Competency Worksheet  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AO Core Competency Worksheet AO Core Competency Worksheet 1 DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS Key Cyber Security Role: Authorizing Official (AO) Role Definition: The AO is the Senior DOE Management Federal official with the authority to formally assume responsibility and be held fully accountable for operating an information system at an acceptable level of risk. Competency Area: Incident Management Functional Requirement: Manage Competency Definition: Refers to the knowledge and understanding of the processes and procedures required to prevent, detect, investigate, contain, eradicate, and recover from incidents that impact the organizational mission as directed by the DOE Cyber Incident Response Capability (CIRC). Behavioral Outcome: Individuals fulfilling the role of AO will have a working knowledge of policies

47

Improved solid aerosol generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

48

ARM - Field Campaign - 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Process Study (CHAPS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Process Study (CHAPS) 7 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Process Study (CHAPS) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Process Study (CHAPS) 2007.06.04 - 2007.06.25 Lead Scientist : Carl Berkowitz For data sets, see below. Description The primary goal of this campaign was to characterize and contrast freshly emitted aerosols above, within and below fields of cumulus humilis (or fair-weather cumulus, FWC) and to use these observations to address how below-cloud and above-cloud aerosol optical and cloud nucleating properties differ downwind of a mid-size city relative to similar aerosols in air less affected by emissions. The observations from this campaign can also be used to aid in the development and evaluation of parameterizations of the

49

Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and absorption of light by aerosols. At the ground sites, a new Humidigraph, a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter, a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer, and an upgraded 915-MHz...

50

ARM - Field Campaign - Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBiogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: govCampaignsBiogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: FIGAERO-ToF-CIMS Instrument in Hyytiala with AMF-2 Related Campaigns Biogenic Aerosols- Effects on Clouds and Climate 2014.02.01, Petäjä, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: FIGAERO-ToF-CIMS Instrument in Hyytiala with AMF-2 2014.04.01 - 2014.06.01 Lead Scientist : Joel Thornton Description The ultimate goal of this work is to connect field and laboratory observations of organic aerosol chemical and physical properties during the nascent growth stage to the diurnal and vertical distributions of aerosol abundance measured over the boreal forest by the ARM Mobile Facility 2

51

Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

Mccomiskey, Allison

52

Observations of the Variation in Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics along the 20°S Transect on 13 November 2008 during VOCALS-REx  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations are presented of the structure of the marine boundary layer (MBL) in the southeastern Pacific made with the U.K. BAe 146 aircraft on 13 November 2008 as it flew at a variety of altitudes along 20°S between the coast of Chile and a ...

Zhiqiang Cui; Alan Gadian; Alan Blyth; Jonathan Crosier; Ian Crawford

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Aerosol Retrievals under Partly Cloudy Conditions: Challenges and Perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are lots of interesting and intriguing features of aerosols near clouds – many of which can be quite engaging, as well being useful and climate-related. Exploring aerosol with the aid of the remote sensing, in situ observations and numerical modeling has piqued our curiosity and led to improve insights into the nature of aerosol and clouds and their complex relationship. This chapter conveys the outstanding issues of cloudy-sky aerosol retrievals of important climate properties and outlines their fruitful connections to other research areas such as in situ measurements and model simulations. The chapter focuses mostly on treating the inverse problems in the context of the passive satellite remote sensing and how they can improve our understanding of the cloud-aerosol interactions. The presentation includes a basis in the inverse problem theory, reviews available approaches and discusses their applications to partly cloudy situations. Potential synergy of observations and model simulations is described as well.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor J.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Authorizing Official (AO) | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

(AO) Authorizing Official (AO) The AO is the Senior DOE Management Federal official with the authority to formally assume responsibility and be held fully accountable for operating...

55

Aerosol Cans? -Aerosol cans use a pressurized  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? - The waste generated in the processing of images/photos contains silver. Silver is a toxic heavy metal the product. Propellants are often flammable and/or toxic. Therefore, never store aerosol cans near ignition of this pamphlet. -Carefully transfer the old paint thinner from the one gallon closable can to the 30 gallon metal

Jia, Songtao

56

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Title On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Pang, Yanbo, B. J. Turpin, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 128-133 Abstract This study shows how aerosol organic oxygen data could provide new and independent information about organic aerosol mass, aqueous solubility of organic aerosols, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the relative contributions of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. For more than two decades atmospheric aerosol organic mass concentration has usually been estimated by multiplying the measured carbon content by an assumed organic mass (OM)-to-organic carbon (OC ) factor of 1.4. However, this factor can vary from 1.0 to 2.5 depending on location. This great uncertainty about aerosol organic mass limits our understanding of the influence of organic aerosol on climate, visibility and health.New examination of organic aerosol speciation data shows that the oxygen content is the key factor responsible for the observed range in the OM-to-OC factor. When organic oxygen content is excluded, the ratio of non-oxygen organic mass to carbon mass varies very little across different environments (1.12 to 1.14). The non-oxygen-OM-to-non-oxygen OC factor for all studied sites (urban and non-urban) is 1.13± 0.02. The uncertainty becomes an order of magnitude smaller than the uncertainty in the best current estimates of organic mass to organic carbon ratios (1.6± 0.2 for urban and 2.1± 0.2 for non-urban areas). When aerosol organic oxygen data become available, organic aerosol mass can be quite accurately estimated using just OC and organic oxygen (OO) without the need to know whether the aerosol is fresh or aged. In addition, aerosol organic oxygen data will aid prediction of water solubility since compounds with OO-to-OC higher than 0.4 have water solubilities higher than 1g per 100 g water

57

Light Absorption by Secondary Organic Aerosol from ?-Pinene: Effects of Oxidants, Seed Aerosol Acidity, and Relative Humidity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known that light absorption from dust and black carbon aerosols has a warming effect on climate while light scattering from sulfate, nitrate, and sea salt aerosols has a cooling effect. However, there are large uncertainties associated with light absorption and scattering by different types of organic aerosols, especially in the near-UV and UV spectral regions. In this paper, we present the results from a systematic laboratory study focused on measuring light absorption by secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from ozonolysis or NO3 oxidation of ?-pinene in the presence of neutral and acidic sulfate seed aerosols. Light absorption was monitored using photoacoustic spectrometers at four different wavelengths: 355, 405, 532 and 870 nm. Light absorption at 355 and 405 nm was observed by SOA generated from oxidation of ?-pinene in the presence of acidic sulfate seed aerosols, under dry conditions. No absorption was observed when the relative humidity was elevated to greater than 27%, or in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols. The light-absorbing compounds are speculated to be aldol condensation oligomers with organosulfate and organic nitrate groups. The results of this study also indicate that organic nitrates from ?-pinene SOA formed in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols do not appear to absorb near-UV and UV radiation.

Song, Chen; Gyawali, Madhu S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shilling, John E.; Arnott, W. Patrick

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Science Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) field campaign will provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility will deploy the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations will be supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods (IOPs), one in the summer and a second in the winter. Each IOP will deploy one, and possibly two, aircraft depending on available resources. The first aircraft will be equipped with a suite of in situ instrumentation to provide measurements of aerosol optical properties, particle composition and direct-beam irradiance. The second aircraft will fly directly over the first and use a multi-wavelength high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and scanning polarimeter to provide continuous optical and cloud properties in the column below.

Berkowitz, CM; Berg, LK; Cziczo, DJ; Flynn, CJ; Kassianov, EI; Fast, JD; Rasch, PJ; Shilling, JE; Zaveri, RA; Zelenyuk, A; Ferrare, RA; Hostetler, CA; Cairns, B; Russell, PB; Ervens, B

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

59

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol particle size  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

particle size particle size ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol particle size Linear size (e.g. radius or diameter) of an aerosol particle. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Field Campaign Instruments AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer CPI : Cloud Particle Imager DRI-GND : Desert Research Institute Ground-Based Aerosol Instruments DRUM-AEROSOL : Drum Aerosol Sampler AEROSOL-TOWER-EML : EML Tower based Aerosol Measurements

60

A World-wide Stratospheric Aerosol Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Massachusetts An aerosol layer has been identified by a stratospheric balloon and aircraft aerosol collection program. Measurements...Abstract. An aerosol layer has been identified by a stratospheric balloon and aircraft aerosol collection program. Meas-urements...

Christian E. Junge; Charles W. Chagnon; James E. Manson

1961-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol program program Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CHAPSCLASIC Summary: Observations of Cloud-Aerosol Halos During CHAPSCLASIC Funded by NASA HQ Science Mission... Directorate Radiation Sciences Program Funded by Department of...

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol features biomass Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

features biomass Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aerosol features biomass Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Global observations and...

63

March 14, 2011 NIST Aerosol Metrology Workshop Optical Properties: The Global  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are difficult without involving satellite measurements Correspondence with satellite measurements require. Improved regional forecasts of both weather and air quality #12;GAW Aerosol Lidar Observation Network

64

Year Report (FY 2000) Evaluation of uncertainties in satellite retrievals of aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Third Year Statement of Work 1. Construct clean aerosol data sets for the Mauna Loa (Hawaii), and Cheeka retrievals to the observed variability of ae

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol size classification Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging Spectroradiometer observations: Top-of-atmosphere albedo change Summary: Panel on Climate Change, 2007. Aerosol particles have a variety of shapes, sizes, and...

66

Long-term Statistics of Continental Cumuli: Does Aerosol Trigger Cumulus Variability?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols may control the formation, maintenance, and dissipation of cumuli by changing their microphysics. Recent observational and modeling results exist both in support and against strong potential impacts of aerosol [1-3]. Typically, the aerosol impact on water clouds has been investigated for regions with high aerosol loading and/or large atmospheric moisture [4]. Can we provide observational evidence of the aerosol-cloud relationship for a relatively dry continental region with low/moderate aerosol burden? To address this question, we revisit the aerosol-cloud relationship at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. In comparison with highly polluted regions, the SGP site is characterized by relatively small-to-moderate aerosol loading. Also, moisture content is small-to-moderate (compared to marine and coastal regions) for the SGP site. Because cumulus clouds have important impacts on climate forcing estimations [5] and are susceptible to aerosol effects [6], we focus on fair-weather cumuli (FWC) and their association with aerosol concentration and other potentially important factors. This association is investigated using a new 8-year aerosol and cloud climatology (2000-2007) developed with collocated and coincident surface and satellite observations.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Berg, Larry K.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Turner, David D.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Do Diurnal Aerosol Changes Affect Daily Average Radiative Forcing?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strong diurnal variability of aerosol has been observed frequently for many urban/industrial regions. How this variability may alter the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF), however, is largely unknown. To quantify changes in the time-averaged DARF, we perform an assessment of 29 days of high temporal resolution ground-based data collected during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) on Cape Cod, which is downwind of metropolitan areas. We demonstrate that strong diurnal changes of aerosol loading (about 20% on average) have a negligible impact on the 24-h average DARF, when daily averaged optical properties are used to find this quantity. However, when there is a sparse temporal sampling of aerosol properties, which may preclude the calculation of daily averaged optical properties, large errors (up to 100%) in the computed DARF may occur. We describe a simple way of reducing these errors, which suggests the minimal temporal sampling needed to accurately find the forcing.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

68

Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols I: Uranium Concentration in Aerosols as a Function of Time and Particle Size  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing depleted uranium were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time particularly within the first minute after the shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% 30 min after perforation. In the Bradley vehicle, the initial (and maximum) uranium concentration was lower than those observed in the Abrams tank and decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in the cyclone samplers, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h post perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages from the Abrams tank tests ranged from 38% to 72% and, in most cases, varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Results with the Bradley vehicle ranged from 18% to 29% and were not specifically correlated with particle size.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Traub, Richard J.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

ARM - Field Campaign - Shortwave Radiation and Aerosol Intensive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsShortwave Radiation and Aerosol Intensive Observation govCampaignsShortwave Radiation and Aerosol Intensive Observation Periods Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Shortwave Radiation and Aerosol Intensive Observation Periods 1998.08.03 - 1998.08.28 Lead Scientist : Warren Wiscombe For data sets, see below. Summary Wednesday, August 5, 1998: IOP Opening Activities: The IOP updates for the Shortwave/Aerosol/BDRF will be composed from notes taken during briefing sessions lead by Don Cahoon and company each night at the Marland Mansion in Ponca City. IOP Status as of 8/4/98 Weather forecasts indicate that cloudy conditions will prevail for the next few days. The Helicopter is on standby for clear sky conditions. Model output indicates clear sky's may move in later this week.

70

The Robo-AO automated intelligent queue system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robo-AO is the first automated laser adaptive optics instrument. In just its second year of scientific operations, it has completed the largest adaptive optics surveys to date, each comprising thousands of targets. Robo-AO uses a fully automated queue scheduling system that selects targets based on criteria entered on a per observing program or per target basis, and includes the ability to coordinate with US Strategic Command automatically to avoid lasing space assets. This enables Robo-AO to select among thousands of targets at a time, and achieve an average observation rate of approximately 20 targets per hour.

Riddle, Reed L; Papadopoulos, Athanasios; Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Characterizing the formation of secondary organic aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic aerosol is an important fraction of the fine particulate matter present in the atmosphere. This organic aerosol comes from a variety of sources; primary organic aerosol emitted directly from combustion process, and secondary aerosol formed in the atmosphere from condensable vapors. This secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can result from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In rural areas of the United States, organic aerosols can be a significant part of the aerosol load in the atmosphere. However, the extent to which gas-phase biogenic emissions contribute to this organic load is poorly understood. Such an understanding is crucial to properly apportion the effect of anthropogenic emissions in these rural areas that are sometimes dominated by biogenic sources. To help gain insight on the effect of biogenic emissions on particle concentrations in rural areas, we have been conducting a field measurement program at the University of California Blodgett Forest Research Facility. The field location includes has been used to acquire an extensive suite of measurements resulting in a rich data set, containing a combination of aerosol, organic, and nitrogenous species concentration and meteorological data with a long time record. The field location was established in 1997 by Allen Goldstein, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the University of California at Berkeley to study interactions between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The Goldstein group focuses on measurements of concentrations and whole ecosystem biosphere-atmosphere fluxes for volatile organic compounds (VOC's), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC's), ozone, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy. Another important collaborator at the Blodgett field location is Ronald Cohen, a professor in the Chemistry Department at the University of California at Berkeley. At the Blodgett field location, his group his group performs measurements of the concentrations of important gas phase nitrogen compounds. Experiments have been ongoing at the Blodgett field site since the fall of 2000, and have included portions of the summer and fall of 2001, 2002, and 2003. Analysis of both the gas and particle phase data from the year 2000 show that the particle loading at the site correlates with both biogenic precursors emitted in the forest and anthropogenic precursors advected to the site from Sacramento and the Central Valley of California. Thus the particles at the site are affected by biogenic processing of anthropogenic emissions. Size distribution measurements show that the aerosol at the site has a geometric median diameter of approximately 100 nm. On many days, in the early afternoon, growth of nuclei mode particles (<20 nm) is also observed. These growth events tend to occur on days with lower average temperatures, but are observed throughout the summer. Analysis of the size resolved data for these growth events, combined with typical measured terpene emissions, show that the particle mass measured in these nuclei mode particles could come from oxidation products of biogenic emissions, and can serve as a significant route for SOA partitioning into the particle phase. During periods of each year, the effect of emissions for forest fires can be detected at the Blodgett field location. During the summer of 2002 emissions from the Biscuit fire, a large fire located in Southwest Oregon, was detected in the aerosol data. The results show that increases in particle scattering can be directly related to increased black carbon concentration and an appearance of a larger mode in the aerosol size distribution. These results show that emissions from fires can have significant impact on visibility over large distances. The results also reinforce the view that forest fires can be a significant source of black carbon in the atmosphere, which has important climate and visibility. Continuing work with the 2002 data set, particularly the combination of the aerosol and gas phase data, will continue to provide important information o

Lunden, Melissa; Black, Douglas; Brown, Nancy

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of Southern African biomass burning aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct and semi-direct radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires during July-October are investigated using 20 year runs of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) coupled to a slab ocean model. The aerosol optical depth is constrained using observations in clear skies from MODIS and for aerosol layers above clouds from CALIPSO. Over the ocean, where the absorbing biomass burning aerosol layers are primarily located above cloud, negative top of atmosphere (TOA) semi-direct radiative effects associated with increased low cloud cover dominate over a weaker positive all-sky direct radiative effect (DRE). In contrast, over the land where the aerosols are often below or within cloud layers, reductions in cloud liquid water path (LWP) lead to a positive semi-direct radiative effect that dominates over a near-zero DRE. Over the ocean, the cloud response can be understood as a response to increased lower tropospheric stability (LTS) which is caused both by aerosol absorptive warming in overlying layers and surface cooling in response to direct aerosol forcing. The ocean cloud changes are robust to changes in the cloud parameterization (removal of the hard-wired dependence of clouds on LTS), suggesting that they are physically realistic. Over land where cloud cover changes are minimal, decreased LWP is consistent with weaker convection driven by increased static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due to opposing effects over the land and ocean. However, the surface forcing is strongly negative requiring a reduction in precipitation. This is primarily realized through reductions in convective precipitation on both the southern and northern flanks of the convective precipitation region spanning the equatorial rainforest and the ITCZ in the southern Sahel. The changes are consistent with the low-level aerosol forced cooling pattern. The results highlight the importance of semi-direct radiative effects and precipitation responses for determining the climatic effects of aerosols in the African region.

Sakaeda, Naoko; Wood, Robert; Rasch, Philip J.

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

73

Modeling aerosols and their interactions with shallow cumuli during the 2007 CHAPS field study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to simulate relationships between aerosols and clouds in the vicinity of Oklahoma City during the June 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS). The regional scale simulation completed using 2 km horizontal grid spacing evaluates four important relationships between aerosols and shallow cumulus clouds observed during CHAPS. First, the model reproduces the trends of higher nitrate volume fractions in cloud droplet residuals compared to interstitial non-activated aerosols, as measured using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Comparing simulations with cloud chemistry turned on and off, we show that nitric acid vapor uptake by cloud droplets explains the higher nitrate content of cloud droplet residuals. Second, as documented using an offline code, both aerosol water and other inorganics (OIN), which are related to dust and crustal emissions, significantly affect predicted aerosol optical properties. Reducing the OIN content of wet aerosols by 50% significantly improves agreement of model predictions with measurements of aerosol optical properties. Third, the simulated hygroscopicity of aerosols is too high as compared to their hygroscopicity derived from cloud condensation nuclei and particle size distribution measurements, indicating uncertainties associated with simulating size-dependent chemical composition and treatment of aerosol mixing state within the model. Fourth, the model reasonably represents the observations of the first aerosol indirect effect where pollutants in the vicinity of Oklahoma City increase cloud droplet number concentrations and decrease the droplet effective radius. While previous studies have often focused on cloud-aerosol interactions in stratiform and deep convective clouds, this study highlights the ability of regional-scale models to represent some of the important aspects of cloud-aerosol interactions associated with fields of short-lived shallow cumuli.

Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Laskin, Alexander; Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Ying; Berkowitz, Carl M.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

75

BNL | Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation Interactions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Atmospheric aerosols exert important "indirect effects" on clouds and climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei that affect cloud radiative and microphysical properties. For example, an increase in CCN increases the number concentration of droplets enhances cloud albedo, and suppresses precipitation that alters cloud coverage and lifetime. However, in the case of moist and strong convective clouds, increasing aerosols may increase precipitation and enhance storm development. Although aerosol-induced indirect effects on climate are believed to have a significant impact on global climate change, estimating their impact continues to be one of the most uncertain climate forcings.

76

Jankovic Aerosol Characterization.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characterization, Characterization, Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Interpretation, and Application of Data Application of Data NSRC Symposium NSRC Symposium July 8, 2008 John Jankovic, CIH CIH Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Application of Data Application of Data Department of Energy (DOE) Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRC) developing Approach to Nanomaterial ES&H - The CNMS Approach * Establish Exposure Control Guideline (ECG) - Characterize Aerosol * Collect and interpret data * Assign Process to a Control Band Aerosol Particle Characterization * Size distribution (geometric mean and geometric standard deviation related to either mass, surface, or number)

77

A New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect Shao, Hongfei Florida State University Liu, Guosheng Florida State University Category: Aerosols The aerosol first indirect effect is known to cool the Earth radiatively. However, its magnitude is very uncertain; large discrepancies exist among the observed values published in the literature. In this study, we first survey the published values of those parameters used for describing the first indirect effect. By analyzing the discrepancies among these values, we show that the first indirect effect has been overestimated by many investigators due to an improper parameter being used. Therefore, we introduce a more meaningful parameter to measure this effect. We estimated the first indirect effect using the new parameter based on observational

78

A Numerical Sensitivity Study of Aerosol Influence on Immersion Freezing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Numerical Sensitivity Study of Aerosol Influence on Immersion Freezing Numerical Sensitivity Study of Aerosol Influence on Immersion Freezing in Mixed-Phase Stratiform Clouds Gijs de Boer, Tempei Hashino, Edwin W. Eloranta and Gregory J. Tripoli The University of Wisconsin - Madison (1) Introduction (1) Introduction Mixed-phase stratiform clouds are commonly observed at high latitudes (Shupe et al., 2006; de Boer et al., 2009a). These clouds significaly impact the atmospheric radiative

79

AOS Solar Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AOS Solar Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: AOS Solar Inc Product: Manufacturer of thin-film silicon-on-glass. References: AOS Solar Inc1 This article is a stub. You can help...

80

aerosols and climate : uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contributes to creating a level playing field. (BC emissions tradeble like CO2 emissions?) OUTLINE #12;size. policy measures, is even more uncertain (emissions & their chemical fingerprint are uncertain (not just aerosol emissions, not just climate impacts) OUTLINE #12;- Standardization doesn't reduce

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to Policy Applications Speaker(s): Susanne Bauer Date: December 6, 2011 - 4:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Surabi Menon The anthropogenic increase in aerosol concentrations since preindustrial times and its net cooling effect on the atmosphere is thought to mask some of the greenhouse gas induced warming. Although the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual forcing agents and feedbacks have positive forcing effects. Recent studies have tried to identify some of those positive forcing agents and their individual emission sectors, However, understanding the net effect of multi-source emitting sectors and the involved cloud feedbacks is

82

ARM - Field Campaign - Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBiogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: Snowfall govCampaignsBiogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: Snowfall Experiment Related Campaigns Biogenic Aerosols- Effects on Clouds and Climate 2014.02.01, Petäjä, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: Snowfall Experiment 2014.02.01 - 2014.04.30 Lead Scientist : Dmitri Moisseev Description The snowfall measurement campaign, which will take place during AMF2 deployment in Finland, will focus on understanding snowfall microphysics and characterizing performance of surface based snowfall measurement instruments. This will be achieved by combining triple frequency (X, Ka, W -band) radar observations of vertical structure of the precipitation,

83

Experimental study of nuclear workplace aerosol samplers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITERATURE REVIEW Aerosol Losses in an Inlet . Aerosol Losses in a Transport System Aerosol Losses in CAMs Critical Flow Venturi 8 13 15 16 EXPERIMENT PROCEDURE 18 CAM Evaluation Consideration FAS Evaluation Consideration Test Protocol Mixing... Chamber Setup High Speed Aerosol Wind Tunnel Setup Low Speed Aerosol Wind Tunnel Setup Critical Flow Venturi 18 19 21 22 24 25 27 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Page 28 Aerosol Penetration through Transport Systems and CAM Areal Uniformity Deposits...

Parulian, Antony

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Two-Column Aerosol Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

help find the answer, the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is conducting the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod...

85

Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Chemical...

86

SAGE II long-term measurements of stratospheric and upper tropospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II solar occultation instrument has been making measurements on stratospheric aerosols and gases continually since October 1984. Observations from the SAGE II instrument provide a valuable long-term data set for study of the aerosol in the stratosphere and aerosol and cloud in the upper troposphere. The period of observation covers the decay phase of material injected by the El Chichon volcanic eruption in 1982, the years 1988--1990 when stratospheric aerosol levels approached background levels, and the period after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991. The Mount Pinatubo eruption caused the largest perturbation in stratospheric aerosol loading in this century, with effects on stratospheric dynamics and chemistry. The SAGE II data sequence shows the global dispersion of aerosols following the Mount Pinatubo eruption, as well as the changes occurring in stratospheric aerosol mass and surface area. The downward transfer of stratospheric aerosols into the upper troposphere following the earlier eruption of El Chichon is clearly visible. Estimates have been made of the amount of volcanic material lying in the upper troposphere and the way in which this varies with latitude and season.

Wang, P.H.; Kent, G.S. [Science and Technology Corp., Hampton, VA (United States); McCormick, M.P.; Thomason, L.W. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

4, 58315854, 2004 Fluorescing aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

released by combustion into the atmosphere absorbs radiation and therefore heats the climate counteracting such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons sticking to the aerosol particles, or bioaerosol such as bacteria, spores) or by combustion processes (soot), or they form in situ by gas to particle conversion, like sulphate aerosol. While

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

88

Aerosol Data Sources and Their Roles within PARAGON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We briefly but systematically review major sources of aerosol data, emphasizing suites of measurements that seem most likely to contribute to assessments of global aerosol climate forcing. The strengths and limitations of existing satellite, surface, and aircraft remote-sensing systems are described, along with those of direct sampling networks and ship-based stations. It is evident that an enormous number of aerosol-related observations have been made, on a wide range of spatial and temporal sampling scales, and that many of the key gaps in this collection of data could be filled by technologies that either exist or are expected in the near future. Emphasis must be given to combining remote sensing, in situ, active and passive observations, and integrating them with aerosol chemical transport models, in order to create a more complete environmental picture having sufficient detail to address current climate-forcing questions. The Progressive Aerosol Retrieval and Assimilation Global Observing Network (PARAGON) initiative would provide an organizational framework to meet this goal.

Kahn, Ralph A.; Ogren, J. A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Bosenberg, Jens; Charlson, Robert J.; Diner, David J.; Holben, B. N.; Menzies, Robert T.; Miller, Mark A.; Seinfeld, John H.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Evolution of Asian aerosols during transpacific transport in INTEX-B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of aerosol composition were made with an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) on board the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B 5 (INTEX-B) field campaign over the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The HR-ToF-AMS measurements of non-refractory submicron aerosol mass are shown to compare well with other aerosol instrumentation in the INTEX-B field study. Two case studies are described for pollution layers transported across the Pacific from the Asian continent, intercepted 3–4 days and 7–10 days downwind of Asia, respectively. Aerosol chemistry is shown to 10 be a robust tracer for air masses originating in Asia, specifically the presence of sulfate dominated aerosol is a distinguishing feature of Asian pollution layers that have been transported to the Eastern Pacific. We examine the time scales of processing for sulfate and organic aerosol in the atmosphere and show that our observations confirm a conceptual model for transpacific transport from Asia proposed by Brock et al. (2004). 15 Our observations of both sulfate and organic aerosol in aged Asian pollution layers are consistent with fast formation near the Asian continent, followed by washout during lofting and subsequent transformation during transport across the Pacific. Our observations are the first atmospheric measurements to indicate that although secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from pollution happens on the timescale of one day, 20 the oxidation of organic aerosol continues at longer timescales in the atmosphere. Comparisons with chemical transport models of data from the entire campaign reveal an under-prediction of SOA mass in the MOZART model, but much smaller discrepancies with the GEOS-Chem model than found in previous studies over the Western Pacific. No evidence is found to support a previous hypothesis for significant secondary 25 organic aerosol formation in the free troposphere.

Dunlea, E. J.; DeCarlo, Peter; Aiken, Allison; Kimmel, Joel; Peltier, R. E.; Weber, R. J.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Shinozuka, Yohei; McNaughton, C. S.; Howell, S. G.; Clarke, A. D.; Emmons, L.; Apel, Eric; Pfister, G. G.; van Donkelaar, A.; Martin, R. V.; Millet, D. B.; Heald, C. L.; Jimenez, J. L.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment: Science and Operations Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ganges Valley region is one of the largest and most rapidly developing sections of the Indian subcontinent. The Ganges River, which provides the region with water needed for sustaining life, is fed primarily by snow and rainfall associated with Indian summer monsoons. Impacts of changes in precipitation patterns, temperature, and the flow of the snow-fed rivers can be immense. Recent satellite-based measurements have indicated that the upper Ganges Valley has some of the highest persistently observed aerosol optical depth values. The aerosol layer covers a vast region, extending across the Indo-Gangetic Plain to the Bay of Bengal during the winter and early spring of each year. The persistent winter fog in the region is already a cause of much concern, and several studies have been proposed to understand the economic, scientific, and societal dimensions of this problem. During the INDian Ocean EXperiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from this region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. This is one of the few regions showing a trend toward increasing surface dimming and enhanced mid-tropospheric warming. Increasing air pollution over this region could modify the radiative balance through direct, indirect, and semi-indirect effects associated with aerosols. The consequences of aerosols and associated pollution for surface insolation over the Ganges Valley and monsoons, in particular, are not well understood. The proposed field study is designed for use of (1) the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure relevant radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol optical characteristics over mainland India during an extended period of 9–12 months and (2) the G-1 aircraft and surface sites to measure relevant aerosol chemical, physical, and optical characteristics in the Ganges Valley during a period of 6–12 weeks. The aerosols in this region have complex sources, including burning of coal, biomass, and biofuels; automobile emissions; and dust. The extended AMF deployment will enable measurements under different regimes of the climate and aerosol abundance—in the wet monsoon period with low aerosol loading; in the dry, hot summer with aerosols dispersed throughout the atmospheric column; and in the cool, dry winter with aerosols confined mostly to the boundary later and mid-troposphere. Each regime, in addition, has its own distinct radiative and atmospheric dynamic drivers. The aircraft operational phase will assist in characterizing the aerosols at times when they have been observed to be at the highest concentrations. A number of agencies in India will collaborate with the proposed field study and provide support in terms of planning, aircraft measurements, and surface sites. The high concentration of aerosols in the upper Ganges Valley, together with hypotheses involving several possible mechanisms with direct impacts on the hydrologic cycle of the region, gives us a unique opportunity to generate data sets that will be useful both in understanding the processes at work and in providing answers regarding the effects of aerosols on climate in a region where the perturbation is the highest.

Kotamarthi, VR

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

91

Aerosol Laboratory - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities > Engineering Capabilities > Engineering Experimentation > Aerosol Laboratory Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Aerosol Laboratory The Aerosol Laboratory (AL) houses equipment to measure and record the physical parameters necessary to characterize the formation and transport of aerosols. Bookmark and Share The Aerosol Laboratory (AL) has extensive analytic and experimental capabilities to characterize the formation and transport of aerosols formed from the condensation of vapors. Computer codes have been developed to

92

Optimization of aerosol penetration through transport lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, F is the numerical reading from the fluorometer , L is the liquid volume of the measured (23) solution, 8 is the testing time for each filter, and V is the filter flow rate during the sample period. Penetration, P, of aerosol through... defined maxima on the penetration versus Reynolds number (or flow rate, since the diameter is constant for a given tube) curves for each tube size. Also, in order to observe an optimum tube diameter , a (10) fixed flow rate of 86 L/min was tested for a...

Wong Luque, Fermin Samuel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

93

Water content and morphology of sodium chloride aerosol particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to explain the H2O content. The model in which the NaCl particles contain pockets of aqueous NaCl solution was found to be most consistent with the spectroscopic observations. The relevance of salt particle morphology and water content to atmospheric aerosol...

Weis, David D.; Ewing, George E.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

94

Aerosol-nutrient-induced picoplankton growth in Lake Tahoe Katherine R. M. Mackey,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerosol-nutrient-induced picoplankton growth in Lake Tahoe Katherine R. M. Mackey,1,2 Deborah been observed in Lake Tahoe in the last several decades and, in particular, following the Wheeler

Paytan, Adina

95

Climatic effects of 1950–2050 changes in US anthropogenic aerosols – Part 2: Climate response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the climate response to changing US anthropogenic aerosol sources over the 1950–2050 period by using the NASA GISS general circulation model (GCM) and comparing to observed US temperature trends. Time-dependent ...

Leibensperger, Eric Michael

96

The impact of biogenic carbon emissions on aerosol absorption inMexico City  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to determine the wavelength dependence of atmospheric aerosol absorption in the Mexico City area, the absorption angstrom exponents (AAEs) were calculated from aerosol absorption measurements at seven wavelengths obtained with a seven-channel aethalometer during two field campaigns, the Mexico City Metropolitan Area study in April 2003 (MCMA 2003) and the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations in March 2006 (MILAGRO). The AAEs varied from 0.76 to 1.56 in 2003 and from 0.54 to 1.52 in 2006. The AAE values determined in the afternoon were consistently higher than the corresponding morning values, suggesting the photochemical formation of absorbing secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the afternoon. The AAE values were compared to stable and radiocarbon isotopic measurements of aerosol samples collected at the same time to determine the sources of the aerosol carbon. The fraction of modern carbon (fM) in the aerosol samples, as determined from {sup 14}C analysis, showed that 70% of the carbonaceous aerosols in Mexico City were from modern sources, indicating a significant impact from biomass burning during both field campaigns. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of the aerosol samples illustrate the significant impact of Yucatan forest fires (C-3 plants) in 2003 and local grass fires (C-4 plants) at site T1 in 2006. A direct comparison of the fM values, stable carbon isotope ratios, and calculated aerosol AAEs suggested that the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption was controlled by the biogenically derived aerosol components.

Marley, N; Gaffney, J; Tackett, M J; Sturchio, N; Hearty, L; Martinez, N; Hardy, K D; Machany-Rivera, A; Guilderson, T P; MacMillan, A; Steelman, K

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

97

CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Operations Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CARES field campaign is motivated by the scientific issues described in the CARES Science Plan. The primary objectives of this field campaign are to investigate the evolution and aging of carbonaceous aerosols and their climate-affecting properties in the urban plume of Sacramento, California, a mid-size, mid-latitude city that is located upwind of a biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emission region. Our basic observational strategy is to make comprehensive gas, aerosol, and meteorological measurements upwind, within, and downwind of the urban area with the DOE G-1 aircraft and at strategically located ground sites so as to study the evolution of urban aerosols as they age and mix with biogenic SOA precursors. The NASA B-200 aircraft, equipped with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), digital camera, and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), will be flown in coordination with the G-1 to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties, and to provide the vertical context for the G-1 and ground in situ measurements.

Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

Secondary Aerosol: Precursors and Formation Mechanisms. Technical Report on Grant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project focused on studying trace gases that participate in chemical reactions that form atmospheric aerosols. Ammonium sulfate is a major constituent of these tiny particles, and one important pathway to sulfate formation is oxidation of dissolved sulfur dioxide by hydrogen peroxide in cloud, fog and rainwater. Sulfate aerosols influence the number and size of cloud droplets, and since these factors determine cloud radiative properties, sulfate aerosols also influence climate. Peroxide measurements, in conjunction with those of other gaseous species, can used to distinguish the contribution of in-cloud reaction to new sulfate aerosol formation from gas-phase nucleation reactions. This will lead to more reliable global climate models. We constructed and tested a new 4-channel fluorescence detector for airborne detection of peroxides. We integrated the instrument on the G-1 in January, 2006 and took a test flight in anticipation of the MAX-Mex field program, where we planned to fly under pressurized conditions for the first time. We participated in the 2006 Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) - Megacity Aerosol EXperiment â?? Mexico City (MAX-Mex) field measurement campaign. Peroxide instrumentation was deployed on the DOE G-1 research aircraft based in Veracruz, and at the surface site at Tecamac University.

Weinstein-Lloyd, Judith B

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

99

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Effects of Aerosol Size  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effects of Aerosol Size Distribution and Vertical Profile on the Effects of Aerosol Size Distribution and Vertical Profile on the Polarization in the Oxygen A-Band Duan, Minzheng State University of New York at Albany Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany A vector radiative transfer code with successive order of scattering method was used to simulate the high-resolution polarization spectra in the oxygen A-band. The effects of aerosol size distribution and vertical profile on the radiance and polarization at the top and bottom of the atmosphere were analyzed. The impacts of instrument specification on information content are also analyzed. Polarized radiances were dominated (>95%) by the first and second orders of scattering. The contributions of scattering from different levels to the TOA and surface observation are analyzed. The

100

Direct Aerosol Forcing in the Infrared at the SGP Site?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Direct Aerosol Forcing in the Infrared at the SGP Site? Direct Aerosol Forcing in the Infrared at the SGP Site? D. D. Turner and C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Low level haze is often observed during the night and early morning hours in many locations. This haze is typically formed during quiescent conditions by radiative cooling of the surface, which lowers the ambient temperature and consequently increases the near-surface relative humidity (RH). Many aerosols start to deliquesce around 75% relative humidity (RH) (depending on their chemical composition), and thus if the near surface RH increases above this level, haze will form. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's ultimate goal, stated simply, is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in global climate models. Global climate models typically do not

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Aerosols and Clouds: In Cahoots to Change Climate  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Key knowledge gaps persist despite advances in the scientific understanding of how aerosols and clouds evolve and affect climate. The Two-Column Aerosol Project, or TCAP, was designed to provide a detailed set of observations to tackle this area of unknowns. Led by PNNL atmospheric scientist Larry Berg, ARM's Climate Research Facility was deployed in Cape Cod, Massachusetts for the 12-month duration of TCAP, which came to a close in June 2013. "We are developing new tools to look at particle chemistry, like our mass spectrometer used in TCAP that can tell us the individual chemical composition of an aerosol," said Berg. "Then, we'll run our models and compare it with the data that we have to make sure we're getting correct answers and make sure our climate models are reflecting the best information."

Berg, Larry

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

The dependence of cloud particle size and precipitation probability on non-aerosol-loading related variables  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explaining and reducing the uncertainties in the first aerosol i Explaining and reducing the uncertainties in the first aerosol i Explaining and reducing the uncertainties in the first aerosol indirect effect ndirect effect Hongfei Shao and Guosheng Liu Meteorology Department, Florida State University INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION Anthropogenic aerosols enhance cloud reflectance of solar radiation by increasing the cloud droplet number concentrations. This so-called first Aerosol Indirect Effect (AIE) has a potentially large cooling tendency on our planet. However, discrepancies of more than a factor of 2 have been reported among observations 1 as well as model simulations 2 of the AIE. Our recent study 3 shows that the discrepancies will be reduced greatly if the entrainment-mixing evaporation of cloud drops is taken into account.

103

Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2 Naoko effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires9 during July-October are investigated region the overall TOA radiative effect from the23 biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due

Wood, Robert

104

Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

Tao, Wei-Kuo [NASA/GSFC] [NASA/GSFC

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

105

ARM - Evaluation Product - Organic Aerosol Component VAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Organic Aerosol Component VAP 2011.01.08 - 2012.03.24 Site(s) SGP General Description Organic aerosol (OA, i.e., the organic fraction of particles) accounts for 10-90% of the fine aerosol mass globally and is a key determinant of aerosol radiative forcing. But atmospheric OA is poorly characterized and its life cycle insufficiently represented in models. As a result, current models are unable to simulate OA concentrations and properties. This deficiency represents a large source of uncertainty in the quantification of aerosol direct and indirect effects and the prediction of future climate change. The Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) value-added product (VAP) uses

106

ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Aerosol IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol IOP Aerosol IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1997 Aerosol IOP 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Lead Scientist : Stephen Schwartz For data sets, see below. Summary The Aerosol IOP was highlighted by the Gulfstream-1 aircraft flying clear-sky aerosol missions over the Central Facility to study the effect of aerosol loading on clear sky radiation fields, with weather particularly favorable for these flights during the first and third weeks of the IOP. A secondary but important goal of this IOP was to fly cloudy-sky missions over the Central Facility to study the effect of aerosol loading on cloud microphysics, and the effect of the microphysics on cloud optical properties. The Gulfstream obtained aerosol data in support of some of the

107

Reflective Aerosols and the Greenhouse Effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The contributions of atmospheric aerosols to add to either a climate-warming effect or climate-cooling effect depend on the chemical composition of the aerosol and the local environment. The best estimation is...

Kathryn E. Kautzman

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Antiviral therapy with small particle aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The generation and use of small particle aqueous aerosols (1.23 µm aerodynamic mass median diameter, GSD=2.0 µm) containing ribavirin is described. Administered via aerosol, ribavirin will be deposited rather ...

V. Knight; B. Gilbert

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

110

Sulfate aerosols and polar stratospheric cloud formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, it was generally assumed that gas-phase chemical reactions controlled the abundance of stratospheric ozone. However, the massive springtime ozone losses over Antarctica first reported by Farman et al in 1985 could not be explained on the basis of gas-phase chemistry alone. In 1986, Solomon et al suggested that chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) could be important for the observed ozone losses. Since that time, an explosion of laboratory, field, and theoretical research in heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry has occurred. Recent work has indicated that the most important heterogeneous reaction on PSCs is ClONO[sub 2] + HCl [yields] Cl[sub 2] + HNO[sub 3]. This reaction converts inert chlorine into photochemically active Cl[sub 2]. Photolysis of Cl[sub 2] then leads to chlorine radicals capable of destroying ozone through very efficient catalytic chain reactions. New observations during the second Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition found stoichiometric loss of ClONO[sub 2] and HCl in air processed by PSCs in accordance with reaction 1. Attention is turning toward understanding what kinds of aerosols form in the stratospheric, their formation mechanism, surface area, and specific chemical reactivity. Some of the latest findings, which underline the importance of aerosols, were presented at a recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration workshop in Boulder, Colorado.

Tolbert, M.A. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States))

1994-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

111

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne aerosol prediction Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

profiles of aerosol extinction and optical depth Evaluate predictions from aerosol transport... aerosol measurements. Comparison of AOT ... Source: Brookhaven National...

112

6, 93519388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al Chemistry and Physics Discussions Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS satellite data and global 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

113

ME323 : Introduc~ao aos Modelos Probabilisticos. Lista de Exercicios -Variaveis aleatorias discretas e continuas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

segundo uma distribui¸c~ao normal, com m´edia µ e desvio padr~ao 20g. a) Em quanto deve ser regulado o hora em hora, ser´a retirada uma amostra de 4 pacotes, e estes ser~ao pesados. Se a m´edia da amostra um industria, que usa sulfeto de carbono como solvente, segue uma distribui¸c~ao nor- mal com m´edia

Lachos, Victor

114

Temporal Variability of Aerosol Properties during TCAP: Impact on Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground-based remote sensing and in situ observations of aerosol microphysical and optical properties have been collected during summertime (June-August, 2012) as part of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/), which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (http://www.arm.gov/). The overall goal of the TCAP field campaign is to study the evolution of optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol transported from North America to the Atlantic and their impact on the radiation energy budget. During TCAP, the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed on Cape Cod, an arm-shaped peninsula situated on the easternmost portion of Massachusetts (along the east coast of the United States) and that is generally downwind of large metropolitan areas. The AMF site was equipped with numerous instruments for sampling aerosol, cloud and radiative properties, including a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), and a three-wavelength nephelometer. In this study we present an analysis of diurnal and day-to-day variability of the column and near-surface aerosol properties obtained from remote sensing (MFRSR data) and ground-based in situ measurements (SMPS, APS, and nephelometer data). In particular, we show that the observed diurnal variability of the MFRSR aerosol optical depth is strong and comparable with that obtained previously from the AERONET climatology in Mexico City, which has a larger aerosol loading. Moreover, we illustrate how the variability of aerosol properties impacts the direct aerosol radiative forcing at different time scales.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Review of models applicable to accident aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimations of potential airborne-particle releases are essential in safety assessments of nuclear-fuel facilities. This report is a review of aerosol behavior models that have potential applications for predicting aerosol characteristics in compartments containing accident-generated aerosol sources. Such characterization of the accident-generated aerosols is a necessary step toward estimating their eventual release in any accident scenario. Existing aerosol models can predict the size distribution, concentration, and composition of aerosols as they are acted on by ventilation, diffusion, gravity, coagulation, and other phenomena. Models developed in the fields of fluid mechanics, indoor air pollution, and nuclear-reactor accidents are reviewed with this nuclear fuel facility application in mind. The various capabilities of modeling aerosol behavior are tabulated and discussed, and recommendations are made for applying the models to problems of differing complexity.

Glissmeyer, J.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A.O. Smith | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A.O. Smith A.O. Smith Jump to: navigation, search Name A.O. Smith Place Milwaukee, WI Zip 53224 Sector Efficiency Stock Symbol AOS Number of employees 10,000 Phone number 414-359-4000 Website http://www.aosmith.com/ Coordinates 43.1676911°, -88.0411993° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.1676911,"lon":-88.0411993,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

117

Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites - one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area - were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climate-related properties in freshly polluted and 'aged' urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, c) an overview of key observations and initial results from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and d) a roadmap of planned data analyses and focused modeling efforts that will facilitate the integration of new knowledge into improved representations of key aerosol processes in climate models.

Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shaw, William J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Schmid, Beat; Ferrare, R.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, Mikhail; Alvarez, R. J.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D.; Baidar, Sunil; Banta, Robert M.; Barnard, James C.; Beranek, Josef; Berg, Larry K.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Brewer, W. A.; Cahill, John F.; Cairns, Brian; Cappa, Christopher D.; Chand, Duli; China, Swarup; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Easter, Richard C.; Erickson, Matthew H.; Fast, Jerome D.; Floerchinger, Cody; Flowers, B. A.; Fortner, Edward; Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Gilles, Mary K.; Gorkowski, K.; Gustafson, William I.; Gyawali, Madhu S.; Hair, John; Hardesty, Michael; Harworth, J. W.; Herndon, Scott C.; Hiranuma, Naruki; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John M.; Jayne, J. T.; Jeong, H.; Jobson, Bertram T.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kleinman, L. I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Knighton, B.; Kolesar, K. R.; Kuang, Chongai; Kubatova, A.; Langford, A. O.; Laskin, Alexander; Laulainen, Nels S.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Mei, F.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Nelson, Danny A.; Obland, Michael; Oetjen, Hilke; Onasch, Timothy B.; Ortega, Ivan; Ottaviani, M.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Radney, J. G.; Rogers, Ray; Sandberg, S. P.; Sedlacek, Art; Senff, Christoph; Senum, Gunar; Setyan, Ari; Shilling, John E.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Song, Chen; Springston, S. R.; Subramanian, R.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Wallace, Hoyt A.; Wang, J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zelenyuk, Alla; Zhang, Qi

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

118

Final Report for LDRD Project ''A New Era of Research in Aerosol/Cloud/Climate Interactions at LLNL''  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of global temperature records seem to show less warming than predictions of global warming brought on by increasing concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases. One of the reasonable explanations for this apparent inconsistency is that the increasing concentrations of anthropogenic aerosols may be partially counteracting the effects of greenhouse gases. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the solar radiation, directly change the planetary albedo. Aerosols, unlike CO{sub 2}, may also have a significant indirect effect by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Increases in CCN can result in clouds with more but smaller droplets, enhancing the reflection of solar radiation. Aerosol direct and indirect effects are a strong function of the distributions of all aerosol types and the size distribution of the aerosol in question. However, the large spatial and temporal variabilities in the concentration, chemical characteristics, and size distribution of aerosols have made it difficult to assess the magnitude of aerosol effects on atmospheric radiation. These variabilities in aerosol characteristics as well as their effects on clouds are the leading sources of uncertainty in predicting future climate variation. Inventory studies have shown that the present-day anthropogenic emissions contribute more than half of fine particle mass primarily due to sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols derived from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning. Parts of our earlier studies have been focused on developing an understanding of global sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol abundances and investigating their climate effects [Chuang et al., 1997; Penner et al., 1998]. We have also modeled aerosol optical properties to account for changes in the refractive indices with relative humidity and dry aerosol composition [Grant et al., 1999]. Moreover, we have developed parameterizations of cloud response to aerosol abundance for use in global models to evaluate the importance of aerosol/cloud interactions on climate forcing [Chuang and Penner, 1995]. Our research has been recognized as one of a few studies attempting to quantify the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate in the IPCC Third Assessment Report [IPCC, 2001]. Our previous assessments of aerosol climate effects were based on a general circulation model (NCAR CCM1) fully coupled to a global tropospheric chemistry model (GRANTOUR). Both models, however, were developed more than a decade ago. The lack of advanced physics representation and techniques in our current models limits us from further exploring the interrelationship between aerosol, cloud, and climate variation. Our objective is to move to a new era of aerosol/cloud/climate modeling at LLNL by coupling the most advanced chemistry and climate models and by incorporating an aerosol microphysics module. This modeling capability will enable us to identify and analyze the responsible processes in aerosol/cloud/climate interactions and therefore, to improve the level of scientific understanding for aerosol climate effects. This state-of-the-art coupled models will also be used to address the relative importance of anthropogenic and natural emissions in the spatial pattern of aerosol climate forcing in order to assess the potential of human induced climate change.

Chuang, C; Bergman, D J; Dignon, J E; Connell, P S

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Examination of the Effects of Sea Salt Aerosols on Southeast Texas Ozone and Secondary Organic Aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this research is to examine sea salt aerosols and their impact on polluted environments. Sea salt aerosols act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) as well as providing a surface for heterogeneous reactions. Such reactions have implications for trace gases...

Benoit, Mark David

2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

120

Spatial characteristics of the difference between MISR and MODIS aerosol optical depth retrievals over mainland Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

autoregressive (SAR) model Spatial clustering Data assimilation Mainland Southeast Asia The difference between satellite, aerosol products generated using data from these two sensors often exhibit noticeable differences Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the NASA Earth Observation System's Terra satellite

Shi, Tao

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121

Influence of local waste burning on atmospheric aerosol properties in urban environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aerosols affect the radiative energy budget on both the regional and global scales. The wavelength-dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a fundamental determinant of the amount by which extra-terrestrial incoming sunlight and outgoing terrestrial radiation are being attenuated in the atmosphere. The present study addresses the influence of local waste burning on aerosol characteristics, black carbon (BC) aerosol mass concentration and spectral solar irradiance using ground-based measurements over the tropical urban environment of Hyderabad, India. AOD has been observed to be maximum during burning days compared to normal days. Aerosol size spectra suggest bimodal distributions during pre-and post-burning periods and trimodal distributions during burning periods. Angstrom wavelength exponent estimated from spectral variation of AOD suggested dominance of accumulation mode particle loading during burning days compared to normal days. Diurnal variation of BC on normal days showed a broad nocturnal peak during ?20:00 to ?24:00 h with a maximum value of BC aerosol concentration of ?14,000 ng m?3 whereas on local waste burning days enormous increases in BC concentrations have been observed with a peak at ?60,000 ng m?3. Relative attenuation of global solar irradiance during burning days has been found to be of the order of 30% in the visible and 28% in the near-infrared regions. The results are discussed in detail in this paper.

K. Madhavi Latha; K.V.S. Badarinath

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

ARM - PI Product - Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsDirect Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty ProductsDirect Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty Site(s) NSA SGP TWP General Description Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in

123

ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsTwo-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) govCampaignsTwo-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Campaign Links TCAP website Related Campaigns Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Field Evaluation of Real-time Cloud OD Sensor TWST 2013.04.15, Scott, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Winter Aerosol Effects on Cloud Formation 2013.02.04, Cziczo, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): CU GMAX-DOAS Deployment 2012.07.15, Volkamer, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerosol Light Extinction Measurements 2012.07.15, Dubey, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerial Campaign 2012.07.07, Berg, AAF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerodynamic Particle Sizer 2012.07.01, Berg, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): KASPRR Engineering Tests 2012.07.01, Mead, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Airborne HSRL and RSP Measurements

124

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol Naoko Sakaeda,1 2011; published 21 June 2011. [1] Direct and semidirect radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning

Wood, Robert

125

FY 2011 Second Quarter: Demonstration of New Aerosol Measurement Verification Testbed for Present-Day Global Aerosol Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The regional-scale Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is being used by a DOE Earth System Modeling (ESM) project titled “Improving the Characterization of Clouds, Aerosols and the Cryosphere in Climate Models” to evaluate the performance of atmospheric process modules that treat aerosols and aerosol radiative forcing in the Arctic. We are using a regional-scale modeling framework for three reasons: (1) It is easier to produce a useful comparison to observations with a high resolution model; (2) We can compare the behavior of the CAM parameterization suite with some of the more complex and computationally expensive parameterizations used in WRF; (3) we can explore the behavior of this parameterization suite at high resolution. Climate models like the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) being used within the Community Earth System Model (CESM) will not likely be run at mesoscale spatial resolutions (10–20 km) until 5–10 years from now. The performance of the current suite of physics modules in CAM5 at such resolutions is not known, and current computing resources do not permit high-resolution global simulations to be performed routinely. We are taking advantage of two tools recently developed under PNNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects for this activity. The first is the Aerosol Modeling Testbed (Fast et al., 2011b), a new computational framework designed to streamline the process of testing and evaluating aerosol process modules over a range of spatial and temporal scales. The second is the CAM5 suite of physics parameterizations that have been ported into WRF so that their performance and scale dependency can be quantified at mesoscale spatial resolutions (Gustafson et al., 2010; with more publications in preparation).

Koch, D

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

127

Carbonaceous Aerosol Study Using Advanced Particle Instrumentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

particles from the combustion of biomass fuels. Environ.range transport of biomass combustion aerosols. Environ.during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory, J.

Qi, Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Proton Elastic Scattering Analysis Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by...

129

The Two-Column Aerosol Project Definitions TCAP Educational  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What's the big deal about aerosols? The Two-Column Aerosol Project Definitions TCAP Educational Outreach Activity About ARM: The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate...

130

Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidificat...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon...

131

The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research projects like the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, increase our knowledge of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud physics.

Ghan, Steve

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

132

Overview of the COPS Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics (ACM) Subgroup...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

properties of orographically induced clouds and how do these depend on dynamics, thermodynamics, and aerosol microphysics? * What is the role of aerosols and changing cloud...

133

Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass...

134

Optical, physical, and chemical properties of springtime aerosol...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optical, physical, and chemical properties of springtime aerosol over Barrow Alaska in 2008. Optical, physical, and chemical properties of springtime aerosol over Barrow Alaska in...

135

Spent fuel sabotage aerosol test program :FY 2005-06 testing and aerosol data summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. This document focuses on an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, primarily during FY 2005 and about the first two-thirds of FY 2006. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of May 2006. We provide details on the significant findings on aerosol results and observations from the recently completed Phase 2 surrogate material tests using cerium oxide ceramic pellets in test rodlets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants. Results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR (the ratio of respirable particles from real spent fuel/respirables from surrogate spent fuel, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber); and, measurements of enhanced volatile fission product species sorption onto respirable particles. We discuss progress and results for the first three, recently performed Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide, DUO{sub 2}, test rodlets. We will also review the status of preparations and the final Phase 4 tests in this program, using short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. These data plus testing results and design are tailored to support and guide, follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program, performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, had significant inputs from, and is strongly supported and coordinated by both the U.S. and international program participants in Germany, France, and the U.K., as part of the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks, WGSTSC.

Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Nolte, O. (Fraunhofer institut fur toxikologie und experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Loiseau, O. (Institut de radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Koch, W. (Fraunhofer institut fur toxikologie und experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Billone, M. C. (Argonne National Laboratory, USA); Lucero, Daniel A.; Burtseva, T. (Argonne National Laboratory, USA); Brucher, W (Gesellschaft fur anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Steyskal, Michele D.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Enhancement factors for resuspended aerosol radioactivity: Effects of topsoil disturbance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enhancement factor for airborne radionuclides resuspended by wind is defined as the ratio of the activity density (Bq g{sup {minus}1}) in the aerosol to the activity density in the underlying surface of contaminated soil. Enhancement factors are useful for assessment of worst-case exposure scenarios and transport conditions, and are one of the criteria for setting environmental standards for radioactivity in soil. This paper presents results of experimental studies where resuspension of {sup 239}Pu was measured when air concentrations were equilibrated to the soil surface. Enhancement factors were observed for several types of man-made disturbances (bulldozer-blading, soil raking, vacuum-cleaning) and natural disturbances (springtime thaw, soil-drying, wildfire). For some cases, enhancement factors are compared over range of geographical locations (Bikini Atoll, California, Nevada, and South Carolina). The particle-size distributions of aerosol activity are compared to particle-size distributions of the underlying soil.

Shinn, J.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Measurements of Aerosol Charge and Size Distribution for Graphite, Gold, Palladium, and Silver Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of charge on aerosol evolution and hence the nuclear source term has been an issue of interest, and there is a need for both experimental techniques and modeling for quantifying this role. Our focus here is on further exploration of a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique to simultaneously measure both the size and charge (positive, negative and neutral) dependent aerosol distributions. We have generated graphite, gold, silver, and palladium nanoparticles (aerosol) using a spark generator. We measure the electrical mobility-size distributions for these aerosols using a TDMA, and from these data we deduce the full charge-size distributions. We observe asymmetry in the particle size distributions for negative and positive charges. This asymmetry could have a bearing on the dynamics of charged aerosols, indicating that the assumption of symmetry for size distributions of negatively and positively charged particles in source term simulations may not be always appropriate. Also, the experimental technique should find applications in measurements of aerosol rate processes that are affected by both particle charge and size (e.g. coagulation, deposition, resuspension), and hence in modeling and simulation of the nuclear source term.

Simones, Matthew P.; Gutti, Veera R.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

PARAGON - An Integrated Approach for Characterizing Aerosol Climate Impacts and Environmental Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosols exert myriad influences on the Earth?s environment and climate and on human health. The complexity of aerosol-related processes requires that information gathered to improve our understanding of climate change must originate from multiple sources, and that effective strategies for data integration need to be established. Currently, the aerosol community lacks the necessary tools and infrastructure to reap maximum scientific benefit from a vast array of observed and modeled data. Spatial and temporal sampling differences among a diverse set of sensors, nonuniform data qualities, aerosol mesoscale variabilities, and difficulties in separating cloud effects are some of the challenges that need to be addressed. A sustained, long-term program also requires maintaining consistently well-understood accuracies as measurement approaches evolve and improve. Achieving a comprehensive understanding of how aerosol physical, chemical, and radiative processes impact the Earth system can only be achieved through a multidisciplinary, interagency, and international initiative capable of dealing with these issues. A systematic approach, capitalizing on modern measurement and modeling techniques, geospatial statistics methodologies, and high-performance information technologies can provide the necessary machinery to support this objective. We outline a framework for integrating and interpreting observations and models and establishing an accurate, consistent and cohesive long-term record, following a strategy whereby information and tools of progressively greater sophistication are incorporated as problems of increasing complexity are tackled. This concept is named the Progressive Aerosol Retrieval and Assimilation Global Observing Network (PARAGON). To encompass the breadth of effort required, we present a set of recommendations dealing with data interoperability, integration, synergy, summarization and mining, model evaluation, calibration and validation, augmentation of surface and in situ measurements, advances in passive and active remote sensing, and design of satellite missions. Without an initiative of this nature, the scientific and policy communities will continue to struggle with understanding the quantitative impact of complex aerosol processes on regional and global climate change and air quality.

Diner, David J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Anderson, Theodore L.; Bosenberg, Jens; Braverman, Amy J.; Charlson, Robert J.; Collins, William D.; Davies, Roger; Holben, B. N.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Martonchik, John V.; Menzies, Robert T.; Miller, Mark A.; Ogren, J. A.; Penner, Joyce E.; Rasch, P; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Seinfeld, John H.; Stephens, Graeme L.; Torres, Omar; Travis, Larry D.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Yu, Bin

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Investigation of Aerosol Indirect Effects using a Cumulus Microphysics Parameterization in a Regional Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new Zhang and McFarlane (ZM) cumulus scheme includes a two-moment cloud microphysics parameterization for convective clouds. This allows aerosol effects to be investigated more comprehensively by linking aerosols with microphysical processes in both stratiform clouds that are explicitly resolved and convective clouds that are parameterized in climate models. This new scheme is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is coupled with the physics and aerosol packages from the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). A test case of July 2008 during the East Asian summer monsoon is selected to evaluate the performance of the new ZM scheme and to investigate aerosol effects on monsoon precipitation. The precipitation and radiative fluxes simulated by the new ZM scheme show a better agreement with observations compared to simulations with the original ZM scheme that does not include convective cloud microphysics and aerosol convective cloud interactions. Detailed analysis suggests that an increase in detrained cloud water and ice mass by the new ZM scheme is responsible for this improvement. To investigate precipitation response to increased anthropogenic aerosols, a sensitivity experiment is performed that mimics a clean environment by reducing the primary aerosols and anthropogenic emissions to 30% of that used in the control simulation of a polluted environment. The simulated surface precipitation is reduced by 9.8% from clean to polluted environment and the reduction is less significant when microphysics processes are excluded from the cumulus clouds. Ensemble experiments with ten members under each condition (i.e., clean and polluted) indicate similar response of the monsoon precipitation to increasing aerosols.

Lim, Kyo-Sun; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Guang; Song, Xiaoliang

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

140

Assessing regional scale predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus, and their interactions during VOCALS-REx using WRF-Chem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assesses the ability of the recent chemistry version (v3.3) of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model to simulate boundary layer structure, aerosols, stratocumulus clouds, and energy fluxes over the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Measurements from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and satellite retrievals (i.e., products from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), and GOES-10) are used for this assessment. The Morrison double-moment microphysics scheme is newly coupled with interactive aerosols in the model. The 31-day (15 October-16 November 2008) WRF-Chem simulation with aerosol-cloud interactions (AERO hereafter) is also compared to a simulation (MET hereafter) with fixed cloud droplet number concentrations in the microphysics scheme and simplified cloud and aerosol treatments in the radiation scheme. The well-simulated aerosol quantities (aerosol number, mass composition and optical properties), and the inclusion of full aerosol-cloud couplings lead to significant improvements in many features of the simulated stratocumulus clouds: cloud optical properties and microphysical properties such as cloud top effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical thickness. In addition to accounting for the aerosol direct and semi-direct effects, these improvements feed back to the simulation of boundary-layer characteristics and energy budgets. Particularly, inclusion of interactive aerosols in AERO strengthens the temperature and humidity gradients within the capping inversion layer and lowers the marine boundary layer (MBL) depth by 130 m from that of the MET simulation. These differences are associated with weaker entrainment and stronger mean subsidence at the top of the MBL in AERO. Mean top-of-atmosphere outgoing shortwave fluxes, surface latent heat, and surface downwelling longwave fluxes are in better agreement with observations in AERO, compared to the MET simulation. Nevertheless, biases in some of the simulated meteorological quantities (e.g., MBL temperature and humidity) and aerosol quantities (e.g., underestimations of accumulation mode aerosol number) might affect simulated stratocumulus and energy fluxes over the Southeastern Pacific, and require further investigation. The well-simulated timing and outflow patterns of polluted and clean episodes demonstrate the model's ability to capture daily/synoptic scale variations of aerosol and cloud properties, and suggest that the model is suitable for studying atmospheric processes associated with pollution outflow over the ocean. The overall performance of the regional model in simulating mesoscale clouds and boundary layer properties is encouraging and suggests that reproducing gradients of aerosol and cloud droplet concentrations and coupling cloud-aerosol-radiation processes are important when simulating marine stratocumulus over the Southeast Pacific.

Yang Q.; Lee Y.; Gustafson Jr., W. I.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Morrison, H.; Chapman, E. G.; Spak, S. N.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC) The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC) Speaker(s): Harmony Gates Date: February 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Melissa Lunden A new differential mobility classifier will be described. The instrument classifies aerosol particles in a channel flow between porous (or screen) electrodes. The aerosol enters the channel parallel to the porous electrodes, while a larger, particle-free cross-flow enters through one of the porous electrode. A potential difference between electrodes causes the charged aerosol particles to migrate upstream against the cross-flow. Only particles whose upward migration velocity balances the cross flow will be transmitted along the path of the classifier. Simulations of the OMAC show that it should give the same resolution at the traditional

143

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Cape Cod, Massachusetts for the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) was designed to provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the ARM Mobile Facility and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System were deployed on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations were supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods, one in the summer and a second in the winter.

144

Semi-Continuous Measurements of Aerosol Chemical Composition During the Summer 2002 Yosemite National Park Special Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Semi-continuous measurements of fine particle composition were made over a period of several weeks in summer 2002 in Yosemite National Park, California. These included measurement of aerosol ionic composition (by PILS- Particle-Into-Liquid System) and aerosol carbon (by dual wavelength aethalometer and an R&P particulate carbon monitor). The data reveal that aerosol composition at the site is highly :variable in time, with a strong diurnal cycle. Interestingly, however, different diurnal cycles were sometimes observed for different chemical constituents of the particles. Organic carbon was observed to dominate fine particle mass, with some periods apparently associated with influx of smoke from wildfires in the western U.S. Measurements of fine particle carbon isotopes revealed the fraction of carbon from biogenic sources to range from approximately 73 to 95%. The ionic fraction of the aerosol was usually dominated by ammoniated sulfate. During most periods, PM{sub 2.5} nitrate was found primarily in sea salt particles from which chloride had been displaced. Strong variations in the extent of ammonia neutralization of sulfate were also observed. The ability to observe rapid changes in aerosol composition using these semi-continuous aerosol composition measurements is helpful for understanding the dynamic chemical composition of fine particles responsible for regional haze.

Collette, J; Lee, T; Heath, J; Carrico, C; Herckes, P; Engling, G; McMeeking, G; Kreidenweis, S; Day, D; Malm, W; Cahill, T

2003-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

Assessment of Aerosol Radiative Impact over Oceanic Regions Adjacent to Indian Subcontinent using Multi-Satellite Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using data from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, we have retrieved regional distribution of aerosol column single scattering albedo (parameter indicative of the relative dominance of aerosol absorption and scattering effects), a most important, but least understood aerosol property in assessing its climate impact. Consequently we provide improved assessment of short wave aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) (on both regional and seasonal scales) estimates over this region. Large gradients in north-south ARF were observed as a consequence of gradients in single scattering albedo as well as aerosol optical depth. The highest ARF (-37 W m-2 at the surface) was observed over the northern Arabian Sea during June to August period (JJA). In general, ARF was higher over northern Bay of Bengal (NBoB) during winter and pre-monsoon period, whereas the ARF was higher over northern Arabian Sea (NAS) during the monsoon and post- monsoon period. The largest forcing observed over NAS during JJA is the consequence of large amounts of desert dust transported from the west Asian dust sources. High as well as seasonally invariant aerosol single scattering albedos (~0.98) were observed over the southern Indian Ocean region far from continents. The ARF estimates based on direct measurements made at a remote island location, Minicoy (8.3°N, 73°E) in the southern Arabian Sea are in good agreement with the estimates made following multisatellite analysis.

Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Krishnamoorthy, K.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Evaluating WRF-Chem aerosol indirect effects in Southeast Pacific marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We evaluate a regional-scale simulation with the WRF-Chem model for the VAMOS (Variability of the American Monsoon Systems) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), which sampled the Southeast Pacific's persistent stratocumulus deck. Evaluation of VOCALS-REx ship-based and aircraft observations focuses on analyzing how aerosol loading affects marine boundary layer (MBL) dynamics and cloud microphysics. We compare local time series and campaign averaged longitudinal gradients, and highlight differences in model simulations with (W) and without wet (NW) deposition processes. The higher aerosol loadings in the NW case produce considerable changes in MBL dynamics and cloud microphysics, in accordance with the established conceptual model of aerosol indirect effects. These include increase in cloud albedo, increase in MBL and cloud heights, drizzle suppression, increase in liquid water content, and increase in cloud lifetime. Moreover, better statistical representation of aerosol mass and number concentration improves model fidelity in reproducing observed spatial and temporal variability in cloud properties, including top and base height, droplet concentration, water content, rain rate, optical depth (COD) and liquid water path (LWP). Together, these help to quantify confidence in WRF-Chem's modeled aerosol-cloud interactions, while identifying structural and parametric uncertainties including: irreversibility in rain wet removal; overestimation of marine DMS and sea salt emissions and accelerated aqueous sulfate conversion. Our findings suggest that WRF-Chem simulates marine cloud-aerosol interactions at a level sufficient for applications in forecasting weather and air quality and studying aerosol climate forcing, including the reliability required for policy analysis and geo-engineering applications.

Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Carmichael, Gregory; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.; Yang, Qing; Howell, S. G.; Leon, Dolislager; Snider, Jefferson R.; Bandy, Alan R.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Benedict, K. B.; de Szoeke, S.; Hawkins, Lisa; Allen, Grant; Crawford, I.; Crosier, J.; Springston, S. R.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

Sensitivity of global-scale climate change attribution results to inclusion of fossil fuel black carbon aerosol - article no. L14701  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is likely that greenhouse gas emissions caused most of the global mean warming observed during the 20th century, and that sulphate aerosols counteracted this warming to some extent, by reflecting solar radiation to space and thereby cooling the planet. However, the importance of another aerosol, namely black carbon, could be underestimated. Here we include fossil fuel black carbon aerosol in a detection and attribution analysis with greenhouse gas and sulphate aerosols. We find that most of the warming of the 20th Century is attributable to changes in greenhouse gases offset by net aerosol cooling. However the pattern of temperature change due to black carbon is currently indistinguishable from the sulphate aerosol pattern of temperature change. The attribution of temperature change due to greenhouse gases is not sensitive to the inclusion of black carbon. We can be confident about the overall attribution of total aerosols, but less so about the contributions of black carbon emissions to 20th century climate change. This work presents no evidence that black carbon aerosol forcing outweighed the cooling due to sulphate aerosol.

Jones, G.S.; Jones, A.; Roberts, D.L.; Stott, P.A.; Williams, K.D. [Hadley Center for Climate Predictions & Research, Exeter (United Kingdom)

2005-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

148

Aerosol nucleation in coal-fired power-plant plumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New-particle nucleation within coal-fired power-plant plumes can have large effects on particle number concentrations particularly near source regions with implications for human health and climate. In order to resolve the formation and growth of particles in these plumes we have integrated TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics in the System for Atmospheric Modelling (SAM) a large-eddy simulation/cloud-resolving model (LES/CRM). We have evaluated this model against aircraft observations for three case studies and the model reproduces well the major features of each case. Using this model we have shown that meteorology and background aerosol concentrations can have strong effects on new-particle formation and growth in coal-fired power-plant plumes even if emissions are held constant. We subsequently used the model to evaluate the effects of SO 2 and NOx pollution controls on newparticle formation in coal-fired power-plant plumes. We found that strong reductions in NOx emissions without concurrent reductions in SO 2 emissions may increase new-particle formation due to increases in OH formation within the plume. We predicted the change in new-particle formation due to changes in emissions between 1997 and 2010 for 330 coal-fired power plants in the US and we found a median decrease of 19% in new-particle formation. However the magnitude and sign of the aerosol changes depend greatly on the relative reductions in NOx and SO 2 emissions in each plant. More extensive plume measurements for a range of emissions of SO 2 and NOx and in varying background aerosol conditions are needed however to better quantify these effects.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME the resulting time series, we use tropospheric NO2 data as a reference in the regions dominated by biomass sensitive to desert dust aerosols (DDA) and biomass burning aerosols (BBA). See Figure 1. The AAI

Tilstra, Gijsbert

150

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol chemical composition Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol on Clouds Summary: chemical composition and mixing stateTime-Resolved Aerosol Collector CCSEMEDX (ASP) Single particle... Sizer CCN spectrum Aerosol absorptionDRI...

151

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol number distributions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inorganic composition PILS-IC Summary: 3563 nephelometers Aerosol number concentration CNC (TSI 3010, 3025) Aerosol size distribution DMA... and APS Non-volatile aerosol size...

152

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Abstract: A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic...

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol jet system Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-controlled laminar aerosol jets and their application for studying aerosol combustion processes Author(s): Shoshin Y... 2002 Times Cited: 6 48. Title: Exhaust aerosol of a...

154

CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Science Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonaceous aerosol components, which include black carbon (BC), urban primary organic aerosols (POA), biomass burning aerosols, and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from both urban and biogenic precursors, have been previously shown to play a major role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. The primary objective of the CARES 2010 intensive field study is to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their effects on optical and cloud formation properties.

Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

Emission Controls Versus Meteorological Conditions in Determining Aerosol Concentrations in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of emission control measures were undertaken in Beijing and the adjacent provinces in China during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games on August 8th-24th, 2008. This provides a unique opportunity for investigating the effectiveness of emission controls on air pollution in Beijing. We conducted a series of numerical experiments over East Asia for the period of July to September 2008 using a coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem). Model can generally reproduce the observed variation of aerosol concentrations. Consistent with observations, modeled concentrations of aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, total particulate matter) in Beijing were decreased by 30-50% during the Olympic period compared to the other periods in July and August in 2008 and the same period in 2007. Model results indicate that emission controls were effective in reducing the aerosol concentrations by comparing simulations with and without emission controls. However, our analysis suggests that meteorological conditions (e.g., wind direction and precipitation) are at least as important as emission controls in producing the low aerosol concentrations appearing during the Olympic period. Transport from the regions surrounding Beijing determines the temporal variation of aerosol concentrations in Beijing. Based on the budget analysis, we suggest that emission control strategy should focus on the regional scale instead of the local scale to improve the air quality over Beijing.

Gao, Yi; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Meigen

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

156

Improving Bulk Microphysics Parameterizations in Simulations of Aerosol Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve the microphysical parameterizations for simulations of the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) in regional and global climate models, a double-moment bulk microphysical scheme presently implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is modified and the results are compared against atmospheric observations and simulations produced by a spectral bin microphysical scheme (SBM). Rather than using prescribed aerosols as in the original bulk scheme (Bulk-OR), a prognostic doublemoment aerosol representation is introduced to predict both the aerosol number concentration and mass mixing ratio (Bulk-2M). The impacts of the parameterizations of diffusional growth and autoconversion and the selection of the embryonic raindrop radius on the performance of the bulk microphysical scheme are also evaluated. Sensitivity modeling experiments are performed for two distinct cloud regimes, maritime warm stratocumulus clouds (SC) over southeast Pacific Ocean from the VOCALS project and continental deep convective clouds (DCC) in the southeast of China from the Department of Energy/ARM Mobile Facility (DOE/AMF) - China field campaign. The results from Bulk-2M exhibit a much better agreement in the cloud number concentration and effective droplet radius in both the SC and DCC cases with those from SBM and field measurements than those from Bulk-OR. In the SC case particularly, Bulk-2M reproduces the observed drizzle precipitation, which is largely inhibited in Bulk-OR. Bulk-2M predicts enhanced precipitation and invigorated convection with increased aerosol loading in the DCC case, consistent with the SBM simulation, while Bulk-OR predicts the opposite behaviors. Sensitivity experiments using four different types of autoconversion schemes reveal that the autoconversion parameterization is crucial in determining the raindrop number, mass concentration, and drizzle formation for warm 2 stratocumulus clouds. An embryonic raindrop size of 40 ?m is determined as a more realistic setting in the autoconversion parameterization. The saturation adjustment employed in calculating condensation/evaporation in the bulk scheme is identified as the main factor responsible for the large discrepancies in predicting cloud water in the SC case, suggesting that an explicit calculation of diffusion growth with predicted supersaturation is necessary for further improvements of the bulk microphysics scheme. Lastly, a larger rain evaporation rate below cloud is found in the bulk scheme in comparison to the SBM simulation, which could contribute to a lower surface precipitation in the bulk scheme.

Wang, Yuan; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Renyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Franklin, Charmaine N.

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

157

Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

158

Spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio program : FY 2004 test and data summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. The program also provides significant technical and political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are the input for follow-on modeling studies to quantify respirable hazards, associated radiological risk assessments, vulnerability assessments, and potential cask physical protection design modifications. This document includes an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, during FY 2004. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2004. All available test results, observations, and aerosol analyses plus interpretations--primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests, series 2/5A through 2/9B, using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. Advanced plans and progress are described for upcoming tests with unirradiated, depleted uranium oxide and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC) and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Mo, Tin (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Billone, Michael C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Young, F. I. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Coats, Richard Lee; Burtseva, Tatiana (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Luna, Robert Earl; Dickey, Roy R.; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Thompson, Nancy Slater (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Hibbs, Russell S. (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Gregson, Michael Warren; Lange, Florentin (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Tsai, Han-Chung (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Southern hemisphere tropospheric aerosol microphysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosol particle size distribution data have been obtained in the southern hemisphere from approximately 4{degree}S to 44{degree}S and between ground level and 6 km, in the vicinity of eastern Australia. The relative shape of the free-tropospheric size distribution for particles with radii larger than approximately 0.04 {mu}m was found to be remarkably stable with time, altitude, and location for the autumn-winter periods considered. This was despite some large concentration changes which were found to be typical of the southeastern Australian coastal region. The majority of free-troposphere large particles were found to have sulfuric acid or lightly ammoniated sulfate morphology. Large particles in the boundary layer almost exclusively had a sea-salt morphology.

Gras, J.L. (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Aspendale (Australia))

1991-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

MagAO: Status and on-sky performance of the Magellan adaptive optics system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MagAO is the new adaptive optics system with visible-light and infrared science cameras, located on the 6.5-m Magellan "Clay" telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The instrument locks on natural guide stars (NGS) from 0$^\\mathrm{th}$ to 16$^\\mathrm{th}$ $R$-band magnitude, measures turbulence with a modulating pyramid wavefront sensor binnable from 28x28 to 7x7 subapertures, and uses a 585-actuator adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) to provide flat wavefronts to the two science cameras. MagAO is a mutated clone of the similar AO systems at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) at Mt. Graham, Arizona. The high-level AO loop controls up to 378 modes and operates at frame rates up to 1000 Hz. The instrument has two science cameras: VisAO operating from 0.5-1 $\\mu$m and Clio2 operating from 1-5 $\\mu$m. MagAO was installed in 2012 and successfully completed two commissioning runs in 2012-2013. In April 2014 we had our first science run that was open to the general Magellan community. Observers from Arizona, Ca...

Morzinski, Katie M; Males, Jared R; Kopon, Derek; Hinz, Phil M; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Puglisi, Alfio; Pinna, Enrico; Briguglio, Runa; Xompero, Marco; Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Bailey, Vanessa; Follette, Katherine B; Rodigas, T J; Wu, Ya-Lin; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Argomedo, Javier; Busoni, Lorenzo; Hare, Tyson; Uomoto, Alan; Weinberger, Alycia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

162

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol particle size distribution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

particle size distribution particle size distribution ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol particle size distribution The number of aerosol particles present in any given volume of air within a specificied size range Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SMPS : Scanning mobility particle sizer TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer UHSAS : Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer Field Campaign Instruments

163

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

164

BNL | Two-Column Aerosol Program (TCAP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) There remain many key knowledge gaps despite advances in the scientific understanding of how aerosols and clouds evolve and affect climate. Many climatically important processes depend on particles that undergo continuous changes within a size range spanning a few nanometers to a few microns, and with compositions that consist of a variety of carbonaceous materials, soluble inorganic salts and acids and insoluble mineral dust. Primary particles, which are externally-mixed when emitted, are subject to coagulation and chemical changes associated with the condensation of semi-volatile gases to their surface resulting in a spectrum of compositions or mixing-states with a range of climate-affecting optical and hygroscopic properties. The numerical treatments of aerosol transformation

165

NASA's Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystems (ACE) Mission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plans for NASA’s Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystem (ACE) mission is described. Recommended by Earth Science Decadal Survey in 2007, ACE is nominally planned for a 2021 launch. ACE is...

Starr, David O'C

166

Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) value-added product (VAP) is to provide vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo, asymmetry parameter, and Angstroem exponents for the atmospheric column above the Central Facility at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We expect that AEROSOLBE will provide nearly continuous estimates of aerosol optical properties under a range of conditions (clear, broken clouds, overcast clouds, etc.). The primary requirement of this VAP was to provide an aerosol data set as continuous as possible in both time and height for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP in order to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Even though BBHRP has been completed, AEROSOLBE results are very valuable for environmental, atmospheric, and climate research.

Flynn, C; Turner, D; Koontz, A; Chand, D; Sivaraman, C

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

167

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

168

An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide. Sulfate aerosols and mist may form in the atmosphere on tank rupture. From chemical spill data from 1990-1996, Lawuyi02 and Fingas [7] prioritize sulfuric acid as sixth most serious. During this period, they note 155 spills totaling 13 Mt, out of a supply volume of 3700 Mt. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] summarize information on three major sulfuric acid spills. On 12 February 1984, 93 tons of sulfuric acid were spilled when 14 railroad cars derailed near MacTier, Parry Sound, Ontario. On 13 December 1978, 51 railroad cars derailed near Springhill, Nova Scotia. One car, containing 93% sulfuric acid, ruptured, spilling nearly its entire contents. In July 1993, 20 to 50 tons of fuming sulfuric acid spilled at the General Chemical Corp. plant in Richmond, California, a major industrial center near San Francisco. The release occurred when oleum was being loaded into a nonfuming acid railroad tank car that contained only a rupture disk as a safety device. The tank car was overheated and this rupture disk blew. The resulting cloud of sulfuric acid drifted northeast with prevailing winds over a number of populated areas. More than 3,000 people subsequently sought medical attention for burning eyes, coughing, headaches, and nausea. Almost all were treated and released on the day of the spill. By the day after the release, another 5,000 people had sought medical attention. The spill forced the closure of five freeways in the region as well as some Bay Area Rapid Transit System stations. Apart from corrosive toxicity, there is the additional hazard that the reactions of sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid vapors with water are extremely exothermic [10, 11]. While the vapors are intrinsically denser than air, there is thus the likelihood of strong, warming-induced buoyancy from reactions with ambient water vapor, water-containing aerosol droplets, and wet environmental surface. Nordin [12] relates just such an occurrence following the Richmond, CA spill, with the plume observed to rise to 300 m. For all practical purposes, sulfur trioxide was the constituent released from the heated tank

Grant, K E

2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: A decade long aerosol  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A decade long aerosol and cloud statistics and aerosol indirect effect at A decade long aerosol and cloud statistics and aerosol indirect effect at the ARM SGP site Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Duan, Minzheng State University of New York at Albany Harrison, Lee State University of New York Joseph, Everette Howard University Twelve-year data of MFRSR and MWR have been used to derive aerosol and cloud optical properties at the ARM SGP. Diurnal, monthly, seasonal and interannual variability of aerosol (optical depth and Angstrom coefficient) and cloud (optical depth and effective radius) have been analyzed. We specially focused on aerosol-cloud interactions. We found a signature of indirect aerosol effect for summer data: increased aerosol index has a statistically-significant anti-correlation with mean effective radius. No

170

DUAL ORIGIN OF AEROSOLS IN TITAN'S DETACHED HAZE LAYER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have analyzed scattered light profiles from the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem, taken at the limb and at several large phase angles. We also used results from an occultation observed by Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph in the ultraviolet. We found that particles responsible for the scattering in the detached haze have an effective radius around 0.15 {mu}m and the aerosol size distribution follows a power law (exponent about -4.5). We discuss these results along with microphysical constraints and thermal equilibrium of the detached haze, and we conclude that only a strong interaction with atmospheric dynamics can explain such a structure.

Cours, T.; Burgalat, J.; Rannou, P. [Groupe de Spectrometrie Moleculaire et Atmospherique (GSMA), CNRS UMR-6089, Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Rodriguez, S.; Brahic, A. [Laboratoire AIM, Universite Paris 7, CNRS UMR-7158, CEA-Saclay/DSM/IRFU/SAp, 91191 Gif/Yvette (France); West, R. A., E-mail: thibaud.cours@univ-reims.fr [Jet Propulsion Laboratory M/S 169-237, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

171

DETERMINATION OF RADIAL MOMENTS OF AN AEROSOL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DETERMINATION OF RADIAL MOMENTS OF AN AEROSOL DETERMINATION OF RADIAL MOMENTS OF AN AEROSOL SIZE DISTRIBUTION FROM MEASUREMENTS OF LIGHT TRANSMITTANCE AND SCATTERING Ernie R. Lewis and Stephen E. Schwartz Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11933 ses@bnl.gov elewis@bnl.gov MOMENTS FROM MEASUREMENTS As each of the measured quantities is linear in the size distribution dn/dr, it is possible to construct linear combinations of measurements that yield

172

Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

173

Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research project was to develop an improved understanding of how electriexecy driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume.

David W. DePaoli; Ofodike A. Ezekoye; Costas Tsouris; Valmor F. de Almeida

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

Development of plutonium aerosol fractionation system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1993 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OP A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Approved as to style and content by: A. R. McFarland (Chair of Committee) N. K. Anand (Mer toer) (', & C. B...

Mekala, Malla R.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Maoming Zhong ao Wind Power Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maoming Zhong ao Wind Power Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Maoming Zhong'ao Wind Power Co Ltd Place: Guangdong Province, China Sector: Wind energy Product: Maoming-based...

176

Advanced Offshore Solutions ApS AOS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Offshore Solutions ApS AOS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Advanced Offshore Solutions ApS (AOS) Place: Tranbjerg, Denmark Zip: 8310 Sector: Wind energy Product: Denmark-based...

177

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: CCN govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: CCN Activity of Aerosols Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: CCN Activity of Aerosols 2014.01.01 - 2014.12.31 Lead Scientist : Jian Wang Description Aerosol indirect effects, which represent the impact of aerosols on climate through influencing the properties of clouds, remain one of the main uncertainties in climate predictions (IPCC, 2007). Reducing this large uncertainty requires both improved understanding and representation of aerosol properties and processes in climate models, including the cloud

178

Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer: Demonstration of feasibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer (AACA) that will provide a continuous, real-time analysis of the elemental (major, minor and trace) composition of atmospheric aerosols. The AACA concept is based on sampling the atmospheric aerosol through a wet cyclone scrubber that produces an aqueous suspension of the particles. This suspension can then be analyzed for elemental composition by ICP/MS or collected for subsequent analysis by other methods. The key technical challenge was to develop a wet cyclone aerosol sampler suitable for respirable particles found in ambient aerosols. We adapted an ultrasonic nebulizer to a conventional, commercially available, cyclone aerosol sampler and completed collection efficiency tests for the unit, which was shown to efficiently collect particles as small as 0.2 microns. We have completed the necessary basic research and have demonstrated the feasibility of the AACA concept.

Mroz, E.J.; Olivares, J.; Kok, G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Biomass Burning Observation Project Specifically,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Burning Observation Project Burning Observation Project Specifically, the aircraft will obtain measurements of the microphysical, chemical, hygroscopic, and optical properties of aerosols. Data captured during BBOP will help scientists better understand how aerosols combine and change at a variety of distances and burn times. Locations Pasco, Washington. From July through September, the G-1 will be based out of its home base in Washington. From this location, it can intercept and measure smoke plumes from naturally occurring uncontrolled fires across Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Northern California, and Western Montana. Smoke plumes aged 0-5 hours are the primary targets for this phase of the campaign. Memphis, Tennessee. In October, the plane moves to Tennessee to sample prescribed

180

Formation of carbon allotrope aerosol by colliding plasmas in an inertial fusion reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Along with repeated implosions, the interior of an inertial fusion target chamber is exposed to short pulses of high-energy x-ray, unburned DT-fuel particles, He-ash and pellet debris. As a result, chamber wall materials are subjected to ablation, emitting particles in the plasma state. Ablated particles will either be re-deposited elsewhere or collide with each other, perhaps in the centre-of-symmetry region of the chamber volume. Colliding ablation plasma particles can lead to the formation of clusters to grow into aerosol, possibly floating thereafter, which can deteriorate the subsequent implosion performance via laser scattering, etc. In a laboratory-scale YAG laser setup, the formation of nano-scale aerosol has been demonstrated in vacuum at irradiation power densities of the orders of 108–10 W cm?2 at 10 Hz, each 6 ns long, simulating the high-repetition rate inertial fusion reactor situation. Interestingly, carbon aerosol formation has been observed in the form of fullerene onion, nano- and micro-tubes when laser-ablated plasma plumes of carbon collide with each other. In contrast, colliding plasma plumes of metals tend to generate aerosol in the form of droplets under identical laser irradiation conditions. An atomic and molecular reaction model is proposed to interpret the process of carbon allotrope aerosol formation.

Y. Hirooka; H. Sato; K. Ishihara; T. Yabuuchi; K.A. Tanaka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Aerosol Radiative Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions.in Winter ZCAREX-2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions in Winter ZCAREX-2001 G. S. Golitsyn, I. A. Gorchakova, and I. I. Mokhov Institute of Atmospheric Physic Moscow, Russia Introduction Aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) is estimated for winter clear-sky conditions from measurements during ZCAREX-2001-Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Experiment in February-March, 2001 at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station (ZSS) of the A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics RAS. ARF in the shortwave range is determined by the difference between the net fluxes of the solar radiation, calculated with and without the aerosol component of the atmosphere. The estimates of ARF are made for conditions with high surface albedo. Data Used The following data of atmospheric characteristics observed during winter are used for the

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol microphysical characteristics Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

new particle formation, aerosol microphysical evolution, three-dimensional transport, and wet... of aerosol microphysical properties. Some of ... Source: Brookhaven...

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol chemical vapor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemical and microphysical properties influence aerosol optical properties and radiative effects... distribution of aerosol extensive and intensive properties will aid ......

184

Chemical Composition and Sources of Coastal Marine Aerosol Particles during the 2008 VOCALS-REx Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical composition of aerosol particles (Dp 1.5 ?m) was measured over the southeast Pacific Ocean during the VAMOS (Variability of the American Monsoon Systems) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-Rex) between 16 October and 15 November 2008 using the US Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft. The objective of these flights was to gain an understanding of the sources and evolution of these aerosols, and of how they interact with the marine stratus cloud layer that prevails in this region of the globe. Our measurements showed that the marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol mass was dominated by non-sea-salt SO2?4, followed by Na+, Cl?, Org (total organics), NH+4 , and NO?3 , in decreasing order of importance; CH3SO?3 (MSA), Ca2+, and K+ rarely exceeded their limits of detection. Aerosols were strongly acidic with a NH+4 to SO2?4 equivalents ratio typically < 0.3. Sea-salt aerosol (SSA) particles, represented by NaCl, exhibited Cl? deficits caused by both HNO3 and H2SO4, but for the most part were externally mixed with particles, mainly SO2?4. SSA contributed only a small fraction of the total accumulation mode particle number concentration. It was inferred that all aerosol species (except SSA) were of predominantly continental origin because of their strong land-to-sea concentration gradient. Comparison of relative changes in median values suggests that (1) an oceanic source of NH3 is present between 72° W and 76° W, (2) additional organic aerosols from biomass burns or biogenic precursors were emitted from coastal regions south of 31° S, with possible cloud processing, and (3) free tropospheric (FT) contributions to MBL gas and aerosol concentrations were negligible. The very low levels of CH3SO?3 observed as well as the correlation between SO2?4 and NO?3 (which is thought primarily anthropogenic) suggest a limited contribution of DMS to SO2?4 aerosol production during VOCALS.

Lee, Y.- N.; Springston, S.; Jayne, John T.; Wang, Jian; Hubbe, John M.; Senum, Gunnar I.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Daum, Peter H.

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

185

Correla\\c{c}\\~ao de longa-dura\\c{c}\\~ao e anal\\'ise bayesiana da evolu\\c{c}\\~ao temporal dos terremotos ao longo da falha de samambaia, nordeste do brasil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Bayesian approach is adopted to analyze the sequence of seismic events and their magnitudes near Jo\\~ao C\\^amara which occurred mainly from 1983 to 1998 along the Samambaia fault. In this work, we choose a Bayesian model for the process of occurrence times conditional on the observed magnitude values following the same procedure suggested by Stavrakakis and Tselentis (1987). The model parameters are determined on the basis of historical and physical information. We generate posterior samples from the joint posterior distribution of the model parameters by using a variant of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. We use the results in a variety of ways, including the construction of pointwise posterior confidence bands for the conditional intensity of the point process as a function of time, as well as, a posterior distribuition as a function of the mean of occurrence per unit time.

de Freitas, D B; Pereira, L L S; Pedro, L S; Atanazio, M G N; Vilar, C S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

DOE research on atmospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

Schwartz, S.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

ARM Aerosol Working Group Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and MFRSR Measurements ARM STM 2008 Norfolk, VA Connor Flynn 1 , Annette Koontz 1 , Anne Jefferson 2 , Jim Barnard 1 , Sally McFarlane 1 1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2 CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder Progress towards ARM DOE 2008 Performance Metric 3 & 4 * Produce and make available new continuous time series of aerosol total column depth, based on results from the AMF deployment in Niger, Africa. * Produce and make available new continuous time series of retrieved dust properties, based on results from the AMF deployment in Niger, Africa. 0 100 200 300 400 0 20 40 60 80 100 ITF movement and surface RH % RH day of year (2006) 0 100 200 300 400 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 day of year wind direction (N = 0, E = 90) 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Wind speed m/s 0 100 200 300 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 MFRSR Vo for filter2, Niamey

188

ARM - Field Campaign - Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsCarbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) govCampaignsCarbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) Campaign Links CARES Website Related Campaigns Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiation Effects Study (CARES) - Surface Meteorological Sounding 2010.05.26, Zaveri, OSC Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiation Effects Study (CARES) Photo-Acoustic Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering 2010.05.26, Arnott, OSC Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES): SMPS & CCN counter deployment during CARES/Cal-NEx 2010.05.04, Wang, OSC Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) Ground Based Instruments 2010.04.01, Cziczo, OSC Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

189

Distinguishing Aerosol Impacts on Climate over the Past Century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aerosol direct (DE), indirect (IE), and black carbon–snow albedo (BAE) effects on climate between 1890 and 1995 are compared using equilibrium aerosol–climate simulations in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model ...

Dorothy Koch; Surabi Menon; Anthony Del Genio; Reto Ruedy; Igor Alienov; Gavin A. Schmidt

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Atmospheric Aerosol Optical Properties in the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aerosol optical depth measurements over Bahrain acquired through the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) are analyzed. Optical depths obtained from ground-based sun/sky radiometers showed a pronounced temporal trend, with a maximum ...

Alexander Smirnov; Brent N. Holben; Oleg Dubovik; Norm T. O'Neill; Thomas F. Eck; Douglas L. Westphal; Andreas K. Goroch; Christophe Pietras; Ilya Slutsker

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Emission-Induced Nonlinearities in the Global Aerosol System: Results from the ECHAM5-HAM Aerosol-Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a series of simulations with the global ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model, the response to changes in anthropogenic emissions is analyzed. Traditionally, additivity is assumed in the assessment of the aerosol climate impact, as the underlying ...

Philip Stier; Johann Feichter; Silvia Kloster; Elisabetta Vignati; Julian Wilson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic ...

S. J. Ghan; X. Liu; R. C. Easter; R. Zaveri; P. J. Rasch; J.-H. Yoon; B. Eaton

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Nonequilibrium atmospheric secondary organic aerosol formation and growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mexico City area are shown...inorganic atmospheric aerosols...2005 ) A large organic aerosol source...photochemical and thermal studies of...Characteristic Group Frequencies—Tables and...particle thermal speed...phase-equilibrium in the atmospheric system: Aerosol...Support, Non-U.S...Determination by plasma-based...implications for atmospheric chemistry...2002) A thermal disso-ciation...

Véronique Perraud; Emily A. Bruns; Michael J. Ezell; Stanley N. Johnson; Yong Yu; M. Lizabeth Alexander; Alla Zelenyuk; Dan Imre; Wayne L. Chang; Donald Dabdub; James F. Pankow; Barbara J. Finlayson-Pitts

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Organic and Inorganic Aerosol Below-Cloud Scavenging by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations, with an average gravimetric PM1.0 of 8.2 ( 1.6 µg m-3 and an average Fourier transform infrared-rinsing behavior was unaffected by source type. The aerosol OM was hydrophilic throughout the sampling period the description of aerosol lifetimes in global models. Introduction Wet and dry deposition of aerosol particles

Russell, Lynn

195

Project of Aerosol Optical Depth Change in South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AerosolDepth Brazil Bolivia French Guiana Suriname Guyana Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Peru Chile Argentina Suriname Guyana Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Peru Chile Argentina Paraguay Uruguay #12;Statistics of Aerosol M ean D ec 01 to 06 Mean Month AerosolDepth Brazil Bolivia French Guiana Suriname Guyana Venezuela

Frank, Thomas D.

196

DO AEROSOLS CHANGE CLOUD COVER AND AFFECT CLIMATE?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AS SEEN FROM SPACE Fire plumes from southern Mexico transported north into Gulf of Mexico. #12;CLOUD IPCC AR4 (2007) 3210-1-2 Forcing, W m-2 CO2 CH4 CFCs N2O Long Lived Greenhouse Gases Tropospheric;AEROSOL INFLUENCES ON CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE #12;DMS #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN #12;AEROSOL

Schwartz, Stephen E.

197

Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition to the known indirect effects (glaciation, riming and thermodynamic), new indirect effects were discovered and quantified due to responses of sedimentation, aggregation and coalescence in glaciated clouds to changing aerosol conditions. In summary, the change in horizontal extent of the glaciated clouds ('lifetime indirect effects'), especially of ice-only clouds, was seen to be of higher importance in regulating aerosol indirect effects than changes in cloud properties ('cloud albedo indirect effects').

Phillips, Vaughan T. J.

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

198

Assessing regional scale predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus, and their interactions during VOCALS-REx using WRF-Chem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the recent chemistry version (v3.3) of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model, we have coupled the Morrison double-moment microphysics scheme with interactive aerosols so that full two-way aerosol-cloud interactions are included in simulations. We have used this new WRF-Chem functionality in a study focused on assessing predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus clouds, and their interactions over the Southeast Pacific using measurements from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and satellite retrievals. This study also serves as a detailed analysis of our WRF-Chem simulations contributed to the VOCALS model Assessment (VOCA) project. The WRF-Chem 31-day (October 15-November 16, 2008) simulation with aerosol-cloud interactions (AERO hereafter) is also compared to a simulation (MET hereafter) with fixed cloud droplet number concentrations assumed by the default in Morrison microphysics scheme with no interactive aerosols. The well-predicted aerosol properties such as number, mass composition, and optical depth lead to significant improvements in many features of the predicted stratocumulus clouds: cloud optical properties and microphysical properties such as cloud top effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical thickness, and cloud macrostructure such as cloud depth and cloud base height. These improvements in addition to the aerosol direct and semi-direct effects, in turn, feed back to the prediction of boundary-layer characteristics and energy budgets. Particularly, inclusion of interactive aerosols in AERO strengths temperature and humidity gradients within capping inversion layer and lowers the MBL depth by 150 m from that of the MET simulation. Mean top-of-the-atmosphere outgoing shortwave fluxes, surface latent heat, and surface downwelling longwave fluxes are in better agreement with observations in AERO, compared to the MET simulation. Nevertheless, biases in some of the simulated meteorological quantities (e.g., MBL temperature and humidity over the remote ocean) and aerosol quantities (e.g., overestimations of supermicron sea salt mass) might affect simulated stratocumulus and energy fluxes over the SEP, and require further investigations. Although not perfect, the overall performance of the regional model in simulating mesoscale aerosol-cloud interactions is encouraging and suggests that the inclusion of spatially varying aerosol characteristics is important when simulating marine stratocumulus over the southeastern Pacific.

Yang, Qing; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Morrison, H.; Lee, Y.- N.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Spak, S. N.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

199

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

Stable carbon fractionation in size-segregated aerosol particles produced by controlled biomass burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Six different biomass fuel types (wood pellets, sunflower stalk pellets, straw pellets, buckwheat shells, mixed biomass waste pellets, and grain screenings) and wastewater sludge pellets were burned under controlled conditions to determine the effect of the biomass type on the emitted particulate matter mass and stable carbon isotope composition of bulk and size-segregated particles. Aerosol particles were sampled using the total suspended particle (TSP) sampler and a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). The results demonstrated that particle emissions were dominated by the submicron particles (size <1 µm) in all biomass types. However, significant differences in emissions of submicron particles and their dominant sizes were found between different biomass fuels. The isotopic fractionation between aerosol particles and original biomass material varied from ?0.94±0.23‰ to 1.12±0.16‰. The largest negative fractionation ?0.94±0.23‰ was obtained for the wood pellet fuel type while the largest positive isotopic fractionation (1.12±0.16‰) was observed during the grain screenings combustion. The carbon isotope composition of MOUDI samples compared very well with the isotope composition of TSP samples indicating consistency of the results. The measurements of the stable carbon isotope ratio in size-segregated aerosol particles suggested that combustion processes could strongly affect isotopic fractionation in aerosol particles of different sizes thereby potentially affecting an interpretation of ambient atmospheric observations.

A. Garbaras; A. Masalaite; I. Garbariene; D. Ceburnis; E. Krugly; V. Remeikis; E. Puida; K. Kvietkus; D. Martuzevicius

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Campaign Campaign For the month of April, researchers are descending on and above Barrow, Alaska, to obtain data from the atmosphere that will help them understand the impacts that aerosols have on Arctic clouds and climate. Scientists sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility are using a heavily instrumented aircraft to collect data from the sky, while instruments based at surface sites in Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska, are obtaining measurements from the ground. Information obtained during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, will help scientists analyze the role of aerosols in climate, and represents a key contribution to Arctic climate research during International Polar Year.

202

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Researchers Model Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May 28, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, (510) 495-2404 LosAngelesSmogv1.jpg Smog over downtown Los Angeles. Aerosols are microscopic particles-like dust, pollen and soot-that ubiquitously float around in our atmosphere. Despite their tiny stature, these particles can have a huge impact on human health, climate and the environment. So scientists from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Colorado State University and the California Air Resources Board have set out to characterize the roles of various particles as atmospheric change agents on a regional scale.

203

Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1#22; m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

Photometric Variations as Small Perturbations in Aerosol Content  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Photometric Variations as Photometric Variations as Small Perturbations in Aerosol Content I. Musat Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland R. G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida Abstract The quality of profile fitting of resolved stars depends ultimately upon the accuracy with which spectral differences of the sources are retrievable within the data, because the radiation color of well-separated known sources can serve as an indicator of the origin of the optical depth variations one observes during the night. The particularities of the whole sky imager (WSI) detector and optical system are such that the data suffer from lack of the spatial resolution required in a common astronomical observation.

205

Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

Novick, Vincent J.; Johnson, Stanley A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Technical Note: Estimating Aerosol Effects on Cloud Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimating anthropogenic aerosol effects on the planetary energy balance through the aerosol influence on clouds using the difference in cloud radiative forcing from simulations with and without anthropogenic emissions produces estimates that are positively biased. A more representative method is suggested using the difference in cloud radiative forcing calculated with aerosol radiative effects neglected. The method also yields an aerosol radiative forcing decomposition that includes a term quantifying the impact of changes in surface albedo. The method requires only two additional diagnostic calculations: the whole-sky and clear-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative flux with aerosol radiative effects neglected.

Ghan, Steven J.

2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

207

Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

208

Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

Novick, Vincent J. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Aerosol Scattering Parameters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Aerosol Scattering Parameters P. J. Ricchiazzi and C. Gautier University of California Santa Barbara, California Introduction Recent studies of clear-sky radiation indicate that current radiative transfer (RT) models underestimate atmospheric absorption when standard aerosol properties are used. This so-called clear-sky anomaly is manifested in predicted levels of diffuse radiation significantly below those observed at Southern Great Plains (SGP) and other sites in the continental United States (e.g., Halthore et al. 1998 GRL). Other observations at pristine sites do not show a discrepancy (Barnard and Powell 2001, 2001; Kato et al. 1997; Halthore 1998). These results may indicate that the clear-sky anomaly is only observed at sites

210

AO Role-Based Training Part I, DAA Overview | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AO Role-Based Training Part I, DAA Overview AO Role-Based Training Part I, DAA Overview AO Role-Based Training AO Role-Based Training Part I, DAA Overview More Documents &...

211

aplicada ao acompanhante: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2014. Esta pesquisa tem como objetivo identificar se a (more) Silva, Denise Mota Pereira da 2014-01-01 27 Linearizao exata adaptativa aplicada ao controle preditivo de...

212

Analise Funcional: Uma introduc~ao Cleon S. Barroso  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An´alise Funcional: Uma introdu¸c~ao Cleon S. Barroso Universidade Federal do Cear´a EMALCA DA AMAZ

Oquendo, Higidio Portillo

213

Aerosol Science and Technology, 41:202216, 2007 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes, such as con- densation, coagulation, gas-to-particle conversion (Reid et al. 1998), and particle Aerosol size distribution is, along with particle refractive in- dex and shape, one of important

214

Uma Infra-Estrutura para Migrac~ao de Objetos CORBA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exemplar corresponde `a redac¸~ao final da dissertac¸~ao devidamente corrigida e defendida por Helves

Reverbel, Francisco

215

A balloon-borne aerosol spectrometer for high altitude low aerosol concentration measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Funded by Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory, a new balloon-borne high altitude aerosol spectrometer, for the measurement of cirrus cloud ice crystals, has been developed and successfully flown by Sandia National Laboratories and Radiance Research. This report (1) details the aerosol spectrometer design and construction, (2) discusses data transmission and decoding, (3) presents data collected on three Florida flights in tables and plots. 2 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Brown, G.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Weiss, R.E. (Radiance Research, Seattle, WA (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Understanding Brown Carbon Aerosols and Their Role in Climate Change  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brown Carbon Aerosols Brown Carbon Aerosols Tiny aerosol particles in the atmosphere are a possible cause of climate change. Among the many contributors to climate change are aerosols in the atmosphere. These tiny particles suspended in the air come from many sources, some natural and some man-made. Some aerosols are organic (containing carbon), while others are inorganic (such as sea salt and sulfates). Most aerosols reflect sunlight, and some also absorb it. Many of these nanoparticles have severe health effects in addition to climate effects. Human activities that produce aerosols include transportation, industry, and agriculture. Black carbon particles (a component of soot) originating from combustion processes have been known for some time to absorb sunlight and warm the

217

The Aerosol Modeling Testbed: A community tool to objectively evaluate aerosol process modules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study describes a new modeling paradigm that significantly advances how the third activity is conducted while also fully exploiting data and findings from the first two activities. The Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) is a computational framework for the atmospheric sciences community that streamlines the process of testing and evaluating aerosol process modules over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The AMT consists of a fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of aerosol process modules via comparison with a wide range of field measurements. The philosophy of the AMT is to systematically and objectively evaluate aerosol process modules over local to regional spatial scales that are compatible with most field campaigns measurement strategies. The performance of new treatments can then be quantified and compared to existing treatments before they are incorporated into regional and global climate models. Since the AMT is a community tool, it also provides a means of enhancing collaboration and coordination among aerosol modelers.

Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Easter, Richard C.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Grell, Georg; Barth, Mary

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

218

The near future availability of photovoltaic energy in Europe and Africa in climate-aerosol modeling experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The near future change in productivity of photovoltaic energy (PVE) in Europe and Africa is assessed by using the climate variables simulated by the ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model, and a model for the performance of photovoltaic systems. The climate simulations are forced by green-house gases emissions from the IPCC SRES B2 scenario. In addition, different scenarios for future anthropogenic aerosols emissions are applied. Thus, the sensitivity of the future PVE productivity to changes in aerosol atmospheric burdens between 2000 and 2030 is analyzed. The analysis indicates that reductions in aerosols emissions in the near future result in an increase of global warming, and a significant response in surface solar radiation and associated PVE productivity. A statistically significant reduction in PVE productivity up to 7% is observed in eastern Europe and northern Africa, while a significant increase up to 10% is observed in western Europe and eastern Mediterranean. The changes in surface solar radiation and PVE productivity are related to global effects of aerosols reduction on the large scale circulation and associated cloud cover pattern, rather than to local effects on the atmospheric optical properties. PVE assessment is then discussed in the frame of the present situation and next decades evolution of the photovoltaic market, highlighting that the effects on productivity induced by industrial and public policies, and technological development are comparable to climate related effects. The presented results encourage the improvement and further use of climate models in assessment of future renewable energies availability.

Marco Gaetani; Thomas Huld; Elisabetta Vignati; Fabio Monforti-Ferrario; Alessandro Dosio; Frank Raes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Source Apportionment of Carbonaceous Aerosols using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are different than the collection of particles from water Filtration has high efficiency for all sizes Size Condensation Nuclei (CCN) Human health Carbonaceous aerosol implicated as important for toxicity and adverse of particulate matter Again, agreement between these two approaches would give a high level of confidence

Einat, Aharonov

220

Photophoretic levitation of engineered aerosols for geoengineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...W. Keith Energy and Environmental...space-based solar scattering...The salient advantage of sulfate aerosols...instrument. Disadvantages of sulfates...concentrating solar power systems...higher energy than molecules...solving the energy balance equation...ratio of solar-spectrum to thermal-spectrum...two of the disadvantages of stratospheric...

David W. Keith

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Modeling Semivolatile Organic Aerosol Mass Emissions from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in diluted diesel and wood combustion exhaust are interpreted using a two-component absorptive with dilution of both wood smoke and diesel exhaust can be described by two lumped compounds in roughly equal. Introduction Sources of organic aerosol such as diesel engines and wood stoves emit semivolatile organic

Stanier, Charlie

222

ADEPT. aerosol deposition in cylindrical pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ADEPT calculates the deposition of aerosols in straight cylindrical pipes during turbulent air flow. Aerosol deposition is calculated in a time-dependent manner based on empirical correlations for turbulent flow in pipes. The calculated deposition during a single time interval is cumulative with that of previous time intervals and results in a decreasing inner diameter of the pipe. The calculated deposition is assumed uniform over the length of the pipe. The entering aerosol distribution is specified by the user in the form of a log-normal distribution of accumulated mass versus particle size and may be time dependent. Entering flow conditions are also specified by the user and may also be time dependent. For simplicity and generality, the geometry implicit in the program is that of a cylindrical pipe with no bends or fittings. The flow is turbulent and monodirectional; only one set of inlet conditions may be applied at a given time. The flow parameters are not calculated along the length of pipe; therefore, the dynamic behavior of the aerosol within the pipe as well as the effects of reentrainment cannot be determined explicitly. A typical problem requires 2 minutes of CPU time.

Fazekas, P.; Tewarson, S.C (Burns and Roe, Oradell, NJ (United States))

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

ADEPT. Aerosol Deposition in Cylindrical Pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ADEPT calculates the deposition of aerosols in straight cylindrical pipes during turbulent air flow. Aerosol deposition is calculated in a time-dependent manner based on empirical correlations for turbulent flow in pipes. The calculated deposition during a single time interval is cumulative with that of previous time intervals and results in a decreasing inner diameter of the pipe. The calculated deposition is assumed uniform over the length of the pipe. The entering aerosol distribution is specified by the user in the form of a log-normal distribution of accumulated mass versus particle size and may be time dependent. Entering flow conditions are also specified by the user and may also be time dependent. For simplicity and generality, the geometry implicit in the program is that of a cylindrical pipe with no bends or fittings. The flow is turbulent and monodirectional; only one set of inlet conditions may be applied at a given time. The flow parameters are not calculated along the length of pipe; therefore, the dynamic behavior of the aerosol within the pipe as well as the effects of reentrainment cannot be determined explicitly. A typical problem requires 2 minutes of CPU time.

Fazekas, P.; Tewarson, S.C [Burns and Roe, Oradell, NJ (United States)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

3, 59195976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 3, 5919­5976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol field over Europe M. Schaap et al. Title Page Abstract of Utrecht, Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science, PO Box 80005, 3508 TA, Utrecht, The Netherlands 2, The Netherlands 3 Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), PO Box 1, 1755 LE Petten, The Netherlands 4 Joint

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

225

UNDERSTANDING THE INFLUENCES OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS ON CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.ecd.bnl.gov/steve BOB BRAWDY / AP #12;OVERVIEW Aerosol influences on climate and climate change Earth's energy balance remarks #12;DMS #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN Light scattering by aerosols decreases absorption of solar radiation. #12;AEROSOLS AS SEEN FROM SPACE Fire plumes from southern

Schwartz, Stephen E.

226

ME323 B: Introduc~ao aos Modelos Probabilisticos I Semestre de 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Par^ametro 4.2 Estima¸c~ao Pontual e por Intervalo de Confian¸ca em Modelos Param´etricos (M´edia, Pro- por¸c~oes e Vari^ancias) 4.3 Teste de Hip´oteses em Modelos Param´etricos (M´edia, Propor¸c~oes e Vari segunda prova; e a m´edia das notas das listas de exerc´icios. A nota final ser´a calculada como NF = NG

Lachos, Victor

227

ME323 B: Introduc~ao aos Modelos Probabilisticos I Semestre de 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

¸c~ao Pontual e por Intervalo de Confian¸ca em Modelos Param´etricos (M´edia, Pro- por¸c~oes e Vari^ancias) 4.3 Teste de Hip´oteses em Modelos Param´etricos (M´edia, Propor¸c~oes e Vari^ancias) 5. Introdu: a nota da primeira prova; a nota da segunda prova; m´edia das notas das listas de exerc´icios e a m´edia

Lachos, Victor

228

Atmospheric aerosol light scattering and surface wetness influence the diurnal pattern of net ecosystem exchange in a semi-arid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and can enhance terrestrial carbon sequestration (Gu et al., 1999, 2002, 2003; Roderick et al., 2001 observational evidence of a link between routine aerosol variability, diffuse radiation and carbon sequestration.g. Baldocchi, 1997). Relation- ships using these variables have been used to model carbon exchange between

Cohen, Ronald C.

229

Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols III: Morphologic and Chemical Oxide Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against an armored target causes erosion and fragmentation of the penetrators, the extent of which is dependent on the thickness and material composition of the target. Vigorous oxidation of the DU particles and fragments creates an aerosol of DU oxide particles and DU particle agglomerations combined with target materials. Aerosols from the Capstone DU aerosol study, in which vehicles were perforated by DU penetrators, were evaluated for their oxidation states using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and particle morphologies using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS). The oxidation state of a DU aerosol is important as it offers a clue to its solubility in lung fluids. The XRD analysis showed that the aerosols evaluated were a combination primarily of U3O8 (insoluble) and UO3 (relatively more soluble) phases, though intermediate phases resembling U4O9 and other oxides were prominent in some samples. Analysis of particle residues in the micrometer-size range by SEM/EDS provided microstructural information such as phase composition and distribution, fracture morphology, size distribution, and material homogeneity. Observations from SEM analysis show a wide variability in the shapes of the DU particles. Some of the larger particles appear to have been fractured (perhaps as a result of abrasion and comminution); others were spherical, occasionally with dendritic or lobed surface structures. Amorphous conglomerates containing metals other than uranium were also common, especially with the smallest particle sizes. A few samples seemed to contain small chunks of nearly pure uranium metal, which were verified by EDS to have a higher uranium content exceeding that expected for uranium oxides. Results of the XRD and SEM/EDS analyses were used in other studies described in this issue of The Journal of Health Physics to interpret the results of lung solubility studies and in selecting input parameters for dose assessments.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Gold, Kenneth; Arey, Bruce W.; Jenson, Evan D.; Guilmette, Raymond A.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Aerosol Modeling at LLNL - Our capability, results, and perspective  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Indirect Effects to Cloud Aerosol Indirect Effects to Cloud Parameterizations in Short-Range Weather Forecasts with CAM3 Over the Southern Great Plains during May 2003 IOP Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 Catherine Chuang, James Boyle Shaocheng Xie and James Kelly LLNL-POST-401948 March 11, 2008 Why are aerosol/cloud interactions important? The greatest uncertainty in the assessment of radiative forcing arises from the interactions of aerosols with clouds. Radiative forcing of climate between 1750 and 2005 (IPCC, 2007) Sources of uncertainty Emissions Gas to particle conversion Aerosol size distribution Linkage between aerosols

231

AEROgui: A graphical user interface for the optical properties of aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols have an uncertain effect on climate, and serious impact on human health. The uncertainty in the aerosols role on climate has several sources. First, aerosols present a great spatial and temporal variability. The spatial variability ...

R. Pedrós; J.L. Gómez-Amo; C.R. Marcos; M.P. Utrillas; S. Gandía; F. Tena; J.A. Martinez Lozano

232

Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Thickness from the GOCART Model and Comparisons with Satellite and Sun Photometer Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Georgia Institute of Technology–Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model is used to simulate the aerosol optical thickness ? for major types of tropospheric aerosols including sulfate, dust, organic carbon ...

Mian Chin; Paul Ginoux; Stefan Kinne; Omar Torres; Brent N. Holben; Bryan N. Duncan; Randall V. Martin; Jennifer A. Logan; Akiko Higurashi; Teruyuki Nakajima

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas extinction. We retrieve ozone and nitrogen dioxide number densities and aerosol extinction from transmission), Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III

234

Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerosol climate e?ects and air quality impacts from 1980 toAerosol climate e?ects and air quality impacts from 1980 toAerosol climate e?ects and air quality impacts from 1980 to

Menon, Surabi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Statistical analysis of aerosol species, trace gasses, and meteorology in Chicago  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possible pollutant sources. Keywords Atmospheric aerosols . Canonical correlation analysis . Chicago air pollution studies involve collection and anal- ysis of atmospheric aerosols and concurrent meteorol- ogy) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to atmospheric aerosol and trace gas concentrations

O'Brien, Timothy E.

236

Priorities for In-situ Aerosol Measurements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Priorities for In-situ Priorities for In-situ Aerosol Measurements Parameters * Aerosol light absorption coefficient - spectral, including UV, vis, and IR - as f(RH), and at ambient RH * Phase function - or relevant integral properties (how many?) * Ice nuclei * Scattering vs. RH, for RH>90% * CCN, as f(S, D p ) * Size distribution * Chemical composition - for determining climate forcing, vs. radiative effect Calibration * Number concentration * Size and shape * Light absorption reference method Characterization * Accuracy and precision - need well-understood error bars * Algorithm comparisons * Closure studies * Facilities for method testing - aircraft time Methods * Inlets - shattering/splashing - location on airplane - passing efficiency - inletless analyzers/samplers * Packaging - modular/portable "pods" for multiple a/c

237

Aerosol and graphitic carbon content of snow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Snow samples from southern New Mexico, west Texas, Antarctica, and Greenland were analyzed for aerosol and graphitic carbon. Graphitic carbon contents were found to be between 2.2 and 25 ..mu..g L/sup -1/ of snow meltwater; water-insoluble aerosol content varied between 0.62 and 8.5 mg L/sup -1/. For comparison, two samples of Camp Century, Greenland, ice core, having approximate ages of 4,000 and 6,000 years, were also analyzed. Ice core graphitic carbon contents were found to be 2.5 and 1.1 ..mu..g L/sup -1/. copyrightAmerican Geophysical Union 1987

Chy-acute-accentlek, P.; Srivastava, V.; Cahenzli, L.; Pinnick, R.G.; Dod, R.L.; Novakov, T.; Cook, T.L.; Hinds, B.D.

1987-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

238

Aerosol generation and entrainment model for cough simulations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The airborne transmission of diseases is of great concern to the public health community. The possible spread of infectious disease by aerosols is of particular… (more)

Ersahin, Cem.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Method of Preparing Super-Concentrated Jets From Dense Aerosol...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Michael J. Hay, Ernest J. Valeo, and Nathaniel J. Fisch This is improvement in aerodynamic focusing of dilute aerosol suspensions. All previous work on this subject has...

240

ARM - Field Campaign - Pajarito Aerosol Coupling to Ecosystems...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

properties during the winter-spring transition. Opportunity to investigate fire and automobile emission interactions with biogenic aerosols will also harnessed MAOS will be...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Exhaust Aerosol Particle and Ion Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Exhaust Aerosol Particle and Ion Measurements ... diesel engines have received increasing attention due to their potential health effects. ...

Tero Lähde; Topi Rönkkö; Annele Virtanen; Tanja J. Schuck; Liisa Pirjola; Kaarle Hämeri; Markku Kulmala; Frank Arnold; Dieter Rothe; Jorma Keskinen

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

242

Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor During the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

modifications reduced but could not eliminate these adverse effects. The Raman lidar water vapor (aerosol extinction) measurements produced by these modified algorithms were,...

243

aerosol influenza transmission: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences Websites Summary: . In preliminary work, we used artificial neural networks (ANNs) to construct global aerosol predictors by learningIntegration...

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol particle size Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of aerosol over many orders-of-magnitude of particle size range, from subcritical clusters on the molecular... to modeling aerosol dynamics under conditions of new...

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol modeling decadal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences 8 Absorbing aerosols and pre-summer monsoon hydroclimate variability over the Indian subcontinent: The challenge in investigating links Summary: in the aerosol-monsoon...

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol radiative forcing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

No. DE- Summary: : WHY MEASUREMENTS ALONE CANNOT QUANTIFY AEROSOL RADIATIVE FORCING OF CLIMATE CHANGE Stephen E. Schwartz... of radiative forcing of climate change by aerosols,...

247

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosols nanometriques application Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is studying how aerosol particles affect everything from Summary: of aerosol particles on climate change, public health, and renewable energy applications. In particular, he......

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol lung inhalation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aerosolized by means... is aerosolized upon inhalation by utilizing the ... Source: Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit - Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies, Department of...

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol condensation model Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Science Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 8 DETERMINING AEROSOL RADIATIVE FORCING AT ARM SITES Summary: OF AEROSOL DIRECT FORCING By linear model and by...

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol code comparisons Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Ecology 4 Estimates of global radiative forcing derived from the GlobAEROSOL dataset Summary: -sky direct aerosol radiative forcing. The Edwards and Slingo (1996)...

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosols harbor diverse Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud & Aerosol Process Group CSDESRLNOAA Presented at: NIST... Aerosol Metrology for Climate Workshop 15th March, 2011 12;Deposition Snow Darkens and Warms BC...

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol light absorption Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AND Summary: population centers were used to calculate the aerosol forcing due to light scattering and absorption. Directly... , NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Aerosols influence...

253

Large Aerosols Play Unexpected Role in Ganges Valley | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

The data have revealed that large aerosols in this region absorb a greater amount of light than expected. The Science Aerosol particles in the atmosphere may absorb solar...

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol atmospheric interactions Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Climate Summary: order estimates of aerosol-climate interaction But... only Earth System Models can include all... of the interactions (in theory at least) 12;Aerosols <>...

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali sulfate aerosol Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Formation during... " and "Mechanism of Alkali Sulfate Aerosols Formation during Biomass Combustion" describe the development... the ... Source: Ris National Laboratory...

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric aerosol size Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for about ten percent of all aerosols in the atmosphere. We... , can actually absorb solar energy and warm the atmosphere. Atmospheric aerosols are very important... by...

257

INTRODUC¸ ˜AO `AS TRANSFORMADAS DE RADON 1. Introduç ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Muitas coisas em matemática, ou de um modo mais geral em ciências, s˜ao assim, se estuda. um problema por que ele é interessante, e a princ?pio pode vir a ...

258

Anomalous Eurasian snow extent and the wintertime AO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The winter mode of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) is the dominating influence on extratropical winter climate variability in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) . The phase of the Arctic Oscillation is characterized by trends in ...

Lundgren, Elizabeth Whitin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

CCM128 COMPUTAC ~AO II INFORMAC ~OES GERAIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ao definidos em breve. Crit´erio de avalia¸c~ao: Voc^e ter´a de atingir m´edia pelo menos 5.0 tanto nas provas (MP) como nos exerc´icios (ME). A m´edia final no semestre ser´a uma m´edia ponderada de MP e ME, com

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

260

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology E. Andrews Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environment University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado E. Andrews, J. A. Ogren, P. J. Sheridan, and J. M. Harris Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado P. K. Quinn Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Seattle, Washington Abstract The uncertainties associated with assumptions of generic aerosol properties in radiative transfer codes are unknown, which means that these uncertainties are frequently invoked when models and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Composition analyses of size-resolved aerosol samples taken from aircraft downwind of Kuwait, Spring 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analyses are reported for eight aerosol samples taken from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Electra typically 200 to 250 km downwind of Kuwait between May 19 and June 1, 1991. Aerosols were separated into fine (D{sub p} < 2.5 {mu}m) and coarse (2.5 < D{sub p} 10 {mu}m) particles for optical, gravimetric, X ray and nuclear analyses, yielding information on the morphology, mass, and composition of aerosols downwind of Kuwait. The mass of coarse aerosols ranged between 60 and 1971 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and, while dominated by soil derived aerosols, contained considerable content of sulfates and salt (NaCl) and soot in the form of fluffy agglomerates. The mass of fine aerosols varied between 70 and 785 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, of which about 70% was accounted for via compositional analyses performed in vacuum. While most components varied greatly from flight to flight, organic matter and fine soils each accounted for about 1/4 of the fine mass, while salt and sulfates contributed about 10% and 7%, respectively. The Cl/S ratios were remarkably constant, 2.4 {+-} 1.2 for coarse particles and 2.0 {+-} 0.2 for fine particles, with one flight deleted in each case. Vanadium, when observed, ranged from 9 to 27 ng/m{sup 3}, while nickel ranged from 5 to 25 ng/m{sup 3}. In fact, fine sulfates, vanadium, and nickel occurred in levels typical of Los Angeles, California, during summer 1986. The V/Ni ratio, 1.7 {+-} 0.4, was very similar to the ratios measured in fine particles from combusted Kuwaiti oil, 1.4 {+-} 0.9. Bromine, copper, zinc, and arsenic/lead were also observed at levels between 2 and 190 ng/m{sup 3}. The presence of massive amounts of fine, typically alkaline soils in the Kuwaiti smoke plumes significantly modified their behavior and probably mitigated their impacts, locally and globally. 16 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Cahill, T.A.; Wilkinson, K. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Schnell, R. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1992-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

262

Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements due to coatings on soot particles). The successfully completed Phase I project included construction of a prototype design for the TD with detailed physical modeling, testing with laboratory and ambient aerosol particles, and the initiation of a detailed microphysical model of the aerosol particles passing through the TD to extract vapor pressure distributions. The objective of the microphysical model is to derive vapor pressure distributions (i.e. vapor pressure ranges, including single chemical compounds, mixtures of known compounds, and complex ‘real-world’ aerosols, such as SOA, and soot particles with absorbing and nonabsorbing coatings) from TD measurements of changes in particle size, mass, and chemical composition for known TD temperatures and flow rates (i.e. residence times). The proposed Phase II project was designed to optimize several TD systems for different instrument applications and to combine the hardware and modeling into a robust package for commercial sales.

Dr. Timothy Onasch

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

263

Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The size and thickness of organic aerosol particles collected by impaction in five field campaigns were compared to those of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) was used to measure the total carbon absorbance (TCA) by individual particles as a function of their projection areas on the substrate. Because they flatten less upon impaction, particles with higher viscosity and surface tension can be identified by a steeper slope on a plot of TCA vs. size. The slopes of the ambient data are statistically similar indicating a small range of average viscosities and surface tensions across five field campaigns. Steeper slopes were observed for the plots corresponding to ambient particles, while smaller slopes were indicative of the laboratory generated SOA. This comparison indicates that ambient organic particles have higher viscosities and surface tensions than those typically generated in laboratory SOA studies.

O'Brien, Rachel E.; Neu, Alexander; Epstein, Scott A.; MacMillan, Amanda; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Laskin, Alexander; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

Inter-annual Tropospheric Aerosol Variability in Late Twentieth Century and its Impact on Tropical Atlantic and West African Climate by Direct and Semi-direct Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new high-resolution (0.9$^{\\circ}$x1.25$^{\\circ}$ in the horizontal) global tropospheric aerosol dataset with monthly resolution is generated using the finite-volume configuration of Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a bulk aerosol model and forced with recent estimates of surface emissions for the latter part of twentieth century. The surface emissions dataset is constructed from Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) decadal-resolution surface emissions dataset to include REanalysis of TROpospheric chemical composition (RETRO) wildfire monthly emissions dataset. Experiments forced with the new tropospheric aerosol dataset and conducted using the spectral configuration of CAM4 with a T85 truncation (1.4$^{\\circ}$x1.4$^{\\circ}$) with prescribed twentieth century observed sea surface temperature, sea-ice and greenhouse gases reveal that variations in tropospheric aerosol levels can induce significant regional climate variability on the inter-annual timescales. Regression analyses over tropical Atlantic and Africa reveal that increasing dust aerosols can cool the North African landmass and shift convection southwards from West Africa into the Gulf of Guinea in the spring season in the simulations. Further, we find that increasing carbonaceous aerosols emanating from the southwestern African savannas can cool the region significantly and increase the marine stratocumulus cloud cover over the southeast tropical Atlantic ocean by aerosol-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere above the low clouds. Experiments conducted with CAM4 coupled to a slab ocean model suggest that present day aerosols can shift the ITCZ southwards over the tropical Atlantic and can reduce the ocean mixed layer temperature beneath the increased marine stratocumulus clouds in the southeastern tropical Atlantic.

Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Truesdale, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Mahajan, Salil [ORNL; Lamarque, J-F [University Center for Atmospheric Research

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Reflective 'cool' roofs under aerosol-burdened skies: radiative benefits across selected Indian cities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of reflective surfaces offers one low-cost solution for reducing solar loading to urban environments and the Earth that should be considered as part of sustainable urban design. Here, we characterize the radiative benefits, i.e. the additional shortwave radiation leaving the atmosphere, from the installation of highly reflective 'cool' roofs in urban areas in India that face relatively large local aerosol burdens. We use a previously tested column radiative transfer model to estimate the energy per unit area reflected to space from increasing the surface albedo at six cities within India. The model is used to characterize radiative transfer each day over five years (2008–2012) based on mid-day satellite retrievals of MODIS aerosol depth, cloud water path, and average surface albedo and MERRA atmospheric profiles of temperature and composition. Compared against ten months of field observations in two cities, the model derived incoming surface shortwave radiation estimates relative to observations show small biases (0.5% and ?2.6%, at Pantnagar and Nainital, respectively). Despite the high levels of local aerosols we found cool roofs provided significant radiative benefits at all locations. Averaged over the five year period we found that increasing the albedo of 1 m2 of roof area by 0.5 would reflect to space 0.9–1.2 kWh daily from 08:30–15:30 LST, depending on location. This is equivalent to a constant forcing of 37–50 W m?2 (equivalent to reducing CO2 emissions by 74 to 101 kg CO2 m?2 roof area). Last, we identify a co-benefit of improving air quality, in that removing aerosols from the atmosphere could increase the radiative benefits from cool roofs by 23–74%, with the largest potential increase found at Delhi and the smallest change found at Nainital.

D E Millstein; M L Fischer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

ARM Aerosol Working Group Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Overview of the An Overview of the C Overview of the An Overview of the C C loud and loud and La La nd nd S S urface urface I I nteractions nteractions C C ampaign ampaign (CLASIC) (CLASIC) ARM Science Team Meeting March 13 th , 2008 Norfolk, VA Jason Tomlinson Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Introduction Archive Website WIKI Overview * The primary goal of CLASIC is to improve understanding of the physics of the early stages of cumulus cloud convection as it relates to land surface conditions, and to translate this new understanding into improved representations in GCMs and regional climate models 1 Overview * ARM Southern Great Plains Climate Research Facility - June 8-July 2, 2007 * Nine participating aircraft - In-situ * CIRPAS Twin Otter * Cessna 206 * Duke University Helicopter Observation Platform

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - agressividade ao amor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aos meus pais, Carlos e Zlia e ao meu irmo, Jnior, por todo amor... Rosa da Silva, Rodrigo dos Santos Machado Feitosa e Carlos Eduardo Sanhudo. Ao meu amor, amiga e......

268

A.O. Smith Corporation Response to Preliminary Plan for Retrospective...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

A.O. Smith Corporation Response to Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of A.O. Smith Corporation Response to Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of A.O. Smith...

269

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao benomyl por Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FINEP e IBM BRASIL, por seu apoio ao... , especialmente ao Romildo, 12;a K atia e ao Luiz Velho. 12;A toda minha fam lia, por seus ininterruptos apoios... e ... Source:...

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao entalhe por Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FINEP e IBM BRASIL, por seu apoio ao... , especialmente ao Romildo, 12;a K atia e ao Luiz Velho. 12;A toda minha fam lia, por seus ininterruptos apoios... e ... Source:...

271

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao parasitismo por Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FINEP e IBM BRASIL, por seu apoio ao... , especialmente ao Romildo, 12;a K atia e ao Luiz Velho. 12;A toda minha fam lia, por seus ininterruptos apoios... e ... Source:...

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao glifosato por Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FINEP e IBM BRASIL, por seu apoio ao... , especialmente ao Romildo, 12;a K atia e ao Luiz Velho. 12;A toda minha fam lia, por seus ininterruptos apoios... e ... Source:...

273

Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California Title Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lunden, Melissa M., Douglas R. Black, Megan McKay, Kenneth L. Revzan, Allen H. Goldstein, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page 373 Issue 5 Pagination 373-388 Date Published 02/2006 ISSN 0278-6826 (Print), 1521-7388 (Online) Abstract Atmospheric aerosols from natural and anthropogenic processes have both primary and secondary origins, and can influence human health, visibility, and climate. One key process affecting atmospheric concentrations of aerosols is the formation of new particles and their subsequent growth to larger particle sizes. A field study was conducted at the Blodgett Forest Research Station in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California from May through September of 2002 to examine the effect of biogenic volatile organic compounds on aerosol formation and processing. The study included in-situ measurements of concentration and biosphere-atmosphere flux of VOCs, ozone, aerosol size distribution, aerosol physical and optical properties, and meteorological variables. Fine particle growth events were observed on approximately 30 percent of the 107 days with complete size distribution data. Average particle growth rates measured during these events were 3.8 ± 1.9 nm hr-1. Correlations between aerosol properties, trace gas concentrations, and meteorological measurements were analyzed to determine conditions conducive to fine particle growth events. Growth events were typically observed on days with a lesser degree of anthropogenic influence, as indicated by lower concentrations of black carbon, carbon monoxide, and total aerosol volume. Days with growth events also had lower temperatures, increased wind speeds, and larger momentum flux. Measurements of ozone concentrations and ozone flux indicate that gas phase oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds occur in the canopy, strongly suggesting that a significant portion of the material responsible for the observed particle growth are oxidation products of naturally emitted very reactive organic compounds.

274

Aerosol radiative forcing and the accuracy of satellite aerosol optical depth retrieval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, New Mexico, USA Michael Mishchenko Goddard Institute for Space Studies, NASA, New York, New York, USA between t = 0.1 and t = 0.8. The Department of Energy research satellite instrument, the Multispectral [Hobbs et al., 1997]. The aerosols' direct effect involves their interaction with solar and terrestrial

275

CLOUD PHYSICS From aerosol-limited to invigoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUD PHYSICS From aerosol-limited to invigoration of warm convective clouds Ilan Koren,1 * Guy Dagan,1 Orit Altaratz1 Among all cloud-aerosol interactions, the invigoration effect is the most elusive. Most of the studies that do suggest this effect link it to deep convective clouds with a warm base

Napp, Nils

276

Deposition of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-47669 Deposition of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Siegel and Iain Walker of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey A. Siegel Iain S. Walker, Ph.D. ASHRAE Student Member that are found in commercial and residential HVAC systems of 1 - 6 m/s (200 - 1200 ft/min), particle diameters

277

Climatology of aerosol optical depth in northcentral Oklahoma: 19922008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aerosol models; for identification of aerosols from spe- cific events (e.g., the Central American fires Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most dimming; that is, the decrease in solar radiation reaching Earth's surface. Additionally, the wavelength

278

Simultaneous Retrieval of Effective Refractive Index and Density from Size Distribution and Light Scattering Data: Weakly-Absorbing Aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define “weakly absorbing” as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 um.The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE~3%) and reasonable (RMSE~28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49±0.02) and effective density (1.68±0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10micron particles. The evaluation results also reveal that the retrieved density and refractive index tend to decrease with an increase of the relative humidity.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Shilling, John E.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mei, Fan; Jefferson, Anne

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Superfund TIO videos. Set B. Enforcement tools: Administrative orders (ao). Part 4. Audio-Visual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The videotape provides an overview of the purpose and objectives of Administrative Orders (AOs). It describes the two types of AOs: AO on Consent (AOC) and Unilateral AO (UAO). Steps leading to their use and issuance and procedures required after an AO has been issued are described. Components of the two AOs are outlined. Significant issues, such as negotiations, non-compliance, penalty reimbursement and model forms are discussed.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo and asymmetry parameter at Barrow. Sivaraman, Chitra Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Aerosols Efforts are currently underway to run and evaluate the Broadband Heating Rate Profile project at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site for the time period March 2004 - February 2005. The Aerosol Best-Estimate (ABE) Value-Added Procedure (VAP) is to provide continuous estimates of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single-scatter albedo, and asymmetry parameter above the Northern Slopes of Alaska (NSA) facility. In the interest of temporal continuity, we have developed an algorithm that

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

ARM - Field Campaign - MArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsMArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP govCampaignsMArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP Campaign Links Science Plan AMF Point Reyes Website AMF Point Reyes Data Plots Related Campaigns MASRAD: Pt. Reyes Stratus Cloud and Drizzle Study 2005.07.07, Coulter, AMF MASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry Measurements 2005.07.01, Berkowitz, AMF MASRAD - Aerosol Optical Properties 2005.06.29, Strawa, AMF MASRAD:Sub-Micron Aerosol Measurements 2005.06.20, Wang, AMF MASRAD: Cloud Study from the 2NFOV at Pt. Reyes Field Campaign 2005.06.02, Wiscombe, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : MArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP 2005.03.14 - 2005.09.14 Website : http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf/pye/ Lead Scientist : Mark Miller

282

Atmospheric aerosol monitoring at the Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a ground based cosmic-ray observatory the atmosphere is an integral part of the detector. Air fluorescence detectors (FDs) are particularly sensitive to the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere. These aerosols, consisting mainly of clouds and dust, can strongly affect the propagation of fluorescence and Cherenkov light from cosmic-ray induced extensive air showers. The Pierre Auger Observatory has a comprehensive program to monitor the aerosols within the atmospheric volume of the detector. In this paper the aerosol parameters that affect FD reconstruction will be discussed. The aerosol monitoring systems that have been deployed at the Pierre Auger Observatory will be briefly described along with some measurements from these systems.

Cester, R.; Chiosso, M.; Chirin, J.; Clay, R.; Dawson, B.; Fick, B.; Filipcic, A.; Garcia, B.; Grillo, A.; Horvat, M.; Iarlori, M.; Malek, M.; Matthews, J.; Matthews,; Melo, D.; Meyhandan, R.; Mostafa, M.; Mussa, R.; Prouza, M.; Raefert, B.; Rizi, V.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Experiments related to the resuspension of aerosols during hydrogen burns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed seven ''add-on'' experiments in two large combustion facilities to investigate the capability of hydrogen burns to remove simulated structural and fission product aerosols previously deposited on small metal discs that have surfaces prototypical of those found in nuclear reactor containments. Our results suggest that hydrogen combustion provides an especially effective mechanism for removal (and, presumably, resuspension) of sedimented aerosols produced in a hypothetical nuclear reactor core-degradation or core-melting accident. The presence of condensing steam does not seem to assure adhesion of sedimented aerosols during hydrogen burns. Differences are exhibited between different surfaces as well as between types of aerosol. In-depth studies will be required to assess the impact exposure of sedimented aerosols to hydrogen burns might have on the radiological source term.

Nelson, L.S.; Guay, K.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

A 113 L/min ambient aerosol sampler for collection of thoracic and respirable fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure IO to show a comparison w1th the ISO 20 100 80 I- Z LLI 60 LLI Q. 0 ~ 40 IX I- LLI z LIJ 0 20 I 2 3 4 5 7 10 AERODYNAMIC PARTICLE DIAMETER, pm Figure 9. Penetration of rronodisperse aerosols through the RSP fractionator. Flow rate... yielded penetration values w1thin one percent of the values observed for the first set of tests. The experimentally observed relationship between cutoo1nt s1ze and flow rate, Figure 11, is one wh1ch provides- reason to question a commonly-used theory...

Rue, Clayton Matthew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao cultural na Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DO SUL INSTITUTO DE INFORM ' Summary: -orientador Porto Alegre, outubro de 1994. 12; 2 CIP - CATALOGA C AO NA PUBLICA C AO Bordini, Rafael Heitor... Bandeira da Silva)...

286

E-Print Network 3.0 - aplicado ao setor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mostraram reduo em relao ao setor adjacente frente. Considerando... de 1988 neste mesmo setor. 31 Figura 4: Esquema da disposio dos quadrados amostrais ao longo...

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - aos doentes mentais Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

tumor atravs de radiao ao mesmo tempo em que procura evitar... inspiradas na tomografia computadorizada que emitem radiao ao longo de todo o corpo do paciente 15......

288

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao tratamento ampliando Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

junto ao Diretrio de Grupos de Pesquisa do CNPq. IX. oferecer orientao... Farmacologia (CCB) receberam meno honrosa junto ao Prmio Jos Pedro de Arajo com o...

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - aplicada aos agricultores Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

junto ao Diretrio de Grupos de Pesquisa do CNPq. IX. oferecer orientao... Farmacologia (CCB) receberam meno honrosa junto ao Prmio Jos Pedro de Arajo com o...

290

A shrouded probe aerosol sampling cyclone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the air stream. In the present design, three concentric shrouds and a probe will be attached to the entrance of the cyclone. The shroud concept was first used in an aircraft-horne sampling device for collecting tropospheric aerosol particles... by A. R. McFarland and S. A. Batterman. College Station, Texas: 1989. 5. Strauss, W. and S. J. Nainwaring: Air Pollution. London, Baltimore, Maryland: Edward Arnold, 1984. pp. 95-96. 6. Moore, N. E. , and A. R. NcFarland: Stairmand-Type Sampling...

Little, Stewart Craig

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

Method of dispersing particulate aerosol tracer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particulate aerosol tracer which comprises a particulate carrier of sheet silicate composition having a particle size up to one micron, and a cationic dopant chemically absorbed in solid solution in the carrier. The carrier is preferably selected from the group consisting of natural mineral clays such as bentonite, and the dopant is selected from the group consisting of rare earth elements and transition elements. The tracers are dispersed by forming an aqueous salt solution with the dopant present as cations, dispersing the carriers in the solution, and then atomizing the solution under heat sufficient to superheat the solution droplets at a level sufficient to prevent reagglomeration of the carrier particles.

O'Holleran, Thomas P. (Belleville, MI)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Size Size Resolved CCN Measurements Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: Size Resolved CCN Measurements 2014.01.01 - 2014.12.31 Lead Scientist : Jian Wang Description Aerosol indirect effects, which represent the impact of aerosols on climate through influencing the properties of clouds, remain one of the main uncertainties in climate predictions (IPCC, 2007). Reducing this large uncertainty requires both improved understanding and representation of aerosol properties and processes in climate models, including the cloud activation properties of aerosols. The Atmospheric System Research (ASR)

293

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG) 2014.02.01 - 2014.10.15 Lead Scientist : Allen Goldstein Description In areas where biogenic emissions are oxidized in the presence of anthropogenic pollutants such as SO2, NOx and black carbon, it has become increasingly apparent that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is substantially enhanced. Research is urgently needed to elucidate fundamental processes of natural

294

Sources and Formation of OrganicSources and Formation of Organic Aerosols in our AtmosphereAerosols in our Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Carnegie Mellon University Smog Chamber Air supply Computer Temperature control Clean air 10 m3 Teflon spectrometer Aerosol mass spectrometerOzone monitor Air supply Computer Temperature control Clean air 10 m3 on temperature Hevap also needed Assumes no interactions among organic aerosol species or with inorganics. #12

Einat, Aharonov

295

Beryllium Carcinogenesis. I. Inhalation Exposure of Rats to Beryllium Sulfate Aerosol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...aerosol at a mean atmospheric concentration of...aerosol at a mean atmospheric concentration of...in the drinking water) for 2 weeks...a glass aerosol generator, with an airflow...chamber, distilled water was disseminated...aerosol generation, atmospheric concentration control...

Andrew L. Reeves; Daniel Deitch; and Arthur J. Vorwald

1967-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

spectra from size-resolved particle samples col-lected from the Southeastern Aerosol Visibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and acrolein aerosols. We believe that these transformations are due to acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reac

Bishop, James K.B.

297

Lidar Investigation of Tropical Nocturnal Boundary Layer Aerosols and Cloud Macrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties under different meteorological conditions is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model version 2.2 developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

Manoj, M. G.; Devara, PC S.; Taraphdar, Sourav

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

CARES Helps Explain Secondary Organic Aerosols  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

What happens when urban man-made pollution mixes with what we think of as pristine forest air? To know more about what this interaction means for the climate, the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study, or CARES, field campaign was designed in 2010. The sampling strategy during CARES was coordinated with CalNex 2010, another major field campaign that was planned in California in 2010 by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the California Energy Commission (CEC). "We found two things. When urban pollution mixes with forest pollutions we get more secondary organic aerosols," said Rahul Zaveri, FCSD scientist and project lead on CARES. "SOAs are thought to be formed primarily from forest emissions but only when they interact with urban emissions. The data is saying that there will be climate cooling over the central California valley because of these interactions." Knowledge gained from detailed analyses of data gathered during the CARES campaign, together with laboratory experiments, is being used to improve existing climate models.

Zaveri, Rahul

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

299

Transport and Mixing Patterns over Central California during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the synoptic and regional-scale meteorological conditions that affected the transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols in the vicinity of Sacramento, California during June 2010 when the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was conducted. The meteorological measurements collected by various instruments deployed during the campaign and the performance of the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) are both discussed. WRF-Chem was run daily during the campaign to forecast the spatial and temporal variation of carbon monoxide emitted from 20 anthropogenic source regions in California to guide aircraft sampling. The model is shown to reproduce the overall circulations and boundary-layer characteristics in the region, although errors in the upslope wind speed and boundary-layer depth contribute to differences in the observed and simulated carbon monoxide. Thermally-driven upslope flows that transported pollutants from Sacramento over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada occurred every afternoon, except during three periods when the passage of mid-tropospheric troughs disrupted the regional-scales flow patterns. The meteorological conditions after the passage of the third trough were the most favorable for photochemistry and likely formation of secondary organic aerosols. Meteorological measurements and model forecasts indicate that the Sacramento pollutant plume was likely transported over a downwind site that collected trace gas and aerosol measurements during 23 periods; however, direct transport occurred during only eight of these periods. The model also showed that emissions from the San Francisco Bay area transported by intrusions of marine air contributed a large fraction of the carbon monoxide in the vicinity of Sacramento, suggesting that this source likely affects local chemistry. Contributions from other sources of pollutants, such as those in the Sacramento Valley and San Joaquin Valley, were relatively low. Aerosol layering in the free troposphere was observed during the morning by an airborne Lidar; WRF-Chem forecasts showed that mountain venting processes contributed to aged pollutants aloft in the valley atmosphere which then can be entrained into the growing boundary layer the subsequent day.

Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Berg, Larry K.; Shaw, William J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Barnard, James C.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John; Erickson, Matthew H.; Jobson, Tom; Flowers, Bradley; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Springston, Stephen R.; Pirce, Bradley R.; Dolislager, Leon; Pederson, J. R.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

300

Transport and mixing patterns over Central California during the carbonaceous aerosol and radiative effects study (CARES)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the synoptic and regional-scale meteorological conditions that affected the transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols in the vicinity of Sacramento, California during June 2010 when the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was conducted. The meteorological measurements collected by various instruments deployed during the campaign and the performance of the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) are both discussed. WRF-Chem was run daily during the campaign to forecast the spatial and temporal variation of carbon monoxide emitted from 20 anthropogenic source regions in California to guide aircraft sampling. The model is shown to reproduce the overall circulations and boundary-layer characteristics in the region, although errors in the upslope wind speed and boundary-layer depth contribute to differences in the observed and simulated carbon monoxide. Thermally-driven upslope flows that transported pollutants from Sacramento over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada occurred every afternoon, except during three periods when the passage of mid-tropospheric troughs disrupted the regional-scale flow patterns. The meteorological conditions after the passage of the third trough were the most favorable for photochemistry and likely formation of secondary organic aerosols. Meteorological measurements and model forecasts indicate that the Sacramento pollutant plume was likely transported over a downwind site that collected trace gas and aerosol measurements during 23 time periods; however, direct transport occurred during only eight of these periods. The model also showed that emissions from the San Francisco Bay area transported by intrusions of marine air contributed a large fraction of the carbon monoxide in the vicinity of Sacramento, suggesting that this source likely affects local chemistry. Contributions from other sources of pollutants, such as those in the Sacramento Valley and San Joaquin Valley, were relatively low. Aerosol layering in the free troposphere was observed during the morning by an airborne Lidar. WRF-Chem forecasts showed that mountain venting processes contributed to aged pollutants aloft in the valley atmosphere that are then entrained into the growing boundary layer the subsequent day.

Fast J. D.; Springston S.; Gustafson Jr., W. I.; Berg, L. K.; Shaw, W. J.; Pekour, M.; Shrivastava, M.; Barnard, J. C.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. A.; Erickson, M.; Jobson, B. T.; Flowers, B.; Dubey, M. K.; Pierce, R. B.; Dolislager, L.; Pederson, J.; Zaveri, R. A.

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

FSE IPSE (2015 AO Admission) Faculty of Science and Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Engineering School of Creative Science and Engineering School of Advanced Science and Engineering WASEDA of Creative Science and Engineering School of Creative Science and Engineering seeks distinctive and motivatedFSE IPSE (2015 AO Admission) Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Fundamental Science

Kaji, Hajime

302

Secc~ao de Algebra e Analise, Departamento de Matematica,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

¸c~ao escrita, NE, ser´a um inteiro de 0 a 20 igual `a m´edia das melhores notas obtidas nos testes. Caso o aluno tenha feito o exame final, NE ser´a a melhor nota a escolher entre a nota do exame e a m´edia

Ventura, Joana

303

Secc~ao de Algebra e Analise, Departamento de Matematica,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anteriormente no respectivo teste somente no caso de ser superior a esta. 4) A nota escrita, NE, ser´a a m´edia forma a que ao longo do semestre todos os alunos tenham as suas resolu¸c~oes corrigidas, em m´edia, o

Nunes, João Pimentel

304

CCM118 COMPUTAC ~AO I INFORMAC ~OES GERAIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

semestre. Crit´erio de avalia¸c~ao: Voc^e ter´a de atingir m´edia pelo menos 5.0 tanto nas provas (MP) como nos exerc´icios (ME). A m´edia final no semestre ser´a uma m´edia ponderada de MP e ME, com pesos

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

305

Secc~ao de Algebra e Analise, Departamento de Matematica,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) A nota escrita, NE, ser´a a m´edia aritm´etica arredondada das notas do 1o e 2o testes, contando com¸c~oes, de forma a que ao longo do semestre todos os alunos tenham as suas resolu¸c~oes corrigidas, em m´edia

Nunes, João Pimentel

306

Secc~ao de Algebra e Analise, Departamento de Matematica,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

testes. 3) A nota da avalia¸c~ao escrita, NE, ser´a um inteiro de 0 a 20 igual `a m´edia das melhores entre a nota do exame e a m´edia previamente obtida das notas dos dois testes. As notas dos testes n

Ventura, Joana

307

Robotic Laser-Adaptive-Optics Imaging of 715 Kepler Exoplanet Candidates using Robo-AO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is designed to observe every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper we present the results from the 2012 observing season, searching for stars close to 715 representative Kepler planet candidate hosts. We find 53 companions, 44 of which are new discoveries. We detail the Robo-AO survey data reduction methods including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for large adaptive optics surveys. Our survey is sensitive to objects from 0.15" to 2.5" separation, with contrast ratios up to delta-m~6. We measure an overall nearby-star-probability for Kepler planet candidates of 7.4% +/- 1.0%, and calculate the effects of each detected nearby star on the Kepler-measured plan...

Law, Nicholas M; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Ravichandran, Ganesh; Ziegler, Carl; Johnson, John Asher; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh P; Das, H K; Dekany, Richard G; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit; Ramaprakash, A N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A New Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For studying the formation and photochemical/thermal reactions of aerosols relevant to the troposphere, a unique, high-volume, slow-flow, stainless steel aerosol flow system equipped with 5 UV lamps has been constructed and characterized experimentally. The total flow system length 6 is 8.5 m and includes a 1.2 m section used for mixing, a 6.1 m reaction section and a 1.2 m 7 transition cone at the end. The 45.7 cm diameter results in a smaller surface to volume ratio than is found in many other flow systems and thus reduces the potential contribution from wall reactions. The latter are also reduced by frequent cleaning of the flow tube walls which is made feasible by the ease of disassembly. The flow tube is equipped with ultraviolet lamps for photolysis. This flow system allows continuous sampling under stable conditions, thus increasing the amount of sample available for analysis and permitting a wide variety of analytical techniques to be applied simultaneously. The residence time is of the order of an hour, and sampling ports located along the length of the flow tube allow for time-resolved measurements of aerosol and gas-phase products. The system was characterized using both an inert gas (CO2) and particles (atomized NaNO3). Instruments interfaced directly to this flow system include a NOx analyzer, an ozone analyzer, relative humidity and temperature probes, a scanning mobility particle sizer spectrometer, an aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer, a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer, an integrating nephelometer, and a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer equipped with a long path (64 m) cell. Particles collected with impactors and filters at the various sampling ports can be analyzed subsequently by a variety of techniques. Formation of secondary organic aerosol from ?-pinene reactions (NOx photooxidation and ozonolysis) are used to demonstrate the capabilities of this new system.

Ezell, Michael J.; Johnson, Stanley N.; Yu, Yong; Perraud, Veronique; Bruns, Emily; Alexander, M. L.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Dabdub, Donald; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud and aerosol data acquired by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Convair-580 aircraft in, above, and below single-layer arctic stratocumulus cloud during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 were used to test three aerosol indirect effects hypothesized to act in mixed-phase clouds: the riming indirect effect, the glaciation indirect effect, and the cold second indirect effect. The data showed a correlation of R= 0.75 between liquid drop number concentration, Nliq, inside cloud and ambient aerosol number concentration NPCASP below cloud. This, combined with increasing liquid water content LWC with height above cloud base and the nearly constant profile of Nliq, suggested that liquid drops were nucleated from aerosol at cloud base. No strong evidence of a riming indirect effect was observed, but a strong correlation of R = 0.69 between ice crystal number concentration Ni and NPCASP above cloud was noted. Increases in ice nuclei (IN) concentration with NPCASP above cloud combined with the subadiabatic LWC profiles suggest possible mixing of IN from cloud top consistent with the glaciation indirect effect. The higher Nice and lower effective radius rel for the more polluted ISDAC cases compared to data collected in cleaner single-layer stratocumulus conditions during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment is consistent with the operation of the cold second indirect effect. However, more data in a wider variety of meteorological and surface conditions, with greater variations in aerosol forcing, are required to identify the dominant aerosol forcing mechanisms in mixed-phase arctic clouds.

Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg; Korolev, Alexei; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Lawson, R. P.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Wolde, Mengistu; Laskin, Alexander; Freer, Matthew

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

310

Aerosol-Based Duct Sealing Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 Aerosol-Based Duct Sealing Technology During the past five years, research has quantified the impacts of residential duct system leakage on HVAC energy consumption and peak electricity demand. A typical house with ducts located in the attic or crawlspace wastes approximately 20% of heating and cooling energy through duct leaks and draws approximately 0.5 KW more electricity during peak cooling periods. A 1991 study indicated that sealing leaks could save close to one Quadrillion Btus per year. (see also Commercializing a New Technology) Because the major cost of sealing leaks in existing air distribution systems is the labor for the location and sealing process, reducing the labor could greatly improve the cost-effectiveness of such a retrofit. Field studies of duct sealing programs performed by HVAC contractors show

311

Aerosol mass spectrometry systems and methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system according to one embodiment includes a particle accelerator that directs a succession of polydisperse aerosol particles along a predetermined particle path; multiple tracking lasers for generating beams of light across the particle path; an optical detector positioned adjacent the particle path for detecting impingement of the beams of light on individual particles; a desorption laser for generating a beam of desorbing light across the particle path about coaxial with a beam of light produced by one of the tracking lasers; and a controller, responsive to detection of a signal produced by the optical detector, that controls the desorption laser to generate the beam of desorbing light. Additional systems and methods are also disclosed.

Fergenson, David P.; Gard, Eric E.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

312

Discrimination between thin cirrus and and tropospheric aerosol using  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Discrimination between thin cirrus and and tropospheric aerosol using Discrimination between thin cirrus and and tropospheric aerosol using multiple measurements from Darwin ARCS Mitchell, Ross CSIRO Category: Aerosols Thin cirrus cloud occurs frequently in the tropics, and is often difficult to distinguish from tropospheric aerosol on the basis of temporal variations in ground based measurements, since both can be rather spatially uniform. In this study we investigate their discrimination by combining data from three instruments at the Darwin Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS): the Cimel sun photometer (CSP), the micropulse lidar (MPL), and the total sky imager (TSI). The study was carried out over the dry season of 2005, with the usual widespread burning of tropical savanna leading to extensive smoke plumes. It is shown that the locus of data in

313

Mobile Climate Observatory for Atmospheric Aerosols in India  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosols in India Atmospheric Aerosols in India Nainital, India, was the site chosen for deployment of a portable climate research laboratory to study how aerosols impact clouds and energy transfer in the atmosphere. The well-being of hundreds of millions of residents in northeastern India depends on the fertile land around the Ganges River, which is fed by monsoon rains and runoff from the nearby Himalayan Mountains. Any disturbance to the monsoon rains could threaten the population. In the same region, increased industrial activities due to economic growth are releasing small aerosol particles, such as soot and dust, that absorb and scatter sunlight and thus can change cloud formation processes and the heat distribution in the atmosphere. Such changes could greatly increase or

314

PNNL-MILAGRO Aerosol Modeling in Mexico | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PNNL-MILAGRO Aerosol Modeling in Mexico PNNL-MILAGRO Aerosol Modeling in Mexico Jump to: navigation, search Name PNNL-MILAGRO Aerosol Modeling in Mexico Agency/Company /Organization Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Topics Co-benefits assessment Resource Type Dataset, Maps Website http://www.pnl.gov/atmospheric Country Mexico UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References PNNL-MILAGRO Aerosol Modeling in Mexico[1] "MILGARO surface data includes measurements from Supersites, RAMA (Red Automatica de Monitoreo Atmosferico), Mobile, and Other sites. A description of each site type follows along with a plot of the site locations. Supersites Supersites provide detailed atmospheric chemistry and meteorological measurements; these sites included: T0 (located at the Instituto Mexicano

315

Effects of operating conditions on a heat transfer fluid aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are made over ranges of temperature, pressure and orifice diameters. Aerosol drop size distributions of a HTF are measured by a non-intrusive method of analysis using a Malvern Laser Diffraction Particle Analyzer (Malvern laser). The Malvern laser employs...

Sukmarg, Passaporn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Ground...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) 2012.07.01, Berg, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at...

317

ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Winter...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) 2012.07.01, Berg, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at...

318

ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerial...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) 2012.07.01, Berg, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at...

319

ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Airborne...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) 2012.07.01, Berg, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at...

320

Application of computational fluid dynamics to aerosol sampling and concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, FLUENT 6 is used to analyze the performance of aerosol sampling and concentration devices including inlet components (impactors), cyclones, and virtual impactors. The ? ? k model was used to predict particle behavior in Inline Cone Impactor (ICI) and Jet...

Hu, Shishan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Pressure-flow reducer for aerosol focusing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pressure-flow reducer, and an aerosol focusing system incorporating such a pressure-flow reducer, for performing high-flow, atmosphere-pressure sampling while delivering a tightly focused particle beam in vacuum via an aerodynamic focusing lens stack. The pressure-flow reducer has an inlet nozzle for adjusting the sampling flow rate, a pressure-flow reduction region with a skimmer and pumping ports for reducing the pressure and flow to enable interfacing with low pressure, low flow aerosol focusing devices, and a relaxation chamber for slowing or stopping aerosol particles. In this manner, the pressure-flow reducer decouples pressure from flow, and enables aerosol sampling at atmospheric pressure and at rates greater than 1 liter per minute.

Gard, Eric (San Francisco, CA); Riot, Vincent (Oakland, CA); Coffee, Keith (Diablo Grande, CA); Woods, Bruce (Livermore, CA); Tobias, Herbert (Kensington, CA); Birch, Jim (Albany, CA); Weisgraber, Todd (Brentwood, CA)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

322

Persistent sensitivity of Asian aerosol to emissions of nitrogen oxides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use a chemical transport model and its adjoint to examine the sensitivity of secondary inorganic aerosol formation to emissions of precursor trace gases from Asia. Sensitivity simulations indicate that secondary inorganic ...

Kharol, S. K.

323

MELCOR 1. 8. 1 assessment: LACE aerosol experiment LA4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MELCOR code has been used to simulate LACE aerosol experiment LA4. In this test, the behavior of single- and double-component, hygroscopic and nonhygroscopic, aerosols in a condensing environment was monitored. Results are compared to experimental data, and to CONTAIN calculations. Sensitivity studies have been done on time step effects and machine dependencies; thermal/hydraulic parameters such as condensation on heat structures and on pool surface, and radiation heat transfer; and aerosol parameters such as number of MAEROS components and sections assumed, the degree to which plated aerosols are washed off heat structures by condensate film draining, and the effect of non-default values for shape factors and diameter limits. 9 refs., 50 figs., 13 tabs.

Kmetyk, L.N.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Distinguishing Aerosol Impacts on Climate Over the Past Century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 8a). The IE cooling increases snow/ice by about 10% (Their cooling e?ect on surface temperatures promotes ice androw), cooling from the aerosol DE increases snow/ice cover

Koch, Dorothy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impacts of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. This paper presents the results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM4), coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4–SOM) ...

Salil Mahajan; Katherine J. Evans; James J. Hack; John E. Truesdale

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Effects of aerosols on deep convective cumulus clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work investigates the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on deep convective clouds and the associated radiative forcing in the Houston area. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) coupled with a spectral-bin microphysics is employed...

Fan, Jiwen

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Impact of aerosols on convective clouds and precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, E19-411 Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA) Location to form and a significant attenuator of solar radiation, aerosols affect climate in several ways. Current

328

Continuous air monitor for alpha-emitting aerosol particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new alpha Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) sampler is being developed for use in detecting the presence of alpha-emitting aerosol particles. The effort involves design, fabrication and evaluation of systems for the collection of aerosol and for the processing of data to speciate and quantify the alpha emitters of interest. At the present time we have a prototype of the aerosol sampling system and we have performed wind tunnel tests to characterize the performance of the device for different particle sizes, wind speeds, flow rates and internal design parameters. The results presented herein deal with the aerosol sampling aspects of the new CAM sampler. Work on the data processing, display and alarm functions is being done in parallel with the particle sampling work and will be reported separately at a later date. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

McFarland, A.R.; Ortiz, C.A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Rodgers, J.C.; Nelson, D.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Chemical Composition and Cloud Nucleation Ability of Marine Aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study is focused on the chemical composition and cloud nucleation ability of marine aerosol based on two cruise researches over Pacific Ocean and North Atlantic Ocean respectively. Implications of CLAW hypothesis and the factors influencing its...

Deng, Chunhua

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

330

Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Aerosol Transport and Deposition Mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, various aerosol particle transport and deposition mechanisms were studied through the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, including inertial impaction, gravitational effect, lift force, interception, and turbophoresis, within...

Tang, Yingjie

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

331

Aerosol-Cloud interactions : a new perspective in precipitation enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increased industrialization and human activity modified the atmospheric aerosol composition and size-distribution during the last several decades. This has affected the structure and evolution of clouds, and precipitation ...

Gunturu, Udaya Bhaskar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry, Climate Change, and Air Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

607 Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry, Climate Change, and Air Quality An EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop Workshop Date: January 30, 2013 Prepared for the U.S. Department of...

333

Climate impacts of carbonaceous and other non-sulfate aerosols: A proposed study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to sulfate aerosols, carbonaceous and other non-sulfate aerosols are potentially significant contributors to global climate change. We present evidence that strongly suggests that current assessments of the effects of aerosols on climate may be inadequate because major aerosol components, especially carbonaceous aerosols, are not included in these assessments. Although data on the properties and distributions of anthropogenic carbonaceous aerosols are insufficient to allow quantification of their climate impacts, the existing information suggests that climate forcing by this aerosol component may be significant and comparable to that by sulfate aerosols. We propose that a research program be undertaken to support a quantitative assessment of the role in climate forcing of non-sulfate, particularly carbonaceous, aerosols.

Andreae, M.O.; Crutzen, P.J. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Cofer, W.R. III; Hollande, J.M. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Division] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

335

Non-intrusive characterization of heat transfer fluid aerosol formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

providing an ignition source for the fine aerosol droplets. TI&e Malvern Laser Diffraction Particle Analyzer RING DIODE ARRAY DETECTOR BEAM EXPANDER/ SPATIAL FILTER HE- NE LASER FOURIER TRANSFORM LENS Figure II-Z. Diffraction particle analyzer... providing an ignition source for the fine aerosol droplets. TI&e Malvern Laser Diffraction Particle Analyzer RING DIODE ARRAY DETECTOR BEAM EXPANDER/ SPATIAL FILTER HE- NE LASER FOURIER TRANSFORM LENS Figure II-Z. Diffraction particle analyzer...

Krishna, Kiran

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

336

Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

337

A13B-0215: Case study of the 9 April 2009 `brown' cloud: Observations of unusually high cloud droplet concentrations in Saudi Arabia, David J Delene, University of North Dakota (delene@aero.und.edu; http://aerosol.atmos.und.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' cloud: Observations of unusually high cloud droplet concentrations in Saudi Arabia, David J Delene accumulation on the unprotected leading edge of the aircraft's wing during the 9 April 2009 research in Saudi diameters compared to a normal cell. Cloud base CCN measurements in Saudi Arabia are variable with some

Delene, David J.

338

On modification of global warming by sulfate aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is increasing evidence that the response of climate to increasing greenhouse gases may be modified by accompanying increases in sulfate aerosols. In this study, the patterns of response in the surface climatology of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model forced by increases in carbon dioxide alone is compared with those obtained by increasing carbon dioxide and aerosol forcing. The simulations are run from early industrial times using the estimated historical forcing and continued to the end of the twenty-first century assuming a nonintervention emissions scenario for greenhouse gases and aerosols. The comparison is made for the period 2030-2050 when the aerosol forcing is a maximum. In winter, the cooling due to aerosols merely tends to reduce the response to carbon dioxide, whereas in summer, it weakens the monsoon circulations and reverses some of the changes in the hydrological cycle on increasing carbon dioxide. This response is in some respects similar to that found in simulations with changed orbital parameters, as between today and the middle Holocene. The hydrological response in the palaeosimulations is supported by palaeoclimatic reconstructions. The results of changes in aerosol concentrations of the magnetic projected in the scenarios would have a major effect on regional climate, especially over Europe and Southeast Asia. 74 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

Mitchell, J.F.B.; Johns, T.C. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Characterisation and dissolution of depleted uranium aerosols produced during impacts of kinetic energy penetrators against a tank  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Characterisation and dissolution of depleted uranium aerosols produced during impacts...Aerosols produced during impacts of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against the...Characterisation and dissolution of depleted uranium aerosols produced during impacts......

V. Chazel; P. Gerasimo; V. Debouis; P. Laroche; F. Paquet

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Human influence on the atmospheric vertical temperature structure: Detection and observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work suggests a discernible human influence on climate. This finding is supported, with less restrictive assumptions than those used in earlier studies, by a 1961 through 1995 data set of radiosonde observations and by ensembles of coupled atmosphere-ocean simulations forced with changes in greenhouse gases, tropospheric sulfate aerosols, and stratospheric ozone. On balance, agreement between the simulations and observations is best for a combination of greenhouse gas, aerosol, and ozone forcing. The uncertainties remaining are due to imperfect knowledge of radiative forcing, natural climate variability, and errors in observations and model response. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Tett, S.F.B.; Mitchell, J.F.B.; Parker, D.E. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell, Berkshire (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Allen, M.R. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom)] [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom)

1996-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Sobre a viagem de Enrico Fermi ao Brasil em 1934  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enrico Fermi was one of the greater physicists of the XX century. In 1934, he gave several lectures in Brazil. Invited by Theodoro Ramos to work in S\\~ao Paulo, he preferred to stay in Rome and went to the USA in 1938. However, Fermi recommended Gleb Wataghin to come in his place. Wataghin made history in Brazil, becoming one of the first Professors of the future S\\~ao Paulo University. Besides his relevance to the History of Science, Fermi eventually leaved an indelible mark on the creation and institutionalization of national scientific research due to the indication of Wataghin. Despite this fact, very little is known about Fermi's trip to Brazil. This work tries to reconstruct the fullest possible steps of the famous Italian physicist in our lands.

Caruso, Francisco

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Implications of the In?Situ Measured Mass Absorption Cross Section of Organic Aerosols in Mexico City on the Atmospheric Energy Balance, Satellite Retrievals, and Photochemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The absorption of short wave incoming solar radiation by the organic component of aerosols has been examined by using data from the MCMA?2003 and the 2006 MILAGRO field campaigns. Both field efforts took place in and around Mexico City. Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) was derived as a function of wavelength (300–870 nm) by combining irradiance measurements from a Multi?Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and spectrally resolved actinic flux measurements by spectroradiometry with a radiative transfer model (TUV). In addition organic aerosol mass measured by a surface deployed aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer was used to estimate the Mass Absorption Cross?section (MAC) of Organic Carbon (OC). It was found that the MAC for OC is about 10.5? m 2 / g at 300 nm and falls close to zero at about 500 nm; these values are roughly consistent with previous MAC estimates of OC and present first in?situ observations of this quantity.

B. Dix; J. C. Barnard; R. Volkamer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

CCM128 COMPUTAC ~AO II INFORMAC ~OES GERAIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

´erio de avalia¸c~ao: Voc^e ter´a de atingir m´edia pelo menos 5.0 tanto nas provas (MP) como nos exerc´icios (ME). A m´edia final no semestre ser´a uma m´edia ponderada de MP e ME, com pesos a serem definidos

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

344

Final Report for Ã?¢Ã?Â?Ã?Â?Cloud-Aerosol Physics in Super-Parameterized Atmospheric Regional Climate Simulations (CAP-SPARCS)Ã?¢Ã?Â?Ã? (DE-SC0002003) for 8/15/2009 through 8/14/2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving the representation of local and non-local aerosol interactions in state-of-the-science regional climate models is a priority for the coming decade (Zhang, 2008). With this aim in mind, we have combined two new technologies that have a useful synergy: (1) an aerosol-enabled regional climate model (Advanced Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Chemistry WRF-Chem), whose primary weakness is a lack of high quality boundary conditions and (2) an aerosol-enabled multiscale modeling framework (PNNL Multiscale Aerosol Climate Model (MACM)), which is global but captures aerosol-convection-cloud feedbacks, and thus an ideal source of boundary conditions. Combining these two approaches has resulted in an aerosol-enabled modeling framework that not only resolves high resolution details in a particular region, but crucially does so within a global context that is similarly faithful to multi-scale aerosol-climate interactions. We have applied and improved the representation of aerosol interactions by evaluating model performance over multiple domains, with (1) an extensive evaluation of mid-continent precipitation representation by multiscale modeling, (2) two focused comparisons to transport of aerosol plumes to the eastern United States for comparison with observations made as part of the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT), with the first being idealized and the second being linked to an extensive wildfire plume, and (3) the extension of these ideas to the development of a new approach to evaluating aerosol indirect effects with limited-duration model runs by �¢����nudging�¢��� to observations. This research supported the work of one postdoc (Zhan Zhao) for two years and contributed to the training and research of two graduate students. Four peer-reviewed publications have resulted from this work, and ground work for a follow-on project was completed.

Lynn M. Russell; Richard C.J. Somerville

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

345

Direct measurements of marine aerosols to examine the influence of biological activity, anthropogenic emissions, and secondary processing on particle chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a low-speed marine diesel engine, Aerosol Sci. Tech. ,from a low-speed marine diesel engine, Aerosol Sci. Tech. ,

Gaston, Cassandra Jayne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

MAC 115 { Introdu c~ao a Computa c~ao Instituto de F sica { Segundo Semestre de 2002 -Noturno  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

devolve a m#19;edia aritm#19;etica dos vizinhos de A[i][j]. (Em geral, essa m#19;edia #19;e a m#19;edia, essa m#19;edia #19;e uma m#19;edia de menos de quatro n#19;umeros; por exemplo, no caso em que (i; j) = (0; 0), a m#19;edia deve ser dos n#19;umeros A[1][0] e A[0][1].) #12; (b) Escreva uma fun#24;c~ao de

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

347

Assessment of the Effect of Air Pollution Controls on Trends in Shortwave Radiation over the United States from 1995 through 2010 from Multiple Observation Networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long term datasets of total (all-sky) and clear-sky downwelling shortwave (SW) radiation, cloud cover fraction (cloudiness) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) are analyzed together with aerosol concentration from several networks (e.g. SURFRAD, CASTNET, IMPROVE and ARM) in the United States (US). Seven states with varying climatology are selected to better understand the effect of aerosols and clouds on SW radiation. This analysis aims to test the hypothesis that the reductions in anthropogenic aerosol burden resulting from substantial reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides over the past 15 years across the US has caused an increase in surface SW radiation. We show that the total and clear-sky downwelling SW radiation from seven sites have increasing trends except Penn State which shows no tendency in clear-sky SW radiation. After investigating several confounding factors, the causes can be due to the geography of the site, aerosol distribution, heavy air traffic and increasing cloudiness. Moreover, we assess the relationship between total column AOD with surface aerosol concentration to test our hypothesis. In our findings, the trends of clear-sky SW radiation, AOD, and aerosol concentration from the sites in eastern US agree well with our hypothesis. However, the sites in western US demonstrate increasing AOD associated with mostly increasing trends in surface aerosol concentration. At these sites, the changes in aerosol burden and/or direct aerosol effects alone cannot explain the observed changes in SW radiation, but other factors need to be considered such as cloudiness, aerosol vertical profiles and elevated plumes.

Gan, Chuen-Meei; Pleim, Jonathan; Mathur, Rohit; Hogrefe, Christian; Long, Charles N.; Xing, Jia; Roselle, Shawn; Wei, Chao

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

348

ARM - Field Campaign - Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP Campaign Links BNL BBOP Website ARM Aerial Facility Payload Science Plan Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP 2013.07.01 - 2013.10.24 Website : http://campaign.arm.gov/bbop/ Lead Scientist : Larry Kleinman For data sets, see below. Description This field campaign will address multiple uncertainties in aerosol intensive properties, which are poorly represented in climate models, by means of aircraft measurements in biomass burning plumes. Key topics to be investigated are: Aerosol mixing state and morphology Mass absorption coefficients (MACs) Chemical composition of non-refractory material associated with

349

Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

350

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosols apports du Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Regional Impact of Inter-Continental Aerosol Transport Leona Charles*a,b , Barry Grossa, Fred... to study the interaction of aerosols in the PBL with long range...

351

Organic Aerosol Formation from Photochemical Oxidation of Diesel Exhaust in a Smog Chamber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diluted exhaust from a diesel engine was photo-oxidized in a smog chamber to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production. Photochemical aging rapidly produces significant SOA, almost doubling the organic aerosol contribution of primary ...

Emily A. Weitkamp; Amy M. Sage; Jeffrey R. Pierce; Neil M. Donahue; Allen L. Robinson

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

352

Comparison of Carbonaceous Aerosols in Tokyo before and after Implementation of Diesel Exhaust Restrictions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparison of Carbonaceous Aerosols in Tokyo before and after Implementation of Diesel Exhaust Restrictions ... (5)?Albert, R. E. Comparative carcinogenic potencies of particulates from diesel engine exhausts, coke oven emissions, roofing tar aerosols and cigarette smoke. ...

Naomichi Yamamoto; Atsushi Muramoto; Jun Yoshinaga; Ken Shibata; Michio Endo; Osamu Endo; Motohiro Hirabayashi; Kiyoshi Tanabe; Sumio Goto; Minoru Yoneda; Yasuyuki Shibata

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol lidar profilometer Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CLASIC Summary: Lidar RH Changes in aerosol properties and RH near clouds Airborne NASA LaRC HSRL, ARM SGP ground... ) RamanLidar RelativeHumidityRamanLidar Aerosol Extensive...

354

The Evolution of the Physicochemical Properties of Aerosols in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

campaign investigated the evolution of the physicochemical properties of the Asian aerosol plume after 3 to 7 days of transport. The Asian aerosol within the free troposphere exhibited a bimodal growth distribution roughly 50 percent of the time. The more...

Tomlinson, Jason

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

355

Aerodynamic Focusing of High-Density Aerosols D.E. Ruiza,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerodynamic Focusing of High-Density Aerosols D.E. Ruiza, , L. Gundersona , M.J. Haya , E. Merinob-density aerosol focusing for 1µm silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic

356

Investigation of the optical and cloud forming properties of pollution, biomass burning, and mineral dust aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties of a biomass burning aerosol generated from fires on the Yucatan Peninsula. Measured aerosol size distributions and size-resolved hygroscopicity and volatility were used to infer critical supersaturation distributions of the distinct particle types...

Lee, Yong Seob

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

357

Climate effects of seasonally varying Biomass Burning emitted Carbonaceous Aerosols (BBCA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The climate impact of the seasonality of Biomass Burning emitted Carbonaceous Aerosols (BBCA) is studied using an aerosol-climate model coupled with a slab ocean model in a set of 60-year long simulations, driven by BBCA ...

Jeong, Gill-Ran

358

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosolized red tide Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

characteristics of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Summary: in the right panel of Fig. 6. The aerosol scenes spectra are drawn in green, the clear sky scenes in...

359

CHASER: An Innovative Satellite Mission Concept to Measure the Effects of Aerosols on Clouds and Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formation of cloud droplets on aerosol particles, technically known as the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), is the fundamental process driving the interactions of aerosols with clouds and precipitation. ...

Rosenfeld, Daniel

360

Estimating the lung burden from exposure to aerosols of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......from exposure to aerosols of depleted uranium Marcelo Valdes * * Corresponding...Following exposure to aerosols of depleted uranium (DU), biological samples...uranyl phosphates. INTRODUCTION Depleted uranium (DU) is a waste product of......

Marcelo Valdés

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Elucidating secondary organic aerosol from diesel and gasoline vehicles through detailed characterization of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elucidating secondary organic aerosol from diesel and gasoline vehicles through detailed 19, 2012 (received for review July 22, 2012) Emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles composition, mass distribu- tion, and organic aerosol formation potential of emissions from gasoline

Silver, Whendee

362

Investigation of the aerosol-cloud interaction using the WRF framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this dissertation, a two-moment bulk microphysical scheme with aerosol effects is developed and implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to investigate the aerosol-cloud interaction. Sensitivities of cloud properties...

Li, Guohui

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol flame deposition Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: aerosol flame deposition Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Flame aerosol nano-technology has been developed to preparation of thin and defect-free porous membrane...

364

Mechanisms of aerosol-forced AMOC variability in a state of the art climate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a new state-of-the-art Earth system model. Anthropogenic aerosols have previously been highlighted anthropogenic aerosols force a strengthening of the AMOC by up to 20% in our state-of-the-art Earth system model

365

The Sensitivity of a Numerically Simulated Idealized Squall Line to the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Changes in the aerosol number concentration are reflected by changes in raindrop size and number concentration that ultimately affect the strength of cold pools via evaporation. Therefore, aerosol perturbations can potentially alter the balance ...

Zachary J. Lebo

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao desmame precoce Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: ao desmame precoce Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ROBERTA MARIA PEREIRA LEITE CICLO ESTRAL E MENSTRUAL: REPERCUSSO DA Summary: do 1o ao 21o dia de vida....

367

E-Print Network 3.0 - ajustamento mental ao Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mental ao Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ajustamento mental ao Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 2 REGRESSO LINEAR MLTIPLA Exerccios...

368

E-Print Network 3.0 - adubos verdes ao Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

verdes ao Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adubos verdes ao Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ARTIGO INTERNET Projecto "Terraprima -Fundo...

369

Calculating Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Concentrations from Beta Activity Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beta activity measurements were used as surrogate measurements of uranium mass in aerosol samples collected during the field testing phase of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. These aerosol samples generated by the perforation of armored combat vehicles were used to characterize the depleted uranium (DU) source term for the subsequent human health risk assessment (HHRA) of Capstone aerosols. Establishing a calibration curve between beta activity measurements and uranium mass measurements is straightforward if the uranium isotopes are in equilibrium with their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny. For DU samples collected during the Capstone study, it was determined that the equilibrium between the uranium isotopes and their immediate short lived, beta-emitting progeny had been disrupted when penetrators had perforated target vehicles. Adjustments were made to account for the disrupted equilibrium and for wall losses in the aerosol samplers. Correction factors for the disrupted equilibrium ranged from 0.16 to 1, and the wall loss correction factors ranged from 1 to 1.92.

Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Alberth, David P.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic aerosol burden Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and surface... generally exhibits low aerosol ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Atmopsheric Chemistry and...

371

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol generation characterization Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: , Brookhaven National Laboratory: "Characterization of Aerosol Organic Matter: Detection, Formation and Optical... : "Atmospheric Formation, Transformation, and...

372

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol biokinetics concentrations Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 4, 2004 Abstract Atmospheric aerosol particles scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation and Source: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Environmental Chemistry...

373

Characterization of Pre-Commercial Gasoline Engine Particulates Through Advanced Aerosol Methods  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Advanced aerosol analysis methods were used to examine particulates from single cylinder test engines running on gasoline and ethanol blends.

374

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao cuidado da Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de Computacao Grafica da universidade (Tecgraf). Ficha Catalografica Hermann, Rodrigo... em deste trabalho. Aos amigos da universidade, ... Source: Celes, Waldemar -...

375

Pontos de nibus Centro Politcnico (porto 1): dentro do campus, em frente ao tubo do Ligeirinho.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ligeirinho. Centro Politécnico (portão 2): Rua Doutor Alcides Vieira Arcoverde. Jardim Botânico (portão 2): ao lado da Fundação Ecumênica, em frente ao portão principal. Reitoria: Rua General Carneiro em frente ao prédio da Administração. DeArtes: em frente ao portão lateral, na Rua Coronel Dulcídio. Sept

Paraná, Universidade Federal do

376

Macroscopic observables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study macroscopic observables defined as the total value of a physical quantity over a collection of quantum systems. We show that previous results obtained for an infinite ensemble of identically prepared systems lead to incorrect conclusions for finite ensembles. In particular, exact measurement of a macroscopic observable significantly disturbs the state of any finite ensemble. However, we show how this disturbance can be made arbitrarily small when the measurements are of finite accuracy. We demonstrate a general trade-off between state disturbance and measurement coarseness as a function of the size of the ensemble. Using this trade-off, we show that the histories generated by any sequence of finite accuracy macroscopic measurements always generate a consistent family in the absence of large-scale entanglement for sufficiently large ensembles. Hence, macroscopic observables behave 'classically' provided that their accuracy is coarser than the quantum correlation length scale of the system. The role of these observable is also discussed in the context of NMR quantum information processing and bulk ensemble quantum state tomography.

Poulin, David [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Macroscopic observables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study macroscopic observables defined as the total value of a physical quantity over a collection of quantum systems. We show that previous results obtained for an infinite ensemble of identically prepared systems lead to incorrect conclusions for finite ensembles. In particular, exact measurement of a macroscopic observable significantly disturbs the state of any finite ensemble. However, we show how this disturbance can be made arbitrarily small when the measurements are of finite accuracy. We demonstrate a general trade-off between state disturbance and measurement coarseness as a function of the size of the ensemble. Using this trade-off, we show that the histories generated by any sequence of finite accuracy macroscopic measurements always generate a consistent family in the absence of large-scale entanglement for sufficiently large ensembles. Hence, macroscopic observables behave “classically” provided that their accuracy is coarser than the quantum correlation length scale of the system. The role of these observable is also discussed in the context of NMR quantum information processing and bulk ensemble quantum state tomography.

David Poulin

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

378

BNL-65388-AB PROPERTIES OF AMMONIATED SULFATE AEROSOLS AT LOW TEMPERATURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BNL-65388-AB PROPERTIES OF AMMONIATED SULFATE AEROSOLS AT LOW TEMPERATURES: WHY ARE THE MODELS SO of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886. #12;PROPERTIES OF AMMONIATED SULFATE AEROSOLS AT LOW will present a study of the properties of ammoniated sulfate aerosols ((NH4)2SO4, NH4HSO4, and in- between

379

REPRESENTING AEROSOL DYNAMICS AND PROPERTIES IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS BY THE METHOD OF MOMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understanding of the key processes that govern the aerosol size distribution: · Gas-to-particle conversion--conversion, suspensions of solid or liquid particles, are an important multi- phase system. Aerosols scatter and absorb retrospectively and prospectively for different emissions scenarios. Important aerosol properties and processes

380

Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from such as cloud mask, atmos- pheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties vapor amount, aerosol particles, and the subsequently formed clouds [9]. Barnes et al. [2] provide

Sheridan, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Surface based remote sensing of aerosol-cloud interactions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface based remote sensing of aerosol-cloud interactions Surface based remote sensing of aerosol-cloud interactions Feingold, Graham NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Frisch, Shelby NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Category: Cloud Properties We will present an analysis of the effect of aerosol on clouds at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. New methods for retrieving cloud droplet effective radius with radar (MMCR), multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), and microwave radiometer (MWR) will be discussed. Relationships based on adiabatic clouds will be used to constrain retrievals. We will investigate the use of a range of proxies for cloud condensation nuclei, ranging from surface measurements of light scattering and accumulation mode number concentration, to lidar-measured extinction or

382

ARM - Evaluation Product - Aerosol Optical Depths from SASHE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsAerosol Optical Depths from SASHE ProductsAerosol Optical Depths from SASHE Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Aerosol Optical Depths from SASHE Site(s) PVC SGP General Description The Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer Hemispheric (SASHE) is a ground-based instrument that measures both direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance. In this regard, the instrument is similar to the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR)-an instrument that has been in the ARM Facility stable for more than 15 years. However, the two instruments differ significantly in wavelength resolution and range. In particular, the SASHE provides hyperspectral measurements from about 350 nm to 1700 nm at a wavelength resolution from 1 to several nanometers, while the MFRSR only

383

Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Particles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2414 2414 1 Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Particles M. P. Modera, O. Brzozowski ** , F. R. Carrié * , D. J. Dickerhoff, W. W. Delp, W. J. Fisk, R. Levinson, D. Wang Abstract Electricity energy savings potential by eliminating air leakage from ducts in large commercial buildings is on the order of 10 kWh/m 2 per year (1 kWh/ft 2 ). We have tested, in two large commercial buildings, a new technology that simultaneously seals duct leaks and measures effective leakage area of ducts. The technology is based upon injecting a fog of aerosolized sealant particles into a pressurized duct system. In brief, this process involves blocking all of the intentional openings in a duct system (e.g., diffusers). Therefore, when the system is pressurized, the only place for the air carrying the aerosol

384

ARM - Field Campaign - Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsGanges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) govCampaignsGanges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) Campaign Links Science Plan AMF India Deployment Website Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) 2011.06.13 - 2012.03.31 Website : http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf/pgh/ Lead Scientist : V. Rao Kotamarthi Description The Ganges valley region is one of the largest and most rapidly developing sections of the Indian subcontinent. The Ganges River, which provides the region with water needed for sustaining life, is fed primarily by snow and rainfall associated with Indian summer monsoon. Impacts of changes in precipitation patterns, temperature, and the flow of the snow-fed rivers could be immense. Recent satellite-based measurements have indicated that

385

Lognormal Size Distribution Theory for Deposition of Polydisperse Aerosol Particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The moments method of the lognormal size distribution theory was applied to the deposition equation of a radioactive aerosol within a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor for analysis of postulated accidents. The deposition coefficient of Crump and Seinfeld was utilized to represent the Brownian and turbulent diffusions and the gravitational sedimentation. The deposition equation was converted into a set of three ordinary differential equations. This approach takes the view point that the size distribution of an aerosol is represented by a time-dependent lognormal size distribution function during the deposition process. Numerical calculations have been performed, and the results were found to be in good agreement with the exact solution. The derived model for aerosol deposition is convenient to use in a numerical general dynamic equation solution routine based on the moments method, where nucleation, condensation, coagulation, and deposition need to be solved simultaneously.

Park, S.H.; Lee, K.W. [Kwangju Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

ARM - PI Product - Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsAerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data ProductsAerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data 2000.01.01 - 2000.12.31 Site(s) SGP General Description The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) makes precise simultaneous measurements of the solar direct normal and diffuse horizontal irradiances at six wavelengths (nominally 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm) at short intervals (20 sec for ARM instruments) throughout the day. Time series of spectral optical depth are derived from these measurements. Besides water vapor at 940 nm, the other gaseous absorbers within the MFRSR channels are NO2 (at 415, 500, and 615 nm) and ozone (at 500, 615, and 670

387

MAC 115 Introduc~ao `a Computac~ao Instituto de Fisica Segundo Semestre de 2002 -Noturno  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

^ametros uma matriz real A com m linhas e n colunas e uma posi¸c~ao (i, j) da matriz, e devolve a m´edia aritm´etica dos vizinhos de A[i][j]. (Em geral, essa m´edia ´e a m´edia aritm´etica dos n´umeros A[i - 1][j], A[i + 1][j], A[i][j - 1], A[i][j + 1]. Nas bordas da matriz, essa m´edia ´e uma m´edia de menos de quatro

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

388

Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season Title Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-50880 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Kirchstetter, Thomas W., Tihomir Novakov, and Peter V. Hobbs Journal Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres Keywords black carbon, evolved gas analysis, light absorption, organic carbon, positive sampling artifact, SAFARI Abstract Particulate matter collected aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 research aircraft over southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season was analyzed for total carbon, organic carbon, and black carbon contents using thermal and optical methods. Samples were collected in smoke plumes of burning savanna and in regional haze. A known artifact, produced by the adsorption of organic gases on the quartz filter substrates used to collect the particulate matter samples, comprised a significant portion of the total carbon collected. Consequently, conclusions derived from the data are greatly dependent on whether or not organic carbon concentrations are corrected for this artifact. For example, the estimated aerosol co-albedo (1 - single scattering albedo), which is a measure of aerosol absorption, of the biomass smoke samples is 60% larger using corrected organic carbon concentrations. Thus, the corrected data imply that the biomass smoke is 60% more absorbing than do the uncorrected data. The black carbon to (corrected) organic carbon mass ratio (BC/OC) of smoke plume samples (0.18±0.06) is lower than that of samples collected in the regional haze (0.25±0.08). The difference may be due to mixing of biomass smoke with background air characterized by a higher BC/OC ratio. A simple source apportionment indicates that biomass smoke contributes about three-quarters of the aerosol burden in the regional haze, while other sources (e.g., fossil fuel burning) contribute the remainder.

389

Distinguishing Aerosol Impacts on Climate Over the Past Century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosol direct (DE), indirect (IE), and black carbon-snow albedo (BAE) effects on climate between 1890 and 1995 are compared using equilibrium aerosol-climate simulations in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model coupled to a mixed layer ocean. Pairs of control(1890)-perturbation(1995) with successive aerosol effects allow isolation of each effect. The experiments are conducted both with and without concurrent changes in greenhouse gases (GHG's). A new scheme allowing dependence of snow albedo on black carbon snow concentration is introduced. The fixed GHG experiments global surface air temperature (SAT) changed -0.2, -1.0 and +0.2 C from the DE, IE, and BAE. Ice and snow cover increased 1.0% from the IE and decreased 0.3% from the BAE. These changes were a factor of 4 larger in the Arctic. Global cloud cover increased by 0.5% from the IE. Net aerosol cooling effects are about half as large as the GHG warming, and their combined climate effects are smaller than the sum of their individual effects. Increasing GHG's did not affect the IE impact on cloud cover, however they decreased aerosol effects on SAT by 20% and on snow/ice cover by 50%; they also obscure the BAE on snow/ice cover. Arctic snow, ice, cloud, and shortwave forcing changes occur mostly during summer-fall, but SAT, sea level pressure, and long-wave forcing changes occur during winter. An explanation is that aerosols impact the cryosphere during the warm-season but the associated SAT effect is delayed until winter.

Koch, Dorothy; Menon, Surabi; Del Genio, Anthony; Ruedy, Reto; Alienov, Igor; Schmidt, Gavin A.

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

390

Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Particles Title Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Particles Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-42414 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Modera, Mark P., Olivier Brzozowski, François Rémi Carrié, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, William W. Delp, William J. Fisk, Ronnen M. Levinson, and Duo Wang Journal Energy & Buildings Volume 34 Start Page Chapter Pagination 705-714 Abstract Electricity energy savings potential by eliminating air leakage from ducts in large commercial buildings is on the order of 10 kWh/m2 per year (1 kWh/ft2). We have tested, in two large commercial buildings, a new technology that simultaneously seals duct leaks and measures effective leakage area of ducts. The technology is based upon injecting a fog of aerosolized sealant particles into a pressurized duct system. In brief, this process involves blocking all of the intentional openings in a duct system (e.g., diffusers). Therefore, when the system is pressurized, the only place for the air carrying the aerosol particles to exit the system is through the leaks. The key to the technology is to keep the particles suspended within the airstream until they reach the leaks, and then to have them leave the airstream and deposit on the leak sites. The principal finding from this field study was that the aerosol technology is capable of sealing the leaks in a large commercial building duct system within a reasonable time frame. In the first building, 66% of the leakage area was sealed within 2.5 hours of injection, and in the second building 86% of the leakage area was sealed within 5 hours. We also found that the aerosol could be blown through the VAV boxes in the second building without impacting their calibrations or performance. Some remaining questions are (1) how to achieve sealing rates comparable to those experienced in smaller residential systems; and (2) what tightness level these ducts systems can be brought to by means of aerosol sealing.

391

Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

Postma, Arlin K. (Halfway, OR)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Final Project Report - ARM CLASIC CIRPAS Twin Otter Aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NOAA/ESRL/GMD aerosol group made three types of contributions related to airborne measurements of aerosol light scattering and absorption for the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) in June 2007 on the Twin Otter research airplane operated by the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS). GMD scientists served as the instrument mentor for the integrating nephelometer and particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) on the Twin Otter during CLASIC, and were responsible for (1) instrument checks/comparisons; (2) instrument trouble shooting/repair; and (3) data quality control (QC) and submittal to the archive.

John A. Ogren

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

393

Flattening coefficient of aerosols collected on treated slides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

collected from oleic acid and DOP (dioctylphthalate) aerosols, The microscope slides were made oilphobic by immersion in a widely used fluorocarbon sur- factant (NYE BAR Type CT 2X or 3' Co. Chemical FC-721). The mean value of F f' or oleic acid... was found to be 1. 338, and for DOP, 1. 354. There is no apparent variation of F with particle diameter for aerosols in the 2. 7-29. 1 um range. The slightly lower value of F for oleic acid suggests that the contact angle of oleic acid with respect...

Olan-Figueroa, Excel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

394

Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

Postma, A.K.

1984-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

395

Spectral-Line Observing at Arecibo Observatory Karen O'Neil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

run through running the AO-Control graphical users interface (gui) o#11;-line, and then saving your/questions/comments/suggestions on this document, please contact Karen O'Neil (koneil@naic.edu) #12; 2 Contents 1 Spectral-Line Observing at AO 4 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1.5 INTEGRATION TIME (per Data Record) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.6 NOISE DIODE

396

Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory Title Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors McMeeking, Gavin R., Sonia M. Kreidenweis, Stephen Baker, Christian M. Carrico, Judith C. Chow, Jeffrey Collett L. Jr., Wei Min Hao, Amanda S. Holden, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, William C. Malm, Hans Moosmuller, Amy P. Sullivan, and Cyle E. Wold Journal Journal of Geophysical Research Volume 114 Abstract We characterized the gas- and speciated aerosol-phase emissions from the open combustion of 33 different plant species during a series of 255 controlled laboratory burns during the Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiments (FLAME). The plant species we tested were chosen to improve the existing database for U.S. domestic fuels: laboratory-based emission factors have not previously been reported for many commonly burned species that are frequently consumed by fires near populated regions and protected scenic areas. The plants we tested included the chaparral species chamise, manzanita, and ceanothus, and species common to the southeastern United States (common reed, hickory, kudzu, needlegrass rush, rhododendron, cord grass, sawgrass, titi, and wax myrtle). Fire-integrated emission factors for gas-phase CO2, CO, CH4, C2-4 hydrocarbons, NH3, SO2, NO, NO2, HNO3, and particle-phase organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), SO4 2, NO3, Cl, Na+, K+, and NH4 + generally varied with both fuel type and with the fire-integrated modified combustion efficiency (MCE), a measure of the relative importance of flaming- and smoldering-phase combustion to the total emissions during the burn. Chaparral fuels tended to emit less particulate OC per unit mass of dry fuel than did other fuel types, whereas southeastern species had some of the largest observed emission factors for total fine particulate matter. Our measurements spanned a larger range of MCE than prior studies, and thus help to improve estimates of the variation of emissions with combustion conditions for individual fuels.

397

Extreme photo-polarimetric behaviour of the blazar AO 0235+164  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present optical photo-polarimetric observations with high temporal resolution of the blazar AO 0235+164. Our data, the first to test the photo-polarimetric behaviour of this object at very short time-scales, show significant micro-variability in total flux, colour index, linear polarization degree, and position angle. Strong inter-night variations are also detected for these parameters. Although no correlation between colour index and total flux was found, our data seem to support the general bluer-when-brighter trend already known for this object. The polarization degree, in turn, shows no correlation with total flux, but a clear trend in the sense that colour index is redder (the spectrum is softer) when the measured polarization is higher.

Sergio A. Cellone; Gustavo E. Romero; Jorge A. Combi; Josep Marti

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

398

Niamey Dust Observations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Niamey aerosol are composed of two main components: dust due to the proximity of the Sahara Desert, and soot from local and regional biomass burning. The purpose of this data product is to identify when the local conditions are dominated by the dust component so that the properties of the dust events can be further studied.

Flynn, Connor

399

Research and Observation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understanding of how the cli mate system varies naturally and reacts 500 to emissions of greenhouse gases of greenhouse gases and aerosols, and (2) the so-called "feedbacks" that determine Note: Contributions Council. Inclusion of these could raise the totals prescribed increase in greenhouse gases. by 10

Worrest, Robert C.

400

A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical parameterizations, but can vary between biologically productive and non-productive regions, and seasonally within a given region. Major uncertainties include the bubble film thickness at bursting and the variability of organic surfactant activity in the ocean, which is poorly constrained. In addition, marine colloids and cooperative adsorption of polysaccharides may make important contributions to the aerosol, but are not included here. This organic fractionation framework is an initial step towards a closer linking of ocean biogeochemistry and aerosol chemical composition in Earth system models. Future work should focus on improving constraints on model parameters through new laboratory experiments or through empirical fitting to observed relationships in the real ocean and atmosphere, as well as on atmospheric implications of the variable composition of organic matter in sea spray.

Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SRI-PTR-ToFMS SRI-PTR-ToFMS Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: SRI-PTR-ToFMS 2014.01.01 - 2014.10.31 Lead Scientist : Alex Guenther Description One of the major uncertainties in climate model simulations is the effects of aerosols on radiative forcing and a better understanding of the factors controlling aerosol distributions and life cycle is urgently needed. Aerosols contribute directly to the Earth's radiation balance by scattering or absorbing light as a function of their physical properties and indirectly through particle-cloud interactions that lead to cloud

402

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TEM of TEM of Aerosol Particles Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: TEM of Aerosol Particles 2014.02.01 - 2014.10.14 Lead Scientist : Peter Buseck Description Atmospheric samples collected from the Amazon Basin, a major source of natural continental aerosols impacted seasonally by biomass burning and urban emissions, are important indicators of atmospheric reactions and their effects on climate and health. We will use transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the spatially resolved compositions, sizes, morphologies, mixing states (aggregated, coated, embedded), and reactions

403

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NPSD NPSD Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: NPSD 2014.02.01 - 2014.10.17 Lead Scientist : Jian Wang Description Participation during GOAMAZON 2014 is in support of studies of the Aerosol Life Cycle, in particular the measurement of new particle formation and initial growth. Measurement will be accomplished through deployment at the T3 measurement site of an aerosol size spectrometer (NPSD) acquiring data on a 5-minute time interval, developed and optimized for the detection of aerosol down to below 1 nm in diameter. Particle detection is achieved through the use of a condensation particle

404

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Mass Spectrometry Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: Aerosol Mass Spectrometry 2014.01.15 - 2014.12.31 Lead Scientist : Lizabeth Alexander Description The first objective of the proposed project is to understand and quantify the interactions of biogenic and anthropogenic emissions with respect to the production of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In clean conditions in the Amazon basin, SOA dominates the diameter distribution of the submicron particles. How and why is the diameter distribution shifted by pollution? The second objective follows from the first in that, although the diameter

405

NBT Baicheng New Energy Development aka Ao Lu Jia New Energy Development |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NBT Baicheng New Energy Development aka Ao Lu Jia New Energy Development NBT Baicheng New Energy Development aka Ao Lu Jia New Energy Development Jump to: navigation, search Name NBT (Baicheng) New Energy Development (aka Ao Lu Jia New Energy Development) Place China Sector Wind energy Product China-based Sino-Norwegian joint venture that develops wind projects. References NBT (Baicheng) New Energy Development (aka Ao Lu Jia New Energy Development)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. NBT (Baicheng) New Energy Development (aka Ao Lu Jia New Energy Development) is a company located in China . References ↑ "[ NBT (Baicheng) New Energy Development (aka Ao Lu Jia New Energy Development)]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=NBT_Baicheng_New_Energy_Development_aka_Ao_Lu_Jia_New_Energy_Development&oldid=349122

406

Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth in Vicinity of Broken Clouds from Reflectance Ratios: Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recently developed reflectance ratio (RR) method for the retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) is evaluated using extensive airborne and ground-based data sets collected during the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) and the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS), which took place in June 2007 over the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site. A detailed case study is performed for a field of single-layer shallow cumuli observed on June 12, 2007. The RR method is applied to retrieve the spectral values of AOD from the reflectance ratios measured by the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) for two pairs of wavelengths (660 and 470 nm and 870 and 470 nm) collected at a spatial resolution of 0.05 km. The retrieval is compared with an independent AOD estimate from three ground-based Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs). The interpolation algorithm that is used to project MFRSR point measurements onto the aircraft flight tracks is tested using AOD derived from NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The RR AOD estimates are in a good agreement (within 5%) with the MFRSR-derived AOD values for the 660-nm wavelength. The AODs obtained from MAS reflectance ratios overestimate those derived from MFRSR measurements by 15-30% for the 470-nm wavelength and underestimate the 870-nm AOD by the same amount.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Berg, Larry K.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ferrare, Richard; Hostetler, Chris A.; Alexandrov, Mikhail

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

407

HEMISPHERIC-SCALE CHEMICAL AND MICROPHYSICAL AEROSOL MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dignon Bates/Lamb DRY DEPOSITION Wesely WET DEPOSITION Berkowitz/Hales CHEMISTRY Gas Aqueous SO2 + OH [OH dependent Size Resolved Wesely WET DEPOSITION Berkowitz/Hales CHEMISTRY Gas Phase Aqueous Phase SO2 AEROSOL;Anthropogenic Anthropogenic #12;by Production Mechanism Gas phase Aqueous Phase Primary October 15, 1986 at 6 UT

Schwartz, Stephen E.

408

Soft ionization of thermally evaporated hypergolic ionic liquid aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isolated ion pairs of a conventional ionic liquid, 1-Ethyl-3-Methyl-Imidazolium Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim+][Tf2N?]), and a reactive hypergolic ionic liquid, 1- Butyl-3-Methyl-Imidazolium Dicyanamide ([Bmim+][Dca?]), are generated by vaporizing ionic liquid submicron aerosol particles for the first time; the vaporized species are investigated by dissociative ionization with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light, exhibiting clear intact cations, Emim+ and Bmim+, presumably originating from intact ion pairs. Mass spectra of ion pair vapor from an effusive source of the hypergolic ionic liquid show substantial reactive decomposition due to the internal energy of the molecules emanating from the source. Photoionization efficiency curves in the near threshold ionization region of isolated ion pairs of [Emim+][Tf2N?] ionic liquid vapor are compared for an aerosol source and an effusive source, revealing changes in the appearance energy due to the amount of internal energy in the ion pairs. The aerosol source has a shift to higher threshold energy (~;;0.3 eV), attributed to reduced internal energy of the isolated ion pairs. The method of ionic liquid submicron aerosol particle vaporization, for reactive ionic liquids such as hypergolic species, is a convenient, thermally ?cooler? source of isolated intact ion pairs in the gas phase compared to effusive sources.

University of California; ERC, Incorporated, Edwards Air Force Base; Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base; National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC); Koh, Christine J.; Liu, Chen-Lin; Harmon, Christopher W.; Strasser, Daniel; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg; Chambreau, Steven D.; L.Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam; Leone, Stephen R.

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

Building America Webinar: Sealing of Home Enclosures with Aerosol Particles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This webinar was presented by research team Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA), and provided information about a project that uses existing aerosol duct sealing technology to seal the entire building enclosure in order to achieve greater airtightness and energy and cost savings.

410

LESSONS LEARNED IN AEROSOL MONITORING WITH THE RASA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) is an automated aerosol collection and analysis system designed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the 1990's and is deployed in several locations around the world as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) required under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The RASA operates unattended, save for regularly scheduled maintenance, iterating samples through a three-step process on a 24-hour interval. In its 15-year history, much has been learned from the operation and maintenance of the RASA that can benefit engineering updates or future aerosol systems. On 11 March 2011, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami rocked the eastern coast of Japan, resulting in power loss and cooling failures at the Daiichi nuclear power plants in Fukushima Prefecture. Aerosol collections were conducted with the RASA in Richland, WA. We present a summary of the lessons learned over the history of the RASA, including lessons taken from the Fukushima incident, regarding the RASA IMS stations operated by the United States.

Forrester, Joel B.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Carty, Fitz; Comes, Laura; Eslinger, Paul W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Litke, Kevin E.; Miley, Harry S.; Morris, Scott J.; Schrom, Brian T.; Van Davelaar, Peter; Woods, Vincent T.

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

411

An overview of geoengineering of climate using stratospheric sulphate aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...prior to mixing with turbine bypass air, through...and infrastructure development effort needed to...sulphate aerosol strategy is imperfect. The...with greenhouse gases. Furthermore...reductions in greenhouse gas emissions must take...geoengineering mitigation strategy occurring in the...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

CLOUD DROPLET NUCLEATION AND ITS CONNECTION TO AEROSOL PROPERTIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUD DROPLET NUCLEATION AND ITS CONNECTION TO AEROSOL PROPERTIES STEPHEN E. SCHWARTZ Environmental in cloud-free conditions and indirectly, by increasing concentratiol1S of cloud droplets thereby enhancing cloud shortwave reflectivity. These effecls are thought to be significant in the context of changes

413

DISSERTATION THE OPTICAL, CHEMICAL, AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF AEROSOLS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND GASES EMITTED BY THE LABORATORY COMBUSTION OF WILDLAND FUELS Biomass burning is a major source of trace BY THE LABORATORY COMBUSTION OF WILDLAND FUELS Submitted by Gavin R. McMeeking Department of Atmospheric Science PROPERTIES OF AEROSOL AND GASES EMITTED BY THE LABORATORY COMBUSTION OF WILDLAND FUELS BE ACCEPTED

Pierce, Jeffrey

414

AT631, Spring 2011 Introduction to Atmospheric Aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Pandis, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change, Wiley-Interscience, 2006AT631, Spring 2011 Introduction to Atmospheric Aerosols Tuesdays 9-9:50 AM, 212B ACRC Wednesdays, Lab, 1-4 PM, ACB 10 Instructor: Prof. Sonia Kreidenweis Atmospheric Chemistry Bldg., Room 19 491

415

Correction to “Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights”  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the paper “Hyperspectral aerosol optical depths from TCAP flights” by Y. Shinozuka et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 118, doi:10.1002/2013JD020596, 2013), Tables 1 and 2 were published with the column heads out of order. Tables 1 and 2 are published correctly here. The publisher regrets the error.

Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

416

Bulk and size-segregated aerosol composition observed during INDOEX 1999: Overview of meteorology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al., 1998; Streets and Waldhoff, 1998, 1999; Dickerson et al., 2002]. [4] The combustion of coal, oil India showed evidence of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning, and eolian material, with elemental Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Troposphere--composition and chemistry; 0305 Atmospheric Composition

417

Aircraft Observations of Sub-cloud Aerosol and Convective Cloud Physical Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nucleation and Aitken modes. Backtrajectories of Central Mediterranean origin contain a high accumulation mode but low nucleation mode. Eastern Europe backtrajectories have the lowest nucleation mode but exhibit a broad accumulation mode which... are shaped by complex nonlinear processes that are difficult to represent numerically. These processes include nucleation of new particles and evaporation, growth and coagulation of existing particles. Most current models explicitly represent the ASD...

Axisa, Duncan

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

418

Satellite observations cap the atmospheric organic aerosol budget Colette L. Heald,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] propose a large possible range of global SOA sources (140­910 TgCyr-1 ) based on several mass balance calculations. Not all of their calculations are specific to SOA, and given the challenges in distinguishing SOA

Heald, Colette L.

419

Aerosol Optical Depth Prediction from Satellite Observations by Multiple Instance Regression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

airborne particles that both reflect and absorb incoming solar radiation and whose effect on the Earth's radiation budget is one of the biggest challenges of current climate research. To help address requirement for the success of the ensuing scientific studies. Among the most challenging climate research

Vucetic, Slobodan

420

Supplementary material Table S1. Observed clean marine organic aerosol concentrations (g m-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0.41 Jun 0.46 Jun 0.29 Jun 0.21 Jun 0.22 Hawaii 21.37 -147.70 Jul-Oct 1975 0.60 (a) (3) Jul-Oct 0),(ac),(ad) (25) 45 167 Aug 0.55 (b),(ac),(ae) Northwest Pacific 30 150 Sep 2008 1.06 (b),(ac) (26) 43 155 Aug 1

Meskhidze, Nicholas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Observational bounds on atmospheric heating by aerosol absorption: Radiative signature of transatlantic dust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of transatlantic dust Amit Davidi,1 Alex B. Kostinski,2 Ilan Koren,1 and Yoav Lehahn1,3 Received 14 November 2011: Radiative signature of transatlantic dust, Geo- phys. Res. Lett., 39, L04803, doi:10.1029/2011GL050358. 1

Kostinski, Alex

422

Aerosol Impacts on California Winter Clouds and Precipitation during CalWater 2011: Local Pollution versus Long-Range Transported Dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter and spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust and biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust and biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB16 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including the strength of the Sierra Barrier Jet, and cloud dynamics. This study further underscores the importance of the interactions between local pollution, dust, and environmental conditions for assessing aerosol effects on cold season precipitation in California.

Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; DeMott, Paul J.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Singh, Balwinder; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tomlinson, Jason M.; White, Allen B.; Prather, Kimberly; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Qilong

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

423

Aerosol optical and hygroscopic properties during TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006 and their impact on aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by diesel-fueled mobile sources and from the numerous coal- fired industries and power generation stations August thru 11 September 2006) with a number of gas and aerosol instru- ments deployed to measure air and power plants, with emissions rich in reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and NOX [Ryerson et al

424

Improving Convection Parameterization Using ARM Observations and NCAR Community Atmosphere Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlight of Accomplishments: We made significant contribution to the ASR program in this funding cycle by better representing convective processes in GCMs based on knowledge gained from analysis of ARM/ASR observations. In addition, our work led to a much improved understanding of the interaction among aerosol, convection, clouds and climate in GCMs.

Zhang, Guang J [Scripps Institution of Oceanography

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

425

Gas/particle partitioning of total alkyl nitrates observed with TD-LIF in Bakersfield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total AN (gas + aerosol) and ANaer show that on average 21% of ANs are in the condensed phaseGas/particle partitioning of total alkyl nitrates observed with TD-LIF in Bakersfield A. W. Rollins samples. These measurements show that ANs are a ubiquitous component of the OA with the ­ONO2 subunit

Cohen, Ronald C.

426

Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations October 2011; accepted 26 October 2011; published 24 December 2011. [1] Arctic clouds simulated-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its

427

Clarissa Coda dos Santos Cavalcanti Marques Animac~ao 3D em Tempo Real com Analises  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clarissa Cod´a dos Santos Cavalcanti Marques Anima¸c~ao 3D em Tempo Real com An´alises Harm Cod´a dos Santos Cavalcanti Marques Anima¸c~ao 3D em Tempo Real com An´alises Harm^onicas e Modal Tese Instituto de Computa¸c~ao -- UFF Prof. Rodrigo de Toledo Instituto de Matem´atica -- UFRJ Prof. Alex Laier

Lewiner, Thomas (Thomas Lewiner)

428

HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) Data from CDIAC's HIPPO Data Archive  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) study of the carbon cycle and greenhouse gases measured meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and aerosol constituents along transects from approximately pole-to-pole over the Pacific Ocean. HIPPO flew hundreds of vertical profiles from the ocean/ice surface to as high as the tropopause, at five times during different seasons over a three year period from 2009-2011. HIPPO provides the first high-resolution vertically-resolved global survey of a comprehensive suite of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols pertinent to understanding the carbon cycle and challenging global climate models.

429

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao muito baixo Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 > >> 1 peixe trombeta; trompetero; trumpetfish; Aulostomus strigosus AULOSTOMIDAE NO BRASIL -AULOSTOMIDAE IN BRAZIL. Summary: espcies citadas a cima. encontrada ao longo da...

430

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao cancro mini-mac Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2007 Encontro com os Laboratrios Associados Summary: reparao cerebral - Lus Pereira de Almeida Terapia Gnica - Do modelo de doena ao tratamento - Carlos......

431

E-Print Network 3.0 - associados ao tratamento Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

"especialidade nica no pas" Summary: pessoas coloca a engenharia ao servio da medicina. O Instituto Superior Tcnico (IST) inaugura na tera... Regenerativa, que integra...

432

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao sul da Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de Braslia Collection: Mathematics 2 Apresentado no III Congresso Brasileiro de Redes Neurais, Flo rian'opolis, SC, Julho, 1997, pp. 455460. Summary: -linear aplicada ao...

433

E-Print Network 3.0 - auxilio ao mapeamento Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A biblioteca de auxilio ao mapeamento utiliza... mapeamentos para quatro diferentes redes de sobreposicao: Bam- boo Bamboo 2007; FreePastry Free... certa rede de ......

434

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao novo marco Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

45 Universidade de Sao Paulo Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos Summary: , Michelle Horta, Marcos Roberto e Leandro Carrijo. Aos professores e pesquisadores que contribuiram...

435

Side 1 av 3 AoC1 underskelse hsten 2006 Innledende test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Side 1 av 3 AoC1 undersøkelse høsten 2006 ­ Innledende test Noter test-person-nr.her: [ _____ ] Du

Natvig, Lasse

436

Side 1 av 3 AoC1 underskelse hsten 2006 Avsluttende test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Side 1 av 3 AoC1 undersøkelse høsten 2006 ­ Avsluttende test Noter test-person-nr.her: [ _____ ] Du

Natvig, Lasse

437

E-Print Network 3.0 - apoio ao teste Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ESTADUAL DE CAMPINAS XI CONGRESSO INTERNO DE INICIAO CIENTFICA Summary: . Salvador Bassi Responsvel pela coordenao das Bolsas de IC no Servio de Apoio ao...

438

E-Print Network 3.0 - aos desafios da Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de game multi-mouse sobre o Bioma Mata Atlntica Ana Beatriz Bahia Cristina Santos Emlio Takase Summary: , permitindo aos jogadores observar a cor, a textura e a...

439

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspectos relativos ao Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Catlica do Rio de Janeiro Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 58 Rodrigo de Proenca Gomes Controle Automatico de Summary: amicos DISSERTAC AO DE...

440

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao nucleo devido Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de Energia em Clusters Web Dorgival Guedes , Wagner Meira Jr. , Diego Nogueira , Rodrigo Pereira Summary: ,meira,diego,rpereira @dcc.ufmg.br Resumo. Devido ao...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao dna promovidos Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: saberes aplicveis ao objecto de estudo que se pretende apresentar (Santos, Conceio, Mendes, Loureno... , 2004; Lopes, 2003) e as 12;2 redes de contactos,...

442

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao melhor conhecimento Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Graphics Laboratory Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 84 Rodrigo de Proenca Gomes Controle Automatico de Summary: em deste trabalho. Aos amigos da...

443

E-Print Network 3.0 - aos limites prescritos Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

recorrer aos tribunais e s instncias europeias ... Source: Soares, Joo Lus Cardoso - Departamento de Matemtica, Universidade de Coimbra Collection: Mathematics 23...

444

E-Print Network 3.0 - alergia ao leite Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: alergia ao leite Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Curriculum Vitae Personal Data Summary: Curriculum Vitae March 2011 Personal Data: Name First...

445

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao leite integral Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: ao leite integral Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Curriculum Vitae Personal Data Summary: Curriculum Vitae March 2011 Personal Data: Name First...

446

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao metabolismo dos Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

) referentes aos picos de difratogramas de raio X de fculas dos cultivares Iac, MIC e Fib. FIGURA 3. Grficos... cristalinidade ou a existncia de uma maior...

447

E-Print Network 3.0 - aprendizagem ao longo Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

devem ser adaptadas ao ensino superior. Existem ... Source: Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica - Polo de Lisboa (Institute for Systems and Robotics, Lisbon pole) Portugal...

448

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspectos relacionados ao Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ao desenvolvimento de competncias necessrias ... Source: Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica - Polo de Lisboa (Institute for Systems and Robotics, Lisbon pole) Portugal...

449

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao longo das Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ulrich... ir evoluindo ao longo do tempo", diz ... Source: Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica - Polo de Lisboa (Institute for Systems and Robotics, Lisbon pole) Portugal...

450

E-Print Network 3.0 - aplicados ao ordenamento Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Florestal do... ao ordenamento florestal. ... Source: Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica - Polo de Lisboa (Institute for Systems and Robotics, Lisbon pole) Portugal...

451

Mec^anica Estatistica Lista 3 1 Deduza a ocupac~ao media de niveis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mec^anica Estat´istica ­ Lista 3 1 Deduza a ocupa¸c~ao m´edia de n´iveis com energia num sistema a ocupa¸c~ao m´axima de cada estado quatico ´e um f´ermion? 2 Deduza a ocupa¸c~ao m´edia de estados com a entropia de um g´as ideal de f´er- mions em termos da ocupa¸c~ao m´edia do estado j, . 5. Calcule

Levin, Yan

452

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao planejamento da Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

incorporados ao referido Plano, assim como o encaminhamento da Proposta de OPI e do PAA 2010 anlise e... Secretaria de Planejamento Decanato de Administrao Pgina 15...

453

E-Print Network 3.0 - apoio ao aleitamento Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cincias Summary: como Ferramenta de Apoio ao Conjunto de Disciplinas Presenciais de Farmacologia e Toxicologia da FCE... , Enfermagem, Odontologia, Medicina Veterinria,...

454

E-Print Network 3.0 - apoio ao fumador Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cincias Summary: como Ferramenta de Apoio ao Conjunto de Disciplinas Presenciais de Farmacologia e Toxicologia da FCE... , Enfermagem, Odontologia, Medicina Veterinria,...

455

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao dirigir alcoolizado Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de So Paulo Collection: Physics ; Mathematics 20 Agentes Inteligentes Prof. Luiz Chaimowicz Soluo de Problemas por Busca Summary: ao estado final Para isso, precisa...

456

E-Print Network 3.0 - associada ao residuo Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 10 O N UMERO DE PONTOS INTEIROS NUMA CIRCUNFERENCIA CARLOS FLORENTINO Summary: , estas funcoes apareceram associadas ao estudo de primitivas...

457

E-Print Network 3.0 - associados ao insucesso Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Universitrio n. 191995 CDT Centro de Apoio ao Desenvolvimento Source: Lucero, Jorge Carlos - Departamento de Matemtica, Universidade de Braslia Collection: Mathematics 13...

458

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao concept study Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de Fisica Emaranhamento Multicolor entre Feixes Intensos de... Luz Alessandro de Sousa Villar Tese de doutorado apresentada ao Instituto de Fisica para a obtencao......

459

Use of Aeronet Aerosol Retrievals to Calculate Clear-Sky Irradiance at the Surface  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AERONET Aerosol Retrievals to AERONET Aerosol Retrievals to Calculate Clear-Sky Irradiance at the Surface G. L. Schuster National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia O. Dubovik National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics Greenbelt, Maryland Motivation The worldwide aerosol robotic network (AERONET) of ground-based radiometers was developed (in part) as a satellite validation tool (Holben et al. 1998). These sites utilize spectral sky-scanning radiometers, providing more information for aerosol retrievals than conventional sunphotometer measurements. The use of the almucantar sky radiance scans in conjunction with the aerosol optical thicknesses are the basis of the AERONET Dubovik retrievals, which provide the aerosol size

460

ARM - Field Campaign - 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City 6 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City 2006.03.03 - 2006.03.28 Lead Scientist : Jeffrey Gaffney For data sets, see below. Description A 4-week field campaign was conducted in and downwind of Mexico City during March 2006. The Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - MEXico City (MAX-MEX) characterized aerosol formation and changes in aerosol composition, size distribution, light scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient, optical depth, soot-specific absorption, and radiative fluxes at selected vertical and horizontal locations in the outflow from a well-characterized urban core. Detailed analyses were made of the meteorological conditions during

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Importance of Iron Mineralogy to Aerosol Solubility: Potential Effects of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Importance of Iron Mineralogy to Importance of Iron Mineralogy to Aerosol Solubility: Potential Effects of Aerosol Source on Ocean Photosynthesis figure 1 Figure 1. Dust storm blowing glacial dusts from the Copper River Basin of southeast Alaska into the North Pacific Ocean, which depends on this and other external iron sources to support its biological communities. (Image: NASA MODIS satellite image, Nov. 1, 2006. http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=7094) Iron is one of the most important elements to life. Despite its paramount importance and relative abundance, dissolved iron concentrations are often very low, in part due to the formation of very stable iron minerals in most oxidizing environments. Since soluble iron is available to living organisms, iron deficiencies are widespread, and the factors that influence

462

Laboratory Testing of Aerosol for Enclosure Air Sealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Space conditioning energy use can be significantly reduced by addressing uncontrolled infiltration and exfiltration through the envelope of a building. A process for improving the air tightness of a building envelope by sealing shell leaks with an aerosol sealing technology is presented. Both retrofit and new construction applications are possible through applying this process either in attics and crawlspaces or during rough-in stage.

Harrington, C.; Modera, M.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

ARM - VAP Process - aip  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Productsaip Productsaip Documentation & Plots Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP : Aerosol Intensive Properties (AIP) Instrument Categories Aerosols The aip1ogren value-added product (VAP) computes several aerosol intensive properties. It requires as input calibrated, corrected, aerosol extensive properties from the Aerosol Observing Station (AOS). Aerosol extensive properties depend on both the nature of the aerosol and the amount of the aerosol. Intensive properties are independent of aerosol amount, depending only on the nature of the specific aerosol. The intensive properties of hygroscopic growth factor, aerosol single-scattering albedo,

464

Thermophoresis and its thermal parameters for aerosol collection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermophoresis and its thermal parameters for aerosol collection Thermophoresis and its thermal parameters for aerosol collection Title Thermophoresis and its thermal parameters for aerosol collection Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Huang, Zhuo, Michael G. Apte, and Lara A. Gundel Journal U.S. Department of Energy Journal of Undergraduate Research Volume 7 Pagination 37-42 Abstract The particle collection effi ciency of a prototype environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) sampler based on the use of thermophoresis is determined by optimizing the operational voltage that determines its thermal gradient. This sampler's heating element was made of three sets of thermophoretic (TP) wires 25µm in diameter suspended across a channel cut in a printed circuit board and mounted with collection surfaces on both sides. The separation between the heating element and the room temperature collection surface was determined in a numerical simulation based on the Brock-Talbot model. Other thermal parameters of this TP ETS sampler were predicted by the Brock-Talbot model for TP deposition. From the normalized results the optimal collection ratio was expressed in terms of operational voltage and fi lter mass. Prior to the Brock-Talbot model simulation for this sampler, 1.0V was used arbitrarily. The operational voltage was raised

465

Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J.E.; Sathaye, J.A.

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

466

Aerosol-Derived Bimetallic Alloy Powders: Bridging the Gap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present aerosol-derived alloy powders as a uniquely useful platform for studying the contribution of the metal phase to multifunctional supported catalysts. Multimetallic heterogeneous catalysts made by traditional methods are usually nonhomogenous while UHV-based methods, such as mass selected clusters or metal vapor deposited on single crystals, lead to considerably more homogeneous, well-defined samples. However, these well-defined samples have low surface areas and do not lend themselves to catalytic activity tests in flow reactors under industrially relevant conditions. Bimetallic alloy powders derived by aerosol synthesis are homogeneous and single phase and can have surface areas ranging 1-10 m2/g, making them suitable for use in conventional flow reactors. The utility of aerosol-derived alloy powders as model catalysts is illustrated through the synthesis of single phase PdZn which was used to derive the specific reactivity of the L10 tetragonal alloy phase for methanol steam reforming. Turnover frequencies on unsupported PdZn were determined from the experimentally determined metal surface area to be 0.21 molecules of methanol reacted per surface Pd at 250 °C and 0.06 molecules of CO oxidized to CO2 per surface Pd at 185 °C. The experimentally measured activation energies for MSR and CO-oxidation on PdZn are 48 and 87 kJ/mol, respectively.

Halevi, Barr; Peterson, Eric; DelaRiva, Andrew; Jeroro, E.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Wang, Yong; Vohs, John M.; Kiefer, Boris; Kunkes, Edward L.; Havecker , Michael; Behrens, Malte; Schlogl, Robert; Datye, Abhaya K.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

467

Source terms for plutonium aerosolization from nuclear weapon accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The source term literature was reviewed to estimate aerosolized and respirable release fractions for accidents involving plutonium in high-explosive (HE) detonation and in fuel fires. For HE detonation, all estimates are based on the total amount of Pu. For fuel fires, all estimates are based on the amount of Pu oxidized. I based my estimates for HE detonation primarily upon the results from the Roller Coaster experiment. For hydrocarbon fuel fire oxidation of plutonium, I based lower bound values on laboratory experiments which represent accident scenarios with very little turbulence and updraft of a fire. Expected values for aerosolization were obtained from the Vixen A field tests, which represent a realistic case for modest turbulence and updraft, and for respirable fractions from some laboratory experiments involving large samples of Pu. Upper bound estimates for credible accidents are based on experiments involving combustion of molten plutonium droplets. In May of 1991 the DOE Pilot Safety Study Program established a group of experts to estimate the fractions of plutonium which would be aerosolized and respirable for certain nuclear weapon accident scenarios.

Stephens, D.R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Using Ground-Based Remote Sensors and Models  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Using Ground-Based Remote Sensors and Models G. Feingold National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. E. Lane Rutgers University Camden, New Jersey Q.-L. Min Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York Albany, New York Introduction The effect of aerosols on cloud microphysical and radiative properties (the "indirect effect") has the greatest uncertainty of all known climate-forcing mechanisms. Increases in aerosol concentrations result in higher concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), increased cloud droplet concentrations, and smaller droplet sizes (Twomey 1974). A possible secondary effect is the suppression of rainfall.

469

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol mass spectrometry Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

used in health effects studies by aerosol mass spectrometry Wingen, L... and heats of sublimation using atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry (ASAP-MS) Bruns E......

470

Ultraclean Two-Stage Aerosol Reactor for Production of Oxide-Passivated Silicon Nanoparticles for Novel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an aerosol by pyrolysis of silane3 or disilane4 or by thermal evaporation of Si.5 In studies of Si

Atwater, Harry

471

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol measurements importance Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

38 Absorbing aerosols and pre-summer monsoon hydroclimate variability over the Indian subcontinent: The challenge in investigating links Summary: for the importance of...

472

Single particle characterization, source apportionment, and aging effects of ambient aerosols in Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of scale, in Air Pollution and Health in Rapidly Developingfor particulate air pollution health standards, Aerosolfor particulate air pollution health standards, Aerosol

Shields, Laura Grace

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

NASA multipurpose airborne DIAL system and measurements of ozone and aerosol profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed for the remote measurement of gas and aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The...

Browell, E V; Carter, A F; Shipley, S T; Allen, R J; Butler, C F; Mayo, M N; Siviter, J H; Hall, W M

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium nitrate aerosols Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ON MINERAL DUSTS: CRYSTALLINE OR AQUEOUS? Summary: 02138, USA Keywords: Phase transition; Atmospheric Aerosols; Ammonium sulfate; Ammonium nitrate... that of ammonium...

475

Evolution of the optical properties of biomass-burning aerosol during the 2003 southeast Australian bushfires  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During January and February 2003, drought conditions led to major bushfires across southeast Australia, causing considerable damage. We have examined aerosol optical depth (AOD) data...

Radhi, Majed; Box, Michael A; Box, Gail P; Gupta, Pawan; Christopher, Sundar A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric aerosol limb Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Big Influence... Aerosols play an important role in our planet's dynamic ... Source: Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Machine Learning Systems Group Collection: Computer Technologies...

477

Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Niño?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fication of drought-induced biomass burning in Indonesiavariability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 toChemistry and Physics Do biomass burning aerosols intensify

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Flanner, M. G; Rasch, P. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric aerosol processes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Applied Science Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 3 Arctic-Winter Climatology and Radiative Effects of Clouds and Aerosols Based on Lidar and Radar Measurements...

479

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol detection equipment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Assessing Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE aerosol climatology using satellite and ground-based measurements Summary: Assessing Goddard Institute...

480

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol deposition method Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the ocean and the dynamic nature of aerosol inputs, this topic... alteration during transport). Before we can reliably model ... Source: Paytan, Adina - Department of Earth...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aos aerosol observing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric aerosol aggregates Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are also directly associated with reduction in visibility and with long-range transport... for atmospheric aerosols is their association ... Source: Brookhaven National...

482

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol depletion test Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

depletion test Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aerosol depletion test Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Supervolcanoes General feedback...

483

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosolized brain natriuretic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

brain natriuretic Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aerosolized brain natriuretic Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL...

484

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing aerosol retention Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

optical properties in the vicinity of biologically active... regions of the ocean. Detection of aerosol signal associated with the ocean ecosystem will provide Source:...

485

Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol assisted chemical Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

American Chemical... Element Methods, Aerosols, Air Pollution Modeling, ... Source: Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science, C1 Chemistry Program Collection: Fossil Fuels 36...

487

E-Print Network 3.0 - annually occurring aerosol Sample Search...  

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in Radiative Transfer Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Science Summary: system. Naturally occurring aerosols reflect some of the incident solar radiation back to space before... in...

488

Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The global model that I used was GATOR-GCMM, which treated gas, aerosol, radiative, meteorological and transport processes (see Supplementary ...

Mark Z. Jacobson

2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

489

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol wastes Sample Search Results  

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Schwartz Proc. Aerosols and Atmospheric Optics Radiation Balance... and Visual Air Quality, Snowbird, UT, Sept. 26-30, pp. 403-409, Air and Waste Management Association... ,...

490

Single particle characterization, source apportionment, and aging effects of ambient aerosols in Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of levoglucosan in biomass combustion aerosol by high-and differences in biomass combustion smoke under differentwere unique to biomass combustion. Finally, the relative

Shields, Laura Grace

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z