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1

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PETRO-PLUG PETRO-PLUG BENTONITE PLUGGING JANUARY 27, 1998 Report No. RMOTC/97PT22 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS PETRO-PLUG BENTONITE PLUGGING Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: Michael R. Tyler RMOTC Project Manager January 27, 1998 Report No. RMOTC/96ET4 CONTENTS Page Technical Description ...................................................................................................... 1 Problem ............................................................................................................................ 1 Solution ............................................................................................................................ 2 Operation..........................................................................................................................

2

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MICROTURBINE PROJECT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MICROTURBINE PROJECT MICROTURBINE PROJECT Stacy & Stacy Consulting, LLC March 31, 1998 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MICROTURBINE PROJECT Stacy & Stacy Consulting, LLC Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager March 31, 1998 JO 850200 : FC 980009 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a demonstration of gas-fired, integrated microturbine systems at the Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), in partnership with Stacy & Stacy Consulting, LLC (Stacy & Stacy). The project encompassed the testing of two gas microturbine systems at two oil-production wellsites. The microturbine-generators were fueled directly by casinghead gas to power their beam-pumping-unit motors. The system at well 47-A-34 utilized the casinghead sweet gas (0-ppm

3

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: Casing Drilling Test  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Casing Drilling Test Casing Drilling Test Date: 5-17-201 1 DOE Code: 6730-020-72000 Contractor Code: 8067-806 Project Lead: Marl< Duletsky Project Overview 1, Brief project description ~nclude The existing 13-1-SX-23 location and entry road will be reworlproject 4. Major equipment to be used

4

DOD ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOD ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project DOD ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project Presentation covers the DOD ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project, given at the May, 23 2012 Federal Technology...

5

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER APRIL 4,1995 FC9510 / 95PT4 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer April 4, 1995 55103/9510:jb CONTENTS Page Introduction........................................................................................1 NPR-3 Map........................................................................................2 Benefits of D-JAX Pump-Off Controller.....................................................3 Test Results.......................................................................................3 Production Information..........................................................................4

6

Property:Did The Test Results Demonstrate Projected Performance...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Did The Test Results Demonstrate Projected Performance? Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Did The Test Results Demonstrate Projected Performance? Property Type Text...

7

HVAC Water Heater Field Tests Research Project | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HVAC Water Heater Field Tests Research Project HVAC Water Heater Field Tests Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into heating,...

8

Alabama Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil Recovery, Testing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil Recovery, Testing Important Geologic CO2 Storage Alabama Injection Project Aimed at Enhanced Oil Recovery, Testing Important...

9

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IMPROVED ELASTOMER COMPOUND FOR IMPROVED ELASTOMER COMPOUND FOR PROGRESSIVE CAVITY PUMPS Cameron Elastomer Technology MARCH 23, 1998 FC9563/96PT17 RMOTC Test Report Number 96PT17 Improved Elastomer Compound for Progressive Cavity Pumps Cameron Elastomer Technology 29501 Katy Fwy Katy, Texas 77494-7801 (281) 391-4615 (281) 391-4640 (fax) David H. Doyle, PE, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center March 23, 1998 Introduction The purpose of this project was to evaluate improved progressing cavity (PC) pump stator elastomer materials in NPR-3 crude under field conditions. The goal of the project was to test an elastomer material that can be used in high API-gravity (greater than 38' API) crude oils. Currently available materials used for the construction of pump stators swell and fail in contact with such crude oils. This limits the applicability of progressing cavity

10

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHEMICAL & MICROBIAL CHEMICAL & MICROBIAL PARAFFIN CONTROL PROJECT DECEMBER 17, 1997 FC9544 / 96PT12 RMOTC Test Report Paraffin Control Project BDM Oklahoma/NIPER 220 N. Virginia Bartlesville, OK 4003 918-336-2400, FAX 918-337-4365 Leo Giangiacomo, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center December 17. 1997 Abstract This report summarizes the field performance results of a comparison of chemical and microbial paraffin control systems. The two systems were selected from laboratory screening work. Well selection was based on production rates, produced fluids, and prior paraffin treatments. The treatments were performed on similar groups of wells over the same period of time, using quantities and techniques recommended by the supplier specifically for the wells to be treated. The tests were conducted by the U. S. Department of

11

Solar Total Energy Project final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP), a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Georgia Power Company (GPC) located at Shenandoah, Georgia, has undergone several design modifications based on experience from previous operations and test programs. The experiences encountered were discussed in detail in the Solar Total Energy Project Summary Report'' completed in 1987 for DOE. Most of the proposed changes discussed in this report were installed and tested in 1987 as part of two 15-day test programs (SNL Contract No. 06-3049). However, several of the suggested changes were not completed before 1988. These plant modifications include a new distributed control system for the balance of plant (BOP), a fiber a optical communications ring for the field control system, and new control configuration reflecting the new operational procedures caused by the plant modifications. These modifications were tested during a non-consecutive day test, and a 60-day field test conducted during the autumn of 1989. These test were partially funded by SNL under Contract No. 42-4859, dated June 22, 1989. Results of these tests and preliminary analysis are presented in this test summary report. 9 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

Nelson, R.F.; Abney, L.O.; Towner, M.L. (Georgia Power Co., Shenandoah, GA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PERMANENT DOWNHOLE PRESSURE GAUGE PERMANENT DOWNHOLE PRESSURE GAUGE MARCH 15, 1998 FC9553/96PT16 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sperry-Sun Permanent Downhole Pressure Gauge PROJECT TEST RESULTS March 16, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract The Sperry-Sun Downhole Permanent Pressure Gauge (DPPG) is a pressure gauge that is designed to remain in the well for long periods of time providing real time surface data on borehole pressures. The DPPG was field tested at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center in well 63-TPX-10. The instrument was attached to the production string directly above a submersible pump. It was expected to monitor pressure draw-down and build-ups during normal production cycles. During the first two months of the test, the tool worked fine providing a pressure up survey that

13

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PETROLEUM MAGNETICS INTERNATIONAL PETROLEUM MAGNETICS INTERNATIONAL NOVEMBER 28, 1996 FC9520 / 95PT8 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS PETROLEUM MAGNETIC INTERNATIONAL DOWNHOLE MAGNETS FOR SCALE CONTROL Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer November 28, 1995 650100/9520:jb ABSTRACT November 28, 1995 The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a field test on the Petroleum Magnetics International (PMI) downhole magnet, at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR- 3) located 35 miles north of Casper in Natrona County, Wyoming. PMI of Odessa, Texas, states that the magnets are designed to reduce scale and paraffin buildup on the rods, tubing

14

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AJUST A PUMP BEAM PUMPING UNIT AJUST A PUMP BEAM PUMPING UNIT FEBRUARY 19, 1997 FC9532 / 95EC1 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER AJUST A PUMP TEST Rosemond Manufacturing, Inc. (RMI) Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager February 19, 1997 650200/551107:9532 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of a Model-2000 Ajust A Pump system at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3). Rosemond Manufacturing, Inc. (RMI) manufactures compact beam-pumping units that incorporate energy-efficient gear boxes. The equipment is designed to reduce operating costs and minimize maintenance labor. This report documents the equipment performance and the results of the Ajust A Pump test. The purpose of the test was to demonstrate claims of energy efficiency and reduced labor requirements. The test showed

15

Microsoft Word - NEPA SECARB Anthropogenic Final EA 2.24.2011.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

85 85 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Phase III Anthropogenic Test Project U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY March 2011 U.S. Department of Energy SECARB Phase III Anthropogenic Test National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Environmental Assessment i March 2011 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This report was prepared with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Award No. DE-FC26-05NT42590. U.S. Department of Energy SECARB Phase III Anthropogenic Test National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Environmental Assessment ii March 2011 COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Phase III Anthropogenic Test

16

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DYNAMOMETER DYNAMOMETER Sandia National Laboratories FEBRUARY 10, 1998 FC9514 / 95PT6 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sandia Lab Downhole Dynamometer PROJECT TEST RESULTS February 10, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract This test involved the use of Downhole Dynamometer Tools (DDT) that were developed by Albert Engineering and the Sandia National Laboratory. The five (5) Downhole Dynamometers (DDT) were installed in the rod string of well 13-A-21 at predetermined intervals. The DDT tools are equipped with strain gauges and programmable clocks. The tools were place in the well and removed after the data had been gathered. The data gathering is pre-programmed to occur when pumped-off conditions are obtained in the well. This information then reflects the true conditions found downhole in a well in a pumped-

17

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DYNAMOTER DYNAMOTER Sandia National Laboratories FEBRUARY 10, 1998 FC9542 / 96PT11 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sandia Lab Downhole Dynamometer PROJECT TEST RESULTS February 10, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract This test involved the use of Downhole Dynamometer Tools (DDT) that were developed by Albert Engineering and the Sandia National Laboratory. The five (5) Downhole Dynamometers (DDT) were installed in the rod string of well 13-A-21 at predetermined intervals. The DDT tools are equipped with strain gauges and programmable clocks. The tools were place in the well and removed after the data had been gathered. The data gathering is pre-programmed to occur when pumped-off conditions are obtained in the well. This information then reflects the true conditions found downhole in a well in a pumped-off state.

18

Power System Equipment Module Test Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology of electric power generation when applying the binary process to hydrothermal resources had not yet been demonstrated in the United States. Accordingly, on November 10, 1977, the Electric Power Research Institute and the Department of Energy, acting through the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, agreed to cofund the Power System Equipment Module Test Project. The Power System Equipment Module Test Project consisted of a field test program to accomplish the objectives listed below while heating hydrocarbon fluids to above their critical points, expanding these fluids, and subsequently, condensing them below their critical points: (1) Verify the performance of state-of-the-art heat exchangers in geothermal service; (2) Verify the heat exchangers' performance heating either selected pure light hydrocarbons or selected mixtures of light hydrocarbons in the vicinity of their respective critical pressures and temperatures; (3) Establish overall heat transfer coefficients that might be used for design of commercial-size geothermal power plants using the same geothermal brine and light hydrocarbon working fluids; (4) Perform and investigate the above under representative fluid operating conditions during which the production wells would be pumped. The project was accomplished by diverting approximately 200 gpm of the flow from one of Magma Power Company's geothermal wells in the East Mesa Geothermal Field. After the heat was removed from the geothermal brine flow, the cooled flow was returned to Magma Power Company and recombined with the main brine stream for disposal by reinjection. Approximately five thermal megawatts was transferred from geothermal brine to hydrocarbon working fluids in a closed system. This heat was removed from the working fluids in a condenser and subsequently rejected to the environment by a wet cooling tower. The thermodynamic performance of both the working fluids and the system components was measured during the test program to achieve the project's objectives.

Schilling, J.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Global projections for anthropogenic reactive nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere: an assessment of scenarios in the scientific literature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most long-term scenarios of global N emissions are produced by Integrated Assessment Models in the context of climate change assessment. The scenarios indicate that N emissions are likely to increase in the next decades, followed by a stabilization or decline. Critical factors for future N emissions are the development of the underlying drivers (especially fertilizer use, animal husbandry, transport and power generation), air pollution control policy and climate policy. The new scenarios made for climate change assessment, the Representative Concentration Pathways - RCPs, are not representative of the range of possible N-emission projections. A more focused development of scenarios for air pollution may improve the relevance and quality of the scenarios.

Van Vuuren, Detlef; Bouwman, Lex; Smith, Steven J.; Dentener, Frank

2011-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS APRIL 4,1995 FC9511 / 95PT5 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer November 28, 1995 650100/9511:jb ABSTRACT November 28, 1995 The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a field test on the Mag-Well Downhole Magnetic Fluid Conditioners (MFCs), at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR- 3) located 35 miles north of Casper in Natrona County, Wyoming. Mag-Well, Inc., manufactures the MFCs, that are designed to reduce scale and paraffin buildup on the rods, tubing and downhole pump of producing oil wells. The Mag-Well magnetic tools failed to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A TIME PROJECTION CHAMBER DIGITIZER TEST SYSTEM USING A MICROCOMPUTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. Nygren, "The Time Projection Chamber", Physics Today, pp.out System for the Time Projection Chamber", IEEE Trans.on Nuclear Science A TIME PROJECTION CHAMBER DIGITIZER TEST

Nunnally, Curtis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Idaho Cleanup Project completes work at Test Area North complex...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Cleanup Project completes work at Test Area North complex at DOEs Idaho site Loss-Of-Fluid Test Reactor Facility (before) Idaho Cleanup Project workers have completed all...

23

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LOW COST REFRACTURING LOW COST REFRACTURING JANUARY 23, 1998 FC9550/96PT14 RMOTC Test Report Number 96PT14 Low Cost Refracturing Rock Creek Enterprises 980 Rock Creek Road Buffalo, Wyoming 82834 (307) 684-5243 (307) 684-0902 (fax) David H. Doyle, Acting Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center January 23, 1998 Introduction There are relatively few stimulation options available to owners of marginal or stripper wells. These wells are commonly restricted in their production rates because of formation or wellbore damage near the wellbore. Current services available to remove this damage are compared to the small gains possible from old, marginal wells. Over time, several things can occur that cause the flow of oil into the wellbore to be restricted. First, carbonate or sulfate scale can accumulate around the well or in the perforations. The accumulated scale will block oil from

24

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

06/97DT15 06/97DT15 RMOTC Test Report Rotary Steerable Stabilizer Smith Drilling and Completions 16740 Hardy Street P. 0. Box 60068 Houston, Texas, 77205-0068 281-443-3370 Leo Giangiacorno, Acting Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center December 17, 1997 Introduction Directional drilling is more expensive than vertical drilling. This is due to the high maintenance cost of downhole motors and MWD systems required to control hole trajectory. In addition, directional holes have lower penetration rates due to the poor hole cleaning with a non-rotating string. Down time is often spent orienting tool face to obtain the desired trajectory after tile weight is placed on the bit and the reactive torque of the motor is absorbed by the drill string. Holes drilled in this manner often have a tortuous profile compared to holes drilled with a rotary system, increasing the torque

25

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEAM MOUNTED GAS COMPRESSOR BEAM MOUNTED GAS COMPRESSOR (JACGAS COMPRESSOR) MARCH 3, 1998 FC970004/97PT23 RMOTC Test Report Number 97PT23 Jacgas Compressor Morrison International Iron Horse Compression Ltd. 9852-33 Avenue Edmonton, Alberta T6N 1C6 (403) 462-6847 David H. Doyle, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center March 3, 1998 Introduction Gas compressors that mount on the walking beam of an oil well pumping unit have been tried with mixed success for many years. Gas compression at the wellhead instead of further downstream can 'increase both oil and gas production by reducing the casinghead gas pressure. Excess pressure on the annulus of the well reduces fluid inflow and restricts production. In old, shallow wells, the small amount of pressure (50 psi) may be sufficient to prevent the well from producing economically. Other applications include the unloading of water

26

Fast flux test facility, transition project plan  

SciTech Connect

The FFTF Transition Project Plan, Revision 1, provides changes and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

Guttenberg, S.

1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

Hulvey, R.K.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SECARB Anthropogenic Test: SECARB Anthropogenic Test: CO 2 Capture/Transportation/Storage Project # DE-FC26-05NT42590 Jerry Hill, Southern Sates Energy Board Richard A. Esposito, Southern Company U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - CO 2 Capture - CO 2 Transportation - CO 2 Storage * Accomplishments to Date * Organization Chart * Gantt Chart * Bibliography * Summary Benefit to the Program 1. Predict storage capacities within +/- 30% * Conducted high resolution reservoir characterization of the Paluxy saline formation key

29

Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected for Continued Testing June 10, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Three Recovery Act funded projects have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to continue testing large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) from industrial sources. The projects - located in Texas, Illinois, and Louisiana - were initially selected for funding in October 2009 as part of a $1.4 billion effort to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrial sources for storage or beneficial use. The first phase of research and development (R&D) included $21.6 million in Recovery Act funding and $22.5 million in private funding for a total initial investment of $44.1 million.

30

Final Report Limited Soil Investigation of Project Chariot Test Holes  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Limited Soil Investigation of Project Limited Soil Investigation of Project Chariot Test Holes Cape Thompson, Alaska December 2010 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alaska District Post Office Box 6898 Elmendorf AFB, Alaska 99506-6898 Contract W911KB-08-D-0003 Task Order 12, Mod 001 Prepared by Fairbanks Environmental Services 3538 International Street Fairbanks, Alaska 99701 (907) 452-1006 FES Project No. 5012-06 Final Report Limited Soil Investigation of Project Chariot Test Holes, Cape Thompson, Alaska Fairbanks Environmental Services 5012-06 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Number EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1.0 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................... 1-1

31

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MICROBIAL PRODUCTION STIMULATION MARCH 31, 1998 FC970010 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Microbial Production Stimulation for: D. Michael Dennis Geomicrobial Technologies,...

32

A Mechanisms-Based Approach to Detecting Recent Anthropogenic Hydroclimate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both naturally occurring La Nińa events and model-projected anthropogenic-driven global warming are associated with widespread drying in the subtropics to midlatitudes. Models suggest anthropogenic drying should already be underway but climate ...

Richard Seager; Naomi Naik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM JULY 25, 1996 FC9519 / 95PT7 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM DOUBLE M ELECTRIC Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer July 25, 1996 551103/9519:jb ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of a Tank Level Gauging System at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3). Double M. Electric manufactures the equipment that incorporates an optical-encoder sending unit, cellular communications, and software interface. The system effectively displayed its capabilities for remote monitoring and recording of tank levels.

34

Spent fuel test project, Climax granitic stock, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is a test of dry geologic storage of spent nuclear reactor fuel. The SFT-C is located at a depth of 420 m in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site. Eleven canisters of spent commercial PWR fuel assemblies are to be stored for 3 to 5 years. Additional heat is supplied by electrical heaters, and more than 800 channels of technical information are being recorded. The measurements include rock temperature, rock displacement and stress, joint motion, and monitoring of the ventilation air volume, temperature, and dewpoint.

Ramspott, L.D.

1980-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

35

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is also possible. Well 83A4 at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 was selected as a test well. This well is rod pumped and had a stable production history. It produced enough...

36

DoD ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project EW-201016 "High Efficiency - Reduced Emissions Boiler Controls" 23 May 2012 Dr. Jim Galvin ESTCP Program Manager for Energy & Water ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project Location 2 3 Boiler Efficiency Improvement Demo Oxygen Sensor Servo Controls * 90% of boilers lack automated controls * State of the art automated controls sense only oxygen * Demonstrated prototype sensed oxygen and carbon monoxide Prototype CO Sensor Key Findings Boiler Before Demo 4 * Size: 25 MMBtu * Age: 30 years * Fuel: Natural Gas or Oil * Demo performed by United Technologies Research Center * Technology demonstrated: Fireye PPC4000 (Oxygen trim control) * Upgraded PPC4000 tested as a prototype 5 Three Phased Test â—Ź Test Phase 1: Existing Legacy System (baseline)

37

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IN-SITU H IN-SITU H 2 S BIOREMEDIATION JULY 11, 1994 FC9509 / 95PT3 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 907 North Poplar, Suite 100, Casper, WY 82601 (307) 261-5000, ext. 5060; FAX (307) 261-5997 IN-SITU H2S BIOREMEDIATION NATIONAL PARAKLEEN COMPANY PREPARED BY Fred Brown Michael R. Tyler 731 W.Wadley Field Engineer Building O July 11, 1994 Suite 130 Midland, Texas 79705 Phone (915)-683-3076 Fax (915)-683-3081 TEST PURPOSE: To treat producing oil wells that contain high concentrations of H2S with a product that will lower the levels of H2S in the well. METHOD OF TREATMENT: A bio-nutrient product (55 gallons) was mixed with 120 bbls of produced tensleep water and the mixture was pumped down the annulus of selected wells. The well was then shut-in for a 24 hour period and then was returned to production.

38

Fallon Test Ranges Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fallon Test Ranges Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Fallon Test Ranges Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.425°, -118.70277777778° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.425,"lon":-118.70277777778,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

39

Manhattan Project: Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Trinity test radiation safety team SAFETY AND THE TRINITY TEST Trinity test radiation safety team SAFETY AND THE TRINITY TEST (Trinity Test Site, July 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 Bunker at S-10,000 The "Trinity" atomic test was the most violent man-made explosion in history to that date. It also posed the single most significant safety hazard of the entire Manhattan Project. Understanding this, test planners chose a flat, desert scrub region in the northwest corner of the isolated Alamogordo Bombing Range in south central New Mexico for the test. This location, 210 miles south of Los Alamos, was only twenty miles from the nearest offsite habitation. If the explosion was considerably larger than predicted, the dangers could be extreme to the test personnel and surrounding areas.

40

Effect of anthropogenic land-use and land cover changes on climate and land carbon storage in CMIP5 projections for the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of land-use changes on climate are assessed using specified-concentration simulations complementary to the RCP2.6 and 8.5 scenarios performed for the fifth coupled model intercomparison project (CMIP5). This analysis focuses on ...

V. Brovkin; L. Boysen; V. K. Arora; J. P. Boisier; P. Cadule; L. Chini; M. Claussen; P. Friedlingstein; V. Gayler; B. J. J. M. van den Hurk; G. C. Hurtt; C. D. Jones; E. Kato; N. de Noblet-Ducoudré; F. Pacifico; J. Pongratz; M. Weiss

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Impacts of Anthropogenic Sound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the chapter. Underwater nuclear tests and ship-shock trials1963 all nuclear states signed the Limited Test Ban Treaty,testing nuclear weapons underwater. The Comprehensive Test

Hildebrand, John A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Test report for run-in acceptance testing of Project W-151 300 HP mixing pumps  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a performance demonstration and operational checkout of three 300 HP mixer pumps in accordance with WHC-SD-WI51-TS-001 ``Mixer Pump Test Specification for Project W-151`` and Statement of Work 8K520-EMN-95-004 ``Mixer Pump Performance Demonstration at MASF`` in the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building. Testing of the pumps was performed by Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Engineering and funded by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project W-151. Testing began with the first pump on 04-01-95 and ended with the third pump on 11-01-96. Prior to testing, the MASF was modified and prepared to meet the pump testing requirements set forth by the Test Specification and the Statement of Work.

Berglin, B.G.

1998-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

43

Categorical Exclusion 4567, MPLE Test Stand Replacement Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

.Forn1 .Forn1 Project Title: MPLE Test Stand Replacement Project (4567) Oak Ridge Tennessee This work scope is upgrade and replace equipment with a new high-pressure leak testing capability. General AdministrationlManagement DA 1 - Routine business actions DA2 - Administrative contract amendments DA4 Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations DA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect DA6 Procedural rulemakings upgrade DA7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged DA8 - Award of technical supportlM&O/personal service contracts DA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training DA I 0 - Reports on non-DOE legislation DAII Technical advice and planning assistance construction/operation/decommissioning DA 12 -

44

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating small energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; 2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protections system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust and under all conditions, including difficult motor starts. The results from these test are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or mroe of the CERTS Microgrid concepts.

Eto, Joseph H.; Eto, Joseph H.; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Klapp, Dave; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Stevens, John; Volkommer, Harry

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

45

Manhattan Project: The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Trinity test, July 16, 1945 THE TRINITY TEST Trinity test, July 16, 1945 THE TRINITY TEST (Trinity Test Site, July 16, 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 Bunker at S-10,000 Until the atomic bomb could be tested, doubt would remain about its effectiveness. The world had never seen a nuclear explosion before, and estimates varied widely on how much energy would be released. Some scientists at Los Alamos continued privately to have doubts that it would work at all. There was only enough weapons-grade uranium available for one bomb, and confidence in the gun-type design was high, so on July 14, 1945, most of the uranium bomb ("Little Boy") began its trip westward to the Pacific without its design having ever been fully tested. A test of the plutonium bomb seemed vital, however, both to confirm its novel implosion design and to gather data on nuclear explosions in general. Several plutonium bombs were now "in the pipeline" and would be available over the next few weeks and months. It was therefore decided to test one of these.

46

Final Test and Evaluation Results from the Solar Two Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar Two was a collaborative, cost-shared project between 11 U. S. industry and utility partners and the U. S. Department of Energy to validate molten-salt power tower technology. The Solar Two plant, located east of Barstow, CA, comprised 1926 heliostats, a receiver, a thermal storage system, a steam generation system, and steam-turbine power block. Molten nitrate salt was used as the heat transfer fluid and storage media. The steam generator powered a 10-MWe (megawatt electric), conventional Rankine cycle turbine. Solar Two operated from June 1996 to April 1999. The major objective of the test and evaluation phase of the project was to validate the technical characteristics of a molten salt power tower. This report describes the significant results from the test and evaluation activities, the operating experience of each major system, and overall plant performance. Tests were conducted to measure the power output (MW) of the each major system, the efficiencies of the heliostat, receiver, thermal storage, and electric power generation systems and the daily energy collected, daily thermal-to-electric conversion, and daily parasitic energy consumption. Also included are detailed test and evaluation reports.

BRADSHAW, ROBERT W.; DAWSON, DANIEL B.; DE LA ROSA, WILFREDO; GILBERT, ROCKWELL; GOODS, STEVEN H.; HALE, MARY JANE; JACOBS, PETER; JONES, SCOTT A.; KOLB, GREGORY J.; PACHECO, JAMES E.; PRAIRIE, MICHAEL R.; REILLY, HUGH E.; SHOWALTER, STEVEN K.; VANT-HULL, LORIN L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

GICHD mine dog testing project : soil sample results #5.  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fifth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in June 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

GICHD mine dog testing project - soil sample results #4.  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fourth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in April 2003 and Sarajevo, Bosnia collected in May 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Wood, Tyson B.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

GICHD Mine Dog Testing Project - Soil Sample Results No.3  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the third batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in October 2002.

PHELAN, JAMES M.; BARNETT, JAMES L.; BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; ARCHULETA, LUISA M.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

MHK Projects/Leancon Real Sea Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leancon Real Sea Test Leancon Real Sea Test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.2481,"lon":7.91208,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

52

MHK Projects/WEST Testing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WEST Testing WEST Testing < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.3665,"lon":-124.218,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

53

MHK Projects/QSEIF Grant Sea Testing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

QSEIF Grant Sea Testing QSEIF Grant Sea Testing < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-26.6734,"lon":153.326,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project. Final report. Volume 1. Project summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SOLERAS Project Summary - Final Report contains a synopsis of each completed project based on contractors final report. Additionally, a brief description of the limited testing completed by the SOLERAS staff on the collectors is included. SOLERAS comments or opinions expressed in the report are solely based on experiences with the SOLERAS Installations. It must be recognized that many product improvements and design modifications have been made since installation completion, many of which are the result of SOLERAS experience. The last chapter of this report is a synopsis of suggested new research areas for the solar cooling program. These suggestions were made by the participants of the cooling workshop held in Phoenix, Arizona in August 1984.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

DOE/RMOTC/05.98001 Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box Field Test Field Test Project Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RMOTC/05.98001 RMOTC/05.98001 Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box Field Test Field Test Project Report Date Published: May 28, 1999 Leo A. Giangiacomo, P.E. Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 907 N. Poplar, Suite 150 Casper, WY 82601 Distribution A. Approved for public release; Further dissemination unlimited. (Unclassified Unlimited) DOE/RMOTC/05.98001 Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box Field Test Test Project Report Test Project Report Test Project Report Test Project Report Date Published: May 28, 1999 Leo A. Giangiacomo, P.E. PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER 907 N. Poplar, Suite 150 Casper, WY 82601 Work Performed Under RMOTC ERIP Funding Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

56

Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Test Plan for Hydrogen Getters Project - Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen levels in many transuranic (TRU) waste drums are above the compliance threshold, therefore deeming the drums non-shippable to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hydrogen getters (alkynes and dialkynes) are known to react irreversibly with hydrogen in the presence of certain catalysts. The primary purpose of this investigation is to ascertain the effectiveness of a hydrogen getter in an environment that contains gaseous compounds commonly found in the headspace of drums containing TRU waste. It is not known whether the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly found in the headspace of TRU waste drums will inhibit (''poison'') the effectiveness of the hydrogen getter. The result of this study will be used to assess the feasibility of a hydrogen-getter system, which is capable of removing hydrogen from the payload containers or the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) inner containment vessel to increase the quantity of TRU waste that can be shipped to the WIPP. Phase II for the Hydrogen Getters Project will focus on four primary objectives: Conduct measurements of the relative permeability of hydrogen and chlorinated VOCs through Tedlar (and possibly other candidate packaging materials) Test alternative getter systems as alternatives to semi-permeable packaging materials. Candidates include DEB/Pd/Al2O3 and DEB/Cu-Pd/C. Develop, test, and deploy kinetic optimization model Perform drum-scale test experiments to demonstrate getter effectiveness

Mroz, G.

1999-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

58

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report  

SciTech Connect

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Operational test report -- Project W-320 cathodic protection systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640 specifies that corrosion protection must be designed into tank systems that treat or store dangerous wastes. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), utilizes underground encased waste transfer piping between tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. Corrosion protection is afforded to the encasements of the WRSS waste transfer piping through the application of earthen ionic currents onto the surface of the piping encasements. Cathodic protection is used in conjunction with the protective coatings that are applied upon the WRSS encasement piping. WRSS installed two new two rectifier systems (46 and 47) and modified one rectifier system (31). WAC 173-303-640 specifies that the proper operation of cathodic protection systems must be confirmed within six months after initial installation. The WRSS cathodic protection systems were energized to begin continuous operation on 5/5/98. Sixteen days after the initial steady-state start-up of the WRSS rectifier systems, the operational testing was accomplished with procedure OTP-320-006 Rev/Mod A-0. This operational test report documents the OTP-320-006 results and documents the results of configuration testing of integrated piping and rectifier systems associated with the W-320 cathodic protection systems.

Bowman, T.J.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

60

The intermountain power project commissioning - Subsynchronous torsional interaction tests  

SciTech Connect

Subsyncronous torsional vibration as a result of electrochemical interaction between the HVDC controls and a turbine-generator was first discovered during the commissioning of the Square Butte Project in 1977. The level of interaction between the HVDC controls and the turbine-generator depends on several interacting factors: the characteristic torsional frequencies of the turbine-generator, the bandwidth of the HVDC controls and the relative strength of the connecting ac system. For the Intermountain Power Project (IPP), early analysis of these interacting factors indicated that there exist definite potential for subsynchronous oscillation to occur. The calculated torsional frequencies of the IPP units showed that the first mode frequency is 14.0 Hz and is within the typical bandwidth of an HVDC control which is between 10-20 Hz. The HVDC controls, therefore, can influence the torsional stability of the IPP units. Further, the IPP turbine-generators are required to operate isolated on the HVDC rectifier terminal, with no other interconnecting ac network. This ''radial'' mode of operation will result in maximum interaction between the converter station and the IPP units. It became obvious that special measure must be implemented in the design of the IPP HVDC control system to modify its typical characteristics to avoid the occurrence of the subsynchronous oscillation. This paper presents the results of the subsynchronous torsional interaction (SSTI) tests that were performed during the commissioning of the IPP Unit 1 and the HVDC Transmission system.

Wu, C.T.; Peterson, K.J. (Dept. of Water and Power, Los Angeles, CA (US)); Pinko, R.J.; Kankam, M.D.; Baker, D.H. (General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY (US))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from the sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. The proposed testing builds on the approach and laboratory test findings for both K Basin sludge and simulated sludge garnered during prior testing from September 2006 to March 2007. The outlined testing in this plan is designed to yield further understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions, the effects of compositional and process variations and the effectiveness of various strategies to mitigate the observed high shear strength phenomenon observed during the prior testing. These tests are designed to provide process validation and refinement vs. process development and design input. The expected outcome is to establish a level of understanding of the chemistry such that successful operating strategies and parameters can be implemented within the confines of the existing STP corrosion vessel design. In July 2007, the DOE provided direction to FH regarding significant changes to the scope of the overall STP. As a result of the changes, FH directed PNNL to stop work on most of the planned activities covered in this test plan. Therefore, it is unlikely the testing described here will be performed. However, to preserve the test strategy and details developed to date, the test plan has been published.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Poloski, Adam P.

2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

Efficiency of an AMTEC recirculating test cell, experiments and projections  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) is an electrochemical device for the direct conversion of heat to electrical energy with efficiencies potentially near Carnot. The future usefulness of AMTEC for space power conversion depends on the efficiency of the devices. Systems studies have projected from 15% to 35% thermal to electric conversion efficiencies, and one experiment has demonstrated 19% efficiency for a short period of time. Recent experiments in a recirculating test cell (RTC) have demonstrated sustained conversion efficiencies as high as 10.2% early in cell life and 9.7% after maturity. Extensive thermal and electrochemical analysis of the cell during several experiments demonstrated that the efficiency could be improved in two ways. First, the electrode performance could be improved. The electrode for these tests operated at about one third the power density of state of the art electrodes. The low power density was caused by a combination of high series resistance and high mass flow resistance. Reducing these resistances could improve the efficiency to greater than 10%. Second, the cell thermal performance could be improved. Efficiencies greater than 14% could be realized through reducing the radiative thermal loss. Further improvements to the efficiency range predicted by systems studies can be accomplished through the development and use of an advanced condenser with improved reflectivity, close to that of a smooth sodium film, and the series connecting of individual cells to further reduce thermal losses.

Underwood, M.L.; O`Connor, D.; Williams, R.M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M.A.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Uncertainty in emissions projections for climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future global climate projections are subject to large uncertainties. Major sources of this uncertainty are projections of anthropogenic emissions. We evaluate the uncertainty in future anthropogenic emissions using a ...

Webster, Mort David.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.; Reilly, John M.; Harnisch, Jochen.; Hyman, Robert C.; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Wang, Chien.

64

EVLA Memo No. 89 The EVLA Outdoor Antenna Test Range Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projected Costs if new range equipment were purchased Total Material and Equipment costs (to date) for building test range: Funds required to complete project Total NRAO Costs (estimate) without NMT involvementEVLA Memo No. 89 The EVLA Outdoor Antenna Test Range Project: Fourth Quarter 2004, Progress Report

Groppi, Christopher

65

Fast Flux Test Facility, Sodium Storage Facility project-specific project management plan  

SciTech Connect

This Project-Specific Project Management Plan describes the project management methods and controls used by the WHC Projects Department to manage Project 03-F-031. The Sodium Storage Facility provides for storage of the 260,000 gallons of sodium presently in the FFTF Plant. The facility will accept the molten sodium transferred from the FFTF sodium systems, and store the sodium in a solid state under an inert cover gas until such time as a Sodium Reaction Facility is available for final disposal of the sodium.

Shank, D.R.

1994-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

66

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report  

SciTech Connect

This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Utility Connected .. 92 CONCLUSION.. 99 II ListUtility Connected mode for Test 10.4.17 .. 215 XV Listutility grid. .. 25 II List

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Test Bed. California Energy Commission, PublicCERTS Microgrid”, California Energy Commission R&D Forum, 4CERTS Microgrid”, California Energy Commission R&D Forum, 4

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Acceptance test report for project C-157 ``T-Plant electrical upgrade``  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents for record purposes the field results, acceptance, and approvals of the completed acceptance test per WHC-SD-Cl57-ATP-001, Rev. 0, ``Acceptance Test Proceedure for Project C-157 `T Plant Electrical Upgrade``` The test was completed and approved without any problems or exceptions.

Jeppson, L.A.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

70

Acceptance test procedure: RMW Land Disposal Facility Project W-025  

SciTech Connect

This ATP establishes field testing procedures to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation system functions as intended by design for the Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility. Procedures are outlined for the field testing of the following: electrical heat trace system; transducers and meter/controllers; pumps; leachate storage tank; and building power and lighting.

Roscha, V. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

Risk-Informed Snubber Inservice Testing Guidelines: Pilot Project Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current industry practice of assuming nuclear power plant snubbers are a homogenous population requires more frequent examination and expanding the test samples if failures are encountered. This report proposes a risk-informed approach that would reduce snubber examination and testing scope and thereby reduce plant O&M costs, shorten plant outages, and reduce personnel radiation exposure.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

EA-1917: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR 17: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR EA-1917: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a Wave Energy Test Facility that will be located near Newport, Oregon. The testing facility will be located within Oregon territorial waters, near the Hatfield Marine Science Center and close to onshore roads and marine support services. The site will not only allow testing of new wave energy technologies, but will also be used to help study any potential environmental impacts on sediments, invertebrates and fish. The project is being jointly funded by the State of Oregon and DOE. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 15, 2012 EA-1917: Mitigation Action Plan

73

EA-1917: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR 17: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR EA-1917: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a Wave Energy Test Facility that will be located near Newport, Oregon. The testing facility will be located within Oregon territorial waters, near the Hatfield Marine Science Center and close to onshore roads and marine support services. The site will not only allow testing of new wave energy technologies, but will also be used to help study any potential environmental impacts on sediments, invertebrates and fish. The project is being jointly funded by the State of Oregon and DOE. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 15, 2012 EA-1917: Mitigation Action Plan

74

Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

NETL: News Release - Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a carbonate rather than clastic reservoir. The test was conducted utilizing a producing oil well in the Mission Canyon Formation, part of the Madison Group of Mississippian-age...

76

Acid Pit Stabilization Project (Volume 1 - Cold Testing) and (Volume 2 - Hot Testing)  

SciTech Connect

During the summer and fall of Fiscal Year 1997, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study was performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The study involved subsurface stabilization of a mixed waste contaminated soil site called the Acid Pit. This study represents the culmination of a successful technology development effort that spanned Fiscal Years 1994-1996. Research and development of the in situ grout stabilization technique was conducted. Hardware and implementation techniques are currently documented in a patent pending with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The stabilization technique involved using jet grouting of an innovative grouting material to form a monolith out of the contamination zone. The monolith simultaneously provides a barrier to further contaminant migration and closes voids in the soil structure against further subsidence. This is accomplished by chemical incorporation of contaminants into less soluble species and achieving a general reduction in hydraulic conductivity within the monolith. The grout used for this study was TECT-HG, a relatively dense iron oxide-based cementitious grout. The treatability study involved cold testing followed by in situ stabilization of the Acid Pit. Volume 1 of this report discusses cold testing, performed as part of a ''Management Readiness Assessment'' in preparation for going hot. Volume 2 discusses the results of the hot Acid Pit Stabilization phase of this project. Drilling equipment was specifically rigged to reduce the spread of contamination, and all grouting was performed under a concrete block containing void space to absorb any grout returns. Data evaluation included examination of implementability of the grouting process and an evaluation of the contaminant spread during grouting. Following curing of the stabilized pit, cores were obtained and evaluated for toxicity characteristic leach ing procedure protocol for the main contaminant of concern, which was mercury. In addition, the cores were evaluated for the extent of mixing of the injected grout and the contaminated soil. A postgrouting geophysical evaluation of the grouted pit is presented.

G. G. Loomis (INEEL); A. P. Zdinak (MSE); M. A. Ewanic (MSE); J. J. Jessmore (INEEL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

EA-1890: Reedsport PB150 Deployment and Ocean Test Project, Oregon |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Reedsport PB150 Deployment and Ocean Test Project, Oregon 0: Reedsport PB150 Deployment and Ocean Test Project, Oregon EA-1890: Reedsport PB150 Deployment and Ocean Test Project, Oregon Overview The U.S. Department of Energy has selected Ocean Power Technologies (OPT) for approximately $2.4 million in financial assistance and proposes to authorize the expenditure of federal funding to OPT for the construction, deployment, and ocean testing of a single, full scale 150kW PB150 PowerBuoy. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 24, 2011 EA-1890: Finding of No Significant Impact Reedsport PB150 Deployment and Ocean Test Project, Oregon August 24, 2011 EA-1890: DOE Notice of Availability of the Finding of No Significant Impact Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. (OPT), Reedsport PB150 Deployment and Ocean

78

EA-1050: Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project, Idaho Falls, Idaho |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50: Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project, Idaho Falls, 50: Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project, Idaho Falls, Idaho EA-1050: Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project, Idaho Falls, Idaho SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's proposal to remove 344 canisters of Three Mile Island core debris and commercial fuels from the Test Area North Pool and transfer them to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant for interim dry storage until an alternate storage location other than INEL, or a permanent federal spent nuclear fuel repository is available. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 6, 1996 EA-1050: Finding of No Significant Impact Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project

79

Project development plan for East Mesa Geothermal Test Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans for a test facility for geothermal energy systems and components designed for moderate temperature/low salinity geothermal fluids available at the East Mesa site in the Imperial Valley of California are discussed. Details of the following phases of development are given: technical plan; management plan; procurement and contracting plan; technology transfer and utilization plan; and resource requirements. (JGB)

Not Available

1975-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The John Deere E diesel Test & Research Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three non-road Tier II emissions compliant diesel engines manufactured by John Deere were placed on a durability test plan of 2000 hours each at full load, rated speed (FLRS). The fuel was a blend of 10% fuel ethanol and 90% low sulfur #2 diesel fuel. Seven operational failures involving twenty seven fuel system components occurred prior to completion of the intended test plan. Regulated emissions measured prior to component failure indicated compliance to Tier II certification goals for the observed test experience. The program plan included operating three non-road Tier II diesel engines for 2000 hours each monitoring the regulated emissions at 500 hour intervals for changes/deterioration. The program was stopped prematurely due to number and frequency of injection system failures. The failures and weaknesses observed involved injector seat and valve wear, control solenoid material incompatibility, injector valve deposits and injector high pressure seal cavitation erosion. Future work should target an E diesel fuel standard that emphasizes minimum water content, stability, lubricity, cetane neutrality and oxidation resistance. Standards for fuel ethanol need to require water content no greater than the base diesel fuel standard. Lubricity bench test standards may need new development for E diesel.

Fields, Nathan; Mitchell, William E.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) program requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Sub-Project (hereafter the Sub-Project) activities. The requirements in this QAPP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). The QAPP Revision 0 supersedes DOE--341, Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 4.

Irene Farnham

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE. Author(s): William R. Henkle, Joel Ronne Published: Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 2008 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Compound and Elemental Analysis At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008)

83

Recovery Act Funds Test Reactor Dome Removal in Historic D&D Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Funds Test Reactor Dome Removal in Historic D&D Recovery Act Funds Test Reactor Dome Removal in Historic D&D Project Recovery Act Funds Test Reactor Dome Removal in Historic D&D Project February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Jim Giusti, DOE (803) 952-7697 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS (803) 646-6075 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov AIKEN, S.C. - The landscape of the Savannah River Site (SRS) is a little flatter and a little less colorful with the removal today of the 75-foot-tall rusty-orange dome from the Cold War-era test reactor. This $25-million reactor decommissioning and deactivation project is funded By the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Affectionately known by SRS employees as "Hector," the iconic Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) has stood in the Site's B Area since 1959

84

Beam dynamics simulations and measurements at the Project X Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project X, under study at Fermilab, is a multitask high-power superconducting RF proton beam facility, aiming to provide high intensity protons for rare processes experiments and nuclear physics at low energy, and simultaneously for the production of neutrinos, as well as muon beams in the long term. A beam test facility - former known as High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) - is under commissioning for testing critical components of the project, e.g. dynamics and diagnostics at low beam energies, broadband beam chopping, RF power generation and distribution. In this paper we describe the layout of the test facility and present beam dynamics simulations and measurements.

Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Scarpine, V.E.; Webber, R.C.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2 Storage with Enhanced  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2 Storage with Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2 Storage with Enhanced Methane Recovery Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2 Storage with Enhanced Methane Recovery June 16, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- Field testing the potential for combining geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage with enhanced methane recovery is underway at a site in Alabama by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners. Members of the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) are injecting CO2 into a coalbed methane well in Tuscaloosa County to assess the capability of mature coalbed methane reservoirs to receive and adsorb significant volumes of carbon dioxide (CO2). Southern Company, El Paso Exploration & Production, the Geological Survey of Alabama, and the

86

Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Develop Standard Method of Test for Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into the development of standard Method of Test (MOT) for integrated heat pumps (IHPs). No active, recognized test procedure or rating standard exists for IHPs. Generating a rating standard with supporting test procedure that is approved by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning (ASHRAE) and the Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) is necessary for these products to be viably marketed. The primary market segment for IHPs is residential buildings, both single-family and small, low-rise multifamily dwellings.

87

Decadal-Scale SST and Salinity Variations in the Central Tropical Pacific: Signatures of Natural and Anthropogenic Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate projections of future temperature and precipitation patterns in many regions of the world depend on quantifying anthropogenic signatures in tropical Pacific climate against its rich background of natural variability. ...

Nurhati, Intan Suci

88

Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes T. Novakov, T.W.indicator of anthropogenic aerosols – with observed surfacetemperature increase. Seasonal aerosol concentration trends

Novakov, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Natural and anthropogenic climate change  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the project progress of grant DE-FG02-86ER60422 for the period March 1, 1990--October 1, 1990. The research program includes three tasks: General Circulation Models (GCM) intercomparison and improvement, climate data-model statistics, and China project science coordination. This work has been performed in collaboration with our subcontractor, Dr. Wei-Chyung Wang, SUNY/Albany. 8 refs.

Gutowski, W.J.; Portman, D.A.; Iacono, M.J. (Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Wang, W.C. (State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (USA). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center)

1990-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

ESTER, Enel integrated System for TEsts on stoRage (Smart Grid Project) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ESTER, Enel integrated System for TEsts on stoRage (Smart Grid Project) ESTER, Enel integrated System for TEsts on stoRage (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name ESTER, Enel integrated System for TEsts on stoRage Country Italy Headquarters Location Livorno, Italy Coordinates 43.551876°, 10.308011° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.551876,"lon":10.308011,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

Evaluation of the radionuclide tracer test conducted at the project Gnome Underground Nuclear Test Site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A radionuclide tracer test was conducted in 1963 by the U.S. Geological Survey at the Project Gnome underground nuclear test site, approximately 40 km southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The tracer study was carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) to study the transport behavior of radionuclides in fractured rock aquifers. The Culebra Dolomite was chosen for the test because it was considered to be a reasonable analogue of the fractured carbonate aquifer at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the principal location of U.S. underground nuclear tests. Project Gnome was one of a small number of underground nuclear tests conducted by the AEC at sites distant from the NTS. The Gnome device was detonated on December 10, 1961 in an evaporate unit at a depth of 360 m below ground surface. Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) implemented an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close these offsite nuclear test areas. An early step in this process is performance of a preliminary risk analysis of the hazard posed by each site. The Desert Research Institute has performed preliminary hydrologic risk evaluations for the groundwater transport pathway at Gnome. That evaluation included the radioactive tracer test as a possible source because the test introduced radionuclides directly into the Culebra Dolomite, which is the only aquifer at the site. This report presents a preliminary evaluation of the radionuclide tracer test as a source for radionuclide migration in the Culebra Dolomite. The results of this study will assist in planning site characterization activities and refining estimates of the radionuclide source for comprehensive models of groundwater transport st the Gnome site.

Pohll, G.; Pohlmann, K.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

NREL Small Wind Turbine Test Project: Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Test Chronology  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a chronology of tests conducted at NREL's National Wind Technology Center on Mariah Power's Windspire 1.2-kW wind turbine and a letter of response from Mariah Power.

Huskey, A.; Forsyth, T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Environmental Assessment of the Hawaii Geothermal Project Well Flow Test Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawaii Geothermal Project, a coordinated research effort of the University of Hawaii, funded by the County and State of Hawaii, and ERDA, was initiated in 1973 in an effort to identify, generate, and use geothermal energy on the Big Island of Hawaii. A number of stages are involved in developing geothermal power resources: exploration, test drilling, production testing, field development, power plant and powerline construction, and full-scale production. Phase I of the Project, which began in the summer of 1973, involved conducting exploratory surveys, developing analytical models for interpretation of geophysical results, conducting studies on energy recovery from hot brine, and examining the legal and economic implications of developing geothermal resources in the state. Phase II of the Project, initiated in the summer of 1975, centers on drilling an exploratory research well on the Island of Hawaii, but also continues operational support for the geophysical, engineering, and socioeconomic activities delineated above. The project to date is between the test drilling and production testing phase. The purpose of this assessment is to describe the activities and potential impacts associated with extensive well flow testing to be completed during Phase II.

None

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Action Memorandum for the Engineering Test Reactor under the Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect

This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative for decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since the missions of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex have been completed, an engineering evaluation/cost analysis that evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex was prepared adn released for public comment. The scope of this Action Memorandum is to encompass the final end state of the Complex and disposal of the Engineering Test Reactor vessol. The selected removal action includes removing and disposing of the vessel at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility and demolishing the reactor building to ground surface.

A. B. Culp

2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

95

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Sites quality assurance project plan: Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) describes the measures that shall be taken to ensure that the environmental data collected during characterization and closure activities of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are meaningful, valid, defensible, and can be used to achieve project objectives. These activities are conducted by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Nevada Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The Nevada ER Project consists of environmental restoration activities on the NTS, Tonopah Test Range, Nellis Air Force Range, and eight sites in five other states. The RCRA Industrial Sites subproject constitutes a component of the Nevada ER Project. Currently, this QAPjP is limited to the seven RCRA Industrial Sites identified within this document that are to be closed under an interim status and pertains to all field-investigation, analytical-laboratory, and data-review activities in support of these closures. The information presented here supplements the RCRA Industrial Sites Project Management Plan and is to be used in conjunction with the site-specific subproject sampling and analysis plans.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Underground Test Area Project Waste Management Plan (Rev. No. 2, April 2002)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) initiated the UGTA Project to characterize the risk posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The UGTA Project investigation sites have been grouped into Corrective Action Units (CAUs) in accordance with the most recent version of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The primary UGTA objective is to gather data to characterize the groundwater aquifers beneath the NTS and adjacent lands. The investigations proposed under the UGTA program may involve the drilling and sampling of new wells; recompletion, monitoring, and sampling of existing wells; well development and hydrologic/ aquifer testing; geophysical surveys; and subsidence crater recharge evaluation. Those wastes generated as a result of these activities will be managed in accordance with existing federal and state regulations, DOE Orders, and NNSA/NV waste minimization and pollution prevention objectives. This Waste Management Plan provides a general framework for all Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project participants to follow for the characterization, storage/accumulation, treatment, and disposal of wastes generated by UGTA Project activities. The objective of this waste management plan is to provide guidelines to minimize waste generation and to properly manage wastes that are produced. Attachment 1 to this plan is the Fluid Management Plan and details specific strategies for management of fluids produced under UGTA operations.

IT Corporation, Las Vegas

2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

97

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Environmental testing philosophy for a Sandia National Laboratories small satellite project  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories is the system integrator on a small satellite project. Following the intent of the NASA GEVS document, an integrated test philosophy was formulated to certify the satellite for flight. The purpose of this paper is to present that philosophy.

Cap, J.S.; Rackley, N.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

BWRVIP-199: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Testing and Evaluation of the Monticello 300 Degree Capsule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, a BWR Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) was developed to improve the surveillance of the U. S. BWR fleet. This report describes testing and evaluation of the Monticello 300 Capsule. These results will be used to monitor embrittlement as part of the BWRVIP ISP.

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

100

Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Gas Generation Testing Program at the INEL  

SciTech Connect

The data quality objectives (DQOs) for the Program are to evaluate compliance with the limits on total gas generation rates, establish the concentrations of hydrogen and methane in the total gas flow, determine the headspace concentration of VOCs in each drum prior to the start of the test, and obtain estimates of the concentrations of several compounds for mass balance purposes. Criteria for the selection of waste containers at the INEL and the parameters that must be characterized prior to and during the tests are described. Collection of gaseous samples from 55-gallon drums of contact-handled transuranic waste for the gas generation testing is discussed. Analytical methods and calibrations are summarized. Administrative quality control measures described in this QAPjP include the generation, review, and approval of project documentation; control and retention of records; measures to ensure that personnel, subcontractors or vendors, and equipment meet the specifications necessary to achieve the required data quality for the project.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Wind-electric icemaking project: Analysis and dynamometer testing. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind/hybrid systems group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been researching the most practical and cost-effective methods for producing ice from off-grid wind-electric power systems. The first phase of the project, conducted in 1993--1994, included full-scale dynamometer and field testing of two different electric ice makers directly connected to a permanent magnet alternator. The results of that phase were encouraging and the second phase of the project was launched in which steady-state and dynamic numerical models of these systems were developed and experimentally validated. The third phase of the project was the dynamometer testing of the North Star ice maker, which is powered by a 12-kilowatt Bergey Windpower Company, Inc., alternator. This report describes both the second and third project phases. Also included are detailed economic analyses and a discussion of the future prospects of wind-electric ice-making systems. The main report is contained in Volume 1. Volume 2 consists of the report appendices, which include the actual computer programs used in the analysis and the detailed test results.

Holz, R.; Gervorgian, V.; Drouilhet, S.; Muljadi, E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Wind-electric icemaking project: Analysis and dynamometer testing. Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind/hybrid systems group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been researching the most practical and cost-effective methods for producing ice from off-grid wind-electric power systems. The first phase of the project, conducted in 1993--1994, included full-scale dynamometer and field testing of two different electric ice makers directly connected to a permanent magnet alternator. The results of that phase were encouraging and the second phase of the project was launched in which steady-state and dynamic numerical models of these systems were developed and experimentally validated. The third phase of the project was the dynamometer testing of the North Star ice maker, which is powered by a 12-kilowatt Bergey Windpower Company, Inc., alternator. This report describes both the second and third project phases. Also included are detailed economic analyses and a discussion of the future prospects of wind-electric ice-making systems. The main report is contained in Volume 1. Volume 2 consists of the report appendices, which include the actual computer programs used in the analysis and the detailed test results.

Holz, R.; Gervorgian, V.; Drouilhet, S.; Muljadi, E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

RF Conditioning and testing of fundamental power couplers for the RIA project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) is the highest priority of the nuclear physics community in the United States for a major new accelerator facility. A principal element of RIA will be a superconducting 1.4 GeV superconducting ion linac accelerating ions of isotopes from hydrogen to uranium onto production targets or for further acceleration by a second superconducting linac. The superconducting linac technology is closely related to that used at existing accelerators and the Spallation Neutron Source. Taking advantage of JLAB's SRF Institute facilities and expertise for the SNS project, preparation of couplers, RF conditioning and high power tests have been performed on fundamental power couplers for RIA project.

M. Stirbet; J. Popielarski; T. L. Grimm; M. Johnson

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Solar Photovoltaic Project: materials, processes, and testing activities. Quarterly report, April 1-June 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has set a 20-year lifetime goal for terrestrial photovoltaic modules. In its capacity as a Photovoltaic Field Tests and Applications Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory has established various experimental test sites, ranging in size from 0.1- to 25-kW-peak power, throughout the United States. These sites include modules from several manufacturers and serve as test beds for photovoltaic system components. This report, the fifth in a series of similar reports (1-4), summarizes the activities of the Materials, Processes and Testing Laboratory of the Solar Photovoltaic Field Tests and Applications Project during the three-month period (4/1/79 to 6/30/79). During this period, inspection trips were made to test sites at the University of Texas at Arlington and at Mead, Nebraska. Modules were tested in the field to determine the extent of physical and electrical degradation which had taken place since previous inspections. Several modules were removed from these sites for more detailed laboratory analysis. In addition, degradation analysis of modules from the rooftop of the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, and failure analysis of modules from the Lincoln Laboratory Rooftop Test Bed and Residential Test Beds was performed. The results of both field testing and the laboratory analyses are reported.

Forman, S.E.; Themelis, M.P.

1979-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Primary Coolant Pump and Motor Replacement Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

Noel Duckwitz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Emergency Firewater Injection System Replacement Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

Noel Duckwitz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

Noel Duckwitz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy�s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program�s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

Craig W. Collar

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

109

Public comment sought on soil cleanup project at the Idaho Siteďż˝s Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public comment sought on soil cleanup project at the Idaho Site�s Test Area North Complex Public comment sought on soil cleanup project at the Idaho Site�s Test Area North Complex The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking public comment on a small-scale soil cleanup at the Idaho Site�s Test Area North (TAN) complex. An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) document with three proposed alternatives for the soil cleanup is under evaluation by DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Idaho�s Department of Environmental Quality. Full-scale decommissioning, decontamination, and demolition of the major TAN facilities began in 2005 and the work was completed in 2008. The project under evaluation includes cleaning up contaminated soil at a former wastewater disposal pond. From 1972 until 2007, the pond received treated sanitary wastewater, low-level radioactive wastewater, and cold process water. Because of the low levels of soil contamination the 3.2-acre area continued to be evaluated, using institutional controls for sampling and monitoring. Further evaluation determined that the 3.2 acre area contained contaminants requiring remediation.

110

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2000 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights the results of FY 2000 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. This is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL-ANCD to document recent investigations of radionuclide migration and transport processes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOENV), and supports DP operations at the NTS through studies of radiochemical and hydrologic processes that are relevant to the DP mission. Other organizations that support the HRMP include Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPS), and Bechtel Nevada (BN). The UGTA Project is sponsored by the Environmental Management (EM) program at DOENV; its goal is to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination in groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. The project strategy follows guidelines set forth in a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Participating contractors include LLNL (both ANCD and the Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate), LANL, USGS, DRI, BN, and IT Corporation (with subcontract support from Geotrans Inc.).

Davisson, M L; Eaton, G F; Hakemi, N L; Hudson, G B; Hutcheon, I D; Lau, C A; Kersting, A B; Kenneally, J M; Moran, J E; Phinney, D L; Rose, T P; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Williams, R; Zavarin, M

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Solar Photovoltaic Project: materials, processes, and testing activities. Quarterly report, 1 January-31 March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has set a 20-year-lifetime goal for terrestrial photovoltaic modules. Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Laboratory, in its capacity as a Photovoltaic Field Tests and Applications Center, has established throughout the United States various experimental test sites which range in size from 0.1 to 25 kW of peak power. These sites include modules from several manufacturers and serve as test beds for photovoltaic system components. The activities of the Materials, Processes, and Testing Laboratory of the Solar Photovoltaic Project during a three-month (1/1/79-3/31/79) period are summarized. During this period, an inspection trip was made to the Mead, Nebraska, test site. The modules were tested in the field to determine the extent of physical and electrical degradation which had taken place since previous inspections. In addition, several modules were removed from the site for more detailed laboratory examination. The results of both the field testing and laboratory analyses are reported.

Forman, S.E.; Themelis, M.P.

1979-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

Transferability of Data Related to the Underground Test Area Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document is the collaborative effort of the members of an ad hoc subcommittee of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Technical Working Group (TWG). The UGTA Project relies on data from a variety of sources; therefore, a process is needed to identify relevant factors for determining whether material-property data collected from other areas can be used to support groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and other models within a Corrective Action Unit (CAU), and for documenting the data transfer decision and process. This document describes the overall data transfer process. Separate Parameter Descriptions will be prepared that provide information for selected specific parameters as determined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) UGTA Project Manager. This document and its accompanying appendices do not provide the specific criteria to be used for transfer of data for specific uses. Rather, the criteria will be established by separate parameter-specific and model-specific Data Transfer Protocols. The CAU Data Documentation Packages and data analysis reports will apply the protocols and provide or reference a document with the data transfer evaluations and decisions.

Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

113

A toolbox for calculating net anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (NANI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ''Net Anthropogenic Nitrogen Input'' (NANI) to a region represents an estimate of anthropogenic net nitrogen (N) fluxes across its boundaries, and is thus a measure of the effect of human activity on the regional nitrogen cycle. NANI accounts for ... Keywords: Anthropogenic, Nitrogen, Synthesis, Toolbox, Watershed

Bongghi Hong; Dennis P. Swaney; Robert W. Howarth

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB GeologicPilot Test  

SciTech Connect

WESTCARB, one of seven U.S. Department of Energypartnerships, identified (during its Phase I study) over 600 gigatonnesof CO2 storage capacity in geologic formations located in the Westernregion. The Western region includes the WESTCARB partnership states ofAlaska, Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon and Washington and theCanadian province of British Columbia. The WESTCARB Phase II study iscurrently under way, featuring three geologic and two terrestrial CO2pilot projects designed to test promising sequestration technologies atsites broadly representative of the region's largest potential carbonsinks. This paper focuses on two of the geologic pilot studies plannedfor Phase II -referred to-collectively as the Rosetta-Calpine CO2 StorageProject. The first pilot test will demonstrate injection of CO2 into asaline formation beneath a depleted gas reservoir. The second test willgather data for assessing CO2 enhanced gas recovery (EGR) as well asstorage in a depleted gas reservoir. The benefit of enhanced oil recovery(EOR) using injected CO2 to drive or sweep oil from the reservoir towarda production well is well known. EaR involves a similar CO2 injectionprocess, but has received far less attention. Depleted natural gasreservoirs still contain methane; therefore, CO2 injection may enhancemethane production by reservoir repressurization or pressure maintenance.CO2 injection into a saline formation, followed by injection into adepleted natural gas reservoir, is currently scheduled to start inOctober 2006.

Trautz, Robert; Benson, Sally; Myer, Larry; Oldenburg, Curtis; Seeman, Ed; Hadsell, Eric; Funderburk, Ben

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

MATERIALS TESTING REACTOR PROJECT. QUARTERLY REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING MARCH 1, 1950  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in finaiizing basic design data for the Materials Testing Reactor. The major emphasis at ANL was on issurance of design reports on practically all phases of the MTR project outside the reactor face and low the first fioor level. Operation of the mock-up reacr at ORNL at 10 watts resulted in no major design changes. Topics discussed include the reactor building, wing, and reactor service building; canal and canal facilities; water systems; air exhaust systems; electrical power systems; effluent control; and shielding requirements. 11 drawings. (C.H.)

Huffman, J.R.

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, November--December 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

117

MHK Projects/Gulf of Mexico Ocean test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gulf of Mexico Ocean test Gulf of Mexico Ocean test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.9541,"lon":-95.3597,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

118

MHK Projects/Wave Star Energy 1 10 Scale Model Test | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 10 Scale Model Test 1 10 Scale Model Test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.6948,"lon":8.33559,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

119

MHK Projects/SurgeWEC Ocean Testing 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SurgeWEC Ocean Testing 1 SurgeWEC Ocean Testing 1 < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.9574,"lon":-75.6241,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

120

MHK Projects/Neptune Renewable Energy 1 10 Scale Prototype Pilot Test |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy 1 10 Scale Prototype Pilot Test Renewable Energy 1 10 Scale Prototype Pilot Test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.7123,"lon":-0.38306,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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121

Nevada Test Site Area 25. Radiological survey and cleanup project, 1974-1983. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The cleanup was part of the Surplus Facilities Management Program funded by the Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for alpha and beta plus gamma radiation contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 12 figures.

McKnight, R.K.; Rosenberry, C.E.; Orcutt, J.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Possible Influence of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Cirrus Clouds and Anthropogenic Forcing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cirrus clouds have a net warming effect on the atmosphere and cover about 30% of the Earth’s area. Aerosol particles initiate ice formation in the upper troposphere through modes of action that include homogeneous freezing of solution droplets, heterogeneous nucleation on solid particles immersed in a solution, and deposition nucleation of vapor onto solid particles. Here, we examine the possible change in ice number concentration from anthropogenic soot originating from surface sources of fossil fuel and biomass burning, from anthropogenic sulfate aerosols, and from aircraft that deposit their aerosols directly in the upper troposphere. We find that fossil fuel and biomass burning soot aerosols exert a radiative forcing of -0.68 to 0.01 Wm-2 while anthropogenic sulfate aerosols exert a forcing of -0.01 to 0.18 Wm-2. Our calculations show that the sign of the forcing by aircraft soot depends on the model configuration and can be both positive or negative, ranging from -0.16 to 0.02 Wm-2. The magnitude of the forcing in cirrus clouds can be comparable to the forcing exerted by anthropogenic aerosols on warm clouds, but this forcing has not been included in past assessments of the total anthropogenic radiative forcing of climate.

Penner, Joyce E.; Chen, Yang; Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

123

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 1 discusses the following topics: the background of the project; test program description; summary of tests and test results; problem evaluation; functional requirements confirmation; recommendations; and completed test documentation for tests performed in Phase 3.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

West Valley Demonstration Project vitrification process equipment Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Vitrification Facility (VF) at the West Valley Demonstration Project was designed to convert stored radioactive waste into a stable glass for disposal in a federal repository. The Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) program was conducted from 1984 to 1989. During this time new equipment and processes were developed, installed, and implemented. Thirty-seven FACTS tests were conducted, and approximately 150,000 kg of glass were made by using nonradioactive materials to simulate the radioactive waste. By contrast, the planned radioactive operation is expected to produce approximately 500,000 kg of glass. The FACTS program demonstrated the effectiveness of equipment and procedures in the vitrification system, and the ability of the VF to produce quality glass on schedule. FACTS testing also provided data to validate the WVNS waste glass qualification method and verify that the product glass would meet federal repository acceptance requirements. The system was built and performed to standards which would have enabled it to be used in radioactive service. As a result, much of the VF tested, such as the civil construction, feed mixing and holding vessels, and the off-gas scrubber, will be converted for radioactive operation. The melter was still in good condition after being at temperature for fifty-eight of the sixty months of FACTS. However, the melter exceeded its recommended design life and will be replaced with a similar melter. Components that were not designed for remote operation and maintenance will be replaced with remote-use items. The FACTS testing was accomplished with no significant worker injury or environmental releases. During the last FACTS run, the VF processes approximated the remote-handling system that will be used in radioactive operations. Following this run the VF was disassembled for conversion to a radioactive process. Functional and checkout testing of new components will be performed prior to radioactive operation.

Carl, D.E.; Paul, J.; Foran, J.M.; Brooks, R.

1990-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

City of North Bonneville, Washington: Geothermal Exploration Project, production test well, Phase II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Based on discussions with the City of North Bonneville, the production test well was drilled to a depth that would also explore for ground water temperatures near 130/sup 0/F (54.4/sup 0/C). Depth projections to a 130/sup 0/F bottom hole temperature were made by assuming a constant ground water temperature rise greater than 50/sup 0/C per kilometer, and by assuming that essentially homogeneous or equivalent conductive rock units would be encountered. Minimum water production requirements were not set, although the City determined that about 800 gpm would be acceptable. Large upper casing diameters of 16 and 12 inches were installed in order to provide the future use of either a vertical turbine or submersible pump, as desired by the city. The scope of work included interpretation of well characteristics, evaluation of ground water as a geothermal resource, geologic analysis of data from drilling and testing, drilling supervision, daily drilling cost accounting, and preparation of a final report. The report includes geologic evaluation of the drilling and test data, ground water and geothermal potential.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY2005 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes FY 2005 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains five chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and Bechtel Nevada (BN).

Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Hudson, G B; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Nimz, G J; Ramon, E C; Rose, T P; Shuller, L; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

128

Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

130

Author manuscript, published in "13th International Conference on Quality Software (QSIC 2013), Nanjing: China (2013)" An Empirical Study of Adoption of Software Testing in Open Source Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—Testing is an indispensable part of software development efforts. It helps to improve the quality of software systems by finding bugs and errors during development and deployment. Huge amount of resources are spent on testing efforts. However, to what extent are they used in practice? In this study, we investigate the adoption of testing in open source projects. We study more than 20,000 non-trivial software projects and explore the correlation of test cases with various project development characteristics including: project size, development team size, number of bugs, number of bug reporters, and the programming languages of these projects. Keywords-Empirical study, Software testing, Adequacy, Test cases

Pavneet Singh Kochhar; Tegawendé F. Bissy; David Lo; Lingxiao Jiang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Why software projects escalate: an empirical analysis and test of four theoretical models1,2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software projects can often spiral out of control to become "runaway systems" that far exceed original budget and schedule projections. The behavior that underlies many runaway systems can best be characterized as "escalation of commitment to a failing ... Keywords: IS project failure, escalation, software project management

Mark Keil; Joan Mann; Arun Rai

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Cold test plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tank contents removal project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) Tanks Contents Removal Project Cold Test Plan describes the activities to be conducted during the cold test of the OHF sluicing and pumping system at the Tank Technology Cold Test Facility (TTCTF). The TTCTF is located at the Robotics and Process Systems Complex at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The cold test will demonstrate performance of the pumping and sluicing system, fine-tune operating instructions, and train the personnel in the actual work to be performed. After completion of the cold test a Technical Memorandum will be prepared documenting completion of the cold test, and the equipment will be relocated to the OHF site.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Environmental assessment for the Groundwater Characterization Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada; Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to conduct a program to characterize groundwater at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, in accordance with a 1987 DOE memorandum stating that all past, present, and future nuclear test sites would be treated as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites (Memorandum from Bruce Green, Weapons Design and Testing Division, June 6, 1987). DOE has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-0532) to evaluate the environmental consequences associated with the proposed action, referred to as the Groundwater Characterization Project (GCP). This proposed action includes constructing access roads and drill pads, drilling and testing wells, and monitoring these wells for the purpose of characterizing groundwater at the NTS. Long-term monitoring and possible use of these wells in support of CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act, is also proposed. The GCP includes measures to mitigate potential impacts on sensitive biological, cultural and historical resources, and to protect workers and the environment from exposure to any radioactive or mixed waste materials that may be encountered. DOE considers those mitigation measures related to sensitive biological, cultural and historic resources as essential to render the impacts of the proposed action not significant, and DOE has prepared a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) that explains how such mitigations will be planned and implemented. Based on the analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and the Department is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

USE AND CALIBRATION OF A GAS CHROMATOGRAPH FOR GAS ANALYSIS AT THE PROJECT ROVER TEST FACILITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gas-chromatograph system operated by test site personnel was used for over a year to monitor the purity of gases used at the Project Rover test facilities at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. Information was obtained on the efficiency of gas line purges, total impurities of frozen air in a large liquid hydrogen dewar, and the quality of room inerting systems. Daily monitoring of several block and bleed systems, which prevent hydrogen gas from entering a system through a leaky valve, and periodic monitoring of all gas added to the 10/sup 6/ cubic feet gas storage bottles are required for safe facilities operation. In addition the chromatograph proved useful in special cases for leak detection in vacuum and high pressure systems. The calibration and operation of the chromatograph system using a column of Linde 5A Molecular Sieve for analysis of H/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, land O/sub 2/ is described. Observations of a thermal conductivity reversal in the binary mixture He--H/sub 2/ is presented. (auth)

Liebenberg, D.H.; Edeskuty, F.J.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Phase 1 can-in-canister cold pour tests for the Plutonium Immobilization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the Phase 1 Tests. Details on the test plan, hardware configuration, and test results are given.

Smith, M.E.

2000-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

136

Prototypical Rod Construction Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 3 discusses the following topics: Downender Test Results and Analysis Report; NFBC Canister Upender Test Results and Analysis Report; Fuel Assembly Handling Fixture Test Results and Analysis Report; and Fuel Canister Upender Test Results and Analysis Report.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or “Core Modeling Update”) Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

Rahmat Aryaeinejad; Douglas S. Crawford; Mark D. DeHart; George W. Griffith; D. Scott Lucas; Joseph W. Nielsen; David W. Nigg; James R. Parry; Jorge Navarro

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2013  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for effective application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

David W. Nigg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A West Valley Demonstration Project Milestone - Achieving Certification to Ship Waste to the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) has successfully pretreated and vitrified nearly all of the 600,000 gallons of liquid high-level radioactive waste that was generated at the site of the only commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant to have operated in the United States. Low-level waste (LLW) generated during the course of the cleanup effort now requires disposal. Currently the WVDP only ships Class A LLW for off-site disposal. It has been shipping Class A wastes to Envirocare of Utah, Inc. since 1997. However, the WVDP may also have a future need to ship Class B and Class C waste, which Envirocare is not currently authorized to accept. The Nevada Test Site (NTS), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility, can accept all three waste classifications. The WVDP set a goal to receive certification to begin shipping Class A wastes to NTS by 2001. Formal certification/approval was granted by the DOE Nevada Operations Office on July 12, 2001. This paper discusses how the WVDP contractor, West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSCO), completed the activities required to achieve NTS certification in 2001 to ship waste to its facility. The information and lessons learned provided are significant because the WVDP is the only new generator receiving certification based on an NTS audit in January 2001 that resulted in no findings and only two observations--a rating that is unparalleled in the DOE Complex.

Jackson, J. P.; Pastor, R. S.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

140

Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes Title Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Novakov, Tihomir, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Surabi Menon, and Jeffery Aguiar Journal Geophysical Research Letters Volume 35 Issue 19 Abstract In this paper, we compare constructed records of concentrations of black carbon (BC) - an indicator of anthropogenic aerosols - with observed surface temperature trends in California. Annual average BC concentrations in major air basins in California significantly decreased after about 1990, coincident with an observed statewide surface temperature increase. Seasonal aerosol concentration trends are consistent with observed seasonal temperature trends. These data suggest that the reduction in anthropogenic aerosol concentrations contributed to the observed surface temperature increase. Conversely, high aerosol concentrations may lower surface temperature and partially offset the temperature increase of greenhouse gases.

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141

Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program  

SciTech Connect

EG&G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG&G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG&G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG&G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and efficiently completing the requirements for WETP.

Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

Craig W. Collar

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

143

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system is being implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications in 2011 and beyond as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation. Finally we note that although full implementation of the new computational models and protocols will extend over a period 3-4 years as noted above, interim applications in the much nearer term have already been demonstrated. In particular, these demonstrations included an analysis that was useful for understanding the cause of some issues in December 2009 that were triggered by a larger than acceptable discrepancy between the measured excess core reactivity and a calculated value that was based on the legacy computational methods. As the Modeling Update project proceeds we anticipate further such interim, informal, applications in parallel with formal qualification of the system under the applicable INL Quality Assurance procedures and standards.

David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system is being implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications in 2011 and beyond as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation. Finally we note that although full implementation of the new computational models and protocols will extend over a period 3-4 years as noted above, interim applications in the much nearer term have already been demonstrated. In particular, these demonstrations included an analysis that was useful for understanding the cause of some issues in December 2009 that were triggered by a larger than acceptable discrepancy between the measured excess core reactivity and a calculated value that was based on the legacy computational methods. As the Modeling Update project proceeds we anticipate further such interim, informal, applications in parallel with formal qualification of the system under the applicable INL Quality Assurance procedures and standards.

David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

LANL LDRD-funded project: Test particle simulations of energetic ions in natural and artificial radiation belts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We summarize the scientific problem and work plan for the LANL LDRD-funded project to use a test particle code to study the sudden de-trapping of inner belt protons and possible cross-L transport of debris ions after a high altitude nuclear explosion (HANE). We also discuss future application of the code for other HANE-related problems.

Cowee, Misa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Kaijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reinhard H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reeves, Geoffrey D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

146

Tests of Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors for Active1 Target Time Projection Chambers in nuclear physics2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests of Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors for Active1 Target Time Projection Chambers in nuclear the gas used as the detection medium10 is also a target for nuclear reactions, have been used for a wide variety of11 nuclear physics applications since the eighties. Improvements in MPGD (Mi-12 cro Pattern

Recanati, Catherine

147

Production test IP-466-A test of the 190 turbine pumps at KE(KW) Rector (Project CGI-844)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this test is to provide for adequate testing of the new steam turbine pumps. This will cover the tests required for the acceptance of these new items as per ATP-2588 and for any additional testing required to ensure reactor emergency cooling adequacy and reliability. A further objective is to provide the safety requiring by which the objectives of the ATP-2588 may be accomplished. A steam pump is being installed in each of the 190-K buildings to provide an additional secondary supply of reactor coolant. The basis for this test is presented in ATP-2588. Briefly, it is to authorize the required reactor down time and to assure reactor safety in the performance of the required testing procedures. These tests will develop the necessary and pertinent information concerning the cooling adequacy of this new system. At the same time, information will be obtained concerning the in situ characteristics of the steam turbine pump and the flow to the reactor when one side of the process lines is closed.

Jones, S.S.

1962-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 2 discusses the following topics: Fuel Rod Extraction System Test Results and Analysis Reports and Clamping Table Test Results and Analysis Reports.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Project W-320 Heel Jet Secondary Catch Mechanism lateral load test  

SciTech Connect

This test procedure establishes the requirements for performing a lateral load test of the Heel Jet Secondary Catch Mechanism (SCM). Successful performance of this test will demonstrate that the SCM is capable of performing as designed when subjected to a force applied normal to the longitudinal axis of the mechanism. This test procedure is prepared following the recommended format and content guidelines for test procedures as prescribed in WHC-IP-1026, Engineering Practice Guidelines, Appendix K, Test Plans, Specifications, Procedures and Reports.

Bellomy, J.R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Test Project: Honeywell Technology Strategy Center. Final report, Volume 2. Engineering field test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SOLERAS solar cooling system at Arizona Public Service Company in Phoenix, Arizona, was subjected to engineering field testing for a period of 18 months. Although some problems arose, which is typical with a new engineering model, the system generally ran well. This document describes the work completed in all three phases of this program, which included the preliminary analysis and detailed design of the solar cooling system, installation, testing, and data analysis.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MVA Tools MVA Tools Sam Clegg, Kristy Nowak-Lovato, Ron Martinez, Julianna Fessenden, Thom Rahn, & Lianjie Huang Los Alamos National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview - Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix - Organization Chart - Bibliography 3 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Surface MVA - Frequency Modulated Spectroscopy - Quantitatively identify CO2, H2S and CH4 seepage from geologic sequestration sites - Distinguish anthropogenic CO2 from natural CO2 emissions * CO2 carbon stable isotope measurements

153

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to properly verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the next anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014-2015 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its third full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL under various licensing arrangements. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core depletion HELIOS calculations for all ATR cycles since August 2009, Cycle 145A through Cycle 151B, was successfully completed during 2012. This major effort supported a decision late in the year to proceed with the phased incorporation of the HELIOS methodology into the ATR Core Safety Analysis Package (CSAP) preparation process, in parallel with the established PDQ-based methodology, beginning late in Fiscal Year 2012. Acquisition of the advanced SERPENT (VTT-Finland) and MC21 (DOE-NR) Monte Carlo stochastic neutronics simulation codes was also initiated during the year and some initial applications of SERPENT to ATRC experiment analysis were demonstrated. These two new codes will offer significant additional capability, including the possibility of full-3D Monte Carlo fuel management support capabilities for the ATR at some point in the future. Finally, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system has been implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation.

David W. Nigg, Principal Investigator; Kevin A. Steuhm, Project Manager

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report for October and November 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes progress on 3 projects: Integrated tank/heat exchanger modeling and experiments for solar thermal storage; Advanced residential solar domestic hot water systems; and Incident angle modifiers (IAMs) by the Monte Carlo method for cylindrical solar collectors. IAMs are used to correct for effects such as shading, back plane reflectance, inter-reflection, etc. Summaries are given for the first two projects; however, a full draft report is given for the third.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

156

Human factors in the management of Becon Construction Company's Heavy Oil Test Station Project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1986, the Becon Construction Company - an open-shop contractor based in Houston, Texas - mobilized a work force to a construction project location at the Belridge Oil Field, near Bakersfield, California. The construction craftsmen and helpers in Becon's work force were expected to improve their level of productivity as the work proceeded because of the knowledge and skills that they would acquire as a result of the repetitive nature of the work. As it was originally organized, the Becon HOTS project represented almost a pure laboratory environment in which to collect data concerning the learning effect on worker productivity as well as to statistically isolate the impact on productivity of such external factors as weather, absenteeism, turnover, and especially work methods improvement techniques and pay incentives. From the outset of the HOTS project, the project manager had established an accurate system to quantitatively measure and compare the total manhours that each crew - civil, mechanical, electrical, and prefabrication -- performed at individual HOTS construction locations. Additionally, it was initially assumed that the project manager would be relatively free to implement changes to the job site conditions involving incentive pay and work methods improvement. The subsequent effect of these changes on the productivity of separate work crews could then be evaluated in terms of measured manhours per crew per HOTS.

Maurer, D.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Modeled Impact of Anthropogenic Land Cover Change on Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equilibrium experiments with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory’s climate model are used to investigate the impact of anthropogenic land cover change on climate. Regions of altered land cover include large portions of Europe, India, ...

Kirsten L. Findell; Elena Shevliakova; P. C. D. Milly; Ronald J. Stouffer

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Incorporating Anthropogenic Water Regulation Modules into a Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic activities have been significantly perturbing global freshwater flows and groundwater reserves. Despite numerous advances in the development of land surface models (LSMs) and global terrestrial hydrological models (GHMs), relatively ...

Yadu Pokhrel; Naota Hanasaki; Sujan Koirala; Jaeil Cho; Pat J.-F. Yeh; Hyungjun Kim; Shinjiro Kanae; Taikan Oki

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Comparison of Statistically Optimal Approaches to Detecting Anthropogenic Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three statistically optimal approaches, which have been proposed for detecting anthropogenic climate change, are intercompared. It is shown that the core of all three methods is identical. However, the different approaches help to better ...

Gabriele C. Hegerl; Gerald R. North

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Quantifying and Minimizing Uncertainty of Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic aerosols are composed of a variety of aerosol types and components including water-soluble inorganic species (e.g., sulfate, nitrate, ammonium), condensed organic species, elemental or black carbon, and mineral dust. Previous ...

J. E. Penner; R. J. Charlson; S. E. Schwartz; J. M. Hales; N. S. Laulainen; L. Travis; R. Leifer; T. Novakov; J. Ogren; L. F. Radke

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Where to Look for Anthropogenic Climate Change in the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled climate model has been used to provide preliminary guidance on which ocean observations will be most useful for early detection of anthropogenic climate change. Given the sparsity of historical ocean measurements, early detection may ...

Helene Banks; Richard Wood

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield.

Glaspey, Douglas J.

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Validation of phasor calculations in the Macrodyne PMU for California-Oregon Transmission Project tests of March 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Faults applied during March 1993 commissioning tests for the California-Oregon Transmission Project produced 14 Hz transient oscillations that were conspicuous in BPA`s enhanced transducers at Malin, and in PG and E`s Dynamic System Monitor at Table Mountain. Prony analysis of high speed fault data provided a detailed model for the underlying network resonance signal, and a basis for validating transient performance of a Macrodyne Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU) at the test site. This instrument, which is closely associated with EPRI`s FACTS project, provides useful insight into emerging technology for high speed digital transducers. The phasor calculations are found to be of very high quality, but filtering enhancements are recommended for broadband applications.

Hauer, J.F. [Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 4 discusses the following topics: Rod Compaction/Loading System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Collection System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Container Transfer Fixture Test Results and Analysis Report; Staging and Cutting Table Test Results and Analysis Report; and Upper Cutting System Test Results and Analysis Report.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report, October 1995--November 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the October/November 1995 project status report of the Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Integrated tank/heat exchanger modeling is discussed, as well as advanced residential solar hot water systems. A paper to be presented at the 1996 International Solar Energy Conference is included. The subject of this paper is rating and certification of domestic water heating systems.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

BWRVIP-275NP: BWR Vessel and Internals Project: Testing and Evaluation of the Susquehanna Unit 1 120° Capsule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, a Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) was developed to improve the surveillance of the U.S. BWR fleet. This report describes testing and evaluation of the Susquehanna Unit 1 120° capsule. These results will be used to monitor embrittlement as part of the BWRVIP ISP.BackgroundThe BWRVIP ISP represents a major enhancement to the process of monitoring embrittlement for the U.S. ...

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

BWRVIP-271NP: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Testing and Evaluation of the Browns Ferry Unit 2 120° Capsule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, a Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) was developed to improve the surveillance of the U.S. BWR fleet. This report describes testing and evaluation of the Browns Ferry Unit 2 120° capsule. These results will be used to monitor embrittlement as part of the BWRVIP ISP.BackgroundThe BWRVIP ISP represents a major enhancement to the process of monitoring embrittlement for the U.S. ...

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

168

Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of the production and interference tests conducted on the geothermal wells RRGE 1 and RRGE 2 in Raft River Valley, Idaho during September--November, 1975 are presented. In all, three tests were conducted, two of them being short-duration production tests and one, a long duration interference test. In addition to providing estimates on the permeability and storage parameters of the geothermal reservoir, the tests also indicated the possible existence of barrier boundaries. The data collected during the tests also indicated that the reservoir pressure varies systematically in response to the changes in the Earth's gravitational field caused by the passage of the sun and the moon. Overall, the results of the tests indicate that the geothermal reservoir in southern Raft River valley is fairly extensive and significantly permeable and merits further exploration.

Narasimhan, T.N.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Project W-314 specific test and evaluation plan for transfer line SN-633 (241-AX-B to 241-AY-02A)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made by the addition of the SN-633 transfer line by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP). This STEP encompasses all testing activities required to demonstrate compliance to the project design criteria as it relates to the addition of transfer line SN-633. The Project Design Specifications (PDS) identify the specific testing activities required for the Project. Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the transfer line addition. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

Hays, W.H.

1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

170

Tests on cores from the Wairakei Geothermal Project, Wairakei, New Zealand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of tests on ckres taken from the Wairakei geothermal site in New Zealand are reported. The cores tests are representative of each of the four basic rock types significant to the functioning of the site. Ultrasonic velocity measurements were made for each rock type tk determine elastic moduli under simulated in situ conditions. Hydrostatic and triaxial deformation tests were performed on three samples of the aquifer rock to determine the effect of in situ stress on the elastic deformation moduli. Thermal conductivity was measured on all four rock types. Tabulation and graphical representation of the measured properties are included. All test procedures and apparatuses are described in detal. (MHR)

Hendrickson, R.R.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Project Rio Blanco reentry drilling and testing of RB-E-01 well. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Reentry by the RB-E-01 hole was made through the 7-in. emplacement casing. Details of the drilling operations and test results are presented. (TFD)

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

DOE-Sponsored Project Begins Demonstrating CCUS Technology in Alabama |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Begins Demonstrating CCUS Technology in Project Begins Demonstrating CCUS Technology in Alabama DOE-Sponsored Project Begins Demonstrating CCUS Technology in Alabama August 22, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Carbon dioxide (CO2) injection has begun at the world's first fully integrated coal power and geologic storage project in southwest Alabama, with the goals of assessing integration of the technologies involved and laying the foundation for future use of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The "Anthropogenic Test"--conducted by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), one of seven partnerships in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program--uses CO2 from a newly constructed post-combustion CO2-capture facility at Alabama Power's 2,657-megawatt Barry Electric Generating Plant (Plant Barry). It will help

173

Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS III) Process Development and Laboratory Tests at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

At the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP),the Vitrification Facility (VF)is designed to convert the high-level radioactive waste (HLW)stored on the site to a stable glass for disposal at a Department of Energy (DOE)-specified federal repository. The Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS-III)verification tests were conducted between February 1995 and August 1995 as a supplemental means to support the vitrification process flowsheet, but at only one seventh the scale.During these tests,the process flowsheet was refined and optimized. The SVS-III test series was conducted with a focus on confirming the applicability of the Redox Forecasting Model, which was based on the Index of Feed Oxidation (IFO)developed during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS)and SVS-I tests. Additional goals were to investigate the prototypical feed preparation cycle and test the new target glass composition. Included in this report are the basis and current designs of the major components of the Scale Vitrification System and the results of the SVS-III tests.The major subsystems described are the feed preparation and delivery, melter, and off-gas treatment systems. In addition,the correlation between the melter's operation and its various parameters;which included feed rate,cold cap coverage,oxygen reduction (redox)state of the glass,melter power,plenum temperature,and airlift analysis;were developed.

V. Jain; S. M. Barnes; B. G. Bindi; R. A. Palmer

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (Gravimelt) System Integration Project, Phase 2. Topical report for test circuit operation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the task (Task 6) covered in this document was to operate the refurbished/modified test circuit of the Gravimeh Process in a continuous integrated manner to obtain the engineering and operational data necessary to assess the technical performance and reliability of the circuit. This data is critical to the development of this technology as a feasible means of producing premium clean burning fuels that meet New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). Significant refurbishments and design modifications had been made to the facility (in particular to the vacuum filtration and evaporation units) during Tasks 1 and 2, followed by off-line testing (Task 3). Two weeks of continuous around-the-clock operation of the refurbished/modified MCL test circuit were performed. During the second week of testing, all sections of the plant were operated in an integrated fashion for an extended period of time, including a substantial number of hours of on-stream time for the vacuum filters and the caustic evaporation unit. A new process configuration was tested in which centrate from the acid wash train (without acid addition) was used as the water makeup for the water wash train, thus-eliminating the one remaining process waste water stream. A 9-inch centrifuge was tested at various solids loadings and at flow rates up to 400 lbs/hr of coal feed to obtain a twenty-fold scaleup factor over the MCL integrated test facility centrifuge performance data.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB Geologic Pilot Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and testing the wells. Capay Shale — Gas Reservoir Pilot Thethe 2-3 m thick Capay Shale gas interval containing methanedepleted gas reservoir located within the Middle Capay shale

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB Geologic Pilot Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and testing the wells. Capay Shale — Gas Reservoir Pilot Thewithin the Middle Capay shale Figure 3. Typical geologic2 is in the Middle Capay Shale. at a depth of 928 m (3044

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in a research and development program to design, build, and test an improved geothermal drill bit. The major tasks of the Phase I effort are entitled: failure mechanisms of existing bits; new steels and new bearing design; and new seals and lubricants. It appears that a significant gain in drill-bit life can be attained by the use of higher-temperature steels which retain more hardness at temperatures above 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F). Such steels are available, and two research bits of high-temperature steels were made and will shortly be tested in a laboratory-simulated full-scale geothermal drilling environment. Two control bits of the same design, but made with conventional drill bit steels, were also obtained for identical laboratory test runs, so that the performance of the research bits can be meaningfully assessed. Base-line properties of the steels, such as hardness and fracture toughness as functions of temperature, are being measured to further assess the value of the high-temperature steels selected for the research bits. A geothermal test vessel was designed and fabricated in which the full-scale drill bits will be tested. The vessel is capable of temperature to 427/sup 0/C (800/sup 0/F) and pressures to 35 MPa (5,000 psi). Seal and lubrication designs were studied, and the state of the art in high-temperature seals and lubricants was assessed. Some candidate seals and lubricants have been obtained for testing, and others are being procured. In addition, a seal test vessel has been designed and will soon be completed which can simulate the geothermal drilling environment in full-scale testing of seal and lubricant designs and materials. (JGB)

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.; Maurer, W.C.; DeVries, L.K.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The Nevada Test Site Legacy TRU Waste - The WIPP Central Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the Central Characterization Project (CCP) designed by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to aid sites, especially those sites with small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste streams, in disposing of legacy waste at their facility. Because of the high cost of contracting vendors with the characterization capabilities necessary to meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria, utilizing the CCP is meant to simplify the process for small quantity sites. The paper will describe the process of mobilization of the vendors through CCP, the current production milestones that have been met, and the on-site lessons learned.

Norton, J. F.; Lahoud, R. G.; Foster, B. D.; VanMeighem, J.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

179

OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out experiments to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interaction. In particular, for both wet and dry cavity conditions, there is uncertainty insofar as evaluating the lateral vs. axial power split during a core-concrete interaction due to a lack of experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. The first step towards generating this data is to produce a test plan for review by the Project Review Group (PRG). The purpose of this document is to provide this plan.

Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

180

Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in Asia Derived From Regional Models With Atmospheric and Aerosol Data Assimilation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-resolution estimate of monthly 3D aerosol solar heating rates and surface solar fluxes in Asia from 2001 to 2004 is described here. This product stems from an Asian aerosol assimilation project, in which a) the PNNL regional model bounded by the NCEP reanalyses was used to provide meteorology, b) MODIS and AERONET data were integrated for aerosol observations, c) the Iowa aerosol/chemistry model STEM-2K1 used the PNNL meteorology and assimilated aerosol observations, and d) 3D (X-Y-Z) aerosol simulations from the STEM-2K1 were used in the Scripps Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation (MACR) model to produce total and anthropogenic aerosol direct solar forcing for average cloudy skies. The MACR model and STEM both used the PNNL model resolution of 0.45ş×0.4ş in the horizontal and of 23 layers in the troposphere. The 2001–2004 averaged anthropogenic all-sky aerosol forcing is ?1.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +7.3 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and ?8.6 Wm-2 (surface) averaged in Asia (60?138°E & Eq. ?45°N). In the absence of AERONET SSA assimilation, absorbing aerosol concentration (especially BC aerosol) is much smaller, giving ?2.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +4.5 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and ?6.8 Wm-2 (surface), averaged in Asia. In the vertical, monthly forcing is mainly concentrated below 600hPa with maxima around 800hPa. Seasonally, low-level forcing is far larger in dry season than in wet season in South Asia, whereas the wet season forcing exceeds the dry season forcing in East Asia. The anthropogenic forcing in the present study is similar to that in Chung et al.’s [2005] in overall magnitude but the former offers fine-scale features and simulated vertical profiles. The interannual variability of the computed anthropogenic forcing is significant and extremely large over major emission outflow areas. In view of this, the present study’s estimate is within the implicated range of the 1999 INDOEX result. However, NCAR/CCSM3’s anthropogenic aerosol forcing is much smaller than the present study’s estimate at the surface, and is outside of what the INDOEX findings can support.

Chung, Chul Eddy; Ramanathan, V.; Carmichael, Gregory; Kulkarni, S.; Tang, Youhua; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: Thermal energy storage tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar-powered water desalination pilot plant at Yanbu in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is a unique project in terms of its size, purpose, objectives, and scope. The plant uses a combination of solar thermal energy and fossil-fuel energy to provide the shaft horsepower necessary to operate the indirect heat-transfer freeze desalination process developed and patented by Chicago Bridge and Iron Inc. (CBandI) to produce potable water. The thermal storage acts as a buffer between the energy collection subsystem and the energy delivery subsystem. This report describes the thermal storage subsystem. One of the objectives of the desalination research project is to publish a series of reports on the performance of its various subsystems. The authors of this report do not claim that it is exhaustive and complete in all respects, for more than one reason. Any research activity is like an open-ended problem and during the tenure of its investigation it raises more problems than can be solved. However, the authors believe that the storage system behavior has posed no serious problem and that the report adequately covers all the facets of the investigation. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

G-Tunnel pressurized slot-testing preparations; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designers and analysts of radioactive waste repositories must be able to predict the mechanical behavior of the host rock. Sandia National laboratories elected to conduct a development program on pressurized slot testing and featured (1) development of an improved method to cut slots using a chain saw with diamond-tipped cutters, (2) measurements useful for determining in situ stresses normal to slots, (3) measurements applicable for determining the in situ modulus of deformation parallel to a drift surface, and (4) evaluations of the potentials of pressurized slot strength testing. This report describes the preparations leading to the measurements and evaluations.

Zimmerman, R.M.; Sifre-Soto, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mann, K.L.; Bellman, R.A. Jr.; Luker, S. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Dodds, D.J. [North Pacific Research, Portland, OR (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Project Flow.qxp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manager Testing Partner RESPONSIBILITIES Tailgate Safety Project Execution 907 North Poplar, Suite 150 Casper, WY 82601 888.599.2200 www.rmotc.doe.gov Project Planning Project...

184

HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

HERTING DL

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

185

laura.schewel@berkeley.edu 1 VIRTUAL EV TEST DRIVE: INTRODUCTION AND PROJECT SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and battery electric vehicles (4) (5). · Many consumers are not interested in strict economic rationality when costs? Her fundamental question: "What does an EV mean for me?" Virtual EV Test Drive helps answer all a plug-in hybrid probably would switch into gasoline mode, and if/where a battery electric would have run

Kammen, Daniel M.

186

Pleasant Bayou geopressured/geothermal testing project, Brazoria County, Texas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase II-B production testing of the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well began September 22, 1982. The test plan was designed to evaluate the capabilities of the geopressured-geothermal reservoir during an extended flow period. Tests were conducted to determine reservoir areal extent; aquifer fluid properties; fluid property change with production; information on reservoir production drive mechanism; long-term scale and corrosion control methods; and disposal well operations. Operatinal aspects of geopressured-geothermal production were also evaluated. The test was discontinued prematurely in May 1983 because of a production tubing failure. Most of the production tubing was recovered from the well and cause of the failure was determined. Plans for recompletion of the well were prepared. However, the well was not recompleted because of funding constraints and/or program rescheduling. In March 1984, the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) directed that the site be placed in a standby-secured condition. In August 1984, the site was secured. Routine site maintenance and security was provided during the secured period.

Ortego, P.K.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

DESIGN CRITERIA FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE LATTICE TEST REACTOR PROJECT CAH-100  

SciTech Connect

Design and construction specifications to be followed in the development of the reactor, its associated systems and experimental facilities, and the housing and required services for the facility are presented. The testing procedures to be used are outlined. (D.C.W.)

Ballard, D.L.; Brown, W.W.; Harrison, C.W.; Heineman, R.E.; Henry, H.L.; Jeffs, T.W.; Morrow, G.W.; Russell, J.T.; Waite, J.K.

1963-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

188

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, January--February 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

189

Project RU LlSON COPY ON-SITE RADIOLOGICAL PROGRAMS DURING REENTRY DISILLING THROUGH PRODUCTION TESTING  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RU LlSON RU LlSON COPY ON-SITE RADIOLOGICAL PROGRAMS DURING REENTRY DISILLING THROUGH PRODUCTION TESTING FINAL REPOAT EBERLlNE INSTRUMENT CORPORATION Santa Fe, New Mexico Date Published - December 1973 PREPARED FOR THE U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION N E V A D A OPERATIONS OFFICE UNDER CONTRACT NO. AT(26-11-294 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Project RULISON ON-S1l'E RADIOLOGICAL PROGRAMS D U R I N G R E E N T R Y D R I L L I N G THROUGH PRODUCTION TESTING \ F I N A L REPORT EBERLINE INSTRUMENT CORPORATION . Santa Fe, New Mexico 1 Date Published - December 1973 NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE . UNDER CONTRACT NO. AT(26-11-294 NOTICE ~~~~ This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United

190

OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is pursuing separate effect tests to examine the viability of the melt coolability mechanisms identified as part of the MACE program. These mechanisms include bulk cooling, water ingression, volcanic eruptions, and crust breach. At the second PRG meeting held at ANL on 22-23 October 2002, a preliminary design1 for a separate effects test to investigate the melt eruption cooling mechanism was presented for PRG review. At this meeting, NUPEC made several recommendations on the experiment approach aimed at optimizing the chances of achieving a floating crust boundary condition in this test. The principal recommendation was to incorporate a mortar sidewall liner into the test design, since data from the COTELS experiment program indicates that corium does not form a strong mechanical bond with this material. Other recommendations included: (i) reduction of the electrode elevation to well below the melt upper surface elevation (since the crust may bond to these solid surfaces), and (ii) favorably taper the mortar liner to facilitate crust detachment and relocation during the experiment. Finally, as a precursor to implementing these modifications, the PRG recommended the development of a design for a small-scale scoping test intended to verify the ability of the mortar liner to preclude formation of an anchored bridge crust under core-concrete interaction conditions. This revised Melt Eruption Test (MET) plan is intended to satisfy these PRG recommendations. Specifically, the revised plan focuses on providing data on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions, including a floating crust boundary condition. The overall objective of MET is to determine to what extent core debris is rendered coolable by eruptive-type processes that breach the crust that rests upon the melt. The specific objectives of this test are as follows: (1) Evaluate the augmentation in surface heat flux during periods of melt eruption; (2) Evaluate the melt entrainment coefficient from the heat flux and gas flow rate data for input into models that calculate ex-vessel debris coolability; (3) Characterize the morphology and coolability of debris resulting from eruptive processes that transport melt into overlying water; and (4) Discriminate between periods when eruptions take the form of particle ejections into overlying water, leading to a porous particle bed, and single-phase extrusions, which lead to volcano-type structures.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

191

Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Operational Experience, Performance Testing, and Systems Integration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind2H2 system is fully functional and continues to gather performance data. In this report, specifications of the Wind2H2 equipment (electrolyzers, compressor, hydrogen storage tanks, and the hydrogen fueled generator) are summarized. System operational experience and lessons learned are discussed. Valuable operational experience is shared through running, testing, daily operations, and troubleshooting the Wind2H2 system and equipment errors are being logged to help evaluate the reliability of the system.

Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.; Ramsden, T. G.; Kramer, W. E.; Novachek, F. J.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Results of the 1988 geothermal gradient test drilling project for the State of Washington  

SciTech Connect

During late summer and early fall of 1988, the Washington Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER) completed drilling eight shallow geothermal gradient test wells in the southern Washington Cascade Range. This report describes the preliminary results of the 1988 drilling and gradient measuring, and summarizes our current perspectives on distribution and magnitude of the geothermal resource potential in the southern Washington Cascades. 18 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

Barnett, D.B.; Korosec, M.A.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Laconia, New Hampshire bottom ash paving project: Volume 3, Physical Performance Testing Report  

SciTech Connect

Bottom ash is the principal waste stream from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). It is comprised of grate ash (97%), the slag material discharged at the end of the grate system, and grate sifting (3%), the material that melts or falls through the grate structure. This project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using municipal solid waste grate ash as an aggregate substitute in the construction of a pavement binder course for a portion of Rt. 3 in Laconia, New Hampshire. The research was conducted over a two year period during 1993 and 1994. This study is the culmination of an earlier two year characterization study between 1990 and 1992 that documented the physical and environmental characteristics of the bottom ash as it was produced at the Concord, N.H. waste-to-energy (@) facility and used in an asphaltic binder course. Together, these two studies provide a complete evaluation of the potential for using grate ash or bottom ash in asphalt binder course or as recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) in base courses in pavements.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Laconia, New Hampshire Bottom, Ashi Paving Project. Volume 1: Environmental testing report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bottom ash is the principal waste stream fro m the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). It is comprised of grate ash (97%), the slag material discharged at the end of the grate system and grate sffting (3%), the material that melts or falls through the grate structure. This project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using municipal solid waste grate ash as an aggregate substitute in the construction of a pavement binder course for a portion of Rt. 3 in Laconia, New Hampshire. The research was conducted over a two year period during 1993 and 1994. This study is the culmination of an earlier two year characterization study between 1990 and 1992 that documented the physical and environmental characteristics of the bottom ash as it was produced at the Concord, N.H. waste-to-energy (WTE) facility and used in an asphaltic binder course. Together, these two studies provide a complete evaluation of the potential for using grate ash or bottom ash in asphalt binder course or as recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) in base courses in pavements.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: Solar-collector field experimental tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar-collection field subsystem of the solar-powered desalination pilot project located at Yanbu in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has been operated successfully for two years. It has been demonstrated that during a one-year period, the solar-collector field can, on the average, provide about 2500 kWh of thermal energy a day for days with a daily insolation total greater than 4000 Wh/m/sup 2/. This is a yearlong solar-collector field average efficiency of 22.5%. In Yanbu, from October 1, 1985, until September 30, 1986, there were only 21 days (5.8%) when the daily direct-normal insolation was less than the mid-60% to 70% range with a peak output of 51 kW per solar collector. It has also been demonstrated that the Power Kinetics, Inc., square-dish solar collector has a problem due to the fixed aperture (outboard focus) that seriously hurts the performance of the solar collector during the summer months at this latitude. A location at latitudes greater than +-35/degree/ would see greatly improved daylong summer performance. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Zimmerman, J.C.; Al-Abbadi, N.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

HGP-A Wellhead Generator Proof-of-Feasibility Project (Well Test) at HGP-A Site Puna, Hawaii. Volume II. Technical Specifications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to provide and secure the well test system complete and ready for use. The project comprises the construction of a chemical treatment system (including caustic and hydrogen peroxide handling systems), new condensate piping, wellhead steam piping modifications, ancillary electrical systems and equipment, instrumentation, site improvements and utilities distribution.

None

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report for the months of June and July 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project status report for the months of June and July 1995, is given on the Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating, and optimizing solar heating systems.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

System design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the hardware subsystems of the data acquisition and control system (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The system was designed and implemented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The mitigation testing uses a pump immersed in the waste tank, directed at certain angles and operated at different speeds and time durations. The SY-101 tank has experienced recurrent periodic gas releases of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and (recently discovered) methane. The hydrogen gas represents a danger, as some of the releases are in amounts above the lower flammability limit (LFL). These large gas releases must be mitigated. Several instruments have been added to the tank to monitor the gas compositions, the tank level, the tank temperature, and other parameters. A mixer pump has been developed to stir the tank waste to cause the gases to be released at a slow rate. It is the function of the DACS to monitor those instruments and to control the mixer pump in a safe manner. During FY93 and FY94 the mixer pump was installed with associated testing operations support equipment and a mitigation test project plan was implemented. These activities successfully demonstrated the mixer pump`s ability to mitigate the SY-101 tank hydrogen gas hazard.

Truitt, R.W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pounds, T.S.; Smith, S.O. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

199

Summary of seasonal thermal energy storage field test projects in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storage of available heat or chill for distribution at a later time to meet thermal loads. STES can reduce energy consumption, peak energy demand, and emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere over conventional systems. It is estimated that full-scale application of STES would provide 2% to 4% of total energy needs in the United States. One STES technology, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), has been determined to be the most cost-effective option in the United States when site conditions enable its use. ATES has been analyzed in the laboratory and investigated in the field in the United States since the program was established at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in 1979. Two field test facilities (FTFs), one for heating ATES at the University of Minnesota and the other for cooling ATES at the University of Alabama, have been primary testing grounds for US ATES research. Computer models have been developed to analyze the complex thermal and fluid dynamics. Extensive monitoring of FTFs has provided verification of and refinements to the computer models. The areas of geochemistry and microbiology have been explored as they apply to the aquifer environment. In general, the two FTFs have been successful in demonstrating the steps needed to make an ATES system operational.

Johnson, B.K.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The sand and aggregate constituents for this particular siliceous concrete were provided by CEA as an in-kind contribution to the program. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-3 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State...

202

Relationship of creative projects in anatomy to medical student professionalism, test performance and stress: an exploratory study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

creative project option completed written projects (n = 36/46; 78.3%), primarily poems (n = 19/36;57.6%) and essays (

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Anthropogenic impacts on global storage and emissions of mercury from terrestrial soils: Insights from a new global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We develop a mechanistic global model of soil mercury storage and emissions that ties the lifetime of mercury in soils to the lifetime of the organic carbon pools it is associated with. We explore the implications of considering terrestrial mercury cycling in the framework of soil carbon cycling and suggest possible avenues of future research to test our assumptions and constrain this type of model. In our simulation, input of mercury to soil is by atmospheric deposition, in part through leaf uptake and subsequent litter fall, and is moderated by surface photoreduction and revolatilization. Once bound to organic carbon, mercury is transferred along a succession of short?lived to long?lived carbon pools and is ultimately reemitted by respiration of these pools. We examine the legacy of anthropogenic influence on global mercury storage and emissions and estimate that storage of mercury in organic soils has increased by ?20 % since preindustrial times, while soil emissions have increased by a factor of 3 (2900 Mg yr ?1 versus 1000 Mg yr ?1). At steady state, mercury accumulates in the most recalcitrant soil carbon pools and has an overall lifetime against respiration of 630 years. However, the impact of anthropogenic emissions since preindustrial times has been concentrated in more labile pools, so that the mean lifetime of present?day anthropogenic mercury in all pools is ?80 years. Our analysis suggests that reductions in anthropogenic emissions would lead to immediate and large reductions in secondary soil mercury emissions.

Nicole V Smith?downey; Elsie M. Sunderl; Daniel J. Jacob

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Mult-Pollutant Control Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-megawatt (MW) Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/induct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. Testing was conducted through ports located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor to evaluate the performance of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system, as well as through ports located at the air heater outlet and baghouse outlet or stack to determine pollutant removal efficiencies across the Turbosorp{reg_sign} scrubber and baghouse. Data from the unit's stack continuous emission monitor (CEM) were also used for determining attainment of the performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions and SO{sub 2} removal efficiency.

Daniel P. Connell; James E. Locke

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Solar Total Energy Test Facility Project. Semiannual report, October 1976--March 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Total Energy System will operate as follows: A heat transfer fluid (Therminol 66) is heated in the receiver tubes of the solar collectors by reflected and focused solar radiation. This fluid is pumped to the high-temperature storage subsystem. Fluid is extracted from this storage on a demand basis and pumped to the heat exchanger which produces superheated toluene vapor to power the turbine/generator. The boiler can also be operated from a fossil fuel-fired heater to insure continuity of operation during extended cloudy periods. Turbine condenser coolant is pumped to the low-temperature storage tank and becomes the energy source for heating and air-conditioning components of the system. Progress is reported on the design, fabrication, installation, and checkout of the first 200 m/sup 2/ collector field quadrant, a high-temperature stratified storage tank, a 32-kW turbine/generator and Therminol-to-toluene heat exchanger, an instrumentation and control subsystem, a cooling tower, the turbine and control building, and all necessary pumps and fluid loops to interconnect these subsystems. Also, experience with operating the facility in accordance with a detailed test plan to provide performance data on all subsystems and to accumulate operating and maintenance experience which can provide a basis for the design of large-scale experimental plants and future solar energy systems is described. (WHK)

Petterson, B. Jr. (ed.)

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Semi-annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Considerable progress has been made in understanding the causes of premature drill-bit failure in the geothermal well drilling environment. Drill-bits of high-temperature steels are being fabricated, as well as a test chamber to simulate the geothermal environment. In addition, several basic properties of the candidate steels and of the conventional drill-bit steels have been gathered from the literature, and provisions have been made for completing the material property picture through a materials testing program at Terra Tek. Considerable background material has been gathered on the drill-bit seal problem and on candidate seal materials. Some seal materials have been selected for further testing, and a seal tester is being designed to provide a very good simulation of the environment experienced by seals in geothermal well drill-bits. Major guidance meetings on the project to develop an improved geothermal drill-bit were held on June 10--11, August 13, and December 10--11. Appendix B includes the reports of these meetings.

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.; Maurer, W.C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations  

SciTech Connect

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Work plan for upgrade of SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this effort is to upgrade the existing DACS-1 used for control and data acquisition in support of the hydrogen mitigation program for tank 101-SY. The planned upgrades will enhance the system capabilities to support additional mitigation projects and improve the system operability by implementing changes identified during operation of the system to date. Once the upgrades have been implemented, the DACS-1 system should operate as it did prior to the upgrade, but with greatly increased speed and capability. No retraining of Test Engineers will be required; the upgrade is designed to be transparent to those who operate it, with only a noticeable increase in the speed of the system. This work plan defines the tasks required for implementing the upgrade. It identifies deliverables, responsible organizations and individuals, interfaces, and schedule. This upgrade effort employs system engineering principles wherever applicable.

Truitt, R.W.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Lifetime of Anthropogenic Climate Change: Millennial Time Scales of Potential CO2 and Surface Temperature Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multimillennial simulations with a fully coupled climate–carbon cycle model are examined to assess the persistence of the climatic impacts of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. It is found that the time required to absorb anthropogenic CO2 strongly ...

M. Eby; K. Zickfeld; A. Montenegro; D. Archer; K. J. Meissner; A. J. Weaver

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

GLASS FORMULATION DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING FOR COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER (CCIM) ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - 9208  

SciTech Connect

Over the past few years, Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) demonstrations have been completed using SRS sludge batches 2, 3 and 4 (SB2, SB3 and SB4) simulant compositions. These campaigns demonstrated the ability of the CCIM to effectively produce quality glasses at high waste loadings. The current Advanced Remediation Technology (ART) Phase II-A Project is aimed at demonstrating the CCIM technology under representative DWPF flowsheet conditions and to demonstrate extended operations of the melter. A glass composition development effort was completed to identify and recommend a frit composition and sludge batch 4 (SB4) simulant waste loading target for subsequent ART-Phase II-A CCIM demonstration testing. Based on the results of the glass formulation testing, it was recommended that the Frit 503-R6 composition (B{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 14 wt %; Li{sub 2}O = 9 wt %; Na{sub 2}O = 3 wt %; and SiO{sub 2} = 74 wt %) be utilized for the demonstration. Furthermore, a waste loading of 46 wt % was recommended. The recommended frit and waste loading would produce a glass with acceptable durability with a liquidus temperature adequately below the 1250 C nominal CCIM operating temperature. This frit composition and waste loading was found to result in a glass that met CCIM processing requirements for viscosity, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity. The recommended frit and waste loading level should also provide a buffer for sludge product compositional variation to support the Phase II-A CCIM demonstration.

Marra, J; Amanda Billings, A; David Peeler, D; Michael Stone, M; Tommy Edwards, T

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

211

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine Wastes Christopher S. Kim,1 James J. Rytuba,2 Gordon E. Brown, Jr.3 1Department of Physical Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 2U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 3Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Introduction Figure 1. Dr. Christopher Kim collects a mine waste sample from the Oat Hill mercury mine in Northern California. The majority of mercury mine wastes at these sites are present as loose, unconsolidated piles, facilitating the transport of mercury-bearing material downstream into local watersheds. Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that poses considerable health risks to humans, primarily through the consumption of fish which

212

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background information - Project Concept (MICP) - Ureolytic Biomineralization, Biomineralization Sealing * Accomplishments to Date - Site Characterization - Site Preparation - Experimentation and Modeling - Field Deployable Injection Strategy Development * Summary

213

Project W-314 updated acceptance test report HNF-4649 for HNF-4648 241-AN-A pit leak detection ANA-WT-LDSTA-331 for project W-314  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the test was to verify that the AN Tank Farm AN-A Pit Leak Detector components are functionally integrated and operate in accordance with engineering design specifications. The Acceptance Test Procedure HNF-4648,24l-AN-A-Pit Leak Detection ANA-WT-LDSTA-331 was conducted between 23 June and 01 July 1999 at the 200E AN Tank Farm. The test has been completed with no open test exceptions. The test was conducted prior to final engineering ''as built'' activities being completed this had no impact on the procedure or test results. All components, identified in the procedure were found to be labeled and identified as written in the procedure.

HAMMERS, J.S.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Project W-314 acceptance test report HNF-4651 for HNF-4650 SN-268 encasement leak detection ANA-WT-LDSTA-335 for project W-314  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the test was to verify that the AN Tank Farm Encasement Leak Detector components are functionally integrated and operate in accordance with engineering design specifications The Acceptance Test Procedure HNF-4650, SN-268 Encasement Leak Detection ANA-W-LDSTA-335, was conducted between 22 June and 01 July 1999 at the 200E AN Tank Farm. The test has been completed with no open test exceptions The test was conducted prior to final engineering ''as built'' activities being completed this had no impact on the procedure or test results. All components, identified in the procedure, were found to be labeled and identified as written in the procedure.

HAMMERS, J.S.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

Project W-314 acceptance test report HNF-4647 for HNF-4646 241-B pit leak detection ANB-WT-LDSTA-231 for project W-314  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the test was to verify that the AN Tank Farm B Pit Leak Detector components are functionally integrated and operate in accordance with engineering design specifications. The Acceptance Test Procedure HNF-4646,241-AN-B-Pit Leak Detection ANB-WT-LDSTA-231 was conducted between 26 June and 02 July 1999 at the 200E AN Tank Farm. The test has been completed with no open test exceptions. The test was conducted prior to final engineering ''as built'' activities being completed this had no impact on the procedure or test results. All components, identified in the procedure were found to be labeled and identified as written in the procedure.

HAMMERS, J.S.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leakage Mitigation Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number: FE0004478 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background Information * Accomplishments to Date - Injection strategy development (control and prediction) - Large core tests - ambient pressure - Large core tests - high pressure - Small core tests - high pressure - MCDP, permeability and porosity assessments * Progress Assessment and Summary

217

Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report, April--May 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project status report for April and May 1995 is given on the Colorado State University program on development of solar heating systems.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Project information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information Amistad Project (Texas) Collbran Project (Colorado) Colorado River Storage Project Dolores Project (Colorado) Falcon Project (Texas) Provo River Project (Utah)...

219

Projected changes in late 21st century tropical cyclone frequency in thirteen coupled climate models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in tropical cyclone (TC) frequency under anthropogenic climate change are examined for thirteen global models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), using the OWZP TC detection method developed by the authors in ...

K. J. Tory; S. S. Chand; J. L. McBride; H. Ye; R. A. Dare

220

EA-0813; Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Decontamination and Decommissioning Project and The Tokamak Physics Experiment at the PPPL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13; Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) The Tokamak Fusion 13; Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Decontamination and Decommissioning Project and The Tokamak Physics Experiment at the PPPL Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ACRONYMS Glossary of Radiological Terms SCIENTIFIC NOTATION 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR THE PROPOSED ACTIONS 1.1 TFTR D&D Project 1.2 TPX Project 1.3 Scope of Document 1.4 Local Community Relations Program 1.5 References 2.0 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTIONS AND ALTERNATIVES 2.1 TFTR D&D Project 2.2 TPX Project 2.3 Environmental Monitoring 2.4 References 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 3.1 PPPL Proposed Site 3.2 ORR Alternative Site 3.3 References 4.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTIONS AND ALTERNATIVES 4.1 TFTR D&D Project 4.1.1 Impacts of Normal D&D Operations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems: Project status report for the months of October and November, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a project to develop tools for evaluating solar heating and cooling systems. Current work on this project has been to validate the Florida Solar Energy Center`s (FSEC) models of the Solahart 302K and 302K-AS systems to prepare a rating for the Sacramento Municipal Utility District`s rebate program for solar domestic hot water heaters. A preliminary rating has been issued by FSEC and updated ratings will be released as necessary. Two of the problems that were mentioned in the August/September report are addressed and a tank heat loss test is discussed. Work continues on improving and validating the models.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Leakage Mitigation CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number FE0004478 Lee H Spangler, Al Cunningham, Robin Gerlach Energy Research Institute Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation * Background information * Large core tests - ambient pressure * Large core tests - high pressure 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. Project benefits statement. The Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies

223

Nevada Test Site Perspective on Characterization and Loading of Legacy Transuranic Drums Utilizing the Central Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) has successfully completed a multi-year effort to characterize and ship 1860 legacy transuranic (TRU) waste drums for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a permanent TRU disposal site. This has been a cooperative effort among the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), the U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office (DOE/CBFO), the NTS Management and Operations (M&O) contractor Bechtel Nevada (BN), and various contractors under the Central Characterization Project (CCP) umbrella. The success is due primarily to the diligence, perseverance, and hard work of each of the contractors, the DOE/CBFO, and NNSA/NSO, along with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters (DOE/HQ). This paper presents, from an NTS perspective, the challenges and successes of utilizing the CCP for obtaining a certified characterization program, sharing responsibilities for characterization, data validation, and loading of TRU waste with BN to achieve disposal at WIPP from a Small Quantity Site (SQS) such as the NTS. The challenges in this effort arose from two general sources. First, the arrangement of DOE/CBFO contractors under the CCP performing work and certifying waste at the NTS within a Hazard Category 2 (HazCat 2) non-reactor nuclear facility operated by BN, presented difficult challenges. The nuclear safety authorization basis, safety liability and responsibility, conduct of operations, allocation and scheduling of resources, and other issues were particularly demanding. The program-level and field coordination needed for the closely interrelated characterization tasks was extensive and required considerable effort by all parties. The second source of challenge was the legacy waste itself. None of the waste was generated at the NTS. The waste was generated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Lynchburg, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), and a variety of other sites over 20 years ago, making the development of Acceptable Knowledge a significant and problematic effort. In addition, the characterization requirements, and data quality objectives for shipment and WIPP disposal today, were non-existent when this waste was generated, resulting in real-time adjustments to unexpected conditions.

R.G. Lahoud; J. F. Norton; I. L. Siddoway; L. W. Griswold

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an abstract. TEST Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras lacinia dui et est venenatis lacinia. Vestibulum lacus dolor, adipiscing id mattis sit amet, ultricies sed purus. Nulla consectetur aliquet feugiat. Maecenas ips

225

Impact of anthropogenic aerosols on Indian summer monsoon  

SciTech Connect

Using an interactive aerosol-climate model we find that absorbing anthropogenic aerosols, whether coexisting with scattering aerosols or not, can significantly affect the Indian summer monsoon system. We also show that the influence is reflected in a perturbation to the moist static energy in the sub-cloud layer, initiated as a heating by absorbing aerosols to the planetary boundary layer. The perturbation appears mostly over land, extending from just north of the Arabian Sea to northern India along the southern slope of the Tibetan Plateau. As a result, during the summer monsoon season, modeled convective precipitation experiences a clear northward shift, coincidently in agreement with observed monsoon precipitation changes in recent decades particularly during the onset season. We demonstrate that the sub-cloud layer moist static energy is a useful quantity for determining the impact of aerosols on the northward extent and to a certain degree the strength of monsoon convection.

Wang, Chien; Kim, Dongchul; Ekman, Annica; Barth, Mary; Rasch, Philip J.

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

226

CMIP5 Projected Changes in the Annual Cycle of Precipitation in Monsoon Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of the 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) experiments show that the global monsoon is expected to increase in area, precipitation and intensity as the climate system responds to anthropogenic forcing. Concurrently, detailed ...

Anji Seth; Sara A. Rauscher; Michela Biasutti; Alessandra Giannini; Suzana J. Camargo; Maisa Rojas

227

CMIP5 Projected Changes in the Annual Cycle of Precipitation in Monsoon Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) experiments show that the global monsoon is expected to increase in area, precipitation, and intensity as the climate system responds to anthropogenic forcing. Concurrently, ...

Anji Seth; Sara A. Rauscher; Michela Biasutti; Alessandra Giannini; Suzana J. Camargo; Maisa Rojas

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: Arizona State University. Prototype carrier 10 ton air-cooled solar absorption chiller. Final evaluation report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A prototype air-cooled 10 ton solar absorption chiller was disassembled and inspected after having been field-tested for three consecutive cooling seasons. Included in the inspection were some flow visualization experiments which revealed some problems in the absorber header design. The objectives of this evaluation project were to determine possible causes for the frequent crystallization and generally below-design performance of the chiller during the testing period. The major conclusions reached were that a combination of leaks and of poor (50%) flow distribution in the absorber could account for most of the chiller's poor performance.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Project management for the reliability fleet testing of alcohol/gasoline blends. Monthly progress report, September 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report (1) provides a brief review of the project background, objectives, and approach, (2) presents the status of progress through September 30, 1979, and (3) summarizes the expenditure status. A summary of contractual task assignments is provided in Appendix A, and a history of principal reporting activities is provided in Appendix B.

None

1979-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Amchitka Island Test Center - AK 01  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amchitka Island Test Center - AK 01 Amchitka Island Test Center - AK 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Amchitka Island Test Center (AK.01) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Amchitka Island Test Center Documents Related to Amchitka Island Test Center Draft Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Amchitka Island, Alaska, Project Site (September 2013) An Assessment of the Reported Leakage of Anthropogenic Radionuclides From the Underground Nuclear Test Sites at Amchitka Island, Alaska, USA to the Surface Environment. Conceptual Site Models as a Tool in Evaluation Ecological health; The Case of the Department of Energys Amchitka Island Nuclear Test Site.

231

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas industries account for 86% of anthropogenic CO 2 * we will continue to depend on non- renewable fossil fuels for the next several decades * The CO 2 cycle is not balanced...

232

The Underground Test Area Project of the Nevada Test Site: Building Confidence in Groundwater Flow and Transport Models at Pahute Mesa Through Focused Characterization Studies  

SciTech Connect

Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site contains about 8.0E+07 curies of radioactivity caused by underground nuclear testing. The Underground Test Area Subproject has entered Phase II of data acquisition, analysis, and modeling to determine the risk to receptors from radioactivity in the groundwater, establish a groundwater monitoring network, and provide regulatory closure. Evaluation of radionuclide contamination at Pahute Mesa is particularly difficult due to the complex stratigraphy and structure caused by multiple calderas in the Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field and overprinting of Basin and Range faulting. Included in overall Phase II goals is the need to reduce the uncertainty and improve confidence in modeling results. New characterization efforts are underway, and results from the first year of a three-year well drilling plan are presented.

Pawloski, G A; Wurtz, J; Drellack, S L

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 System Test Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE System Test Plan is to assess the approach to be taken for intended testing activities associated with the SAPHIRE software product. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

Kent Norris

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Semi-annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit, Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test facilities (the geothermal drilling vessel and the geothermal drill-bit seal tester) were completed and de-bugged, and the first tests were run on full-scale research drill bits and drill-bit seals. In addition, more materials information was gathered, and a number of additional seals of high-temperature elastomer materials were obtained for testing. Maurer Engineering has also been active in the design and procurement of candidate high-temperature drill-bit seals for testing, and has done a literature and patent search on the problem of drill-bit insert retention. Reed Tool Co. has cooperated in the fabrication of drill bits for testing, and has offered consultation on certain seal designs.

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Semi-annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit, phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test facilities (the geothermal drilling vessel and the geothermal drill-bit seal tester) were completed and de-bugged, and the first tests were run on full-scale research drill bits and drill-bit seals. In addition, more materials information was gathered, and a number of additional seals of high-temperature elastomer materials were obtained for testing. Maurer Engineering, on a subcontract basis, has also been active in the design and procurement of candidate high-temperature drill-bit seals for testing, and has done a literature and patent search on the problem of drill-bit insert retention. Reed Tool Co. has cooperated in the fabrication of drill bits for testing, and has offered consultation on certain seal designs.

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: DSET Laboratories. Performance testing of the fresnel point focus concentrating dish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thernal performance of an 80.3 m/sup 2/ (864 ft/sup 2/) Power Kinetics, Inc. (PKI) fresnel point focus concentrating dish was measured over a period of seven months using SYLTHERM 800 as the heat transfer fluid. Three stages of testing were conducted; initial performance, extended all day operational, and final performance testing. The initial and final performance tests each used three different procedures to measure efficiency in order to quantify the solar concentrator's performance. The all day operational testing represented the ''in situ'' performance of the dish. During the seven months of performance testing, the operation of the dish was thoroughly monitored. All significant problems affecting the normal functioning of the PKI solar concentrator are noted in this report along with any corrective action taken to rectify the problems. Also, a small exposure program was conducted on mirror samples to determine if any reduction in total and specular reflectance occurred due to dirt retention on the mirrors.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Anthropogenic increase in carbon dioxide compromises plant defense against invasive insects  

SciTech Connect

Elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), a consequence of anthropogenic global change, can profoundly affect the interactions between crop plants and insect pests and may promote yet another form of global change: the rapid establishment of invasive species. Elevated CO{sub 2} increased the susceptibility of soybean plants grown under field conditions to the invasive Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) and to a variant of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) resistant to crop rotation by down-regulating gene expression related to defense signaling [lipoxygenase 7 (lox7), lipoxygenase 8 (lox8), and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (acc-s)]. The down-regulation of these genes, in turn, reduced the production of cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CystPIs), which are specific deterrents to coleopteran herbivores. Beetle herbivory increased CystPI activity to a greater degree in plants grown under ambient than under elevated CO{sub 2}. Gut cysteine proteinase activity was higher in beetles consuming foliage of soybeans grown under elevated CO{sub 2} than in beetles consuming soybeans grown in ambient CO{sub 2}, consistent with enhanced growth and development of these beetles on plants grown in elevated CO{sub 2}. These findings suggest that predicted increases in soybean productivity under projected elevated CO{sub 2} levels may be reduced by increased susceptibility to invasive crop pests.

Zavala, J.; Casteel, C.; DeLucia, E.; Berenbaum, M. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seal Repair Using Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials Project Number DE-FE0009562 John Stormont, Mahmoud Reda Taha University of New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Ed Matteo, Thomas Dewers Sandia National Laboratories 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction and overview * Materials synthesis * Materials testing and characterization * Annular seal system testing * Numerical simulation * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * BENEFITS STATEMENT: The project involves the development and testing of polymer-cement nanocomposites for repairing flaws in annular wellbore seals. These materials will have superior characteristics compared to conventional

239

CSER 96-014: criticality safety of project W-151, 241-AZ-101 retrieval system process test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Criticality Safety Evaluation Report (CSER) documents a review of the criticality safety implications of a process test to be performed in tank 241-AZ-101 (101-AZ). The process test will determine the effectiveness of the retrieval system for mobilization of solids and the practicality of the system for future use in the underground storage tanks at Hanford. The scope of the CSER extends only to the testing and operation of the mixer pumps and does not include the transfer of waste from the tank. Justification is provided that a nuclear criticality is extremely unlikely, if not impossible, in this tank.

Vail, T.S., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

240

System Design Description for the SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the hardware and software of the computer subsystems for the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

ERMI, A.M.

2000-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

V2X communication in Europe - From research projects towards standardization and field testing of vehicle communication technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the success story of passive and autonomous active safety systems, cooperative Intelligent Transportation Systems based on vehicular communication are the next important step to the vision of accident-free driving. In recent years, various ... Keywords: Cooperative systems, Field operational test (FOT), Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), Safe intelligent mobility - test field Germany (simTD), Vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I), Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V)

Christian Weií

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Demonstration Development Project: Evaluation of a Test Loop to Demonstrate Handling Properties of Liquid CO2-Coal Slurry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants employing liquid CO2 in lieu of water as the slurrying medium to feed coal to the gasifier are a promising option for carbon capture and storage (CCS). This report summarizes the design and cost estimate for a proposed CO2-coal slurry test loop system. The objective is to validate a cost estimate for the construction of a full scale CO2-coal slurry test loop and aid in technical aspects of working with ...

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

243

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: Carrier Corporation. Fabrication, testing and installation report: 53 kW solar absorption cooling system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 53 kW water cooled packaged solar absorption chiller was fabricated and tested. The generator shell and absorber shell had sight glasses added as a diagnostic device. The unit was modified so that a base suitable for mounting pumps, valves and associated piping was cantilevered from one end of the unit. The installation and start-up of the cooling system is outlined.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Sonar imaging of bay bottom sediments and anthropogenic impacts in Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of surface sediment distribution in Galveston Bay is important because it allows us to better understand how the bay works and how human activities impact the bay and its ecosystems. In this project, six areas of bay bottom were surveyed using acoustic techniques to make maps of bay bottom types and to investigate the types and extent of anthropogenic impacts. A total of 31 km2 was surveyed in six areas, one in Bolivar Roads (6.1 km2), one near Redfish Bar (3.1 km2), two in East Bay (12 km2), one southeast of the Clear Lake entrance (5.3 km2), and one in Trinity Bay (4.3 km2). Sidescan sonars (100 kHz and 600 kHz) were used to image the bay bottom, and a chirp sonar (2-12 kHz) was used to image subsurface sediment layers and bottom topography. In the side-scan records, objects as small as a few meters in extent were visible, whereas the chirp sonar records show a vertical resolution of a few tens of centimeters. The sidescan images display strong backscatter in some areas due to coarse sediments in addition to weak backscatter in areas of fine sediment. The bay bottom was classified using three levels of sonar backscatter ranging from high to low. Areas of differing sonar backscatter intensity were sampled with cores and grab-samples. High backscatter corresponded to coarse shell debris and oyster reefs, medium backscatter corresponded to a sand-silt-shell mixture, and low backscatter corresponded to silty loam. Chirp sonar records were classified as one of nine different bottom reflection types based on changes in amplitude and stratigraphy. Parallel, layered sediments are seen filling the bay valley and resting atop a sharp contact at which the acoustic signal fades out. Along the flanks of the valley fill the acoustic response revealed an absent or weakly laminated stratigraphy, whereas areas of high oyster productivity produced mounds, strong surface returns, and strong, shallow subsurface reflectors surrounding current oyster reefs. Anthropogenic features imaged with the sonar included sediment disruptions, such as the ship channels, dredge holes, gouges, and trawl marks, as well as debris, such as submerged boats, pipes, and unidentified objects.

Maddox, Donald Shea

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

SAFARI 2000 Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAFARI 2000 (S.Africa) SAFARI 2000 (S.Africa) The SAFARI 2000 (S2K) Project Overview [SAFARI 2000 Logo] The SAFARI 2000 (S2K) Project was an international science initiative to study the linkages between land and atmosphere processes in the southern African region. In addition, SAFARI 2000 examined the relationship of biogenic, pyrogenic, and anthropogenic emissions and the consequences of their deposition to the functioning of the biogeophysical and biogeochemical systems. This initiative began in 1999 and concluded in 2001, and was built around a number of ongoing, already-funded activities by NASA, the international community, and African nations in the southern African region. Historical data from 1973 through 1995 were compiled as background data. The ORNL DAAC SAFARI 2000 Data archive includes 109 data products from the

246

Simulations of the global carbon cycle and anthropogenic CO{sub 2} transient. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This research focuses on improving the understanding of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide transient using observations and models of the past and present. In addition, an attempt is made to develop an ability to predict the future of the carbon cycle in response to continued anthropogenic perturbations and climate change. Three aspects of the anthropogenic carbon budget were investigated: (1) the globally integrated budget at the present time; (2) the time history of the carbon budget; and (3) the spatial distribution of carbon fluxes. One of the major activities of this study was the participation in the model comparison study of Enting, et al. [1994] carried out in preparation for the IPCC 1994 report.

Sarmiento, J.L.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Addendum to Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project: Additiona NH3, NOx, and CO Testing Results  

SciTech Connect

On March 28-30 and May 1-4, 2007, CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-MW Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The testing in March and May demonstrated that the multi-pollutant control system attained its performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, acid gas (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF) removal efficiency, and mercury removal efficiency. However, the ammonia slip measured between the SCR outlet and air heater inlet was consistently greater than the guarantee of 2 ppmvd {at} 3% O{sub 2}. As a result, additional testing was performed on May 30-June 1 and on June 20-21, 2007, in conjunction with tuning of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system by BPEI, in an effort to achieve the performance target for ammonia slip. This additional testing occurred after the installation of a large particle ash (LPA) screen and removal system just above the SCR reactor and a fresh SCR catalyst layer in mid-May. This report describes the results of the additional tests. During the May 30-June 1 sampling period, CONSOL R&D and Clean Air Engineering (CAE) each measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet, downstream of the in-duct SCR reactor. In addition, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the economizer outlet, upstream of the SCR reactor, and CAE measured flue gas NO{sub x} and CO concentrations at the sampling grids located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor. During the June 20-21 sampling period, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet. All ammonia measurements were performed using a modified version of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Conditional Test Method (CTM) 027. The NO{sub x} and CO measurements were performed using U.S. EPA Methods 7E and 10, respectively.

Daniel P. Connell; James E. Locke

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Chemical characteristics of material released during Source Term Experiments Project (STEP) in-pile tests: Part 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of four experiments aimed at characterizing the radiological source term associated with postulated severe light water reactor (LWR) accidents has been conducted at Argonne's Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). The STEP tests drove fuel elements to the point of severe cladding disruption in steam environments by fission heating and oxidation of the Zircaloy cladding. The released fission products and volatile cladding constituents entrained in the steam/hydrogen flows were captured by the test vehicles' sampling systems and analyzed by SEM/EDX. The principal constituents of the deposits were fission product cesium, molybdenum and rubidium, and tin from the cladding. Iodine was generally seen collocated with cesium, although lone iodine deposits were observed indicating that the iodine was not completely transported as CsI. Structural material was also observed. The composition information in conjunction with counted particle distributions were used to determine the particle loading of that portion of the material released during the first test that was transported in aerosol form.

Schlenger, B.J.; Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Simms, R.; Horton, E.L.; Baker, L. Jr.; Ritzman, R.L.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Alternative Fuel Evaluation Program: Alternative Fuel Light Duty Vehicle Project - Data collection responsibilities, techniques, and test procedures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the data gathering and analysis procedures that support the US Department of Energy's implementation of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. Specifically, test procedures, analytical methods, and data protocols are covered. The aim of these collection and analysis efforts, as mandated by AMFA, is to demonstrate the environmental, economic, and performance characteristics of alternative transportation fuels.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Alternative Fuel Evaluation Program: Alternative Fuel Light Duty Vehicle Project - Data collection responsibilities, techniques, and test procedures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the data gathering and analysis procedures that support the US Department of Energy`s implementation of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. Specifically, test procedures, analytical methods, and data protocols are covered. The aim of these collection and analysis efforts, as mandated by AMFA, is to demonstrate the environmental, economic, and performance characteristics of alternative transportation fuels.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUMNER SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS Project Number DE-FE0006821 W. Lynn Watney Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Fountainview Wednesday 8-21-12 1:10-1:35 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Small Scale Field Test Wellington Field Regional Assessment of deep saline Arbuckle aquifer Acknowledgements & Disclaimer Acknowledgements * The work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Grant DE-FE0002056 and DE- FE0006821, W.L. Watney and Jason Rush, Joint PIs. Project is managed and

252

Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid: Some prototype studies conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site for the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect

Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid has been conducted in the G Tunnel Underground Facility (GTUF) at the Nevada Test Site. This work is part of the prototype investigations of hydrogeology for the Yucca Mountain Project. The work is being conducted to develop methods and procedures that will be used at the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Site, a candidate site for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository, during the site characterization phase of the investigations. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting this prototype testing under the guidance of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and in conjunction with Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Company (REECo), the drilling contractor. 7 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Chornack, M.P. [Geological Survey, Las Vegas, NV (USA); French, C.A. [Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Las Vegas, NV (USA)

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Work plan for transition of SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this effort is to transfer operating and maintenance responsibility for the 241-SY-101 data acquisition and control system (DACS-1) from Los Alamos National Laboratory to Westinghouse Hanford Company. This work plan defines the tasks required for a successful turnover. It identifies DACS-1 transition, deliverables, responsible organizations and individuals, interfaces, cost, and schedule. The transition plan will discuss all required hardware, software, documentation, maintenance, operations, and training for use at Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101. The transfer of responsibilities for DACS-1 to WHC is contingent on final approval of applicable Acceptance for Beneficial Use documentation by Waste Tank Operations. The DACS-1 was designed to provide data monitoring, display, and storage for Tank 241-SY-101. The DACS-1 also provides alarm and control of all the hydrogen mitigation testing systems, as well as ancillary systems and equipment (HVAC, UPS, etc.) required to achieve safe and reliable operation of the testing systems in the tank.

McClees, J.; Truitt, R.W.

1994-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

254

Computer system design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Description of the Proposed Activity/REPORTABLE OCCURRENCE or PIAB: This ECN changes the computer systems design description support document describing the computers system used to control, monitor and archive the processes and outputs associated with the Hydrogen Mitigation Test Pump installed in SY-101. There is no new activity or procedure associated with the updating of this reference document. The updating of this computer system design description maintains an agreed upon documentation program initiated within the test program and carried into operations at time of turnover to maintain configuration control as outlined by design authority practicing guidelines. There are no new credible failure modes associated with the updating of information in a support description document. The failure analysis of each change was reviewed at the time of implementation of the Systems Change Request for all the processes changed. This document simply provides a history of implementation and current system status.

Ermi, A.M.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

System Design Description for the SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the hardware and software of the computer subsystems for the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, The original system was designed and implemented by LANL, supplied to WHC, and turned over to LMHC for operation. In 1999, the hardware and software were upgraded to provide a state-of-the-art, Year-2000 compliant system.

ERMI, A.M.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

256

Effect of Observational Sampling Error on the Detection of Anthropogenic Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of sampling error in surface air temperature observations is assessed for detection and attribution of an anthropogenic signal. This error arises because grid-box values are based on varying densities of station and marine data. An ...

Gabriele C. Hegerl; Philip D. Jones; Tim P. Barnett

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Distinguishing the Roles of Natural and Anthropogenically Forced Decadal Climate Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given that over the course of the next 10–30 years the magnitude of natural decadal variations may rival that of anthropogenically forced climate change on regional scales, it is envisioned that initialized decadal predictions will provide ...

Amy Solomon; Lisa Goddard; Arun Kumar; James Carton; Clara Deser; Ichiro Fukumori; Arthur M. Greene; Gabriele Hegerl; Ben Kirtman; Yochanan Kushnir; Matthew Newman; Doug Smith; Dan Vimont; Tom Delworth; Gerald A. Meehl; Timothy Stockdale

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Simulating the Regional Impacts of Urbanization and Anthropogenic Heat Release on Climate across China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Together with economic development and accelerated urbanization, the urban population in China has been increasing rapidly, and anthropogenic heat released by large-scale energy consumption in cities is expected to be a vital factor affecting the ...

Jin-Ming Feng; Yong-Li Wang; Zhu-Guo Ma; Yong-He Liu

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

An “A-Train” Strategy for Quantifying Direct Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document outlines a practical strategy for achieving an observationally based quantification of direct climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols. The strategy involves a four-step program for shifting the current assumption-laden estimates ...

Theodore L. Anderson; Robert J. Charlson; Nicolas Bellouin; Olivier Boucher; Mian Chin; Sundar A. Christopher; Jim Haywood; Yoram J. Kaufman; Stefan Kinne; John A. Ogren; Lorraine A. Remer; Toshihiko Takemura; Didier Tanré; Omar Torres; Charles R. Trepte; Bruce A. Wielicki; David M. Winker; Hongbin Yu

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Climatic effects of 1950–2050 changes in US anthropogenic aerosols – Part 2: Climate response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the climate response to changing US anthropogenic aerosol sources over the 1950–2050 period by using the NASA GISS general circulation model (GCM) and comparing to observed US temperature trends. Time-dependent ...

Leibensperger, Eric Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

If anthropogenic CO2 emissions cease, will atmospheric CO2 concentration continue to increase?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If anthropogenic CO2 emissions were to suddenly cease, the evolution of the atmospheric CO2 concentration would depend on the magnitude and sign of natural carbon sources and sinks. Experiments using Earth system models indicate that overall ...

Andrew H. MacDougall; Michael Eby; Andrew J. Weaver

262

Tribology of improved transformation-toughened ceramics-heat engine test. Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A short term study has been carried out to evaluate the suitability as cam roller followers of three ceria zirconia toughened aluminas and two yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconias (YTZPs) previously enhanced in programs supported by ORNL. Norton Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (NBD-100) was also included in this study as a reference material, because it was known from work at Northwestern University that Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} to experienced little or no wear in this application, and NBD-100 is currently a successful commercial bearing material. The tribological studies were subcontracted to the Torrington Company. They found that in cam roller follower simulated tests that there was essentially no wear after 1 hour and 5 hours of testing detectable by weighing and concluded that all of these ceramics are, therefore, candidate materials. Because of the minute amounts of wear it was not possible to identify the wear mechanism or to make any correlations with the other physical properties which were evaluated such as MOR, K{sub IC} hardness, density and grain size. Phase transformation during rolling has been of interest in the tribology of zirconia contain materials. The least stable of the ceria zirconia toughened aluminas resulted in as much as 33% monoclinic phase after testing whereas the yttria stabilized (TTZ) contained very little of this transformed phase. The results of this study show that oxide materials can now be considered as candidates for cam roller followers in heat engines.

Lilley, E.; Rossi, G.A.; Pelletier, P.J. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Cleanup and treatment (CAT) test: a land-area decontamination project utilizing a vacuum method of soil removal  

SciTech Connect

Areas 11 and 13 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are contaminated with varying concentrations of Pu-239, 240 and Am-241. An investigation of a vacuum method of soil removal, the Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test, was conducted over a 3-month period in the plutonium safety shot or Plutonium Valley portion of Area 11. Soil in Plutonium Valley is of the Aridisol Order. The surface 0 to 10 cm is a gravelly loam, and is strongly alkaline (pH 8.8). A large truck-mounted vacuum unit, rather than conventional earth-moving equipment, was used as the primary soil collection unit. Effectiveness of the vacuum method of soil removal was evaluated in relation to conventional earthmoving procedures, particularly in terms of volume reduction of removed soil achieved over conventional techniques. Radiological safety considerations associated with use of the vacuum unit were evaluated in relation to their impact on a full-scale land decontamination program. Environmental and operational impacts of devegetation with retention of root crowns or root systems were investigated. It is concluded that the CAT test was successful under difficult environmental conditions.

Orcutt, J.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Decontamination systems information and research program -- Literature review in support of development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for in situ formed barriers project  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is responsible for approximately 3,000 sites in which contaminants such as carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, perchlorethylene, non-volatile and soluble organic and insoluble organics (PCBs and pesticides) are encountered. In specific areas of these sites radioactive contaminants are stored in underground storage tanks which were originally designed and constructed with a 30-year projected life. Many of these tanks are now 10 years beyond the design life and failures have occurred allowing the basic liquids (ph of 8 to 9) to leak into the unconsolidated soils below. Nearly one half of the storage tanks located at the Hanford Washington Reservation are suspected of leaking and contaminating the soils beneath them. The Hanford site is located in a semi-arid climate region with rainfall of less than 6 inches annually, and studies have indicated that very little of this water finds its way to the groundwater to move the water down gradient toward the Columbia River. This provides the government with time to develop a barrier system to prevent further contamination of the groundwater, and to develop and test remediation systems to stabilize or remove the contaminant materials. In parallel to remediation efforts, confinement and containment technologies are needed to retard or prevent the advancement of contamination plumes through the environment until the implementation of remediation technology efforts are completed. This project examines the various confinement and containment technologies and protocols for testing the materials in relation to their function in-situ.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Computer system design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1). Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides descriptions of components and tasks that are involved in the computer system for the data acquisition and control of the mitigation tests conducted on waste tank SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The system was designed and implemented by Los alamos National Laboratory and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company. The computers (both personal computers and specialized data-taking computers) and the software programs of the system will hereafter collectively be referred to as the DACS (Data Acquisition and Control System).

Truitt, R.W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

266

Evaluation Project 4492  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSA-B-10-0412 Sandia National LaboratoriesNew Mexico (SNLNM) proposes to support the Bio-Response Operational Testing and Evaluation (BOTE) project. The BOTE project would...

267

OPT's Reedsport Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 Single PowerBuoy and DOE Project The scope of the DOE Reedsport Deployment and Ocean Test project (DE-EE0003646) is the installation of a single autonomous PowerBuoy at...

268

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 7. Science Applications, Incorporated field test facility preliminary design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the preliminary design of an SCEAS Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF is a 3600 m/sup 2/ fluid roof greenhouse with an inflated plastic film roof to maintain a clean environment for the fluid roof and to protect the inner glazing from hail and other small missiles. The objective of the design was the faithful scaling of the commercial facility to ensure that the ETF results could be extrapolated to a commercial facility of any size. Therefore, all major features, including the photovoltaic power system, an integral water desalination system and even the basic structural module have been retained. The design is described in substantial detail in the body of this report, with appendices giving the drawings and specifications.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Hawaii geothermal project. Phase III. Well testing and analysis. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Management and geosciences program activities are reviewed briefly. The primary emphasis in geosciences is on continued data analysis and synthesis. The engineering program continued with numerical modelling activities. The HGP-A wellhead assembly has been modified to reduce the noise level, and a new wellhead platform has been built which meets OSHA standards. HGP-A has been flash discharged from January 26 to February 11, 1977 and data obtained for throttled flow conditions by inserting orifices of varied sizes in the discharge line. A second pressure buildup test was run after the well was shut-in. Pressure and temperature profiles have been obtained during discharge and quiescent periods. Reservoir analyses have been made using pressure buildup and drawdown data.

Shupe, J.W.; Helsley, C.E.; Yuen, P.C.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Potential for Induced Seismicity Related to the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project Pilot Test, Solano County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this technical report is to analyze the potential for induced seismicity due to a proposed small-scale CO{sub 2} injection project in the Montezuma Hills. We reviewed currently available public information, including 32 years of recorded seismic events, locations of mapped faults, and estimates of the stress state of the region. We also reviewed proprietary geological information acquired by Shell, including seismic reflection imaging in the area, and found that the data and interpretations used by Shell are appropriate and satisfactory for the purpose of this report. The closest known fault to the proposed injection site is the Kirby Hills Fault. It appears to be active, and microearthquakes as large as magnitude 3.7 have been associated with the fault near the site over the past 32 years. Most of these small events occurred 9-17 miles (15-28 km) below the surface, which is deep for this part of California. However, the geographic locations of the many events in the standard seismicity catalog for the area are subject to considerable uncertainty because of the lack of nearby seismic stations; so attributing the recorded earthquakes to motion along any specific fault is also uncertain. Nonetheless, the Kirby Hills Fault is the closest to the proposed injection site and is therefore our primary consideration for evaluating the potential seismic impacts, if any, from injection. Our planned installation of seismic monitoring stations near the site will greatly improve earthquake location accuracy. Shell seismic data also indicate two unnamed faults more than 3 miles east of the project site. These faults do not reach the surface as they are truncated by an unconformity at a depth of about 2,000 feet (610 m). The unconformity is identified as occurring during the Oligocene Epoch, 33.9-23.03 million years ago, which indicates that these faults are not currently active. Farther east are the Rio Vista Fault and Midland Fault at distances of about 6 miles (10 km) and 10 miles (16 km), respectively. These faults have been identified as active during the Quaternary (last 1.6 million years), but without evidence of displacement during the Holocene (the last 11,700 years). The stress state (both magnitude and direction) in the region is an important parameter in assessing earthquake potential. Although the available information regarding the stress state is limited in the area surrounding the injection well, the azimuth of the mean maximum horizontal stress is estimated at 41{sup o} and it is consistent with strike-slip faulting on the Kirby Hills Fault, unnamed fault segments to the south, and the Rio Vista Fault. However, there are large variations (uncertainty) in stress estimates, leading to low confidence in these conclusions regarding which fault segments are optimally oriented for potential slip induced by pressure changes. Uncertainty in the stress state can be substantially reduced by measurements planned when wells are drilled at the site. Injection of CO{sub 2} at about two miles depth will result in a reservoir fluid pressure increase, which is greatest at the well and decreases with distance from the well. After the injection stops, reservoir fluid pressures will decrease rapidly. Pressure changes have been predicted quantitatively by numerical simulation models of the injection. Based on these models, the pressure increase on the Kirby Hills Fault at its closest approach to the well due to the injection of 6,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} would be a few pounds per square inch (psi), which is a tiny fraction of the natural pressure of approximately 5,000 psi at that depth. The likelihood of such a small pressure increase triggering a slip event is very small. It is even more unlikely that events would be induced at the significantly greater depths where most of the recorded earthquakes are concentrated, because it is unlikely that such a small pressure pulse would propagate downwards any appreciable distance. Therefore, in response to the specific question of the likelihood of the CO{sub 2} injection caus

Myer, L.; Chiaramonte, L.; Daley, T.M.; Wilson, D.; Foxall, W.; Beyer, J.H.

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Mississippi CCS Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mississippi CCS Project is a proposed large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which would have demonstrated advanced technologies to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically, the Mississippi CCS Project was to accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petcoke to Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) plant that is selected for a Federal Loan Guarantee and would be the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Mississippi CCS Project was to promote the expansion of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana region which would supply greater energy security through increased domestic energy production. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure would have continued to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project were expected to be fulfilled through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 included the studies that establish the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the MG SNG Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Soso oil field in Mississippi. The overall objective of Phase 2, was to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, the Mississippi CO{sub 2} Pipeline to Denbury's Free State Pipeline, and an MVA system at the Soso oil field.

Doug Cathro

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

System design description for the SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is no new activity or procedure associated with the updating of this reference document. The updating of this system design description maintains an agreed upon documentation program initiated within the test program and carried into operations at time of turnover to maintain configuration control as outlined by design authority practicing guidelines. Any changes made to controlled components in the field will be updated after the time of implementation to support the engineers and operators understand, maintain, train to and operate the system. There are no new credible failure modes associated with the updating of information in a support description document. The failure analysis of each change was reviewed at the time of implementation of the Systems Change Request for all the processes changed. This document simply provides a history of implementation and current system status. The incorporation of the two documents, Computer Systems Design Description (HNF-SD-WMCSDD-008) and the Input/Output Channel List (HNF-SD-WM-EL-001), as appendices allow for fewer errors in changes. Because the documents are all together, they will be approved as one document, not three separate entities which could be updated at different times, creating a situation which does not accurately depict field conditions.

Ermi, A.M.

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

273

Climate response of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equilibrium climate response to the total effects (direct, indirect and semi-direct effects) of aerosols arising from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions on the South Asian summer monsoon system is studied using a coupled atmosphere-slab ocean model. Our results suggest that anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols generally induce a reduction in mean summer monsoon precipitation over most parts of the Indian subcontinent, strongest along the western coastline of the Indian peninsula and eastern Nepal region, but modest increases also occur over the north western part of the subcontinent. While most of the noted reduction in precipitation is triggered by increased emissions of aerosols from anthropogenic activities, modest increases in the north west are mostly associated with decreases in local emissions of aerosols from forest fire and grass fire sources. Anthropogenic aerosols from outside Asia also contribute to the overall reduction in precipitation but the dominant contribution comes from aerosol sources within Asia. Local emissions play a more important role in the total rainfall response to anthropogenic aerosol sources during the early monsoon period, whereas both local as well as remote emissions of aerosols play almost equally important roles during the later part of the monsoon period. While precipitation responses are primarily driven by local aerosol forcing, regional surface temperature changes over the region are strongly influenced by anthropogenic aerosols from sources further away (non-local changes). Changes in local anthropogenic organic and black carbon emissions by as much as a factor of two (preserving their ratio) produce the same basic signatures in the model's summer monsoon temperature and precipitation responses.

Ganguly, Dilip; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

274

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracer for Tracking Permanent CO 2 Storage in Basaltic Rocks DE-FE0004847 Jennifer Hall Columbia University in the City of New York U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Conservative and Reactive Tracer Techniques * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The goal of the project is to develop and test novel geochemical tracer techniques for quantitative monitoring, verification and accounting of stored CO 2 . These techniques contribute to the Carbon Storage Program's

275

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS DE-FE0006821 W. Lynn Watney, Jason Rush, Joint PIs Kansas Geological Survey The University of Kansas Lawrence, KS U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Brighton 1&2 Wednesday 8-21-13 1:10-1:35 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 2 Small Scale Field Test Wellington Field Regional Assessment of deep saline Arbuckle aquifer Project Team DOE-NETL Contract #FE0006821 KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 3 L. Watney (Joint PI), J. Rush (Joint PI), J. Doveton, E. Holubnyak, M. Fazelalavi, R. Miller, D. Newell, J. Raney

276

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Geological CO Monitoring Geological CO 2 Sequestration using Perfluorocarbon and Stable Isotope Tracers Project Number FEAA-045 Tommy J. Phelps and David R. Cole* Oak Ridge National Laboratory Phone: 865-574-7290 email: phelpstj@ornl.gov (*The Ohio State University) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 22, 2013 2 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Goal: Develop methods to interrogate subsurface for improved CO 2 sequestration, field test characterization and MVA, demonstrate CO 2 remains in zone, and tech transfer. Objectives: 1. Assessment of injections in field. PFT gas tracers are analyzed by GC-ECD to

277

Testing Distributed Parameter Hypotheses for the Detection of Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general statistical methodology, based on testing alternative distributed parameter hypotheses, is proposed as a method for deciding whether or not anthropogenic influences are causing climate change. This methodology provides a framework for ...

Haroon S. Kheshgi; Benjamin S. White

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Diurnal tracking of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diurnal tracking of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin Diurnal tracking of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin megacity during spring 2010 Title Diurnal tracking of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin megacity during spring 2010 Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Newman, Sally, Seongeun Jeong, Marc L. Fischer, Xiaomei Xu, Christine L. Haman, Barry Lefer, Sergio Alvarez, Bernhard Rappenglueck, Eric A. Kort, Arlyn E. Andrews, Jeffrey Peischl, Kevin R. Gurney, Charles E. Miller, and Yuk L. Yung Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 13 Pagination 4359-4372 Abstract Attributing observed CO2 variations to human or natural cause is critical to deducing and tracking emissions from observations. We have used in situ CO2, CO, and planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) measurements recorded during the CalNex-LA (CARB et al., 2008) ground campaign of 15 May-15 June 2010, in Pasadena, CA, to deduce the diurnally varying anthropogenic component of observed CO2 in the megacity of Los Angeles (LA). This affordable and simple technique, validated by carbon isotope observations and WRF-STILT (Weather Research and Forecasting model - Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model) predictions, is shown to robustly attribute observed CO2 variation to anthropogenic or biogenic origin over the entire diurnal cycle. During CalNex-LA, local fossil fuel combustion contributed up to ~50% of the observed CO2 enhancement overnight, and ~100% of the enhancement near midday. This suggests that sufficiently accurate total column CO2 observations recorded near midday, such as those from the GOSAT or OCO-2 satellites, can potentially be used to track anthropogenic emissions from the LA megacity.

279

Anthropogenic and natural contributions to regional trends in aerosol optical depth, 1980-2006.  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the roles of human and natural sources in contributing to aerosol concentrations around the world is an important step toward developing efficient and effective mitigation measures for local and regional air quality degradation and climate change. In this study we test the hypothesis that changes in aerosol optical depth (AOD) over time are caused by the changing patterns of anthropogenic emissions of aerosols and aerosol precursors. We present estimated trends of contributions to AOD for eight world regions from 1980 to 2006, built upon a full run of the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model for the year 2001, extended in time using trends in emissions of man-made and natural sources. Estimated AOD trends agree well (R > 0.5) with observed trends in surface solar radiation in Russia, the United States, south Asia, southern Africa, and East Asia (before 1992) but less well for Organization for Economic Co-operative Development (OECD) Europe (R < 0.5). The trends do not agree well for southeast Asia and for East Asia (after 1992) where large-scale inter- and intraannual variations in emissions from forest fires, volcanic eruptions, and dust storms confound our approach. Natural contributions to AOD, including forest and grassland fires, show no significant long-term trends (<1%/a), except for a small increasing trend in OECD Europe and a small decreasing trend in South America. Trends in man-made contributions to AOD follow the changing patterns of industrial and economic activity. We quantify the average contributions of key source types to regional AOD over the entire time period.

Streets, D. G.; Yan, F.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Mahowald, N.; Schultz, M.; Wild, M.; Wu, Y.; Yu, C.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Illinois; NASA; Cornell Univ.; Forschungszentrum; Inst.for Atmospheric and Climate Science; Tsinghua Univ.

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

280

Anthropogenic NO2 in the Atmosphere: Estimates of the Column Content and Radiative Forcing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anthropogenic NO Anthropogenic NO 2 in the Atmosphere: Estimates of the Column Content and Radiative Forcing A. N. Rublev Institution of Molecular Physics Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute Moscow, Russia N Chubarova Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University Moscow, Russia G. Gorchakov Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia Introduction The work summarizes the different methodical aspects, firstly, the use of atmosphere optical depths presented in Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data for NO 2 column retrievals, and, secondly, its radiative forcing calculated as difference between integral solar fluxes absorbed in the atmosphere with and without NO 2 under given air mass or the sun zenith angle.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Estimation of the relationship between remotely sensed anthropogenic heat discharge and building energy use  

SciTech Connect

This paper examined the relationship between remotely sensed anthropogenic heat discharge and energy use from residential and commercial buildings across multiple scales in the city of Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Anthropogenic heat discharge was estimated based on a remote sensing-based surface energy balance model, which was parameterized using land cover, land surface temperature, albedo, and meteorological data. Building energy use was estimated using a GIS-based building energy simulation model in conjunction with Department of Energy/ Energy Information Administration survey data, Assessor's parcel data, GIS floor areas data, and remote sensing-derived building height data.

Zhou, Yuyu; Weng, Qihao; Gurney, Kevin R.; Shuai, Yanmin; Hu, Xuefei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Anthropogenic moisture production and its effect on boundary layer circulations over New York City  

SciTech Connect

A heat and moisture excess over New York City is shown to exist by the analysis of helicopter soundings of temperature and wet bulb depression. The magnitude of the temporal and spatial distribution of anthropogenic moisture emissions in New York City were estimated from fuel usage data. The URBMET urban boundary layer model was used to evaluate the effects on the dynamics of the urban boundary layer resulting from the observed urban moisture excess. Work is currently in progress which seeks to determine the fraction of the observed moisture excess over New York that is due to anthropogenic sources. (auth)

Bornstein, R.D.; Tam, Y.T.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.  

SciTech Connect

Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted region or upstream. Fish were also swimming faster and straighter when the lights were on compared to off. (3) The behavioral results were most pronounced for medium- and large-sized fish at night. Medium-sized fish, based on acoustic target strength, were similar to the size of kokanee and rainbow trout released upstream of Grand Coulee Dam. Based on this study and general review of strobe lights, the researchers recommend several modifications and enhancements to the follow-on study in 2002. The recommendations include: (1) modifying the study design to include only the 24-hr on/off treatments, and controlling the discharge at the third powerplant, so it can be included as a design variable; and (2) providing additional data by beginning the study earlier (mid-May) to better capture the kokanee population, deploying an additional splitbeam transducer to sample the region close to the lights, and increasing the number of lights to provide better definition of the lit and unlit region.

Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chart: project timeline - Project Milestones - Budget - Bibliography * Thank you 29 30 Organization Chart * Project team: Purdue University - Dr. Brenda B. Bowen: PI, student...

286

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, March--November 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program includes six tasks, including (1) a project measuring the performance of unique solar system components, (2) a project to develop a methodology for determining annual performance ratings of solar domestic hot water systems, (3) a project that will identify, analyze, design, build, and experimentally evaluate SDHW systems incorporating advanced concepts and components, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform TRNSYS simulations to determine potential energy savings for desiccant cooling systems, especially in humid climates, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described.

Not Available

1993-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

287

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Kansas Center for Research University of Kansas Center for Research Kansas Geological Survey U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Benefits, objectives, overview * Methods * Background & setting * Technical status * Accomplishments * Summary Benefit to the Program * Program goal addressed: Develop technologies that will support the industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ± 30 percent. * Program goal addressed: This project will confirm - via a horizontal test boring - whether fracture attributes derived from 3-D seismic PSDM Volumetric Curvature (VC) processing are real. If

288

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and objectives * Carbon reactivity studies * Catalyst mechanism studies * Catalyst development * Test results * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: Reduce CO 2 emissions by developing beneficial uses that meet the DOE net cost metric of $10/MT for captured CO 2 that will mitigate CO 2 emissions in areas where geological storage may not be an optimal solution * Benefits statement: Development of a commercial process for converting CO 2 and a carbon source into a commodity chemical at a

289

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigating the Fundamental Investigating the Fundamental Scientific Issues Affecting the Long-term Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide Project Number DE-FE0000397 Lee H Spangler Energy Research Institute Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Computational tool development * Laboratory studies to understand subsurface CO 2 behavior * Analog studies to inform risk analysis * Near surface detection technologies / testing * Mitigation method development 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

290

Project240  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Takashi Nakamura Takashi Nakamura Principal Investigator Physical Sciences, Inc. 20 New England Business Court Andover, MA 01810 925-743-1110 nakamura@psicorp.com Sequestration RECOVERY AND SEQUESTRATION OF CO 2 FROM STATIONARY COMBUSTION SYSTEMS BY PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF MICROALGAE Background Most anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic CO 2 . Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. A large-scale photo bioreactor would be similar to a large display of solar panels, except instead of producing electricity, the

291

Recent trends in anthropogenic mercury emission in the northeast United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] We note that the consumption data included in our study represent the entire energy sector% decrease in emission between 1999/2000 and 2003/2004, although the rate has increased since 2001/2002. Air United States is characterized by the highest regional anthropogenic Hg flux density in the country, due

Lee, Xuhui

292

Abstract The savannas (cerrado) of south-central Brazil are currently subjected to frequent anthropogenic burning,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anthropogenic burning, causing widespread reduction in tree density. Increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO2 could reduce the im- pact of such frequent burning by increasing the availabili- ty CO2 and at two nutrient levels. To simulate burning, the plants were either clipped at 15 weeks

Jackson, Robert B.

293

Manhattan Project: Library  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

LIBRARY LIBRARY Resources A number of government publications relating to the Manhattan Project are available either as web pages or as .pdf documents. Cover of the Manhattan Project publication Department of Energy Publications Fehner and Gosling, Origins of the Nevada Test Site Fehner and Gosling, Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site Gosling, Manhattan Project, 1999 Gosling, Manhattan Project, 2010 Harnessed Atom United States Nuclear Tests, 1945-1992 Wahlen, History of 100-B Area Los Alamos National Laboratory Publications Bainbridge, Trinity Fakley, "The British Mission" Hawkins, MDH: Project Y, Vol. 1 Los Alamos: Beginning of an Era, 1943-1945 Malik, Yields of Hiroshima and Nagasaki "Oppenheimer Years" Serber, Los Alamos Primer Truslow, MDH: Project Y, Vol. 2

294

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a 3-day block throughout the study period. Hydroacoustic technology was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The hydroacoustic system in 2003 comprised seven splitbeam transducers arrayed in front of the strobe lights, two multibeam transducers behind the lights, and a mobile splitbeam system. The seven splitbeam transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. These transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on an aluminum frame floating upstream of the barge and looked vertically downward. The multibeam transducers monitored the distribution of fish directly behind and to both sides of the lights, while the mobile splitbeam system looked at the distribution of fish within the third powerplant forebay. To augment the hydroacoustic data, additional studies were conducted. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the third powerplant forebay were measured, and acoustically tagged juvenile kokanee were released upstream of the strobe lights and tracked within the forebay and downstream of the dam. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on kokanee and rainbow trout focused on the number of fish detected in each of the areas covered by one of the downlooking transducers, the timing of fish arrivals after the status of the strobe lights changed, fish swimming effort (detected velocity minus flow velocity), and fish swimming direction. Water velocity measurements were used to determine fish swimming effort. The tracking of tagged kokanee provided data on fish movements into and out of the third powerplant forebay, including entrainment.

Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The Lake Charles CCS Project  

SciTech Connect

The Lake Charles CCS Project is a large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which will demonstrate advanced technologies that capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically the Lake Charles CCS Project will accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petroleum coke to chemicals plant (the LCC Gasification Project) and the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Lake Charles CCS Project will promote the expansion of EOR in Texas and Louisiana and supply greater energy security by expanding domestic energy supplies. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure will continue to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project are expected to be fulfilled by working through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 includes the studies attached hereto that will establish: the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the LCC Gasification Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Hastings oil field in Texas. The overall objective of Phase 2, provided a successful competitive down-selection, is to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: (1) the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, (2) a Connector Pipeline from the LLC Gasification Project to the Green Pipeline owned by Denbury and an affiliate of Denbury, and (3) a comprehensive MVA system at the Hastings oil field.

Doug Cathro

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Anthropogenic Disturbance of Western Gray Whale Behavior Off Sakhalin Island, Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

he western North Pacific population of gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) is critically endangered of extinction. The population size is estimated to be 131 individuals with 31 reproductive females. Throughout their potential home range, the western gray whale population face several threats to their future survival. On their only known feeding grounds off the northeastern coast of Sakhalin Island, Russia, anthropogenic activity has increased in the past decade due to oil and gas exploration and platform/pipeline construction. This dissertation examines the influences of geophysical seismic surveys (pulse sounds) and platform/pipeline installation (continuous sounds). Each chapter progressively improves upon behavioral models that assess changes in gray whale movements and respirations relative to anthropogenic activity. Theodolite tracking and focal follow methodologies were employed to collect gray whales' movement and respiration information during and in the absence of anthropogenic activity. Spatial, temporal, environmental, and acoustic (pulse and/or continuous) sound levels and non-sound related anthropogenic variables were included as explanatory variables to examine their influence on movement and respiration response variables, such as speed, orientations, dive/surface time, breathing rates, etc. During the 3-D seismic activity, gray whales traveled faster, changed directions of movement less, were recorded farther from shore and stayed underwater longer between respirations as the received sound level exposure increased. During platform/pipeline installations, western gray whales increased their distance from shore with indicators of stress (rapid breathing) and observed to be sensitive to close distance of approach by vessels. No acoustic influence on western gray whale behavior was found during a 4-D seismic survey; however, sample sizes were small in this study to sufficiently detect more subtle to moderate changes in gray whale behavior. These studies illustrate short-term influences anthropogenic activity had on western gray whale behavior which could lead to longer-term responses that may be detrimental to the survival of certain individuals and/or the population. A comprehensive analyses are proposed to increase sample sizes to identify subtle to moderate behavioral changes as well as examine alternative hypotheses to the null hypothesis of no impact used in this dissertation. With the potential to displace individuals/population out of critical feeding habitats needed for their annual survival and the expected increase of anthropogenic activity in the future, this dissertation highlights the importance to monitor and identify problems and suggest alternatives to development/activities that may be impacting this endangered population of gray whales.

Gailey, Glenn Andrew

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Project Accounts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Project Accounts » Project Accounts Project Accounts Overview Project accounts are designed to facilitate collaborative computing by allowing multiple users to use the same account. All actions performed by the project account are traceable back to the individual who used the project account to perform those actions via gsisshd accounting logs. Requesting a Project Account PI's, PI proxies and project managers are allowed to request a project account. In NIM do "Actions->Request a Project Account" and fill in the form. Select the repository that the Project Account is to use from the drop-down menu, "Sponsoring Repository". Enter the name you want for the account (8 characters maximum) and a description of what you will use the account for and then click on the "Request Project Account" button. You

298

Heterogeneous nucleation of ice on anthropogenic organic particles collected in Mexico City  

SciTech Connect

This study reports on heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of predominantly organic (or coated with organic material) anthropogenic particles sampled within and around the polluted environment of Mexico City. The onset of heterogeneous ice nucleation was observed as a function of particle temperature (Tp), relative humidity (RH), nucleation mode, and particle chemical composition which is influenced by photochemical atmospheric aging. Particle analyses included computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). In contrast to most laboratory studies employing proxies of organic aerosol, we show that anthropogenic organic particles collected in Mexico City can potentially induce ice nucleation at experimental conditions relevant to cirrus formation. The results suggest a new precedent for the potential impact of organic particles on ice cloud formation and climate.

Knopf, D.A.; Wang, B.; Laskin, A.; Moffet, R.C.; Gilles, M.K.

2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

299

System verification and validation plan for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1). Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document outlines the system verification and validation plan for the SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS), covering the operation and maintenance phase of the project life cycle

Ermi, A.M.; Gauck, G.J.; Smith, S.O.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Significance of Pre-Industrial and Older Anthropogenic Sources of Mercury in Ichawaynochaway Creek Watershed, Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to concerns about elevated levels of mercury in fish tissue, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed mercury Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL), which is a calculation of the maximum amount of mercury a waterbody can assimilate without exceeding the applicable water quality standard. These calculations assume that >99% of mercury load to the aquatic systems is derived from recent atmospheric deposition and that older anthropogenic mercury or mercury from terrestrial sources...

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Project 244  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROJECT PARTNER Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. Pittsburgh, PA PROJECT PARTNERS Ohio University Athens, OH Texas A&M University-Kingsville Kingsville, TX WEBSITES http:...

302

Projects | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Conferences Supporting Organizations Supercomputing and Computation Home | Science & Discovery | Supercomputing and Computation | Projects Projects 1-10 of 180 Results Prev...

303

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit...

304

Fast and Slow Responses of the South Asian Monsoon System to Anthropogenic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a global climate model with fully predictive aerosol life cycle, we investigate the fast and slow responses of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Our results show that the feedbacks associated with sea surface temperature (SST) change caused by aerosols play a more important role than the aerosol's direct impact on radiation, clouds and land surface (rapid adjustments) in shaping the total equilibrium climate response of the monsoon system to aerosol forcing. Inhomogeneous SST cooling caused by anthropogenic aerosols eventually reduces the meridional tropospheric temperature gradient and the easterly shear of zonal winds over the region, slowing down the local Hadley cell circulation, decreasing the northward moisture transport, and causing a reduction in precipitation over South Asia. Although total responses in precipitation are closer to the slow responses in general, the fast component dominates over land areas north of 25°N. Our results also show an east-west asymmetry in the fast responses to anthropogenic aerosols causing increases in precipitation west of 80°E but decreases east of it.

Ganguly, Dilip; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

305

Exploring the Interplay between Natural Decadal Variability and Anthropogenic Climate Change in Summer Rainfall over China. Part I: Observational Evidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summer rainfall over China has experienced substantial variability on longer time scales during the last century, and the question remains whether this is due to natural, internal variability or is part of the emerging signal of anthropogenic ...

Yonghui Lei; Brian Hoskins; Julia Slingo

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Regression-based estimates of the rate of accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 in the ocean: A fresh look  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

those from repeated hydro- graphic surveys, such as might be provided by appropriately instrumented, as oceanic car- bon's natural spatial and temporal variability is larger than the expected anthropogenic

307

Evolution of Anthropogenic Pb and Pb isotopes in the deep North Atlantic Ocean and the Indian Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pb and Pb isotopes in the ocean have varied on decadal to centennial time scales due to anthropogenic Pb inputs. Thus, tracing the temporal variation of Pb and Pb isotopes in the ocean provides information on the major ...

Lee, Jong-Mi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The effect of anthropogenic development on sediment loading to bays on St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to assess the impact of anthropogenic development on sediment delivery rates to bays on St. John, U.S.V.I., I developed a sediment loading prediction model. Based on the modified universal soil loss equation, this ...

McCreery, Helen F

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Exploring the value proposition of integrating back-up saline storage into anthropogenic CO? supplied EOR operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) through carbon dioxide (CO?) sequestration from anthropogenic sources has been gaining attention in policy circles. In particular, it is viewed as a potential way to help accelerate the deployment ...

Toukan, Ibrahim (Ibrahim Khaled)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

General Circulation Model Calculations of the Direct Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Sulfate and Fossil-Fuel Soot Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new radiation code within a general circulation model is used to assess the direct solar and thermal radiative forcing by sulfate aerosol of anthropogenic origin and soot aerosol from fossil-fuel burning. The radiative effects of different ...

J. M. Haywood; D. L. Roberts; A. Slingo; J. M. Edwards; K. P. Shine

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Simulation of Late-Twenty-First-Century Changes in Wintertime Atmospheric Circulation over Europe Due to Anthropogenic Causes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence is presented, based on an ensemble of climate change scenarios performed with a global general circulation model of the atmosphere with high horizontal resolution over Europe, to suggest that the end-of-century anthropogenic climate ...

Laurent Terray; Marie-Estelle Demory; Michel Déqué; Gaelle de Coetlogon; Eric Maisonnave

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Climatic effects of 1950–2050 changes in US anthropogenic aerosols – Part 1: Aerosol trends and radiative forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model combined with the GISS general circulation model to calculate the aerosol direct and indirect (warm cloud) radiative forcings from US anthropogenic sources over the 1950–2050 ...

Leibensperger, Eric Michael

313

Project311  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lang Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov John Bowser Principal Investigator Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. 325 Water Street Wilmington, DE 19804 302-999-7996 john.bowser@compactmembrane.com Sequestration CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM LARGE POINT SOURCES Background Capture of carbon dioxide at the source of its emission has been a major focus in greenhouse gas emission control. Current technologies used for capturing CO 2 suffer from inefficient mass transfer and economics. In Phase I, Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. will fabricate and test a membrane-based absorption system for the removal of carbon dioxide from a simulated power-plant flue gas. The stability of the membrane system under various operating conditions

314

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

® ® © 2012 Paulsson, Inc. (PI) Development of a 1,000 Level 3C Fiber Optic Borehole Seismic Receiver Array Applied to Carbon Sequestration DE-FE0004522 Björn N.P. Paulsson Paulsson, Inc. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 ® © 2012 Paulsson, Inc. (PI) © 2012 Paulsson, Inc. (PI) * Goals: Design, build, and test a high performance borehole seismic receiver system to allow cost effective geologic Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) * Objectives: A: Develop technology to allow deployment of a 1,000 level drill pipe deployed 3C Fiber Optic Geophone (FOG) receiver array for deep

315

Project 370  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

crshadd@sandia.gov crshadd@sandia.gov O 2 /CO 2 RECYCLE COAL COMBUSTION TO MINIMIZE POLLUTANTS Description O 2 /CO 2 recycle coal combustion is a promising, retrofittable technique for electric power production, while producing a nearly pure stream of CO 2 for subsequent use or sequestration. Most pollutant emissions, including NO x , are lower in this process, compared to conventional pulverized coal combustion. However, laboratory and pilot-scale tests to date have shown a wide variation in the fractional reduction of NO x when adopting this technology, suggesting that further improvements in NO x reduction are possible, given a better understanding of the dominant routes of NO x production and destruction in these systems. Goals The goal of this project is to determine the relative influence of three different

316

Project 261  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOVEL CORROSION SENSOR FOR ADVANCED NOVEL CORROSION SENSOR FOR ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY POWER SYSTEMS Description The overall objective of this proposed project is to develop a new technology for on-line corrosion monitoring based on an innovative concept. The specific objectives and corresponding tasks are (1) develop the sensor and electronic measurement system; (2) evaluate and improve the system in a laboratory muffle furnace; and (3) evaluate and improve the system through tests conducted in a pilot-scale coal combustor (~1 MW). Fireside corrosion refers to the metal loss caused by chemical reactions on surfaces exposed to the combustion environment. Such corrosion is the leading mechanism for boiler tube failures and is a serious concern for current and future energy plants due to the introduction of technologies targeting emissions

317

Test plan for glass melter system technologies for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste, Project No. RDD-43288  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a test plan for the conduct of combustion fired cyclone vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, Low-Level Waste Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it is the Babcock & Wilcox Company Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. This vendor is one of seven selected for glass melter testing.

Higley, B.A.

1995-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

NREL: Wind Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Projects NREL's wind energy research and development projects focus on reducing the cost of wind technology and expanding access to wind energy sites. Our specialized technical expertise, comprehensive design and analysis tools, and unique testing facilities help industry overcome challenges to bringing new wind technology to the marketplace. Some of these success stories are described in NREL's Wind R&D Success Stories. We also work closely with universities and other national laboratories supporting fundamental research in wind technologies, including aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, and material sciences essential in the development of new blade technologies and advanced controls, power electronics, and testing to further refine drivetrain topology.

319

Manhattan Project: Maps  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

MAPS MAPS Resources Scroll down to view thumbnails of each map. Leslie Groves looks at a map of Japan. Manhattan Project: General Manhattan Project Facilities Places map "Signature Facilities of the MED" map Hanford Hanford map Hanford (black and white) map Hanford Site Diagram Hanford Site Location Map Hanford: Native Peoples map Hanford: Town map Los Alamos Map of Los Alamos, New Mexico Los Alamos: "Tech Area" map Oak Ridge Map of Clinton Engineer Works, Oak Ridge Clinton Engineer Works, Oak Ridge (black and white) map Oak Ridge: Projected Site for Atomic Production Plants, 1942, map Other Flight paths for Hiroshima and Nagasaki missions map Map of the Trinity Test Site Post-War U.S. Nuclear Tests map Manhattan Project Facilities Manhattan Project Facilities

320

Test building instrumentation cooperative agreement: heating/daylighting prototype development. Phase II. Passive and hybrid solar manufactured building project. Project status report No. 2, April 16, 1980-March 16, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the test building instrumentation and problems encountered are described. An instrumentation trip report is presented dealing with installation of data acquisition systems, roof and roll runner building. (MCW)

Lindsey, L.L.; Snyder, M.K.

1981-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NETL: Turbine Projects - Efficiency Improvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Improvemenet Turbine Projects Efficiency Improvemenet Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig DataFact Sheets System Study for Improved Gas Turbine...

322

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Special Projects on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing...

323

BWRVIP-111, Revision 1: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Testing and Evaluation of BWR Supplemental Surveillance Program Capsules E, F, and I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the testing and evaluation of BWR Supplemental Surveillance Program (SSP) capsules E, F and I. These capsules were installed in the Oyster Creek reactor in February 1993 and removed in October 2000. The capsules contained flux wires for neutron fluence measurement, thermal monitors to measure temperature and Charpy test specimens for material property evaluations. The flux wires were evaluated to determine the fluence experienced by the test specimens. Thermal monitors were evaluate...

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

324

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report for the months of April and May 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Colorado State University Solar Energy Applications Laboratory is currently testing several solar domestic hot water heating systems. The experimental systems are fully instrumented to yield data appropriate for in-depth analyses of performance. Indoor testing of the horizontal-tank thermosyphon system under investigation has been completed. Current work involves outdoor testing of the system and further analysis of the heat exchanger calculations used in the TRNSYS model of the system.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, June--July 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes activities of the Colorado State program for developing, testing, evaluating, and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems during the months of June and July, 1993.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, March--May 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of heat loss tests for the Integral Collector Storage unit are shown. Work on unique solar system components is summarized briefly.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The whitehouse effect: shortwave radiative forcing of climate by anthropogenic aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Increases in atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other infrared active gases over the industrial period are thought to have increased the average flux of longwave (thermal infrared) radiation between the surface of the earth and the lower atmosphere, leading to an increase in global mean temperature. Over the same period it is though that concentrations of aerosol particles in the troposphere have similarly increased as a consequence of industrial emissions and that these increased concentrations of particles have increased the earth`s reflectivity of shortwave (solar) radiation incident on the planet both directly, by scattering radiation, and indirectly, by increasing the reflectivity of clouds. The term ``whitehouse effect`` is introduced to refer to this increased scattering of shortwave radiation by analogy to the term ``greenhouse effect,`` which refers to the enhanced trapping of longwave radiation resulting from increased concentrations of infrared active gases. Each of these phenomena is referred to as a ``forcing`` of the earth`s climate, that is a secular change imposed on the system; such a forcing is to be distinguished from a ``response`` of the system, such as a change in global mean temperature or other index of global climate. The forcing due to the direct and indirect effects induced by anthropogenic aerosols has been estimated to be comparable in global- average magnitude to that due to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases, but it is of opposite direction, that is exerting a cooling influence. The shortwave radiative influence of anthropogenic aerosols may thus be considered to be offsetting some, perhaps a great fraction, of the longwave radiative influence of anthropogenic greenhouse gases.

Schwartz, S.E.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Project 211  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26507 26507 304-285-4133 dawn.deel@netl.doe.gov Jack C. Pashin Geological Survey of Alabama P.O. Box 869999 Tuscaloosa, AL 35486 205-349-2852 jpashin@gsa.state.al.us Sequestration GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO 2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA Background The amount of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in the Earth's atmosphere has risen substantially since the start of the industrial age. This increase is attributed widely to the burning of fossil fuels, and if current trends in resource utilization continue, anthropogenic CO 2 emissions will triple during the 21st century. Among the principal ways CO 2 emissions from power plants can be addressed is to sequester this greenhouse gas in geologic formations. Within the number of geologic formations that can potentially store CO

329

Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne Science Project Ideas! Our Science Project section provides you with sample classroom projects and experiments, online aids for learning about science, as well as ideas for Science Fair Projects. Please select any project below to continue. Also, if you have an idea for a great project or experiment that we could share, please click our Ideas page. We would love to hear from you! Science Fair Ideas Science Fair Ideas! The best ideas for science projects are learning about and investigating something in science that interests you. NEWTON has a list of Science Fair linkd that can help you find the right topic. Toothpick Bridge Web Sites Toothpick Bridge Sites! Building a toothpick bridge is a great class project for physics and engineering students. Here are some sites that we recommend to get you started!

330

Test Diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a novel method for measuring the degree to which a set of test cases executes a given program in diverse ways with respect to the two fundamental programming concepts: control and data. Test Diversity is a method for measuring the variety of software control flow and data flow, comprising of four new measures: conditional diversity, data diversity, standard deviation of diversity, and test orthogonality. These closely-related measures could be used to evaluate the test effectiveness and the test-effort distribution of a test suite. The Diversity Analyzer is a novel industrial-strength testing tool that can currently perform diversity analysis on software written in C/C++/C#/VB in Windows and.NET environments. The Diversity Analyzer is used to evaluate the fault-detection effectiveness of Test Diversity on various types of industrial projects. Key Words: testing tools, verification, theory, experimentation, conditional diversity, data diversity, standard deviation,

Borislav Nikolik

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Power Projects Contact SN Customers Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > About SNR Power Projects Central Valley: In California's Central Valley, 18 dams create reservoirs that can store 13 million acre-feet of water. The project's 615 miles of canals irrigate an area 400 miles long and 45 miles wide--almost one third of California. Powerplants at the dams have an installed capacity of 2,099 megawatts and provide enough energy for 650,000 people. Transmission lines total about 865 circuit-miles. Washoe: This project in west-central Nevada and east-central California was designed to improve the regulation of runoff from the Truckee and Carson river systems and to provide supplemental irrigation water and drainage, as well as water for municipal, industrial and fishery use. The project's Stampede Powerplant has a maximum capacity of 4 MW.

332

Frequency and amplitude shifts in the whistle vocalizations of bottlenose dolphins in response to anthropogenic noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anthropogenic noise can have a number of negative effects on cetaceans including the masking of biologically important sounds. Although many observational studies are found in the literature, few data have been published on the effects of low frequency anthropogenic noise on odontocetes. The purpose of this thesis is to examine the effect of shipping and industrial noise on the whistle vocalizations of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) living in Galveston Bay, Texas. Dolphin whistles were recorded in different types of noise environments. Vocalization characteristics such as whistle mean frequency, frequency of peak energy, and sound pressure level were examined as functions of total background noise. Findings indicated that whistle mean frequencies were significantly lower in noisier areas. Whistles were also significantly louder in noisier environments. Combined frequency and amplitude results indicate that lower whistle frequencies had higher sound pressure levels. It may be, that given a specific amount of energy available for vocalization, a dolphin can produce a louder whistle at a lower frequency. Postulating a situation in which a dolphin has the option of more than one behavioral adaptation to avoid masking in a noisy site, the animal may implement the behavior that would require the least amount of energy. Energetic studies are needed to further investigate the relationship between vocalization frequency and amplitude. In addition, since large gaps in our knowledge of the effects of noise pollution still exist, more quantified, long-term data on a variety of species in different acoustic environments is needed.

Candelaria-Ley, Roxanne Inez

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Acceptance Test Procedure for Project 251W, WBS 3, Substation A-8, Building 251-W, Bus {number_sign}2 switchgear replacement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document records the steps taken and results of the acceptance testing of the new 13.8kV switchgear installed at 251W. This gear is under the administrative control of Electrical Utilities.

VanBaalen, R.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Sweet Lake Geopressured-geothermal Project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco Fee. Volume II. Surface installations reservoir testing. Annual report, February 28, 1981-February 10, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Magma Gulf-Technadril/Department of Energy Amoco Fee No. 1 (production) and salt water disposal wells were drilled in the period from August, 1980 to February 1981. Surface facilities were designed and constructed during March-June 1981. Flow testing began in June 1981 and continued until February, 1982. The Miogypsinoides interval contains seven discrete sands in the test well. These sands have been numbered 1 to 7, beginning at the top of the sequence. Data from wireline logs and core samples suggested that the first zone to be perforated should be Sand 5. Because of its high porosity and permeability, Sand 5 was thought to contain almost 50% of the total hydraulic capacity of the well. Flow testing of Sand 5 was performed in three stages, each of which is fully described in this report. Phase I was designed as an initial clean-up flow and a reservoir confirmation test. Phase II consisted of the reservoir limit determination test and lasted 17 days. Boundaries were confirmed which suggest that the Sweet Lake reservoir is fairly narrow, with boundaries on three sides, but is open in one direction with no closure for at least 4-1/4 miles. These boundaries approximate the shape of the graben in which the test well was drilled, but may or may not be directly related to the major faults forming the graben. Phase III testing was planned to be a long-term test at commercial design rates. Although Sand 5 alone would not support such rates, long-term production was demonstrated. Additional research not supported by DOE funding was also performed during the period covered by this report. This research, consisting of mud logging, micropaleontology, organic geochemistry, core analysis, and rock mechanics, is summarized in this report.

Hoffman, K.S. (ed.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

BWRVIP-262NP: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Baseline Fracture Toughness and Crack Growth Rate Testing of Alloys X-750 and XM-19 (Idaho National Laboratory Phase I)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) based at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials in a pilot program intended to establish guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase 1 (of three phases), which entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cr...

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

336

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Simulating Particle Deposition and Mitigating Deposition Degradation Effects in Film Cooled Turbine Sections University of Texas 7 Simulating Particle Deposition and Mitigating Deposition Degradation Effects in Film Cooled Turbine Sections University of Texas David Bogard Project Dates: 8/1/2007 - 9/30/2010 Area of Research: Aero/Heat Transfer Federal Project Manager: Mark Freeman Project Objective: A major goal of this project is to determine a reliable methodology for simulating contaminant deposition in a low-speed wind tunnel facility where testing is considerably less costly. The project is aimed at developing new cooling designs for turbine components that will minimize the effect of the depositions of contaminant particles on turbine components and maintain good film cooling performance even when surface conditions deteriorate. Moreover, a methodology will be established that

337

Saltcreek Project Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Summary Project Summary HELP Index Summary Scenario References Student Pages Subject/Content Area: Environmental Science Target Audience: Middle school level - all students, including gifted, learning-disabled, behavior-disordered and limited English proficient Project Goals: As a result of their participation in the Salt Creek Investigation, the students will develop the abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry. They will increase their understanding of factors affecting environmental quality, including the interdependence of organisms, and human-induced hazards. Students will learn how science and technology can help people solve local, national and global environmental problems. Learner Outcomes: Students will: be able to carry out six types of stream monitoring tests.

338

NIST Report of Test FR 4016  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Home Smoke Alarm Project, Manufactured Home Tests Report of Test FR 4016 February, 2005. Richard D. Peacock, Jason ...

2013-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

339

Small Wind Independent Testing (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the Small Wind Independent Testing at the NWTC and the Regional Test Centers project.

Not Available

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * This research project develops a reservoir scale CO 2 plume migration model at the Sleipner project, Norway. The Sleipner project in the Norwegian North Sea is the world's first commercial scale geological carbon storage project. 4D seismic data have delineated the CO 2 plume migration history. The relatively long history and high fidelity data make

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada, was the site for a 12-kiloton-ton nuclear test  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NV/13609-53 NV/13609-53 Development of a Groundwater Management Model for the Project Shoal Area prepared by Gregg Lamorey, Scott Bassett, Rina Schumer, Douglas P. Boyle, Greg Pohll, and Jenny Chapman submitted to Nevada Site Office National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy Las Vegas, Nevada September 2006 Publication No. 45223 Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof or its contractors or subcontractors. Available for sale to the public, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce

342

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline I. Benefits II. Project Overview III. Technical Status A. Background B. Results IV. Accomplishments V. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals. - Prediction of CO 2 storage capacity. * Project benefits. - Workforce/Student Training: Support of 3 student GAs in use of multiphase flow and geochemical models simulating CO 2 injection. - Support of Missouri DGLS Sequestration Program. 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Project Goals and Objectives. 1. Training graduate students in use of multi-phase flow models related to CO 2 sequestration. 2. Training graduate students in use of geochemical models to assess interaction of CO

343

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Coal's Center for Coal's FY10 Carbon Sequestration Peer Review February 8 - 12, 2010 2 Collaborators * Tissa Illangasekare (Colorado School of Mines) * Michael Plampin (Colorado School of Mines) * Jeri Sullivan (LANL) * Shaoping Chu (LANL) * Jacob Bauman (LANL) * Mark Porter (LANL) 3 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Project technical status * Accomplishments to date * Future Plans * Appendix 4 Benefit to the program * Program goals being addressed (2011 TPP): - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefit: - This project is developing system modeling capabilities that can be used to address challenges associated with infrastructure development, integration, permanence &

344

Project 364  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

765-494-5623 lucht@purdue.edu DEVELOPMENT OF NEW OPTICAL SENSORS FOR MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS, SPECIATION, AND CHEMISTRY Project Description The feasibility of...

345

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL's Consolidated Sequestration Research Program (CSRP) Project Number FWP ESD09-056 Barry Freifeld Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits and Goals of GEO-SEQ * Technical Status - Otway Project (CO2CRC) - In Salah (BP, Sonatrach and Statoil) - Ketzin Project (GFZ, Potsdam) - Aquistore (PTRC) * Accomplishments and Summary * Future Plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed: - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage capacity estimation - Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence.

346

Project 283  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NJ 07039 973-535 2328 ArchieRobertson@fwc.com Sequestration ADVANCED CO 2 CYCLE POWER GENERATION Background This project will develop a conceptual power plant design...

347

Project 197  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will bring economic value to both the industrial customers and to the participating companies. * Complete project by June 2006. Accomplishments A ceramic membrane and seal...

348

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CCUS Pittsburgh,...

349

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interdisciplinary Investigation of the CO 2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations Project Number DE-FE-0004731 Jennifer Wilcox, Tony Kovscek, Mark Zoback Stanford...

350

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for...

351

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Concrete products in this project * Standard 8" concrete blocks * Standard 4' x 8' fiber-cement boards CO 2 The Goals * Maximizing carbon uptake by carbonation (at least...

352

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Evaluating Potential Groundwater Impacts and Natural Geochemical...

353

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Organization * Benefit to Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date...

354

Project 252  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stanford Global Climate Energy Project Terralog Technologies TransAlta University of Alaska Fairbanks Washington State Department of Natural Resources Western Interstate...

355

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research partnership to improve the understanding of CO 2 within coal and shale reservoirs. 2 2 3 Presentation Outline * Program Goal and Benefits Statement * Project...

356

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mechanistic insights 5 Project Overview: Scope of work * Task 1 - Pipeline and Casing Steel Corrosion Studies * Evaluate corrosion behavior of pipeline steels in CO 2 mixtures...

357

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20-22, 2013 2 Acknowledgements * NETL * Shell * Tri-State * Trapper Mining * State of Colorado 3 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project Program Goals * Technical...

358

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* This project pinpoints the critical catalyst features necessary to promote carbon dioxide conversion to acrylate, validate the chemical catalysis approach, and develop an...

359

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale CO 2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States Project Number: DE-FE0010554 George J. Koperna, Jr. Shawna Cyphers Advanced Resources...

360

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of CO 2 Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology Project Number...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, December 1994--January 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes activities, experiments, and testing performed on a variety of solar heating and cooling systems in conjunction with four technical research tasks. Areas of focus include: Unique solar system components; Rating and certification of domestic water heating systems; and, Advanced residential solar domestic hot water systems.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 8. Science Applications, Incorporated specifications for engineering field test facility preliminary design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Specifications are presented for the SCEAS Engineering Test Facility. The specifications are provided for the following elements of the SCEAS: site preparation and construction, mechanical and plumbing, electrical, power conditioning subsystem, display and control panels, control system equipment, water desalination system, and the meteorological station. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Strobe Light Testing and Kokanee Population Monitoring : Dworshak Dam Impacts Assessment and Fisheries Investigation Project, 97-99 : annual Progress Report for 1998.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We tested the response of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka to strobe lights. Testing was conducted on wild, free-ranging fish in their natural environment (i.e., the pelagic region of two large Idaho lakes). Split-beam hydroacoustics were used to record the distance kokanee moved away from the lights as well as the density of kokanee in the area near the lights. In control tests, where the strobe lights were lowered into the lake but kept turned off, kokanee remained within a few meters of the lights. Once the lights began flashing, kokanee quickly moved away from the light source. Kokanee were found to move an average of 30 to 136 m away from the lights in waters with Secchi transparencies from 2.8 to 17.5 m (p=0.00 to p=0.04). Kokanee densities near the lights were significantly lower (p=0.00 to p=0.07) when the lights were turned on than in control samples with no lights flashing. Flash rates of 300, 360, and 450 flashes/min elicited strong avoidance responses from the fish. Kokanee remained at least 24 m away from the lights during our longest test that lasted for 5 h 50 min. Kokanee appeared to be responding to flashes that were well less than 0.00016 lux above background lighting.

Maiolie, Melo A.; Harryman, Bill; Ament, William J.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Solar Dish Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

(Original wording, now somewhat outdated.) The Nevada Solar Dish Project is designed to deploy at least 1 MW of dish-based, field validation power generation systems in a mini-power plant near Las Vegas, Nevada, as a transitional precursor to the full commercialization of the technology. This will occur over a period of about three years, from 2001 through 2004. The statement of work defines activities that the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) will provide by establishing a test site for two dish/Stirling systems on the UNLV campus and providing operation, test and training, and education in support of the project.

Robert F. Boehm

2004-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

365

Development of wear-resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components. Volume 1, Coating development and tribological testing: Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tribological properties of a variety of advanced coating materials have been evaluated under conditions which simulate the piston ring -- cylinder liner environment near top ring reversal in a heavy duty diesel engine. Coated ``ring`` samples were tested against a conventional pearlitic grey cast iron liner material using a high temperature reciprocating wear test rig. Tests were run with a fresh CE/SF 15W40lubricant at 200 and 350{degrees}C, with a high-soot, engine-tested oil at 200{degrees}C and with no lubrication at 200{degrees}C. For lowest wear under boundary lubricated conditions, the most promising candidates to emerge from this study were high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3} C{sub 2} - 20% NiCr and WC - 12% Co cermets, low temperature arc vapor deposited (LTAVD) CrN and plasma sprayed chromium oxides. Also,plasma sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} materials were found to give excellent wear resistance in unlubricated tests and at extremely high temperatures (450{degrees}C) with a syntheticoil. All of these materials would offer substantial wear reductions compared to the conventional electroplated hard chromium ring facing and thermally sprayed metallic coatings, especially at high temperatures and with high-soot oils subjected to degradation in diesel environments. The LTAVD CrN coating provided the lowest lubricated wear rates of all the materials evaluated, but may be too thin (4 {mu}m) for use as a top ring facing. Most of the coatings evaluated showed higher wear rates with high-soot, engine-tested oil than with fresh oil, with increases of more than a factor of ten in some cases. Generally, metallic materials were found to be much more sensitive to soot/oil degradation than ceramic and cermet coatings. Thus, decreased ``soot sensitivity`` is a significant driving force for utilizing ceramic or cermet coatings in diesel engine wear applications.

Naylor, M.G.S. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Pumping test and fluid sampling report, Mansfield No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin: Report of the Geologic Project Manager, Permian Basin  

SciTech Connect

This report describes pumping test and fluid sampling activities performed at the Mansfield No. 1 well in Oldham County about 10 miles north of Vega, Texas. The well site was selected by TBEG and is located along the northern margin of the Palo Duro Basin in an area of active dissolution with the Permian salt sections. The objectives of the pumping test and fluid sampling program were to collect data to determine the hydrologic characteristics (formation pressure and permeability) of deep water bearing formations, and to obtain formation fluid samples for analyses (gas and fluid chemistry) in order to evaluate fluid migration and age relationships in the Permian Basin. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Are there basic physical constraints on future anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Climate Models (GCMs) provide forecasts of future climate warming using a wide variety of highly sophisticated anthropogenic CO2 emissions models as input, each based on the evolution of four emissions "drivers": population p, standard of living g, energy productivity (or efficiency) f and energy carbonization c. The range of scenarios considered is extremely broad, however, and this is a primary source of forecast uncertainty. Here, it is shown both theoretically and observationally how the evolution of the human system can be considered from a surprisingly simple thermodynamic perspective in which it is unnecessary to explicitly model two of the emissions drivers: population and standard of living. Specifically, the human system grows through a self-perpetuating feedback loop in which the consumption rate of primary energy resources stays tied to the historical accumulation of global economic production - or p times g - through a time-independent factor of 9.7 +/- 0.3 milliwatts per inflation-adjuste...

Garrett, Timothy J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Space Geodesy, Seismology, Space Geodesy, Seismology, and Geochemistry for Monitoring Verification and Accounting of CO 2 in Sequestration Sites DE-FE0001580 Tim Dixon, University of South Florida Peter Swart, University of Miami U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to program * Goals & objectives * Preliminary InSAR results (site selection phase) * Project location * Project installed equipment * Specific project results * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Focused on monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) * If successful, our project will demonstrate the utility of low cost, surface

369

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 DE-FE0001159 Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO 2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations Gary Mavko Rock Physics Project/Stanford University 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Motivating technical challenge * Approach * Technical Status - Laboratory results - Theoretical modeling * Summary Mavko: Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99% of injected CO 2 remains in injection zones. * Project benefits statement.

370

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Volume Injection of CO Large Volume Injection of CO 2 to Assess Commercial Scale Geological Sequestration in Saline Formations in the Big Sky Region Project Number: DE-FC26-05NT42587 Dr. Lee Spangler Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Kevin Dome characteristics * Project design philosophy * Infrastructure * Modeling * Monitoring * Project Opportunities 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

371

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Research on Probabilistic and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical (HTM) Modeling of CO 2 Geological Sequestration (GS) in Fractured Porous Rocks Project DE-FE0002058 Marte Gutierrez, Ph.D. Colorado School of Mines U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program (Program goals addressed and Project benefits) * Project goals and objectives * Technical status - Project tasks * Technical status - Key findings * Lessons learned * Summary - Accomplishments to date 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

372

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complexity and Choice of Complexity and Choice of Model Approaches for Practical Simulations of CO 2 Injection, Migration, Leakage, and Long- term Fate Karl W. Bandilla Princeton University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Project Number DE-FE0009563 2 Presentation Outline * Project Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Accomplishments * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The aim of the project is to develop criteria for the selection of the appropriate level of model complexity for CO 2 sequestration modeling at a given site. This will increase the confidence in modeling results, and reduce computational cost when appropriate.

373

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snøhvit CO Snøhvit CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 4 Principal Investigators: L. Chiaramonte, *J.A. White Team Members: Y. Hao, J. Wagoner, S. Walsh Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Summary & Accomplishments * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is focused on mechanical

374

Project title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Requested By: David Young Mail Code : N1410 Phone: 916-353-4542 Date Submitted: 5/4/2011 Date Required: 5/7/2011 Description of the Project: Purpose and Need The Western Area Power Administration (Western), Sierra Nevada Region (SNR), is responsible for the operation and maintenance (O&M) of federally owned and operated transmission lines, Switchyards, and facilities throughout California. Western and Reclamation must comply with the National Electric Safety Code, Western States Coordinating Council (WECC), and internal directives for protecting human safety, the physical environment, and maintaining the reliable operation of the transmission system. There is an existing OPGW communications fiber on the transmission towers between Roseville and Elverta

375

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

InSalah CO InSalah CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 2 Principal Investigator: W. McNab Team Members: L. Chiaramonte, S. Ezzedine, W. Foxall, Y. Hao, A. Ramirez, *J.A. White Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is combining sophisticated

376

Verification survey report of the south waste tank farm training/test tower and hazardous waste storage lockers at the West Valley demonstration project, West Valley, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A team from ORAU's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site?s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

Weaver, Phyllis C.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

377

VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT OF THE SOUTH WASTE TANK FARM TRAINING/TEST TOWER AND HAZARDOUS WASTE STORAGE LOCKERS AT THE WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT WEST VALLEY, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

A team from ORAU’s Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site’s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

Phyllis C. Weaver

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

378

Testing the effectiveness of mobile home weatherization measures in a controlled environment: The SERI CMFERT (Collaborative Manufactured Buildings Facility for Energy Research and Training) Project  

SciTech Connect

For several years the Solar Energy Research Institute has been testing the effectiveness of mobile home weatherization measures, with the support of the US DOE Office of State and Local Assistance Programs Weatherization Assistance Program, the DOE Office of Buildings and Community Systems, the seven states within the federal Weatherization Region 7, the Colorado Division of Housing, and the DOE Denver Support Office. During the winter of 1988--89, several weatherization measures were thermally tested on three mobile homes under controlled conditions inside a large environmental enclosure. The effects of each weatherization measure on conduction losses, infiltration losses, and combined furnace and duct-delivered heat efficiency were monitored. The retrofit options included air sealing, duct repair, furnace tune-up, interior storm panels, floor insulation, and roof insulation. The study demonstrated that cost-effective heating energy savings of about 20% to 50% are possible if weatherization techniques adapted to the special construction details in mobile homes are applied. 24 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

Judkoff, R.D.; Hancock, C.E.; Franconi, E.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6 Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project  

SciTech Connect

The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of -11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

Del Cul, G.D.; Icenhour, A.S.; Simmons, D.W.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project  

SciTech Connect

The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of {approx}11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8})], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

Del Cul, G.D.

2000-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: CBI Na-Con, Inc. Engineering Test Facility problem assessment and lessons learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Solar Energy Water Desalination Engineering Test Facility has been undergoing operation and testing in Yanbu, Saudi Arabia, as part of of the SOLERAS Program. The facility employs a field of point-focus, distributed receiver, solar thermal collectors operating at 388/degree/C (730/degree/F). Thermal energy is collected using a synthetic heat transfer fluid, stored in dual tank molten salt storage, and utilized on demand to generate steam, which provides both mechanical and thermal energy for refrigeration. The refrigeration drives a unique freeze desalination process in which ice is crystallized from concentrated seawater, pumped as a slurry of ice and brine, rinsed of brine in a countercurrent wash column, and melted to produce fresh water. The report presents an executive summary followed by an overview of the facility design and operation. The plant operation, from start-up in December, 1984 through mid-1986, is then briefly summarized. Key problem areas and areas of concern are identified and discussed; in addition to problems encountered, the discussion details problem causes, problem solutions, and in some cases problem avoidance which was accomplished through preventive measures employed during design and/or operation. The problems are grouped into areas corresponding to the facility's main subsystems: energy collection, energy storage, energy delivery, and desalination. 37 refs., 43 figs., 7 tabs.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Western LNG project - Project summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western LNG Project is a major new undertaking involving the liquefaction of conventional natural gas from the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin at a plant on the British Columbia north coast. The gas in its liquid form will be shipped to Japan for consumption by utility companies. The Project represents a new era in gas processing and marketing for the Canadian natural gas industry.

Forgues, E.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A new stepwise project management method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Stepwise Project Management Method (SPMM) is developed to resolve the Project Management (PM) issues. The template of a new stepwise PM method is derived from a Project Management, Inc. (PMI) 19-Step PM method. The 19 Steps ... Keywords: acceptance test procedure, predecessor networks, resource analysis method, results tracking, statement of work, stepwise project management, task assignment, very small aperture terminal, work breakdown structure

Keh-Ming Lu

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

OPT's Reedsport Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPT's Reedsport Project OPT's Reedsport Project Summary of Licensing and Permitting As of April 13, 2011 Single PowerBuoy ® and DOE Project The scope of the DOE Reedsport Deployment and Ocean Test project (DE-EE0003646) is the installation of a single autonomous PowerBuoy at Reedsport, Oregon followed by two (2) years of operation in the Oregon Territorial Sea (TRL 7/8 Relevant Environment). Since the single PowerBuoy will not be grid connected, the lead Federal Agency for this effort is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. OPT filed a Joint Permit Application and draft Biological Assessment with the Corps and has secured the following permits and/or authorizations for the single PowerBuoy deployment which are posted on the DOE's NEPA EF1 website: o Corps Permit NWP-2007-62, which includes conditions from National Marine Fisheries

385

Climatic Effects of 1950-2050 Changes in US Anthropogenic Aerosols -1 Part 1: Aerosol trends and radiative forcing2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory, Argonne, IL USA18 N. Kumar19 Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA USA20 D. Rind21 anthropogenic sources over the 1950-2050 period, based on historical31 emission inventories and future declining post-2010 but at a41 much slower rate since US SO2 emissions have already declined by almost 60

Jacob, Daniel J.

386

Executive Summary An emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1 sources and sinks of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fuels Iron and Steel Production & Metallurgical Coke Production Natural Gas Systems Cement with the relevant provisions of the Convention, stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere the latest information on U.S. anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission trends from 1990 through 2010. To ensure

Little, John B.

387

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS CCS Project Number 49607 Christopher Harto Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Increased control of reservoir pressure, reduced risk of CO2 migration, and expanded formation storage capacity. * Project benefits statement. - This work supports the development of active reservoir management approaches by identifying cost effective and environmentally benign strategies for managing extracted brines (Tasks 1 + 2). - This work will help identify water related constraints on CCS deployment and provide insight into

388

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Multiphase of Multiphase Flow for Improved Injectivity and Trapping 4000.4.641.251.002 Dustin Crandall, URS PI: Grant Bromhal, NETL ORD Morgantown, West Virginia U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Breakdown of FY12 project tasks * Facilities and personnel * Task progress to date * Planned task successes * Tech transfer and summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

389

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Resources International, Inc. Advanced Resources International, Inc. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Project benefits statement: - This research seeks to develop a set of robust mathematical modules to predict how coal and shale permeability and

390

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS: CCS: Life Cycle Water Consumption for Carbon Capture and Storage Project Number 49607 Christopher Harto Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness. * Project benefits statement. - This work supports the development of active reservoir management approaches by identifying cost effective and environmentally benign strategies for managing extracted brines (Tasks 1 + 2). - This work will help identify water related constraints

391

Project Gnome  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

knowledge of civilian applications for nuclear explosives. Beyond the Nevada Test Site (NTS), nuclear testing activities were conducted at eight locations in five different...

392

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report for the months of December 1995 and January 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Colorado State University Solar Energy Applications Laboratory is currently testing several solar domestic hot water heating systems. The experimental systems are fully instrumented to yield data appropriate for in-depth analyses of performance. One of these systems is an unpressurized drainback system with a load-side heat exchanger. An analysis of the performance of this heat exchanger is the focus of this paper. Analytical calculations for the effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficients from correlations are compared against the experimental data. Three models for the convective heat transfer coefficients are analyzed and yield results that underpredict the measured heat transfer from 23% to 72%. TRNSYS simulations were performed using the average effectiveness (the calculated effectiveness varies from 0.68 to 0.95); the results compare favorably with experimental results, indicating that a constant effectiveness is an adequate model for the system.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: United Technologies Research Center. Design guidelines for solar heating/cooling/power generation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology, design guidelines and analytical tools for the preliminary technical/economic evaluation of solar heating/cooling/power generation systems. In particular, it provides the theoretical framework, data bases and software tools for: determining the preliminary economic feasibility of solar-powered configurations compared with grid-supplied electric power and/or competing fossil fuels; selecting the optimum system configuration with respect to solar collector area and ''solar-side'' thermal storage capacity. Implementation of the methodology described in this report can be facilitated by the use of the accompanying IBM PC-compatible computer program ''SOLERAS''. This report represents the final task of the multi-year SOLERAS Program -- jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology -- which involved the development and field-testing of a solar-powered cooling system in Phoenix, AZ. 11 refs., 37 figs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web-based CO Web-based CO 2 Subsurface Modeling Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Project Number DE-FE0002069 Christopher Paolini San Diego State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and goals. * Web interface for simulating water-rock interaction. * Development of, and experience teaching, a new Carbon Capture and Sequestration course at San Diego State University. * Some noteworthy results of student research and training in CCS oriented geochemistry. * Status of active student geochemical and geomechancal modeling projects.

395

Project Title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 DOE Code: Project Lead: Wes Riesland NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY # 291 Project Information Date: 3/1 1/2010 Contractor Code: Project Overview In order to repair this line it was decided to trench a line aproximately 100 feet and tie it into the line at 71-3- 1. What are the environmental sx-3. This will get us out of the old flow line which has been repaired 5-6 times. this will mitigate the chances impacts? of having spills in the future. 2. What is the legal location? This flowline runs from the well77-s-1 0 to the B-2-10 manifold.+ "/-,~?X3 3. What is the duration of the project? Approximately 10 hours(1 day) to complete 4. What major equipment will be used backhoe and operator and one hand if any (work over rig. drilling rig.

396

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Co-Sequestration Co-Sequestration Studies Project Number 58159 Task 2 B. Peter McGrail Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 and mixed gas storage capacity in various geologic settings - Demonstrate fate of injected mixed gases * Project benefits statement:

397

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of CO 2 Exposed Wells to Predict Long Term Leakage through the Development of an Integrated Neural- Genetic Algorithm Project DE FE0009284 Boyun Guo, Ph.D. University of...

398

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Sequestration: A Design of Experiment (DoE) & Response Surface (RS) Uncertainty Analysis Project Number: DE-FE-0009238 Mingkan Zhang 1 , Ye Zhang 1 , Peter Lichtner 2 1. Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 2. OFM Research, Inc., Santa Fe, New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project major goals and benefits; * Detailed project objectives & success criteria; * Accomplishments to date; * Summary of results; * Appendix (organization chart; Gantt chart; additional results). Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wyoming

399

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Region Region DE-FE0001812 Brian J. McPherson University of Utah U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Acknowledgements * NETL * Shell * Tri-State * Trapper Mining * State of Colorado 3 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project / Program Goals * Technical Status: Finalizing 10-Point Protocol for CO 2 Storage Site Characterization * Key Accomplishments * Summary 4 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project / Program Goals * Technical Status: Finalizing 10-Point Protocol for CO 2 Storage Site Characterization * Key Accomplishments * Summary 5 Benefit to the Program Program Goals Being Addressed by this Project

400

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0-22, 2013 0-22, 2013 Collaborators Zhengrong Wang, Yale University Kevin Johnson, University of Hawaii 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 storage capacity - Demonstrate fate of injected CO 2 and most common contaminants * Project benefits statement: This research project conducts modeling, laboratory studies, and pilot-scale research aimed at developing new technologies and new systems for utilization of basalt formations for long term subsurface storage of CO 2 . Findings from this project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

behavior of shales as behavior of shales as seals and storage reservoirs for CO2 Project Number: Car Stor_FY131415 Daniel J. Soeder USDOE/NETL/ORD U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Program Goals - Support industry's ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness * Project Objectives - Assess how shales behave as caprocks in contact with CO 2 under a variety of conditions - Assess the viability of depleted gas shales to serve as storage reservoirs for sequestered CO

402

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 leakage and cap rock remediation DE-FE0001132 Runar Nygaard Missouri University of Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Technical status * Accomplishments to date * Summary 2 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefits statement. - The project develops a coupled reservoir and geomechanical modeling approach to simulate cap rock leakage and simulate the success of remediation

403

LUCF Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RZWR'HVLJQDQG RZWR'HVLJQDQG +RZWR'HVLJQDQG ,PSOHPHQW&DUERQ ,PSOHPHQW&DUERQ 0HDVXULQJDQG0RQLWRULQJ 0HDVXULQJDQG0RQLWRULQJ $.WLYLWLHVIRU/8&) $.WLYLWLHVIRU/8&) 3URMH.WV 3URMH.WV Sandra Brown Winrock International sbrown@winrock.org Winrock International 2 3URMH.WGHVLJQLVVXHV 3URMH.WGHVLJQLVVXHV z Baselines and additionality z Leakage z Permanence z Measuring and monitoring z Issues vary with projects in developed versus developing countries Winrock International 3 /HDNDJH /HDNDJH z Leakage is the unanticipated loss or gain in carbon benefits outside of the project's boundary as a result of the project activities-divide into two types: - Primary leakage or activity shifting outside project area - Secondary leakage or market effects due to

404

Project 265  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The goal of this project is to develop an on-line instrument using multi- wavelength lasers that is capable of characterizing particulate matter (PM) generated in fossil energy...

405

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Carbonsheds" as a Framework for Optimizing US CCS Pipeline Transport on a Regional to National Scale DOE-ARRA Project Number DE-FE0001943 Lincoln Pratson Nicholas School of the...

406

Project 114  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prototech Company SRI International Kellogg, Brown, and Root ChevronTexaco Sd-Chemie, Inc. COST Total Project Value 20,320,372 DOENon-DOE Share 15,326,608 4,993,764...

407

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

408

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

409

Project 134  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Goal To demonstrate a "whole plant" approach using by-products from a coal-fired power plant to sequester carbon in an easily quantifiable and verifiable form. Objectives...

410

MANHATTAN PROJECT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy traces its origins to World War II and  the Manhattan Project effort to build the first atomic bomb. As the direct descendent of the Manhattan Engineer District, the...

411

Project 310  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbohydrate generated from agricultural enterprises in the U.S., such as corn wet-milling. This project is studying the production of a suite of specialty chemicals by...

412

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G., 2011, Design and package of a 14CO2 field analyzer: the Global Monitor Platform (GMP). Proceedings of SPIE, v 8156, p. 81560E 17 DOE-NETL PROJECT REVIEW MEETING 08-21-2012...

413

Project 297  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of this project is to utilize pure oxygen at a feed rate of less than 10% of the stoichiometric requirement in demonstrating the use of oxygen-enhanced combustion in meeting...

414

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Project Number DE-FE0009562 John Stormont, Mahmoud Reda Taha University of New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D...

415

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical (HTM) Modeling of CO 2 Geological Sequestration (GS) in Fractured Porous Rocks Project DE-FE0002058 Marte Gutierrez, Ph.D....

416

Project Title: VIscosity Reduction Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4t 3 4t 3 l I Project lnfonnatlon Project Title: VIscosity Reduction Date: 11-22-2010 DOE Code: 673()-()20-51141 Contractor Code: 8067-778 Project Lead: Frank Ingham Project Overview 1. The purpose of the project is to test a tool that temporarily reduces the viscosity of oil which allows it to be 1. Brief project description ~nclude pumped through pipelines easier. The test will require about 4 miles of line to pump the oil through after anything that could impact the treatment (hence the need to connect the 31oops together), a holding volume for recovery, then repeat. environmenJ] There will be tanks to hold the original volume, tanks to receive the volume after treatment and pumping 2. Legal location through the line, possible transfer between tanks, transport (trucking) of the oil to the site (by the COC) and

417

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

418

The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This project will implement and test a series of innovative geothermal exploration strategies in two phases. Phase 1 studies...

419

Linkage of anthropogenic aerosol to clouds and climate. Progress report No. 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the first year of this project equipment was built to obtain direct droplet measurement data from a mobile platform in fog (or mountain impacted stratum) and to characterize CCN according to particle volatility (thermal processing). Since the start date, July 15, 1990, was during the California stratus season and it was necessary to complete the construction of equipment and allow time before a field project it was not possible to begin field work until the summer of 1991. This report discusses surface measurements made in 1991 and 1992 as well as the SEAHUNT (Shiptrail Evolution Above High Updraft Naval Targets) Project and the ASTEX (Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment) Project.

Hudson, J.G.

1992-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

420

Milliwatt Generator Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator Project from April 1986 through March 1988. Activities included fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, fabrication of pressure-burst test units, compatibility studies, impact testing, and examination of surveillance units. The major task of the Los Alamos Milliwatt Generator Project is to fabricate MC2893A heat sources (4.0 W) for MC2730A radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGS) and MC3599 heat sources (4.5 W) for MC3500 RTGs. The MWG Project interfaces with the following contractors: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (designer); E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. (Inc.), Savannah River Plant (fuel); Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility (metal hardware); and General Electric Company, Neutron Devices Department (RTGs). In addition to MWG fabrication activities, Los Alamos is involved in (1) fabrication of pressure-burst test units, (2) compatibility testing and evaluation, (3) examination of surveillance units, and (4) impact testing and subsequent examination of compatibility and surveillance units.

Latimer, T.W.; Rinehart, G.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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421

Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Project Definition Rating Index (EM-PDRI) is a modification of a commercially developed planning tool that has been tested by an EM team specifically for...

422

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 Brighton 1&2 2:40 August 20, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Modeling CO 2 Sequestration in Saline A quifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional CO 2 Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau A quifer System, South-Central Kansas Co-Principal Investigators Co-Principal Investigators Kerry D. Newell -- stratigraphy, geochemistry

423

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Geotechnical Site and Geotechnical Site Investigations for the Design of a CO 2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection Facility Project Number DOE Grant FE0001833 Paul Metz Department of Mining & Geological Engineering University of Alaska Fairbanks U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix: Not Included in Presentation 3 Benefit to the Program * Carbon Storage Program Major Goals: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to

424

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale CO Scale CO 2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States Project Number: DE-FE0010554 George J. Koperna, Jr. Shawna Cyphers Advanced Resources International U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Program Goals * Benefits Statement * Project Overview - Goals - Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix USDOE/NETL Program Goals * Support industry's ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence. * Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage

425

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming: MVA Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock Integrity Project Number DE-FE0002112 PIs Drs. John Kaszuba and Kenneth Sims Virginia Marcon University of Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - Results - Conclusions - Next Steps * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. - Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA). MVA technologies seek to monitor, verify, and

426

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of CO Impact of CO 2 Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology Project Number (DEFE0002421) Dr. Yiran Dong Drs. Bruce W. Fouke, Robert A. Sanford, Stephen Marshak University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Technical status * Results and discussion * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program This research project has developed scientific, technical and institutional collaborations for the development of

427

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira University of Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status o Experimentation: core-flooding and IFT/CA o Pore-scale modeling modeling * Accomplishments to Date * Summary University of Wyoming 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: o 'Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent.' * Benefits statement: o The research project is focused on performing reservoir conditions experiments to measure steady-state relative permeabilities,

428

Project Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle School Home Energy Audit Middle School Home Energy Audit Project Homepage NTEP Home - Project Homepage - Teacher Homepage - Student Pages Abstract: This set of lessons provides an opportunity for midlevel students to gain a basic understanding of how energy is turned into power, how power is measured using a meter, the costs of those units and the eventual reduction of energy consumption and cost to the consumer. Introduction to Research: By conducting energy audits of their own homes and completing exercises to gain baclground information, students begin to see the importance of energy in their daily lives. By using the Internet as a research tool, students gain develop research skills as they gain knowledge for their project. They use e-mail to collaborate with energy experts and share results with other

429

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Title: DEVELOPING A Title: DEVELOPING A COMPREHENSIVE RISK ASSESMENT FRAMEWORK FOR GEOLOGICAL STORAGE OF CO2 Ian Duncan University of Texas U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline 1. Benefit to the Program 2. Goals and Objectives 3. Technical Status Project 4. Accomplishments to Date 5. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program The research project is developing a comprehensive understanding of the programmatic (business), and technical risks associated with CCS particularly the likelihood of leakage and its potential consequences. This contributes to the Carbon Storage Program's effort of ensuring 99 percent CO

430

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Acknowledgments Dave Harris, Kentucky Geological Survey Dave Barnes, Western Michigan University John Rupp, Indiana Geological Survey Scott Marsteller, Schlumberger Carbon Services John McBride, Brigham Young University * Project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and by a cost share agreement with the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Office of Coal Development through the Illinois Clean Coal Institute * ConocoPhillips: in-kind match * Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation: matching funding * SeisRes 2020, Houston: VSP acquisition and processing

431

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Analyze Spatial and Temporal to Analyze Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneities in Reservoir and Seal Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry: Implications for CO 2 Sequestration Prediction, Simulation, and Monitoring Project Number DE-FE0001852 Dr. Brenda B. Bowen Purdue University (now at the University of Utah) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction to the project * Tasks * Student training * Student research successes * Lessons learned and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Addresses Carbon Storage Program major goals: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

432

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Results from Simulation Project Results from Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO 2 Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of Midwest United States DOE Award No. DE-FE0001034 Ohio Dept. of Dev. Grant CDO/D-10-03 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting August 21-23, 2012 Joel Sminchak and Neeraj Gupta Battelle Energy Systems sminchak@battelle.org, 614-424-7392 gupta@battelle.org, 614-424-3820 BUSINESS SENSITIVE 2 Presentation Outline 1. Technical Status 2. Background (CO 2 Sources, Geologic Setting) 3. Injection Well history 4. Geocellular Model Development 5. Geological Data (Geological dataset, Geostatistics) 6. Geocellular porosity/permeability model development 7. Pipeline Routing Analysis

433

Research projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yuan » Research projects Yuan » Research projects Research projects Research Interests Scientific computing, domain decomposition methods Linear solvers for sparse matrices Computational plasma physics Grid generation techniques GPU computing Current Research PDSLin: A hybrid linear solver for large-scale highly-indefinite linear systems The Parallel Domain decomposition Schur complement based Linear solver (PDSLin), which implements a hybrid (direct and iterative) linear solver based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition technique called chur complement method, and it has two levels of parallelism: a) to solve independent subdomains in parallel and b) to apply multiple processors per subdomain. In such a framework, load imbalance and excessive communication lead to the performance bottlenecks, and several techniques are developed

434

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of the CO Investigation of the CO 2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations Project Number DE-FE-0004731 Jennifer Wilcox, Tony Kovscek, Mark Zoback Stanford University, School of Earth Sciences U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Project Benefits * Technical Status * Imaging at mm- to micron-scales using CT - Permeability measurements and application of the Klinkenberg effect - Molecular Dynamics simulations for permeability and viscosity estimates * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Carbon Storage Program major goals

435

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fidelity Computational Analysis of Fidelity Computational Analysis of CO2 Trappings at Pore-scales Project Number: DE-FE0002407 Vinod Kumar (vkumar@utep.edu) & Paul Delgado (pmdelgado2@utep.edu) University of Texas at El Paso U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Collaborators: Dr. C. Harris (Shell Oil Company/Imperial College), Dr. G. Bromhal (NETL), Dr. M. Ferer (WVU/NETL), Dr. D. Crandall (NETL-Ctr), and Dr. D. McIntyre (NETL). 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - Pore-network modeling - Conductance derivation for irregular geom. - Pore-to-CFD Computations

436

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY Bittersweet Energy Inc. Partners FE0002056 Devilbiss Coring Service Basic Energy Services Wellington Field Operator Industrial and Electrical Power Sources of CO 2 Southwest Kansas CO 2 -EOR Initiative Industry Partners (modeling 4 Chester/Morrowan oil fields to make CO2 ready) +drilling and seismic contractors TBN

437

Towards the detection and attribution of an anthropogenic effect on climate  

SciTech Connect

It has been hypothesized recently that cooling caused by anthropogenic sulfate aerosols may be obscuring a warming signal associated with changes in greenhouse gas concentrations. Here the authors use results from model experiments in which sulfate and carbon dioxide have been varied individually and in combination in order to determine whether the simulated surface temperature change patterns are increasingly evident in observed records of temperature change. They use centered [R(t)] and uncentered [C(t)] pattern correlation statistics in order to compare observed time-evolving surface temperature change patterns with the model-predicted equilibrium signal patterns. They show that in the case of temperature signals from the ``CO{sub 2}-only`` and ``sulfate-only`` experiments, the C(t) statistic essentially reduces to a measure of observed global-mean temperature changes, and cannot be used to uniquely attribute observed climate changes to a specific causal mechanism. For the signal from the experiment with combined CO{sub 2}/sulfate aerosol forcing, C(t) provides information on pattern congruence, but trends in C(t) are difficult to interpret without decomposing the statistic into pattern similarity and global-mean change components. They therefore focus on R(t), which is a more useful statistic for discriminating between forcing mechanisms with different pattern signatures but similar rates of global mean change.

Santer, B.D.; Taylor, K.E.; Penner, J.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wigley, T.M.L. [UCAR Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies, Boulder, CO (United States); Jones, P.D. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Climatic Research Unit; Cubasch, U. [Deutsches Klimarechenzentrum, Hamburg (Germany)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Integrated measures of anthropogenic stress in the U.S. Great Lakes Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using publicly available, pre-existing spatial datasets, we developed a geographic information system database of 86 variables related to five classes of anthropogenic stress in the U.S. Great Lakes basin: agriculture, atmospheric deposition, human population, land cover, and point source pollution. The original variables were quantified by a variety of data types over a broad range of spatial and classification resolutions. We summarized the original data for 762 watershed-based units that comprise the U.S. portion of the basin and then used principal components analysis to develop overall stress measures within each stress category. We developed a cumulative stress index by combining the first principal component from each of the five stress categories. Maps of the stress measures illustrate strong spatial patterns across the basin, with the greatest amount of stress occurring on the western shore of Lake Michigan, southwest Lake Erie, and southeastern Lake Ontario. We found strong relationships between the stress measures and characteristics of bird communities, fish communities, and water chemistry measurements from the coastal region. The stress measures are taken to represent the major threats to coastal ecosystems in the U.S. Great Lakes. Such regional-scale efforts are critical for understanding relationships between human disturbance and ecosystem response, and can be used to guide environmental decision-making at both regional and local scales.

Danz, Nicholas; Niemi, Gerald; Regal, Ronald (and others) [University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, MN (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

The whitehouse effect: Shortwave radiative forcing of climate by anthropogenic aerosols, an overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstraet--Loadings of tropospheric aerosols have increased substantially over the past 150 yr as a consequence of industrial activities. These aerosols enhance reflection of solar radiation by the Earth-atmosphere system both directly, by scattering light in clear air and, indirectly, by increasing the reflectivity of clouds. The magnitude of the resultant decrease in absorption of solar radiation is estimated to be comparable on global average to the enhancement in infrared forcing at the tropopause due to increases in concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases over the same time period. Estimates of the aerosol shortwave forcing are quite uncertain, by more than a factor of two about the current best estimates. This article reviews the atmospheric chemistry and microphysical processes that govern the loading and light scattering properties of the aerosol particles responsible for the direct effect and delineates the basis for the present estimates of the magnitude and uncertainty in the resultant radiative forcing. The principal sources of uncertainty are in the loading of anthropogenic aerosols, which is highly variable spatially and temporally because of the relatively short residence time of these aerosols (ca. 1 week) and the episodic removal in precipitation, and in the dependence of light scattering on particle size, and in turn on relative humidity. Uncertainty in aerosol forcing is the greatest source of uncertainty in radiative forcing of climate

Stephen E. Schwartz

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-FE0002225: DE-FE0002225: Actualistic and geochemical modeling of reservoir rock, CO 2 and formation fluid interaction, Citronelle oil field, Alabama West Virginia University & University of Alabama Presenter: Dr. Amy Weislogel (WVU) Co-PI: Dr. Rona Donahoe (UA) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits * Overview & Project Map * Reservoir Geochemical Characterization * Formation Fluid Geochemistry * Geochemical Modeling * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries'

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthropogenic test project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 BROWN 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits & overview of deriving acrylates from coupling carbon dioxide and ethylene * Chemical catalysis approach: background and battles left to fight * Experimental assessment of the viability of thermochemical acrylate production * Perspectives for the future BROWN 3 Benefit to the Program * This project identifies the critical catalyst features necessary to promote carbon dioxide coupling with ethylene to acrylate at molybdenum catalysts. This research demonstrates the viability of acrylate production

442

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Proof-of-Feasibility of Using Wellbore Deformation as a Diagnostic Tool to Improve CO2 Sequestration DE FE0004542 Larry Murdoch, Clemson University Stephen Moysey, Clemson University Leonid Germanovich, Georgia Tech Cem Ozan, Baker Hughes Sihyun Kim, Georgia Tech Glenn Skawski, Clemson University Alex Hanna, Clemson University Johnathan Ebenhack, Clemson University Josh Smith, Clemson University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Proof-of-Feasibility of Using Wellbore Deformation as a Diagnostic Tool, Larry Murdoch Project Review Meeting, 23 Aug. 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Preliminaries

443

Hallmark Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Project Commercialization of the Secure SCADA Communications Protocol, a cryptographic security solution for device-to-device communication Increased connectivity and automation in the control systems that manage the nation's energy infrastructure have improved system functionality, but left systems more vulnerable to cyber attack. Intruders could severely disrupt control system operation by sending fabricated information or commands to control system devices. To ensure message integrity, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems require a method to validate device-to- device communication and verify that information has come from a trusted source and not been altered in transit. The Secure SCADA Communications Protocol (SSCP) provides message

444

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-FE0001836: DE-FE0001836: Numerical modeling of geomechanical processes related to CO 2 injection within generic reservoirs Andreas Eckert & Runar Nygaard Missouri University of Science & Technology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Objectives, Benefits and Outcomes * Technical status: Project summary - Teaching - Reservoir scale (Geomechanics & Fluid flow simulation) - Borehole scale (Wellbore integrity & wellbore trajectory planning) * Conclusions * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

445

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Special Projects on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

446

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Special...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Special Projects to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Special Projects on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

447

Building Technologies Office: Test Homes and Community Scale...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Homes and Community Scale Projects to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Test Homes and Community Scale Projects on Facebook Tweet about Building...