National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for anthropogenic test project

  1. Project W-320, combined pump winch assembly test - Test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellomy, J.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-15

    Test report documenting results of the Project W-320 combined pump/winch test performed at Lawrence Pumps.

  2. Fallon Test Ranges Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Ranges Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Fallon Test Ranges Geothermal Project Project Location Information...

  3. Yeager Airport Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Williams

    2015-10-01

    The scope of this project was changed during the course of the project. Phase I of the project was designed to have the National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC), together with its partners, manage the Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project at the Yeager Airport in conjunction with the Central West Virginia Regional Airport Authority (CWVRAA) in coordination with the United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. DOE NETL). This program would allow testing and evaluation of the use of hydrogen vehicles in the state of West Virginia utilizing the hydrogen fueling station at Yeager Airport. The NAFTC and CWVRAA to raise awareness and foster a greater understanding of hydrogen fuel and hydrogen-powered vehicles through a targeted utilization and outreach and education effort. After initial implementation of the project, the project added, determine the source(s) of supply for hydrogen powered vehicles that could be used for the testing. After completion of this, testing was begun at Yeager Airport. During the course of the project, the station at Yeager Airport was closed and moved to Morgantown and the West Virginia University Research Corporation. The vehicles were then moved to Morgantown and a vehicle owned by the CWVRAA was purchased to complete the project at the new location. Because of a number of issues detailed in the report for DE-FE0002994 and in this report, this project did not get to evaluate the effectiveness of the vehicles as planned.

  4. Testing, Manufacturing, and Component Development Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's testing, manufacturing, and component development projects for utility-scale and distributed wind energy from fiscal years 2006 to 2014.

  5. Fast Flux Test Facility Closure Project - Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BEACH, R.R.

    2002-09-26

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Closure Project, Project Management Plan, Revision 5, provides the scope, cost, and schedule to achieve the most cost effective and expeditious closure of the FFTF to an assumed final end-state with the reactor vessel and the containment building, below the 5504 grade level, being entombed in place. Closure will be completed by December 2009 at a cost of $547 million.

  6. Alabama Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil Recovery, Testing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil Recovery, Testing Important Geologic CO2 Storage Alabama Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil Recovery, Testing Important Geologic CO2 ...

  7. Project Profile: National Solar Thermal Test Facility Operations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Profile: National Solar Thermal Test Facility Operations and Maintenance (SuNLaMP) Project Profile: National Solar Thermal Test Facility Operations and Maintenance (SuNLaMP) ...

  8. Final Report Limited Soil Investigation of Project Chariot Test...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Limited Soil Investigation of Project Chariot Test Holes Cape Thompson, Alaska December ... Soil Investigation of Project Chariot Test Holes, Cape Thompson, Alaska Fairbanks ...

  9. Property:Did The Test Results Demonstrate Projected Performance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Did The Test Results Demonstrate Projected Performance? Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Did The Test Results Demonstrate Projected Performance? Property Type Text...

  10. Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support ...

  11. Mk12A/W78 ground test project (u)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stokes, Kyle R

    2010-12-01

    The slides present the scope, objectives and status of the Mk12A1W78 Ground Test Project for the purpose of updating the ICBM Project Officers Group. In addition, project constraints and risks are discussed.

  12. Final Test and Evaluation Results from the Solar Two Project...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Final Test and Evaluation Results from the Solar Two Project Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Final Test and Evaluation Results from the Solar Two Project You are ...

  13. Advanced Wind Energy Projects Test Facility Moving to Texas Tech...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Energy Projects Test Facility Moving to Texas Tech University Advanced Wind Energy Projects Test Facility Moving to Texas Tech University December 19, 2011 - 1:32pm Addthis ...

  14. LANL LDRD-funded project: Test particle simulations of energetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Test particle simulations of energetic ions in natural and artificial radiation belts Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LANL LDRD-funded project: Test particle ...

  15. Fast flux test facility, transition project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenberg, S.

    1994-11-15

    The FFTF Transition Project Plan, Revision 1, provides changes and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  16. Project Profile: National Solar Thermal Test Facility Operations and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maintenance (SuNLaMP) | Department of Energy Project Profile: National Solar Thermal Test Facility Operations and Maintenance (SuNLaMP) Project Profile: National Solar Thermal Test Facility Operations and Maintenance (SuNLaMP) Funding Program: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: CSP Location: Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM SunShot Award Amount: $2,250,000 This project maintains the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF), which provides the CSP industry with established test

  17. Project Profile: National Solar Thermal Test Facility | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Concentrating Solar Power » Project Profile: National Solar Thermal Test Facility Project Profile: National Solar Thermal Test Facility SNL logo The first solar receivers ever tested in the world were tested at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF). The receivers were each rated up to 5 megawatts thermal (MWt). Receivers with various working fluids have been tested here over the years, including air, water-steam, molten salt, liquid sodium, and solid particles. The NSTTF

  18. Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  19. MHK Projects/Leancon Real Sea Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Leancon Real Sea Test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADM...

  20. Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing June 10, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Three Recovery Act funded projects have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to continue testing large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) from industrial sources. The projects - located in Texas, Illinois, and Louisiana - were initially selected for funding in October 2009 as part of a $1.4

  1. Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department of Energy Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Lieko Earle, National Renewable Energy Laboratory The goal of this project is for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to provide extensive, hands-on technical support to Building America teams in the areas of experiment

  2. Project W-151 checkout-testing report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordquist, E.M.

    1997-01-31

    This document contains the completed checkout testing plan along with the exception log documenting exceptions which occurred during the test and their closure. This document also contains several minor open exceptions which will be closed upon installation of the radiation-sensitive equipment.

  3. Project W320 52-inch diameter equipment container load test: Test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellomy, J.R.

    1995-02-22

    This test report summarizes testing activities and documents the results of the load tests performed on-site and off-site to structural qualify the 52-inch equipment containers designed and fabricated under Project W-320.

  4. Integrated Performance Testing for Nonproliferation Support Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johns, Russell; Bultz, Garl Alan; Byers, Kenneth R.; Yaegle, William

    2013-08-20

    The objective of this workshop is to provide participants with training in testing techniques and methodologies for assessment of the performance of: Physical Protection system elements; Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) system elements.

  5. Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Projects NASA White Sands Test

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facility (WSTF) | Department of Energy Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Projects NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Projects NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) These slides were presented at the Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on April 29, 2010. nondestructiveevaluation_nasa_ostw.pdf (1.93 MB) More Documents & Publications Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Methods for Certification and Production/Performance Monitoring of Composite

  6. Project Manager, Nevada Test Site | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Project Manager, Nevada Test Site Susan Livenick, NTS Project Manager Susan Livenick August 2009 U.S. Department of Energy's Management Award On August 12, Susan Livenick, a Project Manager at the Nevada Test Site received the 2009 U.S. Department of Energy's Management Award at a special awards ceremony in Providence, R.I. The awards honor outstanding achievements in energy and water management. Susan oversaw Bldg. B3's abatement and renovation from 2005-2008, making

  7. Underground Test Area Subproject Project Management Plan, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-03

    This Project Management Plan (PMP) describes the manner in which the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) will manage the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It provides the basic guidance for implementation and the organizational structure for meeting the UGTA objectives.

  8. PROJECT PROFILE: Regional Test Center Operations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regional Test Center Operations PROJECT PROFILE: Regional Test Center Operations Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM SunShot Award Amount: $6,999,432 Location: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO SunShot Award Amount: $1,250,000 The Regional Test Center (RTC) program aims to support technical innovation in the U.S. solar sector by validating the performance of new PV products in multiple climates. The

  9. Regional Test Centers Project Expands U.S. Small Wind Certification Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capability - News Releases | NREL Regional Test Centers Project Expands U.S. Small Wind Certification Testing Capability Organizations in Kansas, New York, Texas, and Utah to receive support to conduct small wind turbine tests March 5, 2010 On Feb. 9, 2010, The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and DOE's Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program announced the selection of four partners to establish small wind Regional Test Centers (RTCs) to conduct

  10. EA-1917: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a Wave Energy Test Facility that will be located near Newport, Oregon. The testing facility will be located within Oregon territorial waters, near the Hatfield Marine Science Center and close to onshore roads and marine support services. The site will not only allow testing of new wave energy technologies, but will also be used to help study any potential environmental impacts on sediments, invertebrates and fish. The project is being jointly funded by the State of Oregon and DOE.

  11. Underground test area quality assurance project plan, Nevada test site, Nevada. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) is one of the planning documents used for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which falls under the oversight of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project (NV ERP). The Nevada ERP consists of environmental restoration activities on the NTS, Tonopah Test Range, Nellis Air Force Range, and eight sites in five other states. The UGTA Subproject constitutes a component of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project. The purposes of the UGTA Subproject are to define boundaries around each Corrective Action Unit (CAU), as defined by the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO), that establish areas containing water that may be unsafe for domestic or municipal use and to establish monitoring programs for each CAU that will verify modeling upon which the boundaries are based.

  12. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Eto, Joseph H.; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Klapp, Dave; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Stevens, John; Volkommer, Harry

    2008-07-25

    The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating small energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; 2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protections system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust and under all conditions, including difficult motor starts. The results from these test are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or mroe of the CERTS Microgrid concepts.

  13. Final Test and Evaluation Results from the Solar Two Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRADSHAW, ROBERT W.; DAWSON, DANIEL B.; DE LA ROSA, WILFREDO; GILBERT, ROCKWELL; GOODS, STEVEN H.; HALE, MARY JANE; JACOBS, PETER; JONES, SCOTT A.; KOLB, GREGORY J.; PACHECO, JAMES E.; PRAIRIE, MICHAEL R.; REILLY, HUGH E.; SHOWALTER, STEVEN K.; VANT-HULL, LORIN L.

    2002-01-01

    Solar Two was a collaborative, cost-shared project between 11 U. S. industry and utility partners and the U. S. Department of Energy to validate molten-salt power tower technology. The Solar Two plant, located east of Barstow, CA, comprised 1926 heliostats, a receiver, a thermal storage system, a steam generation system, and steam-turbine power block. Molten nitrate salt was used as the heat transfer fluid and storage media. The steam generator powered a 10-MWe (megawatt electric), conventional Rankine cycle turbine. Solar Two operated from June 1996 to April 1999. The major objective of the test and evaluation phase of the project was to validate the technical characteristics of a molten salt power tower. This report describes the significant results from the test and evaluation activities, the operating experience of each major system, and overall plant performance. Tests were conducted to measure the power output (MW) of the each major system, the efficiencies of the heliostat, receiver, thermal storage, and electric power generation systems and the daily energy collected, daily thermal-to-electric conversion, and daily parasitic energy consumption. Also included are detailed test and evaluation reports.

  14. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  15. Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

  16. Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Poloski, Adam P.

    2007-08-17

    This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from the sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. The proposed testing builds on the approach and laboratory test findings for both K Basin sludge and simulated sludge garnered during prior testing from September 2006 to March 2007. The outlined testing in this plan is designed to yield further understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions, the effects of compositional and process variations and the effectiveness of various strategies to mitigate the observed high shear strength phenomenon observed during the prior testing. These tests are designed to provide process validation and refinement vs. process development and design input. The expected outcome is to establish a level of understanding of the chemistry such that successful operating strategies and parameters can be implemented within the confines of the existing STP corrosion vessel design. In July 2007, the DOE provided direction to FH regarding significant changes to the scope of the overall STP. As a result of the changes, FH directed PNNL to stop work on most of the planned activities covered in this test plan. Therefore, it is unlikely the testing described here will be performed. However, to preserve the test strategy and details developed to date, the test plan has been published.

  17. DOE Announces $11 Million for Seven New Projects to Test New...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for Seven New Projects to Test New Options for Optimal Efficiency of the U.S. Electric Grid DOE Announces 11 Million for Seven New Projects to Test New Options for Optimal ...

  18. Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

  19. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. MHK Projects/QSEIF Grant Sea Testing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Tidal Energy Pty Ltd Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesDavidson Hill Venturi DHV Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See...

  1. The intermountain power project commissioning - Subsynchronous torsional interaction tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.T.; Peterson, K.J. ); Pinko, R.J.; Kankam, M.D.; Baker, D.H. )

    1988-10-01

    Subsyncronous torsional vibration as a result of electrochemical interaction between the HVDC controls and a turbine-generator was first discovered during the commissioning of the Square Butte Project in 1977. The level of interaction between the HVDC controls and the turbine-generator depends on several interacting factors: the characteristic torsional frequencies of the turbine-generator, the bandwidth of the HVDC controls and the relative strength of the connecting ac system. For the Intermountain Power Project (IPP), early analysis of these interacting factors indicated that there exist definite potential for subsynchronous oscillation to occur. The calculated torsional frequencies of the IPP units showed that the first mode frequency is 14.0 Hz and is within the typical bandwidth of an HVDC control which is between 10-20 Hz. The HVDC controls, therefore, can influence the torsional stability of the IPP units. Further, the IPP turbine-generators are required to operate isolated on the HVDC rectifier terminal, with no other interconnecting ac network. This ''radial'' mode of operation will result in maximum interaction between the converter station and the IPP units. It became obvious that special measure must be implemented in the design of the IPP HVDC control system to modify its typical characteristics to avoid the occurrence of the subsynchronous oscillation. This paper presents the results of the subsynchronous torsional interaction (SSTI) tests that were performed during the commissioning of the IPP Unit 1 and the HVDC Transmission system.

  2. Environmental Assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped from the EA/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. A new drying process was subsequently developed and is analyzed in Section 2.1.2 of this document. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

  3. Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for data frac'' stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

  4. Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Projects NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, CA Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Projects NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) POCs: NASA WSTF: Regor Saulsberry (575) 524-5518 Overview * Background and Projects Overview * Survey of Test Projects of Interest * NASA Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Working Group (NNWG) Testing * Orbiter Testing - NNWG Piggyback Efforts 2 Background and Issues * Safe applications of Composite Pressure Vessels (CPVs) is major concern - The NASA

  5. Advanced Test Reactor Design Basis Reconstitution Project Issue Resolution Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven D. Winter; Gregg L. Sharp; William E. Kohn; Richard T. McCracken

    2007-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Design Basis Reconstitution Program (DBRP) is a structured assessment and reconstitution of the design basis for the ATR. The DBRP is designed to establish and document the ties between the Document Safety Analysis (DSA), design basis, and actual system configurations. Where the DBRP assessment team cannot establish a link between these three major elements, a gap is identified. Resolutions to identified gaps represent configuration management and design basis recovery actions. The proposed paper discusses the process being applied to define, evaluate, report, and address gaps that are identified through the ATR DBRP. Design basis verification may be performed or required for a nuclear facility safety basis on various levels. The process is applicable to large-scale design basis reconstitution efforts, such as the ATR DBRP, or may be scaled for application on smaller projects. The concepts are applicable to long-term maintenance of a nuclear facility safety basis and recovery of degraded safety basis components. The ATR DBRP assessment team has observed numerous examples where a clear and accurate link between the DSA, design basis, and actual system configuration was not immediately identifiable in supporting documentation. As a result, a systematic approach to effectively document, prioritize, and evaluate each observation is required. The DBRP issue resolution process provides direction for consistent identification, documentation, categorization, and evaluation, and where applicable, entry into the determination process for a potential inadequacy in the safety analysis (PISA). The issue resolution process is a key element for execution of the DBRP. Application of the process facilitates collection, assessment, and reporting of issues identified by the DBRP team. Application of the process results in an organized database of safety basis gaps and prioritized corrective action planning and resolution. The DBRP team follows the ATR

  6. CoolCab Truck Testing Project Update (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Proc, K.

    2007-10-31

    Presentation describes the CoolCab project, a DOE/NREL initiative to design efficient thermal management systems in heavy trucks to eliminate idling and reduce petroleum consumption.

  7. Project Impact Assessments … Building America FY14 Field Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Assessments - Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support 2014 Building ... 9302014 Key Milestones : 1. Launch Field Test Best Practices web- based facilitated ...

  8. MHK Projects/Gulf of Mexico Ocean test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gulf of Mexico Ocean test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"R...

  9. MHK Projects/Wave Star Energy 1 10 Scale Model Test | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Star Energy 1 10 Scale Model Test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","...

  10. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, J.A.; Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  11. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Project W320 heel jet secondary catch mechanism lateral load test - test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellomy, J.R.

    1994-12-01

    This test report summarizes testing activities and documents the results of the lateral load test performed on the Heel Jet Secondary Catch Mechanism.

  13. Acid Pit Stabilization Project (Volume 1 - Cold Testing) and (Volume 2 - Hot Testing)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. G. Loomis; A. P. Zdinak; M. A. Ewanic; J. J. Jessmore

    1998-01-01

    During the summer and fall of Fiscal Year 1997, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study was performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The study involved subsurface stabilization of a mixed waste contaminated soil site called the Acid Pit. This study represents the culmination of a successful technology development effort that spanned Fiscal Years 1994-1996. Research and development of the in situ grout stabilization technique was conducted. Hardware and implementation techniques are currently documented in a patent pending with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The stabilization technique involved using jet grouting of an innovative grouting material to form a monolith out of the contamination zone. The monolith simultaneously provides a barrier to further contaminant migration and closes voids in the soil structure against further subsidence. This is accomplished by chemical incorporation of contaminants into less soluble species and achieving a general reduction in hydraulic conductivity within the monolith. The grout used for this study was TECT-HG, a relatively dense iron oxide-based cementitious grout. The treatability study involved cold testing followed by in situ stabilization of the Acid Pit. Volume 1 of this report discusses cold testing, performed as part of a ''Management Readiness Assessment'' in preparation for going hot. Volume 2 discusses the results of the hot Acid Pit Stabilization phase of this project. Drilling equipment was specifically rigged to reduce the spread of contamination, and all grouting was performed under a concrete block containing void space to absorb any grout returns. Data evaluation included examination of implementability of the grouting process and an evaluation of the contaminant spread during grouting. Following curing of the stabilized pit, cores were obtained and evaluated for toxicity characteristic leach ing

  14. Manhattan Project: Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bunker at S-10,000 The "Trinity" atomic test was the most violent man-made explosion in history to that date. It also posed the single most significant safety hazard of the entire ...

  15. The John Deere E diesel Test & Research Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, Nathan; Mitchell, William E.

    2008-09-23

    Three non-road Tier II emissions compliant diesel engines manufactured by John Deere were placed on a durability test plan of 2000 hours each at full load, rated speed (FLRS). The fuel was a blend of 10% fuel ethanol and 90% low sulfur #2 diesel fuel. Seven operational failures involving twenty seven fuel system components occurred prior to completion of the intended test plan. Regulated emissions measured prior to component failure indicated compliance to Tier II certification goals for the observed test experience. The program plan included operating three non-road Tier II diesel engines for 2000 hours each monitoring the regulated emissions at 500 hour intervals for changes/deterioration. The program was stopped prematurely due to number and frequency of injection system failures. The failures and weaknesses observed involved injector seat and valve wear, control solenoid material incompatibility, injector valve deposits and injector high pressure seal cavitation erosion. Future work should target an E diesel fuel standard that emphasizes minimum water content, stability, lubricity, cetane neutrality and oxidation resistance. Standards for fuel ethanol need to require water content no greater than the base diesel fuel standard. Lubricity bench test standards may need new development for E diesel.

  16. Enhanced Cover Assessment Project:Soil Manipulation and Revegetation Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W. Joseph; Albright, Dr. Bill; Benson, Dr. Craig

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management is evaluating methods to enhance natural changes that are essentially converting conventional disposal cell covers for uranium mill tailings into water balance covers. Conventional covers rely on a layer of compacted clayey soil to limit exhalation of radon gas and percolation of rainwater. Water balance covers rely on a less compacted soil “sponge” to store rainwater, and on soil evaporation and plant transpiration (evapotranspiration) to remove stored water and thereby limit percolation. Over time, natural soil-forming and ecological processes are changing conventional covers by increasing hydraulic conductivity, loosening compaction, and increasing evapotranspiration. The rock armor on conventional covers creates a favorable habitat for vegetation by slowing soil evaporation, increasing soil water storage, and trapping dust and organic matter, thereby providing the water and nutrients needed for plant germination, survival, and sustainable transpiration. Goals and Objectives Our overall goal is to determine if allowing or enhancing these natural changes could improve cover performance and reduce maintenance costs over the long term. This test pad study focuses on cover soil hydrology and ecology. Companion studies are evaluating effects of natural and enhanced changes in covers on radon attenuation, erosion, and biointrusion. We constructed a test cover at the Grand Junction disposal site to evaluate soil manipulation and revegetation methods. The engineering design, construction, and properties of the test cover match the upper three layers of the nearby disposal cell cover: a 1-foot armoring of rock riprap, a 6-inch bedding layer of coarse sand and gravel, and a 2-foot protection layer of compacted fine soil. The test cover does not have a radon barrier—cover enhancement tests leave the radon barrier intact. We tested furrowing and ripping as means for creating depressions parallel to the slope

  17. Generic TriBITS PRoject, Build, Test, and Install Quick Reference Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generic TriBITS PRoject, Build, Test, and Install Quick Reference Guide Ross Bartlett Oak Ridge National Laboratory CASL-U-2014-0075-000-a CASL-U-2014-0075-000-a Generic TriBITS PRoject, Build, Test, and Install Quick Reference Guide Author: Roscoe A. Bartlett Contact: bartlett.roscoe@gmail.com Abstract This document is generated from the generic template body docu- ment TribitsBuildQickRefBody.rst and provides a general project- independent quick reference on how to configure, build, test, and

  18. Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irene Farnham

    2011-05-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) program requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Sub-Project (hereafter the Sub-Project) activities. The requirements in this QAPP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). The QAPP Revision 0 supersedes DOE--341, Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 4.

  19. Generic TriBITS Project, Build, Test, and Install Reference Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generic TriBITS Project, Build, Test, and Install Reference Guide Author: Roscoe A. Bartlett Contact: bartlett.roscoe@gmail.com Date: 2015-08-27 Version: tribitsstart-1317-g4908e4...

  20. High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project: Final Test Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Test Plan for the High Burnup Dry Storage Research Project (HDRP) outlines the data to be collected, the high burnup fuel to be included, and the storage system design, procedures, and licensing necessary for implementation.

  1. Project W-151 flexible receiver radiation detector system acceptance test plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troyer, G.L.

    1994-12-06

    The attached document is the Acceptance Test Plan for the portion of Project W-151 dealing with acceptance of gamma-ray detectors and associated electronics manufactured at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The document provides a written basis for testing the detector system, which will take place in the 305 building (300 Area).

  2. Subsea processing and control system in the GASP project; Testing of the prototype system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordvik, H.S. )

    1992-03-01

    The subsea production and processing system developed under the Goodfellow Assocs. Subsea Production (GASP) project involved two stages of separation that led to the production of exportable-quality crude oil by pipeline. The produced gas is transported along a separate line. This paper described key elements of the subsea process system. A prototype system was developed during the second phase of the project. The system was tested under dry and submerged conditions in a dry dock. Key features of the prototype system and the tests carried out are described. Prototype testing proved the viability of the GASP system and helped identify areas requiring particular attention and improvement for future applications.

  3. Idaho Cleanup Project completes work at Test Area North complex at DOE�s

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Idaho site Idaho Cleanup Project completes work at Test Area North complex at DOE�s Idaho site Loss-Of-Fluid Test Reactor Facility (before) Idaho Cleanup Project workers have completed all the original contract work scope at the U.S. Department of Energy�s Idaho Site�s Test Area North (TAN) complex. The work involved close cooperation among the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, with public input incorporated

  4. NREL Small Wind Turbine Test Project: Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Test Chronology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.; Forsyth, T.

    2009-06-01

    This report presents a chronology of tests conducted at NREL's National Wind Technology Center on Mariah Power's Windspire 1.2-kW wind turbine and a letter of response from Mariah Power.

  5. Healy Clean Coal Project: Healy coal firing at TRW Cleveland Test Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koyama, T.; Petrill, E.; Sheppard, D.

    1991-08-01

    A test burn of two Alaskan coals was conducted at TRW`s Cleveland test facility in support of the Healy Clean Coal Project, as part of Clean Coal Technology III Program in which a new power plant will be constructed using a TRW Coal Combustion System. This system features ash slagging technology combined with NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} control. The tests, funded by the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) and TRW, were conducted to verify that the candidate Healy station coals could be successfully fired in the TRW coal combustor, to provide data required for scale-up to the utility project size requirements, and to produce sufficient flash-calcined material (FCM) for spray dryer tests to be conducted by Joy/NIRO. The tests demonstrated that both coals are viable candidates for the project, provided the data required for scale-up, and produced the FCM material. This report describes the modifications to the test facility which were required for the test burn, the tests run, and the results of the tests.

  6. Healy Clean Coal Project: Healy coal firing at TRW Cleveland Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koyama, T.; Petrill, E.; Sheppard, D.

    1991-08-01

    A test burn of two Alaskan coals was conducted at TRW's Cleveland test facility in support of the Healy Clean Coal Project, as part of Clean Coal Technology III Program in which a new power plant will be constructed using a TRW Coal Combustion System. This system features ash slagging technology combined with NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} control. The tests, funded by the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) and TRW, were conducted to verify that the candidate Healy station coals could be successfully fired in the TRW coal combustor, to provide data required for scale-up to the utility project size requirements, and to produce sufficient flash-calcined material (FCM) for spray dryer tests to be conducted by Joy/NIRO. The tests demonstrated that both coals are viable candidates for the project, provided the data required for scale-up, and produced the FCM material. This report describes the modifications to the test facility which were required for the test burn, the tests run, and the results of the tests.

  7. The Yucca Mountain Project prototype air-coring test, U12g tunnel, Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, J.M.; Newsom, J.C.

    1994-12-01

    The Prototype Air-Coring Test was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) G-Tunnel facility to evaluate standard coring techniques, modified slightly for air circulation, for use in testing at a prospective nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Air-coring technology allows sampling of subsurface lithology with minimal perturbation to ambient characteristic such as that required for exploratory holes near aquifers, environmental applications, and site characterization work. Two horizontal holes were cored, one 50 ft long and the other 150 ft long, in densely welded fractured tuff to simulate the difficult drilling conditions anticipated at Yucca Mountain. Drilling data from seven holes on three other prototype tests in nonwelded tuff were also collected for comparison. The test was used to establish preliminary standards of performance for drilling and dust collection equipment and to assess procedural efficiencies. The Longyear-38 drill achieved 97% recovery for HQ-size core (-2.5 in.), and the Atlas Copco dust collector (DCT-90) captured 1500 lb of fugitive dust in a mine environment with only minor modifications. Average hole production rates were 6-8 ft per 6-h shift in welded tuff and almost 20 ft per shift on deeper holes in nonwelded tuff. Lexan liners were successfully used to encapsulate core samples during the coring process and protect core properties effectively. The Prototype Air-Coring Test demonstrated that horizontal air coring in fractured welded tuff (to at least 150 ft) can be safely accomplished by proper selection, integration, and minor modification of standard drilling equipment, using appropriate procedures and engineering controls. The test also indicated that rig logistics, equipment, and methods need improvement before attempting a large-scale dry drilling program at Yucca Mountain.

  8. Recovery Act Funds Test Reactor Dome Removal in Historic D&D Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Funds Test Reactor Dome Removal in Historic D&D Project Recovery Act Funds Test Reactor Dome Removal in Historic D&D Project February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Jim Giusti, DOE (803) 952-7697 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS (803) 646-6075 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov AIKEN, S.C. - The landscape of the Savannah River Site (SRS) is a little flatter and a little less colorful with the removal today of the 75-foot-tall rusty-orange dome from the

  9. Action Memorandum for the Engineering Test Reactor under the Idaho Cleanup Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. B. Culp

    2007-01-26

    This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative for decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since the missions of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex have been completed, an engineering evaluation/cost analysis that evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex was prepared adn released for public comment. The scope of this Action Memorandum is to encompass the final end state of the Complex and disposal of the Engineering Test Reactor vessol. The selected removal action includes removing and disposing of the vessel at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility and demolishing the reactor building to ground surface.

  10. AVTA: Chrysler RAM Experimental PHEV Pickup Truck Recovery Act Project Testing Results Phase 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act supported a number of projects that together made up the largest ever deployment of plug-in electric vehicles and charging infrastructure in the U.S. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2011 Chrysler RAM PHEV, a demonstration vehicle not currently available for sale. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  11. OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) CWP (Cold Water Pipe) Laboratory Test Program. Materials Project Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Fiberglass sandwich wall structures emerged as leading candidates for the OTEC cold water pipe because of their high strength to weight ratio, their flexibility in selecting directional properties, their resistance to electrochemical interaction, their ease of deployment and their relative low cost. A review of the literature established reasonable confidence that FRP laminates could meet the OTEC requirements; however, little information was available on the performance of core materials suitable for OTEC applications. Syntactic foam cores of various composition and density were developed and tested for mechanical properties and seawater absorption.

  12. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Sites quality assurance project plan: Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) describes the measures that shall be taken to ensure that the environmental data collected during characterization and closure activities of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are meaningful, valid, defensible, and can be used to achieve project objectives. These activities are conducted by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Nevada Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The Nevada ER Project consists of environmental restoration activities on the NTS, Tonopah Test Range, Nellis Air Force Range, and eight sites in five other states. The RCRA Industrial Sites subproject constitutes a component of the Nevada ER Project. Currently, this QAPjP is limited to the seven RCRA Industrial Sites identified within this document that are to be closed under an interim status and pertains to all field-investigation, analytical-laboratory, and data-review activities in support of these closures. The information presented here supplements the RCRA Industrial Sites Project Management Plan and is to be used in conjunction with the site-specific subproject sampling and analysis plans.

  13. High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project, Final Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-02-27

    EPRI is leading a project team to develop and implement the first five years of a Test Plan to collect data from a SNF dry storage system containing high burnup fuel.12 The Test Plan defined in this document outlines the data to be collected, and the storage system design, procedures, and licensing necessary to implement the Test Plan.13 The main goals of the proposed test are to provide confirmatory data14 for models, future SNF dry storage cask design, and to support license renewals and new licenses for ISFSIs. To provide data that is most relevant to high burnup fuel in dry storage, the design of the test storage system must mimic real conditions that high burnup SNF experiences during all stages of dry storage: loading, cask drying, inert gas backfilling, and transfer to the ISFSI for multi-year storage.15 Along with other optional modeling, SETs, and SSTs, the data collected in this Test Plan can be used to evaluate the integrity of dry storage systems and the high burnup fuel contained therein over many decades. It should be noted that the Test Plan described in this document discusses essential activities that go beyond the first five years of Test Plan implementation.16 The first five years of the Test Plan include activities up through loading the cask, initiating the data collection, and beginning the long-term storage period at the ISFSI. The Test Plan encompasses the overall project that includes activities that may not be completed until 15 or more years from now, including continued data collection, shipment of the Research Project Cask to a Fuel Examination Facility, opening the cask at the Fuel Examination Facility, and examining the high burnup fuel after the initial storage period.

  14. Test and evaluation plan for Project W-314 tank farm restoration and safe operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hays, W.H.

    1998-06-25

    The ``Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations`` (TFRSO), Project W-314 will restore and/or upgrade existing Hanford Tank Farm facilities and systems to ensure that the Tank Farm infrastructure will be able to support near term TWRS Privatization`s waste feed delivery and disposal system and continue safe management of tank waste. The capital improvements provided by this project will increase the margin of safety for Tank Farms operations, and will aid in aligning affected Tank Farm systems with compliance requirements from applicable state, Federal, and local regulations. Secondary benefits will be realized subsequent to project completion in the form of reduced equipment down-time, reduced health and safety risks to workers, reduced operating and maintenance costs, and minimization of radioactive and/or hazardous material releases to the environment. The original regulatory (e.g., Executive Orders, WACS, CFRS, permit requirements, required engineering standards, etc.) and institutional (e.g., DOE Orders, Hanford procedures, etc.) requirements for Project W-314 were extracted from the TWRS S/RIDs during the development of the Functions and Requirements (F and Rs). The entire family of requirements were then validated for TWRS and Project W-314. This information was contained in the RDD-100 database and used to establish the original CDR. The Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) team recognizes that safety, quality, and cost effectiveness in the Test and Evaluation (T and E) program is achieved through a planned systematic approach to T and E activities. It is to this end that the Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP) is created. The TEP for the TFRSO Project, was developed based on the guidance in HNF-IP-0842, and the Good Practice Guide GPG-FM-005, ``Test and Evaluation,`` which is derived from DOE Order 430.1, ``Life Cycle Asset Management.`` It describes the Test and Evaluation program for the TFRSO project starting with the definitive design phase and ending

  15. Fast Flux Test Facility transition project resource loaded schedule. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1994-10-31

    Revision 1 of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS) provides detail to manage the major elements, project baseline and cost estimate for the FFF Transition Project within the Advanced Reactors Transition Program, comprised of Activity Data Sheets (ADS) 6640, 6641, and 6642. The scope includes all work in the Budget and Reporting categories of Program Integration (PI), Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M), and Deactivation/Compliance (D/C). The transition activities are necessary to bring the FFTF and related facilities to a safe deactivation state, while maintaining worker health and safety. The scope of ADS 6640 and 6642 is the FFTF Transition Project while the scope of ADS 6641 is the Hanford Site Nuclear Energy Legacies.

  16. Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

    2008-06-15

    This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

  17. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Gas Generation Testing Program at the INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    The data quality objectives (DQOs) for the Program are to evaluate compliance with the limits on total gas generation rates, establish the concentrations of hydrogen and methane in the total gas flow, determine the headspace concentration of VOCs in each drum prior to the start of the test, and obtain estimates of the concentrations of several compounds for mass balance purposes. Criteria for the selection of waste containers at the INEL and the parameters that must be characterized prior to and during the tests are described. Collection of gaseous samples from 55-gallon drums of contact-handled transuranic waste for the gas generation testing is discussed. Analytical methods and calibrations are summarized. Administrative quality control measures described in this QAPjP include the generation, review, and approval of project documentation; control and retention of records; measures to ensure that personnel, subcontractors or vendors, and equipment meet the specifications necessary to achieve the required data quality for the project.

  18. Wind-electric icemaking project: Analysis and dynamometer testing. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holz, R; Gervorgian, V; Drouilhet, S; Muljadi, E

    1998-07-01

    The wind/hybrid systems group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been researching the most practical and cost-effective methods for producing ice from off-grid wind-electric power systems. The first phase of the project, conducted in 1993--1994, included full-scale dynamometer and field testing of two different electric ice makers directly connected to a permanent magnet alternator. The results of that phase were encouraging and the second phase of the project was launched in which steady-state and dynamic numerical models of these systems were developed and experimentally validated. The third phase of the project was the dynamometer testing of the North Star ice maker, which is powered by a 12-kilowatt Bergey Windpower Company, Inc., alternator. This report describes both the second and third project phases. Also included are detailed economic analyses and a discussion of the future prospects of wind-electric ice-making systems. The main report is contained in Volume 1. Volume 2 consists of the report appendices, which include the actual computer programs used in the analysis and the detailed test results.

  19. Testing, Manufacturing, and Component Development Projects for Utility-Scale and Distributed Wind Energy, Fiscal Years 2006-2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-04-01

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's Testing, Manufacturing, and Component Development Projects for Utility-Scale and Distributed Wind Energy from 2006 to 2014.

  20. Selected Examples of LDRD Projects Supporting Test Ban Treaty Verification and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, K.; Al-Ayat, R.; Walter, W. R.

    2015-02-23

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at the DOE National Laboratories was established to ensure the scientific and technical vitality of these institutions and to enhance the their ability to respond to evolving missions and anticipate national needs. LDRD allows the Laboratory directors to invest a percentage of their total annual budget in cutting-edge research and development projects within their mission areas. We highlight a selected set of LDRD-funded projects, in chronological order, that have helped provide capabilities, people and infrastructure that contributed greatly to our ability to respond to technical challenges in support of test ban treaty verification and nonproliferation.

  1. Hydro-Kansas (HK) Research Project: Tests of a Physical Basis of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statistical Self-Similarity in Peak Flows in the Whitewater Basin, Kansas Hydro-Kansas (HK) Research Project: Tests of a Physical Basis of Statistical Self-Similarity in Peak Flows in the Whitewater Basin, Kansas Gupta, Vijay University of Colorado Furey, Peter Colorado Research Associates Mantila, Ricardo University of Colorado Krajewski, Witold University of Iowa Kruger, Anton The University of Iowa Clayton, Jordan US Geological Survey and University of Iowa Category: Atmospheric State and

  2. Public comment sought on soil cleanup project at the Idaho Site�s Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area North Complex Public comment sought on soil cleanup project at the Idaho Site�s Test Area North Complex The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking public comment on a small-scale soil cleanup at the Idaho Site�s Test Area North (TAN) complex. An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) document with three proposed alternatives for the soil cleanup is under evaluation by DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Idaho�s Department of Environmental Quality.

  3. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Emergency Firewater Injection System Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  4. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Primary Coolant Pump and Motor Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  5. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  6. Testing the performance of real-time incinerator emission monitors. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghorishi, S.B.; Whitworth, W.E.; Goldman, C.G.; Waterland, L.R.

    1997-03-01

    Ten prototypes of continuous emission monitors (CEMs) for measuring trace metal or trace organic species concentrations were tested. Of the 10 CEMs tested, four measured incinerator flue gas concentrations of several specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs), one measured total particulate-bound polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations, two measured flue gas concentrations of several (up to 14) trace metals, and three measured mercury concentrations. While the testing consisted of obtaining quantitative measurement data on the four measures of CEM performance checked in a relative accuracy test audit (RATA) as described in 40 CFR 60 Appendix F -- relative accuracy (RA), calibration drift (CD), zero drift (ZD), and response time - the primary project objective focused on the RA measurement. Four series of tests were performed, each simultaneously testing up to three monitors measuring the same or similar analyte type. Each test series consisted of performing triplicate Reference Method (RM) measurements at each of three target flue gas monitored analyte concentrations while the tested CEMs were in operation.

  7. Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig W. Collar

    2012-11-16

    Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy’s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program’s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental

  8. Anthropogenic plutonium-244 in the environment: Insights into...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anthropogenic plutonium-244 in the environment: Insights into plutonium's longest-lived isotope Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anthropogenic plutonium-244 in the ...

  9. Transferability of Data Related to the Underground Test Area Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2004-06-24

    This document is the collaborative effort of the members of an ad hoc subcommittee of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Technical Working Group (TWG). The UGTA Project relies on data from a variety of sources; therefore, a process is needed to identify relevant factors for determining whether material-property data collected from other areas can be used to support groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and other models within a Corrective Action Unit (CAU), and for documenting the data transfer decision and process. This document describes the overall data transfer process. Separate Parameter Descriptions will be prepared that provide information for selected specific parameters as determined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) UGTA Project Manager. This document and its accompanying appendices do not provide the specific criteria to be used for transfer of data for specific uses. Rather, the criteria will be established by separate parameter-specific and model-specific Data Transfer Protocols. The CAU Data Documentation Packages and data analysis reports will apply the protocols and provide or reference a document with the data transfer evaluations and decisions.

  10. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project: Feasibility test of real-time radiation monitoring during removal of surface contamination from concrete floors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leino, R.; Corle, S.

    1995-10-01

    This feasibility test was conducted to determine if real-time radiation-monitoring instruments could be mounted on decontamination machines during remediation activities to provide useful and immediate feedback to equipment operators. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored this field test under the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project (GJPORAP) to identify a more efficient method to remove radiological contamination from concrete floor surfaces. This test demonstrated that project durations and costs may be reduced by combining radiation-monitoring equipment with decontamination machines. The test also demonstrated that a microprocessor-based instrument such as a radiation monitor can withstand the type of vibration that is characteristic of floor scabblers with no apparent damage. Combining radiation-monitoring equipment with a decontamination machine reduces the time and costs required to decontaminate concrete surfaces. These time and cost savings result from the reduction in the number of interim radiological surveys that must be conducted to complete remediation. Real-time radiation monitoring allows equipment operators to accurately monitor contamination during the decontamination process without support from radiological technicians, which also reduces the project duration and costs. The DOE Grand Junction Projects Office recommends more extensive and rigorous testing of this real-time radiation monitoring to include a variety of surfaces and decontamination machines. As opportunities arise, additional testing will be conducted under GJPORAP.

  11. The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB GeologicPilot Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trautz, Robert; Benson, Sally; Myer, Larry; Oldenburg, Curtis; Seeman, Ed; Hadsell, Eric; Funderburk, Ben

    2006-01-30

    WESTCARB, one of seven U.S. Department of Energypartnerships, identified (during its Phase I study) over 600 gigatonnesof CO2 storage capacity in geologic formations located in the Westernregion. The Western region includes the WESTCARB partnership states ofAlaska, Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon and Washington and theCanadian province of British Columbia. The WESTCARB Phase II study iscurrently under way, featuring three geologic and two terrestrial CO2pilot projects designed to test promising sequestration technologies atsites broadly representative of the region's largest potential carbonsinks. This paper focuses on two of the geologic pilot studies plannedfor Phase II -referred to-collectively as the Rosetta-Calpine CO2 StorageProject. The first pilot test will demonstrate injection of CO2 into asaline formation beneath a depleted gas reservoir. The second test willgather data for assessing CO2 enhanced gas recovery (EGR) as well asstorage in a depleted gas reservoir. The benefit of enhanced oil recovery(EOR) using injected CO2 to drive or sweep oil from the reservoir towarda production well is well known. EaR involves a similar CO2 injectionprocess, but has received far less attention. Depleted natural gasreservoirs still contain methane; therefore, CO2 injection may enhancemethane production by reservoir repressurization or pressure maintenance.CO2 injection into a saline formation, followed by injection into adepleted natural gas reservoir, is currently scheduled to start inOctober 2006.

  12. Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating- Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project Y.-H. Yu, M. Lawson, and Y. Li National Renewable Energy Laboratory M. Previsic and J. Epler Re Vision Consulting J. Lou Oregon State University Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-62951 January 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no

  13. Chemical Reactivity Testing for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program. Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, H.C.

    1999-01-24

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) summarizes requirements used by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (LMES) Development Division at Y-12 for conducting chemical reactivity testing of Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel, sponsored by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). The requirements are based on the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 (Statement of Work for Laboratory Determination of Uranium Hydride Oxidation Reaction Kinetics.) This QAPjP will utilize the quality assurance program at Y-12, QA-101PD, revision 1, and existing implementing procedures for the most part in meeting the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 requirements, exceptions will be noted.

  14. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 1 discusses the following topics: the background of the project; test program description; summary of tests and test results; problem evaluation; functional requirements confirmation; recommendations; and completed test documentation for tests performed in Phase 3.

  15. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2007-03-30

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

  16. Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

  17. Steam atmosphere dryer project: System development and field test. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate the use of a superheated steam atmosphere dryer as a highly improved alternative to conventional hot air-drying systems, the present industrial standard method for drying various wet feedstocks. The development program plan consisted of three major activities. The first was engineering analysis and testing of a small-scale laboratory superheated steam dryer. This dryer provided the basic engineering heat transfer data necessary to design a large-scale system. The second major activity consisted of the design, fabrication, and laboratory checkout testing of the field-site prototype superheated steam dryer system. The third major activity consisted of the installation and testing of the complete 250-lb/hr evaporation rate dryer and a 30-kW cogeneration system in conjunction with an anaerobic digester facility at the Village of Bergen, NY. Feedstock for the digester facility at the Village of Bergen, NY. Feedstock for the digester was waste residue from a nearby commercial food processing plant. The superheated steam dryer system was placed into operation in August 1996 and operated successfully through March 1997. During this period, the dryer processed all the material from the digester to a powdered consistency usable as a high-nitrogen-based fertilizer.

  18. City of North Bonneville, Washington: Geothermal Exploration Project, production test well, Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    Based on discussions with the City of North Bonneville, the production test well was drilled to a depth that would also explore for ground water temperatures near 130/sup 0/F (54.4/sup 0/C). Depth projections to a 130/sup 0/F bottom hole temperature were made by assuming a constant ground water temperature rise greater than 50/sup 0/C per kilometer, and by assuming that essentially homogeneous or equivalent conductive rock units would be encountered. Minimum water production requirements were not set, although the City determined that about 800 gpm would be acceptable. Large upper casing diameters of 16 and 12 inches were installed in order to provide the future use of either a vertical turbine or submersible pump, as desired by the city. The scope of work included interpretation of well characteristics, evaluation of ground water as a geothermal resource, geologic analysis of data from drilling and testing, drilling supervision, daily drilling cost accounting, and preparation of a final report. The report includes geologic evaluation of the drilling and test data, ground water and geothermal potential.

  19. Improved test method to verify the power rating of a photovoltaic (PV) project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchula, A.; Pligavko, A.; King, D.; Marion, B.; Townsend, T.; Mitchell, L.; Dierauf, T.; Kimber, A.; Osterwald, C. R.; Newmiller, Jeff; Emery, K.; Talmud, F.; Whitaker, Chuck; Myers, D.; Forbess, J.; Granata, Jennifer E.; Levitsky, T.

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews the PVUSA power rating method and presents two additional methods that seek to improve this method in terms of model precision and increased seasonal applicability. It presents the results of an evaluation of each method based upon regression analysis of over 12 MW of operating photovoltaic (PV) systems located in a wide variety of climates. These systems include a variety of PV technologies, mounting configurations, and array sizes to ensure the conclusions are applicable to a wide range of PV designs and technologies. The work presented in this paper will be submitted to ASTM for use in the development of a standard test method for certifying the power rating of PV projects.

  20. An overview of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project field test program for evaluating seal performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, J.A.; Case, J.B.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), a participant in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, is responsible for implementing the repository sealing program. One aspect of this program is the definition and fielding of tests related to sealing components which comprise the sealing subsystem. The sealing components are identified in the Site Characterization Plan (U.S. DOE, 1988) and Fernandez et al. (1987). These include an anchor-to-bedrock plug, single dams (or single bulkheads with not settlement), general shaft fill, drift backfill, station and shaft plugs, double bulkheads, backfilled sumps, and channels in a backfilled room. The materials used to create these components are cementitious and earthen. Earthen materials will be used for as many applications as possible to minimize potential degradation of physical properties and potential adverse effects on ground-water chemistry in the repository environment. In places where low strength is acceptable, earthen materials may be used. The most likely application for cementitious materials is where high strength and low deformability may be required. (Hinkebein and Fernandez, 1989). The basis for performing seal component testing is divided into two parts: regulatory requirements and technical requirements. The regulatory requirements are derived primarily from Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 60 (10 CFR 60) (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1986). The technical requirements are defined by the uncertainties associated with seal performance and seal emplacement. Both categories of requirements are discussed below.

  1. Conceptual Design Report: Nevada Test Site Mixed Waste Disposal Facility Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-01-31

    Environmental cleanup of contaminated nuclear weapons manufacturing and test sites generates radioactive waste that must be disposed. Site cleanup activities throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex are projected to continue through 2050. Some of this waste is mixed waste (MW), containing both hazardous and radioactive components. In addition, there is a need for MW disposal from other mission activities. The Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision designates the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as a regional MW disposal site. The NTS has a facility that is permitted to dispose of onsite- and offsite-generated MW until November 30, 2010. There is not a DOE waste management facility that is currently permitted to dispose of offsite-generated MW after 2010, jeopardizing the DOE environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. A mission needs document (CD-0) has been prepared for a newly permitted MW disposal facility at the NTS that would provide the needed capability to support DOE's environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. This report presents a conceptual engineering design for a MW facility that is fully compliant with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The facility, which will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the NTS, will provide an approximately 20,000-cubic yard waste disposal capacity. The facility will be licensed by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP).

  2. US-VISIT Independent Verification and Validation Project: Test Bed Establishment Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, N W; Gansemer, J D

    2011-01-21

    This document describes the computational and data systems available at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use on the US-VISIT Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) project. This system - composed of data, software and hardware - is designed to be as close as a representation of the operational ADIS system as is required to verify and validate US-VISIT methodologies. It is not required to reproduce the computational capabilities of the enterprise-class operational system. During FY10, the test bed was simplified from the FY09 version by reducing the number of database host computers from three to one, significantly reducing the maintenance and overhead while simultaneously increasing system throughput. During the current performance period, a database transfer was performed as a set of Data Pump Export files. The previous RMAN backup from 2007 required the availability of an AIX system which is not required when using data pump. Due to efficiencies in the new system and process, loading of the database refresh was able to be accomplished in a much shorter time frame than was previously required. The FY10 Oracle Test Bed now consists of a single Linux platform hosting two Oracle databases including the 2007 copy as well as the October 2010 refresh.

  3. Analysis Of Ductile Crack Growth In Pipe Test In STYLE Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Shengjun; Williams, Paul T; Klasky, Hilda B; Bass, Bennett Richard

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is conducting structural analyses, both deterministic and probabilistic, to simulate a large scale mock-up experiment planned within the European Network for Structural Integrity for Lifetime Management non-RPV Components (STYLE). The paper summarizes current ORNL analyses of STYLE s Mock-up3 experiment to simulate/evaluate ductile crack growth in a cladded ferritic pipe. Deterministic analyses of the large-scale bending test of ferritic surge pipe, with an internal circumferential crack, are simulated with a number of local micromechanical approaches, such as Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model and cohesive-zone model. Both WARP 3D and ABAQUS general purpose finite element programs are being used to predict the failure load and the failure mode, i.e. ductile tearing or net-section collapse, as part of the pre-test phase of the project. Companion probabilistic analyses of the experiment are utilizing the ORNL developed open-source Structural Integrity Assessment Modular - Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics (SIAM-PFM) framework. SIAM-PFM contains engineering assessment methodology such as the tearing instability (J-T analysis) module developed for inner surface cracks under bending load. The driving force J-integral estimations are based on the SC.ENG1 or SC.ENG2 models. The J-A2 methodology is used to transfer (constraint-adjust) J-R curve material data from standard test specimens to the Mock-up3 experiment configuration. The probabilistic results of the Mock-Up3 experiment obtained from SIAM-PFM will be compared to those generated using the deterministic finite element modeling approach. The objective of the probabilistic analysis is to provide uncertainty bounds that will assist in assessing the more detailed 3D finite-element solutions and to also assess the level of confidence that can be placed in the best-estimate finite-element solutions.

  4. Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation Project Near Surface Test Facility 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the development of the reclamation project for the Hanford Site Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF), its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation project is to return disturbed sites as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native species. Gable Mountain is dominated by two plant communities: a big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) -- Sandberg's bluegrass (Poa sandbergii) community and a stiff sagebrush (Artemisia rigida) -- Sandberg's bluegrass community. Disassembly of the site installations began on March 15, 1988, and the site was returned to original contours by December 12, 1988. Two separate revegetation methods were employed at the NSTF to meet differing site constraints. Vegetative cover and density in the revegetation plots were assessed in April 1989 and again in June 1989 and 1990. It is extremely unlikely that the sand pit, borrow pit, box cuts, generator pad area, or ventilation fan area will reach the reclamation objectives set for these areas within the next 50 years without further intervention. These areas currently support few living plants. Vegetation on revegetated native soils appears to be growing as expected. Vegetation growth on the main waterline is well below the objective. To date, no shrubs have grown on the area, growth of native grasses is well below the objective, and much of the area has been covered with the pit run material, which may not support adequate growth. Without further treatments, the areas without the pit run material will likely revert to a nearly pure cheatgrass condition. 44 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. A West Valley Demonstration Project Milestone - Achieving Certification to Ship Waste to the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J. P.; Pastor, R. S.

    2002-02-28

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) has successfully pretreated and vitrified nearly all of the 600,000 gallons of liquid high-level radioactive waste that was generated at the site of the only commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant to have operated in the United States. Low-level waste (LLW) generated during the course of the cleanup effort now requires disposal. Currently the WVDP only ships Class A LLW for off-site disposal. It has been shipping Class A wastes to Envirocare of Utah, Inc. since 1997. However, the WVDP may also have a future need to ship Class B and Class C waste, which Envirocare is not currently authorized to accept. The Nevada Test Site (NTS), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility, can accept all three waste classifications. The WVDP set a goal to receive certification to begin shipping Class A wastes to NTS by 2001. Formal certification/approval was granted by the DOE Nevada Operations Office on July 12, 2001. This paper discusses how the WVDP contractor, West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSCO), completed the activities required to achieve NTS certification in 2001 to ship waste to its facility. The information and lessons learned provided are significant because the WVDP is the only new generator receiving certification based on an NTS audit in January 2001 that resulted in no findings and only two observations--a rating that is unparalleled in the DOE Complex.

  6. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg

    2013-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for effective application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

  7. West Pearl Queen CO2 sequestration pilot test and modeling project 2006-2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engler, Bruce Phillip; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Symons, Neill Phillip; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Byrer, Charles; Elbring, Gregory Jay; McNemar, Andrea; Aldridge, David Franklin; Lorenz, John Clay

    2008-08-01

    The West Pearl Queen is a depleted oil reservoir that has produced approximately 250,000 bbl of oil since 1984. Production had slowed prior to CO{sub 2} injection, but no previous secondary or tertiary recovery methods had been applied. The initial project involved reservoir characterization and field response to injection of CO{sub 2}; the field experiment consisted of injection, soak, and venting. For fifty days (December 20, 2002, to February 11, 2003) 2090 tons of CO{sub 2} were injected into the Shattuck Sandstone Member of the Queen Formation at the West Pearl Queen site. This technical report highlights the test results of the numerous research participants and technical areas from 2006-2008. This work included determination of lateral extents of the permeability units using outcrop observations, core results, and well logs. Pre- and post-injection 3D seismic data were acquired. To aid in interpreting seismic data, we performed numerical simulations of the effects of CO{sub 2} replacement of brine where the reservoir model was based upon correlation lengths established by the permeability studies. These numerical simulations are not intended to replicate field data, but to provide insight of the effects of CO{sub 2}.

  8. Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01

    The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for ``data frac`` stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

  9. Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

    1993-11-01

    EG&G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG&G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG&G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG&G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and efficiently completing the requirements for WETP.

  10. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

    2011-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a

  11. LANL LDRD-funded project: Test particle simulations of energetic ions in natural and artificial radiation belts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowee, Misa; Liu, Kaijun; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    2012-07-17

    We summarize the scientific problem and work plan for the LANL LDRD-funded project to use a test particle code to study the sudden de-trapping of inner belt protons and possible cross-L transport of debris ions after a high altitude nuclear explosion (HANE). We also discuss future application of the code for other HANE-related problems.

  12. Performance analysis and pilot plant test results for the Komorany fluidized bed retrofit project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, G.C.

    1995-12-01

    Detailed heat and mass balance calculations and emission performance projections are presented for an atmospheric fluidized bed boiler bottom retrofit at the 927 MWt (steam output) Komorany power station and district heating plant in the Czech Republic. Each of the ten existing boilers are traveling grate stoker units firing a local, low-rank brown coal. This fuel, considered to be representative of much of the coal deposits in Central Europe, is characterized by an average gross calorific value of 10.5 MJ/kg (4,530 Btu/lb), an average dry basis ash content of 47 %, and a maximum dry basis sulfur content of 1.8 % (3.4 % on a dry, ash free basis). The same fuel supply, together with limestone supplied from the region will be utilized in the retrofit fluidized bed boilers. The primary objectives of this retrofit program are, (1) reduce emissions to a level at or below the new Czech Clean Air Act, and (2) restore plant capacity to the original specification. As a result of the AFBC retrofit and plant upgrade, the particulate matter emissions will be reduced by over 98 percent, SO{sub 2} emissions will be reduced by 88 percent, and NO{sub x} emissions will be reduced by 38 percent compared to the present grate-fired configuration. The decrease in SO{sub 2} emissions resulting from the fluidized bed retrofit was initially predicted based on fuel sulfur content, including the distribution among organic, pyritic, and sulfate forms; the ash alkalinity; and the estimated limestone calcium utilization efficiency. The methodology and the results of this prediction were confirmed and extended by pilot scale combustion trials at a 1.0 MWt (fuel input), variable configuration test facility in France.

  13. Q-Sync Motors in Commercial Refrigeration. Preliminary Test Results and Projected Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, Brian A.; Becker, Bryan R.

    2015-09-01

    This report provides background information on various fractional-horsepower electric motor technologies, summarizes initial data from a DOE-sponsored Q-Sync motor demonstration project, and extrapolates that data to project the potential economic and environmental benefits resulting from upgrading the current installed base of 9–12 W evaporator fan motors to Q-Sync motors.

  14. DOE-Funded Project Testing Laser CO2 Monitoring at Carbon Storage Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A project that uses lasers to monitor carbon dioxide (CO2) is being analyzed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) drive to improve greenhouse gas-monitoring abilities at CO2 storage sites. The project is managed by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

  15. Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

    2009-03-25

    The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

  16. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2008-04-08

    This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and

  17. Project W-320 acceptance test report for AY-farm electrical distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevins, R.R.

    1998-04-02

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the AY-Farm Electrical Distribution System functions as required by the design criteria. This test is divided into three parts to support the planned construction schedule; Section 8 tests Mini-Power Pane AY102-PPI and the EES; Section 9 tests the SSS support systems; Section 10 tests the SSS and the Multi-Pak Group Control Panel. This test does not include the operation of end-use components (loads) supplied from the distribution system. Tests of the end-use components (loads) will be performed by other W-320 ATPs.

  18. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg, Principal Investigator; Kevin A. Steuhm, Project Manager

    2012-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to properly verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the next anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014-2015 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its third full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL under various licensing arrangements. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core

  19. Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaspey, Douglas J.

    2008-01-30

    Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield.

  20. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2001-2002 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, T P; Kersting, A B; Harris, L J; Hudson, G B; Smith, D K; Williams, R W; Loewen, D R; Nelson, E J; Allen, P G; Ryerson, F J; Pawloski, G A; Laue, C A; Moran, J E

    2003-08-15

    This report contains highlights of FY 2001 and 2002 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work emphasizes the Defense Programs goal of responsible management of natural resources at the NTS, while UGTA-funded work focuses on defining the extent of radionuclide contamination in NTS groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing. The report is organized on a topical basis, and contains eight chapters that reflect the range of technical work performed by LLNL-ANCD in support of HRMP and UGTA. Chapter 1 describes recent hot well sampling efforts at the NTS, and presents the results of chemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples from six near-field wells. These include the Cambric (UE-5n), Bilby (U-3cn PS No.2), Bourbon (UE-7nS), Nash (UE-2ce), Tybo/Benham (ER-20-5 No.3), and Almendro (U-19v PS No.1ds) sites. The data generated by the hot well program is vital to the development and validation of contaminant transport models at the NTS. Chapter 2 discusses the results of xenon isotope measurements of groundwater samples from the six near-field wells described in Chapter 1. This work demonstrates that fission xenon is present in the water at levels that are readily measurable and highlights the significant differences in xenon concentrations and isotopic abundances at different sites. These differences provide insight into the early cooling history of nuclear test cavities, and may assist in predicting the distribution of the source term in the near-field environment. Chapter 3 is an investigation of the distribution

  1. Tank monitor and control system (TMACS) software project Westronics Driver acceptance test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasscock, J.A.

    1998-08-18

    The acceptance test for the Westronics driver. This driver connects the Westronics Smart Multiplexer with the TMACS monitoring system.

  2. Substantial Contribution of Anthropogenic Air Pollution to Catastrophi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Substantial Contribution of Anthropogenic Air Pollution to Catastrophic Floods in Southwest China Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Substantial Contribution of ...

  3. Arctic Haze: Effect of Anthropogenic and Biomass Burning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Haze: Effect of Anthropogenic and Biomass Burning Aerosols Transported from Europe to the Arctic For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:...

  4. Are GRACE-era Terrestrial Water Trends Driven by Anthropogenic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Are GRACE-era Terrestrial Water Trends Driven by Anthropogenic Climate Change? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Are GRACE-era Terrestrial Water Trends Driven by ...

  5. Estimation of the relationship between remotely sensed anthropogenic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Anthropogenic heat discharge was estimated based on a remote sensing-based surface energy balance model, which was parameterized using land ...

  6. Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y. H.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Previsic, M.; Epler, J.; Lou, J.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy established a reference model project to benchmark a set of marine and hydrokinetic technologies including current (tidal, open-ocean, and river) turbines and wave energy converters. The objectives of the project were to first evaluate the status of these technologies and their readiness for commercial applications. Second, to evaluate the potential cost of energy and identify cost-reduction pathways and areas where additional research could be best applied to accelerate technology development to market readiness.

  7. Testing, Evaluation, and Qualification of Bio-Oil for Heating Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing, Evaluation, and Qualification of Bio-Oil for Heating March 26, 2015 Dr. Thomas A. Butcher Brookhaven National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement 2 * The goal of this project is to enable the replacement of 20% of the petroleum-derived heating oil in the Northeast with infrastructure compatible bio-oil by 2020 thereby stabilizing the supply and cost peaks for heating oil. * Heating oil and diesel

  8. Waste Tank Size Determination for the Hanford River Protection Project Cold Test, Training, and Mockup Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Yasuo; Wells, Beric E.; Kuhn, William L.

    2001-03-30

    The objective of the study was to determine the minimum tank size for the Cold Test Facility process testing of Hanford tank waste. This facility would support retrieval of waste in 75-ft-diameter DSTs with mixer pumps and SSTs with fluidic mixers. The cold test model will use full-scale mixer pumps, transfer pumps, and equipment with simulated waste. The study evaluated the acceptability of data for a range of tank diameters and depths and included identifying how the test data would be extrapolated to predict results for a full-size tank.

  9. AVTA: Chrysler RAM Experimental PHEV Pickup Truck Recovery Act Project Testing Results- Phase 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2011 Chrysler RAM PHEV, a demonstration vehicle not currently available for sale.

  10. Fabrication and testing for solar detoxification project. Final report, October 1996-August 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doty, S.; Widmer, N.; Beninga, K.; Cole, J.

    1997-12-01

    A demonstration of a solar detoxification system was conducted for the U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC) at Science Applications International Corporation`s (SAIC`s) test site near Golden, Colorado, in June 1997. The purpose of this demonstration test was to evaluate the use of solar energy for thermally detoxifying organic compounds representative of soil contamination found at U.S. Army sites. The demonstration test was carried out under the third of three tasks conducted under contract by SAIC. Under Tasks I and II, the conceptual and detailed design of a pilot-scale system was completed. Under Task III, fabrication and testing of the system were accomplished. This document presents the results obtained during the Task III demonstration test. The purpose of this demonstration test was to evaluate the use of solar energy to thermally detoxify organic compounds removed from contaminated media by ex situ (such as thermal desorption) or in situ (such as soil vapor extraction) treatment systems, or desorbed from pretreatment matrices (such as activated carbon). Extraction systems are commercially available so the step of directly extracting organic from contaminated soil was excluded from the pilot-scale demonstration. Rather, the pilot-scale demonstration test focused on evaluating ultraviolet (UV)-rich solar destruction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) by a solar incinerator and the environmental control of the resulting off gases.

  11. DOE-Sponsored Project Tests Novel Method to Increase Oil Recovery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Successful laboratory tests at the Energy Department’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have verified that the use of a brine-soluble ionic surfactant could improve the efficiency of carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR).

  12. Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2 Storage with Enhanced Methane Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Field testing the potential for combining geologic carbon dioxide storage with enhanced methane recovery is underway at a site in Alabama by a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners.

  13. Advanced Wind Energy Projects Test Facility Moving to Texas Tech University

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is moving its wind energy test facility to a new location near the campus of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas.

  14. OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out

  15. The Nevada Test Site Legacy TRU Waste - The WIPP Central Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, J. F.; Lahoud, R. G.; Foster, B. D.; VanMeighem, J.

    2003-02-25

    This paper discusses the Central Characterization Project (CCP) designed by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to aid sites, especially those sites with small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste streams, in disposing of legacy waste at their facility. Because of the high cost of contracting vendors with the characterization capabilities necessary to meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria, utilizing the CCP is meant to simplify the process for small quantity sites. The paper will describe the process of mobilization of the vendors through CCP, the current production milestones that have been met, and the on-site lessons learned.

  16. Energy Efficiency Pilot Projects in Jaipur: Testing the Energy Conservation Building Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Mathur, Jyotirmay; Yu, Sha

    2014-03-26

    The Malaviya National Institute of Technology (MNIT) in Jaipur, India is constructing two new buildings on its campus that allow it to test implementation of the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC), which Rajasthan made mandatory in 2011. PNNL has been working with MNIT to document progress on ECBC implementation in these buildings.

  17. HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTING DL

    2008-09-16

    The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

  18. Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Operational Experience, Performance Testing, and Systems Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.; Ramsden, T. G.; Kramer, W. E.; Novachek, F. J.

    2009-03-01

    The Wind2H2 system is fully functional and continues to gather performance data. In this report, specifications of the Wind2H2 equipment (electrolyzers, compressor, hydrogen storage tanks, and the hydrogen fueled generator) are summarized. System operational experience and lessons learned are discussed. Valuable operational experience is shared through running, testing, daily operations, and troubleshooting the Wind2H2 system and equipment errors are being logged to help evaluate the reliability of the system.

  19. The Waveform Correlation Event Detection System project, Phase II: Testing with the IDC primary network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, C.J.; Beiriger, J.I.; Moore, S.G.

    1998-04-01

    Further improvements to the Waveform Correlation Event Detection System (WCEDS) developed by Sandia Laboratory have made it possible to test the system on the accepted Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) seismic monitoring network. For our test interval we selected a 24-hour period from December 1996, and chose to use the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) produced by the Prototype International Data Center (PIDC) as ground truth for evaluating the results. The network is heterogeneous, consisting of array and three-component sites, and as a result requires more flexible waveform processing algorithms than were available in the first version of the system. For simplicity and superior performance, we opted to use the spatial coherency algorithm of Wagner and Owens (1996) for both types of sites. Preliminary tests indicated that the existing version of WCEDS, which ignored directional information, could not achieve satisfactory detection or location performance for many of the smaller events in the REB, particularly those in the south Pacific where the network coverage is unusually sparse. To achieve an acceptable level of performance, we made modifications to include directional consistency checks for the correlations, making the regions of high correlation much less ambiguous. These checks require the production of continuous azimuth and slowness streams for each station, which is accomplished by means of FK processing for the arrays and power polarization processing for the three-component sites. In addition, we added the capability to use multiple frequency-banded data streams for each site to increase sensitivity to phases whose frequency content changes as a function of distance.

  20. EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results. Topical report, Task 7.30

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K.; Moe, T.A.

    1992-09-01

    Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors` designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550{degree}F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100{degree}F lower.

  1. OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375

  2. TFTR D&D Project: Final Examination and Testing of the TFTR TF-Coils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irving J. Zatz

    2003-01-31

    In operation for nearly 15 years, TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) was not only a fusion science milestone, but a milestone of achievement in engineering as well. The TFTR D&D (Decommissioning and Decontamination) program provided a rare opportunity to examine machine components that had been exposed to a unique performance environment of greater than 100,000 mechanical and thermal load cycles. In particular, the possible examination of the TFTR toroidal-field (TF) coils, which met, then exceeded, the 5.2 Tesla magnetic field machine specification, could supply the answers to many questions that have been asked and debated since the coils were originally designed and built. A test program conducted in parallel with the D&D effort was the chance to look inside and examine, in detail, the TFTR TF coils for the first time since they were delivered encased to PPPL (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory). The results from such a program would provide data and insight that would not only be nefit PPPL and the fusion community, but the broader scientific community as well.

  3. System design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truitt, R.W.; Pounds, T.S.; Smith, S.O.

    1994-08-24

    This document describes the hardware subsystems of the data acquisition and control system (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The system was designed and implemented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The mitigation testing uses a pump immersed in the waste tank, directed at certain angles and operated at different speeds and time durations. The SY-101 tank has experienced recurrent periodic gas releases of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and (recently discovered) methane. The hydrogen gas represents a danger, as some of the releases are in amounts above the lower flammability limit (LFL). These large gas releases must be mitigated. Several instruments have been added to the tank to monitor the gas compositions, the tank level, the tank temperature, and other parameters. A mixer pump has been developed to stir the tank waste to cause the gases to be released at a slow rate. It is the function of the DACS to monitor those instruments and to control the mixer pump in a safe manner. During FY93 and FY94 the mixer pump was installed with associated testing operations support equipment and a mitigation test project plan was implemented. These activities successfully demonstrated the mixer pump`s ability to mitigate the SY-101 tank hydrogen gas hazard.

  4. Biological testing of sediment for the Olympia Harbor Navigation Improvement Project, 1988: Geoduck, amphipod, and echinoderm bioassays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.; Antrim, L.D.

    1989-05-01

    The Olympia Harbor Navigation Improvement Project requires the dredging of approximately 330,000 cubic yards (cy) of sediment from the harbor entrance channel and 205,185 cy from the turning basin. Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA) partial characterization studies were used to plan a full sediment characterization in which chemical analyses and biological testing of sediments evaluated the suitability of the dredged material for unconfined, open-water disposal. The US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), Seattle District, contracted with NOAA/NMFS, Environmental Conservation Division, to perform the chemical analysis and Microtox bioassay tests, and with the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) in Sequim to perform flow-through solid-phase bioassays utilizing juvenile (8 to 10 mm) geoduck clams, Panopea generosa, and static solid phase bioassays using the phoxocephalid amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius, developing embryos and gametes of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and the larvae of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. When the results of the biological tests were evaluated under PSDDA guidelines, it was found that all the tested sediment treatments from Olympia Harbor are suitable for unconfined open-water disposal. 14 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. The Mechanisms of Natural Variability and its Interaction with Anthropogenic Climate Change Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vallis, Geoffrey K.

    2015-02-01

    The project had two main components. The first concerns estimating the climate sensitivity in the presence of forcing uncertainty and natural variability. Climate sensitivity is the increase in the average surface temperature for a given increase in greenhouse gases, for example a doubling of carbon dioxide. We have provided new, probabilistic estimates of climate sensitivity using a simple climate model an the observed warming in the 20th century, in conjunction with ideas in data assimilation and parameter estimation developed in the engineering community. The estimates combine the uncertainty in the anthropogenic aerosols with the uncertainty arising because of natural variability. The second component concerns how the atmospheric circulation itself might change with anthropogenic global warming. We have shown that GCMs robustly predict an increase in the length scale of eddies, and we have also explored the dynamical mechanisms whereby there might be a shift in the latitude of the jet stream associated with anthropogenic warming. Such shifts in the jet might cause large changes in regional climate, potentially larger than the globally-averaged signal itself. We have also shown that the tropopause robustly increases in height with global warming, and that the Hadley Cell expands, and that the expansion of the Hadley Cell is correlated with the polewards movement of the mid-latitude jet.

  6. Irradiation Test Plan for the ATR National Scientific User Facility - University of Wisconsin Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heather J. MacLean; Kumar Sridharan; Timothy A. Hyde

    2008-06-01

    The performance of advanced nuclear systems critically relies on the performance of the materials used for cladding, duct, and other structural components. In many proposed advanced systems, the reactor design pushes the temperature and the total radiation dose higher than typically seen in a light water reactor. Understanding the stability of these materials under radiation is critical. There are a large number of materials or material systems that have been developed for greater high temperature or high dose performance for which little or no information on radiation response exists. The goal of this experiment is to provide initial data on the radiation response of these materials. The objective of the UW experiment is to irradiate materials of interest for advanced reactor applications at a variety of temperatures (nominally 300°C, 400°C, 500°C, and 700°C) and total dose accumulations (nominally 3 dpa and 6 dpa). Insertion of this irradiation test is proposed for September 2008 (ATR Cycle 143A).

  7. Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Mult-Pollutant Control Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, Daniel P; Locke, James E

    2008-02-01

    CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-megawatt (MW) Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/induct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. Testing was conducted through ports located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor to evaluate the performance of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system, as well as through ports located at the air heater outlet and baghouse outlet or stack to determine pollutant removal efficiencies across the Turbosorp{reg_sign} scrubber and baghouse. Data from the unit's stack continuous emission monitor (CEM) were also used for determining attainment of the performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions and SO{sub 2} removal efficiency.

  8. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Global Ocean Storage of Anthropogenic Carbon (GOSAC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, J C

    2002-04-02

    GOSAC was an EC-funded project (1998-2001) focused on improving the predictive capacity and accelerating development of global-scale, three-dimensional, ocean carbon-cycle models by means of standardized model evaluation and model intercomparison. Through the EC Environment and Climate Programme, GOSAC supported the participation of seven European modeling groups in the second phase of the larger international effort OCMIP (the Ocean Carbon-Cycle Model Intercomparison Project). OCMIP included model comparison and validation for both CO{sub 2} and other ocean circulation and biogeochemical tracers. Beyond the international OCMIP effort, GOSAC also supported the same EC ocean carbon cycle modeling groups to make simulations to evaluate the efficiency of purposeful sequestration of CO{sub 2} in the ocean. Such sequestration, below the thermocline has been proposed as a strategy to help mitigate the increase of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. Some technical and scientific highlights of GOSAC are given.

  10. Manhattan Project: Places

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Other Places Columbia University University of California, Berkeley The Dayton Project, 1943-1945 The Dayton Project, 1945 and Beyond Bomb Casing and Drop Test Sites Trinity Test ...

  11. The Navajo scrubber project -- Start up and performance testing of the largest FGD system in the USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusko, J.; Massion, R.; Sekhar, N.

    1998-07-01

    The Navajo Scrubber Project located in Page, Arizona is the largest Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system in the USA. Limestone based FGD system producing disposable grade gypsum is being installed on Units 1,2 and 3 (3 x 750 MWe) at the Navajo Generating Station (NGS) to comply with an EPA ruling mandating SO{sub 2} emission reduction to improve visibility in the Grand Canyon National Park. Compliance will be phased-in by unit in 1997, 1998 and 1999. The NGS burns low-sulfur coal with a sulfur content of approximately 0.5%. The FGD system is designed to treat a total flue gas flow of 11.25 million acfm, at an SO{sub 2} removal efficiency of 92% for an emission of 0.1 lb. per million BTU. Unique features of the FGD system include, a totally closed loop water balance system, 775 ft. chimney with C-276 alloy clad designed to handle both wet and hot dry gas, solid C-276 alloy absorber vessels and the use of existing ID fans, with suitable modification, to overcome the additional pressure drop of the FGD system. The start-up sequence/operation and performance tests of Unit 3 of this unique FGD system is described in this paper. Performance tests include, removal efficiency determination at 0.6 and 0.8% sulfur coal at normal and 60,000 PPM chloride in the slurry, particulate carry over determination under normal as well as upset ESP conditions, and determination of mist eliminator carry-over using Video Droplet Analyzer.

  12. Molten-Caustic-Leaching (Gravimelt) System Integration Project, Phase 2. Topical report for test circuit maintenance, refurbishment, modification, and off-line operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This is a report of the maintenance, refurbishment, modifications, and off-line circuit component testing of the integrated test circuit of the Molten-Caustic-Leaching (MCL or Gravimelt) process for the desulfurization and demineralization of coal. The project is sponsored by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC22-86-PC91257.

  13. EA-1792-S1: University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project – Castine Harbor Test Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Supplemental EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the University of Maine proposal to use Congressionally directed federal funding, from DOE, to deploy, test and retrieve one 1/8-scale floating wind turbine (20kw) prototype in Castine Harbor, offshore of Castine Maine. This test would be conducted prior to testing at the site 2 miles from Monhegan Island (evaluated under DOE EA-1792).

  14. In silico identification of anthropogenic chemicals as ligands of zebrafish sex hormone binding globulin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsteinson, Nels; Ban, Fuqiang; Santos-Filho, Osvaldo; Tabaei, Seyed M.H. [Prostate Centre at the Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, 2660 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC, V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Miguel-Queralt, Solange; Underhill, Caroline [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Child and Family Research Institute, 950 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4H4 (Canada); Cherkasov, Artem [Prostate Centre at the Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, 2660 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC, V6H 3Z6 (Canada)], E-mail: artc@interchange.ubc.ca; Hammond, Geoffrey L. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Child and Family Research Institute, 950 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4H4 (Canada)

    2009-01-01

    Anthropogenic compounds with the capacity to interact with the steroid-binding site of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) pose health risks to humans and other vertebrates including fish. Building on studies of human SHBG, we have applied in silico drug discovery methods to identify potential binders for SHBG in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model aquatic organism. Computational methods, including; homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, virtual screening, and 3D QSAR analysis, successfully identified 6 non-steroidal substances from the ZINC chemical database that bind to zebrafish SHBG (zfSHBG) with low-micromolar to nanomolar affinities, as determined by a competitive ligand-binding assay. We also screened 80,000 commercial substances listed by the European Chemicals Bureau and Environment Canada, and 6 non-steroidal hits from this in silico screen were tested experimentally for zfSHBG binding. All 6 of these compounds displaced the [{sup 3}H]5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone used as labeled ligand in the zfSHBG screening assay when tested at a 33 {mu}M concentration, and 3 of them (hexestrol, 4-tert-octylcatechol, and dihydrobenzo(a)pyren-7(8H)-one) bind to zfSHBG in the micromolar range. The study demonstrates the feasibility of large-scale in silico screening of anthropogenic compounds that may disrupt or highjack functionally important protein:ligand interactions. Such studies could increase the awareness of hazards posed by existing commercial chemicals at relatively low cost.

  15. Hanfords Supplemental Treatment Project: Full-Scale Integrated Testing of In-Container-Vitrification and a 10,000-Liter Dryer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witwer, Keith S.; Dysland, Eric J.; Garfield, J. S.; Beck, T. H.; Matyas, Josef; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Cooley, Scott K.; Pierce, Eric M.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2008-02-22

    The GeoMelt In-Container Vitrification (ICV) process was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 2004 for further evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanfords low-activity waste (LAW). Also referred to as bulk vitrification, this process combines glass forming minerals, LAW, and chemical amendments; dries the mixture; and then vitrifies the material in a refractory-lined steel container. AMEC Nuclear Ltd. (AMEC) is adapting its GeoMelt ICV technology for this application with technical and analytical support from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The DVBS project is funded by the DOE Office of River Protection and administered by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The Demonstration Bulk Vitrification Project (DBVS) was initiated to engineer, construct, and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat up to 750,000 liters of LAW from Waste Tank 241-S-109 at the DOE Hanford Site. Since the beginning of the DBVS project in 2004, testing has used laboratory, crucible-scale, and engineering-scale equipment to help establish process limitations of selected glass formulations and identify operational issues. Full-scale testing has provided critical design verification of the ICV process before operating the Hanford pilot-plant. In 2007, the projects fifth full-scale test, called FS-38D, (also known as the Integrated Dryer Melter Test, or IDMT,) was performed. This test had three primary objectives: 1) Demonstrate the simultaneous and integrated operation of the ICV melter with a 10,000-liter dryer, 2) Demonstrate the effectiveness of a new feed reformulation and change in process methodology towards reducing the production and migration of molten ionic salts (MIS), and, 3) Demonstrate that an acceptable glass product is produced under these conditions. Testing was performed from August 8 to 17, 2007. Process and analytical results demonstrated that the primary test objectives, along with a dozen supporting

  16. Observed Aerosol Radiative Forcings: Comparison for Natural and Anthropogenic Sources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Radiative Forcings: Comparison for Natural and Anthropogenic Sources A. M. Vogelmann Center for Atmospheric Sciences and Center for Clouds, Chemistry and Climate Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California San Diego, California Introduction The modeling of radiative forcing, and aerosol radiative forcing in particular, is one of the largest uncertainties in predicting climate change (Hansen et al. 1998). Addressing this uncertainty first requires an accurate

  17. Disentangling climatic and anthropogenic controls on global terrestrial evapotranspiration trends

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Wei, Yaxing; Thornton, Peter E.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Fu, Wenting; Fisher, Joshua B.; Dickinson, Robert E.; Shem, Willis; et al

    2015-09-08

    Here, we examined natural and anthropogenic controls on terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET) changes from 1982-2010 using multiple estimates from remote sensing-based datasets and process-oriented land surface models. A significant increased trend of ET in each hemisphere was consistently revealed by observationally-constrained data and multi-model ensembles that considered historic natural and anthropogenic drivers. The climate impacts were simulated to determine the spatiotemporal variations in ET. Globally, rising CO2 ranked second in these models after the predominant climatic influences, and yielded a decreasing trend in canopy transpiration and ET, especially for tropical forests and high-latitude shrub land. Increased nitrogen deposition slightly amplified globalmore » ET via enhanced plant growth. Land-use-induced ET responses, albeit with substantial uncertainties across the factorial analysis, were minor globally, but pronounced locally, particularly over regions with intensive land-cover changes. Our study highlights the importance of employing multi-stream ET and ET-component estimates to quantify the strengthening anthropogenic fingerprint in the global hydrologic cycle.« less

  18. Disentangling climatic and anthropogenic controls on global terrestrial evapotranspiration trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Wei, Yaxing; Thornton, Peter E.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Fu, Wenting; Fisher, Joshua B.; Dickinson, Robert E.; Shem, Willis; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Kaicun; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Tian, Hanqin; Mu, Mingquan; Arain, Altaf; Ciais, Philippe; Cook, Robert; Dai, Yongjiu; Hayes, Daniel; Huang, Maoyi; Huang, Suo; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Ito, Akihiko; Jain, Atul; King, Anthony W.; Lei, Huimin; Lu, Chaoqun; Michalak, Anna M.; Parazoo, Nicholas; Peng, Changhui; Peng, Shushi; Poulter, Benjamin; Schaefer, Kevin; Jafarov, Elchin; Wang, Weile; Zeng, Ning; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Zhao, Fang; Zhu, Qiuan; Zhu, Zaichun

    2015-09-08

    Here, we examined natural and anthropogenic controls on terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET) changes from 1982-2010 using multiple estimates from remote sensing-based datasets and process-oriented land surface models. A significant increased trend of ET in each hemisphere was consistently revealed by observationally-constrained data and multi-model ensembles that considered historic natural and anthropogenic drivers. The climate impacts were simulated to determine the spatiotemporal variations in ET. Globally, rising CO2 ranked second in these models after the predominant climatic influences, and yielded a decreasing trend in canopy transpiration and ET, especially for tropical forests and high-latitude shrub land. Increased nitrogen deposition slightly amplified global ET via enhanced plant growth. Land-use-induced ET responses, albeit with substantial uncertainties across the factorial analysis, were minor globally, but pronounced locally, particularly over regions with intensive land-cover changes. Our study highlights the importance of employing multi-stream ET and ET-component estimates to quantify the strengthening anthropogenic fingerprint in the global hydrologic cycle.

  19. Field test of a generic method for halogenated hydrocarbons: Semivost test at a chemical manufacturing facility. Final project report, August 1992-August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.; Merrill, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    The candidate methods for semivolatile organic compounds are SW-846 Sampling Method 0010 and Analytical Method 8270, which are applicable to stationary sources. Two field tests were conducted using quadruple sampling trains with dynamic spiking were performed according to the guidelines of EPA Method 301. The first field test was performed at a site with low levels of moisture. The second test reported here was conducted at a chemical manufacturing facility where chemical wastes were burned in a coal-fired boiler. Poor recoveries obtained for the spiked analytes at the second test were attributed to wet sorbent from the sampling train, use of methanol to effect complete transfer of wet sorbent from the sampling module, and use of extraction techniques which did not effect a complete separation of methylene chloride from methanol. A procedure to address problems with preparation of samples from Method 0010 is included in the report.

  20. Hanford's Supplemental Treatment Project: Full-Scale Integrated Testing of In-Container-Vitrification and a 10,000-Liter Dryer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witwer, K.S.; Dysland, E.J.; Garfield, J.S.; Beck, T.H.; Matyas, J.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Cooley, S.K.; Pierce, E.; Kim, D.S.; Schweiger, M.J.

    2008-07-01

    The GeoMelt{sup R} In-Container Vitrification{sup TM} (ICV{sup TM}) process was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 2004 for further evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford's low-activity waste (LAW). Also referred to as 'bulk vitrification', this process combines glass forming minerals, LAW, and chemical amendments; dries the mixture; and then vitrifies the material in a refractory-lined steel container. AMEC Nuclear Ltd. (AMEC) is adapting its GeoMelt ICV{sup TM} technology for this application with technical and analytical support from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The DVBS project is funded by the DOE Office of River Protection and administered by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The Demonstration Bulk Vitrification Project (DBVS) was initiated to engineer, construct, and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat up to 750,000 liters of LAW from Waste Tank 241-S-109 at the DOE Hanford Site. Since the beginning of the DBVS project in 2004, testing has used laboratory, crucible-scale, and engineering-scale equipment to help establish process limitations of selected glass formulations and identify operational issues. Full-scale testing has provided critical design verification of the ICV{sup TM} process before operating the Hanford pilot-plant. In 2007, the project's fifth full-scale test, called FS-38D, (also known as the Integrated Dryer Melter Test, or IDMT,) was performed. This test had three primary objectives: 1) Demonstrate the simultaneous and integrated operation of the ICV{sup TM} melter with a 10,000- liter dryer, 2) Demonstrate the effectiveness of a new feed reformulation and change in process methodology towards reducing the production and migration of molten ionic salts (MIS), and, 3) Demonstrate that an acceptable glass product is produced under these conditions. Testing was performed from August 8 to 17, 2007. Process and analytical results demonstrated that the primary test

  1. The Underground Test Area Project of the Nevada Test Site: Building Confidence in Groundwater Flow and Transport Models at Pahute Mesa Through Focused Characterization Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawloski, G A; Wurtz, J; Drellack, S L

    2009-12-29

    Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site contains about 8.0E+07 curies of radioactivity caused by underground nuclear testing. The Underground Test Area Subproject has entered Phase II of data acquisition, analysis, and modeling to determine the risk to receptors from radioactivity in the groundwater, establish a groundwater monitoring network, and provide regulatory closure. Evaluation of radionuclide contamination at Pahute Mesa is particularly difficult due to the complex stratigraphy and structure caused by multiple calderas in the Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field and overprinting of Basin and Range faulting. Included in overall Phase II goals is the need to reduce the uncertainty and improve confidence in modeling results. New characterization efforts are underway, and results from the first year of a three-year well drilling plan are presented.

  2. Predictions of tracer transport in interwell tracer tests at the C-Hole complex. Yucca Mountain site characterization project report milestone 4077

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, P.W.

    1996-09-01

    This report presents predictions of tracer transport in interwell tracer tests that are to be conducted at the C-Hole complex at the Nevada Test Site on behalf of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The predictions are used to make specific recommendations about the manner in which the tracer test should be conducted to best satisfy the needs of the Project. The objective of he tracer tests is to study flow and species transport under saturated conditions in the fractured tuffs near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The potential repository will be located in the unsaturated zone within Yucca Mountain. The saturated zone beneath and around the mountain represents the final barrier to transport to the accessible environment that radionuclides will encounter if they breach the engineered barriers within the repository and the barriers to flow and transport provided by the unsaturated zone. Background information on the C-Holes is provided in Section 1.1, and the planned tracer testing program is discussed in Section 1.2.

  3. NESC VII European project: demonstration of warm pre-stressing effect in biaxial loading conditions - Bending tests on 18MND5 cruciform specimens and their interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacquemoud, C.; Yuritzinn, T.; Marie, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the NESC VII European project, a large experimental program has been dedicated to characterize the Warm Pre-Stressing (WPS) effect in different testing configurations. One of the CEA (France) contributions to this project is the realization of five point bending tests on large cruciform specimens considering different WPS loading cycles. The five cruciform specimens, sponsored by EDF (France) and IRSN (France), are made of 18MND5 steel. Two of them have been tested on a same LCF (Load-Cool-Fracture) loading cycle and two others on the same LCTF (Load-Cool-Transient-Fracture) loading cycle. The experimental results presented in this paper give a successful demonstration of the WPS effect in biaxial loading conditions either on a LCF or on a LCTF cycle. During the test interpretations, different models have then been tested and compared in order to evaluate their ability to predict the cleavage fracture in the case of different WPS loading cycles. They all provide very conservative predictions whatever loading cycle is concerned. (authors)

  4. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 System Test Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE System Test Plan is to assess the approach to be taken for intended testing activities associated with the SAPHIRE software product. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

  5. Laboratory and Field Studies Related to Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site in Support of the Underground Test Area and Hydrologic Resources Management Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.L.Finnegan; J.L.Thompson

    2002-06-01

    This report details the work of Chemistry Division personnel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY 2001 for the U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) under its Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration divisions. Los Alamos is one of a number of agencies collaborating in an effort to describe the present and future movement of radionuclides in the underground environment of the Nevada Test Site. This fiscal year we collected and analyzed water samples from a number of expended test locations at the Nevada Test Site. We give the results of these analyses and summarize the information gained over the quarter century that we have been studying several of these sites. We find that by far most of the radioactive residues from a nuclear test are contained in the melt glass in the cavity. Those radionuclides that are mobile in water can be transported if the groundwater is moving due to hydraulic or thermal gradients. The extent to which they move is a function of their chemical speciation, with neutral or anionic materials traveling freely relative to cationic materials that tend to sorb on rock surfaces. However, radionuclides sorbed on colloids may be transported if the colloids are moving. Local conditions strongly influence the distribution and movement of radionuclides, and we continue to study sites such as Almendro, which is thermally quite hot, and Nash and Bourbon, where radionuclides had not been measured for 8 years. We collected samples from three characterization wells in Frenchman Flat to obtain baseline radiochemistry data for each well, and we analyzed eight wells containing radioactivity for {sup 237}Np, using our highly sensitive ICP/MS. We have again used our field probe that allows us to measure important groundwater properties in situ. We conclude our report by noting document reviews and publications produced in support of this program.

  6. EA-1965: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center’s Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), is proposing to provide federal funding to Florida Atlantic University’s South-East National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) to support the at sea testing of FAU SNMREC’s experimental current generation turbine and the deployment and operation of their Small-Scale Ocean Current Turbine Test Berth, sited on the outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters off the coast of Ft Lauderdale, Florida. SNMREC would demonstrate the test berth site readiness by testing their pilot-scale experimental ocean current turbine unit at that location. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) conducted an Environmental Assessment to analyze the impacts associated with leasing OCS lands to FAU SNMREC, per their jurisdictional responsibilities under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. DOE was a cooperating agency in this process and based on the EA, DOE issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  7. Acceptance test procedure bldg. 271-U remote monitoring of project W-059 B-Plant canyon exhaust system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCDANIEL, K.S.

    1999-09-01

    The test procedure provides for verifying indications and alarms The test procedure provides for verifying indications and alarms associated with the B Plant Canyon Ventilation System as they are being displayed on a remote monitoring workstation located in building 271-U. The system application software was installed by PLCS Plus under contract from B&W Hanford Company. The application software was installed on an existing operator workstation in building 271U which is owned and operated by Bechtel Hanford Inc.

  8. Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

    2007-10-10

    This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

  9. Addendum to Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project: Additiona NH3, NOx, and CO Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, Daniel P; Locke, James E

    2008-03-01

    On March 28-30 and May 1-4, 2007, CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-MW Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The testing in March and May demonstrated that the multi-pollutant control system attained its performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, acid gas (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF) removal efficiency, and mercury removal efficiency. However, the ammonia slip measured between the SCR outlet and air heater inlet was consistently greater than the guarantee of 2 ppmvd {at} 3% O{sub 2}. As a result, additional testing was performed on May 30-June 1 and on June 20-21, 2007, in conjunction with tuning of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system by BPEI, in an effort to achieve the performance target for ammonia slip. This additional testing occurred after the installation of a large particle ash (LPA) screen and removal system just above the SCR reactor and a fresh SCR catalyst layer in mid-May. This report describes the results of the additional tests. During the May 30-June 1 sampling period, CONSOL R&D and Clean Air Engineering (CAE) each measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet, downstream of the in-duct SCR reactor. In addition, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the

  10. Fingerprints of anthropogenic and natural variability in global-mean surface temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, J.M.; Zhang, Yuan

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents an analysis designed to detect greenhouse warming by distinguishing between temperature rises induced by increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and those induced by background variability that are present without changes in atmospheric composition. The strategy is based on the surface temperature field. At each observation time, the projection of the anomalous temperature field on the presumed anthropogenic fingerprint is removed in order to obtain a temperature deviation field; i.e., the temperature anomalies in the phase space orthogonal to the anthropogenic fingerprint, which are presumed to be entirely natural. The time series of the expansion coefficients of the fingerprint a(t) is then regressed on this temperature deviation field to identify the axis in the orthogonal phase space along which the variations are most strongly correlated, and an index n(t) of the temporal variations along that axis is generated. The index a(t) is then regressed upon n(t) and the resulting least squares fit is regarded as the component of a(t) that can be ascribed to natural causes. The analysis was performed for monthly global surface temperature anomaly fields for the period 1900-95. Results indicate that two well defined patterns of natural variability contribute to variations in global mean temperature: the synthetic cold ocean-warm land (COWL) pattern and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In domains that include surface air temperature over Eurasia and North America, the COWL pattern tends to be dominant. The ENSO signature emerges as the pattern most strongly linearly correlated with global sea surface temperature and with tropospheric layer-averaged temperatures. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  11. EA-1792: University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project, Gulf of Maine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to support research on floating offshore wind turbine platforms. This project would support the mission, vision, and goals of DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Water Power Program to improve performance, lower costs, and accelerate deployment of innovative wind power technologies. Development of offshore wind energy technologies would help the nation reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, diversify its energy supply, provide cost-competitive electricity to key coastal regions, and stimulate revitalization of key sectors of the economy.

  12. Design, Project Execution, and Commissioning of the 1.8 K Superfluid Helium Refrigeration System for SRF Cryomodule Testing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Treite, P.; Nuesslein, U.; Jia, Yi; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.

    2015-07-15

    The Fermilab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) provides a test bed to measure the performance of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CM). These SRF components form the basic building blocks of future high intensity accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and a Muon Collider. Linde Kryotechnik AG and Linde Cryogenics have designed, constructed and commissioned the superfluid helium refrigerator needed to support SRF component testing at the CMTF Facility. The hybrid refrigerator is designed to operate in a variety of modes and under a wide range of boundary conditions down to 1.8 Kelvin set by CM design. Special features ofmore » the refrigerator include the use of warm and cold compression and high efficiency turbo expanders.This paper gives an overview on the wide range of the challenging cooling requirements, the design, fabrication and the commissioning of the installed cryogenic system.« less

  13. Design, Project Execution, and Commissioning of the 1.8 K Superfluid Helium Refrigeration System for SRF Cryomodule Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treite, P.; Nuesslein, U.; Jia, Yi; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.

    2015-07-15

    The Fermilab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) provides a test bed to measure the performance of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CM). These SRF components form the basic building blocks of future high intensity accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and a Muon Collider. Linde Kryotechnik AG and Linde Cryogenics have designed, constructed and commissioned the superfluid helium refrigerator needed to support SRF component testing at the CMTF Facility. The hybrid refrigerator is designed to operate in a variety of modes and under a wide range of boundary conditions down to 1.8 Kelvin set by CM design. Special features of the refrigerator include the use of warm and cold compression and high efficiency turbo expanders.This paper gives an overview on the wide range of the challenging cooling requirements, the design, fabrication and the commissioning of the installed cryogenic system.

  14. Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona: Nonuse value study pilot-test final report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welsh, M.P.; Bishop, R.C.; Baumgartner, R.M.; Phillips, M.L.

    1997-10-01

    Nonuse or passive use economic value is the value of a natural resource held by individuals who may not physically use the resource. The goal of the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES) Nonuse Study was to estimate the total economic value for changes in the operation of Glen Canyon Dam. This four year effort included extensive qualitative research, a number of focus groups, a survey design phase, two reviews by the Office of Management and Budget, a pilot-test phase, and a final survey of 8,000 households in the United States. This document details the Pilot-Test phase of the study.

  15. Anthropogenic CO2 as a Feedstock for Cyanobacteria-Based Biofuels |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Anthropogenic CO2 as a Feedstock for Cyanobacteria-Based Biofuels Anthropogenic CO2 as a Feedstock for Cyanobacteria-Based Biofuels Breakout Session 2-A: The Future of Algae-Based Biofuels Anthropogenic CO2 as a Feedstock for Cyanobacteria-Based Biofuels Ronald R. Chance, Executive Vice President, Engineering, Algenol chance_bioenergy_2015.pdf (2.15 MB) More Documents & Publications Metabolic Pathways and Metabolic Engineering 2016 National Algal Biofuels Technology

  16. Tribology of improved transformation-toughened ceramics-heat engine test. Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lilley, E.; Rossi, G.A.; Pelletier, P.J.

    1992-04-01

    A short term study has been carried out to evaluate the suitability as cam roller followers of three ceria zirconia toughened aluminas and two yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconias (YTZPs) previously enhanced in programs supported by ORNL. Norton Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (NBD-100) was also included in this study as a reference material, because it was known from work at Northwestern University that Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} to experienced little or no wear in this application, and NBD-100 is currently a successful commercial bearing material. The tribological studies were subcontracted to the Torrington Company. They found that in cam roller follower simulated tests that there was essentially no wear after 1 hour and 5 hours of testing detectable by weighing and concluded that all of these ceramics are, therefore, candidate materials. Because of the minute amounts of wear it was not possible to identify the wear mechanism or to make any correlations with the other physical properties which were evaluated such as MOR, K{sub IC} hardness, density and grain size. Phase transformation during rolling has been of interest in the tribology of zirconia contain materials. The least stable of the ceria zirconia toughened aluminas resulted in as much as 33% monoclinic phase after testing whereas the yttria stabilized (TTZ) contained very little of this transformed phase. The results of this study show that oxide materials can now be considered as candidates for cam roller followers in heat engines.

  17. Decontamination systems information and research program -- Literature review in support of development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for in situ formed barriers project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    The US Department of Energy is responsible for approximately 3,000 sites in which contaminants such as carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, perchlorethylene, non-volatile and soluble organic and insoluble organics (PCBs and pesticides) are encountered. In specific areas of these sites radioactive contaminants are stored in underground storage tanks which were originally designed and constructed with a 30-year projected life. Many of these tanks are now 10 years beyond the design life and failures have occurred allowing the basic liquids (ph of 8 to 9) to leak into the unconsolidated soils below. Nearly one half of the storage tanks located at the Hanford Washington Reservation are suspected of leaking and contaminating the soils beneath them. The Hanford site is located in a semi-arid climate region with rainfall of less than 6 inches annually, and studies have indicated that very little of this water finds its way to the groundwater to move the water down gradient toward the Columbia River. This provides the government with time to develop a barrier system to prevent further contamination of the groundwater, and to develop and test remediation systems to stabilize or remove the contaminant materials. In parallel to remediation efforts, confinement and containment technologies are needed to retard or prevent the advancement of contamination plumes through the environment until the implementation of remediation technology efforts are completed. This project examines the various confinement and containment technologies and protocols for testing the materials in relation to their function in-situ.

  18. Project test plan for runoff and erosion on fine-soil barrier surfaces and rock-covered side slopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Hoover, K.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1990-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company are working together to develop protective barriers to isolate near-surface radioactive waste. The purpose of the barriers is to protect defense wastes at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site from infiltration of precipitation, biointrusion, and surficial erosion for up to 10,000 years without the need for long-term monitoring, maintenance, or institutional control. The barriers will be constructed of layered earth and rock material designed to direct surface and groundwater pathways away from the buried waste. To address soil erosion as it applies to barrier design and long-term stability, a task designed to study this problem has been included in the Protective Barriers Program at PNL. The barrier soil-erosion task will investigate the ability of the soil cover and side slopes to resist the erosional and destabilizing processes from externally applied water. The study will include identification and field testing of the dominant processes contributing to erosion and barrier failure. The effects of rock mulches, vegetation cover on the top fine-grained soil surface, as well as the stability of rock armoring on the side slopes, will be evaluated. Some of the testing will include the effects of animal intrusion on barrier erosion, and these will be coordinated with other animal intrusion studies. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Project W420 Air Sampler Probe Placement Qualification Tests for Four 6-Inch Diameter Stacks: 296-A-25, 296-B-28, 296-S-22, and 296-T-18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maughan, A.D.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1998-09-30

    The W420 project covers the upgrading of effluent monitoring systems at six ventilation exhaust stacks in tank-farm facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The discharge stacks of five of the six systems will be completely replaced. Four of these (296-A-25, 296-B-28, 296-S-22, and 296-T-18) will be of the same size, 6-inches in diameter and about 12-ft high. This report documents tests that were conducted to verify that these four stacks meet the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of the air sampling probe. These criteria ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the location of the probe such that the extracted sample represents the whole. There are also criteria addressing the transport of the sample to the collection device. These are not covered in this report, but will need to be addressed later. These tests were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on a full-scale model of the 6-inch stick. The sequence of tests addresses the acceptability of the flow angle relative to the probe and the uniformity of air velocity and gaseous and particle tracers in the cross section of the stack. All tests were successful, and all acceptance criteria were met.

  20. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 7. Science Applications, Incorporated field test facility preliminary design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report contains the preliminary design of an SCEAS Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF is a 3600 m/sup 2/ fluid roof greenhouse with an inflated plastic film roof to maintain a clean environment for the fluid roof and to protect the inner glazing from hail and other small missiles. The objective of the design was the faithful scaling of the commercial facility to ensure that the ETF results could be extrapolated to a commercial facility of any size. Therefore, all major features, including the photovoltaic power system, an integral water desalination system and even the basic structural module have been retained. The design is described in substantial detail in the body of this report, with appendices giving the drawings and specifications.

  1. Potential for Induced Seismicity Related to the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project Pilot Test, Solano County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, L.; Chiaramonte, L.; Daley, T.M.; Wilson, D.; Foxall, W.; Beyer, J.H.

    2010-06-15

    The objective of this technical report is to analyze the potential for induced seismicity due to a proposed small-scale CO{sub 2} injection project in the Montezuma Hills. We reviewed currently available public information, including 32 years of recorded seismic events, locations of mapped faults, and estimates of the stress state of the region. We also reviewed proprietary geological information acquired by Shell, including seismic reflection imaging in the area, and found that the data and interpretations used by Shell are appropriate and satisfactory for the purpose of this report. The closest known fault to the proposed injection site is the Kirby Hills Fault. It appears to be active, and microearthquakes as large as magnitude 3.7 have been associated with the fault near the site over the past 32 years. Most of these small events occurred 9-17 miles (15-28 km) below the surface, which is deep for this part of California. However, the geographic locations of the many events in the standard seismicity catalog for the area are subject to considerable uncertainty because of the lack of nearby seismic stations; so attributing the recorded earthquakes to motion along any specific fault is also uncertain. Nonetheless, the Kirby Hills Fault is the closest to the proposed injection site and is therefore our primary consideration for evaluating the potential seismic impacts, if any, from injection. Our planned installation of seismic monitoring stations near the site will greatly improve earthquake location accuracy. Shell seismic data also indicate two unnamed faults more than 3 miles east of the project site. These faults do not reach the surface as they are truncated by an unconformity at a depth of about 2,000 feet (610 m). The unconformity is identified as occurring during the Oligocene Epoch, 33.9-23.03 million years ago, which indicates that these faults are not currently active. Farther east are the Rio Vista Fault and Midland Fault at distances of about 6 miles

  2. NREL Distributes Wind Competitiveness Improvement Project Round...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Type testing includes safety and function test, power performance test, load measurements, acoustic noise test, and blade test. The awardees will complete their projects within an ...

  3. The last decade of global anthropogenic sulfur dioxide: 2000-2011 emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klimont, Z.; Smith, Steven J.; Cofala, Janusz

    2013-01-09

    Evolution of global and regional anthropogenic SO2 emissions in the last decade has been estimated through a bottom-up calculation for recent years. After a strong increase in emissions that peaked about 2006, we estimate a declining trend continuing until 2011. However, there is a strong spatial variability with North America and Europe continuing to reduce emissions with an increasing role of Asia and international shipping. China remains a key contributor but the introduction of stricter emission limits followed by an ambitious program of installing flue gas desulfurization on power plants resulted in significant decline in emissions from energy sector and stabilization of Chinese SO2 emissions. Comparable mitigation strategies are not yet present in several other Asian countries and industrial sectors in general, while emissions from international shipping are expected to start declining soon following agreed reduction of sulfur content of fuel oil. Estimated trends in global SO2 emissions are within the range of RCP projections and uncertainty calculated for the year 2005.

  4. Anthropogenic increase in carbon dioxide compromises plant defense against invasive insects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavala, J.; Casteel, C.; DeLucia, E.; Berenbaum, M.

    2008-04-01

    Elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), a consequence of anthropogenic global change, can profoundly affect the interactions between crop plants and insect pests and may promote yet another form of global change: the rapid establishment of invasive species. Elevated CO{sub 2} increased the susceptibility of soybean plants grown under field conditions to the invasive Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) and to a variant of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) resistant to crop rotation by down-regulating gene expression related to defense signaling [lipoxygenase 7 (lox7), lipoxygenase 8 (lox8), and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (acc-s)]. The down-regulation of these genes, in turn, reduced the production of cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CystPIs), which are specific deterrents to coleopteran herbivores. Beetle herbivory increased CystPI activity to a greater degree in plants grown under ambient than under elevated CO{sub 2}. Gut cysteine proteinase activity was higher in beetles consuming foliage of soybeans grown under elevated CO{sub 2} than in beetles consuming soybeans grown in ambient CO{sub 2}, consistent with enhanced growth and development of these beetles on plants grown in elevated CO{sub 2}. These findings suggest that predicted increases in soybean productivity under projected elevated CO{sub 2} levels may be reduced by increased susceptibility to invasive crop pests.

  5. MHK Projects/Oyster 800 Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 Project Details Operational testing of Oyster 800 commenced in June 2012 when the machine produced first electrical power to the grid. Project Installed Capacity (MW) 1...

  6. Fermilab | Directorate | Office of Project Management Oversight...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Project Management Oversight Fermilab ManagementNon-Scientific Projects Current Management Projects IARC OTE Building Liquid Argon Test Building (LArTB) TeV ...

  7. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted region or

  8. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam

  9. Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide sources from anthropogenic activity: Implications for carbon cycle constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Elliott; Whelan, Mary; Seibt, U.; Smith, Steven J.; Berry, Joe; Hilton, Timothy W.

    2015-04-28

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) has recently emerged as an atmospheric tracer of gross primary production. All modeling studies of COS air-monitoring data rely on a climatological anthropogenic inventory that does not reflect present conditions or support interpretation of ice core and firn trends. Here we develop a global anthropogenic inventory for the years 1850 to 2013 based on new emission measurements and material-specific data. By applying methods from a recent regional inventory to global data, we find that the anthropogenic source is similar in magnitude to the plant sink, confounding carbon cycle applications. However, a material-specific approach results in a current anthropogenic source that is only one-third of plant uptake and is concentrated in Asia, supporting carbon cycle applications of global air-monitoring data. Furthermore, the source alone cannot explain the century-scale mixing ratio growth, which suggests that ice and firn data may provide the first global history of gross primary production.

  10. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project and the Tokamak Physics Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-05-27

    If the US is to meet the energy needs of the future, it is essential that new technologies emerge to compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors. Fusion energy has the potential to become a major source of energy for the future. Power from fusion energy would provide a substantially reduced environmental impact as compared with other forms of energy generation. Since fusion utilizes no fossil fuels, there would be no release of chemical combustion products to the atmosphere. Additionally, there are no fission products formed to present handling and disposal problems, and runaway fuel reactions are impossible due to the small amounts of deuterium and tritium present. The purpose of the TPX Project is to support the development of the physics and technology to extend tokamak operation into the continuously operating (steady-state) regime, and to demonstrate advances in fundamental tokamak performance. The purpose of TFTR D&D is to ensure compliance with DOE Order 5820.2A ``Radioactive Waste Management`` and to remove environmental and health hazards posed by the TFTR in a non-operational mode. There are two proposed actions evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA). The actions are related because one must take place before the other can proceed. The proposed actions assessed in this EA are: the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR); to be followed by the construction and operation of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Both of these proposed actions would take place primarily within the TFTR Test Cell Complex at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The TFTR is located on ``D-site`` at the James Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and is operated by PPPL under contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  11. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Texas Pacific Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310, Wasson (San Andres) Field, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.; McCoy, R.L.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Glascock, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    The coring, logging and testing of Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310 was a cooperative effort between Texas Pacific, owner of the well, and Gruy Federal, Inc. The requirements of the contract, which are summarized in Enclosure 1, Appendix A, include drilling and coring activities. The pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs in selected wells are intended to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report presents detailed information on the first such project. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood. The engineering of tests and analysis of such experimental data requires original thinking, but the reliability of the results is higher than data derived from conventional tests.

  12. The Mississippi CCS Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doug Cathro

    2010-09-30

    The Mississippi CCS Project is a proposed large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which would have demonstrated advanced technologies to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically, the Mississippi CCS Project was to accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petcoke to Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) plant that is selected for a Federal Loan Guarantee and would be the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Mississippi CCS Project was to promote the expansion of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana region which would supply greater energy security through increased domestic energy production. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure would have continued to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project were expected to be fulfilled through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 included the studies that establish the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the MG SNG Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Soso oil field in Mississippi. The overall objective of Phase 2, was to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, the Mississippi CO{sub 2} Pipeline to Denbury's Free State Pipeline, and an MVA system at the Soso oil field.

  13. DOE Announces $11 Million for Seven New Projects to Test New Options for Optimal Efficiency of the U.S. Electric Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ARPA-E’s GRID DATA Projects will Develop Innovative Models and Data Repositories to Improve Transmission and Distribution of Electricity on the U.S. Electric Grid

  14. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a

  15. Building America Case Study: Combustion Safety Simplified Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Chicago, Illinois, and Minneapolis, Minnesota PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Location: ...

  16. About Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Projects MicroBooNE Project Web Pages The Project Pages hold information and links for the collaboration and its Project Managers, and also hold links to project Director's and ...

  17. Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide sources from anthropogenic activity: Implications for carbon cycle constraints

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Campbell, J. E.; Whelan, Mary; Seibt, U.; Smith, Steven J.; Berry, J. A.; Hilton, Timothy W.

    2015-04-16

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) has recently emerged as an atmospheric tracer of gross primary production. All modeling studies of COS air-monitoring data rely on a climatological anthropogenic inventory that does not reflect present conditions or support interpretation of ice core and firn trends. Here we develop a global anthropogenic inventory for the years 1850 to 2013 based on new emission measurements and material-specific data. By applying methods from a recent regional inventory to global data, we find that the anthropogenic source is similar in magnitude to the plant sink, confounding carbon cycle applications. However, a material-specific approach results in a currentmore » anthropogenic source that is only one third of plant uptake and is concentrated in Asia, supporting carbon cycle applications of global air-monitoring data. As a result, changes in the anthropogenic source alone cannot explain the century-scale mixing ratio growth, which suggests that ice and firn data may provide the first global history of gross primary production.« less

  18. Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide sources from anthropogenic activity: Implications for carbon cycle constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J. E.; Whelan, Mary; Seibt, U.; Smith, Steven J.; Berry, J. A.; Hilton, Timothy W.

    2015-04-16

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) has recently emerged as an atmospheric tracer of gross primary production. All modeling studies of COS air-monitoring data rely on a climatological anthropogenic inventory that does not reflect present conditions or support interpretation of ice core and firn trends. Here we develop a global anthropogenic inventory for the years 1850 to 2013 based on new emission measurements and material-specific data. By applying methods from a recent regional inventory to global data, we find that the anthropogenic source is similar in magnitude to the plant sink, confounding carbon cycle applications. However, a material-specific approach results in a current anthropogenic source that is only one third of plant uptake and is concentrated in Asia, supporting carbon cycle applications of global air-monitoring data. As a result, changes in the anthropogenic source alone cannot explain the century-scale mixing ratio growth, which suggests that ice and firn data may provide the first global history of gross primary production.

  19. Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide sources from anthropogenic activity: Implications for carbon cycle constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.E.; Whelan, Mary; Seibt, U.; Smith, Steven J.; Berry, J.A.; Hilton, Timothy W.

    2015-04-28

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) has recently emerged as an atmospheric tracer of gross primary production. All modeling studies of COS air-monitoring data rely on a climatological anthropogenic inventory that does not reflect present conditions or support interpretation of ice core and firn trends. Here we develop a global anthropogenic inventory for the years 1850 to 2013 based on new emission measurements and material-specific data. By applying methods from a recent regional inventory to global data, we find that the anthropogenic source is similar in magnitude to the plant sink, confounding carbon cycle applications. However, a material-specific approach results in a current anthropogenic source that is only one third of plant uptake and is concentrated in Asia, supporting carbon cycle applications of global air-monitoring data. Furthermore, changes in the anthropogenic source alone cannot explain the century-scale mixing ratio growth, which suggests that ice and firn data may provide the first global history of gross primary production.

  20. Offshore Wind Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects Offshore Wind Projects This report covers the Wind and Water Power Program's offshore wind energy projects from fiscal years 2006 to 2016. Offshore Wind Energy Projects 2006-2016 (4.2 MB) More Documents & Publications Testing, Manufacturing, and Component Development Projects Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects

  1. Estimation of the relationship between remotely sensed anthropogenic heat discharge and building energy use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Weng, Qihao; Gurney, Kevin R.; Shuai, Yanmin; Hu, Xuefei

    2012-01-01

    This paper examined the relationship between remotely sensed anthropogenic heat discharge and energy use from residential and commercial buildings across multiple scales in the city of Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Anthropogenic heat discharge was estimated based on a remote sensing-based surface energy balance model, which was parameterized using land cover, land surface temperature, albedo, and meteorological data. Building energy use was estimated using a GIS-based building energy simulation model in conjunction with Department of Energy/ Energy Information Administration survey data, Assessor's parcel data, GIS floor areas data, and remote sensing-derived building height data.

  2. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan is to assess the approach to be taken for intended testing activities. The plan typically identifies the items to be tested, the requirements being tested, the testing to be performed, test schedules, personnel requirements, reporting requirements, evaluation criteria, and any risks requiring contingency planning. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

  3. Test plan for glass melter system technologies for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste, Project No. RDD-43288

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higley, B.A.

    1995-03-15

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of combustion fired cyclone vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, Low-Level Waste Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it is the Babcock & Wilcox Company Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. This vendor is one of seven selected for glass melter testing.

  4. Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind project HomeTag:Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind project The CREW public ...

  5. Environmental Wind Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Wind Projects Environmental Wind Projects This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's environmental wind projects from fiscal years 2006 to 2015. Environmental Projects Report 2006-2015 (2.24 MB) More Documents & Publications Testing, Manufacturing, and Component Development Projects Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Projects Wind Integration, Transmission, and Resource Assessment and Characterization Pr

  6. Investigating the Influence of Anthropogenic Forcing on Observed Mean and Extreme Sea Level Pressure Trends over the Mediterranean Region

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barkhordarian, Armineh

    2012-01-01

    We investigate whether the observed mean sea level pressure (SLP) trends over the Mediterranean region in the period from 1975 to 2004 are significantly consistent with what 17 models projected as response of SLP to anthropogenic forcing (greenhouse gases and sulphate aerosols, GS). Obtained results indicate that the observed trends in mean SLP cannot be explained by natural (internal) variability. Externally forced changes are detectable in all seasons, except spring. The large-scale component (spatial mean) of the GS signal is detectable in all the 17 models in winter and in 12 of the 17 models in summer. However, the small-scalemore » component (spatial anomalies about the spatial mean) of GS signal is only detectable in winter within 11 of the 17 models. We also show that GS signal has a detectable influence on observed decreasing (increasing) tendency in the frequencies of extremely low (high) SLP days in winter and that these changes cannot be explained by internal climate variability. While the detection of GS forcing is robust in winter and summer, there are striking inconsistencies in autumn, where analysis points to the presence of an external forcing, which is not GS forcing.« less

  7. Small Wind Independent Testing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    This fact sheet describes the Small Wind Independent Testing at the NWTC and the Regional Test Centers project.

  8. Maritime Hydrogen Fuel Cell project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Maritime Hydrogen Fuel Cell project HomeTag:Maritime Hydrogen Fuel Cell project - Pete Devlin, of the Department of Energy's Fuel ...

  9. Tracing the transport of anthropogenic lead in the atmosphere and in soils using isotopic ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erel, Y.; Veron, A.; Halicz, L.

    1997-11-01

    The isotopic composition of lead in aerosols and soils in Israel is used to characterize the sources of anthropogenic lead in the region, to ascertain the isotopic composition of natural, rock-derived lead in specific areas, and to determine rates of anthropogenic lead migration in soils. The isotopic composition of lead currently emitted from cars in Israel ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb = 1.115 {+-} 2) is controlled by alkyl-lead produced in France and Germany. In addition to petrol-lead, two more sources of anthropogenic lead can be detected in sampled aerosols; the first one has low concentrations of lead ({approximately} ng/m{sup 3}) and {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb {approximately} 1.157, and is most likely lead, emitted in Turkey, that traveled across the eastern Mediterranean basin; the second type of aerosols contains a mixture of lead emitted in several countries including Turkey, Greece, and Ukraine ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb value of 1.155-1.160; [Pb] {approximately}20-30 ng/m{sup 3}). Anthropogenic lead is more accessible for acid leaching than natural lead, therefore, it is more labile in the soil. The isotopic composition of lead in the acid-leached fraction of near-road soil profiles records the history of alkyl-lead emission in the country. Based on changes in the isotopic composition of lead with soil depth, it is estimated that anthropogenic lead migrates into the soil at approximately 0.5 cm/y. A soil profile from a relatively remote area is less contaminated by anthropogenic lead and displays a different distribution of lead isotopic values with depth. The isotopic composition of lead suggests that natural lead in soils developed on carbonate bedrock is derived from clays, either from the rock-residue (the clay fraction in the carbonate bedrock), or from airborne clay, but not from lead released from the carbonate fraction in the rock. 44 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. The Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada, was the site for a 12-kiloton-ton nuclear test

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NV/13609-53 Development of a Groundwater Management Model for the Project Shoal Area prepared by Gregg Lamorey, Scott Bassett, Rina Schumer, Douglas P. Boyle, Greg Pohll, and Jenny Chapman submitted to Nevada Site Office National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy Las Vegas, Nevada September 2006 Publication No. 45223 Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily

  11. The Lake Charles CCS Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doug Cathro

    2010-06-30

    The Lake Charles CCS Project is a large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which will demonstrate advanced technologies that capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically the Lake Charles CCS Project will accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petroleum coke to chemicals plant (the LCC Gasification Project) and the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Lake Charles CCS Project will promote the expansion of EOR in Texas and Louisiana and supply greater energy security by expanding domestic energy supplies. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure will continue to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project are expected to be fulfilled by working through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 includes the studies attached hereto that will establish: the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the LCC Gasification Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Hastings oil field in Texas. The overall objective of Phase 2, provided a successful competitive down-selection, is to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: (1) the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, (2) a Connector Pipeline from the LLC Gasification Project to the Green Pipeline owned by Denbury and an affiliate of Denbury, and (3) a comprehensive MVA system at the Hastings oil field.

  12. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2005-02-01

    This report documents a four-year study(a) to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) at the entrance to the forebay of the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). In this report, emphasis is placed on the methodology and results associated with the fourth project year and compared with findings from the previous years to provide an overall project summary. Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River (Figure S.1). A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish, including kokanee and rainbow trout, were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. Because these entrainment rates represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam, they have been judged unacceptable to fishery managers responsible for perpetuating the fishery in Lake Roosevelt. In an effort to reduce fish entrainment rates, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was modified in 2001 to include a multiyear study of the efficacy of using strobe lights to deter fish from entering the third powerplant forebay. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated the four-year study in collaboration with Colville Tribal

  13. Sweet Lake Geopressured-geothermal Project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco Fee. Volume II. Surface installations reservoir testing. Annual report, February 28, 1981-February 10, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, K.S.

    1984-01-01

    The Magma Gulf-Technadril/Department of Energy Amoco Fee No. 1 (production) and salt water disposal wells were drilled in the period from August, 1980 to February 1981. Surface facilities were designed and constructed during March-June 1981. Flow testing began in June 1981 and continued until February, 1982. The Miogypsinoides interval contains seven discrete sands in the test well. These sands have been numbered 1 to 7, beginning at the top of the sequence. Data from wireline logs and core samples suggested that the first zone to be perforated should be Sand 5. Because of its high porosity and permeability, Sand 5 was thought to contain almost 50% of the total hydraulic capacity of the well. Flow testing of Sand 5 was performed in three stages, each of which is fully described in this report. Phase I was designed as an initial clean-up flow and a reservoir confirmation test. Phase II consisted of the reservoir limit determination test and lasted 17 days. Boundaries were confirmed which suggest that the Sweet Lake reservoir is fairly narrow, with boundaries on three sides, but is open in one direction with no closure for at least 4-1/4 miles. These boundaries approximate the shape of the graben in which the test well was drilled, but may or may not be directly related to the major faults forming the graben. Phase III testing was planned to be a long-term test at commercial design rates. Although Sand 5 alone would not support such rates, long-term production was demonstrated. Additional research not supported by DOE funding was also performed during the period covered by this report. This research, consisting of mud logging, micropaleontology, organic geochemistry, core analysis, and rock mechanics, is summarized in this report.

  14. High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project: Final Test Plan High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project: Final Test Plan The potential need to ...

  15. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LaboratoryNational Security Education Center Menu NSEC Educational Programs Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School Science of Signatures Advanced Studies Institute Judicial Science School SHM Data Sets and Software Research Projects Current Projects Past Projects Publications NSEC » Engineering Institute » Research Projects » Joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/UCSD research projects Past Research Projects Previous collaborations between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of

  16. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Research Projects Joint Los Alamos National LaboratoryUCSD Research Projects Collaborations between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San...

  17. Project Accounts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Accounts Project Accounts A redirector page has been set up without anywhere to redirect to. Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:50

  18. Project Gnome

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Gnome Double Beta Decay Dark Matter Biology Repository Science Renewable Energy The first underground physics experiment near Carlsbad was Project Gnome, December 10, 1961 ...

  19. WRF-Chem Simulations of Aerosols and Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yi; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Meigen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to provide a first comprehensive evaluation of WRF-Chem for modeling aerosols and anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (RF) over East Asia. Several numerical experiments were conducted from November 2007 to December 2008. Comparison between model results and observations shows that the model can generally reproduce the observed spatial distributions of aerosol concentration, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) from measurements at different sites, including the relatively higher aerosol concentration and AOD over East China and the relatively lower AOD over Southeast Asia, Korean, and Japan. The model also depicts the seasonal variation and transport of pollutions over East Asia. Particulate matter of 10 um or less in the aerodynamic diameter (PM10), black carbon (BC), sulfate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) concentrations are higher in spring than other seasons in Japan due to the pollutant transport from polluted area of East Asia. AOD is high over Southwest and Central China in winter, spring and autumn and over North China in summer while is low over South China in summer due to monsoon precipitation. SSA is lowest in winter and highest in summer. The model also captures the dust events at the Zhangye site in the semi-arid region of China. Anthropogenic aerosol RF is estimated to range from -5 to -20 W m-2 over land and -20 to -40 W m-2 over ocean at the top of atmosphere (TOA), 5 to 30 W m-2 in the atmosphere (ATM) and -15 to -40 W m-2 at the bottom (BOT). The warming effect of anthropogenic aerosol in ATM results from BC aerosol while the negative aerosol RF at TOA is caused by scattering aerosols such as SO4 2-, NO3 - and NH4+. Positive BC RF at TOA compensates 40~50% of the TOA cooling associated with anthropogenic aerosol.

  20. Anthropogenic NO2 in the Atmosphere: Estimates of the Column Content and Radiative Forcing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anthropogenic NO 2 in the Atmosphere: Estimates of the Column Content and Radiative Forcing A. N. Rublev Institution of Molecular Physics Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute Moscow, Russia N Chubarova Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University Moscow, Russia G. Gorchakov Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia Introduction The work summarizes the different methodical aspects, firstly, the use of atmosphere optical depths presented in

  1. Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-05-13

    Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

  2. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-04-10

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic. Total PM2.5 agrees well with the measurements, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that during the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had undergone significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne lidar measurements. Model results show that the pollution event transported aerosols into the Arctic (> 66.6° N) for a 4-day period. During this 4-day period, biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~ 1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~ 4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface in anthropogenic plumes. The European plumes sampled during the POLARCAT-France campaign were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant

  3. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-04-10

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic. Total PM2.5 agrees well with the measurements, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that duringmore » the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had undergone significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne lidar measurements. Model results show that the pollution event transported aerosols into the Arctic (> 66.6° N) for a 4-day period. During this 4-day period, biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~ 1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~ 4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface in anthropogenic plumes. The European plumes sampled during the POLARCAT-France campaign were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this

  4. Project Controls

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

  5. Development of wear-resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components. Volume 1, Coating development and tribological testing: Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naylor, M.G.S.

    1992-06-01

    The tribological properties of a variety of advanced coating materials have been evaluated under conditions which simulate the piston ring -- cylinder liner environment near top ring reversal in a heavy duty diesel engine. Coated ``ring`` samples were tested against a conventional pearlitic grey cast iron liner material using a high temperature reciprocating wear test rig. Tests were run with a fresh CE/SF 15W40lubricant at 200 and 350{degrees}C, with a high-soot, engine-tested oil at 200{degrees}C and with no lubrication at 200{degrees}C. For lowest wear under boundary lubricated conditions, the most promising candidates to emerge from this study were high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3} C{sub 2} - 20% NiCr and WC - 12% Co cermets, low temperature arc vapor deposited (LTAVD) CrN and plasma sprayed chromium oxides. Also,plasma sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} materials were found to give excellent wear resistance in unlubricated tests and at extremely high temperatures (450{degrees}C) with a syntheticoil. All of these materials would offer substantial wear reductions compared to the conventional electroplated hard chromium ring facing and thermally sprayed metallic coatings, especially at high temperatures and with high-soot oils subjected to degradation in diesel environments. The LTAVD CrN coating provided the lowest lubricated wear rates of all the materials evaluated, but may be too thin (4 {mu}m) for use as a top ring facing. Most of the coatings evaluated showed higher wear rates with high-soot, engine-tested oil than with fresh oil, with increases of more than a factor of ten in some cases. Generally, metallic materials were found to be much more sensitive to soot/oil degradation than ceramic and cermet coatings. Thus, decreased ``soot sensitivity`` is a significant driving force for utilizing ceramic or cermet coatings in diesel engine wear applications.

  6. Project Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Information Slider award map The REE Program funds projects focused on developing economically feasible and environmentally benign technologies for recovering REEs from coal and/or coal by-products. Project Information The listed projects represent the current REE program portfolio. Agreement Number Project Title Performer Name FWP-RIC REE FY2016-2020 Rare Earth Elements (REE) from Coal and Coal By-Products National Energy Technology Laboratory FE0027167 High Yield and Economical

  7. Pumping test and fluid sampling report, Mansfield No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin: Report of the Geologic Project Manager, Permian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    This report describes pumping test and fluid sampling activities performed at the Mansfield No. 1 well in Oldham County about 10 miles north of Vega, Texas. The well site was selected by TBEG and is located along the northern margin of the Palo Duro Basin in an area of active dissolution with the Permian salt sections. The objectives of the pumping test and fluid sampling program were to collect data to determine the hydrologic characteristics (formation pressure and permeability) of deep water bearing formations, and to obtain formation fluid samples for analyses (gas and fluid chemistry) in order to evaluate fluid migration and age relationships in the Permian Basin. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET)...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Experimental Tests (FACET) Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) Facility Ops Projects, ... link , began operation in April 2012 as a test bed for technologies that could power the ...

  9. TMACS Test Procedure TP007: System administration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlan, P.; Washburn, S.; Seghers, R.

    1994-05-24

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure tests the TMACS System Administration functions.

  10. TMACS Test Procedure TP001: Alarm Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlan, P.K.

    1994-05-31

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure tests the TMACS Alarm management functions.

  11. TMACS Test Procedure TP002: Trending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlan, P.K.

    1994-05-31

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure tests the TMACS Trending functions.

  12. TMACS Test Procedure TP009: Acromag Driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washburn, S.J.

    1994-05-31

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure tests the TMACS Acromag Software Driver (Bridge Code).

  13. TMACS Test Procedure TP002: Trending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlan, P.K.

    1994-08-29

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure tests the TMACS Trending functions.

  14. Verification survey report of the south waste tank farm training/test tower and hazardous waste storage lockers at the West Valley demonstration project, West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-08-29

    A team from ORAU's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site?s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

  15. Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.

    2000-06-07

    The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of {approx}11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8})], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

  16. Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6 Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Icenhour, A.S.; Simmons, D.W.

    2000-04-01

    The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of -11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

  17. Testing the effectiveness of mobile home weatherization measures in a controlled environment: The SERI CMFERT (Collaborative Manufactured Buildings Facility for Energy Research and Training) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.D.; Hancock, C.E.; Franconi, E.

    1990-03-01

    For several years the Solar Energy Research Institute has been testing the effectiveness of mobile home weatherization measures, with the support of the US DOE Office of State and Local Assistance Programs Weatherization Assistance Program, the DOE Office of Buildings and Community Systems, the seven states within the federal Weatherization Region 7, the Colorado Division of Housing, and the DOE Denver Support Office. During the winter of 1988--89, several weatherization measures were thermally tested on three mobile homes under controlled conditions inside a large environmental enclosure. The effects of each weatherization measure on conduction losses, infiltration losses, and combined furnace and duct-delivered heat efficiency were monitored. The retrofit options included air sealing, duct repair, furnace tune-up, interior storm panels, floor insulation, and roof insulation. The study demonstrated that cost-effective heating energy savings of about 20% to 50% are possible if weatherization techniques adapted to the special construction details in mobile homes are applied. 24 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. The whitehouse effect: shortwave radiative forcing of climate by anthropogenic aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1994-12-31

    Increases in atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other infrared active gases over the industrial period are thought to have increased the average flux of longwave (thermal infrared) radiation between the surface of the earth and the lower atmosphere, leading to an increase in global mean temperature. Over the same period it is though that concentrations of aerosol particles in the troposphere have similarly increased as a consequence of industrial emissions and that these increased concentrations of particles have increased the earth`s reflectivity of shortwave (solar) radiation incident on the planet both directly, by scattering radiation, and indirectly, by increasing the reflectivity of clouds. The term ``whitehouse effect`` is introduced to refer to this increased scattering of shortwave radiation by analogy to the term ``greenhouse effect,`` which refers to the enhanced trapping of longwave radiation resulting from increased concentrations of infrared active gases. Each of these phenomena is referred to as a ``forcing`` of the earth`s climate, that is a secular change imposed on the system; such a forcing is to be distinguished from a ``response`` of the system, such as a change in global mean temperature or other index of global climate. The forcing due to the direct and indirect effects induced by anthropogenic aerosols has been estimated to be comparable in global- average magnitude to that due to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases, but it is of opposite direction, that is exerting a cooling influence. The shortwave radiative influence of anthropogenic aerosols may thus be considered to be offsetting some, perhaps a great fraction, of the longwave radiative influence of anthropogenic greenhouse gases.

  19. Line Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grand Coulee Transmission Line Replacement Project Hooper Springs McNary-John Day Montana-to-Washington Transmission System Upgrade Project - M2W Olympia-Grand Coulee No. 1...

  20. Project Benefits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Benefits of the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project including reducing energy upgrade costs for consumers, employers, and program administrators.

  1. Hydropower Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's hydropower project funding from fiscal years 2008 to 2014.

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Full Text Available September 2005 Project Management ... resource-related drivers of anthropogenic climate change. ... requirements, implementation, testing, and ...

  3. Estimating the in situ sediment-porewater distribution of PAHs and chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons in anthropogenic impacted sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hans Peter H. Arp; Gijs D. Breedveld; Gerard Cornelissen

    2009-08-15

    It has become increasingly apparent that the in situ sediment-porewater distribution behavior of organic compounds within anthropogenic impacted sediments is quite diverse, and challenging to generalize. Traditional models based on octanol-water partitioning generally overestimate native porewater concentrations, and modern approaches accounting for multiple carbon fractions, including black carbon, appear sediment specific. To assess the diversity of this sorption behavior, we collected all peer-reviewed total organic carbon (TOC)-normalized in situ sediment-porewater distribution coefficients, K{sub TOC}, for impacted sediments. This entailed several hundreds of data for PAHs, PCBs, PCDD/Fs, and chlorinated benzenes, covering a large variety of sediments, locations, and experimental methods. Compound-specific KTOC could range up to over 3 orders of magnitude. Output from various predictive models for individual carbonaceous phases found in impacted sediments, based on peer-reviewed polyparameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs), Raoult's Law, and the SPARC online-calculator, were tested to see if any of the models could consistently predict literature K{sub TOC} values within a factor of 30 (i.e. about 1.5 orders of magnitude, or half the range of K{sub TOC} values). The Raoult's Law model and coal tar PP-LFER achieved the sought-after accuracy for all tested compound classes, and are recommended for general, regional-scale modeling purposes. As impacted sediment-porewater distribution models are unlikely to get more accurate than this, this review underpins that the only way to accurately obtain accurate porewater concentrations is to measure them directly, and not infer them from sediment concentrations. 86 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  5. National Geothermal Data System Design and Testing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Geothermal Data System Design and Testing Principal Investigator Harold Blackman ... Other NGDS projects deal with system data development and population Our Project ...

  6. Summary report of the drilling technologies tested at the Integrated Demonstration Project for cleanup of organic contaminants in soils and groundwater at non-arid sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development initiated an integrated demonstration of innovative technologies and systems for cleanup of volatile organic compounds in soil and groundwater at SRS. The overall goal of the program is the demonstration of multiple technologies and systems in the fields of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation at a single test bed. Horizontal environmental well installation technology was one of the remediation technologies that was demonstrated at SRS. Four distinctly different systems of directional drilling and horizontal well installations were successfully demonstrated and evaluated. The four systems were developed in the petroleum industry, the river crossing industry, and the utility industry. The transfer of information concerning the horizontal environmental well installations has been facilitated by publishing a series of reports describing each individual demonstration. This is the final report in the series and provides a comprehensive evaluation of all four systems. The objectives of this report are to summarize the strengths and weaknesses of each drilling technology, describe and compare the problems encountered by each drilling technology, compare the compatibility of each technology with varying logistical and geological conditions, and discuss the expense of using each technology. This report is designed to be a horizontal environmental well reference document for the environmental remediation industry. An environmental problem holder may use this report to evaluate a directional drilling technology for use at his/her site.

  7. Are GRACE-era Terrestrial Water Trends Driven by Anthropogenic Climate Change?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fasullo, J. T.; Lawrence, D. M.; Swenson, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    To provide context for observed trends in terrestrial water storage (TWS) during GRACE (2003–2014), trends and variability in the CESM1-CAM5 Large Ensemble (LE) are examined. Motivated in part by the anomalous nature of climate variability during GRACE, the characteristics of both forced change and internal modes are quantified and their influences on observations are estimated. Trends during the GRACE era in the LE are dominated by internal variability rather than by the forced response, with TWS anomalies in much of the Americas, eastern Australia, Africa, and southwestern Eurasia largely attributable to the negative phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)more » and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). While similarities between observed trends and the model-inferred forced response also exist, it is inappropriate to attribute such trends mainly to anthropogenic forcing. For several key river basins, trends in the mean state and interannual variability and the time at which the forced response exceeds background variability are also estimated while aspects of global mean TWS, including changes in its annual amplitude and decadal trends, are quantified. The findings highlight the challenge of detecting anthropogenic climate change in temporally finite satellite datasets and underscore the benefit of utilizing models in the interpretation of the observed record.« less

  8. A Joint Theory and Experimental Project in the Synthesis and Testing of Porous COFs for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Goddard, William A.

    2013-06-29

    Conventional storage of large amounts of hydrogen in its molecular form is difficult and expensive because it requires employing either extremely high pressure gas or very low temperature liquid. Because of the importance of hydrogen as a fuel, the DOE has set system targets for hydrogen storage of gravimetric (5.5 wt%) and volumetric (40 g/L) densities to be achieved by 2015. From our continuous efforts on hydrogen storage, it is believed that metalation of highly porous solids with high-valence metals is promising and provides a rational direction to realize high volumetric hydrogen density near room temperature. This grant was focused on the study of high surface area covalent organic frameworks (COFs) with these specific objectives (1) to introduce potential metal binding sites through the COF synthesis and (2) to implement metalation experiments and evaluate their respective hydrogen adsorption properties. To maximize our efforts, simulation calculations were also performed (prior to experiments) for the prediction of binding enthalpy of hydrogen for molecular building units containing transition metals and promising COF structures to increase volumetric hydrogen uptake at room temperature. In this effort, first molecular building units with optimal binding energy for hydrogen storage (20 kJ/mol) were designed by quantum mechanical (QM) methods. Employing these results, it was revealed that one of metalated COFs takes up 60 g/L (total) of H2 at 100 bar and 298 K. To realize proposed COF structures, chemistry of COF synthesis has been developed; for instance, new air stable COFs were synthesized via hydrazone (COF-41 to 43) and imine condensation (COF-301, 320, 340, and 366) and some of them were tested the effect on metalation. Finally, a new triazine COF with high volumetric hydrogen uptake capacity was presented as a proposed future direction.

  9. Distinct effects of anthropogenic aerosols on the East Asian summer monsoon between multidecadal strong and weak monsoon stages

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xie, Xiaoning; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Xiaodong; Li, Jiandong; Wang, Zhaosheng; Liu, Yangang

    2016-06-18

    Industrial emissions of anthropogenic aerosols over East Asia have greatly increased in recent decades, and so the interactions between atmospheric aerosols and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) have attracted enormous attention. In order to further understand the aerosol-EASM interaction, we investigate the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the EASM during the multidecadal strong (1950–1977) and weak (1978–2000) EASM stages using the Community Atmospheric Model 5.1. Numerical experiments are conducted for the whole period, including the two different EASM stages, with present day (PD, year 2000) and preindustrial (PI, year 1850) aerosol emissions, as well as the observed time-varying aerosolmore » emissions. A comparison of the results from PD and PI shows that, with the increase in anthropogenic aerosols, the large-scale EASM intensity is weakened to a greater degree (-9.8%) during the weak EASM stage compared with the strong EASM stage (-4.4%). The increased anthropogenic aerosols also result in a significant reduction in precipitation over North China during the weak EASM stage, as opposed to a statistically insignificant change during the strong EASM stage. Because of greater aerosol loading and the larger sensitivity of the climate system during weak EASM stages, the aerosol effects are more significant during these EASM stages. Moreover, these results suggest that anthropogenic aerosols from the same aerosol emissions have distinct effects on the EASM and the associated precipitation between the multidecadal weak and strong EASM stages.« less

  10. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential, Conoco MCA unit well No. 358, Maljamar Field, Lea County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Marlow, R.E.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.

    1981-11-01

    This report describes part of the work done to fulfill a contract awarded to Gruy Federal, Inc., by the Department of Energy (DOE) on Feburary 12, 1979. The work includes pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report details the second such project. Core porosities agreed well with computed log porosities. Core water saturation and computed log porosities agree fairly well from 3692 to 3712 feet, poorly from 3712 to 3820 feet and in a general way from 4035 to 4107 feet. Computer log analysis techniques incorporating the a, m, and n values obtained from Core Laboratories analysis did not improve the agreement of log versus core derived water saturations. However, both core and log analysis indicated the ninth zone had the highest residual hydrocarbon saturations and production data confirmed the validity of oil saturation determinations. Residual oil saturation, for the perforated and tested intervals were 259 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 4035 to 4055 feet, and 150 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 3692 to 3718 feet. Nine BOPD was produced from the interval 4035 to 4055 feet and no oil was produced from interval 3692 to 3718 feet, qualitatively confirming the relative oil saturations as calculated. The low oil production in the zone from 4022 to 4055 and the lack of production from 3692 to 3718 feet indicated the zone to be at or near residual waterflood conditions as determined by log analysis. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log, and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood.

  11. TMACS Test Procedure TP011: Panalarm Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seghers, R.; Washburn, S.J.

    1994-05-24

    The TMACS Software Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. The TMACS Test Plan (WHC-SD-WM-TP-148) is fulfilled when all Test Cases are approved. This Test Procedure tests the TMACS Panalarm Interface functions.

  12. Project Tour

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Tour Project Tour See NMSSUP from the ground NMSSUP Phase II Construction Project Tour Transportation Transportation to the tour will be provided from Hilton Santa Fe Buffalo Thunder to Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 55. After the tour, transportation will be provided back to Hilton Santa Fe Buffalo Thunder. What to wear Wear comfortable pants and leather shoes (flat, comfortable, closed-toe; no tennis shoes or high heels). Schedule There will be a one-hour, no-host lunch

  13. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structure whose behavior is fundamentally nonlinear. Thus, the students assigned to this project will develop control techniques that will allow an electrodynamic shake table to...

  14. project management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Project Management and Systems Support http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsapmprojectmanagementandsystemssupport

  15. Custom Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Management Small Industrial Lighting Compressed Air ESUE Motors Federal Agriculture Custom Projects No two industrial customers are alike; each has its own unique...

  16. Project Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has published its Record of Decision announcing and explaining DOE’s chosen project alternative and describing any commitments for mitigating potential environmental impacts. The NEPA process...

  17. project management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Project Management and Systems Support http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsapmprojectmanagementandsystemssupport

  18. Project Construction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Integrating renewable energy into Federal new construction or major renovations requires effective structuring of the construction team and project schedule. This overview discusses key construction team considerations for renewable energy as well as timing and expectations for the construction phase. The project construction phase begins after a project is completely designed and the construction documents (100%) have been issued. Construction team skills and experience with renewable energy technologies are crucial during construction, as is how the integration of renewable energy affects the project construction schedule.

  19. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Past Research Projects Composite-to-Steel Joint Integrity Monitoring and Assessment Collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San ...

  20. Russian anthropogenic black carbon: Emission reconstruction and Arctic black carbon simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Kan; Fu, Joshua S.; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y.; Storey, John M.; Romanov, Alexander; Hodson, Elke L.; Cresko, Joe; Morozova, Irina; Ignatieva, Yulia; Cabaniss, John

    2015-10-02

    Development of reliable source emission inventories is needed to advance the understanding of the origin of Arctic haze using chemical transport modeling. This paper develops a regional anthropogenic black carbon (BC) emission inventory for the Russian Federation, the largest country by land area in the Arctic Council. Activity data from combination of local Russia information and international resources, emission factors based on either Russian documents or adjusted values for local conditions, and other emission source data are used to approximate the BC emissions. Emissions are gridded at a resolution of 0.1° × 0.1° and developed into a monthly temporal profile.more » Total anthropogenic BC emission of Russia in 2010 is estimated to be around 224 Gg. Gas flaring, a commonly ignored black carbon source, contributes a significant fraction of 36.2% to Russia's total anthropogenic BC emissions. Other sectors, i.e., residential, transportation, industry, and power plants, contribute 25.0%, 20.3%, 13.1%, and 5.4%, respectively. Three major BC hot spot regions are identified: the European part of Russia, the southern central part of Russia where human population densities are relatively high, and the Urals Federal District where Russia's major oil and gas fields are located but with sparse human population. BC simulations are conducted using the hemispheric version of Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model with emission inputs from a global emission database EDGAR (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research)-HTAPv2 (Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution) and EDGAR-HTAPv2 with its Russian part replaced by the newly developed Russian BC emissions, respectively. The simulation using the new Russian BC emission inventory could improve 30–65% of absorption aerosol optical depth measured at the AERONET sites in Russia throughout the whole year as compared to that using the default HTAPv2 emissions. At the four ground monitoring sites (Zeppelin, Barrow, Alert

  1. Russian anthropogenic black carbon: Emission reconstruction and Arctic black carbon simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Kan; Fu, Joshua S.; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y.; Storey, John M.; Romanov, Alexander; Hodson, Elke L.; Cresko, Joe; Ignatieva, Yulia; Cabaniss, John

    2015-10-02

    Development of reliable source emission inventories is needed to advance the understanding of the origin of Arctic haze using chemical transport modeling. This paper develops a regional anthropogenic black carbon (BC) emission inventory for the Russian Federation, the largest country by land area in the Arctic Council. Activity data from combination of local Russia information and international resources, emission factors based on either Russian documents or adjusted values for local conditions, and other emission source data are used to approximate the BC emissions. Emissions are gridded at a resolution of 0.1° × 0.1° and developed into a monthly temporal profile. Total anthropogenic BC emission of Russia in 2010 is estimated to be around 224 Gg. Gas flaring, a commonly ignored black carbon source, contributes a significant fraction of 36.2% to Russia's total anthropogenic BC emissions. Other sectors, i.e., residential, transportation, industry, and power plants, contribute 25.0%, 20.3%, 13.1%, and 5.4%, respectively. Three major BC hot spot regions are identified: the European part of Russia, the southern central part of Russia where human population densities are relatively high, and the Urals Federal District where Russia's major oil and gas fields are located but with sparse human population. BC simulations are conducted using the hemispheric version of Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model with emission inputs from a global emission database EDGAR (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research)-HTAPv2 (Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution) and EDGAR-HTAPv2 with its Russian part replaced by the newly developed Russian BC emissions, respectively. The simulation using the new Russian BC emission inventory could improve 30–65% of absorption aerosol optical depth measured at the AERONET sites in Russia throughout the whole year as compared to that using the default HTAPv2 emissions. At the four ground monitoring sites (Zeppelin, Barrow, Alert, and

  2. CO{sub 2} level control by anthropogenic peat: The anaerobic digestion of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartung, H.A.

    1995-12-31

    Anthropogenic Peat (AP) has been described as an effective and economical way to control the level of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere without adverse effect on economic activity and development. All elements of the proposal are separately at work, but one, anaerobic digestion, is not widely known nor has it been applied to biomass as AP requires. Anaerobic digestion is described here, with some of its current large-scale applications. Results of lab studies of the digestion of other materials, including biomass especially grown for this purpose are presented, and the methods used to find them are explained. The preferred biomass source for AP is sugar cane, and extended studies have been run on a close relative, sorghum; preliminary work on cane itself and on various sugar sources is also reported.

  3. Awarded projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    projects Awarded projects 2016 Allocation Awards This page lists the allocation awards for NERSC for the 2016 allocation year (Jan 12, 2016 through Jan 09, 2017). Read More » Previous Year Awards Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:1

  4. Limited effect of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides on secondary organic aerosol formation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Y.; Unger, N.; Hodzic, A.; Emmons, L.; Knote, C.; Tilmes, S.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Yu, P.

    2015-12-08

    Globally, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is mostly formed from emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by vegetation, but it can be modified by human activities as demonstrated in recent research. Specifically, nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) have been shown to play a critical role in the chemical formation of low volatility compounds. We have updated the SOA scheme in the global NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Atmospheric Model version 4 with chemistry (CAM4-chem) by implementing a 4-product volatility basis set (VBS) scheme, including NOx-dependent SOA yields and aging parameterizations. Small differences are found for themore » no-aging VBS and 2-product schemes; large increases in SOA production and the SOA-to-OA ratio are found for the aging scheme. The predicted organic aerosol amounts capture both the magnitude and distribution of US surface annual mean measurements from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network by 50 %, and the simulated vertical profiles are within a factor of 2 compared to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements from 13 aircraft-based field campaigns across different regions and seasons. We then perform sensitivity experiments to examine how the SOA loading responds to a 50 % reduction in anthropogenic nitric oxide (NO) emissions in different regions. We find limited SOA reductions of 0.9–5.6, 6.4–12.0 and 0.9–2.8 % for global, southeast US and Amazon NOx perturbations, respectively. The fact that SOA formation is almost unaffected by changes in NOx can be largely attributed to a limited shift in chemical regime, to buffering in chemical pathways (low- and high-NOx pathways, O3 versus NO3-initiated oxidation) and to offsetting tendencies in the biogenic versus anthropogenic SOA responses.« less

  5. Trends in anthropogenic mercury emissions in China from 1995 to 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye Wu; Shuxiao Wang; David G. Streets; Jiming Hao; Melissa Chan; Jingkun Jiang

    2006-09-01

    We have developed multiple-year inventories of anthropogenic mercury emissions in China for 1995 through 2003. It is estimated that total Hg emissions from all anthropogenic sources increased at an average annual rate of 2.9% during the period 1995-2003, reaching 696 ({+-}307) t in 2003, with a speciation split of 395 t of Hg{sup 0}, 230 t of Hg{sup 2+}, and 70 t of particulate mercury, Hg{sup p}. Nonferrous metals smelting and coal combustion continue to be the two leading mercury sources in China, as nonferrous metals production and coal consumption keep increasing. Nonferrous metals smelting and coal combustion together contributed {approximately}80% of total Hg emissions during the past decade. Hg emissions from coal combustion increased from 202 t in 1995 to 257 t in 2003 at an average annual rate of 3.0%. Among all of the coal consumption sectors, the power sector is the leading one in Hg emissions growth, up by 5.9% annually. Hg emissions from nonferrous metals smelting increased from 230 t in 1995 to 321 t in 2003 at an average annual rate of 4.2%. Although Hg emissions related to gold smelting decreased since 1996, other nonferrous metals such as zinc, lead, and copper contributed significant Hg growth at annual rates of 8.5%, 13.0%, and 6.9%, respectively. At provincial level, the trends of Hg emissions show significant variation. The uncertainty level decreased from {+-}78% (95% confidence interval) in the estimate of total emissions in 1995, to {+-}44% in 2003. This is primarily attributed to the decreased emissions from those Hg sources with the largest uncertainty in both activity levels and emission factors, such as artisanal gold smelting, mercury mining, and battery/fluorescent lamp production. 36 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Limited effect of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides on Secondary Organic Aerosol formation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Y.; Unger, N.; Hodzic, A.; Emmons, L.; Knote, C.; Tilmes, S.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Yu, P.

    2015-08-28

    Globally, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is mostly formed from emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by vegetation, but can be modified by human activities as demonstrated in recent research. Specifically, nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) have been shown to play a critical role in the chemical formation of low volatility compounds. We have updated the SOA scheme in the global NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 4 with chemistry (CAM4-chem) by implementing a 4-product Volatility Basis Set (VBS) scheme, including NOx-dependent SOA yields and aging parameterizations. The predicted organic aerosol amounts capture both the magnitude and distribution ofmore » US surface annual mean measurements from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network by 50 %, and the simulated vertical profiles are within a factor of two compared to Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) measurements from 13 aircraft-based field campaigns across different region and seasons. We then perform sensitivity experiments to examine how the SOA loading responds to a 50 % reduction in anthropogenic nitric oxide (NO) emissions in different regions. We find limited SOA reductions of 0.9 to 5.6, 6.4 to 12.0 and 0.9 to 2.8 % for global, the southeast US and the Amazon NOx perturbations, respectively. The fact that SOA formation is almost unaffected by changes in NOx can be largely attributed to buffering in chemical pathways (low- and high-NOx pathways, O3 versus NO3-initiated oxidation) and to offsetting tendencies in the biogenic versus anthropogenic SOA responses.« less

  7. Hallmark Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Energy's test energy management system * Measure control ... test, research, and help design cyber security solutions ... The graphic illustrates the device's ability to authenticate ...

  8. Establishment of Small Wind Turbine Regional Test Centers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.

    2011-09-16

    This presentation offers an overview of the Regional Test Centers project for Small Wind Turbine testing and certification.

  9. ACCESS Project: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, Heiko

    2015-04-01

    The ACCESS project addressed the development, testing, and demonstration of the proposed advanced technologies and the associated emission and fuel economy improvement at an engine dynamometer and on a full-scale vehicle. Improve fuel economy by 25% with minimum performance penalties Achieve SULEV level emissions with gasoline Demonstrate multi-mode combustion engine management system

  10. Laser-Based Nondestructive Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Projects Laser-Based Nondestructive Testing High speed, non-contact NDT for ... scanning, non-destructive pulsed laser excitation and a laser-Doppler vibrometer (LDV). ...

  11. MHK Projects/The Engineering Business Ltd Shetland Islands UK...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    60.5303, -1.26592 Project Phase Phase 1 Project Details The Engineering Business (EB) has recently completed its program to design, build, install, test and...

  12. MHK Projects/Seaflow Tidal Energy System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    been operating the Seaflow Tidal Energy System project since May 2003. This was an experimental test rig - the successor, SeaGen is intended for commercial applications Project...

  13. Direct shortwave forcing of climate by anthropogenic sulfate aerosol: Sensitivity to particle size, composition, and relative humidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemesure, S.; Wagener, R.; Schwartz, S.E.

    1996-04-01

    Recent estimates of global or hemispheric average forcing of climate by anthropogenic sulfate aerosol due to scattering of shortwave radiation are uncertain by more than a factor of 2. This paper examines the sensitivity of forcing to these microphysical properties for the purposes of obtaining a better understanding of the properties required to reduce the uncertainty in the forcing.

  14. Assessing Sources of Stress to Aquatic Ecosystems: Using Biomarkers and Bioindicators to Characterize Exodure-Response Profiles of Anthropogenic Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, S.M.

    1999-03-29

    Establishing causal relationships between sources of environmental stressors and aquatic ecosystem health if difficult because of the many biotic and abiotic factors which can influence or modify responses of biological systems to stress, the orders of magnitude involved in extrapolation over both spatial and temporal scales, and compensatory mechanisms such as density-dependent responses that operate in populations. To address the problem of establishing causality between stressors and effects on aquatic systems, a diagnostic approach, based on exposure-response profiles for various anthropogenic activities, was developed to help identify sources of stress responsible for effects on aquatic systems at ecological significant levels of biological organization (individual, population, community). To generate these exposure-effects profiles, biomarkers of exposure were plotted against bioindicators of corresponding effects for several major anthropogenic activities including petrochemical , pulp and paper, domestic sewage, mining operations, land-development activities, and agricultural activities. Biomarkers of exposure to environmental stressors varied depending on the type of anthropogenic activity involved. Bioindicator effects, however, including histopathological lesions, bioenergetic status, individual growth, reproductive impairment, and community-level responses were similar among many of the major anthropogenic activities. This approach is valuable to help identify and diagnose sources of stressors in environments impacted by multiple stressors. By identifying the types and sources of environmental stressors, aquatic ecosystems can be more effectively protected and managed to maintain acceptable levels of environmental quality and ecosystem fitness.

  15. NREL: Water Power Research - Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects NREL's water power R&D projects support industry efforts to develop and deploy cost-effective water power technologies and to better understand the value and potential of conventional hydropower generation and pumped storage hydropower facilities. Here are some examples of current R&D projects focused on achieving these objectives: Testing and Standards Computer-Aided Engineering Resource Characterization Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis Printable Version Water

  16. Monthly Project Bulletin: August 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 2012 This bulletin is your monthly source for project updates on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project. This issue is dedicated to the new Home Energy Professional certifications and covers: * Pilot Certification: Be One of the First to be Certified * Free Home Energy Professional Certification Pilot Exams Available for Current and Former WAP Workers * Finding a Testing Center Near You * Upcoming Conferences and Events * Project Testimonial *

  17. RENOTER Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of French project on thermoelectric waste heat recovery for cars and trucks with focus on cheap, available, efficient, and sustainable TE materials, as well as efficient material integration and production process.

  18. Project 1027697

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    William Apel and Frank Roberto at) the Biotechnology Department at the INEEL. Each part of this project is funded under a different contract with the Science Division of the US ...

  19. EGS Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EGS projects span research, development, and demonstration. Unlike traditional hydrothermal systems, EGS capture heat from areas that traditional geothermal energy cannot—where fluid and/or...

  20. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Projects » Past Research Projects Composite-to-Steel Joint Integrity Monitoring and Assessment Collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff Assistant Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email UCSD Faculty and Graduate

  1. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Projects Joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/UCSD Research Projects Collaborations between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff Assistant Jutta Kayser (505) 663-5649 Email Administrative Assistant Stacy Baker (505) 663-5233 Email "Since 2003, LANL has funded numerous collaborative

  2. Manhattan Project Sites on Laboratory Land

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manhattan Project » Manhattan Project Signature Facilities Manhattan Project Signature Facilities The "Gadget" device fully assembled atop the 100-foot firing tower, shortly before the Trinity test. July 15, 1945. The "Gadget" device fully assembled atop the 100-foot firing tower, shortly before the Trinity test. July 15, 1945. New! Manhattan Project National Historical Park New! K-25 Virtual Museum The Department of Energy, in the mid-1990s, developed a list of eight

  3. Manhattan Project Signature Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manhattan Project » Manhattan Project Signature Facilities Manhattan Project Signature Facilities The "Gadget" device fully assembled atop the 100-foot firing tower, shortly before the Trinity test. July 15, 1945. The "Gadget" device fully assembled atop the 100-foot firing tower, shortly before the Trinity test. July 15, 1945. New! Manhattan Project National Historical Park New! K-25 Virtual Museum The Department of Energy, in the mid-1990s, developed a list of eight

  4. Cathodic protection acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordquist, E.M.

    1994-09-02

    This acceptance test procedure is to document testing of added anodes to existing Rectifier No. 11. Anodes were added under Project W-151, Tank 101-AZ Waste Retrieval System.

  5. CONNECTICUT BIOFUELS TECHNOLOGY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARTONE, ERIK

    2010-09-28

    DBS Energy Inc. (DBS) intends on using the Connecticut Biofuels Technology Project for the purpose of developing a small-scale electric generating systems that are located on a distributed basis and utilize biodiesel as its principle fuel source. This project will include research and analysis on the quality and applied use of biodiesel for use in electricity production, 2) develop dispatch center for testing and analysis of the reliability of dispatching remote generators operating on a blend of biodiesel and traditional fossil fuels, and 3) analysis and engineering research on fuel storage options for biodiesel of fuels for electric generation.

  6. Building Energy Modeling Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emerging Technologies » Building Energy Modeling » Building Energy Modeling Projects Building Energy Modeling Projects View the Building Technologies Office's current portfolio of Building Energy Modeling projects. Core Projects AIA 2030 Commitment Portal Energy Modeling Community Resources EnergyPlus Modelica Buildings Library OpenStudio Radiance Test Procedures For Building Energy Simulation Tools Competitively Awarded Projects BENEFIT: A New Hybrid Approach to Energy Modeling BUILD:

  7. Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKernan, M.L.

    1989-12-22

    The Shippingport Atomic Power Station was located on the Ohio River in Shippingport Borough (Beaver County), Pennsylvania, USA. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) constructed the plant in the mid-1950s on a seven and half acre parcel of land leased from Duquesne Light Company (DLC). The purposes were to demonstrate and to develop Pressurized Water Recovery technology and to generate electricity. DLC operated the Shippingport plant under supervision of (the successor to AEC) the Department of Energy (DOE)-Naval Reactors (NR) until operations were terminated on October 1, 1982. NR concluded end-of-life testing and defueling in 1984 and transferred the Station`s responsibility to DOE Richland Operations Office (RL), Surplus Facility Management Program Office (SFMPO5) on September 5, 1984. SFMPO subsequently established the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project and selected General Electric (GE) as the Decommissioning Operations Contractor. This report is intended to provide an overview of the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project.

  8. Substantial Contribution of Anthropogenic Air Pollution to Catastrophic Floods in Southwest China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jiwen; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Yang, Yan; Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Zhanqing

    2015-07-20

    Extreme events such as heat waves, floods, and droughts, have become more frequent since the 1950s1-2. This is likely caused through changes in greenhouse gases and aerosols that perturb the radiative balance and alter cloud processes3-8. On 8-9 July, 2013 a catastrophic flood devastated several metropolitan areas at the foothills of the Sichuan Basin. Using a high-resolution coupled atmosphere-chemistry model, we show that this disaster was not entirely natural. Ensemble simulations robustly show that the severe anthropogenic pollution in the Sichuan Basin significantly enhanced rainfall intensity over the mountainous area northwest of the basin. The heavy air pollution (mainly black carbon) absorbs solar radiation in the lower atmosphere at the expense of surface cooling, which stabilizes the atmosphere and suppresses convection and precipitation over the basin. The enhanced moisture and moist static energy over the basin are then transported by the prevailing winds towards the mountains during daytime. As the excessive moist air that reaches the foothills at night is orographically lifted, very strong convection develops and produces extremely heavy precipitation. Reducing black carbon (BC) emissions in the basin can effectively mitigate the extreme precipitation in the mountains. Unfortunately, BC emissions have been increasing in many developing countries including China9, making them more vulnerable to enhanced disasters as reported here.

  9. HESFIRE: a global fire model to explore the role of anthropogenic and weather drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Page, Yannick LB; Morton, Douglas; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Pereira, Jose M.; Hurtt, George C.

    2015-02-13

    Vegetation fires are a major driver of ecosystem dynamics and greenhouse gas emissions. Anticipating potential changes in fire activity and their impacts relies first on a realistic model of fire activity (e.g., fire incidence and interannual variability) and second on a model accounting for fire impacts (e.g., mortality and emissions). In this paper, we focus on our understanding of fire activity and describe a new fire model, HESFIRE (Human–Earth System FIRE), which integrates the influence of weather, vegetation characteristics, and human activities on fires in a stand-alone framework. It was developed with a particular emphasis on allowing fires to spread over consecutive days given their major contribution to burned areas in many ecosystems. A subset of the model parameters was calibrated through an optimization procedure using observation data to enhance our knowledge of regional drivers of fire activity and improve the performance of the model on a global scale. Modeled fire activity showed reasonable agreement with observations of burned area, fire seasonality, and interannual variability in many regions, including for spatial and temporal domains not included in the optimization procedure. Significant discrepancies are investigated, most notably regarding fires in boreal regions and in xeric ecosystems and also fire size distribution. The sensitivity of fire activity to model parameters is analyzed to explore the dominance of specific drivers across regions and ecosystems. The characteristics of HESFIRE and the outcome of its evaluation provide insights into the influence of anthropogenic activities and weather, and their interactions, on fire activity.

  10. Modeling Study of the Effect of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Late Spring Drought in South China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Ning; Liu, Xiaohong

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the mechanisms underlying the decadal variability of late spring precipitation in south China are investigated using the latest version 1 of Community Earth System Model (CESM1). We aim to unravel the effects of different climate forcing agents, such as aerosols and greenhouse gases (GHGs), on the decadal variation of precipitation with transient experiments from pre-industry (for year 1850) to present-day (for year 2000). Our results reveal that: (1) CESM1 can reproduce the climatological features of atmospheric circulation and precipitation for the late spring in south China; (2) Only simulations including the forcing of anthropogenic aerosols can reproduce the observed decreasing trend of late spring precipitation from 1950-2000 in south China; (3) Aerosols affect the decadal change of precipitation mainly by altering the large scale atmospheric circulation, and to a less extent by increasing the lower-tropospheric stability to inhibit the convective precipitation; and (4) In comparison, other climate forcing agents, such as GHGs, have much smaller effects on the decadal change of spring precipitation in south China. Key words: precipitation, aerosols, climate change, south China, Community Earth System Model

  11. DOE Project Scorecards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Project Scorecards DOE project scorecards summarize capital asset project performance compared to the current approved baseline. 

  12. DOE Project Scorecards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Project Scorecards DOEproject scorecards summarize capital asset project performance compared to the current approved baseline.

  13. Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second underground nuclear test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. ...

  14. PROJECT PROFILE: Support of International Photovoltaic Module...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This project supports the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's involvement in the Photovoltaic (PV) Module Quality Assurance Task Force (PVQAT) to develop the international test ...

  15. Cloudnet Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hogan, Robin

    Cloudnet is a research project supported by the European Commission. This project aims to use data obtained quasi-continuously for the development and implementation of cloud remote sensing synergy algorithms. The use of active instruments (lidar and radar) results in detailed vertical profiles of important cloud parameters which cannot be derived from current satellite sensing techniques. A network of three already existing cloud remote sensing stations (CRS-stations) will be operated for a two year period, activities will be co-ordinated, data formats harmonised and analysis of the data performed to evaluate the representation of clouds in four major european weather forecast models.

  16. Cloudnet Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Robin

    2008-01-15

    Cloudnet is a research project supported by the European Commission. This project aims to use data obtained quasi-continuously for the development and implementation of cloud remote sensing synergy algorithms. The use of active instruments (lidar and radar) results in detailed vertical profiles of important cloud parameters which cannot be derived from current satellite sensing techniques. A network of three already existing cloud remote sensing stations (CRS-stations) will be operated for a two year period, activities will be co-ordinated, data formats harmonised and analysis of the data performed to evaluate the representation of clouds in four major european weather forecast models.

  17. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenicbiogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento Plume during CARES?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kleinman, L.; Kuang, C.; Sedlacek, A.; Senum, G.; Springston, S.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Jayne, J.; Fast, J.; Hubbe, J.; et al

    2015-09-17

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA) can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrations are enhanced bymorethe simultaneous presence of high concentrations of CO and either isoprene, MVK+MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein) or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, respectively. Linear and bilinear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, "Bio", for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short time and distance scales can be explained by CO. For each transect and species a plume perturbation, (i.e., ?OA, defined as the difference between 90th and 10th percentiles) was defined and regressions done amongst ? values in order to probe day to day and location dependent variability. Species that predicted the largest fraction of the variance in ?OA were ?O3 and ?CO. Background OA was highly correlated with background methanol and poorly correlated with other tracers. Because background OA was ~ 60 % of peak OA in the urban plume, peak OA should be primarily biogenic and therefore non-fossil. Transects were split into subsets according to the percentile rankings of ?CO and ?Bio, similar to an approach used by Setyan et al. (2012) and Shilling et al. (2013) to determine if anthropogenic-biogenic interactions enhance OA production. As found earlier, ?OA in the data subset having high ?CO and high ?Bio was

  18. TMACS Test Procedure TP008: SACS Interface. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washburn, S.J.

    1994-05-31

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure tests the TMACS SACS Interface functions.

  19. TMACS test procedure TP009: Acromag driver. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, R.B.; Washburn, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure addresses the testing of the functionality of the TMACS Acromag driver software in conjunction with a new bridge for the Panalarm Annunciator system.

  20. Project Narrative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driscoll, Mary C.

    2012-07-12

    The Project Narrative describes how the funds from the DOE grant were used to purchase equipment for the biology, chemistry, physics and mathematics departments. The Narrative also describes how the equipment is being used. There is also a list of the positive outcomes as a result of having the equipment that was purchased with the DOE grant.

  1. Automated Testing System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-05-09

    ATS is a Python-language program for automating test suites for software programs that do not interact with thier users, such as scripted scientific simulations. ATS features a decentralized approach especially suited to larger projects. In its multinode mode it can utilize many nodes of a cluster in order to do many test in parallel. It has features for submitting longer-running tests to a batch system and would have to be customized for use elsewhere.

  2. Healy Clean Coal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    The Healy Clean Coal Project, selected by the U.S. Department of Energy under Round 111 of the Clean Coal Technology Program, has been constructed and is currently in the Phase 111 Demonstration Testing. The project is owned and financed by the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA), and is cofunded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Construction was 100% completed in mid-November of 1997, with coal firing trials starting in early 1998. Demonstration testing and reporting of the results will take place in 1998, followed by commercial operation of the facility. The emission levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (S02), and particulate from this 50-megawatt plant are expected to be significantly lower than current standards.

  3. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-10-25

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  4. Reference Model Project (RMP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Model Project (RMP) - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs

  5. Popeye Project: Subsea system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, P.B.; Langner, C.G.; Sgouros, G.E.; Saucier, B.J.; Voss, R.K.

    1996-12-31

    The subsea system installed for Shell Offshore Inc. (SOI) Popeye Project represents an advancement in deep water subsea technology. It is a diverless, guidelineless, 10,000 psi cluster manifold concept, the first of its kind. The cluster concept was selected in large part based on SOI`s deep water experience and anticipated future subsea development needs. This paper describes how the innovative Popeye subsea system was selected, designed, tested, and successfully installed.

  6. Popeye project: Subsea system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, P.B.; Sgouros, G.E.; Langner, C.G.; Saucier, B.J.; Voss, R.K.

    1997-12-01

    The subsea system installed for the Shell Offshore Inc. (SOI) Popeye project represents an advance in deepwater subsea technology. It is a diverless, guidelineless, 10,000-psi cluster-manifold concept, the first of its kind. The cluster concept was selected in large part based on SOI`s deepwater experience and anticipated future subsea-development needs. This paper describes how the innovative Popeye subsea system was selected, designed, tested, and successfully installed.

  7. structured innovation project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    innovation project - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  8. Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasky, Hilda B; Bass, Bennett Richard; Williams, Paul T; Phillips, Rick; Erickson, Marjorie A; Kirk, Mark T; Stevens, Gary L

    2013-01-01

    The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

  9. Baseline for Climate Change: Modeling Watershed Aquatic Biodiversity Relative to Environmental and Anthropogenic Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurakis, Eugene G

    2010-10-01

    Objectives of the two-year study were to (1) establish baselines for fish and macroinvertebrate community structures in two mid-Atlantic lower Piedmont watersheds (Quantico Creek, a pristine forest watershed; and Cameron Run, an urban watershed, Virginia) that can be used to monitor changes relative to the impacts related to climate change in the future; (2) create mathematical expressions to model fish species richness and diversity, and macroinvertebrate taxa and macroinvertebrate functional feeding group taxa richness and diversity that can serve as a baseline for future comparisons in these and other watersheds in the mid-Atlantic region; and (3) heighten peoples awareness, knowledge and understanding of climate change and impacts on watersheds in a laboratory experience and interactive exhibits, through internship opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, a week-long teacher workshop, and a website about climate change and watersheds. Mathematical expressions modeled fish and macroinvertebrate richness and diversity accurately well during most of the six thermal seasons where sample sizes were robust. Additionally, hydrologic models provide the basis for estimating flows under varying meteorological conditions and landscape changes. Continuations of long-term studies are requisite for accurately teasing local human influences (e.g. urbanization and watershed alteration) from global anthropogenic impacts (e.g. climate change) on watersheds. Effective and skillful translations (e.g. annual potential exposure of 750,000 people to our inquiry-based laboratory activities and interactive exhibits in Virginia) of results of scientific investigations are valuable ways of communicating information to the general public to enhance their understanding of climate change and its effects in watersheds.

  10. Evaluation and comparison of biochemical markers of anthropogenic stress in the sheepshead minnow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuck, K.; Furst, H.; Boyd, C.; Walker, W.; Watts, S.; Mayer, F.

    1995-12-31

    The utility of bioenergetic and growth-rate indices for assessing chemically induced stress in larval and juvenile sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) was investigated. Viable embryos were exposed to zinc chloride at concentrations of 0.6, 1.5 and 3.8 ppm over a period of 28 days. Samples were collected from each exposure group and a unexposed control group on days 7, 14 and 28 of the study. Individual fish were measured and weighed wet. Triacylglycerol (TAG) and sterol content of exposed and control fish was determined using a FID/TLC latroscan system, polyamines were quantified by HPLC, nucleic acids levels were determined using an ethidium bromide fluorescence technique, and % tissue solids were estimated by dry weight analysis. A significant reduction in the TAG:sterol ratio was observed among fish exposed to 3.8 ppm ZnCl for 28 days. TAG:sterol was significantly correlated with growth-rate, % tissue solids, and concentration of ZnCl. RNA:DNA and polyamine (putrescine: spermine) ratios were significantly higher among day 7 control and exposed fish than those obtained from fish collected on days 14 and 28. RNA:DNA ratios of fish exposed to 3.8 ppm ZnCl for 28 days were significantly lower than those of fish in the control group. Polyamine ratios from fish exposed to 3.8 ppm ZnCl were significantly lower than control fish after 14 days of exposure. There was a significant correlation between polyamine ratios and concentration of ZnCl. TAG:sterol, RNA:DNA, and polyamine ratios can be used to biochemically assess anthropogenic stress; however, due to ontogenetic changes, these indicators are applicable only after endogenous yolk reserves have been depleted.

  11. HESFIRE: a global fire model to explore the role of anthropogenic and weather drivers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Le Page, Yannick LB; Morton, Douglas; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Pereira, Jose M.; Hurtt, George C.

    2015-02-13

    Vegetation fires are a major driver of ecosystem dynamics and greenhouse gas emissions. Anticipating potential changes in fire activity and their impacts relies first on a realistic model of fire activity (e.g., fire incidence and interannual variability) and second on a model accounting for fire impacts (e.g., mortality and emissions). In this paper, we focus on our understanding of fire activity and describe a new fire model, HESFIRE (Human–Earth System FIRE), which integrates the influence of weather, vegetation characteristics, and human activities on fires in a stand-alone framework. It was developed with a particular emphasis on allowing fires to spreadmore » over consecutive days given their major contribution to burned areas in many ecosystems. A subset of the model parameters was calibrated through an optimization procedure using observation data to enhance our knowledge of regional drivers of fire activity and improve the performance of the model on a global scale. Modeled fire activity showed reasonable agreement with observations of burned area, fire seasonality, and interannual variability in many regions, including for spatial and temporal domains not included in the optimization procedure. Significant discrepancies are investigated, most notably regarding fires in boreal regions and in xeric ecosystems and also fire size distribution. The sensitivity of fire activity to model parameters is analyzed to explore the dominance of specific drivers across regions and ecosystems. The characteristics of HESFIRE and the outcome of its evaluation provide insights into the influence of anthropogenic activities and weather, and their interactions, on fire activity.« less

  12. Hydropower Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-04-02

    The Water Power Program helps industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. Through support for public, private, and nonprofit efforts, the Water Power Program promotes the development, demonstration, and deployment of advanced hydropower devices and pumped storage hydropower applications. These technologies help capture energy stored by diversionary structures, increase the efficiency of hydroelectric generation, and use excess grid energy to replenish storage reserves for use during periods of peak electricity demand. In addition, the Water Power Program works to assess the potential extractable energy from domestic water resources to assist industry and government in planning for our nation’s energy future. From FY 2008 to FY 2014, DOE’s Water Power Program announced awards totaling approximately $62.5 million to 33 projects focused on hydropower. Table 1 provides a brief description of these projects.

  13. PROJECT SUMMARY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROJECT SUMMARY 1 TITLE Advancing Synchrophasor Applications and Training through Academic-Industry Collaborations 2 PRINCIPLE INVESTIGATORS University of Wyoming: Dongliang Duan (PI), John Pierre, Suresh Muknahallipatna (co-PIs) Colorado State University: Liuqing Yang, Louis L. Scharf (co-PIs) Montana Tech of the University of Montana: Daniel Trudnowski, Matthew Donnelly (co-PIs) 3 CONTACT INFORMATION Dongliang Duan Dept. 3295, 1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82070 Tel: (307)766-6541; Fax:

  14. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Organization Examples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Organization Examples Example 8 4.0 PROJECT ORGANIZATION Chapter 4.0 describes the principle project organizations, including their responsibilities and relationships. Other organizations, that have an interest in the project, also are described. 4.1 Principal Project Organizations and Responsibilities The management organization for the 324/327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project represents a partnership between four principal project organizations responsible for the project. The four

  15. MHK Projects/Manchac Point Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    el":"","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112008 Project City St Gabriel, LA Project StateProvince Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource...

  16. MHK Projects/Claiborne Island Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    el":"","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112008 Project City St Gabriel, LA Project StateProvince Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource...

  17. MHK Projects/Point Pleasant Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    el":"","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112008 Project City St Gabriel, LA Project StateProvince Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource...

  18. MHK Projects/College Point Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    bel":"","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112008 Project City St James, LA Project StateProvince Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource...

  19. Quality assurance plan for Final Waste Forms project in support of the development, demonstration, testing and evaluation efforts associated with the Oak Ridge reservation`s LDR/FFCA compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Mattus, C.H.

    1994-07-01

    This quality assurance project plan specifies the data quality objectives for Phase I of the Final Waste Forms Project and defines specific measurements and processes required to achieve those objectives. Although the project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the ultimate recipient of the results is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Consequently, relevant quality assurance requirements from both organizations must be met. DOE emphasizes administrative structure to ensure quality; EPA`s primary focus is the reproducibility of the generated data. The ten criteria of DOE Order 5700.6C are addressed in sections of this report, while the format used is that prescribed by EPA for quality assurance project plans.

  20. Tidd PFBC demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marrocco, M.

    1997-12-31

    The Tidd project was one of the first joint government-industry ventures to be approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in its Clean Coal Technology Program. In March 1987, DOE signed an agreement with the Ohio Power Company, a subsidiary of American Electric Power, to refurbish the then-idle Tidd plant on the banks of the Ohio River with advanced pressurized fluidized bed technology. Testing ended after 49 months of operation, 100 individual tests, and the generation of more than 500,000 megawatt-hours of electricity. The demonstration plant has met its objectives. The project showed that more than 95 percent of sulfur dioxide pollutants could be removed inside the advanced boiler using the advanced combustion technology, giving future power plants an attractive alternative to expensive, add-on scrubber technology. In addition to its sulfur removal effectiveness, the plant`s sustained periods of steady-state operation boosted its availability significantly above design projections, heightening confidence that pressurized fluidized bed technology will be a reliable, baseload technology for future power plants. The technology also controlled the release of nitrogen oxides to levels well below the allowable limits set by federal air quality standards. It also produced a dry waste product that is much easier to handle than wastes from conventional power plants and will likely have commercial value when produced by future power plants.

  1. OCGen Module Mooring Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEntee, Jarlath

    2015-02-06

    Ocean Renewable Power Company's OCGen Module Mooring Project provided an extensive research, design, development, testing and data collection effort and analysis conducted with respect to a positively buoyant, submerged MHK device secured to the seabed using a tensioned mooring system. Different analytic tools were evaluated for their utility in the design of submerged systems and their moorings. Deployment and testing of a prototype OCGen® system provided significant data related to mooring line loads and system attitude and station keeping. Mooring line loads were measured in situ and reported against flow speeds. The Project made a significant step in the development of designs, methodologies and practices related to floating and mooring of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Importantly for Ocean Renewable Power Company, the Project provided a sound basis for advancing a technically and commercially viable OCGen® Power System. The OCGen® Power System is unique in the MHK industry and, in itself, offers distinct advantages of MHK devices that are secured to the seabed using fixed structural frames. Foremost among these advantages are capital and operating cost reductions and increased power extraction by allowing the device to be placed at the most energetic level of the water column.

  2. PORTNUS Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loyal, Rebecca E.

    2015-07-14

    The objective of the Portunus Project is to create large, automated offshore ports that will the pace and scale of international trade. Additionally, these ports would increase the number of U.S. domestic trade vessels needed, as the imported goods would need to be transported from these offshore platforms to land-based ports such as Boston, Los Angeles, and Newark. Currently, domestic trade in the United States can only be conducted by vessels that abide by the Merchant Marine Act of 1920 – also referred to as the Jones Act. The Jones Act stipulates that vessels involved in domestic trade must be U.S. owned, U.S. built, and manned by a crew made up of U.S. citizens. The Portunus Project would increase the number of Jones Act vessels needed, which raises an interesting economic concern. Are Jones Act ships more expensive to operate than foreign vessels? Would it be more economically efficient to modify the Jones Act and allow vessels manned by foreign crews to engage in U.S. domestic trade? While opposition to altering the Jones Act is strong, it is important to consider the possibility that ship-owners who employ foreign crews will lobby for the chance to enter a growing domestic trade market. Their success would mean potential job loss for thousands of Americans currently employed in maritime trade.

  3. Capital Project Prioritization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capital-Project-Prioritization Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects &...

  4. Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKernan, M.L.

    1989-12-22

    The Shippingport Atomic Power Station was located on the Ohio River in Shippingport Borough (Beaver County), Pennsylvania, USA. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) constructed the plant in the mid-1950s on a seven and half acre parcel of land leased from Duquesne Light Company (DLC). The purposes were to demonstrate and to develop Pressurized Water Recovery technology and to generate electricity. DLC operated the Shippingport plant under supervision of (the successor to AEC) the Department of Energy (DOE)-Naval Reactors (NR) until operations were terminated on October 1, 1982. NR concluded end-of-life testing and defueling in 1984 and transferred the Station's responsibility to DOE Richland Operations Office (RL), Surplus Facility Management Program Office (SFMPO5) on September 5, 1984. SFMPO subsequently established the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project and selected General Electric (GE) as the Decommissioning Operations Contractor. This report is intended to provide an overview of the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project.

  5. The Nautilus project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salis, J. de

    1996-02-01

    The objective of the Nautilus project is to design, build, and evaluate a subsea multiphase electrical booster system to demonstrate its operability and reliability. The subsea station will reflect the integration of existing, tested, and recently developed equipment. The integration of various technologies, control, and maintenance in a subsea environment represents the challenging aspect of the project. Boosted by a helicoaxial pump, the produced multiphase effluent receives enough energy to reach either a host platform or the shore where the classical separation and treatment operations are performed. For deep offshore developments, the concept should induce a lower investment than alternative solutions. The concept should also give access to marginal fields, currently undeveloped for economical reasons, with the benefit of maximizing existing infrastructure. Furthermore, where sea traffic or environment concerns may limit offshore surface developments, Nautilus should demonstrate itself as an economical alternative.

  6. PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLANS Project Management Plans

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    MANAGEMENT PLANS Project Management Plans Overview Project Management Plan Suggested Outline Subjects Crosswalk between the Suggested PMP Outline Subjects and a Listing ...

  7. Preparing for Project Implementation Financing Project Implementation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Financing Project Implementation Save Energy Now LEADER Web Conference Project Implementation Seminar Series Save Energy Now LEADER Web Conference Agenda Seminar Series ...

  8. Project Grandmaster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-16

    The purpose of the Project Grandmaster Application is to allow individuals to opt-in and give the application access to data sources about their activities on social media sites. The application will cross-reference these data sources to build up a picture of each individual activities they discuss, either at present or in the past, and place this picture in reference to groups of all participants. The goal is to allow an individual to place themselves in the collective and to understand how their behavior patterns fit with the group and potentially find changes to make, such as activities they weren?t already aware of or different groups of interest they might want to follow.

  9. Project Grandmaster

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-09-16

    The purpose of the Project Grandmaster Application is to allow individuals to opt-in and give the application access to data sources about their activities on social media sites. The application will cross-reference these data sources to build up a picture of each individual activities they discuss, either at present or in the past, and place this picture in reference to groups of all participants. The goal is to allow an individual to place themselves inmore » the collective and to understand how their behavior patterns fit with the group and potentially find changes to make, such as activities they weren’t already aware of or different groups of interest they might want to follow.« less

  10. Anthropogenic emissions of NOx over China: Reconciling the difference of inverse modeling results using GOME-2 and OMI measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Dasa; Wang, Yuhang; Smeltzer, Charles; Boersma, K. Folkert

    2014-06-27

    Inverse modeling using satellite observations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns has been extensively used to estimate nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in China. Recently, the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) provide independent global NO2 column measurements on a nearly daily basis at around 9:30 and 13:30 local time across the equator, respectively. Anthropogenic NOx emission estimates by applying previously developed monthly inversion (MI) or daily inversion (DI) methods to these two sets of measurements show substantial differences. We improve the DI method by conducting model simulation, satellite retrieval, and inverse modeling sequentially on a daily basis. After each inversion, we update anthropogenic NOx emissions in the model simulation with the newly obtained a posteriori results. Consequently, the inversion-optimized emissions are used to compute the a priori NO2 profiles for satellite retrievals. As such, the a priori profiles used in satellite retrievals are now coupled to inverse modeling results. The improved procedure was applied to GOME-2 and OMI NO2 measurements in 2011. The new daily retrieval-inversion (DRI) method estimates an average NOx emission of 6.9 Tg N/yr over China, and the difference between using GOME-2 and OMI measurements is 0.4 Tg N/yr, which is significantly smaller than the difference of 1.3 Tg N/yr using the previous DI method. Using the more consistent DRI inversion results, we find that anthropogenic NOx emissions tend to be higher in winter and summer than spring (and possibly fall) and the weekday-to-weekend emission ratio tends to increase with NOx emission in China.

  11. Integrated Project Teams - An Essential Element of Project Management during Project Planning and Execution - 12155

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burritt, James G.; Berkey, Edgar

    2012-07-01

    Managing complex projects requires a capable, effective project manager to be in place, who is assisted by a team of competent assistants in various relevant disciplines. This team of assistants is known as the Integrated Project Team (IPT). he IPT is composed of a multidisciplinary group of people who are collectively responsible for delivering a defined project outcome and who plan, execute, and implement over the entire life-cycle of a project, which can be a facility being constructed or a system being acquired. An ideal IPT includes empowered representatives from all functional areas involved with a project-such as engineering design, technology, manufacturing, test and evaluation, contracts, legal, logistics, and especially, the customer. Effective IPTs are an essential element of scope, cost, and schedule control for any complex, large construction project, whether funded by DOE or another organization. By recently assessing a number of major, on-going DOE waste management projects, the characteristics of high performing IPTs have been defined as well as the reasons for potential IPT failure. Project managers should use IPTs to plan and execute projects, but the IPTs must be properly constituted and the members capable and empowered. For them to be effective, the project manager must select the right team, and provide them with the training and guidance for them to be effective. IPT members must treat their IPT assignment as a primary duty, not some ancillary function. All team members must have an understanding of the factors associated with successful IPTs, and the reasons that some IPTs fail. Integrated Project Teams should be used by both government and industry. (authors)

  12. Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  13. Storage & Transmission Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage & Transmission Projects Storage & Transmission Projects Storage & Transmission Projects Storage & Transmission Projects Storage & Transmission Projects Storage & ...

  14. Project Management Lessons Learned

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-08-05

    The guide supports DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, and aids the federal project directors and integrated project teams in the execution of projects.

  15. Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R.; Newmark, R.; McConachie, W.; Udell, K.; Rice, D.; Ramirez, A.; Siegel, W.; Buettner, M.; Daily, W.; Krauter, P.; Folsom, E.; Boegel, A.J.; Bishop, D.; Udell, K.

    1992-01-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation and underground imaging techniques for use in rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called ``Dynamic Stripping`` to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first 8 months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques before moving the contaminated site in FY 92.

  16. Western Interconnection Synchrophasor Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demonstration Project Western Interconnection Synchrophasor Project Resources & Links Demand Response Energy Efficiency Emerging Technologies Synchrophasor measurements are a...

  17. Innovative Drivetrain Testing Nears Completion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National laboratory researchers have entered the final phase of testing a next-generation drivetrain that will be less expensive, more reliable, and more efficient. This project, funded by the U.S....

  18. Demonstration project Smart Charging (Smart Grid Project) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Smart Grid Projects Smart Grid Projects in Europe Smart Grid Projects - Grid Automation Distribution Smart Grid Projects - Integrated System Smart Grid Projects - Home...

  19. 2016 DOE Project Management Workshop - "Enhancing Project Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 DOE Project Management Workshop - "Enhancing Project Management" 2016 DOE Project Management Workshop - "Enhancing Project Management" 20160407-doe-project-management-workshop-AD...

  20. MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    eLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112006 Project City Port Townsend, WA Project StateProvince Washington Project Country United States...

  1. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenic – biogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento plume during CARES?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Kuang, Chongai; Sedlacek, Art; Senum, Gunnar I.; Springston, Stephen R.; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Qi; Jayne, John T.; Fast, Jerome D.; Hubbe, John M.; et al

    2016-02-15

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA) can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrations are enhanced bymore » the simultaneous presence of high concentrations of CO and either isoprene, MVK+MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein) or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. Furthermore, linear and bi-linear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, “Bio”, for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short time and distance scales can be explained by CO.« less

  2. Heavy Water Test Reactor Dome Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    A high speed look at the removal of the Heavy Water Test Reactor Dome Removal. A project sponsored by the Recovery Act on the Savannah River Site.

  3. Transport Test Problems for Radiation Detection Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2012-09-30

    This is the final report and deliverable for the project. It is a list of the details of the test cases for radiation detection scenarios.

  4. National Geothermal Data System Architecture Design, Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Geothermal Data System Architecture Design, Testing and Maintenance Project objective: To create the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) comprised of a core and ...

  5. Rapid prototype and test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, D.L.; Hansche, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    In order to support advanced manufacturing, Sandia has acquired the capability to produce plastic prototypes using stereolithography. Currently, these prototypes are used mainly to verify part geometry and ``fit and form`` checks. This project investigates methods for rapidly testing these plastic prototypes, and inferring from prototype test data actual metal part performance and behavior. Performances examined include static load/stress response, and structural dynamic (modal) and vibration behavior. The integration of advanced non-contacting measurement techniques including scanning laser velocimetry, laser holography, and thermoelasticity into testing of these prototypes is described. Photoelastic properties of the epoxy prototypes to reveal full field stress/strain fields are also explored.

  6. NREL Smart Grid Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hambrick, J.

    2012-01-01

    Although implementing Smart Grid projects at the distribution level provides many advantages and opportunities for advanced operation and control, a number of significant challenges must be overcome to maintain the high level of safety and reliability that the modern grid must provide. For example, while distributed generation (DG) promises to provide opportunities to increase reliability and efficiency and may provide grid support services such as volt/var control, the presence of DG can impact distribution operation and protection schemes. Additionally, the intermittent nature of many DG energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) can present a number of challenges to voltage regulation, etc. This presentation provides an overview a number of Smart Grid projects being performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) along with utility, industry, and academic partners. These projects include modeling and analysis of high penetration PV scenarios (with and without energy storage), development and testing of interconnection and microgrid equipment, as well as the development and implementation of advanced instrumentation and data acquisition used to analyze the impacts of intermittent renewable resources. Additionally, standards development associated with DG interconnection and analysis as well as Smart Grid interoperability will be discussed.

  7. The IPHI Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferdinand, Robin; Beauvais, Pierre-Yves

    2005-06-08

    High Power Proton Accelerators (HPPAs) are studied for several projects based on high-flux neutron sources driven by proton or deuteron beams. Since the front end is considered as the most critical part of such accelerators, the two French national research agencies CEA and CNRS decided to collaborate in 1997 to study and build a High-Intensity Proton Injector (IPHI). The main objective of this project is to master the complex technologies used and the concepts of manufacturing and controlling the HPPAs. Recently, a collaboration agreement was signed with CERN and led to some evolutions in the design and in the schedule. The IPHI design current was maintained at 100 mA in Continuous Wave mode. This choice should allow to produce a high reliability beam at reduced intensity (typically 30 mA) tending to fulfill the Accelerator Driven System requirements. The output energy of the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), was reduced from 5 to 3 MeV, allowing then the adjunction and the test, in pulsed operation of a chopper line developed by CERN for the Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL). In a final step, the IPHI RFQ and the chopper line should become parts of the SPL injector. In this paper, the IPHI project and the recent evolutions are reported together with the construction and operation schedule.

  8. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  9. Forklift Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forklift Safety Test Instructions: All Training and Testing Material is for LSU CAMD Users ... A minimum passing score is 80% (8 out of 10) This test can only be taken once in a thirty ...

  10. Hydrogen Storage Testing and Analysis Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's hydrogen storage R&D activities include testing, analysis, and developing recommended best practices. The status of hydrogen storage testing and analysis projects is detailed in the...

  11. Distinct effects of anthropogenic aerosols on the East Asian summer monsoon between multi-decadal strong and weak monsoon stages: Effects of aerosols on EASM

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xie, Xiaoning; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Xiaodong; Li, Jiandong; Wang, Zhaosheng; Liu, Yangang

    2016-06-18

    Industrial emissions of anthropogenic aerosols over East Asia have greatly increased in recent decades, and so the interactions between atmospheric aerosols and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) have attracted enormous attention. In order to further understand the aerosol-EASM interaction, we investigate the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the EASM during the multidecadal strong (1950–1977) and weak (1978–2000) EASM stages using the Community Atmospheric Model 5.1. Numerical experiments are conducted for the whole period, including the two different EASM stages, with present day (PD, year 2000) and preindustrial (PI, year 1850) aerosol emissions, as well as the observed time-varying aerosolmore » emissions. A comparison of the results from PD and PI shows that, with the increase in anthropogenic aerosols, the large-scale EASM intensity is weakened to a greater degree (-9.8%) during the weak EASM stage compared with the strong EASM stage (-4.4%). The increased anthropogenic aerosols also result in a significant reduction in precipitation over North China during the weak EASM stage, as opposed to a statistically insignificant change during the strong EASM stage. Because of greater aerosol loading and the larger sensitivity of the climate system during weak EASM stages, the aerosol effects are more significant during these EASM stages. Moreover, these results suggest that anthropogenic aerosols from the same aerosol emissions have distinct effects on the EASM and the associated precipitation between the multidecadal weak and strong EASM stages.« less

  12. Lustre Tests

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-08-31

    Lustre-tests is a package of regression tests for the Lustre file system containing I/O workloads representative of problems discovered on production systems.

  13. Environmental Assessment Lakeview Geothermal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treis, Tania

    2012-04-30

    The Town of Lakeview is proposing to construct and operate a geothermal direct use district heating system in Lakeview, Oregon. The proposed project would be in Lake County, Oregon, within the Lakeview Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA). The proposed project includes the following elements: Drilling, testing, and completion of a new production well and geothermal water injection well; construction and operation of a geothermal production fluid pipeline from the well pad to various Town buildings (i.e., local schools, hospital, and Lake County Industrial Park) and back to a geothermal water injection well. This EA describes the proposed project, the alternatives considered, and presents the environmental analysis pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act. The project would not result in adverse effects to the environment with the implementation of environmental protection measures.

  14. Geothermal Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy ...

  15. Solar Manufacturing Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Solar Manufacturing Projects Solar Manufacturing Projects Solar Manufacturing Projects Solar Manufacturing Projects Solar Manufacturing Projects Solar Manufacturing Projects SOLAR ...

  16. Step 3: Project Refinement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Project Refinement 2 1 Potential 3 Refinement 4 Implementation 5 Operations & Maintenance 2 Options 3 Refinement 1/28/2016 2 3 FUNDING AND FINANCING OPTIONS Project Ownership Financing structure is highly dependent on size of the project and the capital available for a given project: * Tribe owns the project (cash purchase or debt) * Tribe hosts the project and buys the electricity (power purchase agreement) * Tribe partners with private sector and co-owns the project (uncertainties about

  17. Project Plan Remote Target Fabrication Refurbishment Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Gary L; Taylor, Robin D

    2009-08-01

    In early FY2009, the DOE Office of Science - Nuclear Physics Program reinstated a program for continued production of {sup 252}Cf and other transcurium isotopes at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The FY2009 major elements of the workscope are as follows: (1) Recovery and processing of seven transuranium element targets undergoing irradiation at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL; (2) Development of a plan to manufacture new targets for irradiation beginning in early- to mid-FY10 to supply irradiated targets for processing Campaign 75 (TRU75); and (3) Refurbishment of the target manufacturing equipment to allow new target manufacture in early FY10 The {sup 252}Cf product from processing Campaign 74 (recently processed and currently shipping to customers) is expected to supply the domestic demands for a period of approximately two years. Therefore it is essential that new targets be introduced for irradiation by the second quarter of FY10 (HFIR cycle 427) to maintain supply of {sup 252}Cf; the average irradiation period is {approx}10 HFIR cycles, requiring about 1.5 calendar years. The strategy for continued production of {sup 252}Cf depends upon repairing and refurbishing the existing pellet and target fabrication equipment for one additional target production campaign. This equipment dates from the mid-1960s to the late 1980s, and during the last target fabrication campaign in 2005- 2006, a number of component failures and operations difficulties were encountered. It is expected that following the target fabrication and acceptance testing of the targets that will supply material for processing Campaign 75 a comprehensive upgrade and replacement of the remote hot-cell equipment will be required prior to subsequent campaigns. Such a major refit could start in early FY 2011 and would take about 2 years to complete. Scope and cost estimates for the repairs described herein were developed, and

  18. MHK Projects/Norde lv | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase Phase 1 Project Details The test site for the first full scale Current Power prototype is currently in the planning and siting stage. Project Installed Capacity (MW) 0...

  19. DOE-Sponsored Project Begins Demonstrating CCUS Technology in...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Regional Partner Announces Plans for Carbon Storage Project Using CO2 Captured from Coal-Fired Power Plant Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2 Storage with Enhanced ...

  20. Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garetson, Thomas

    2013-03-31

    The objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation (AVTE) project was to provide test and evaluation services for advanced technology vehicles, to establish a performance baseline, to determine vehicle reliability, and to evaluate vehicle operating costs in fleet operations.Vehicles tested include light and medium-duty vehicles in conventional, hybrid, and all-electric configurations using conventional and alternative fuels, including hydrogen in internal combustion engines. Vehicles were tested on closed tracks and chassis dynamometers, as well as operated on public roads, in fleet operations, and over prescribed routes. All testing was controlled by procedures developed specifically to support such testing.

  1. Project Reports for Chickasaw Nation- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the Chickasaw Nation, Division of Commerce (CNDC) will upgrade old, inefficient lighting systems throughout CNDC to new, energy saving systems. Learn more about this project or...

  2. Project Reports for Haida Corporation- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Reynolds Creek Hydroelectric Project ("Reynolds Creek" or the "Project") is a 5 MW hydroelectric resource to be constructed on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, approximately 10 miles east of Hydaburg.

  3. Step 4: Project Implementation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Step 4: Project Implementation Presentation Agenda * Step 4: Project Implementation - Pre-construction - Contract execution - Interconnection - Project construction - Commissioning * Project Example 2 1/28/2016 2 1 Potential 3 Refinement 5 Operations & Maintenance 2 Options 4 Implementation 4 Implementation 3 Potential Options Refinement Implementation Operations & Maintenance Step 4: Implementation 4 Purpose: Contract and begin physical construction of project Tasks: * Finalize

  4. NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects Photo of person at work in laboratory setting. NREL scientist tests a photoelectrochemical water-splitting system used for renewable hydrogen production. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL NREL hydrogen and fuel cell research projects support the development and adoption of cost-effective, high-performance fuel cell systems and sustainable hydrogen technologies for transportation, stationary, and portable applications. Learn about our projects: Fuel cells Hydrogen production and delivery

  5. AVTA: ARRA EV Project Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act supported a number of projects that together made up the largest ever deployment of plug-in electric vehicles and charging infrastructure in the U.S. The following document describes the context of the EV Project, which partnered with city, regional and state governments, utilities, and other organizations in 16 cities to deploy about 14,000 Level 2 PEV chargers and 300 DC fast chargers. It also deployed 5,700 all-electric Nissan Leafs and 2,600 plug-in hybrid electric Chevrolet Volts. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  6. Long-term Performance of Engineered Barrier Systems (PEBS) - An International EURATOM Project on the Study and Testing of Engineered Barriers for the Final Disposal of HAW Using PEBS as an Example - 13299

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mente, M.

    2013-07-01

    The main aim of the PEBS project is to evaluate the sealing and barrier performance of the EBS over time, through development of a comprehensive approach involving experiments, model development, and consideration of the potential impacts on long-term safety functions. The experiments and models cover the full range of conditions, from initial emplacement of wastes (high heat generation and EBS re-saturation) through to later stage establishment of near steady state conditions, i.e. full re-saturation and thermal equilibrium with the host rock. These aspects will be integrated in a manner that will lead to greater certainty and thus greater confidence regarding the development from the initial transient state of the EBS to its long-term state, which provides the required isolation of the wastes. The work proposed within the project builds on existing knowledge and experience generated during recent years and supported by ongoing national and EC research programs. The project aims to provide a more complete description of the THM and THMC (thermo-hydro-mechanical- chemical) evolution of the EBS system, a more quantitative basis for relating the evolutionary behavior to the safety functions of the system, and a further clarification of the significance of residual uncertainties for long-term performance assessment. The importance of uncertainties arising from potential disagreement between the process models and the laboratory and in-situ experiments to be performed within PEBS, and their implications for an extrapolation of the results, will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on possible impacts on safety functions. In addition to the scientific-technical aims, the consortium will disseminate the basic findings to the broad scientific community within the EU, China and Japan, use expertise gained for public information purposes, and promote knowledge and technology transfer through training. (authors)

  7. Container evaluation for microwave solidification project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.A.

    1994-08-01

    This document discusses the development and testing of a suitable waste container and packaging arrangement to be used with the Microwave Solidification System (MSS) and Bagless Posting System (BPS). The project involves the Rocky Flats Plant.

  8. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenic - biogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento plume during CARES?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kleinman, Lawrence; Kuang, Chongai; Sedlacek, Arthur; Senum, Gunnar; Springston, Stephen; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Qi; Jayne, John; Fast, Jerome; Hubbe, John; et al

    2016-02-15

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) the US Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA, plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA) can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrationsmore » are enhanced by the simultaneous presence of high concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) and either isoprene, MVK+MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein), or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, respectively. Linear and bilinear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, “Bio”, for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short timescales and distance scales can be explained by CO. For each transect and species a plume perturbation, (i.e., ΔOA, defined as the difference between 90th and 10th percentiles) was defined and regressions done amongst Δ values in order to probe day-to-day and location-dependent variability. Species that predicted the largest fraction of the variance in ΔOA were ΔO3 and ΔCO. Background OA was highly correlated with background methanol and poorly correlated with other tracers. Because background OA was ~60% of peak OA in the urban plume, peak OA should be primarily biogenic and therefore non-fossil, even though the day-to-day and spatial variability of plume OA is best described by an anthropogenic tracer, CO. Transects were split into subsets according to the percentile rankings of ΔCO and ΔBio, similar to an approach used by Setyan et al. (2012) and Shilling et

  9. General circulation model calculations of the direct radiative forcing by anthropogenic sulfate and fossil-fuel soot aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, J.M.; Roberts, D.L.; Slingo, A.

    1997-07-01

    A new radiation code within a general circulation model is used to assess the direct solar and thermal radiative forcing by sulfate aerosol of anthropogenic origin and soot aerosol from fossil-fuel burning. The radiative effects of different aerosol profiles, relative humidity parameterizations, chemical compositions, and internal and external mixtures of the two aerosol types are investigated. The contribution to the radiative forcing from cloudy sky regions is found to be negligible for sulfate aerosol; this is in contrast to recent studies where the cloudy sky contribution was estimated using a method in which the spatial correlation between cloud amount and sulfate burden was ignored. However, the radiative forcing due to fossil-fuel soot aerosol is enhanced in cloudy regions if soot aerosol exists within or above the cloud. The global solar radiative forcing due to sulfate aerosol is estimated to be -0.38 W m{sup -2} and the global thermal radiative forcing is estimated to be +0.01 W m{sup -2}. The hemispheric mean radiative forcings vary by only about 10% for reasonable assumptions about the chemical form of the sulfate aerosol and the relative humidity dependence; the uncertainties in the aerosol loading are far more significant. If a soot/sulfate mass ratio of 0.075 is assumed, then the global solar radiative forcing weakens to -0.18 W m{sup -2} for an external mixture and weakens further for an internal mixture. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the radiative forcing shows strong negative/positive forcing contrasts that may influence the dynamical response of the atmosphere. Although these results are extremely sensitive to the adopted soot/sulfate ratio and the assumed vertical profile, they indicate that fossil-fuel soot aerosol may exert a nonnegligible radiative forcing and emphasize the need to consider each anthropogenic aerosol species. 58 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. TMACS test procedure TP003: Graphics. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlan, P.K.; Washburn, S.

    1994-09-01

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure addresses the graphics requirements of the TMACS. The features to be tested are the data display graphics and the graphic elements that provide for operator control and selection of displays.

  11. TMACS test procedure TP001: Alarm management. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlan, P.K.

    1994-09-01

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure addresses the Alarm Management requirements of the TMACS. The features to be tested are: real-time alarming on high and low level and discrete alarms, equipment alarms, dead-band filtering, alarm display color coding, alarm acknowledgement, and alarm logging.

  12. TMACS test procedure TP004: Reporting. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washburn, S.J.

    1994-08-25

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure addressed the report generation capability of the TMACS. The features to be tested are generation of the alarm history report, equipment failure report, single-shell tank report and double-shell tank report.

  13. TMACS test procedure TP010: Integration summary. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spurling, D.G.

    1994-09-01

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure verifies that Test Procedures 1, 2, 3, 5 and 9 (WHC-SD-WM-TRP-105, 106, 107, 109 and 113) of TMACS Software Release 4.1 have been successfully completed.

  14. TMACS test procedure TP003: Graphics. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlan, P.K.

    1994-08-25

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure addresses the graphics requirements of the TMACS. The features to be tested are the data display graphics and the graphic elements that provide for operator control and selection of displays.

  15. Ocean acidification over the next three centuries using a simple global climate carbon-cycle model: projections and sensitivities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Patel, Pralit; Mundra, Anupriya

    2016-08-01

    Continued oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 is projected to significantly alter the chemistry of the upper oceans over the next three centuries, with potentially serious consequences for marine ecosystems. Relatively few models have the capability to make projections of ocean acidification, limiting our ability to assess the impacts and probabilities of ocean changes. In this study we examine the ability of Hector v1.1, a reduced-form global model, to project changes in the upper ocean carbonate system over the next three centuries, and quantify the model's sensitivity to parametric inputs. Hector is run under prescribed emission pathways from the Representative Concentrationmore » Pathways (RCPs) and compared to both observations and a suite of Coupled Model Intercomparison (CMIP5) model outputs. Current observations confirm that ocean acidification is already taking place, and CMIP5 models project significant changes occurring to 2300. Hector is consistent with the observational record within both the high- (> 55°) and low-latitude oceans (< 55°). The model projects low-latitude surface ocean pH to decrease from preindustrial levels of 8.17 to 7.77 in 2100, and to 7.50 in 2300; aragonite saturation levels (ΩAr) decrease from 4.1 units to 2.2 in 2100 and 1.4 in 2300 under RCP 8.5. These magnitudes and trends of ocean acidification within Hector are largely consistent with the CMIP5 model outputs, although we identify some small biases within Hector's carbonate system. Of the parameters tested, changes in [H+] are most sensitive to parameters that directly affect atmospheric CO2 concentrations – Q10 (terrestrial respiration temperature response) as well as changes in ocean circulation, while changes in ΩAr saturation levels are sensitive to changes in ocean salinity and Q10. We conclude that Hector is a robust tool well suited for rapid ocean acidification projections and sensitivity analyses, and it is capable of emulating both current observations

  16. Project File System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with each project directory. This user must have a NIM role of PI, PI Proxy, or Project Manager. Access control for project directories is based on Unix groups. The...

  17. Project Charter Template

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EERE WebDigital Project Charter |Project Name|| |Project Lead|| |Supporting EERE Office... How do you plan to address Section 508 requirements? Do you need a separate Web statistics ...

  18. Project ATHENA creates surrogate human organ systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project ATHENA creates surrogate human organ systems Project ATHENA creates surrogate human organ systems The development of miniature surrogate human organs, coupled with highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, could one day revolutionize the way new drugs and toxic agents are studied. June 15, 2015 ATHENA prototype undergoes testing. ATHENA prototype undergoes testing. Contact Los Alamos National Laboratory Kevin Roark Communications Office (505) 665-9202 Email "By developing

  19. Earthjustice, Appliance Standards Awareness Project, Natural Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Defense Council - Comments in response to DOE solicitation of views on the implementation of test procedure waivers for large capacity clothes washers | Department of Energy Earthjustice, Appliance Standards Awareness Project, Natural Resources Defense Council - Comments in response to DOE solicitation of views on the implementation of test procedure waivers for large capacity clothes washers Earthjustice, Appliance Standards Awareness Project, Natural Resources Defense Council - Comments in

  20. Net Test

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-09-01

    Nettest is a secure, real-time network utility. The nettest framework is designed to incorporate existing and new network tests, and be run as a daemon or an interactive process. Requests for network tests are received via a SSL connection or the user interface and are authorized using a ACL list (in the future authorization using Akenti will also be supported). For tests that require coordination between the two ends of the test, Nettest establishes anmore » SSL connection to accomplish this coordination. A test between two remote computers can be requested via the user interlace if the Nettest daemon is running on both remote machines and the user is authorized. Authorization for the test is through a chain of trust estabtished by the nettest daemons. Nettest is responsible for determining if the test request is authorized, but it does nothing further to secure the test once the test is running. Currently the Nettest framework incorporates lperf-vl.2, a simple ping type test, and a tuned TCP test that uses a given required throughput and ping results to determine the round trip time to set a buffer size (based on the delay bandwidth product) and then performs an iperf TCP throughput test. Additional network test tools can be integrated into the Nettest framework in the future.« less

  1. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Baselines - Performance Baseline Examples Example 34 6.0 PROJECT BASELINE This section presents a summary of the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project baseline, which was prepared by an inter- contractor team to support an accelerated planning case for the project. The project schedules and associated cost profiles presented in this section are compared to the currently approved project baseline, as contained in the Facility Stabilization Project Fiscal Year 1999 Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP)

  2. Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects Projects The U.S. Department of Energy supports a variety of energy-related projects on tribal lands. Through these projects, tribes have built the institutional capacity to manage their energy needs, assessed the feasibility of energy efficiency and renewable energy installation, and demonstrated the viability of installing renewable energy systems on tribal lands. View a map of projects Get information on project funding history Learn about Tribal Energy Deployment Program staff

  3. Perspectives on Project Finance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Finance July 29 2014 Project Company (Borrower) Off-take Agreements Feedstock Agreements O&M Agreement EPC Contract (construct) Technology License Agreements Sponsor's Equity Project Level Equity Investors Senior Project Debt Providers Equity Investors Typical Project Finance Structure 2 SOUND PROJECT ECONOMICS Leads to Adequate Debt Service Coverage And Acceptable Equity Returns Market Risk Assessment Competitive positioning. Supply / demand forecasts. Competing suppliers.

  4. Buckman Direct Diversion Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Buckman Direct Diversion Project Buckman Direct Diversion Project This project takes surface water from the Rio Grande, and then treats and distributes these waters to the city and county of Santa Fe through their drinking water distribution systems. August 1, 2013 Water flumes at Buckman Direct Diversion Project Water flumes at Buckman Direct Diversion Project The City of Santa Fe and Santa Fe County completed the construction of the Buckman Direct Diversion (BDD) Project in December 2010. The

  5. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  6. Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Definition Rating Index (PDRI) Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI) The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Project Definition Rating Index (EM-PDRI) is a modification of a commercially developed planning tool that has been tested by an EM team specifically for EM's projects. EM-PDRI Team members represent a number of EM sites, and have already used this project planning tool successfully. The EM-PDRI examines a wide range of project factors related to cost, scope, and schedule, and

  7. Advanced engineering environment collaboration project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamph, Jane Ann; Pomplun, Alan R.; Kiba, Grant W.; Dutra, Edward G.; Dankiewicz, Robert J.; Marburger, Scot J.

    2008-12-01

    The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a model for an engineering design and communications system that will enhance project collaboration throughout the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) worked together on a prototype project to evaluate the suitability of a portion of PTC's Windchill 9.0 suite of data management, design and collaboration tools as the basis for an AEE. The AEE project team implemented Windchill 9.0 development servers in both classified and unclassified domains and used them to test and evaluate the Windchill tool suite relative to the needs of the NWC using weapons project use cases. A primary deliverable was the development of a new real time collaborative desktop design and engineering process using PDMLink (data management tool), Pro/Engineer (mechanical computer aided design tool) and ProductView Lite (visualization tool). Additional project activities included evaluations of PTC's electrical computer aided design, visualization, and engineering calculations applications. This report documents the AEE project work to share information and lessons learned with other NWC sites. It also provides PTC with recommendations for improving their products for NWC applications.

  8. Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research ... Experimental Tests (FACET) Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) Facility Ops Projects, ...

  9. GTO Project Portfolio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office funds 154 research and development projects leveraging nearly $500 million in total combined investment. Each project represents a growing technology sector in conventional hydrothermal,...

  10. Falls Creek Hydroelectric Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavus Electric Company; Richard Levitt; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2007-06-12

    This project was for planning and construction of a 700kW hydropower project on the Fall River near Gustavus, Alaska.

  11. Project Finance and Investments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Project Finance and Investments Chris Cassidy, National Business Renewable Energy Advisor, U.S. Department of Agriculture

  12. Evaluation Project 4492

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organization area to allow the movement and radio-graphing of component for evaluation to determine the proper Project Execution Plan for dismantlement. Evaluation Project...

  13. Step 4: Project Implementation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... expected * Technology O&M Assumed low, mitigable or allocatable Sources: Adapted from Holland & Hart, RE Project Development & Finance & Infocast, Advanced RE Project Finance & ...

  14. Transmission Commercial Project Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects Expand Projects Skip navigation links Ancillary and Control Area Services (ACS) Practices Forum Attachment K Commercial Business Process Improvement (CBPI) Customer...

  15. DHS Flat Stanley Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To provide information on the DHS Flat Stanley Project. The goal of the project is to help kids learn about the importance of cybersecurity.

  16. ARRA Electrification Projects

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    U.S. Department of Energy funded multiple electrification projects through the American ... The U.S. Department of Energy funded multiple electrification projects through the ...

  17. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Forecast FY ...

  18. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 Actual & Forecast FY 2011 Pre- & ...

  19. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 Forecast FY 2011 Pre- & ...

  20. 2016 Technology Innovation Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects FY 2016 Technology Innovation Project Briefs Demand Response TIP 292: Advanced Heat Pump Water Heater Research TIP 336: Scaled Deployment and Demonstration of Demand...

  1. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Second Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast ...

  2. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 ...

  3. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 nd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1. ...

  4. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 rd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1. ...

  5. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Actual FY ...

  6. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast ...

  7. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Final FY ...

  8. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 ...

  9. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Second Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Actual FY ...

  10. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 st Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1. ...

  11. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 4 th Quarter Metrics Final Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2008 Target FY 2008 Actual ...

  12. Manhattan Project: Maps

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scroll down to view thumbnails of each map. Leslie Groves looks at a map of Japan. Manhattan Project: General Manhattan Project Facilities Places map "Signature Facilities of the ...

  13. The Manhattan Project

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Center for Oak Ridge Oral History, including stories about the Manhattan Project The Manhattan Project: A New and Secret World of Human Experimentation Top Related Information: ...

  14. Heavy Metals Contaminated Soil Project, Resource Recovery Project, and Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) (OTD) as an element of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November, 1989. OTD has begun to search out, develop, test and demonstrate technologies that can now or in the future be applied to the enormous remediation problem now facing the DOE and the United States public in general. Technology demonstration projects have been designed to attack a separate problem as defined by DOE. The Heavy Metals Contaminated Soil Project was conceived to test and demonstrate off-the-shelf technologies (dominantly from the mining industry) that can be brought to bear on the problem of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination in soils and sediments. The Resource Recovery Project is tasked with identifying, developing, testing, and evaluating new and innovative technologies for the remediation of metal contaminated surface and groundwater. An innovative twist on this project is the stated goal of recovering the metals, formerly disposed of as a waste, for reuse and resale, thereby transforming them into a usable resource. Finally, the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project was developed to demonstrate and remediate underground spills of hydrocarbons from formations that are (1) too deep for excavation, and/or (2) require in-situ remediation efforts of long duration. This project has already been shown effective in reducing the time for remediation by conventional methods from an estimated 200 years at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to less than one year. The savings in time and dollars from this technology alone can be immeasurable.

  15. MHK Projects/Twelve Mile Point Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Province Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource Click here Current Tidal Coordinates 29.9177, -89.9307 Project Phase Phase 1 Project Installed Capacity...

  16. MHK Projects/Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Country Australia Project Resource Click here Current Tidal Project Nearest Body of Water Clarence Strait Coordinates -12.083533792616, 131.04972839355 Project...

  17. Y-12 Steam Plant Project Received National Recognition for Project...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Steam Plant Project Received National Recognition for Project Management Excellence March 23, 2011 Y-12 steam plant project receives national recognition for project management ...

  18. TMACS Test Procedure TP005: Sensor configuration, logging, and data conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washburn, S.J.

    1994-08-29

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the projects acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes.

  19. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Craig; Carroll, Paul; Bell, Abigail

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and

  20. EA-1785: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1785: Finding of No Significant Impact Phase III Anthropogenic Test Characterization Project, Mobile County, Alabama Based on the analyses in...

  1. Energy Department Announces New Innovative Projects to Develop...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Washington that will test renewable biofuels as a domestic alternative to power our ... These projects build on the Obama Administration's broader efforts to advance biofuels ...

  2. DOE CD-4 Review of the MINERvA Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment Document (with signatures) (pdf) Integrated Safety Management Document (pdf) Burn Test Results (pdf) Project Execution Plan (22207 Version with signatures) (pdf) Other...

  3. FY 2014 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Project Selections | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The project will include fabrication and testing of cells, modeling the thermodynamics and ... and evaluate their performance in comparison to more established cathode materials. ...

  4. Southline Transmission Line Project - Volume 1 Front Matter

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Infrastructure Program TPE total potential effect tpy ton(s) per year UAS FTC Unmanned Aircraft Systems Flight Test Center Southline Transmission Line Project Final ...

  5. Charging Infrastructure for Electric Vehicles (Smart Grid Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    level and remote onoff functionality. A onestopshop charging offer was tested on the market and further developed within the project. An internal development plan for charging...

  6. Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal Test Centre, Jump to: navigation, search 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleClarenceStrai...

  7. Project Profile: Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation Project ... They will conduct detailed tests using a laboratory-scale TES system to: Graphic of a ...

  8. Solar Energy Science Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Projects Curriculum: Solar Power -(thermodynamics, lightelectromagnetic, radiation, energy transformation, conductionconvection, seasons, trigonometry) Grade Level: ...

  9. Desert Peak EGS Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Desert Peak EGS Project presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  10. eProject Builder

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-06-01

    eProject Builder enables Energy Services Companies (ESCOs) and their contracting agencies to: 1. upload and track project-level Information 2. generate basic project reports required by local, state, and/or federal agencies 3. benchmark new Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) projects against historical data

  11. EM Projects Perspective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jack Surash, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisition and Project Management, Environmental Management March 22, 2016

  12. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Execution Example

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project Execution Example Example 73 6.3 Project Approach The overall schedule strategy for the PFP project includes ongoing minimum safe activities, combined with stabilization of materials followed by materials disposition, and subsequent transition of the PFP complex to a decommissioned state. The PFP material stabilization baseline was developed using a functionally-based work WBS. The WBS defines all activities required to take each material stream from their current location/conditions

  13. January 2016 Project Dashboard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Project Management Oversight and Assessments (PM) provides a monthly assessment of DOEs portfolio of capital assets projects, which is summarized in the monthly Project Dashboard report. The current portfolio consists of 32 active projects with established scope, schedule, and cost performance baselines. Based on current performance, projects that are expected to meet their performance baseline are assessed as GREEN, projects that are at-risk of breaching their performance baselines are assessed as YELLOW, and projects that are expected to breach their performance baselines are assessed as RED.

  14. December 2015 Project Dashboard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Project Management Oversight and Assessments (PM) provides a monthly assessment of DOEs portfolio of capital assets projects, which is summarized in the monthly Project Dashboard report. The current portfolio consists of 32 active projects with established scope, schedule, and cost performance baselines. Based on current performance, projects that are expected to meet their performance baseline are assessed as GREEN, projects that are at-risk of breaching their performance baselines are assessed as YELLOW, and projects that are expected to breach their performance baselines are assessed as RED.

  15. April 2016 Project Dashboard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Project Management Oversight and Assessments (PM) provides a monthly assessment of DOE’s portfolio of capital assets projects, which is summarized in the monthly Project Dashboard report. The current portfolio consists of 34 active projects with established scope, schedule, and cost performance baselines. Based on current performance, projects that are expected to meet their performance baseline are assessed as GREEN, projects that are at-risk of breaching their performance baselines are assessed as YELLOW, and projects that are expected to breach their performance baselines are assessed as RED.

  16. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 nd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 80% - Two projects completed in the 2 nd Qtr FY09. This is a 3-year rolling average (FY07 to FY09). 2. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: 90% of EM cleanup projects

  17. Project Reports for Winnebago Tribe- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Following through with the Winnebago Tribe's commitment to reduce energy usage and consumption, the Winnebago Tribe Solar Project will focus on renewable energy production and energy cost savings...

  18. Volatility basis-set approach simulation of organic aerosol formation in East Asia: implications for anthropogenic-biogenic interaction and controllable amounts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, H.; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka; Takami, A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Kanaya, Y.; Takigawa, M.

    2014-09-16

    Organic aerosol (OA) simulations using the volatility basis-set approach were made for East Asia and its outflow region. Model simulations were evaluated through comparisons with OA measured by aerosol mass spectrometers in and around Tokyo (at Komaba and Kisai in summer 2003 and 2004) and over the outflow region in East Asia (at Fukue and Hedo in spring 2009). The simulations with aging processes of organic vapors reasonably well reproduced mass concentrations, temporal variations, and formation efficiency of observed OA at all sites. As OA mass was severely underestimated in the simulations without the aging processes, the oxidations of organic vapors are essential for reasonable OA simulations over East Asia. By considering the aging processes, simulated OA concentrations considerably increased from 0.24 to 1.28 g m-3 in the boundary layer over the whole of East Asia. OA formed from the interaction of anthropogenic and biogenic sources was also enhanced by the aging processes. The fraction of controllable OA was estimated to be 87 % of total OA over the whole of East Asia, showing that most of the OA in our simulations formed anthropogenically (controllable). A large portion of biogenic secondary OA (78 % of biogenic secondary OA) formed through the influence of anthropogenic sources. The high fraction of controllable OA in our simulations is likely because anthropogenic emissions are dominant over East Asia and OA formation is enhanced by anthropogenic sources and their aging processes. Both the amounts (from 0.18 to 1.12 g m-3) and the fraction (from 75 % to 87 %) of controllable OA were increased by aging processes of organic vapors over East Asia.

  19. Camp Lejeune Solar Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lejeune Solar Project FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR Cincinnati, OH May 18, 2016 Camp Lejeune Solar  Duke Energy Overview  Project Overview  Project Background / Goals & Objectives  Timeline  Project Development  Partnership  Initial Development Steps  Project Background  Lessons Learned 2 Duke Energy Overview 3  Largest electric power holding company in the United States  150+ years of service  7.4 million electric customers and 525,000

  20. Project Management Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Management Resources Project Management Resources Performance & Project Completion Environmental Management Completed Projects 2005-Present EM Current Project Performance ...

  1. Gullfaks multiphase booster project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vangen, G.; Carstensen, C.; Bakken, L.E.

    1995-12-31

    A Poseidon Multiphase Pump has been Installed and is presently running on Statoil`s Gullfaks A platform in the North Sea, giving additional pressure to one of the wells. The main objective of this work has been to qualify the Poseidon Booster Technology, technically and operationally, and to provide a reliable and industrialized tool for multiphase boosting, either sub sea or installed topside a platform. The paper gives a brief summary of the project and describes the Poseidon pump, the platform installation and outlines the experience and results from the ongoing qualification test. The Gullfaks booster, as delivered by Framo Engineering AS, has up to January 1995 accumulated 2,400 running hours. The booster is fully integrated into the production systems on the platform. The daily operations are carried out from the central control room by the ordinary platform staff. The objectives of the test program have so far been successfully fulfilled. Multiphase booster technology combined with progress in multiphase flow technology will have a significant impact on development and production of smaller oil and gas fields that today are assumed to be non-profitable.

  2. PROJECT PROFILE: Oregon State University

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon State University will continue the development of a microchannel solar receiver, using supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) as the heat transfer fluid. The research will resolve key issues associated with the commercial viability of the technology, which allows for a radical reduction in the size of a solar central receiver. The project will culminate in a field test of a commercial scale receiver module with a surface area of approximately one square meter.

  3. Maritime Hydrogen Fuel Cell Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell Project - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  4. KTM Experimental Complex Project Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tazhibayeva, I.L.; Azizov, E.A.; Krylov, V.A.; Shkolnik, V.S.; Velikhov, E.P.; Obysov, N.A.; Tukhvatulin, Sh.T.; Tikhomirov, L.N.; Shestakov, V.P.; Filatov, O.G

    2005-04-15

    A review of KTM experimental complex project status, which is aimed the creation of a Kazakhstani spherical tokamak for study and tests materials and components of future fusion reactors. Revised basic parameters of the KTM facility and ground of the changes taking into account new plasma core geometry, new design of vacuum chamber and modified magnetic system, transport sluice and movable divertor devices, and additional RF-heating system are presented here.

  5. Status of LLNL granite projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-12-31

    The status of LLNL Projects dealing with nuclear waste disposal in granitic rocks is reviewed. This review covers work done subsequent to the June 1979 Workshop on Thermomechanical Modeling for a Hardrock Waste Repository and is prepared for the July 1980 Workshop on Thermomechanical-Hydrochemical Modeling for a Hardrock Waste Repository. Topics reviewed include laboratory determination of thermal, mechanical, and transport properties of rocks at conditions simulating a deep geologic repository, and field testing at the Climax granitic stock at the USDOE Nevada Test Site.

  6. Sweet lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco Fee. Annual report, December 1, 1979-February 27, 1981. Volume I. Drilling and completion test well and disposal well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, R.W.

    1982-06-01

    The Sweet lake site is located approximately 15 miles southeast of Lake Charles in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A geological study showed that the major structure in this area is a graben. The dip of the beds is northwesterly into the basin. A well drilled into the deep basin would find the target sand below 18,000', at high pressures and temperatures. However, since there is no well control in the basin, the specific site was chosen on the 15,000' contour of the target sand in the eastern, more narrow part of the garben. Those key control wells are present within one mile of the test well. The information acquired by drilling the test well confirmed the earlier geologic study. The target sand was reached at 15,065', had a porosity of over 20% and a permeability to water of 300 md. The original reservoir pressure was 12,060 psi and the bottom hole temperature 299{sup 0}F. There are approximately 250 net feet of sand available for the perforation. The disposal well was drilled to a total depth of 7440'.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Kauai Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kauai Test Facility Kauai photo The Kauai Test Facility (KTF) is a rocket launch range in Hawaii operated by Sandia for the Department of Energy. The facilities and personnel support a variety of sounding-rocket missions, including weapons research and development; operational training, test, and evaluation; and technology development. To ensure maximum use of the facilities, Sandia conducts launch projects for other organizations or government agencies on a noninterference basis. These projects

  8. AVTA: Transit Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Transit Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures AVTA: Transit Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures All Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity transit projects follow a rigorous data collection and analysis protocol. Refer to "General Evaluation Plan: Fleet Test and Evaluation Projects" for information about fleet selection, data collection, and products related to new evaluation projects. More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Vehicle and

  9. Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Current projects include various catalyst development projects, a system contaminant project, and the manufacturing project. Testing capabilities include but are not limited to single cell fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

  10. Microsoft Word - Renewable Energy Project at LLNL_June 2011_jb...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    solar energy, along with renewable energy test capabilities, to better understand how to ... instrumented, multi-technology renewable energy test facility into the power project. ...

  11. Climate data, analysis and models for the study of natural variability and anthropogenic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Philip D.

    2014-07-31

    Gridded Temperature Under prior/current support, we completed and published (Jones et al., 2012) the fourth major update to our global land dataset of near-surface air temperatures, CRUTEM4. This is one of the most widely used records of the climate system, having been updated, maintained and further developed with DoE support since the 1980s. We have continued to update the CRUTEM4 (Jones et al., 2012) database that is combined with marine data to produce HadCRUT4 (Morice et al., 2012). The emphasis in our use of station temperature data is to access as many land series that have been homogenized by National Meteorological Services (NMSs, including NCDC/NOAA, Asheville, NC). Unlike the three US groups monitoring surface temperatures in a similar way, we do not infill areas that have no or missing data. We can only infill such regions in CRUTEM4 by accessing more station temperature series. During early 2014, we have begun the extensive task of updating as many of these series as possible using data provided by some NMSs and also through a number of research projects and programs around the world. All the station data used in CRUTEM4 have been available since 2009, but in Osborn and Jones (2014) we have made this more usable using a Google Earth interface (http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/cru/data/crutem/ge/ ). We have recently completed the update of our infilled land multi-variable dataset (CRU TS 3.10, Harris et al., 2014). This additionally produces complete land fields (except for the Antarctic) for temperature, precipitation, diurnal temperature range, vapour pressure and sunshine/cloud. Using this dataset we have calculated sc-PDSI (self-calibrating Palmer Drought Severity Index) data and compared with other PDSI datasets (Trenberth et al., 2014). Also using CRU TS 3.10 and Reanalysis datasets, we showed no overall increase in global temperature variability despite changing regional patterns (Huntingford et al., 2013). Harris et al. (2014) is an update of an earlier

  12. Probable Causes of the Abnormal Ridge Accompanying the 2013-2014 California Drought: ENSO Precursor and Anthropogenic Warming Footprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S-Y; Hipps, Lawrence; Gillies, Robert R.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-05-16

    The 2013-14 California drought was accompanied by an anomalous high-amplitude ridge system. The anomalous ridge was investigated using reanalysis data and the Community Earth System Model (CESM). It was found that the ridge emerged from continual sources of Rossby wave energy in the western North Pacific starting in late summer, and subsequently intensified into winter. The ridge generated a surge of wave energy downwind and deepened further the trough over the northeast U.S., forming a dipole. The dipole and associated circulation pattern is not linked directly with either ENSO or Pacific Decadal Oscillation; instead it is correlated with a type of ENSO precursor. The connection between the dipole and ENSO precursor has become stronger since the 1970s, and this is attributed to increased GHG loading as simulated by the CESM. Therefore, there is a traceable anthropogenic warming footprint in the enormous intensity of the anomalous ridge during winter 2013-14, the associated drought and its intensity.

  13. 2014 DOE Project Management Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What:  2014 DOE Project Management Workshop (Meeting the Challenge—Integrated Acquisition & Project Management)

  14. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 4 th Quarter Metrics Final Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2008 Target FY 2008 Actual Comment 1. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 75% 76% This is a 3-year rolling average Data includes FY06 to FY08. (37/48) 2. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: 90% of EM cleanup projects complete

  15. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 st Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 80% - No 1 st Qtr FY09 completions. This is a 3-year rolling average (FY07 to FY09). 2. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: 90% of EM cleanup projects complete 80% of

  16. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 rd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 80% 72% This is a 3-year rolling average (FY07 to FY09). No 3 rd qtr FY09 completions. 2. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: 90% of EM cleanup projects complete 80% of

  17. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 th Quarter Metrics Final Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 80% 73% This is a 3-year rolling average (FY07 to FY09). 2. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: 90% of EM cleanup projects complete 80% of scope within 125%

  18. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 st Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target 1st Qtr FY 2010 Actual FY 2010 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 85% Line Item 73% Line Item 70% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is a projection based on a 3-year rolling average (FY08 to

  19. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Second Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Actual FY 2010 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 85% Line Item 73% Line Item 70% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is a projection based on a 3-year rolling average (FY08 to FY10).

  20. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Forecast FY 2010 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 85% Line Item 71% Line Item 70% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is a projection based on a 3-year rolling average (FY08 to FY10).

  1. Vitrification facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DesCamp, V.A.; McMahon, C.L.

    1996-07-01

    This report is a description of the West Valley Demonstration Project`s vitrification facilities from the establishment of the West Valley, NY site as a federal and state cooperative project to the completion of all activities necessary to begin solidification of radioactive waste into glass by vitrification. Topics discussed in this report include the Project`s background, high-level radioactive waste consolidation, vitrification process and component testing, facilities design and construction, waste/glass recipe development, integrated facility testing, and readiness activities for radioactive waste processing.

  2. Crane Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crane Safety Test Instructions: All Training and Testing Material is for LSU CAMD Users ONLY! Please enter your personal information in the spaces below. A minimum passing score is 80% (8 out of 10) This test can only be taken once in a thirty day period. All fields are required to be filled in. Login: Login First Name: Last Name: Phone Number: Contact: 1. The first thing you should do when using the crane is to: a. verify the battery power on the remote control. b. drag the load to the desired

  3. Safety evaluation report related to the Department of Energy`s proposal for the irradiation of lead test assemblies containing tritium-producing burnable absorber rods in commercial light-water reactors. Project Number 697

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The NRC staff has reviewed a report, submitted by DOE to determine whether the use of a commercial light-water reactor (CLWR) to irradiate a limited number of tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) in lead test assemblies (LTAs) raises generic issues involving an unreviewed safety question. The staff has prepared this safety evaluation to address the acceptability of these LTAs in accordance with the provision of 10 CFR 50.59 without NRC licensing action. As summarized in Section 10 of this safety evaluation, the staff has identified issues that require NRC review. The staff has also identified a number of areas in which an individual licensee undertaking irradiation of TPBAR LTAs will have to supplement the information in the DOE report before the staff can determine whether the proposed irradiation is acceptable at a particular facility. The staff concludes that a licensee undertaking irradiation of TPBAR LTAs in a CLWR will have to submit an application for amendment to its facility operating license before inserting the LTAs into the reactor.

  4. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Conoco MCA unit well No. 358, Maljamar Field, Lea County, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Kumar, R.M.; Marlow, R.E.; Wilhelm, M.H.

    1982-08-01

    Field operations, which were conducted as a cooperative effort between Conoco and Gruy Federal, began on January 16, 1980 when the well was spudded. The well was drilled to 3692 feet, and 18 cores recovered in 18 core-barrel runs (144 feet). Upon completion of the coring phase, the hole was drilled to a total depth of 4150 feet and a complete suite of geophysical logs was run. Logging was then followed by completion and testing by Concoco. Core porosities agreed well with computed log porosities. Core water saturation and computed log porosities agree fairly well from 3692 to 3712 feet, poorly from 3712 to 3820 feet and in a general way from 4035 to 4107 feet. Computer log analysis techniques did not improve the agreement of log versus core derived water saturations. However, both core and log analysis indicated the ninth zone had the highest residual hydrocarbon saturations. Residual oil saturation were 259 STB/acre-ft for the 4035 - 4055 feet interval, and 150 STB/acre-ft for the 3692 - 3718 feet interval. Nine BOPD was produced from the 4035 - 4055 feet interval and no oil was produced from 3692 to 3718 feet interval, qualitatively confirming the relative oil saturations. The low oil production in the zone from 4022 to 4055 and the lack of production from 3692 to 3718 feet indicated the zone to be at or near residual waterflood conditions as determined by log analysis. 68 figures, 11 tables.

  5. Concentrating Solar Power Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects

  6. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Randy M; Gross, Ian G; Smith, Cyrus M; Hill, David E

    2011-11-01

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor

  7. Experimental Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  8. Mechanical Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  9. Acquisition and Project Management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4%2A en Acquisition and Project Management Office volunteers get up-close look at Office of Secure Transportation exercise http:nnsa.energy.govblogacquisition-and-project-mana...

  10. Haida Corporation- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Reynolds Creek Hydroelectric Project ("Reynolds Creek" or the "Project") is a 5 MW hydroelectric resource to be constructed on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, approximately 10 miles east of Hydaburg.

  11. Information Technology Project Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-03

    The Order provides program and project management direction for the acquisition and management of IT projects, investments, and initiatives. Cancels DOE G 200.1-1. Admin Chg 1 approved 1-16-2013.

  12. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Metric FY 2013 Target FY 2013 Forecast FY 2013 Pre- & Post-CAP* Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and ...

  13. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and ...

  14. Information Technology Project Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-03

    The Order provides program and project management direction for the acquisition and management of IT projects, investments, and initiatives. Admin Chg 1, dated 1-16-2013, supersedes DOE O 415.1.

  15. Sample Project Execution Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The project execution plan (PEP) is the governing document that establishes the means to execute, monitor, and control projects.  The plan serves as the main communication vehicle to ensure that...

  16. Radkowsky Thorium Fuel Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todosow, Michael

    2006-12-31

    In the early/mid 1990’s Prof. Alvin Radkowsky, former chief scientist of the U.S. Naval Reactors program, proposed an alternate fuel concept employing thorium-based fuel for use in existing/next generation pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The concept was based on the use of a 'seed-blanket-unit' (SBU) that was a one-for-one replacement for a standard PWR assembly with a uranium-based central 'driver' zone, surrounded by a 'blanket' zone containing uranium and thorium. Therefore, the SBU could be retrofit without significant modifications into existing/next generation PWRs. The objective was to improve the proliferation and waste characteristics of the current once-through fuel cycle. The objective of a series of projects funded by the Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-IPP) - BNL-T2-0074,a,b-RU 'Radkowsky Thorium Fuel (RTF) Concept' - was to explore the characteristics and potential of this concept. The work was performed under several BNL CRADAs (BNL-C-96-02 and BNL-C-98-15) with the Radkowsky Thorium Power Corp./Thorium Power Inc. and utilized the technical and experimental capabilities in the Former Soviet Union (FSU) to explore the potential of this concept for implementation in Russian pressurized water reactors (VVERs), and where possible, also generate data that could be used for design and licensing of the concept for Western PWRs. The Project in Russia was managed by the Russian Research Center-'Kurchatov Institute'(RRC-KI), and included several institutes (e.g., PJSC 'Electrostal', NPO 'LUCH' (Podolsk), RIINM (Bochvar Institute), GAN RF (Gosatomnadzor), Kalininskaja NPP (VVER-1000)), and consisted of the following phases: Phase-1 ($550K/$275K to Russia): The objective was to perform an initial review of all aspects of the concept (design, performance, safety, implementation issues, cost, etc.) to confirm feasibility/viability and identify any “show-stoppers”; Phase-2 ($600K/$300K to Russia

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects Threat and Intelligence Insight Game-changing projects with a high degree of technical risk realized and produced in support of the warfighter Threat and Intelligence Insight Various Project Highlights IMS spearheads work supporting a number of prominent projects. Supporting the Department of Defense's core mission and ever-evolving needs, IMS leverages its robust background in weapons development to understand and actively engage with a number of weapons technologies, defense

  18. Red Lake Weatherization Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    REVIEW RED LAKE WEATHERIZATION PROJECT BERT VAN WERT ENERGY ACTIVITIES COORDINATOR Project Overview To develop the capacity to conduct energy audits Implement energy efficiency measures into Tribal homes Develop a Tribally administered Energy Efficiency Program and business PROJECT LOCATION Our project is located at Red Lake Housing Authority Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians Red Lake , MN Red Lake Band of Chippewas Area overview Reservation (Diminished Lands) and Surroundings Red Lake Band of

  19. GHPsRUS Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Battocletti, Liz

    The GHPsRUS Project's full name is "Measuring the Costs and Benefits of Nationwide Geothermal Heat Pump Deployment." The dataset contains employment and installation price data collected by four economic surveys: (1)GHPsRUS Project Manufacturer & OEM Survey, (2) GHPsRUS Project Geothermal Loop Survey, (3) GHPsRUS Project Mechanical Equipment Installation Survey, and (4) GHPsRUS Geothermal Heat Pump Industry Survey

  20. Mentors and Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mentors, Projects Mentors and Projects Bringing together top space science students with internationally recognized researchers at Los Alamos in an educational, collaborative atmosphere Contacts Director Misa Cowee Email Administrative Assistant Lynea Koshar Email Request more information Email Students work closely with their mentors, who are Laboratory scientists, on challenging research projects in the Space Weather Summer School. Projects are related to current research topics in space

  1. WIPP Projects Interative Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View WIPP Projects in a larger map. To report corrections, please email WeatherizationInnovation@ee.doe.gov.

  2. Step 2: Project Options

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Project Options 2 2 Design 1 Potential 3 Refinement 4 Implementation 2 Options 5 Operations & Maintenance 1/28/2016 2 Presentation Agenda * Step 2: Project Options * Project members and roles * Activity * Project ownership options - Interconnection, net metering, permitting, and considerations * Tools * Case in Point 3 Potential Options Refinement Implementation Operations & Maintenance 4 Step 2: Roles, Business Structures, & Regulatory Considerations Purpose: Determine ownership

  3. GHPsRUS Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Battocletti, Liz

    2013-07-09

    The GHPsRUS Project's full name is "Measuring the Costs and Benefits of Nationwide Geothermal Heat Pump Deployment." The dataset contains employment and installation price data collected by four economic surveys: (1)GHPsRUS Project Manufacturer & OEM Survey, (2) GHPsRUS Project Geothermal Loop Survey, (3) GHPsRUS Project Mechanical Equipment Installation Survey, and (4) GHPsRUS Geothermal Heat Pump Industry Survey

  4. All Selected Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Selected Projects Oct 23, 2009 (rev. Dec. 14, 2010) 99 Projects SMART GRID INVESTMENT GRANTS Type Advanced Metering Infrastructure Customer Systems Electric Systems Distribution Electric Transmission Systems Equipment Manufacturing Integrated and/or Crosscutting Systems Circle indicates project where specific utility/area is not known.

  5. Project Reports for Pawnee Nation- 2006 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The primary goal of this project is to move the energy vision of the Pawnee Nation forward by conducting specific data collection and analysis tasks to assess the viable options available to Pawnee to meet future energy needs sustainable.

  6. Project Reports for Hualapai Tribe- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The project will build on the potential for renewable energy development on the Hualapai Reservation that was identified during the Phase l renewable energy resource assessment conducted by the Hualapai Tribe since 2005.

  7. Reynolds Creek Hydroelectric Project, Project Status

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Excellent School System November 17, 2009 ... South Fork (2.3 MW) Remainder of Generation is Diesel-fired November 17, 2009 6 Project ... Order TurbineGenerator - January 2010 ...

  8. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's marine and hydrokinetic projects from fiscal years 2008 to 2015. 2008-2015 Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Projects (1.87 MB) More Documents & Publications NREL - FY09 Lab Call: Supporting Research and Testing for MHK Presentation from the 2011 Water Program Peer Review Water Power Program: 2011 Peer Review Report Before the House Science and

  9. Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, M.J.

    1993-03-01

    Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

  10. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's marine and hydrokinetic projects from fiscal years 2008 to 2015. 2008-2015 Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Projects (1.87 MB) More Documents & Publications NREL - FY09 Lab Call: Supporting Research and Testing for MHK Presentation from the 2011 Water Program Peer Review Water Power Program: 2011 Peer Review Report Before the House Science and

  11. PROJECT PROFILE: Sistine Solar (Incubator 10) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sistine Solar (Incubator 10) PROJECT PROFILE: Sistine Solar (Incubator 10) Project Title: SolarSkin, Color-Match Solar Panels Funding Opportunity: SunShot Technology to Market (Incubator 10) SunShot Subprogram: Technology to Market Location: Somerville, MA Amount Awarded: $1,000,000 Awardee Cost Share: $250,000 Project Investigator: Senthil Balasubramanian In this project, Sistine Solar plans to develop, test, and manufacture SolarSkin, a new, integrated component of a solar photovoltaic panel

  12. CERCLA Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CERCLA Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan CERCLA Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan CERCLA Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan CERCLA Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan (905.68 KB) More Documents & Publications Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Closure Sites Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site

  13. MHK Projects/Tensas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112009 Project City Butte la Rose, LA Project StateProvince Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource...

  14. Laser-Based Nondestructive Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Projects Laser-Based Nondestructive Testing High speed, non-contact NDT for bridging the gap between traditional nondestructive testing and embedded structural health monitoring. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff Assistant Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email The engineering institute is working to develop a new class of non-destructive

  15. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the second quarter of FY94. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: Biomass Remediation Project; Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil Project; MHD Shutdown; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; Sodium Sulfide/Ferrous Sulfate Project; and Spray Casting Project.

  16. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the third quarter of FY93. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD Proof-of-Concept Project; Mine Waste Technology Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; Sodium Sulfide/Ferrous Sulfate Project; Soil Washing Project; and Spray Casting Project.

  17. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the first quarter of FY93. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy (DOE) test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD proof-of-concept project; mine waste pilot program; plasma projects; resource recovery project; sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate project; soil washing project; and spray casting project.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories Test Capabilities Revitalization Phase 2

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Project Completed On Time, Under Budget | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Sandia National Laboratories Test Capabilities Revitalization Phase 2 Project Completed On Time, Under Budget March 24, 2014 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Test Capabilities Revitalization Phase 2 (TCR 2) project was recently completed on schedule and $4 million under the original budget. Completion of the project, located at Sandia National Laboratories in

  19. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

  20. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technical Baseline Development and Control Examples Example 40 5.0 PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL The Project Management and Control section provides an overview of the project ...