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1

Sub-bituminous coal handling problems solved with bunker liner retrofit  

SciTech Connect

After switching to low-sulfur sub-bituminous coal, Northern States Power Co. (NSP) experience several fires and an explosion in the coal storage bunkers of its two-unit, 384-MW Riverside plant located in Minneapolis, Minn. The most recent incident occurred in November 1993 when a blast rocked Unit 7`s coal storage bunker. The spontaneous combustion explosion was touched off when coal dust from the dust collection system was being conveyed back into the bunker and came into contact with hot coal. Reaction to the incident was swift and NSP management established a task force known as ``Operation Cease Fire`` to investigate the situation and develop a solution to eliminate fires and explosions at all of its coal-fired plants. This article describes the problems found in the coal handling systems and the steps taken to correct them.

Steppling, K.P.; McAtee, K.L.; Huggins, J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Modification of sub-bituminous coal by steam treatment: Caking and coking properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Chinese sub-bituminous Shenfu (SF) coal was steam treated under atmospheric pressure and the caking and coking properties of the treated coals were evaluated by caking indexes (GRI) and crucible coking characterizations. The results show that steam treatment can obviously increase the GRI of SF coal. When the steam treated coals were used in the coal blends instead of SF raw coal, the micro-strength index (MSI) and particle coke strength after reaction (PSR) of the coke increased, and particle coke reactivity index (PRI) decreased, which are beneficial for metallurgical coke to increase the gas permeability in blast furnace. The quality of the coke obtained from 8% of 200 °C steam treated SF coal in coal blends gets to that of the coke obtained from the standard coal blends, in which there was no SF coal addition in the coal blends. The removal of oxygen groups, especially hydroxyl group thus favoring the breakage of the coal macromolecules and allowing the treated coal formation of much more amount of hydrocarbons, may be responsible for the modified results. The mechanism of the steam treatment was proposed based on the elemental analysis, thermo gravimetric (TG) and FTIR spectrometer characterizations of the steam treated coal.

Hengfu Shui; Haiping Li; Hongtao Chang; Zhicai Wang; Zhi Gao; Zhiping Lei; Shibiao Ren

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

INTERACTION OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH A STRONG ACID AND A STRONG BASE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

molten sodium hydroxide. coal ash. and glass. b, Ultimatealmost all the ash constituents of coal, and hence ofash composition The ash composition bituminous coals 39 are

Seth, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies and PDU scale-up with sub-bituminous coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Reported are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using sub-bituminous coal conducted at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-88PC88818 during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with testing of the baseline Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process with comparisons with other two stage process configurations, catalyst evaluations and unit operations such as solid separation, pretreatments, on-line hydrotreating, and an examination of new concepts. In the overall program, three coals were evaluated, bituminous Illinois No. 6, Burning Star and sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The runs (experiments) concern process variables, variable reactor volumes, catalysts (both supported, dispersed and rejuvenated), coal cleaned by agglomeration, hot slurry treatments, reactor sequence, on-line hydrotreating, dispersed catalyst with pretreatment reactors and CO{sub 2}/coal effects. The tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico Coals are reported herein, and the tests involving the Illinois coal are described in Topical Report No. 2. On a laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects were conducted and reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer such as: rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids and cleaned coals. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL{trademark} process are described in the CTSL{trademark} Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.T.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Mercury emissions during cofiring of sub-bituminous coal and biomass (chicken waste, wood, coffee residue, and tobacco stalk) in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor  

SciTech Connect

Four types of biomass (chicken waste, wood pellets, coffee residue, and tobacco stalks) were cofired at 30 wt % with a U.S. sub-bituminous coal (Powder River Basin Coal) in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor. A cyclone, followed by a quartz filter, was used for fly ash removal during tests. The temperatures of the cyclone and filter were controlled at 250 and 150{sup o}C, respectively. Mercury speciation and emissions during cofiring were investigated using a semicontinuous mercury monitor, which was certified using ASTM standard Ontario Hydra Method. Test results indicated mercury emissions were strongly correlative to the gaseous chlorine concentrations, but not necessarily correlative to the chlorine contents in cofiring fuels. Mercury emissions could be reduced by 35% during firing of sub-bituminous coal using only a quartz filter. Cofiring high-chlorine fuel, such as chicken waste (Cl = 22340 wppm), could largely reduce mercury emissions by over 80%. When low-chlorine biomass, such as wood pellets (Cl = 132 wppm) and coffee residue (Cl = 134 wppm), is cofired, mercury emissions could only be reduced by about 50%. Cofiring tobacco stalks with higher chlorine content (Cl = 4237 wppm) did not significantly reduce mercury emissions. Gaseous speciated mercury in flue gas after a quartz filter indicated the occurrence of about 50% of total gaseous mercury to be the elemental mercury for cofiring chicken waste, but occurrence of above 90% of the elemental mercury for all other cases. Both the higher content of alkali metal oxides or alkali earth metal oxides in tested biomass and the occurrence of temperatures lower than 650{sup o}C in the upper part of the fluidized bed combustor seemed to be responsible for the reduction of gaseous chlorine and, consequently, limited mercury emissions reduction during cofiring. 36 refs., 3 figs. 1 tab.

Yan Cao; Hongcang Zhou; Junjie Fan; Houyin Zhao; Tuo Zhou; Pauline Hack; Chia-Chun Chan; Jian-Chang Liou; Wei-ping Pan [Western Kentucky University (WKU), Bowling Green, KY (USA). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Impacts of halogen additions on mercury oxidation, in a slipstream selective catalyst reduction (SCR), reactor when burning sub-bituminous coal  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a comparison of impacts of halogen species on the elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in a real coal-derived flue gas atmosphere. It is reported there is a higher percentage of Hg(0) in the flue gas when burning sub-bituminous coal (herein Powder River Basin (PRB) coal) and lignite, even with the use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The higher Hg(0) concentration in the flue gas makes it difficult to use the wet-FGD process for the mercury emission control in coal-fired utility boilers. Investigation of enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of hydrogen halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI) was conducted in a slipstream reactor with and without SCR catalysts when burning PRB coal. Two commercial SCR catalysts were evaluated. SCR catalyst no. 1 showed higher efficiencies of both NO reduction and Hg(0) oxidation than those of SCR catalyst no. 2. NH{sub 3} addition seemed to inhibit the Hg(0) oxidation, which indicated competitive processes between NH{sub 3} reduction and Hg(0) oxidation on the surface of SCR catalysts. The hydrogen halogens, in the order of impact on Hg(0) oxidation, were HBr, HI, and HCl or HF. Addition of HBr at approximately 3 ppm could achieve 80% Hg(0) oxidation. Addition of HI at approximately 5 ppm could achieve 40% Hg(0) oxidation. In comparison to the empty reactor, 40% Hg(0) oxidation could be achieved when HCl addition was up to 300 ppm. The enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of HBr and HI seemed not to be correlated to the catalytic effects by both evaluated SCR catalysts. The effectiveness of conversion of hydrogen halogens to halogen molecules or interhalogens seemed to be attributed to their impacts on Hg(0) oxidation. 30 refs., 4 figs.

Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jiashun Zhu; Quanhai Wang; Yaji Huang; Chengchung Chiu; Bruce Parker; Paul Chu; Wei-ping Pan [Western Kentucky University (WKU), Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing: Direct coal liquefaction of rawhide sub-bituminous coal. Final topical report, June 1994--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

Supported catalysts, either in fixed bed or ebullating bed reactors, are subject to deactivation with time, especially if the feed contains deactivating species, such as metals and coke precursors. Dispersed catalyst systems avoid significant catalyst deactivation because there are no catalyst pores to plug, hence no pore mouth plugging, and hopefully, no relevant decline of catalyst surface area or pore volume. The tests carried out in 1994, at the Exxon Research and Development Laboratories (ERDL) for DOE covered a slate of 5 dispersed catalysts for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal, which is similar to the Black Thunder coal tested earlier at Wilsonville. The catalysts included three iron and two molybdenum types. The Bailey iron oxide and the two molybdenum catalysts have previously been tested in DOE-sponsored research. These known catalysts will be used to help provide a base line and tie-in to previous work. The two new catalysts, Bayferrox PK 5210 and Mach-1`s Nanocat are very finely divided iron oxides. The iron oxide addition rate was varied from 1.0 to 0.25 wt % (dry coal basis) but the molybdenum addition rate remained constant at 100 wppm throughout the experiments. The effect of changing recycle rate, sulfur and iron oxide addition rates, first stage reactor temperature, mass velocity and catalyst type were tested in the 1994 operations of ERDL`s recycle coal liquefaction unit (RCLU). DOE will use these results to update economics and plan future work. The test program will resume in mid 1995, with another 2-3 months of pilot plant testing.

Coless, L.A.; Poole, M.C.; Wen, M.Y.

1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

8

Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing: Direct coal liquification of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal. Technical report, July 1995--December 1995  

SciTech Connect

In 1994 extensive tests were conducted in the Exxon Research and Engineering Recycle Coal Liquefaction Unit (RCLU) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The work conducted in 1994 explored a variety of dispersed iron molybdenum promoted catalyst systems for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide subbituminus coal. The goal was to identify the preferred iron system. We learned that among the catalysts tested, all were effective; however, none showed a large process advantage over the others. In 1995, we tested dispersed molybdenum catalysts systems for direct coal liquefaction on a second subbituminous coal, Black Thunder. Catalyst properties are shown in Table 1. We also checked a molybdenum promoted iron case, as well as the impact of process variables, such as sulfur type, hydrogen treat rate, and catalyst addition rate, as shown in Table 2. In 1995, we ran 18 material balances over a 7 week period, covering 7 conditions. This report covers the 1995 operations and results.

Coless, L.A.; Poole, M.C.; Wen, M.Y.

1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

9

China Energy Primer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reserves, 54.4% were bituminous (including anthracite), 29.4% were sub-bituminous, and 16.2% were lignite.

Ni, Chun Chun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Definition: Bituminous coal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bituminous coal Bituminous coal Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Bituminous coal A dense coal, usually black, sometimes dark brown, often with well-defined bands of bright and dull material, used primarily as fuel in steam-electric power generation, with substantial quantities also used for heat and power applications in manufacturing and to make coke; contains 45-86% carbon.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Bituminous coal or black coal is a relatively soft coal containing a tarlike substance called bitumen. It is of higher quality than lignite coal but of poorer quality than anthracite. Formation is usually the result of high pressure being exerted on lignite. Its composition can be black and sometimes dark brown; often there are well-defined bands of bright and dull

11

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Coal Rank, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Bituminous",,"Subbituminous",,"Lignite",,"Anthracite",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Number...

12

Curriculum Support Maps for the Study of Indiana Coal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

": lignite, subbituminous, bituminous, and anthracite. Indiana coals are bituminous and composed of 55 to 79 nearly 17 billion tons is recoverable. These reserves could last another 585 years at the current rate

Polly, David

13

Process for separating anthracite coal from impurities  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for separating a first mixture including previously mined anthracite coal, klinker-type cinder ash and other refuse consisting of: a. separating the first mixture to produce a refuse portion and a second mixture consisting of anthracite and klinker-type cinder ash, b. reducing the average particle size in the second mixture to a uniform size, c. subjecting the second mixture to a separating magnetic field to produce a klinker-type cinder ash portion and an anthracite coal portion.

Stiller, D.W.; Stiller, A.H.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

14

Definition: Anthracite coal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

coal Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Anthracite coal A hard, brittle, and black lustrous coal, often referred to as hard coal; contains 86-97% carbon, and generally has...

15

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Table 7.2 Coal Production, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year Rank Mining Method Location Total 1 Bituminous Coal 1 Subbituminous Coal Lignite Anthracite 1...

16

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Table 7.9 Coal Prices, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Short Ton) Year Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite 1 Anthracite Total Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3...

17

Comparative Study of Gasification Performance between Bituminous Coal and Petroleum Coke in the Industrial Opposed Multiburner Entrained Flow Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SUMMARY : Co-gasification performance of coal and petroleum coke (petcoke) blends in a pilot-scale pressurized entrained-flow gasifier was studied exptl. ... Two different coals, including a subbituminous coal (Coal A) and a bituminous coal (Coal B), individually blended with a petcoke in the gasifier were considered. ... results suggested that, when the petcoke was mixed with Coal A over 70%, the slagging problem, which could shorten the operational period due to high ash content in the coal, was improved. ...

Zhonghua Sun; Zhenghua Dai; Zhijie Zhou; Jianliang Xu; Guangsuo Yu

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

18

HYDROGENOLYSIS OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH MOLTEN ZINC CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Liquefaction and Gasification of Western Coals", in5272 (1976). COal Processing - Gasification, Liguefaction,or gaseous fuels, coal gasification has advanced furthest

Holten, R.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

HYDROGENOLYSIS OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH MOLTEN ZINC CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the loss of Zn to the coal ash (which appears to invoLve ionhydrocracking is the catalyst/coal ash interaction typifiedof chlorides of metals found in coal ash is of interest, and

Holten, R.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Hydrothermal Treatment of a Sub-bituminous Coal and Its Use in Coking Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crucible coking determinations suggest that hydrothermal treatment can greatly increase the coke strength and the particle coke strength after reaction toward CO2 and decrease the coke reactivity when the hydrothermally treated coals were used in the coal blends instead of the raw coal. ... While the cokes from the crucible coking experiments were subjected to 800 rotations at a speed of 25 rpm, the weight percent of coke particles (>0.2 ... The coal charges were coked in the lab. ...

Hengfu Shui; Ye Wu; Zhicai Wang; Zhiping Lei; Changhui Lin; Shibiao Ren; Chunxiu Pan; Shigang Kang

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

THE EFFECTS OF SOLVENTS ON SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL BELOW ITS PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. S. , "Solvent Treatment of Coal", Mills and Boon, London,of this solvent with the coal structure. When coupled withis indeed quite an unusual coal solvent. REFEREMCES Oele, A.

Grens III., Edward A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

INTERACTION OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH A STRONG ACID AND A STRONG BASE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I.D I.D XBL 7111- 11389 g. s urn coal iurn REfERENCES 1. W.H. Wiser, Coal Catalysis, Proceedings of the EPRIC. Howard. Chern; (John Wil of Coal Utilization H. H. lowry.

Seth, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

HYDROGENOLYSIS OF A SUB-BITUMINOUS COAL WITH MOLTEN ZINC CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 22, 1974. Project Western Coal: Conversion of Coal Intoand Gasification of Western Coals", in proceedings of ERDA/Investigators' Conference - Coal Research, Colorado School

Holten, R.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Upgrading of Pitch Produced by Mild Gasification of Subbituminous Cal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Upgrading of Pitch Produced by Mild Gasification of Subbituminous Cal ... Structural Characterization of Coal Tar Pitches Obtained by Heat Treatment under Different Conditions ...

Robert L. McCormick; Mahesh C. Jha

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Fine Anthracite Coal Washing Using Spirals  

SciTech Connect

The spiral performed well in cleaning the coarse 8 x 16 mesh size fraction, as demonstrated by the Ep ranging from 0.091 to 0.177. This is in line with typical spiral performance. In addition, the presence of the coarser size fraction did not significantly affect spiral performance on the typical 16 x 100 mesh fraction, in which the Ep ranged from 0.144 to 0.250. Changes in solids concentration and flow rate did not show a clear correlation with spiral performance. However, for difficult-to-clean coals with high near-gravity material, such as this anthracite, a single-stage spiral cleaning such a wide size fraction may not be able to achieve the clean coal ash and yield specifications required. In the first place, while the performance of the spiral on the coarse 8 x 16 mesh fraction is good with regard to Ep, the cutpoints (SG50s) are high (1.87 to 1.92), which may result in a clean coal with a higher-than-desired ash content. And second, the combination of the spiral's higher overall cutpoint (1.80) with the high near-gravity anthracite results in significant misplaced material that increases the clean coal ash error. In a case such as this, one solution may be to reclean the clean coal and middlings from the first-stage spiral in a second stage spiral.

R.P. Killmeyer; P.H. Zandhuis; M.V. Ciocco; W. Weldon; T. West; D. Petrunak

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

High temperature air-blown gasification of Korean anthracite and plastic waste mixture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Korean anthracite is too high in ash contents and low in calorific value to be used as an industrial energy source, the demand for anthracite has rapidly decreased and its competitiveness weakened. To overcome...

Young-Chan Choi; Jae-Goo Lee; Jae-Ho Kim…

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

JV Task 126 - Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Bituminous Coal  

SciTech Connect

The EERC developed an applied research consortium project to test cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for utilities burning bituminous coals. The project goal was to test innovative Hg control technologies that have the potential to reduce Hg emissions from bituminous coal-fired power plants by {ge}90% at costs of one-half to three-quarters of current estimates for activated carbon injection (ACI). Hg control technology evaluations were performed using the EERC's combustion test facility (CTF). The CTF was fired on pulverized bituminous coals at 550,000 Btu/hr (580 MJ/hr). The CTF was configured with the following air pollution control devices (APCDs): selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFDS). The Hg control technologies investigated as part of this project included ACI (three Norit Americas, Inc., and eleven Envergex sorbents), elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation catalysts (i.e., the noble metals in Hitachi Zosen, Cormetech, and Hitachi SCR catalysts), sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) (a proprietary EERC additive, trona, and limestone), and blending with a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. These Hg control technologies were evaluated separately, and many were also tested in combination.

Jason Laumb; John Kay; Michael Jones; Brandon Pavlish; Nicholas Lentz; Donald McCollor; Kevin Galbreath

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

28

Lignin as Both Fuel and Fusing Binder in Briquetted Anthracite Fines for Foundry Coke Substitute.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lignin that had been extracted from Kraft black liquor was investigated as a fusing binder in briquetted anthracite fines for a foundry coke substitute. Cupola… (more)

Lumadue, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Factors Related to the Residence Time of Fine Particle Concerning the Burnout of Fujian Anthracite During Combustion in CFB Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Factors related to the residence time of fine Fujian anthracite coke particle during combustion in CFB boiler which would affect its burnout were ... burnout of Fujian anthracite particle during combustion in CFB

Jieqing Zheng; Hongzhou He

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Bituminous pavement recycling Aravind K. and Animesh Das  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bituminous pavement recycling Aravind K. and Animesh Das Department of Civil Engineering IIT Kanpur Introduction The bituminous pavement rehabilitation alternatives are mainly overlaying, recycling and reconstruction. In the recycling process the material from deteriorated pavement, known as reclaimed asphalt

Das, Animesh

31

NETL - Bituminous Baseline Performance and Cost Interactive Tool | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NETL - Bituminous Baseline Performance and Cost Interactive Tool NETL - Bituminous Baseline Performance and Cost Interactive Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bituminous Baseline Performance and Cost Interactive Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/results.asp?ptype=Models/Too References: Bituminous Baseline Performance and Cost Interactive Tool [1] Bituminous Baseline Performance and Cost Interactive Tool The Bituminous Baseline Performance and Cost Interactive Tool illustrates key data from the Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants - Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity report. The tool provides an

32

Co-Combustion of Refuse Derived Fuel with Anthracites in a CFB Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combustion of Refuse derived fuel (RDF) is considered as a priority solution to energy recovery from municipal solid waste (MSW). The co-combustion characteristics of anthracite coals with RDF were determined in ...

Dong-Won Kim; Jong-Min Lee; Jae-Sung Kim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Use of POTW biosolids in bituminous concrete  

SciTech Connect

Although wastewater treatment helps alleviate water pollution, it creates residual by-products that can pose a disposal dilemma. Four main practices are presently employed to dispose of wastewater treatment plant sludge: land application, composting, incineration, and landfilling. A fifth disposal method that may help to alleviate the sludge disposal problem in future years is the incorporation of sludge into useful end products such as fertilizer or construction materials. This research was designed to evaluate the properties of bituminous concrete mixes that had anaerobically digested sewage sludge incorporated into their design. In doing so, it was desired to verify the work of Wells concerning sludge incorporation into bituminous concrete mixes using today`s asphalts. Hot mix and cold mix designs were studied.

Smith, R.C. [Jones and Henry Engineers, Ltd., Toledo, OH (United States); Angelbeck, D.I. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Emissions, Monitoring, and Control of Mercury from Subbituminous Coal-Fired Power Plants - Phase II  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI), in conjunction with Western Farmers Electric Cooperative (WFEC), has teamed with Clean Air Engineering of Pittsburgh PA to conduct a mercury monitoring program at the WEFC Hugo plant in Oklahoma. Sponsored by US Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-26-98FT40323, the program included the following members of the Subbituminous Energy Coalition (SEC) as co-sponsors: Missouri Basin Power Project; DTE Energy; Entergy; Grand River Dam Authority; and Nebraska Public Power District. This research effort had five objectives: (1) determine the mass balance of mercury for subbituminous coal-fired power plant; (2) assess the distribution of mercury species in the flue gas (3) perform a comparison of three different Hg test methods; (4) investigate the long-term (six months) mercury variability at a subbituminous coal-fired power plant; and (5) assess operation and maintenance of the Method 324 and Horiba CEMS utilizing plant personnel.

Alan Bland; Jesse Newcomer; Allen Kephart; Volker Schmidt; Gerald Butcher

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry: Chapter 2: Coal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Coal Coal is a mixture of organic mineral material produced by a natural process of growth and decay, or an accumulation of debris both vegetal and mineral with some sorting and stratification. The process is accomplished by chemical, biological, bacteriological and metamorphic action. 1 Forms of Coal Coal is a hydrocarbon that is classified according to the amount of heat it produces. Heat content depends upon the amount of fixed carbon it contains. Rank is the degree of progressive alteration in the transformation from lignite to anthracite. There are four primary ranks of coal: * Anthracite (semi-anthracite, anthracite, and meta-anthracite) * Bituminous (high-volatile, medium-volatile, and low-volatile) * Subbituminous * Lignite (brown coal and lignite)

36

Co-carbonization of two anthracites with a fat coal or two pitches  

SciTech Connect

The blends of two anthracite powders (YQ and JC) with a fat coal (C4) or a petroleum pitch (PP) or a coal tar pitch (CTP) in different proportions were co-carbonized at 3{sup o}C/min up to 1000{sup o}C in an experimental 1 kg coke oven. Coke yield, coke particulate size, coke micro-strength and coke cracking strength were measured respectively. Coke optical textures were watched under a microscope. The results show that as anthracite proportion increases, coke yields of all blends improve; > 0.8 mm lump coke yields of blends with CTP or PP decline slightly, blends with C4 drop heavily; coke microstrengths do not change sharply, and coke cracking strength of blends with C4 or PP decrease more than blends with CTP. C4 produces fine-grained mosaics, and two anthracites are mainly fusinite and fragments, PP is coarse-grained mosaics, and CTP is chiefly flow or domain textures. Independent optical textures were observed in cokes. There exist evident borders between the two contact optical textures which were produced by different components, and a few phenomena that domain or flow textures penetrating into fusinite appeared in the blends. It seems that CTP is the best adhesives for blending with anthracites for producing high quality cokes.

Shen, J.; Wang, Z.Z. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). College of Chemical Engineering & Technology

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

INTERACTION OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS WITH A SUBBITUMINOUS COAL BELOW PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and P. Fugassi, Phenanthrene Extraction of Bituminous Coal,Coal Science, Advances in Chemistry Series No. 55, 448 C.Mechanism of High Volatile Coal, Coal Science, Advances in

Dorighi, G.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Gasification of an Indonesian subbituminous coal in a pilot-scale coal gasification system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indonesian Roto Middle subbituminous coal was gasified in a pilot-scale dry-feeding gasification system and the produced syngas was purified...2, and 5–8% CO2. Particulates in syngas were 99.8% removed by metal f...

Yongseung Yun; Seok Woo Chung

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Evaluation of an alternative bituminous material as a soil stabilizer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asphalt cements, cutback asphalts, and emulsified asphalts are used as bituminous stabilizing agents in the pavement systems. The emulsified asphalts are increasingly used in lieu of cutback asphalts because of environmental regulations and safety...

Kim, Yong-Rak

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

INAA multielemental analysis of Nigerian bituminous coal and coal ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to analyzed Nigerian bituminous coal and ash. Good statistical agreement (p...?0.05) between the literature and reported elemental values of USGS AGV-1 sam...

V. O. Ogugbuaja; W. D. James

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Industrial coking of coal batch without bituminous coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years, Kuznetsk-coal batch has always included bituminous coal. Depending on the content of such coal, the batch may be characterized as lean ... classification was adopted by specialists of the Eastern

P. V. Shtark; Yu. V. Stepanov; N. K. Popova; D. A. Koshkarov…

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Evaluation of co-cokes from bituminous coal with vacuum resid or decant oil, and evaluation of anthracites, as precursors to graphite.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Graphite is utilized as a neutron moderator and structural component in some nuclear reactor designs. During the reactor operaction the structure of graphite is damaged… (more)

Nyathi, Mhlwazi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012" 1. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Bituminous","Subbituminous","Lignite","Anthracite","Total" "Alabama",106.57,"-","-","-",106.57 "Alaska","-","w","-","-","w" "Arizona","w","-","-","-","w" "Arkansas","w","-","-","-","w" "Colorado","w","w","-","-",37.54 "Illinois",53.08,"-","-","-",53.08 "Indiana",52.01,"-","-","-",52.01

44

Emissions, Monitoring and Control of Mercury from Subbituminous Coal-Fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The Subbituminous Energy Coalition (SEC) identified a need to re-test stack gas emissions from power plants that burn subbituminous coal relative to compliance with the EPA mercury control regulations for coal-fired plants. In addition, the SEC has also identified the specialized monitoring needs associated with mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEM). The overall objectives of the program were to develop and demonstrate solutions for the unique emission characteristics found when burning subbituminous coals. The program was executed in two phases; Phase I of the project covered mercury emission testing programs at ten subbituminous coal-fired plants. Phase II compared the performance of continuous emission monitors for mercury at subbituminous coal-fired power plants and is reported separately. Western Research Institute and a number of SEC members have partnered with Eta Energy and Air Pollution Testing to assess the Phase I objective. Results of the mercury (Hg) source sampling at ten power plants burning subbituminous coal concluded Hg emissions measurements from Powder River Basin (PBR) coal-fired units showed large variations during both ICR and SEC testing. Mercury captures across the Air Pollution Control Devices (APCDs) present much more reliable numbers (i.e., the mercury captures across the APCDs are positive numbers as one would expect compared to negative removal across the APCDs for the ICR data). Three of the seven units tested in the SEC study had previously shown negative removals in the ICR testing. The average emission rate is 6.08 lb/TBtu for seven ICR units compared to 5.18 lb/TBtu for ten units in the SEC testing. Out of the ten (10) SEC units, Nelson Dewey Unit 1, burned a subbituminous coal and petcoke blend thus lowering the total emission rate by generating less elemental mercury. The major difference between the ICR and SEC data is in the APCD performance and the mercury closure around the APCD. The average mercury removal values across the APCDs are 2.1% and 39.4% with standard deviations (STDs) of 1990 and 75%, respectively for the ICR and SEC tests. This clearly demonstrates that variability is an issue irrespective of using 'similar' fuels at the plants and the same source sampling team measuring the species. The study also concluded that elemental mercury is the main Hg specie that needs to be controlled. 2004 technologies such as activated carbon injection (ACI) may capture up to 60% with double digit lb/MMacf addition of sorbent. PRB coal-fired units have an Hg input of 7-15 lb/TBtu; hence, these units must operate at over 60% mercury efficiency in order to bring the emission level below 5.8 lb/TBtu. This was non-achievable with the best technology available as of 2004. Other key findings include: (1) Conventional particulate collectors, such as Cold-side Electro-Static Precipitators (CESPs), Hot-side Electro-Static Precipitator (HESP), and Fabric Filter (FF) remove nearly all of the particulate bound mercury; (2) CESPs perform better highlighting the flue gas temperature effect on the mercury removal. Impact of speciation with flue gas cooling is apparent; (3) SDA's do not help in enhancing adsorption of mercury vapor species; and (4) Due to consistently low chlorine values in fuels, it was not possible to analyze the impact of chlorine. In summary, it is difficult to predict the speciation at two plants that burn the same fuel. Non-fuel issues, such as flue gas cooling, impact the speciation and consequently mercury capture potential.

Alan Bland; Kumar Sellakumar; Craig Cormylo

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Ash Deposition Behavior of Upgraded Brown Coal and Bituminous Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ash Deposition Behavior of Upgraded Brown Coal and Bituminous Coal ... Ash with a low melting point causes slagging and fouling problems in pulverized coal combustion boilers. ... The ash composition in coal and operational conditions in boilers such as heat load greatly affect the ash deposition behavior. ...

Katsuya Akiyama; Haeyang Pak; Toshiya Tada; Yasuaki Ueki; Ryo Yoshiie; Ichiro Naruse

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

46

"1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Emission Factors" Fuel Emission Factors" "(From Appendix H of the instructions to Form EIA-1605)" "1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion1" "Fuel ",,"Emission Factor ",,"Units" "Coal2" "Anthracite",,103.69,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Bituminous",,93.28,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Sub-bituminous",,97.17,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Lignite",,97.72,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Electric Power Sector",,95.52,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Industrial Coking",,93.71,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Other Industrial",,93.98,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Residential/Commercial",,95.35,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Natural Gas3"

47

Steam gasification of Indonesian subbituminous coal with calcium carbonate as a catalyst raw material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of Ca catalysts prepared from CaCO3 on the steam gasification of Indonesian subbituminous coal at 700–800 °C is examined. The char obtained by pyrolyzing the coal with 0.59 wt.% of Ca (dry basis) showed conversions in steam gasification at 750 and 800 °C of around 70 and 90 wt.% (dry ash and catalyst free basis), which were 2 and 1.5 times larger than those of the coal without the Ca catalyst, respectively. The activity of this Ca catalyst was as high as that prepared using an aqueous solution of Ca(OH)2. The TPD and XRD measurements demonstrated that the Ca catalyst from CaCO3 was initially present in the ion-exchanged form, and as a finely dispersed calcium species after pyrolysis. These results confirm that CaCO3 is effective as a catalyst raw material in the steam gasification of subbituminous coal, even at low catalyst loadings.

Kenji Murakami; Masahiko Sato; Naoto Tsubouchi; Yasuo Ohtsuka; Katsuyasu Sugawara

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Development of a stack plume opacity index for subbituminous coal-fired utility boilers  

SciTech Connect

Powder River Basin subbituminous coals were burned using conventional and low-NO{sub x} combustion conditions in a drop-tube furnace equipped with a multicyclone ash collection device. Fine ash fractions (< 2 {micro}m in diameter) collected during the tests were analyzed using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM). Advances in particulate sample preparation methods enabled the CCSEM analysis of individual ash particles with submicron diameters as small as 0.1 {micro}m. The fine ash samples produced from the conventional combustion of coal consisted of discrete spherical particles, whereas particle agglomerates were characteristic of the low-NO{sub x} ash samples. Particle-size distributions of the low-NO{sub x} fine ash fractions were coarser because of the agglomeration. Theoretical light-scattering calculations indicate that for a given coal, the ash produced in low-NO{sub x} conditions causes less opacity as compared to conventional combustion conditions. The following phases were abundant in the ashes: Ca aluminosilicate, Ca aluminate, aluminosilicate, silica, (Ca, Mg)O, CaSO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2} SO{sub 4}, and (Na, K)Cl. Primary mechanisms that produced the fine ash include the thermal metamorphism of small (0.1 to 5 {micro}m) mineral grains and the vaporization and subsequent condensation of organically bound Na, Mg, and Ca, Empirical equations for estimating the concentration of fine ash produced from burning subbituminous coals were formulated into an opacity index based on CCSEM coal mineral and fine ash analyses and on drop-tube furnace testing results. The effects of ash electrical resistivity on electrostatic precipitator collection efficiency are also considered in the index.

Galbreath, K.C.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; McCollor, D.P.; Toman, D.L. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Pore size distribution and accessible pore size distribution in bituminous coals  

SciTech Connect

The porosity and pore size distribution of coals determine many of their properties, from gas release to their behavior on carbonization, and yet most methods of determining pore size distribution can only examine a restricted size range. Even then, only accessible pores can be investigated with these methods. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) are increasingly used to characterize the size distribution of all of the pores non-destructively. Here we have used USANS/SANS to examine 24 well-characterized bituminous and subbituminous coals: three from the eastern US, two from Poland, one from New Zealand and the rest from the Sydney and Bowen Basins in Eastern Australia, and determined the relationships of the scattering intensity corresponding to different pore sizes with other coal properties. The range of pore radii examinable with these techniques is 2.5 nm to 7 {micro}m. We confirm that there is a wide range of pore sizes in coal. The pore size distribution was found to be strongly affected by both rank and type (expressed as either hydrogen or vitrinite content) in the size range 250 nm to 7 {micro}m and 5 to 10 nm, but weakly in intermediate regions. The results suggest that different mechanisms control coal porosity on different scales. Contrast-matching USANS and SANS were also used to determine the size distribution of the fraction of the pores in these coals that are inaccessible to deuterated methane, CD{sub 4}, at ambient temperature. In some coals most of the small ({approx} 10 nm) pores were found to be inaccessible to CD{sub 4} on the time scale of the measurement ({approx} 30 min - 16 h). This inaccessibility suggests that in these coals a considerable fraction of inherent methane may be trapped for extended periods of time, thus reducing the effectiveness of methane release from (or sorption by) these coals. Although the number of small pores was less in higher rank coals, the fraction of total pores that was inaccessible was not rank dependent. In the Australian coals, at the 10 nm to 50 nm size scales the pores in inertinites appeared to be completely accessible to CD{sub 4}, whereas the pores in the vitrinite were about 75% inaccessible. Unlike the results for total porosity that showed no regional effects on relationships between porosity and coal properties, clear regional differences in the relationships between fraction of closed porosity and coal properties were found. The 10 to 50 nm-sized pores of inertinites of the US and Polish coals examined appeared less accessible to methane than those of the inertinites of Australian coals. This difference in pore accessibility in inertinites may explain why empirical relationships between fluidity and coking properties developed using Carboniferous coals do not apply to Australian coals.

Sakurovs, Richard [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell [ORNL; Blach, Tomasz P [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Combustion of high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes in a rotary kiln combustor with an advanced internal air distributor  

SciTech Connect

Fluid bed combustors have received extensive testing with both high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes. Rotary kilns are effective and popular devices for waste combustion. The Angelo Rotary Furnace{trademark} has been developed to improve the operation of rotary pyrolyzer/combustor systems through enhanced air distribution, which in this process is defined as staged, swirled combustion air injection. Fourteen of these new furnaces have been installed worldwide. Two units in Thailand, designed for rice hull feed with occasional lignite feed, have been recently started up. An older unit in Pennsylvania is being upgraded with a new, more advanced air distribution system for a series of tests this fall in which inexpensive high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes will be fired with limestone. The purposes of these tests are to determine the burning characteristics of these two fuels in this system, to discover the Ca/S ratios necessary for operation of a rotary kiln combusting these fuels, and to observe the gas-borne emissions from the furnace. An extensive preliminary design study will be performed on a commercial installation for combustion of anthracite wastes. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Cobb, J.T. Jr. (Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA)); Ahn, Y.K. (Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (USA)); Angelo, J.F. (Universal Energy International, Inc., Little Rock, AR (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Liquefaction of calcium-containing subbituminous coals and coals of lower rank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the treatment of a calcium-containing subbituminous coal and coals of lower rank to form insoluble, thermally stable calcium salts which remain within the solids portions of the residue on liquefaction of the coal, thereby suppressing the formation scale, made up largely of calcium carbonate deposits, e.g., vaterite, which normally forms within the coal liquefaction reactor (i.e., coal liquefaction zone), e.g., on reactor surfaces, lines, auxiliary equipment and the like. A solution of a compound or salt characterized by the formula MX, where M is a Group IA metal of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X is an anion which is capable of forming water-insoluble, thermally stable calcium compounds, is maintained in contact with a particulate coal feed sufficient to impregnate said salt or compound into the pores of the coal. On separation of the impregnated particulate coal from the solution, the coal can be liquefied in a coal liquefaction reactor (reaction zone) at coal liquefaction conditions without significant formation of vaterite or other forms of calcium carbonate on reactor surfaces, auxiliary equipment and the like; and the Group IA metal which remains within the liquefaction bottoms catalyzes the reaction when the liquefaction bottoms are subjected to a gasification reaction.

Gorbaty, Martin L. (Sanwood, NJ); Taunton, John W. (Seabrook, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Performance of Low Energy Crumb Rubber Modified Bituminous Mixes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Rising energy costs and increased awareness of emission problems in the production of Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) have brought attention to the potential benefits of Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) in India. Warm-mix asphalt is the generic term for a variety of technologies that allow the producers of hot-mix asphalt pavement material to lower the temperatures at which the material is mixed and placed on the road. Crumb Rubber Modified Bitumen (CRMB) is a popular binder in India. CRMB is composed of bitumen binder and tyre rubber. Tyre rubber, at various percentages, is added to the binder, addition of tyre rubber into binder results in a new product, which requires higher mixing temperatures compared to the conventional one, as well as increased mixing time, so as to get the uniformity of the product. A laboratory study was conducted at CSIR-Central Road Research Institute (CRRI) to investigate, how a commercially available chemical additive can be used to bring down the mixing and compaction temperature of CRMB mix as compared to the hot mix CRMB. Four different temperature ranges were considered in this study viz 1000C to 1050C, 1100C to 1150C, 1200C to 1250C and 1300C to 1350C to determine the various performance characteristics. The CRMB bituminous mix was prepared in these four temperature ranges and various mix tests were carried out to indicate to how the lower production and compaction temperatures affect the properties and performance characteristics of the mixes. After the laboratory evaluation it was found that CRMB Warm mix can be successfully produced at temperature as low as 110 °C and can be compacted at 80- 900C as compared to CRMB hot mix (155 °C). Full scale performance study indicate that process is highly energy efficient and environment friendly, warm mixes performed equivalent to “Hot Bituminous Mixes” and indicated encouraging results. After laboratory evaluation, a test track was successfully laid using low energy Crumb Rubber Modified Bitumen.

Ambika Behl; Gajendra Kumar; Girish Sharma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Investigation of the combustion characteristics of Zonguldak bituminous coal using DTA and DTG  

SciTech Connect

Combustion characteristics of coking, semicoking, and noncoking Turkish bituminous coal samples from Zonguldak basin were investigated applying differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG) techniques. Results were compared with that of the coke from Zonguldak bituminous coal, a Turkish lignite sample from Soma, and a Siberian bituminous coal sample. The thermal data from both techniques showed some differences depending on the proximate analyses of the samples. Noncombustible components of the volatile matter led to important changes in thermal behavior. The data front both methods were, evaluated jointly, and some thermal properties were interpreted considering these methods in a complementary combination.

Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Okutan, H. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

54

Run 263 with Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal and dispersed molybdenum catalysts  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of Run 263 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run started on October 31, 1991 and continued until February 23, 1992. Tests were conducted by operating the reactors in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode and by processing Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal from Wyodak-Anderson seam in Wyoming Powder River Basin. Half volume reactors were used for the entire run. In the first part of Run 263, a dispersed molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for its performance without a supported catalyst in the second stage. Molyvan L and Molyvan 822 (commercially available as friction reducing lubricants) were used as precursors for the dispersed molybdenum catalyst. The effect of the dispersed catalyst on eliminating the solids buildup was also evaluated. For the second part of the run, the hybrid catalyst system was tested with supported Criterion 324 1/1611 catalyst in the second stage at catalyst replacement rates of 2 and 3 lb/ton of MF coal. The molybdenum concentration was 100--200 ppm based on MF coal. Iron oxide was used as a slurry catalyst precursor at a rate of 1--2 wt % MF coal throughout the run with dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) as the sulfiding agent. The close-coupled reactor unit was on-stream for 2482 hours for an on-stream factor of 91.2% and the ROSE-SR[sup sm] unit was on-feed for 2126 hours for an on-stream factor of 96.4% for the entire run.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Run 263 with Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal and dispersed molybdenum catalysts. Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of Run 263 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run started on October 31, 1991 and continued until February 23, 1992. Tests were conducted by operating the reactors in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode and by processing Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal from Wyodak-Anderson seam in Wyoming Powder River Basin. Half volume reactors were used for the entire run. In the first part of Run 263, a dispersed molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for its performance without a supported catalyst in the second stage. Molyvan L and Molyvan 822 (commercially available as friction reducing lubricants) were used as precursors for the dispersed molybdenum catalyst. The effect of the dispersed catalyst on eliminating the solids buildup was also evaluated. For the second part of the run, the hybrid catalyst system was tested with supported Criterion 324 1/1611 catalyst in the second stage at catalyst replacement rates of 2 and 3 lb/ton of MF coal. The molybdenum concentration was 100--200 ppm based on MF coal. Iron oxide was used as a slurry catalyst precursor at a rate of 1--2 wt % MF coal throughout the run with dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) as the sulfiding agent. The close-coupled reactor unit was on-stream for 2482 hours for an on-stream factor of 91.2% and the ROSE-SR{sup sm} unit was on-feed for 2126 hours for an on-stream factor of 96.4% for the entire run.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Thermo-Viscoelastic-Viscoplastic-Viscodamage-Healing Modeling of Bituminous Materials: Theory and Computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time- and rate-dependent materials such as polymers, bituminous materials, and soft materials clearly display all four fundamental responses (i.e. viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity, viscodamage, and healing) where contribution of each response...

Darabi Konartakhteh, Masoud

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

57

Physical and mechanical properties of bituminous mixtures containing oil shales  

SciTech Connect

Rutting of bituminous surfaces on the Jordanian highways is a recurring problem. Highway authorities are exploring the use of extracted shale oil and oil shale fillers, which are abundant in Jordan. The main objectives of this research are to investigate the rheological properties of shale oil binders (conventional binder with various percentages of shale oil), in comparison with a conventional binder, and to investigate the ability of mixes to resist deformation. The latter is done by considering three wearing course mixes containing three different samples of oil shale fillers--which contained three different oil percentages--together with a standard mixture containing limestone filler. The Marshall design method and the immersion wheel tracking machine were adopted. It was concluded that the shale oil binders displayed inconsistent physical properties and therefore should be treated before being used. The oil shale fillers have provided mixes with higher ability to resist deformation than the standard mix, as measured by the Marshall quotients and the wheel tracking machine. The higher the percentages of oil in the oil shale fillers, the lower the ability of the mixes to resist deformation.

Katamine, N.M.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Desulfurization and de-ashing of a mixture of subbituminous coal and gangue minerals by selective oil agglomeration  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to investigate desulfurization and de-ashing of a mixture of subbituminous coal and gangue minerals by the agglomeration method. For this purpose, experimental studies were conducted on a mixture containing subbituminous coal, pyrite, quartz and calcite. The effects of some parameters that markedly influence the effectiveness of selective oil agglomeration, such as solid concentration, pH, bridging liquid type and concentration, and depressant type and amount, were investigated. Agglomeration results showed that the usage of various depressants (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}, FeCl3, corn starch, wheat starch) in the agglomeration medium has a positive effect on the reduction of ash and total sulfur content of agglomerates. It was found that an agglomerate product containing 3.03% total sulfur and 25.01% ash with a total sulfur reduction of 56.71% was obtained from a feed that contained 7% total sulfur and 43.58% ash when FeCl{sub 3} was used in the agglomeration medium.

Ayhan, F.D. [Dicle University, Diyarbakir (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Co-gasification of Biomass and Non-biomass Feedstocks: Synergistic and Inhibition Effects of Switchgrass Mixed with Sub-bituminous Coal and Fluid Coke During CO2 Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co-gasification of biomass, namely, switchgrass, with coal and fluid coke was performed to investigate the availability of the gasification catalysts to the mixed feedstock, especially alkali and alkaline earth elements, naturally present on switchgrass. ...

Rozita Habibi; Jan Kopyscinski; Mohammad S. Masnadi; Jill Lam; John R. Grace; Charles A. Mims; Josephine M. Hill

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

60

Optimization of regimes for the feed of highly concentrated culm-anthracite coal dust for burning in a TPP-210A boiler  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented for regime adjustment of feed systems for a TPP-210A boiler for the burning of highly concentrated culm-anthracite coal dust. As compared with nonoptimal regimes, optimal regimes of high-concentration-feed systems improve the economy of the boiler by 1.7% on average.

L.V. Golyshev; G.A. Dovgoteles [JSC 'L'vovORGRES', L'vov (Ukraine)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Impact of coal quality and gasifier technology on IGCC performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it is estimated that 47 % of global coal reserves consist of lignite and sub-bituminous coals [2]. Several

62

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, 1949-2011 Total By Rank By Mining Method By Location 200 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Anthracite Lignite Subbituminous...

63

The First Coal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Plants Coal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 329-A January 25, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE FIRST COAL PLANTS Coal has been called "the mainspring" of our civilization. You are probably familiar, in a general way, with the story of how it originated ages ago from beds of peat which were very slowly changed to coal; and how it became lignite or brown coal, sub-bituminous, bituminous, or anthracite coal, depending on bacterial and chemical changes in the peat, how much it was compressed under terrific pressure, and the amount of heat involved in the process. You also know that peat is formed by decaying vegetation in shallow clear fresh-water swamps or bogs, but it is difficult to find a simple description of the kinds of plants that, living and dying during different periods of the earth's history, created beds of peat which eventually became coal.

64

Comparative analysis of structural transformations of two bituminous coals with different maximum fluidity during carbonization  

SciTech Connect

The variation of the volume of two bituminous coals with different maximum fluidity (MF) values has been determined using carbonization tests, and the quality of coke obtained has been examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. The structural and chemical changes in bituminous coals at the pre-plastic stage during carbonization were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) techniques and compared to the changes in their electric and dielectric parameters. It was observed that the structural and chemical transformations occurred in the disordered phase of both coals in different ways. These differences are attributed to the different redistributions of hydrogen between the radicals generated in the aliphatic and aromatic parts of the macromolecule fragments. 42 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Valentina Zubkova; Victor Prezhdo; Andrzej Strojwas [Jan Kochanowski University, Kielce (Poland). Institute of Chemistry

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

The mechanism of coking pressure generation II: Effect of high volatile matter coking coal, semi-anthracite and coke breeze on coking pressure and contraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the most important aspects of the cokemaking process is to control and limit the coking pressure since excessive coking pressure can lead to operational problems and oven wall damage. Following on from a previous paper on plastic layer permeability we have studied the effect of contraction of semi-coke on coking pressure and the effect of organic additives on contraction. A link between contraction (or simulated contraction) outside the plastic layer and coking pressure was demonstrated. The interaction between this contraction, local bulk density around the plastic layer and the dependence of the permeability of the plastic layer on bulk density was discussed as possible mechanisms for the generation of coking pressure. The effect of blending either a high volatile matter coal or one of two semi-anthracites with low volatile matter, high coking pressure coals on the coking pressure of the binary blends has been explained using this mechanism.

Merrick Mahoney; Seiji Nomura; Koichi Fukuda; Kenji Kato; Anthony Le Bas; David R. Jenkins; Sid McGuire

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbent InjectIon for Small eSP Sorbent InjectIon for Small eSP mercury control In low Sulfur eaStern bItumInouS coal flue GaS Background Full-scale field testing has demonstrated the effectiveness of activated carbon injection (ACI) as a mercury-specific control technology for certain coal-fired power plants, depending on the plant's coal feedstock and existing air pollution control device configuration. In a typical configuration, powdered activated carbon (PAC) is injected downstream of the plant's air heater and upstream of the existing particulate control device - either an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) or a fabric filter (FF). The PAC adsorbs the mercury from the combustion flue gas and is subsequently captured along with the fly ash in the ESP or FF. ACI can have some negative side

67

Kinetics of steam gasification of bituminous coals in terms of their use for underground coal gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The kinetics of steam gasification was examined for bituminous coals of a low coal rank. The examined coals can be the raw material for underground coal gasification. Measurements were carried out under isothermal conditions at a high pressure of 4 MPa and temperatures of 800, 900, 950, and 1000 °C. Yields of gasification products such as carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane were calculated based on the kinetic curves of formation reactions of these products. Also carbon conversion degrees are presented. Moreover, calculations were made of the kinetic parameters of carbon monoxide and hydrogen formation reaction in the coal gasification process. The parameters obtained during the examinations enable a preliminary assessment of coal for the process of underground coal gasification.

Stanis?aw Porada; Grzegorz Czerski; Tadeusz Dziok; Przemys?aw Grzywacz; Dorota Makowska

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Soft coal, hard choices: The economic welfare of bituminous coal miners, 1890-1930  

SciTech Connect

Price Fishback, an economist at the University of Arizona, has looked backward and studied the economic welfare of the bituminous coal miner during the industry's ascendancy, from 1890 to 1930. The result is an impressive work which should be of interest to all students of Appalachia. His account combines economic theory and quantitative evidence to examine the historical record. There are chapters on the coal market during the period as well as appendices presenting the technical basis for the author's work. Chapters are devoted to a discussion of wages and the role of the unions, accident/safety legislation and workers compensation. Living conditions in the company town and the role of the company store are explored as well as the economic development of the region. Labor shortages, subsequent hiring of minorities, and the social problems associated with discrimination and segragation are discussed. Finally, Fishback examines the strike data and draws conclusions about why miners chose to strike.

Fishback, P.V.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Weighted Average Cost of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Fossil Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite All Coal Ranks...

70

China Energy Databook - Rev. 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lignite Hydropower f Uranium U Unless otherwise noted, "reserves"Reserves * for Selected Countries Coal (Mt) Bituminous & Subbituminous Crude Oil Natural Gas Hydropower f Uranium H & Lignite (

Sinton Editor, J.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 4.8 Coal Demonstrated Reserve Base, January 1, 2011 (Billion Short Tons) Region and State Anthracite Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite Total Underground Surface Underground Surface Underground Surface Surface 1 Underground Surface Total Appalachian .............................................. 4.0 3.3 68.2 21.9 0.0 0.0 1.1 72.1 26.3 98.4 Alabama ................................................... .0 .0 .9 2.1 .0 .0 1.1 .9 3.1 4.0 Kentucky, Eastern .................................... .0 .0 .8 9.1 .0 .0 .0 .8 9.1 9.8 Ohio .......................................................... .0 .0 17.4 5.7 .0 .0 .0 17.4 5.7 23.1

72

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

prices prices are developed for the following three categories: coking coal; steam coal (all noncoking coal); and coal coke imports and exports. Coking coal, used in the industrial sector only, is a high-quality bitumi- nous coal that is used to make coal coke. Steam coal, which may be used by all sectors, includes anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, and lignite. In the industrial sector, coal consumption is the sum of cok- ing coal and steam coal. The industrial coal price is the quantity- weighted average price of these two components. Imports and exports of coal coke are available only on the national level and are accounted for in the industrial sector. Coal coke imports and ex- ports are reported separately and are not averaged with other coal prices and expenditures. Coking Coal Coking coal is generally more expensive than steam coal; therefore, it is identified separately

73

Production of low ash coal by thermal extraction with N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Present study was conducted for the purpose of producing low ash coal from LRC (low rank coals) such as lignite and sub-bituminous coal through thermal extraction using polar solvent. Extraction from bituminous coal

Sang Do Kim; Kwang Jae Woo; Soon Kwan Jeong…

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although lignite composes 16% of China’s coal reserves bys coal reserves are estimated to be 16% lignite by volume.reserves are classified as bituminous coal by volume, versus 29% sub-bituminous and 16% lignite.

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Influence of operating conditions and coal properties on \\{NOx\\} and N2O emissions in pressurized fluidized bed combustion of subbituminous coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This experimental study is aimed at finding effects of operating conditions in PFBC on nitrogen oxide emissions for subbituminous coals differing in ash content/composition, combustion/gasification reactivities and in particle size distribution. The experiments have been done on a smaller laboratory apparatus with ID=8 cm. The effects of operating pressure (0.1–1 MPa), temperature of the fluidized bed (800–900 °C), freeboard temperature and oxygen concentration (3–10 vol.%) on the nitrogen oxides emissions are relatively complex, coupled with temperature of burning coal particles. The coal ash content/composition (esp. CaO and Fe2O3) and fly ash freeboard concentration play an important role in formation/destruction chemistry of both NO and N2O. The \\{NOx\\} emissions decrease with increasing operating pressure at the same volumetric oxygen concentration and temperature. Temperature, volatile content, reactivities of coals and ash composition are the most important factors for N2O emissions. The N2O emissions are either almost constant or can exhibit a maximum at increasing operating pressure. Influence of increasing oxygen concentration on \\{NOx\\} and N2O emissions is more pronounced at lower operating pressures, esp. for the less reactive, medium ash coal. The particle size distribution of the coal (influence of coal dust) can cause characteristic changes in \\{NOx\\} and N2O emissions in PFBC, esp. at lower combustion temperatures (800–840 °C). The emission changes are dependent on ash properties/composition.

Karel Svoboda; Michael Poho?elý

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Production characteristics and drainage optimization of coalbed methane wells: A case study from low-permeability anthracite hosted reservoirs in southern Qinshui Basin, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Monitoring the production from 94 coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the southern part of the Qinshui Basin of China this study demonstrates production characteristics of CBM wells, and how the incorrect production system, including improper water drainage rates and wellhead pressures, can lead to diminished gas production. Using data from these wells our results suggest that high-production rate wells, medium-production rate wells, low-production rate wells, and drainage wells, are controlled by drainage conditions in addition to the well location and structural geology. The analysis of drainage parameters shows that the maximum wellhead pressure should be maintained around 1.5 MPa before stable production, and between 0.10 MPa and 0.30 MPa after stable production. The most efficient average water production rate is approximately 4 m3/day before gas production and should be maintained near 1 m3/day during gas production. Initial daily average water production rate should be maintained around 1.5 m3/day. Maximum water production rate should be regulated between 4 and 17 m3/day. The rate of water level reduction should be within 4 m/d and drainage time should be maintained for 50–200 days prior to gas production. Implementation of these optimal drainage parameters will promote and sustain peak gas production for several years. In addition, reservoirs with adequate permeability, > 0.1 mD, are ideal for electric submersible pump systems while sucker-rod pumps are better suited for reservoirs with poor permeability. The combination of these operating conditions and the appropriate pumps optimizes the extraction efficiency and recovery of coalbed methane from the anthracitic coals in the Qinshui Basin.

Huihu Liu; Shuxun Sang; Michael Formolo; Mengxi Li; Shiqi Liu; Hongjie Xu; Shikai An; Junjun Li; Xingzhen Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Plant betterment for an anthracite-burning utility in Ukraine: Coal preparation as part of a SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulate emission control strategy  

SciTech Connect

Workers at the Energy Departments of the US and Ukraine have cooperatively devised a strategy for upgrading performance of a 200 MWe wet bottom pulverized coal boiler in eastern Ukraine at the Lugansk GRES power station. The plant currently burns poor quality anthracite (30% ash versus 18% ash design coal, as-received basis) and is in need of maintenance. Oil or gas support fuel in the amount of 30% (calorific basis) is required to stabilize the flame and supplement the calorific value of the coal feed. No NO{sub x} or SO{sub 2} controls are used at present, and unburned carbon content in the fly ash is high. An experimental program was carried out at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to estimate the improvement in plant performance that could be expected if the unit is supplied with design coal and is refurbished. High ash Ukrainian anthracite was cleaned to design specifications. Raw and cleaned coal were fed to a 490 MJ/h coal feed combustion unit at a number of conditions of support fuel use and ingress air leakage designed to simulate current and improved operations at the power plant. The results indicate the improvement in performance and reductions in SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions that can be expected as a result of the planned upgrade and conversion to use of cleaned coal. A detailed engineering and financial analysis indicates that plant rehabilitation combined with the use of cleaned schtib reduces not only pollutant emissions but also cost of electricity (COE). Additional benefits include increased plant life and capacity, and reduced supplementary fuel consumption.

Ruether, J.A.; Freeman, M.C. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center; Gollakota, S.V. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Experimental Investigation of the Combustion of Bituminous Coal in Air and O2/CO2 Mixtures: 1. Particle Imaging of the Combustion of Coal and Char  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental Investigation of the Combustion of Bituminous Coal in Air and O2/CO2 Mixtures: 1. Particle Imaging of the Combustion of Coal and Char ... (1, 2) Extensive studies in both pilot-plant and lab scales have pointed out the pronounced influence of gas composition (air versus O2/CO2) on coal combustion performance. ... By augmenting a companion paper on ash formation in air versus O2/CO2,(17) this study aims to provide further evidence to promote the understanding on the role of CO2 on the combustion of bituminous coal and hence shed new lights into the retrofitting of existing power generation plants with oxy-firing technology. ...

Lian Zhang; Eleanor Binner; Luguang Chen; Yu Qiao; Chun-Zhu Li; Sankar Bhattacharya; Yoshihiko Ninomiya

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

JV Task-123 Determination of Trace Element Concentrations at an Eastern Bituminous Coal Plant Employing an SCR and Wet FGD  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and with funding from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), conducting tests to prove that a high level of mercury control (>90%) can be achieved at a power plant burning a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. With funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), DOE, and Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates Program, the EERC completed an additional sampling project to provide data as to the behavior of a number of trace elements across the various pollution control devices, with a special emphasis on the wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Results showed that the concentrations of almost all the elements of interest leaving the stack were very low, and a high percentage of the trace elements were captured in the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) (for most, >80%). Although, with a few exceptions, the overall mass balances were generally quite good, the mass balances across the wet FGD were more variable. This is most likely a result of some of the concentrations being very low and also the uncertainties in determining flows within a wet FGD.

Dennis Laudal

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1146/annurev-earth-040610-133343 Copyright c 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved 0084 known as coalification; progresses from peat through lignite, subbituminous coal, bituminous coal

Macalady, Jenn

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Argonne Coal Structure Rearrangement Caused by Sorption of CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Argonne Coal Structure Rearrangement Caused by Sorption of CO2 ... The sorption of CO2 on seven Argonne premium coals was measured by using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy as a function of time at constant CO2 pressure (0.62 MPa) and temperature (55 °C). ... The following seven Argonne premium coals were investigated:? Upper Freeport (medium volatile bituminous), Pittsburgh No. 8 (high volatile bituminous), Lewiston?Stockton (high volatile bituminous), Blind Canyon (high volatile bituminous), Illinois No. 6 (high volatile bituminous), Wyodak (sub-bituminous), and Beulah Zap (lignite). ...

A. L. Goodman; R. N. Favors; John W. Larsen

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

Dike intrusions into bituminous coal, Illinois Basin: H, C, N, O isotopic responses to rapid and brief heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unlike long-term heating in subsiding sedimentary basins, the near-instantaneous thermal maturation of sedimentary organic matter near magmatic intrusions is comparable to artificial thermal maturation in the laboratory in terms of short duration and limited extent. This study investigates chemical and H, C, N, O isotopic changes in high volatile bituminous coal near two Illinois dike contacts and compares observed patterns and trends with data from other published studies and from artificial maturation experiments. Our study pioneers in quantifying isotopically exchangeable hydrogen and measuring the D/H (i.e., 2H/1H) ratio of isotopically non-exchangeable organic hydrogen in kerogen near magmatic contacts. Thermal stress in coal caused a reduction of isotopically exchangeable hydrogen in kerogen from 5% to 6% in unaltered coal to 2–3% at contacts, mostly due to elimination of functional groups (e.g., OH, COOH, NH2). In contrast to all previously published data on D/H in thermally matured organic matter, the more mature kerogen near the two dike contacts is D-depleted, which is attributed to (i) thermal elimination of D-enriched functional groups, and (ii) thermal drying of hydrologically isolated coal prior to the onset of cracking reactions, thereby precluding D-transfer from relatively D-enriched water into kerogen. Maxima in organic nitrogen concentration and in the atomic N/C ratio of kerogen at a distance of ?2.5 to ?3.5 m from the thicker dike indicate that reactive N-compounds had been pyrolytically liberated at high temperature closer to the contact, migrated through the coal seam, and recombined with coal kerogen in a zone of lower temperature. The same principle extends to organic carbon, because a strong ?13Ckerogen vs. ?15Nkerogen correlation across 5.5 m of coal adjacent to the thicker dike indicates that coal was functioning as a flow-through reactor along a dynamic thermal gradient facilitating back-reactions between mobile pyrolysis products from the hot zone as they encounter less hot kerogen. Vein and cell filling carbonate is most abundant in highest rank coals where carbonate ?13CVPDB and ?18OVSMOW values are consistent with thermal generation of 13C-depleted and 18O-enriched CO2 from decarboxylation and pyrolysis of organic matter. Lower background concentrations of 13C-enriched carbonate in thermally unaffected coal may be linked to 13C-enrichment in residual CO2 in the process of CO2 reduction via microbial methanogenesis. Our compilation and comparison of available organic H, C, N isotopic findings on magmatic intrusions result in re-assessments of majors factors influencing isotopic shifts in kerogen during magmatic heating. (i) Thermally induced shifts in organic ?D values of kerogen are primarily driven by the availability of water or steam. Hydrologic isolation (e.g., near Illinois dikes) results in organic D-depletion in kerogen, whereas more common hydrologic connectivity results in organic D-enrichment. (ii) Shifts in kerogen (or coal) ?13C and ?15N values are typically small and may follow sinusoidal patterns over short distances from magmatic contacts. Laterally limited sampling strategies may thus result in misleading and non-representative data. (iii) Fluid transport of chemically active, mobile carbon and nitrogen species and recombination reactions with kerogen result in isotopic changes in kerogen that are unrelated to the original, autochthonous part of kerogen.

Arndt Schimmelmann; Maria Mastalerz; Ling Gao; Peter E. Sauer; Katarina Topalov

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012 Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 31. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Anthracite Total Alabama 106.57 - - - 106.57 Alaska - w - - w Arizona w - - - w Arkansas w - - - w Colorado w w - - 37.54 Illinois 53.08 - - - 53.08 Indiana 52.01 - - - 52.01 Kentucky Total 63.12 - - - 63.12 Kentucky (East) 75.62 - - - 75.62 Kentucky (West) 48.67 - - - 48.67 Louisiana - - w - w Maryland 55.67 - - - 55.67 Mississippi - - w - w Missouri w - - - w Montana w 17.60 w - 18.11 New Mexico w w - - 36.74 North Dakota - - 17.40 - 17.40 Ohio 47.80 - - - 47.80 Oklahoma 59.63 - - - 59.63 Pennsylvania Total 72.57

84

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. World recoverable coal reserves as of January 1, 2009 2. World recoverable coal reserves as of January 1, 2009 billion short tons Recoverable reserves by coal rank Region/country Bituminous and anthracite Subbituminous Lignite Total 2010 production Reserves-to- production ratio (years) World total 445.0 285.9 215.2 946.1 7.954 119 United Statesa 118.4 107.2 33.1 258.6 1.084 238 Russia 54.1 107.4 11.5 173.1 0.359 482 China 68.6 37.1 20.5 126.2 3.506 36 Other non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 42.2 18.9 39.9 100.9 0.325 311 Australia and New Zealand 40.9 2.5 41.4 84.8 0.473 179 India 61.8 0.0 5.0 66.8 0.612 109 OECD Europe 6.2 0.9 54.5 61.6 0.620 99 Africa 34.7 0.2 0.0 34.9 0.286 122 Other non-OECD Asia 3.9 3.9 6.8 14.7 0.508 29 Other Central and South America 7.6 1.0 0.0 8.6 0.085 101

85

Conventional coal preparation in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Processing of bituminous and anthracite coal is widely practiced in the United States and, as mentioned earlier, about 80 percent of the production of these coals is processed as clean coal in preparation plants. Subbituminous coal is not widely processed, primarily because these low rank raw coals are low in sulfur (0.5 to 1.0 percent) and relatively low in ash (8 to 15 percent). They are also relatively low in heat content due to their high inherent moisture. Lignite coals, to the best of the authors{close_quote} knowledge, are not presently being processed in Conventional Coal Preparation plants. This is due to their unstable nature and putting them in water in a coal preparation plant is likely to cause severe degradation in particle size and add to their already high inherent moisture content. The following are the benefits of clean coal processing: produces a uniform product which can be utilized more efficiently; produces a higher quality product which results in higher efficiency at the power station or the steel mill; reduces sulfur dioxide and other adverse stack emissions during coal firing which is a very important environmental consideration; reduces ash or slag handling costs by the user; reduces shipping costs; and reduces handling and storage costs. Processing any stable raw coal in a coal preparation plant will always produce a higher grade product which is a more efficient and a more environmentally acceptable fuel for use at power stations, steel mills, home heating or industrial boilers.

Beck, M.K.; Taylor, B.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the U.S.-Resource Base  

SciTech Connect

By applying the multi-Hubbert curve analysis to coal production in the United States, we demonstrate that anthracite production can be modeled with a single Hubbert curve that extends to the practical end of commercial production of this highest-rank coal. The production of bituminous coal from existing mines is about 80% complete and can be carried out at the current rate for the next 20 years. The production of subbituminous coal from existing mines can be carried out at the current rate for 40-45 years. Significant new investment to extend the existing mines and build new ones would have to commence in 2009 to sustain the current rate of coal production, 1 billion tons per year, in 2029. In view of the existing data, we conclude that there is no spare coal production capacity of the size required for massive coal conversion to liquid transportation fuels. Our analysis is independent of other factors that will prevent large-scale coal liquefaction projects: the inefficiency of the process and either emissions of greenhouse gases or energy cost of sequestration.

Croft, Gregory D. [University of California, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States); Patzek, Tad W. [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States)], E-mail: patzek@mail.utexas.edu

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, . Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, 2002 through 2012 (Btu per Kilowatthour) Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Nuclear 2002 10,314 10,641 9,533 10,442 2003 10,297 10,610 9,207 10,422 2004 10,331 10,571 8,647 10,428 2005 10,373 10,631 8,551 10,436 2006 10,351 10,809 8,471 10,435 2007 10,375 10,794 8,403 10,489 2008 10,378 11,015 8,305 10,452 2009 10,414 10,923 8,159 10,459 2010 10,415 10,984 8,185 10,452 2011 10,444 10,829 8,152 10,464 2012 10,498 10,991 8,039 10,479 Coal includes anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous and lignite coal. Waste coal and synthetic coal are included starting in 2002. Petroleum includes distillate fuel oil (all diesel and No. 1 and No. 2 fuel oils), residual fuel oil (No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils and bunker C fuel oil, jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke, and waste oil.

88

table7.2_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; 2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Bituminous and NAICS Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Code(a) Subsector and Industry TOTAL Acetylene Breeze Total Anthracite Coal Lignite Coke Coke Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.1 2.1 0.6 0.9 0.6 0.9 1.4 0.7 0.9 311 Food 6.42 113.78 0 1.46 W 1.46 0 5.18 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 3.11 106.84 0 1.32 0 1.32 0 0 0 31131 Sugar 3.14 80.39 0 1.65 W 1.64 0 5.18 0 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 7.09 103.28 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 7.53 123.52 0 2.32 0 2.32 0 0 0 3121 Beverages 7.96 124.83

89

Hydrogen from Coal in a Single Step  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The CO2 generated, a greenhouse gas with a potential to contribute to global warming, is generally released to the atmosphere. ... The H2/CH4 ratio in the product gases from three different rank coals Datong coal (bituminous), Taiheiyo coal (sub-bituminous), Wyoming coal (lignite) followed the order Datong>Taiheiyo>Wyoming. ...

Kanchan Mondal; Krzystof Piotrowski; Debalina Dasgupta; Edwin Hippo; Tomasz Wiltowski

2005-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

90

Study of physical and chemical properties of vitrinites. Inferences on depositional and coalification controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, textural and coking properties was carried out on vitrains from the Puertollano, Blanzy­Montçeau, Asturias (subbituminous/high volatile C bituminous coals). The characteristics of the Puertollano vitrains described here can also be attributed to the telocollinite (>80% vol.) for the high volatile C bituminous coal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

91

Anthracite Power & Light | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56220 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility...

92

Evaluation of Control Strategies to Effectively Meet 70-90% Mercury Reduction on an Eastern Bituminous Coal Cyclone Boiler with SCR  

SciTech Connect

This is the final site report for testing conducted at Public Service of New Hampshire's (PSNH) Merrimack Unit 2 (MK2). This project was funded through the DOE/NETL Innovations for Existing Plants program. It was a Phase III project with the goal to develop mercury control technologies that can achieve 50-70% mercury capture at costs 25-50% less than baseline estimates of $50,000-$70,000/lb of mercury removed. While results from testing at Merrimack indicate that the DOE goal was partially achieved, further improvements in the process are recommended. Merrimack burned a test blend of eastern bituminous and Venezuelan coals, for a target coal sulfur content of 1.2%, in its 335-MW Unit 2. The blend ratio is approximately a 50/50 split between the two coals. Various sorbent injection tests were conducted on the flue gas stream either in front of the air preheater (APH) or in between the two in-series ESPs. Initial mercury control evaluations indicated that, without SO3 control, the sorbent concentration required to achieve 50% control would not be feasible, either economically or within constraints specific to the maximum reasonable particle loading to the ESP. Subsequently, with SO{sub 3} control via trona injection upstream of the APH, economically feasible mercury removal rates could be achieved with PAC injection, excepting balance-of-plant concerns. The results are summarized along with the impacts of the dual injection process on the air heater, ESP operation, and particulate emissions.

Tom Campbell

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report, September 20, 1991--September 19, 1993  

SciTech Connect

One of the main goals for competitive coal liquefaction is to decrease gas yields to reduce hydrogen consumption. Complexing this element as methane and ethane decreases process efficiently and is less cost effective. To decrease the gas yield and increase the liquid yield, an effective preconversion process has been explored on the basis of the physically associated molecular nature of coal. Activities have been focused on two issues: (1) maximizing the dissolution of associated coal and (2) defining the different reactivity associated with a wide molecular weight distribution. Two-step soaking at 350{degrees}C and 400{degrees}C in a recycle oil was found to be very effective for coal solubilization. No additional chemicals, catalysts, and hydrogen are required for this preconversion process. High-volatile bituminous coals tested before liquefaction showed 80--90% conversion with 50--55% oil yields. New preconversion steps suggested are as follows: (1) dissolution of coal with two-step high-temperature soaking, (2) separation into oil and heavy fractions of dissolved coal with vacuum distillation, and (3) selective liquefaction of the separated heavy fractions under relatively mild conditions. Laboratory scale tests of the proposed procedure mode using a small autoclave showed a 30% increase in the oil yield with a 15--20% decrease in the gas yield. This batch operation projects a substantial reduction in the ultimate cost of coal liquefaction.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lb for anthracite. The reserves of lignite on a weight basisand reserves. Typical energy contents of coal range from about 7,000 for ligniteReserves of the United States, 1974 (Billion Tons). Underground Surface Total Energy Value (Quads) Subbituminous Lignite

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Characterization of liquids derived from laboratory coking of decant oil and co-coking of Pittsburgh seam bituminous coal with decant oil  

SciTech Connect

In this study, decant oil and a blend of Pittsburgh seam bituminous coal with decant oil were subjected to coking and co-coking in a laboratory-scale delayed coker. Higher yields of coke and gas were obtained from co-coking than from coking. Coal addition into the feedstock resulted in lighter overhead liquid. GC/MS analyses of gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel show that co-coking of coal/decant oil gave higher quantity aromatic components than that of coking of decant oil alone. Simulated distillation gas chromatography analyses of overhead liquids and GC/MS analyses of vacuum fractions show that when coal was reacted with a decant oil, the coal constituents contributed to the distillable liquids. To address the reproducibility of the liquid products, overhead liquid samples collected at the first, third, and fifth hours of experiments of 6 h duration were evaluated using simulated distillation gas chromatography and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR. NMR analyses of the liquid products showed that, even though there were slight changes in the {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C spectra, the standard deviation was low for the time-dependent samples. Simulated distillation gas chromatography showed that the yields of refinery boiling range materials (i.e., gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, and fuel oil cuts) were reproducible between runs. Fractionation of the overhead liquids into refinery boiling range materials (gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, fuel oil fractions) showed that the boiling range materials and chemical compositions of fractions were found to be reproducible. 54 refs., 17 tabs.

Omer Gul; Caroline Clifford; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Emissions of airborne toxics from coal-fired boilers: Mercury  

SciTech Connect

Concerns over emissions of hazardous air Pollutants (air toxics) have emerged as a major environmental issue, and the authority of the US Environmental Protection Agency to regulate such pollutants was greatly expanded through the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Mercury has been singled out for particular attention because of concerns over possible effects of emissions on human health. This report evaluates available published information on the mercury content of coals mined in the United States, on mercury emitted in coal combustion, and on the efficacy of various environmental control technologies for controlling airborne emissions. Anthracite and bituminous coals have the highest mean-mercury concentrations, with subbituminous coals having the lowest. However, all coal types show very significant variations in mercury concentrations. Mercury emissions from coal combustion are not well-characterized, particularly with regard to determination of specific mercury compounds. Variations in emission rates of more than an order of magnitude have been reported for some boiler types. Data on the capture of mercury by environmental control technologies are available primarily for systems with electrostatic precipitators, where removals of approximately 20% to over 50% have been reported. Reported removals for wet flue-gas-desulfurization systems range between 35 and 95%, while spray-dryer/fabric-filter systems have given removals of 75 to 99% on municipal incinerators. In all cases, better data are needed before any definitive judgments can be made. This report briefly reviews several areas of research that may lead to improvements in mercury control for existing flue-gas-clean-up technologies and summarizes the status of techniques for measuring mercury emissions from combustion sources.

Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.; Zaromb, S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Steam–Coal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These two coals represent the two main types of non-lignite coals currently used in the U.S.: a medium-sulfur eastern bituminous coal and a low-sulfur western sub-bituminous coal. ... At a commercial scale, this would likely mean that there could be a roughly 3-fold decrease in the size of the gasifier compared to the case of dry mixing coal and the regenerated calcium oxide. ...

Nicholas S. Siefert; Dushyant Shekhawat; Shawn Litster; David A. Berry

2013-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

98

Leaching characteristics of arsenic and selenium from coal fly ash: role of calcium  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the leaching behavior of arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) in coal fly ash is important in evaluating the potential environmental impact of coal fly ash. Batch experiments were employed to systematically investigate the leaching behavior of As and Se in two major types of coal fly ashes, bituminous coal ash and sub-bituminous coal ash, and to determine the underlying processes that control As and Se leaching. The effects of pH, solid/liquid (S/L) ratio, calcium addition, and leaching time on the release of As and Se were studied. Overall, bituminous coal ash leached significantly more As and Se than sub-bituminous coal ash, and Se was more readily leachable, in both absolute concentration and relative fraction, than As for both types of fly ashes. Adsorption/desorption played a major role on As and Se leaching from bituminous coal ashes. However, calcium precipitation played the most important role in reducing As and Se leaching from sub-bituminous coal ashes in the entire experimental pH range. The leaching of As and Se from bituminous coal ashes generally increased with increases in the S/L ratio and leaching time. However, for sub-bituminous coal ashes, the leaching of As was not detected under most experimental conditions, while the leaching of Se increased with increases in the S/L ratio and leaching time. As{sup V} and Se{sup IV} were found to be the major species in all ash leachates in this study. 46 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Tian Wang; Jianmin Wang; Yulin Tang; Honglan Shi; Ken Ladwig [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States). Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, and Environmental Research Center (ERC)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Synthesis Gas Production with an Adjustable H2/CO Ratio through the Coal Gasification Process: Effects of Coal Ranks And Methane Addition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the decline of oil reserves and production, the gas-to-liquids (GTL) part of Fischer–Tropsch (F-T) synthesis technology has become increasing important. ... The Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that over 50% of the coal reserve base in the United States (U.S.) is bituminous coal, about 30% is sub-bituminous, and 9% is lignite. ...

Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jing Jin; Hongchang Zhou; Marten Cohron; Houying Zhao; Hongying Liu; Weiping Pan

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

100

Iron Transformation and Ash Fusibility during Coal Combustion in Air and O2/CO2 Medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) The successful design and operation of oxy-fired pulverized coal boilers require comprehensive knowledge of ash deposition characteristics, which have a major impact on the safety and economic performance of the boilers. ... Two bituminous coals (Utah coal and Illinois coal) and one sub-bituminous coal (PRB coal) were burned on a down-fired combustor under both oxy- and air-firing. ...

Dunxi Yu; Liang Zhao; Zuoyong Zhang; Chang Wen; Minghou Xu; Hong Yao

2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Michael Murray, Ph.D. National Wildlife Federation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Michael Murray, Ph.D. National Wildlife Federation Great Lakes Natural Resource Center Ann Arbor context #12;2 Source: Cassedy and Grossman, Introduction to Energy, 1998 #12;3 Coal Ranks · Anthracite ­ highest rank, high energy content · Bituminous ­ second highest rank, high energy content; typically

O'Donnell, Tom

102

Particle and Gas Emissions from a Simulated Coal-Burning Household Fire Pit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle and Gas Emissions from a Simulated Coal-Burning Household Fire Pit ... Chinese anthracite and bituminous coals produce different amounts of emissions when burned in a fire pit that simulates common rural household use of these fuels. ... Here we present emissions from burning 15 different fuels in a laboratory system designed to mimic the fire pits used in Xuan Wei County, China. ...

Linwei Tian; Donald Lucas; Susan L. Fischer; S. C. Lee; S. Katharine Hammond; Catherine P. Koshland

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

103

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the U.S.-Resource Base  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the U.S.-Resource Base Gregory D. Croft1 and Tad W the multi-Hubbert curve analysis to coal production in the United States, we demonstrate that anthracite production of this highest-rank coal. The pro- duction of bituminous coal from existing mines is about 80

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

104

High-Sulfur Coal for Generating Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...made historically by heating bitumi-nous coal in...heart of the anthracite district only about 5 years ago...energy, wind, and geothermal steam and brines, will...15.7 Nuclear 3.1 Geothermal Negligible 1973, use...home and commercial heating, transporta-tion...

James T. Dunham; Carl Rampacek; T. A. Henrie

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

105

Clean Fuels from Coal Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...superheating and water-heating sections of the boiler...percent on a higher heating value basis. Conclusions...made historically by heating bitumi-nous coal in...heart of the anthracite district only about 5 years ago...energy, wind, and geothermal steam and brines, will...

Arthur M. Squires

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Key Coal Producers ONLINE SUPPORTING MATERIALS to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Shaanxi and Shanxi together accounted for 83 percent of China's proven coal reserves in 2000, and Shanxi is not considered reserves [8]. Of China's forecasted coal reserves, a broader category than proven reserves, only January 13, 2011 #12;shown in Figures 1 and 2. The production data for anthracite, bituminous and lignite

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

107

Carnegie Mellon University A Technical and Economic Assessment of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

develops a general modeling framework to provide tools for assessing gasification-based energy conversion systems with various CO2 capture options on a systematic and consistent basis. Many factors influence other factors). For low rank coals (sub-bituminous and lignite) costs increased significantly relative

108

Low-Grade Coals: A Review of Some Prospective Upgrading Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These are commonly lignites or sub-bituminous coals. ... The earliest upgrading of high-moisture lignite involved drying and manufacturing of briquettes. ... It can therefore be concluded that, because reserves for low-grade coals are quite plentiful, it is important to intensify efforts that will make these coals usable in an acceptable manner in terms of energy efficiency and environmental protection. ...

Hassan Katalambula; Rajender Gupta

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

The British Association at Newcastle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... and widely prevalent coal-making conditions. For I find that of the actual and probable reserves of coal in the world, according to our present state of knowledge, about 43 ... of which is of Carboniferous age; while there are about 3 million million tons of lignites and sub-bituminous coals, mostly of Cretaceous and Tertiary age.

W. S. BOULTON

1916-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

110

Washington Briefs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An assured and abundant source of fuel will be available when needed to supply synthetic fuel plants, according to a recent appraisal made by the U. S. Geological Survey of coal reserves in Montana. More than 28 billion tons of lignite and sub-bituminous ...

1949-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Furnace Steelmaking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This factsheet describes a research project whose objective is to investigate reducing processing temperature, controlling the gas temperature and gas atmosphere over metalized iron nodules, and effectively using sub-bituminous coal as a reductant for producing high quality metalized iron nodules at low cost.

112

Incinerator residue in bituminous base construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tructio ~ of pavements is to form a bond between adjacent aggregate particles by coating them with an adhesive ductile film of bitumen and cementing the coated particles to the adjacent surfaces. Asphalt is a natural constituent of most petroleums... which consisted of 1 in. (2. 54 cm. ) to silt sized material from the Holmes Road incinerator plant in Houston, Texas, was collected and subjected to sieve analysis, approximate composition, loss on ignition and the optimum asphalt content determined...

Haynes, Joseph Anthony

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Role of Fly Ash in the Removal of Organic Pollutants from Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In India the problem is further compounded by the use of wet fly ash collection systems by a large number of power plants, which results in degradation of the pozzolanic characteristics of ash, an essential ingredient for several ash-based products. ... To accommodate the many new subbituminous fly ashes, the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) established two classes of fly ash, Class F from bituminous coal and Class C from subbituminous and lignite coal. ... Thermal power plant waste material (bottom ash) was utilized as a potential adsorbent for the textile dye malachite green. ...

M. Ahmaruzzaman

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

114

Evaluating Mercury Concentrations in Midwest Fish in Relationship to Mercury Emission Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given that: (1) coal use worldwide is increasing, (2) the US has abundant coal reserves (USDOE, 2007) and appears poised to embrace numerous energy sources including increased coal as a means to supplant foreign oil consumption, and (3) coal... primary types of coal (bituminous, anthracite, and lignite) all have various energy contents and mixtures of elements (World Coal Institute, 2005). In addition to the primary constituents of coal, numerous other elements exist in minute concentrations...

Robichaud, Jeffery

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

115

Long-Term Demonstration of Sorbent Enhancement Additive Technology for Mercury Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term DemonsTraTion of sorbenT Long-Term DemonsTraTion of sorbenT enhancemenT aDDiTive TechnoLogy for mercury conTroL Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. The combustion of subbituminous coals typically results in higher fractions of elemental mercury emissions than the combustion of bituminous coals. This complicates mercury capture efforts, particularly for technologies using powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection, because elemental mercury is not readily captured by PAC injection alone. In short, unmodified PACs are better suited for bituminous coals than for subbituminous coals. Various proprietary sorbent enhancement additives (SEA) have been developed to increase the mercury reactivity of PACs, and perhaps fly

116

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Advanced Utility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field Testing Program Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field Testing Program Sorbent Technologies Corporation, will test an advanced halgenated activated carbon to determine the mercury removal performance and relative costs of sorbent injection for advanced sorbent materials in large-scale field trials of a variety of combinations of coal-type and utility plant-configuration. These include one site (Detroit Edison's St. Clair Station) with a cold-side ESP using subbituminous coal, or blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal, and one site (Duke Energy's Buck Plant) with a hot-side ESP which burns a bituminous coal. Related Papers and Publications: Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report for the period April 1 - October 31, 2004 [PDF-2275KB] Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report for the period of October 2003 - March 2004 [PDF-1108KB]

117

Pilot plant assessment of blend properties and their impact on critical power plant components  

SciTech Connect

A series of tests were performed to determine the effects of blending eastern bituminous coals with western subbituminous coals on utility boiler operation. Relative to the baseline bituminous coal, the testing reported here indicated that there were significant impacts to boiler performance due to the blending of the eastern and western coals. Results indicated that fuel blending can be used to adequately control flue gas emissions of both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} at the expense of reduced milling efficiency, increased sootblowing in the high-temperature and low-temperature regions of the boiler and, to a lesser extent, decreased collection efficiency for an electrostatic precipitator. The higher reactivity of the subbituminous coal increased the overall combustion efficiency, which may tend to decrease the impact of milling efficiency losses. The extent of these impacts was directly related to the percentage of subbituminous coal in the blends. At the lowest blend ratios of subbituminous coal, the impacts were greatly reduced.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Close-coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies. Final report, [October 1, 1988--July 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a four year and ten month contract starting on October 1, 1988 to July 31, 1993 with the US Department of Energy to study and improve Close-Coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Direct Liquefaction of coal by producing high yields of distillate with improved quality at lower capital and production costs in comparison to existing technologies. Laboratory, Bench and PDU scale studies on sub-bituminous and bituminous coals are summarized and referenced in this volume. Details are presented in the three topical reports of this contract; CTSL Process Bench Studies and PDU Scale-Up with Sub-Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-1, CTSL Process Bench Studies with Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-2, and CTSL Process Laboratory Scale Studies, Modelling and Technical Assessment-DE-88818-TOP-3. Results are summarized on experiments and studies covering several process configurations, cleaned coals, solid separation methods, additives and catalysts both dispersed and supported. Laboratory microautoclave scale experiments, economic analysis and modelling studies are also included along with the PDU-Scale-Up of the CTSL processing of sub-bituminous Black Thunder Mine Wyoming coal. During this DOE/HRI effort, high distillate yields were maintained at higher throughput rates while quality was markedly improved using on-line hydrotreating and cleaned coals. Solid separations options of filtration and delayed coking were evaluated on a Bench-Scale with filtration successfully scaled to a PDU demonstration. Directions for future direct coal liquefaction related work are outlined herein based on the results from this and previous programs.

Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Popper, G.A.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Modelling of NO{sub x} reduction strategies applied to 350 MW(e) utility boilers  

SciTech Connect

A computational fluid dynamics model has been combined with a NO{sub x} chemistry post-processor to predict the formation and destruction of nitric oxide in three-dimensional furnaces burning pulverized fuel. The model considers the complex interaction of turbulent flow, heat transfer, combustion, and NO{sub x} reaction chemistry. Lagrangian particle dynamics are used to track burning pulverized coal particles through the computational cells. Fuel nitrogen is released in proportion to the burnout of the particle. A range of combustion NO{sub x} reduction strategies has been applied to two 350 MW(e) utility boilers burning different coals. A medium volatile bituminous coal is fired using low NO{sub x} burners in one furnace and a sub-bituminous coal is burnt using conventional swirl burners in a different furnace. The strategies include: burner out of service, overfire air, reduction in excess air, change in particle size, and fuel reburn. In general NO{sub x} predictions are better for the sub-bituminous coal than for the medium volatile bituminous coal. Typical NO{sub x} prediction errors are {+-} 10 percent.

Visona, S.P.; Singh, B. [AUSTA Electric, Brisbane (Australia); Stanmore, B.R. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Brisbane (Australia)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

INTERACTION OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS WITH A SUBBITUMINOUS COAL BELOW PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the original dry, ash-free coal; and E is the yield oforiginal dry or dry, ash-free coal charged to the system.6.3% of the original dry, ash-free coal. calculation of the

Dorighi, G.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. INTERACTION OF ORGANIC SOLVENT WITH A SUBBITUMINOUS COAL BELOW PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

just 51% of the coal on a dry, ash free basis. thatextracted 8.7% (dry, ash free basis) of the coal at 250 0 CAsh % Oxygen (difference) HIC Molcular Ratio Table II. Analysis of Roland Seam Coal

Lindsey, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Western fuels symposium. 19th international conference on lignite, brown, and subbituminous coals. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Topics covered at the conference include: advanced power systems; environmental issues and control technologies - multipollutants and mercury; power plant systems performance; fuel by-products utilization; fuel properties and upgrading; coalbed methane and water minimization; and carbon sequestration. A few of the papars only consist of a printout of the overheads/viewgraphs. The proceedings are also available on CD-ROM.

NONE

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

INTERACTION OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS WITH A SUBBITUMINOUS COAL BELOW PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this substance could be added to a poor coking coal in ordersubstance from the coal called the "coking principle." Itcoking properties. These attempts failed, but they provided the starting point for further investigation of coal

Dorighi, G.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. INTERACTION OF ORGANIC SOLVENT WITH A SUBBITUMINOUS COAL BELOW PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~. ~. ~. ~. Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . Coal and Solventon Subbiturninous Coal Below Pyrolysis Temperatures, LBL-Treatment of Extract Solution Coal Residue Treatment. Yield

Lindsey, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Energy scarcity and economic growth reconsidered  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analysis in this paper is concerned with the effect of energy scarcity on economic growth in the United States. After defining the notion of scarcity and introducing two measures of scarcity - unit costs and relative energy price - changes in the trend in resource scarcity for natural gas, bituminous coals, anthracite coal, and crude oil over the most recent three decades are investigated. Each of the energy resources became significantly more scarce resources during the decade of the 1970s in the Malthusian Stock Scarcity and Malthusian Flow Scarcity sense. Unit costs exhibit a similar change for natural gas and crude oil but not for bituminous coal and anthracite coal. The situation reversed itself during the 1980s. Natural gas, bituminous coal, anthracite coal, and crude oil all became significantly less scarce resources during the decade of the 1980s than they had been during the 1970s. That is, the increase in scarcity as measured by relative energy prices observed during the decade of the) 1970s was not reversed completely during the 1980s for natural gas and crude oil. Unit costs for natural gas and crude oil demonstrate analogous patterns and test results. Given that change has taken place, it has implications for future economic growth to the extent resource scarcity and economic growth are interrelated. To see whether this is a relevant concern, subsequent to the examination of changing resource scarcity trends, an objective effort is made to identify a long run equilibrium relationship between energy scarcity and economic growth. Relying on cointegration techniques, only for crude oil is there a suggestion that resource scarcity has affected economic growth in the United States over the period 1889-1992.

Noel D. Uri

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Updated Costs (June 2011 Basis) for Selected Bituminous Baseline...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - GEE IGCC without CO 2 capture * Case 2 - GEE IGCC with CO 2 capture * Case 9 - Subcritical PC without CO 2 capture * Case 10 - Subcritical PC with CO 2 capture * Case 11 -...

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthracite Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source: Fusiongnition Research Experiment (FIRE) Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 75 Coking properties of perhydrous low-rank vitrains. Influence of pyrolysis conditions...

128

The status of coal briquetting technology in Korea  

SciTech Connect

Anthracite is the only indigenous fossil fuel resource produced in Korea and is an important main source of residential fuel. Due to its particular characteristics, the best way to use Korean coal is in the form of briquettes, called {open_quotes}Yontan.{close_quotes} The ability to use this coal as briquettes was a great discovery made nearly 50 years ago and since then, has made a great contribution to the energy consumption of low and middle income households. Korean anthracite in coal briquette form has been used widely for household heating purposes. Collieries in Korea produced no more than one million tons of anthracite annually in the 1960s. Production, however, increased substantially up to about 17 million tons per year in the mid-1970s. In 1986, Korea succeeded in raising its coal production to 24.2 million tons, which was the maximum production level achieved by the Korean coal industrial sector. Since then, anthracite production has fallen. In 1991, coal output dropped to 15.1 million tons, a decrease of 12.2 percent from the 17.2 million tons produced in 1990, due to falling coal demand and rising labor costs. The role of coal as an energy source will be more important in the future to meet projected economic growth in Korea. While the production of indigenous Korean anthracite is expected to decrease under a coal mining rationalization policy, imports of bituminous coal will increase rapidly and will be used as an oil substitute in industry and power generation. In this chapter, general aspects of the Korean coal industry and coal utilization for residential uses, especially the Yontan coal briquetting techniques, are discussed. In addition, coal briquetting technology applications suitable for the APEC region will be presented.

Choi, Woo-Zin

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Carbon Sequestration 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perspectives on Carbon Capture and Storage Perspectives on Carbon Capture and Storage - Directions, Challenges, and Opportunities Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Capture and Storage November 13-15, 2007 Austin, Texas C Capture & Storage, Austin, TX Nov. 13-15, 2007 U.S. Fossil Fuel Reserves / Production Ratio 250+ Year Supply at Current Demand Levels ! 258 11.7 9.7 0 100 200 300 Coal Oil Natural Gas Anthracite & Bituminous Sub- Bituminous & Lignite Sources: BP Statistical Review, June 2004, - for coal reserves data - World Energy Council; EIA, Advance Summary U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves, 2003 Annual Report, September 22, 2004 - for oil and gas reserves data. C Capture & Storage, Austin, TX Nov. 13-15, 2007 80 120 160 200 240 1970 1975 1980

130

Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 1 - effects of solvents, catalysts and temperature conditions on conversion and structural changes of low-rank coals  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of this project were to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank, and influence of solvent were examined. Specific objectives were to identify the basic changes in coal structure induced by catalytic and thermal pretreatments, and to determine the reactivity of the catalytically and thermally treated coals for liquefaction. In the original project management plan it was indicated that six coals would be used for the study. These were to include two each of bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite rank. For convenience in executing the experimental work, two parallel efforts were conducted. The first involved the two lignites and one subbituminous coal; and the second, the two bituminous coals and the remaining subbituminous coal. This Volume presents the results of the first portion of the work, studies on two lignites and one subbituminous coal. The remaining work accomplished under this project will be described and discussed in Volume 2 of this report. The objective of this portion of the project was to determine and compare the effects of solvents, catalysts and reaction conditions on coal liquefaction. Specifically, the improvements of reaction conversion, product distribution, as well as the structural changes in the coals and coal-derived products were examined. This study targeted at promoting hydrogenation of the coal-derived radicals, generated during thermal cleavage of chemical bonds, by using a good hydrogen donor-solvent and an effective catalyst. Attempts were also made in efforts to match the formation and hydrogenation of the free radicals and thus to prevent retrogressive reaction.

Lili Huang; Schobert, H.H.; Chunshan Song

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Gasification of New Zealand coals: a comparative simulation study  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to conduct a preliminary feasibility assessment of gasification of New Zealand (NZ) lignite and sub-bituminous coals, using a commercial simulation tool. Gasification of these coals was simulated in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) application and associated preliminary economics compared. A simple method of coal characterization was developed for simulation purposes. The carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen content of the coal was represented by a three component vapor solid system of carbon, methane, and water, the composition of which was derived from proximate analysis data on fixed carbon and volatile matter, and the gross calorific value, both on a dry, ash free basis. The gasification process was modeled using Gibb's free energy minimization. Data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Shell Gasifier base cases using Illinios No. 6 coal was used to verify both the gasifier and the IGCC flowsheet models. The H:C and O:C ratios of the NZ coals were adjusted until the simulated gasifier output composition and temperature matched the values with the base case. The IGCC power output and other key operating variables such as gas turbine inlet and exhaust temperatures were kept constant for study of comparative economics. The results indicated that 16% more lignite than sub-bituminous coal was required. This translated into the requirement of a larger gasifier and air separation unit, but smaller gas and steam turbines were required. The gasifier was the largest sole contributor (30%) to the estimated capital cost of the IGCC plant. The overall cost differential associated with the processing of lignite versus processing sub-bituminous coal was estimated to be of the order of NZ $0.8/tonne. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

Smitha V. Nathen; Robert D. Kirkpatrick; Brent R. Young [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand). Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and NAICS Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Coke Oven (excluding or LPG and Natural Gas from Local

133

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace Coke Oven (excluding or LPG and Natural Gas

134

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace

135

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: 4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Commercial Sector by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Middle Atlantic 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

136

Adsorption Behavior of CO2 in Coal and Coal Char  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coals of diverse characteristics have been chosen to provide a better understanding on the influence of various coal properties, such as maceral, volatile matter, and ash contents. ... In addition, char samples from two of these coals (a non-coking coal A and a coking coal B) were prepared by pyrolysis at 800 and 1000 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere and were tested for CO2 adsorption capacity. ... As stated earlier, virgin coal samples considered for the adsorption measurements include coals A, C, and D, which are of low-, high-, and medium-volatile sub-bituminous rank, respectively. ...

Shanmuganathan Ramasamy; Pavan Pramod Sripada; Md Moniruzzaman Khan; Su Tian; Japan Trivedi; Rajender Gupta

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Gasification of New Zealand Coals: A Comparative Simulation Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to conduct a preliminary feasibility assessment of gasification of New Zealand (NZ) lignite and sub-bituminous coals, using a commercial simulation tool. ... Coal is a nonrenewable resource; however, the world’s coal reserves amount to twice the combined oil and gas reserves. ... The reasons for the entrained flow gasifier selection include its high suitability to low rank coals (lignites) and the use of entrained flow gasifiers for an IGCC as the industrially preferred choice dictated through experience. ...

Smitha V. Nathen; Robert D. Kirkpatrick; Brent R. Young

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

138

Alaska Coal Geology: GIS Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Geology: GIS Data Coal Geology: GIS Data Dataset Summary Description Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces. Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and Southern Alaska-Cook Inlet. Cretaceous resources, predominantly bituminous coal and lignite, are in the Northern Alaska-Slope coal province. Most of the Tertiary resources, mainly lignite to subbituminous coal with minor amounts of bituminous and semianthracite coals, are in the other two provinces. The combined measured, indicated, inferred, and hypothetical coal resources in the three areas are estimated to be 5,526 billion short tons (5,012 billion metric tons), which constitutes about 87 percent of Alaska's coal and surpasses the total coal resources of the conterminous United States by 40 percent. Available here: GIS shapefiles of relevant faults and geology, associated with the following report: http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds-077/pdf/DDS-77.pdf

139

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: August 2011 Highlights: August 2011 Extreme heat in Texas, New Mexico, Colorado and Arizona drove significant increases in the retail sales of electricity in the Southwest. Wind generation increased in much of the United States, except the middle of the country where total generation declined. Bituminous coal stocks dropped 14% from August 2010. Key indicators Same Month 2010 Year to date Total Net Generation -1% 11% Residential Retail Price -6% 11% Cooling Degree-Days -3% 2% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub -6% -9% Bituminous Coal Stocks -14% -14% Subbituminous Coal Stocks -10% -17% Heat wave drives record demand and wholesale prices in Texas A prolonged August heat wave in Texas stressed available generating capacity and produced very high wholesale prices in the Electric

140

Gasification Â… Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

th th Annual International Colloquium on Environmentally Preferred Advanced Power Generation, Costa Mesa, CA, February 7, 2012 An Overview of U.S. DOE's Gasification Systems Program Jenny B. Tennant Technology Manager - Gasification 2 Gasification Program Goal "Federal support of scientific R&D is critical to our economic competitiveness" Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy November 2010 The goal of the Gasification Program is to reduce the cost of electricity, while increasing power plant availability and efficiency, and maintaining the highest environmental standards 3 U.S. Coal Resources Low rank: lignite and sub-bituminous coal - About 50% of the U.S. coal reserves - Nearly 50% of U.S. coal production - Lower sulfur Bituminous coal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Wide angle X-ray scattering study of the layering in three of the Argonne premium coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using wide angle X-ray scattering methods, the phase interference curves and the inter-layer structure curves of thee of the Argonne Premium Coals were measured. These analyses indicate the inter-layer structuring is rank dependent. In the sub-bituminous coal (Wyodak–Anderson), the number of layers in the average short-range structural domain is ca. 2.3, with the average inter-layer distance being 4.1 Å. For Pittsburgh #8 coal, the average inter-layer distance decreases slightly, to 4.0 Å, while the number of layers in the average short-range structural domain increases to ca. 3. For the more mature Pocahontas #3, a low-volatile bituminous coal, the inter-layer distance decreases to 3.7 Å, and the average short-range structural domain contains 4.5–5 layers.

D.L. Wertz; J.L. Quin

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

EA-1616: National Carbon Research Center Project at Southern Company Services' Power Systems Development Facility near Wilsonville, Alabama  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates and updates the potential environmental impacts of DOE’s proposed continued operations of the NCCC Project at the PSDF plant. The NCCC is designed to test and evaluate carbon dioxide (CO2) control technologies for power generation facilities, including CO2 capture solvents and sorbents, mass-transfer devices, lower cost water-gas shift reactors, and scaled-up membrane technologies. Additionally, the NCCC evaluates methods to integrate CO2 capture technologies with other coal-based power plant systems by testing both pre-combustion and post-combustion technologies. The NCCC provides the capability to test these systems under a wide range of fuels, including bituminous and sub-bituminous coals, lignites and biomass/coal mixtures. The goal of the NCCC project is to accelerate the development, optimization, and commercialization of viable CO2 control technologies.

143

Recommended guidelines for solid fuel use in cement plants  

SciTech Connect

Pulverized solid fuel use at cement plants in North America is universal and includes bituminous and sub-bituminous coal, petroleum coke, and any combination of these materials. Provided are guidelines for the safe use of pulverized solid fuel systems in cement plants, including discussion of the National Fire Protection Association and FM Global fire and explosion prevention standards. Addressed are fire and explosion hazards related to solid fuel use in the cement industry, fuel handling and fuel system descriptions, engineering design theory, kiln system operations, electrical equipment, instrumentation and safety interlock issues, maintenance and training, and a brief review of code issues. New technology on fire and explosion prevention including deflagration venting is also presented.

Young, G.L.; Jayaraman, H.; Tseng, H. (and others)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Pilot-scale study of the effect of selective catalytic reduction catalyst on mercury speciation in Illinois and Powder River Basin coal combustion flue gases  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to investigate the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst on mercury (Hg) speciation in bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases. Three different Illinois Basin bituminous coals (from high to low sulfur (S) and chlorine (Cl)) and one Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal with very low S and very low Cl were tested in a pilot-scale combustor equipped with an SCR reactor for controlling nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The SCR catalyst induced high oxidation of elemental Hg (Hg{sup 0}), decreasing the percentage of Hg{sup 0} at the outlet of the SCR to values <12% for the three Illinois coal tests. The PRB coal test indicated a low oxidation of Hg{sup 0} by the SCR catalyst, with the percentage of Hg{sup 0} decreasing from {approximately} 96% at the inlet of the reactor to {approximately} 80% at the outlet. The low Cl content of the PRB coal and corresponding low level of available flue gas Cl species were believed to be responsible for low SCR Hg oxidation for this coal type. The test results indicated a strong effect of coal type on the extent of Hg oxidation. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Lee, C.W.; Srivastava, R.K.; Ghorishi, S.B.; Karwowski, J.; Hastings, T.H.; Hirschi, J.C. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Rice Hull Silica, A Silicon Carbide Precursor For Collagen, Lignin And Silicon Metal Powder Bindered Anthracite Briquettes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Foundry coke is currently the primary energy source of U.S. iron foundries employing cupolas to produce iron. The availability, cost and environmental impact of this… (more)

Jiles, Allura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Glossary Anthracite: A hard, black, lustrous coal containing a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter. Often referred to as hard coal. Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure equivalent to 42 U.S. gallons. Biomass: Organic nonfossil material of biological origin constituting a renewable energy source. Bituminous Coal: A dense, black coal, often with well-defined bands of bright and dull material, with a moisture content usually less than 20 percent. Often referred to as soft coal. It is the most common coal. Blast Furnace: A shaft furnace in which solid fuel (coke) is burned with an air blast to smelt ore in a continuous operation. Blast Furnace Gas: The waste combustible gas generated in a blast furnace when iron ore is being reduced with coke to

147

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 December 2008 2007 Changes in Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources The changes in the coal distribution data sources made in 2006 are carried over to the 2007 tables. As in 2006, EIA used data from the EIA-3 survey to distribute synfuel to the electric generation sector on a state level, aggregated with all of the other coal (such as bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite coal) sent to electric generating plants. EIA supplemented the EIA-3 data with previously collected information to determine the mode of transportation from the synfuel plant to the electric generating consumer, which was not reported on the EIA-3A survey form. Although not contained in the EIA-6A master file, this information has been documented in an ancillary spreadsheet in the EIA

148

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: January 2012 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: January 2012 Stocks Above normal temperatures in January have allowed electric utilities to significantly replinish stockpiles of coal. The upswing in coal stockpiles corresponds to decreasing consumption of coal at electric generators seen in the resource use section across all regions of the country. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. Along with coal stockpiles at electric power plants, the supply of coal significantly increased in January of 2012. Total bituminous coal days of burn increased 10 percent from January 2011 to 87, while subbituminous supply increased nearly 10

149

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring and Modeling Sorption- Induced Coal Strain Eric P. Robertson, Idaho National Laboratory Richard L. Christiansen, Colorado School of Mines FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION DOE/NETL May 2-5, 2005 Abstract Strain caused by the adsorption of gases was measured in samples of subbituminous coal from the Powder River basin of Wyoming, U.S.A. and high-volatile bituminous coal from east-central Utah, U.S.A. using an apparatus developed jointly at the Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, U.S.A.) and Colorado School of Mines (Golden, Colorado, U.S.A.). The apparatus can be used to measure strain on multiple small coal samples based on the optical detection of the longitudinal strain instead of the more common usage of strain gauges, which require larger samples and longer equilibration times. With

150

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: October 2013 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: October 2013 Stocks In October 2013, total coal stocks increased 0.8 percent from the previous month. This follows the normal seasonal pattern for this time of year as the country begins to build up coal stocks to be consumed during the winter months. Compared to last October, coal stocks decreased 17.7 percent. This occurred because coal stocks in October 2012 were at an extremely high level. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The total bituminous supply decreased from 85 days the previous month to 78 days in October 2013, while the total subbituminous supply decreased from 63 days in September 2013 to

151

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Electric Utilties by State, 2012 2. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Electric Utilties by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 353 2.20 7.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 353 2.20 7.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

152

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: 5. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Industrial Sector by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 19 0.66 6.9 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 19 0.66 6.9 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

153

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Stocks: August 2011 Coal Stocks: August 2011 Stocks Coal stocks continued the usual summer decline as utilities burned into their summer stockpile in August. Sigificant declines from August 2010 were seen in total coal stockpiles, driven by a 14 percent drop in bituminous coal stockpiles as well as a 10 percent drop in subbituminous coal stockpiles. Lignite stockpiles declined by 6 percent over the same time period. Days of burn The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The average number of days of burn held on hand at electric power plants increased slightly in August 2011 compared to previous months. This was largely driven by increases in

154

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin and Method of Transportation, 2006 Origin and Method of Transportation, 2006 April 2008 2006 Changes in Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources The changes in the coal distribution table formats and data sources made in 2005 are carried over to the 2006 table except in several significant areas (See Note for 2005 changes). In 2005, EIA reported coal synfuel distributed to electric generating plants as a single national total. For its 2006 table, EIA used data from the EIA-3 survey to distribute synfuel to the electric generation sector on a state level, aggregated with all of the other coal (such as bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite coal) sent to electric generating plants. EIA supplemented the EIA-3 data by making follow-up contacts with the synfuel plants to

155

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Ultra Low-NOx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultra Low NOx Integrated System Ultra Low NOx Integrated System TFS 2000(tm) Low NOx Firing System Project Summary: ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories, working in concert with ALSTOM Power's Performance Projects Group, has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient NOx control technologies for retrofit to pulverized coal fired utility boilers. The objective of this project was to develop retrofit NOx control technology to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx (for bituminous coals) and 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx (for subbituminous coals) from existing pulverized coal fired utility boilers at a cost which is at least 25% less than SCR technology. Efficient control of NOx is seen as an important,

156

Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275{degrees}C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275[degrees]C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report  

SciTech Connect

The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Chemistry and petrology of fly ash derived from the co-combustion of western United States coal and tire-derived fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inorganic ash chemistry and petrology was investigated in coal-combustion by-products from the burning of tire-derived fuel (TDF) with a 1:1 blend of Colorado and Utah high volatile C bituminous coal and Powder River Basin subbituminous coal. Both coal components had high vitrinite contents. With the exception of Sr and Ba, the trace-element contents of the coals were not high. The fly ash was enriched in Zn, known to be a constituent of both the rubber and the wire in tires. Cu, also a constituent of the brass coatings of bead wire, was enriched in the same fractions with high Zn concentrations. Zn and Cu, along with several other elements, increased in concentration in the back, cooler row of the electrostatic precipitator. The enrichment of other elements, such as Se, As, and Pb, was more problematical. It is possible that the latter elements have more of a coal source than a tire source.

James C. Hower; J.David Robertson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

KINETIC STUDY OF COAL AND BIOMASS CO-PYROLYSIS USING THERMOGRAVIMETRY  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study are to investigate thermal behavior of coal and biomass blends in inert gas environment at low heating rates and to develop a simplified kinetic model using model fitting techniques based on TGA experimental data. Differences in thermal behavior and reactivity in co-pyrolysis of Powder River Basin (PRB) sub-bituminous coal and pelletized southern yellow pine wood sawdust blends at low heating rates are observed. Coal/wood blends have higher reactivity compared to coal alone in the lower temperature due to the high volatile matter content of wood. As heating rates increase, weight loss rates increase. The experiment data obtained from TGA has a better fit with proposed two step first order reactions model compared single first order reaction model.

Wang, Ping; Hedges, Sheila; Chaudharib, Kiran; Turtonb, Richard

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Investigation of bonding mechanism of coking on semi-coke from lignite with pitch and tar  

SciTech Connect

In coking, the bonding ability of inert macerals by reactive macerals is dependent on various parameters and also is related to the wettability of the inert macerals. In this study, the effect of carbonization temperature on the wettability of semi-cokes produced at various temperatures has been investigated. Soma and Yatagan semicokes represent inert macerals, and pitch was used as a reactive structure in the experiments. The briquetted pitch blocks were located on the semi-cokes and heated from the softening temperature of pitch (60{sup o}C) to 140{sup o}C to observe the wettability. In addition, liquid tar was also used to determine the wettability of semi-cokes. From the standpoint of wettability, the temperature of 900{sup o}C was determined to be the critical point for coke produced from sub-bituminous coals. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Vedat Arslan [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Engineering Faculty

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Advances and new directions in direct liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

With advance in single stage processes such as H-Coal, EDS and SRC, and refining and upgrading of coal liquids by Chevron and UOP, the direct liquefaction process has continuously evolved to the present two-stage catalytic configuration, which produces the highest liquid yield and product quality of any process worldwide. The Two Stage Liquefaction (TSL) process has been successfully applied to bituminous and subbituminous coals, overcoming problems associated with earlier processes. But, potential for additional improvement is recognized in several areas: cleaning coal prior to liquefaction; low temperature and pressure preconditioning of feed coal; novel catalysts development to arrest regressive reactions and improve hydrotreatment and cracking reactions; improvement in hydrocarbon value recovery and reduced energy rejection by alternate bottoms processing techniques. In this paper, after discussing briefly the history of liquefaction and development of the TSL process, present potential areas for research and development are presented.

Rao, S.N.; Schindler, H.D.; McGurl, G.V.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Independent Power Producers by State, 2012 3. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Independent Power Producers by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 732 0.87 10.5 41 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 41 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Maine 32 0.80 7.0 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 700 0.88 10.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

164

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Consumer, Origin and Method of Transportation, 2007 December 2008 2007 Changes in Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources The changes in the coal distribution data sources made in 2006 are carried over to the 2007 tables. As in 2006, EIA used data from the EIA-3 survey to distribute synfuel to the electric generation sector on a state level, aggregated with all of the other coal (such as bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite coal) sent to electric generating plants. EIA supplemented the EIA-3 data with previously collected information to determine the mode of transportation from the synfuel plant to the electric generating consumer, which was not reported on the EIA-3A survey form. Although not contained in the EIA-6A

165

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 April 2008 2006 Changes in Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources The changes in the coal distribution table formats and data sources made in 2005 are carried over to the 2006 table except in several significant areas (See Note for 2005 changes). In 2005, EIA reported coal synfuel distributed to electric generating plants as a single national total. For its 2006 table, EIA used data from the EIA-3 survey to distribute synfuel to the electric generation sector on a state level, aggregated with all of the other coal (such as bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite coal) sent to electric generating plants. EIA supplemented the EIA-3 data by making follow-up contacts with the synfuel plants to determine the mode of transportation from the synfuel plant to the electric generating

166

Evaluation of methods of mixing lime in bituminous paving mixtures in batch and drum plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

added directly to the asphalt cement wi 11, of course, significantly increase the effective viscosity of the resulting binder. When lime is added at a rate of 1. 5 percent by weight of total aggregate, it is equivalent to about 30 percent by weight... of asphalt cement. Figure 5 shows the effect of this increase in binder viscosity which caused a corresponding increase in air void content of Mixture LA (dry lime in asphalt cement). That is, when holding constant the compactive effort, compaction...

Button, Joseph Wade

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Coal Ranks and Geothermal Gradients in High-volatile Bituminous Coalfields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 380; Sw. No., 6. If it is assumed that no great changes in geothermal gradient have occurred since the early Pleistocene, this coal was metamorphosed at a temperature ... Silesia5. The most obvious explanation is that of a nearly two to one difference in geothermal gradient. Comparison of data from the Carboniferous coalfields of the Netherlands with analyses of ...

R. P. SUGGATE; J. O. ELPHICK

1964-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

168

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian bituminous coal Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Physics Institute Collection: Engineering 36 Impact of coal quality and gasifier technology on IGCC performance Summary: was captured and the two highest rank...

169

Creep-recovery behavior of bituminous binders and its relation to asphalt mixture rutting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rutting is one of the main distress modes of asphalt pavements, especially after prolonged warm periods, and thus a great deal of research has been focused on the development of a rheological parameter that wo...

Olli-Ville Laukkanen; Hilde Soenen; Terhi Pellinen…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Solvent extraction of bituminous coals using light cycle oil: characterization of diaromatic products in liquids  

SciTech Connect

Many studies of the pyrolytic degradation of coal-derived and petroleum-derived aviation fuels have demonstrated that the coal-derived fuels show better thermal stability, both with respect to deposition of carbonaceous solids and cracking to gases. Much previous work at our institute has focused on the use of refined chemical oil (RCO), a distillate from the refining of coal tar, blended with light cycle oil (LCO) from catalytic cracking of vacuum gas oil. Hydroprocessing of this blend forms high concentrations of tetralin and decalin derivatives that confer particularly good thermal stability on the fuel. However, possible supply constraints for RCO make it important to consider alternative ways to produce an 'RCO-like' product from coal in an inexpensive process. This study shows the results of coal extraction using LCO as a solvent. At 350{sup o}C at a solvent-to-coal ratio of 10:1, the conversions were 30-50 wt % and extract yields 28-40 wt % when testing five different coals. When using lower LCO/coal ratios, conversions and extract yields were much smaller; lower LCO/coal ratios also caused mechanical issues. LCO is thought to behave similarly to a nonpolar, non-hydrogen donor solvent, which would facilitate heat-induced structural relaxation of the coal followed by solubilization. The main components contributed from the coal to the extract when using Pittsburgh coal are di- and triaromatic compounds. 41 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

Josefa M. Griffith; Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). EMS Energy Institute

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Aerobic Biofilms Grown from Athabasca Watershed Sediments Are Inhibited by Increasing Concentrations of Bituminous Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...step at 95C, followed by 25 cycles of 30 s at 95C, 30 s at 55C...hydrocarbon compounds. Thus, for general inhibition of the microbial...temperature and freeze-thaw cycle frequency. Environ. Microbiol...degradation in Arctic soils following diesel and nutrient disturbance. ISME...

Etienne Yergeau; John R. Lawrence; Sylvie Sanschagrin; Julie L. Roy; George D. W. Swerhone; Darren R. Korber; Charles W. Greer

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

172

Effect of bituminous coal properties on carbon dioxide and methane high pressure sorption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High pressure sorption experiments with carbon dioxide and methane were carried out at a temperature of 45 °C and at pressures up to 15 MPa with three samples of methane-bearing, medium-rank coals in a moisture-equilibrated state using a manometric method. The samples were taken from selected positions of drill cores from exploration boreholes in the Bohemian part of the Upper Silesian Basin, and were characterized by a narrow range of degree of coalification and markedly different petrographic compositions, including a different mineral matter content. The total porosity of the coal samples was between 9% and 10%. A positive correlation was found between the equilibrium moisture in the coal samples and the total abundance of oxygen functional groups determined by FTIR. The excess sorption capacities ranged from 0.78 to 0.91 mmol g?1 for CO2 and from 0.45 to 0.52 mmol g?1 for CH4, and after recalculation to coal organic matter, the excess sorption capacities increased by up to 14% in the coal with the highest mineral fraction. The highest CO2/CH4 ratio was found in the sample that had the highest inertinite and liptinite content. The experimental isotherm data was fitted by modified Langmuir and Dubinin–Radushkevich sorption isotherms. The parameters obtained by these two methods were in good agreement for carbon dioxide. It was found that the sorption capacity of the organic matter in a coal sample with prevalence of inertinite (63.0 vol.%) was lower only by 14% for CO2 and by 18% for CH4 than the sorption capacity of the organic matter in a coal sample with prevalence of vitrinite (65.3 vol.%). This provided confirmation that the petrographic composition of a coal has an ambiguous effect.

Zuzana Weishauptová; Old?ich P?ibyl; Ivana Sýkorová; Vladimír Machovi?

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A study on carbon dioxide emissions from bituminous coal in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Consumption of primary energy in Korea increased 5.25 % per year over a 10 years span starting in 1990. Korea ranked 8th in primary energy consumption in 2011; coal consumption increased 35 % from 87,827 milli...

Jeongwoo Lee; Chang-Sang Cho; Ki-hyup Hong; Jae-Hak Jeong…

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Caking and coking properties of the thermal dissolution soluble fraction of a fat coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the coal blending for coke-making, fat coal has a very important role for the caking and coking properties of the coal blends. In this study, a fat coal was thermally dissolved, and the caking and coking properties of the thermal dissolution soluble factions (TDSFs) from different solvents and temperatures were characterized. It was found that the caking properties of \\{TDSFs\\} were better than that of fat raw coal. The \\{TDSFs\\} obtained from non-polar solvents have a higher caking property than those obtained from polar solvents at the same thermal dissolution (TD) temperature. During TD process, polar solvents can thermally dissolve more polyaromatic compounds into TDSF, thus increasing the softening temperature and decreasing the caking property of the TDSF. For the same TD solvent, the \\{TDSFs\\} obtained from higher temperatures have a lower caking property compared to those obtained from lower temperatures because of more aromatic components and oxygen functional groups entering them. Crucible coking determinations were carried out to evaluate the coking property of the TDSFs. The result suggests that when 5% of TDSF and 5% of non-caking sub-bituminous coal were used instead of the same amount of fat coal and gas coal, respectively in the coal blends, the quality of the coke obtained could get to the level of the coke obtained from the standard coal blends (i.e. without TDSF and sub-bituminous coal). Therefore, the use of TDSF in coal blending for coke-making is one of the effective methods for opening the coking coal resources.

Hengfu Shui; Wenjuan Zhao; Chuanjun Shan; Tao Shui; Chunxiu Pan; Zhicai Wang; Zhiping Lei; Shibiao Ren; Shigang Kang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Thermodynamic properties of pulverized coal during rapid heating devolatilization processes. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge of the thermodynamic and morphological properties of coal associated with rapid heating decomposition pathways is essential to progress in coal utilization technology. Specifically, knowledge of the heat of devolatilization, surface area and density of coal as a function of rank characteristics, temperature and extent of devolatilization in the context of rapid heating conditions is essential to the fundamental determination of kinetic parameters of coal devolatilization. These same properties are also needed to refine existing devolatilization sub-models utilized in large-scale modeling of coal combustion systems. The objective of this research is to obtain data on the thermodynamic properties and morphology of coal under conditions of rapid heating. Specifically, the total heat of devolatilization, external surface area, BET surface area and true density will be measured for representative coal samples. The coal ranks to be investigated will include a high volatile A bituminous (PSOC 1451 D) and a low volatile bituminous (PSOC 1516D). An anthracite (PSOC 1468) will be used as a non-volatile coal reference. In addition, for one coal, the contribution of each of the following components to the overall heat of devolatilization will be measured: the specific heat of coal/char during devolatilization, the heat of thermal decomposition of the coal, the specific heat capacity of tars, and the heat of vaporization of tars.

Proscia, W.M.; Freihaut, J.D.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION--A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT, PHASE II: ELEMENT MODES OF OCCURRENCE FOR THE OHIO 5/6/7, WYODAK AND NORTH DAKOTA COAL SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

This study reports on the second phase (Phase II) of USGS research activities in support of DOE contract DE-AC22-95PC95101 ''Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion--A Comprehensive Assessment'', funded under DOE Interagency Agreement DE-AI22-95PC95145. The purpose of the study was to provide a quantitative and semi-quantitative characterization of the modes of occurrence of trace elements in coal samples investigated under Phase II, including (1) Ohio 5/6/7, an Ohio bituminous coal sample blended from the No.5, No.6, and No.7 beds; (2) North Dakota, a lignite sample from the Falkirk Mine, Underwood, ND, and (3) Wyodak, a sub-bituminous coal sample from the Cordero Mine, Gillette, WY. Samples from these coal beds were selected for their range in rank and commercial applicability. Results of this research provide basic information on the distribution of elements in Phase II coal samples, information needed for development of a commercial predictive model for trace-element behavior during coal combustion.

Allan Kolker; Stanley J. Mroczkowski; Curtis A. Palmer; Kristen O. Dennen; Robert B. Finkelman; John H. Bullock Jr.

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

Catalytic steam gasification reactivity of HyperCoals produced from different rank of coals at 600-775{degree}C  

SciTech Connect

HyperCoal is a clean coal with ash content <0.05 wt %. HyperCoals were prepared from a brown coal, a sub-bituminous coal, and a bituminous raw coal by solvent extraction method. Catalytic steam gasification of these HyperCoals was carried out with K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at 775, 700, 650, and 600 {degree}C, and their rates were compared. HyperCoals produced from low-rank coals were more reactive than those produced from the high-rank coals. XRD measurements were carried out to understand the difference in gasification reactivity of HyperCoals. Arrhenius plot of ln (k) vs 1/T in the temperature range 600-825{degree}C was a curve rather than a straight line. The point of change was observed at 700{degree}C for HyperCoals from low-rank coals and at 775{degree}C for HyperCoals from high-rank coals. Using HyperCoal produced from low-rank coals as feedstock, steam gasification of coal may be possible at temperatures less than 650{degree}C. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Atul Sharma; Ikuo Saito; Toshimasa Takanohashi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki (Japan). Advanced Fuel Group, Energy Technology Research Institute

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Alaska coal geology, resources, and coalbed methane potential  

SciTech Connect

Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces, Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and Southern Alaska-Cook Inlet. Cretaceous resources, predominantly bituminous coal and lignite, are in the Northern Alaska-Slope coal province. Most of the Tertiary resources, mainly lignite to subbituminous coal with minor amounts of bituminous and semianthracite coals, are in the other two provinces. The combined measured, indicated, inferred, and hypothetical coal resources in the three areas are estimated to be 5,526 billion short tons (5,012 billion metric tons), which constitutes about 87 percent of Alaska's coal and surpasses the total coal resources of the conterminous United States by 40 percent. Coal mining has been intermittent in the Central Alaskan-Nenana and Southern Alaska-Cook Inlet coal provinces, with only a small fraction of the identified coal resource having been produced from some dozen underground and strip mines. Alaskan coals have a lower sulfur content (averaging 0.3 percent) than most coals in the conterminous United States and are within or below the minimum sulfur value mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. Another untapped potential resource is coalbed methane estimated to total 1,000 trillion cubic feet (28 trillion cubic meters).

Romeo M. Flores; Gary D. Stricker; Scott A. Kinney

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

EDS coal liquefaction process development: Phase V. Final technical progress report, Volume I  

SciTech Connect

All objectives in the EDS Cooperative Agreement for Phases III-B through V have been achieved for the RCLU pilot plants. EDS operations have been successfully demonstrated in both the once-through and bottoms recycle modes for coals of rank ranging from bituminous to lignitic. An extensive data base detailing the effects of process variable changes on yields, conversions and product qualities for each coal has been established. Continuous bottoms recycle operations demonstrated increased overall conversion and improved product slate flexibility over once-through operations. The hydrodynamics of the liquefaction reactor in RCLU were characterized through tests using radioactive tracers in the gas and slurry phases. RCLU was shown to have longer liquid residence times than ECLP. Support work during ECLP operations contributed to resolving differences between ECLP conversions and product yields and those of the small pilot plants. Solvent hydrogenation studies during Phases IIIB-V of the EDS program focused on long term activity maintenance of the Ni-MO-10 catalyst. Process variable studies for solvents from various coals (bituminous, subbituminous, and lignitic), catalyst screening evaluations, and support of ECLP solvent hydrogenation operations. Product quality studies indicate that highly cyclic EDS naphthas represent unique and outstanding catalytic reforming feedstocks. High volumes of high octane motor gasoline blendstock are produced while liberating a considerable quantity of high purity hydrogen.

None

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The effect of wood biomass blending with pulverized coal on combustion characteristics under oxy-fuel condition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, combustion from the co-firing of coal and wood biomass, and thermal characteristics such as ignition temperature, burn-out temperature, and activation energy were discussed using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). We investigated the effects of biomass blending with two kinds of pulverized coal (bituminous Shenhua, and sub-bituminous Adaro) under air and oxy-fuel conditions. The coal fraction in the blended samples was set to 1, 0.8, and 0.5. The oxygen fraction in the oxidant was set to 0.21, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.8. The ignition temperature was governed by the fuel composition, particularly in the blended biomass which has a much higher content of volatile matter comparing to coal. However, the burnout temperature, which shows a strong relationship with char combustion, depended on the oxidant ingredients rather than on the fuel components. Thermal characteristics such as ignition, burnout temperature, reaction region, and heat flow were very similar between air and a 0.3 oxygen concentration under oxy-fuel conditions with Shenhua coal.

Seongyool Ahn; Gyungmin Choi; Duckjool Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2  

SciTech Connect

The Mesaba Energy Project is a nominal 600 MW integrated gasification combine cycle power project located in Northeastern Minnesota. It was selected to receive financial assistance pursuant to code of federal regulations (?CFR?) 10 CFR 600 through a competitive solicitation under Round 2 of the Department of Energy?s Clean Coal Power Initiative, which had two stated goals: (1) to demonstrate advanced coal-based technologies that can be commercialized at electric utility scale, and (2) to accelerate the likelihood of deploying demonstrated technologies for widespread commercial use in the electric power sector. The Project was selected in 2004 to receive a total of $36 million. The DOE portion that was equally cost shared in Budget Period 1 amounted to about $22.5 million. Budget Period 1 activities focused on the Project Definition Phase and included: project development, preliminary engineering, environmental permitting, regulatory approvals and financing to reach financial close and start of construction. The Project is based on ConocoPhillips? E-Gas? Technology and is designed to be fuel flexible with the ability to process sub-bituminous coal, a blend of sub-bituminous coal and petroleum coke and Illinois # 6 bituminous coal. Major objectives include the establishment of a reference plant design for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (?IGCC?) technology featuring advanced full slurry quench, multiple train gasification, integration of the air separation unit, and the demonstration of 90% operational availability and improved thermal efficiency relative to previous demonstration projects. In addition, the Project would demonstrate substantial environmental benefits, as compared with conventional technology, through dramatically lower emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, particulate matter and mercury. Major milestones achieved in support of fulfilling the above goals include obtaining Site, High Voltage Transmission Line Route, and Natural Gas Pipeline Route Permits for a Large Electric Power Generating Plant to be located in Taconite, Minnesota. In addition, major pre-construction permit applications have been filed requesting authorization for the Project to i) appropriate water sufficient to accommodate its worst case needs, ii) operate a major stationary source in compliance with regulations established to protect public health and welfare, and iii) physically alter the geographical setting to accommodate its construction. As of the current date, the Water Appropriation Permits have been obtained.

Stone, Richard; Gray, Gordon; Evans, Robert

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Determination of the effect of different additives in coking blends using a combination of in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry  

SciTech Connect

High-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry measurements were carried out on 4:1 wt/wt blends of a medium volatile bituminous coal with two anthracites, two petroleum cokes, charcoal, wood, a low-temperature coke breeze, tyre crumb, and active carbon to determine the effects on fluidity development to identify the parameters responsible for these effects during pyrolysis and to study possible relationships among the parameters derived from these techniques. Positive, negative, and neutral effects were identified on the concentration of fluid material. Small positive effects (ca. 5-6%) were caused by blending the coal with petroleum cokes. Charcoal, wood, and active carbon all exerted negative effects on concentration (18-27% reduction) and mobility (12-25% reduction in T2) of the fluid phase, which have been associated with the inert character and high surface areas of these additives that adsorb the fluid phase of the coal. One of the anthracites and the low-temperature coke breeze caused deleterious effects to a lesser extent on the concentration (7-12%) and mobility (13-17%) of the fluid material, possibly due to the high concentration of metals in these additives (ca. 11% ash). Despite the high fluid character of tyre crumb at the temperature of maximum fluidity of the coal (73%), the mobility of the fluid phase of the blend was lower than expected. The comparison of {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry results indicated that to account for the variations in minimum complex viscosity for all the blends, both the maximum concentration of fluid phase and the maximum mobility of the fluid material had to be considered. For individual blends, two exponential relationships have been found between the complex viscosity and the concentration of solid phase in both the softening and resolidification stages but the parameters are different for each blend. 30 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Miguel C. Diaz; Karen M. Steel; Trevor C. Drage; John W. Patrick; Colin E. Snape [Nottingham University, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factor of bituminous coal, coking coal, and coke consumed inprice of Bituminous coal, coking coal, and coke consumed in

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner  

SciTech Connect

For more than two decades, Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom) has developed a range of low cost, infurnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes Alstom's internally developed TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy. As of the date of this report, more than 270 units representing approximately 80,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with Alstom low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coal to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coal, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing boiler equipment. On March 10, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). CAIR requires 25 Eastern states to reduce NOx emissions from the power generation sector by 1.7 million tons in 2009 and 2.0 million tons by 2015. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. The overall objective of the work is to develop an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner, which, when integrated with Alstom's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems will provide a means to achieve: Less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a high volatile Eastern or Western bituminous coal, Less than 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a subbituminous coal, NOx reduction costs at least 25% lower than the costs of an SCR, Validation of the NOx control technology developed through large (15 MWt) pilot scale demonstration, and Documentation required for economic evaluation and commercial application. During the project performance period, Alstom performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and large pilot scale combustion testing in its Industrial Scale Burner Facility (ISBF) at its U.S. Power Plant Laboratories facility in Windsor, Connecticut in support of these objectives. The NOx reduction approach was to optimize near-field combustion to ensure that minimum NOx emissions are achieved with minimal impact on unburned carbon in ash, slagging and fouling, corrosion, and flame stability/turn-down. Several iterations of CFD and combustion testing on a Midwest coal led to an optimized design, which was extensively combustion tested on a range of coals. The data from these tests were then used to validate system costs and benefits versus SCR. Three coals were evaluated during the bench-scale and large pilot-scale testing tasks. The three coals ranged from a very reactive subbituminous coal to a moderately reactive Western bituminous coal to a much less reactive Midwest bituminous coal. Bench-scale testing was comprised of standard ASTM properties evaluation, plus more detailed characterization of fuel properties through drop tube furnace testing and thermogravimetric analysis. Bench-scale characterization of the three test coals showed that both NOx emissions and combustion performance are a strong function of coal properties. The more reactive coals evolved more of their fuel bound nitrogen in the substoichiometric main burner zone than less reactive coal, resulting in the potential for lower NOx emissions. From a combustion point of view, the more reactive coals also showed lower carbon in ash and CO values than the less reactive coal at any given main burner zone stoichiometry. According to bench-scale results, the subbituminous coal was found to be the most amenable to both low NOx, and acceptably low combustibles in the flue gas, in an air staged low NOx system. The Midwest bituminous coal, by contrast, was predicted to be the most challenging of the three coals, with the Western bituminous coal predicted to beh

David Towle; Richard Donais; Todd Hellewell; Robert Lewis; Robert Schrecengost

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Physical properties of selected block Argonne Premium bituminous coal related to CO2, CH4, and N2 adsorption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2, CH4, and N2 adsorption and gas-induced swelling were quantified for block Blind Canyon, Pittsburgh #8 and Pocahontas Argonne Premium coals that were dried and structurally relaxed at 75 °C in vacuum. Strain measurements were made perpendicular and parallel to the bedding plane on ~ 7 × 7 × 7 mm3 coal blocks and gravimetric sorption measurements were obtained simultaneously on companion coal blocks exposed to the same gaseous environment. The adsorption amount and strain were determined after equilibration at P  ? 1.8 MPa. There is a strong non-linear correlation between strain and the quantity of gas adsorbed and the results for all gases and coals studied follow a common pattern. The dependence of the coal matrix shrinkage/swelling coefficient (Cgc) on the type and quantity of gas adsorbed is seen by plotting the ratio between the strain and the adsorbate concentration against the adsorbate concentration. In general, Cgc increases with increasing adsorbate concentration over the range of ~ 0.1 to 1.4 mmol/g. Results from the dried block coals are compared to CO2 experiments using native coals with an inherent level of moisture as received. The amount of CO2 adsorbed using native coals (assuming no displacement of H2O by CO2) is significantly less than the dried coals. The gas-induced strain (S) and adsorption amount (M) were measured as a function of time following step changes in CO2, CH4, and N2 pressure from vacuum to 1.8 MPa. An empirical diffusion equation was applied to the kinetic data to obtain the exponent (n) for time dependence for each experiment. The data for all coals were pooled and the exponent (n) evaluated using an ANOVA statistical analysis method. Values for (n) near 0.5 were found to be independent on the coal, the gas or type of measurement (e.g., parallel strain, perpendicular strain, and gas uptake). These data support the use of a Fickian diffusion model framework for kinetic analysis. The kinetic constant k was determined using a unipore diffusion model for each experiment and the data were pooled for ANOVA analysis. For dry coal, statistically significant differences for k were found for the gases (CO2 > N2 > CH4) and coals (Pocahontas >Blind Canyon > Pittsburgh #8) but not for the method of the kinetic measurement (e.g., strain or gas uptake). For Blind Canyon and Pittsburgh #8 coal, the rate of CO2 adsorption and gas-induced strain for dry coal was significantly greater than that of the corresponding native coal. For Pocahontas coal the rates of CO2 adsorption and gas-induced strain for dry and native coal were indistinguishable and may be related to its low native moisture and minimal amount of created porosity upon drying.

S.R. Kelemen; L.M. Kwiatek

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Sphagnum Mosses from 21 Ombrotrophic Bogs in the Athabasca Bituminous Sands Region Show No Significant Atmospheric Contamination of “Heavy Metals”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sifton bog ... Hg accumulation rates decrease in the order Sifton Bog, in the City of London, Ontario (141 ?g Hg m-2 per yr), Luther Bog in an agricultural region (89 ?g Hg m-2 per yr), and Spruce Bog which is in a comparatively remote, forested region (54 ?g Hg m-2 per yr). ...

William Shotyk; Rene Belland; John Duke; Heike Kempter; Michael Krachler; Tommy Noernberg; Rick Pelletier; Melanie A. Vile; Kelman Wieder; Claudio Zaccone; Shuangquan Zhang

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

187

Effects of Steam and CO2 in the Fluidizing Gas when Using Bituminous Coal in Chemical-Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology where an oxygen carrier is used to transfer oxygen from the combustion air to the fuel in order to...2 is inherently separated from the flue gases with...

H. Leion; A. Lyngfelt; T. Mattisson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and carrying out a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The primary coal of this program, Black Thunder subbituminous coal, can be effectively beneficiated to about 3.5 wt % ash using aqueous sulfurous acid pretreatment. This treated coal can be further beneficiated to about 2 wt % ash using commercially available procedures. All three coals used in this study (Black Thunder, Burning Star bituminous, and Martin Lake lignite) are effectively swelled by a number of solvents. The most effective solvents are those having hetero-functionality. laboratory- and bench-scale liquefaction experimentation is underway using swelled and catalyst impregnated coal samples. Higher coal conversions were observed for the SO{sub 2}-treated subbituminous coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Conversions of swelled coal were highest when Molyvan L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively, were added to the liquefaction solvent. The study of bottoms processing consists of combining the ASCOT process which consists of coupling solvent deasphalting with delayed coking to maximize the production of coal-derived liquids while rejecting solids within the coke drum. The asphalt production phase has been completed; representative product has been evaluated. The solvent system for the deasphalting process has been established. Two ASCOT tests produced overall liquid yields (63.3 wt % and 61.5 wt %) that exceeded the combined liquid yields from the vacuum tower and ROSE process.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., (United States); Gutterman, C. [FWDC (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Coal in National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA): framework geology and resources  

SciTech Connect

The North Slope of Alaska contains huge resources of coal, much of which lies within NPRA. The main coal-bearing units, the Corwin and Chandler Formations of the Nanushuk Group (Lower and Upper Cretaceous), underlie about 20,000 mi/sup 2/ (51,800 km/sup 2/) of NPRA. They contain low-sulfur, low-ash, and probable coking-quality coal in gently dipping beds as thick as 20 ft (6.1 m) within stratigraphic intervals as thick as 4500 ft (1370 m). Lesser coal potential occurs in other Upper Cretaceous units and in Lower Mississippian and Tertiary strata. The river-dominated Corwin and Umiat deltas controlled the distribution of Nanushuk Group coal-forming environments. Most organic deposits formed on delta plains; fewer formed in alluvial plain or delta-front environments. Most NPRA coal beds are expected to be lenticular and irregular, as they probably accumulated in interdistributary basins, infilled bays, or inland flood basins, whereas some blanket beds may have formed on broad, slowly sinking, delta lobes. The major controls of coal rank and degree of deformation were depth of burial and subsequent tectonism. Nanushuk Group coal resources in NPRA are estimated to be as much as 2.75 trillion short tons. This value is the sum of 1.42 trillion short tons of near-surface (< 500 ft or 150 m of overburden) bituminous coal, 1.25 trillion short tons of near-surface subbituminous coal, and 0.08 trillion shorts tons of more deeply buried subbituminous coal. These estimates indicate that the North Slope may contain as much as one-third of the United States coal potential.

Sable, E.G.; Stricker, G.D.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Alaska has 4. 0 trillion tons of low-sulfur coal: Is there a future for this resource  

SciTech Connect

The demand for and use of low-sulfur coal may increase because of concern with acid rain. Alaska's low-sulfur coal resources can only be described as enormous: 4.0 trillion tons of hypothetical onshore coal. Mean total sulfur content is 0.34% (range 0.06-6.6%, n = 262) with a mean apparent rank of subbituminous B. There are 50 coal fields in Alaska; the bulk of the resources are in six major fields or regions: Nenana, Cook Inlet, Matanuska, Chignik-Herendeen Bay, North Slope, and Bering River. For comparison, Carboniferous coals in the Appalachian region and Interior Province have a mean total sulfur content of 2.3% (range 0.1-19.0%, n = 5,497) with a mean apparent rank of high-volatile A bituminous coal, and Rocky Mountain and northern Great Plains Cretaceous and Tertiary coals have a mean total sulfur content of 0.86% (range 0.02-19.0%, n = 2,754) with a mean apparent rank of subbituminous B. Alaskan coal has two-fifths the total sulfur of western US coals and one-sixth that of Carboniferous US coals. Even though Alaska has large resources of low-sulfur coal, these resources have not been developed because of (1) remote locations and little infrastructure, (2) inhospitable climate, and (3) long distances to potential markets. These resources will not be used in the near future unless there are some major, and probably violent, changes in the world energy picture.

Stricker, G.D. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was purchased used and all of the equipment has nearly reached the end of its useful service.

Ronald Landreth

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit to Pulverized Coal Power Plants for In-Situ CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect

A novel Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) system is proposed to effectively capture CO2 from existing PC power plants. The work during the past three years has led to an oxygen carrier particle with satisfactory performance. Moreover, successful laboratory, bench scale, and integrated demonstrations have been performed. The proposed project further advanced the novel CDCL technology to sub-pilot scale (25 kWth). To be more specific, the following objectives attained in the proposed project are: 1. to further improve the oxygen carrying capacity as well as the sulfur/ash tolerance of the current (working) particle; 2. to demonstrate continuous CDCL operations in an integrated mode with > 99% coal (bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite) conversion as well as the production of high temperature exhaust gas stream that is suitable for steam generation in existing PC boilers; 3. to identify, via demonstrations, the fate of sulfur and NOx; 4. to conduct thorough techno-economic analysis that validates the technical and economical attractiveness of the CDCL system. The objectives outlined above were achieved through collaborative efforts among all the participants. CONSOL Energy Inc. performed the techno-economic analysis of the CDCL process. Shell/CRI was able to perform feasibility and economic studies on the large scale particle synthesis and provide composite particles for the sub-pilot scale testing. The experience of B&W (with boilers) and Air Products (with handling gases) assisted the retrofit system design as well as the demonstration unit operations. The experience gained from the sub-pilot scale demonstration of the Syngas Chemical Looping (SCL) process at OSU was able to ensure the successful handling of the solids. Phase 1 focused on studies to improve the current particle to better suit the CDCL operations. The optimum operating conditions for the reducer reactor such as the temperature, char gasification enhancer type, and flow rate were identified. The modifications of the existing bench scale reactor were completed in order to use it in the next phase of the project. In Phase II, the optimum looping medium was selected, and bench scale demonstrations were completed using them. Different types of coal char such as those obtained from bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite were tested. Modifications were made on the existing sub-pilot scale unit for coal injection. Phase III focused on integrated CDCL demonstration in the sub-pilot scale unit. A comprehensive ASPEN® simulations and economic analysis was completed by CONSOL t is expected that the CDCL process will be ready for further demonstrations in a scale up unit upon completion of the proposed project.

Zeng, Liang; Li, Fanxing; Kim, Ray; Bayham, Samuel; McGiveron, Omar; Tong, Andrew; Connell, Daniel; Luo, Siwei; Sridhar, Deepak; Wang, Fei; Sun, Zhenchao; Fan, Liang-Shih

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. Final technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

Plastic coals are important feedstocks in coke manufacture, coal liquefaction, gasification, and combustion. During these processes, the thermoplastic behavior of these coals is also important since it may contribute to desirable or undesirable characteristics. For example, during liquefaction, the plastic behavior is desired since it leads to liquid-liquid reactions which are faster than solid-liquid reactions. During gasification, the elastic behavior is undesired since it leads to caking and agglomeration of coal particles which result in bed bogging in fixed or fluidized bed gasifiers. The plastic behavior of different coals was studied using a fast-response plastometer. A modified plastometer was used to measure the torque required to turn at constant angular speed a cone-shaped disk embedded in a thin layer of coal. The coal particles were packed between two metal plates which are heated electrically. Heating rates, final temperatures, pressures, and durations of experiment ranged from 200--800 K/s, 700--1300 K, vacuum-50 atm helium, and 0--40 s, respectively. The apparent viscosity of the molten coal was calculated from the measured torque using the governing equation of the cone-and-plate viscometer. Using a concentrated suspension model, the molten coal`s apparent viscosity was related to the quantity of the liquid metaplast present during pyrolysis. Seven coals from Argonne National Laboratory Premium Coal Sample Bank were studied. Five bituminous coals, from high-volatile to low-volatile bituminous, were found to have very good plastic behavior. Coal type strongly affects the magnitude and duration of plasticity. Hvb coals were most plastic. Mvb and lvb coals, though the maximum plasticity and plastic period were less. Low rank coals such as subbituminous and lignite did not exhibit any plasticity in the present studies. Coal plasticity is moderately well correlated with simple indices of coal type such as the elemental C,O, and H contents.

Gerjarusak, S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

PILOT-SCALE EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION FOR NOx ON MERCURY SPECIATION  

SciTech Connect

Full-scale tests in Europe and bench-scale tests in the United States have indicated that the catalyst, normally vanadium/titanium metal oxide, used in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x}, may promote the formation of Hg{sup 2+} and/or particulate-bound mercury (Hg{sub p}). To investigate the impact of SCR on mercury speciation, pilot-scale screening tests were conducted at the Energy & Environmental Research Center. The primary research goal was to determine whether the catalyst or the injection of ammonia in a representative SCR system promotes the conversion of Hg{sup 0} to Hg{sup 2+} and/or Hg{sub p} and, if so, which coal types and parameters (e.g., rank and chemical composition) affect the degree of conversion. Four different coals, three eastern bituminous coals and a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal, were tested. Three tests were conducted for each coal: (1) baseline, (2) NH{sub 3} injection, and (3) SCR of NO{sub x}. Speciated mercury, ammonia slip, SO{sub 3}, and chloride measurements were made to determine the effect the SCR reactor had on mercury speciation. It appears that the impact of SCR of NO{sub x} on mercury speciation is coal-dependent. Although there were several confounding factors such as temperature and ammonia concentrations in the flue gas, two of the eastern bituminous coals showed substantial increases in Hg{sub p} at the inlet to the ESP after passing through an SCR reactor. The PRB coal showed little if any change due to the presence of the SCR. Apparently, the effects of the SCR reactor are related to the chloride, sulfur and, possibly, the calcium content of the coal. It is clear that additional work needs to be done at the full-scale level.

Dennis L. Laudal; John H. Pavlish; Kevin C. Galbreath; Jeffrey S. Thompson; Gregory F. Weber; Everett Sondreal

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Annual Coal Distribution Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2001 and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2001 State / Region Domestic Foreign Total Alabama 14,828 4,508 19,336 Alaska 825 698 1,524 Arizona 13,143 - 13,143 Arkansas 13 - 13 Colorado 32,427 894 33,321 Illinois 33,997 285 34,283 Indiana 36,714 - 36,714 Kansas 176 - 176 Kentucky Total 131,546 2,821 134,367 East 107,000 2,707 109,706 West 24,547 114 24,660 Louisiana 3,746 - 3,746 Maryland 4,671 319 4,990 Mississippi 475 - 475 Missouri 366 - 366 Montana 38,459 485 38,944 New Mexico 28,949 - 28,949 North Dakota 30,449 - 30,449 Ohio 25,463 12 25,475 Oklahoma 1,710 - 1,710 Pennsylvania Total 64,392 6,005 70,397 Anthracite 2,852 205 3,057 Bituminous 61,540 5,800 67,340 Tennessee 3,346 28 3,374 Texas 45,019 31 45,050 Utah 24,761 2,144 26,905 Virginia 25,685 7,071 32,756 Washington 4,623 - 4,623 West Virginia Total 144,584

196

file://C:\Documents%20and%20Settings\ICR\My%20Documents\Coal\Di  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Release Date: September 2003 Release Date: September 2003 Next Release Date: Summer 2004 Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2002 (Thousand Short Tons) State / Region Domestic Foreign Total Alabama 15,552 3,425 18,977 Alaska 847 311 1,158 Arizona 12,971 - 12,971 Arkansas 12 - 12 Colorado 33,904 843 34,748 Illinois 32,719 21 32,740 Indiana 35,391 - 35,391 Kansas 205 - 205 Kentucky Total 123,129 791 123,920 East 98,492 791 99,284 West 24,636 - 24,636 Louisiana 3,810 - 3,810 Maryland 4,632 413 5,044 Mississippi 2,906 - 2,906 Missouri 203 - 203 Montana 37,050 180 37,230 New Mexico 27,555 - 27,555 North Dakota 31,011 - 31,011 Ohio 20,919 68 20,987 Oklahoma 1,394 - 1,394 Pennsylvania Total 59,764 5,530 65,294 Anthracite 2,436 251 2,687 Bituminous 57,328 5,279 62,607 Tennessee 3,229 52 3,281 Texas 45,638 33

197

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 April 2008 Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas Colorado Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Total Louisiana Maryland Mississippi Missouri Montana New Mexico North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Pennsylvania Total Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Total Wyoming Appalachian Total Interior Total Western Total East of Miss. River West of Miss. River U.S. Total State / Region Domestic Foreign 19,449 1,398 8,027 4 33,125 31,076 36,379 437 125,333 98,027 27,306 4,257 7,689 3,593 391 41,570 26,473 30,265 23,139 1,920 73,815 2,902 70,913 2,633 44,531 24,519 31,789 2,580 145,321 42,435 102,886 449,638 401,863 149,893 617,595 500,216 669,134 1,169,350 Total East West Anthracite Bituminous Northern Southern 13,425 964 8,027 4 32,326 30,836 36,379 437 121,621 94,315 27,306 4,257 7,277 3,593

198

file://J:\mydocs\Coal\Distribution\2003\distable1.HTML  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2003 and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2003 (Thousand Short Tons) State / Region Domestic Foreign Total Alabama 16,639 3,902 20,541 Alaska 856 232 1,088 Arizona 12,093 - 12,093 Arkansas 6 - 6 Colorado 34,997 898 35,895 Illinois 31,751 55 31,806 Indiana 35,350 - 35,350 Kansas 154 - 154 Kentucky Total 113,241 906 114,146 East 92,391 890 93,282 West 20,849 15 20,865 Louisiana 3,959 - 3,959 Maryland 4,955 596 5,551 Mississippi 3,739 - 3,739 Missouri 345 - 345 Montana 36,181 541 36,721 New Mexico 27,138 - 27,138 North Dakota 31,077 - 31,077 Ohio 21,770 176 21,945 Oklahoma 1,645 - 1,645 Pennsylvania Total 57,362 3,562 60,924 Anthracite 2,805 68 2,873 Bituminous 54,557 3,494 58,051 Tennessee 2,551 2 2,553 Texas 47,506 8 47,513 Utah 23,276 318 23,594 Virginia 26,000 6,117 32,117 Washington 6,232 - 6,232 West Virginia Total 134,359

199

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012 Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 29. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Alabama w - w 107.73 Arkansas w - - w Colorado w - 37.18 w Illinois 48.08 - 59.51 54.18 Indiana 52.94 - - 52.94 Kentucky Total w w - 62.24 Kentucky (East) w w - 79.23 Kentucky (West) 50.18 - - 50.18 Maryland w - - w Montana - - w w New Mexico - - w w Ohio w - w 49.39 Oklahoma w - - w Pennsylvania Total 94.53 w 65.01 w Pennsylvania (Anthracite) w w - 82.71 Pennsylvania (Bituminous) w - w 72.67 Tennessee w - - w Utah w - 34.99

200

Distribution of thermogenic methane in Carboniferous coal seams of the Donets Basin (Ukraine): “Applications to exploitation of methane and forecast of mining hazards”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main purpose of this contribution is to estimate methane production and to define its migration paths and storage in the Donets Basin formations for exploitation of methane and forecast of mining hazards. In order to study methane migration and storage, maps of production calculated by 2D modelling, adsorption capacity of methane in coal, and present-day methane contents were constructed for an altitude of ? 300 m (close to 500 m depth) in this basin. The results show that three principal factors influenced the methane migration and accumulation in Donets Basin: 1) faults that acted as migration pathways, 2) a replacement of thermogenic methane by endogenic CO2 in the central and SE parts, and 3) the occurrence of magmatic events in some areas in this basin. Finally, in Donbas, the areas with the highest methane potential and the maximum risk of outburst are not the areas with anthracite that produce the highest volume of methane, but areas with volatile bituminous coals where an impermeable cover preserved the accumulated gas until the Cenozoic and where dextral shear belts facilitated its migration.

D. Alsaab; M. Elie; A. Izart; R.F. Sachsenhofer; V.A. Privalov; I. Suarez-Ruiz; L. Martinez; E.A. Panova

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hazard recognition and adjustment in northern Appalachia: examples of coal-mine subsidence in small communities  

SciTech Connect

Mine subsidence is a pervasive hazard in the northern Appalachian coal fields and is associated with both active and abandoned mines. Causative factors include the method of mining, geological and hydrologic conditions, and surface activities. Its economic costs include surface property damages and depreciations plus costs of mitigation. Environmental impacts include derangement of surface drainage and loss of aquifer. These topics are reviewed here, and on subsidence cognition and the research findings are discussed. One bituminous and three anthracite area boroughs in Pennsylvania served as case studies. Local officials and planners were informally interviewed and surveys of residents conducted. The present study differs from most in the traditional hazard-perception genus in several ways. It addresses the salience of hazard amid other pressing community concerns. Salience, rather than perceived seriousness, provides greater insights into residents' coping responses. Consideration is given to institutional and other contextual influences on individuals' adjustment strategies. Finally, coal mine subsidence is a technological hazard, albeit one which is geological in character.

Barnes, K.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Injury experience in coal mining, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1991. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. Data used in compiling this report were reported by operators of coal mines and preparation plants on a mandatory basis as required under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977, Public Law 91-173,as amended by Public Law 95-164. Since January 1, 1978, operators of mines or preparation plants or both which are subject to the Act have been required under 30 CFR, Part 50, to submit reports of injuries, occupational illnesses, and related data.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the washability and comprehensive characterization results of 247 raw coal channel samples, including anthracite, bituminous and lignite coals, collected from the Western Region of the United States. Although the Western Region includes Alaska, coal data from this state will often be cited apart from the Western Region data from the lower United States. This is the third of a three volume report on the coals of the United States. All the data are presented in six appendices. Statistical techniques and definitions are presented in Appendix A, and a glossary of terms is presented in Appendix B. The complete washability data and an in-depth characterization of each sample are presented alphabetically by state in Appendix C. In Appendix D, a statistical evaluation is given for the composited washability data, selected chemical and physical properties, and washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. This presentation is shown by state, section, and region where four or more samples were collected. Appendix E presents coalbed codes and names for the Western Region coals. Graphical summations are presented by state, rank, and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions, and the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. 35 figs., 3 tabs.

Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA). Coal Preparation Div.); Jacobsen, P.S. (Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Coalbed methane potential of the Pechora Coalfield, Timan-Pechora Basin, Russia  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of the more important geologic attributes of coal beds in the coalbed methane producing regions of the United States to Permian coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield, Timan-Pechora Basin, Russia indicates a high potential for commercial coalbed methane production. Although the depositional and structural histories, as well as the age, of the coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield are different than coal beds in U.S. basins, coal quality attributes are similar. The more prospective part of the coal-bearing sequence is as thick as 1600 m and contains more than 150 coal beds that individually are as thick as 4 m. These coal beds are composed primarily of rank ranges from subbituminous to anthracite (,0.5->2.5% R[sub 0]), with the highest rank coal located near the city of Vorkuta. Published data indicates that the gas content of coals is as high as 28-35 m[sup 3]/ton, with an average value of 18 m[sup 3]/ton. About 700 MMCM of gas per year is emmitted from coal mines. Pore pressures in the coal beds are unknown, however, interbedded sandstones in some parts of the basin are overpressured. The commonly occurring problem, in mid-latitude coalbed methane well, of excessive amounts of water may be alleviated in this high-latitude coal field. We suggest that the wide-spread occurrence of permafrost in the Pechora Coalfield may form an effective barrier to down-dip water flow, thereby facilitating the dewatering state. In summary, the quality of coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield are similar to methane producing coal beds in the United States and should, therefore, be favorable for commercial rates of gas production.

Yakutseni, V.P.; Petrova, Y.E. (VNIGRI, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)); Law, B.E.; Ulmishek, G.F. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Coalbed methane potential of the Pechora Coalfield, Timan-Pechora Basin, Russia  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of the more important geologic attributes of coal beds in the coalbed methane producing regions of the United States to Permian coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield, Timan-Pechora Basin, Russia indicates a high potential for commercial coalbed methane production. Although the depositional and structural histories, as well as the age, of the coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield are different than coal beds in U.S. basins, coal quality attributes are similar. The more prospective part of the coal-bearing sequence is as thick as 1600 m and contains more than 150 coal beds that individually are as thick as 4 m. These coal beds are composed primarily of rank ranges from subbituminous to anthracite (,0.5->2.5% R{sub 0}), with the highest rank coal located near the city of Vorkuta. Published data indicates that the gas content of coals is as high as 28-35 m{sup 3}/ton, with an average value of 18 m{sup 3}/ton. About 700 MMCM of gas per year is emmitted from coal mines. Pore pressures in the coal beds are unknown, however, interbedded sandstones in some parts of the basin are overpressured. The commonly occurring problem, in mid-latitude coalbed methane well, of excessive amounts of water may be alleviated in this high-latitude coal field. We suggest that the wide-spread occurrence of permafrost in the Pechora Coalfield may form an effective barrier to down-dip water flow, thereby facilitating the dewatering state. In summary, the quality of coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield are similar to methane producing coal beds in the United States and should, therefore, be favorable for commercial rates of gas production.

Yakutseni, V.P.; Petrova, Y.E. [VNIGRI, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Law, B.E.; Ulmishek, G.F. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Use of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Commercial Use of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Operating Facilities - Sasol Production of liquid fuels and chemicals from coal on a large scale has been a reality in South Africa for decades. Sasol Synfuels owns and operates Sasol II and Sasol III, which are two F-T synthesis-based fuels production plants in Secunda, South Africa. The Sasol plants represent the most significant example of commercialized F-T synthesis in the world. Construction of Sasol II began in the mid 1970s, with operation of the two plants commencing in the early 1980s. The two plants contain 80 Sasol-Lurgi Fixed Bed Dry Bottom (FBDB) gasifiers, and total output from both of the plants is approximately 150,000 barrels per day (bpd), reaching 160,000 bpd in 2006. The feedstock for the plants is sub-bituminous coal supplied by Sasol Mining, a sister company of Sasol Synfuels. Natural gas is also used as a supplemental feedstock. A proprietary iron-based Fisher-Tropsch (FT) process is used to convert the synthesis gas (syngas) produced by the gasifiers to gasoline, light olefins (alkenes), and a variety of other products.

207

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - ALTA for Cyclone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full-Scale Demonstration of ALTA NOx Control for Cyclone-Fired Boilers Full-Scale Demonstration of ALTA NOx Control for Cyclone-Fired Boilers The primary goal of this project was to evaluate a technology called advanced layered technology application (ALTA) as a means to achieve NOx emissions below 0.15 lb/MMBtu in a cyclone boiler. Reaction Engineering International (REI) conducted field testing and combustion modeling to refine the process design, define the optimum technology parameters, and assess system performance. The ALTA NOx control technology combines deep staging from overfire air, rich reagent injection (RRI), and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR). Field testing was conducted during May-June 2005 at AmerenUE's Sioux Station Unit 1, a 500 MW cyclone boiler unit that typically burns an 80/20 blend of Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. Parametric testing was also conducted with 60/40 and 0/100 blends. The testing also evaluated process impacts on balance-of-plant issues such as the amount of unburned carbon in the ash, slag tapping, waterwall corrosion, ammonia slip, and heat distribution.

208

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Receipts and Quality of Coal Delivered for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 . Receipts and Quality of Coal Delivered for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Period Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight 2002 423,128 1.47 10.1 391,785 0.36 6.2 65,555 0.93 13.3 2003 467,286 1.50 10.0 432,513 0.38 6.4 79,869 1.03 14.4 2004 470,619 1.52 10.4 445,603 0.36 6.0 78,268 1.05 14.2 2005 480,179 1.56 10.5 456,856 0.36 6.2 77,677 1.02 14.0 2006 489,550 1.59 10.5 504,947 0.35 6.1 75,742 0.95 14.4 2007 467,817 1.62 10.3 505,155 0.34 6.0 71,930 0.90 14.0

209

Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that dispersed catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on exploring novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction and the effectiveness of temperature-programmed liquefaction using dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research was to explore novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular precursors, that could be used in low concentrations but exhibit relatively high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. We have synthesized and tested various catalyst precursors in liquefaction of subbituminous and bituminous coals and in model compound studies to examine how do the composition and structure of the catalytic precursors affect their effectiveness for coal liquefaction under different reaction conditions, and how do these factors affect their catalytic functions for hydrogenation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, for cleavage of C-C bonds in polycyclic systems such as 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, for hydrogenolysis of C-O bond such as that in dinaphthylether, for hydrodeoxygenation of phenolic compounds and other oxygen-containing compounds such as xanthene, and for hydrodesulfurization of polycyclic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene. The novel bimetallic and monometallic precursors synthesized and tested in this project include various Mo- and Fe-based compounds.

Chunshan Song; Schobert, H.H.; Parfitt, D.P. [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Market Assessment and Technical Feasibility Study of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Ash Use  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute, Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy Technology Center (METC), has undertaken a research and demonstration program designed to examine the market potential and the technical feasibility of ash use options for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) ashes. The assessment is designed to address six applications, including: (1) structural fill, (2) road base construction, (3) supplementary cementing materials in portland cement, (4) synthetic aggregate, and (5) agricultural/soil amendment applications. Ash from low-sulfur subbituminous coal-fired Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, and ash from the high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired American Electric Power (AEP) bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing. This paper addresses the technical feasibility of ash use options for PFBC unit using low- sulfur coal and limestone sorbent (karhula ash) and high-sulfur coal and dolomite sorbents (AEP Tidd ash).

Bland, A.E.; Brown, T.H. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

A compact XRF unit for determining total sulphur content in coals  

SciTech Connect

A microcomputer based x-ray fluorescence (XRF) unit was developed for off-line determination of total sulphur content in coal samples. The unit consisted of the x-ray exciting/measuring set and the microcomputer with a plug-in interface card, An Fe-55 radioisotope was used as the exciting source while a krypton-filled proportional counter was used to measure x-rays from the samples. The x-ray spectrum was simultaneously displayed on the microcomputer screen. For quantitative determination of sulphur, the intensities of sulphur K x-rays as well as calcium K x-rays and scattered x-rays were taken into account. The unit was tested with finely-ground, dried and compressed lignite, subbituminous and bituminous samples. It was found that for low-calcium coals the results were in good agreement with those obtained from the standard chemical analysis method within {+-}0.2 %S and within {+-}0.5 %S for high-calcium coals.

Sumitra, T.; Chankow, N.; Punnachaiya, S.; Srisatit, S. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Power Systems Development Facility. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the PSDF would be to provide a modular facility which would support the development of advanced, pilot-scale, coal-based power systems and hot gas clean-up components. These pilot-scale components would be designed to be large enough so that the results can be related and projected to commercial systems. The facility would use a modular approach to enhance the flexibility and capability for testing; consequently, overall capital and operating costs when compared with stand-alone facilities would be reduced by sharing resources common to different modules. The facility would identify and resolve technical barrier, as well as-provide a structure for long-term testing and performance assessment. It is also intended that the facility would evaluate the operational and performance characteristics of the advanced power systems with both bituminous and subbituminous coals. Five technology-based experimental modules are proposed for the PSDF: (1) an advanced gasifier module, (2) a fuel cell test module, (3) a PFBC module, (4) a combustion gas turbine module, and (5) a module comprised of five hot gas cleanup particulate control devices. The final module, the PCD, would capture coal-derived ash and particles from both the PFBC and advanced gasifier gas streams to provide for overall particulate emission control, as well as to protect the combustion turbine and the fuel cell.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect

On March 15, 2005, EPA issued the Clean Air Mercury Rule, requiring phased-in reductions of mercury emissions from electric power generators. ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL and industry partners, is conducting evaluations of EPRI's TOXECON II{trademark} process and of high-temperature reagents and sorbents to determine the capabilities of sorbent/reagent injection, including activated carbon, for mercury control on different coals and air emissions control equipment configurations. DOE/NETL targets for total mercury removal are {ge}55% (lignite), {ge}65% (subbituminous), and {ge}80% (bituminous). Based on work done to date at various scales, meeting the removal targets appears feasible. However, work needs to progress to more thoroughly document and test these promising technologies at full scale. This is the final site report for tests conducted at MidAmerican's Louisa Station, one of three sites evaluated in this DOE/NETL program. The other two sites in the program are MidAmerican's Council Bluff Station and Entergy's Independence Station. MidAmerican's Louisa Station burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and employs hot-side electrostatic precipitators with flue gas conditioning for particulate control. This part of the testing program evaluated the effect of reagents used in the existing flue gas conditioning on mercury removal.

Sharon Sjostrom

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Reactivity of fly ashes in a spray dryer FGD process  

SciTech Connect

During the period 1981-1982, a study was performed to determine the ability of various fly ashes to retain sulfur dioxide in a pilot plant spray dryer/fabric filter flue gas desulfurization system. This knowledge would provide design engineers with the necessary data to determine whether the fly ash from a particular utility could be used as an effective supplement or substitute for slaked lime in a spray dryer system. The study commenced with the collection of 22 fly ashes from lignite, subbituminous, and bituminous eastern and western coals. The ashes were contacted with the flue gas entering the pilot plant by two different techniques. In the first, the ashes were slurried in water and injected into the spray dryer through a spinning disk atomizer. In the second, the ashes were injected as a dry additive into the flue gas upstream of the spray dryer. Analyses were conducted to determine the ability of each ash to retain sulfur dioxide in the system followed by statistical correlations of the sulfur retention with the physical/chemical properties of each ash. 17 references, 32 figures, 19 tables.

Davis, W.T.; Reed, G.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Characteristics of carbonized sludge for co-combustion in pulverized coal power plants  

SciTech Connect

Co-combustion of sewage sludge can destabilize its combustion profile due to high volatility, which results in unstable flame. We carried out fuel reforming for sewage sludge by way of carbonization at pyrolysis temperature of 300-500 deg. C. Fuel characteristics of carbonized sludge at each temperature were analyzed. As carbonization temperature increased, fuel ratio increased, volatile content reduced, and atomic ratio relation of H/C and O/C was similar to that of lignite. The analysis result of FT-IR showed the decrease of aliphatic C-H bond and O-C bond in carbonization. In the analysis result of TG-DTG, the thermogravimetry reduction temperature of carbonized sludge (CS400) was proven to be higher than that of dried sludge, but lower than that of sub-bituminous coal. Hardgrove grindability index increased in proportion to fuel ratio increase, where the carbonized sludge value of 43-110 was similar or higher than the coal value of 49-63. As for ash deposits, slagging and fouling index were higher than that of coal. When carbonized sludge (CS400) and coal were co-combusted in 1-10% according to calorific value, slagging tendency was low in all conditions, and fouling tendency was medium or high according to the compositions of coal.

Park, Sang-Woo [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Cheol-Hyeon, E-mail: jangch@hanbat.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Utilization of Partially Gasified Coal for Mercury Removal  

SciTech Connect

In this project, General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) developed a novel mercury (Hg) control technology in which the sorbent for gas-phase Hg removal is produced from coal in a gasification process in-situ at a coal burning plant. The main objective of this project was to obtain technical information necessary for moving the technology from pilot-scale testing to a full-scale demonstration. A pilot-scale gasifier was used to generate sorbents from both bituminous and subbituminous coals. Once the conditions for optimizing sorbent surface area were identified, sorbents with the highest surface area were tested in a pilot-scale combustion tunnel for their effectiveness in removing Hg from coal-based flue gas. It was determined that the highest surface area sorbents generated from the gasifier process ({approx}600 m{sup 2}/g) had about 70%-85% of the reactivity of activated carbon at the same injection rate (lb/ACF), but were effective in removing 70% mercury at injection rates about 50% higher than that of commercially available activated carbon. In addition, mercury removal rates of up to 95% were demonstrated at higher sorbent injection rates. Overall, the results of the pilot-scale tests achieved the program goals, which were to achieve at least 70% Hg removal from baseline emissions levels at 25% or less of the cost of activated carbon injection.

Chris Samuelson; Peter Maly; David Moyeda

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

217

Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

Under the cooperative agreement program of DOE and funding from Wyoming State’s Clean Coal Task Force, Western Research Institute and Thermosolv LLC studied the direct conversion of Wyoming coals and coal-lignin mixed feeds into liquid fuels in conditions highly relevant to practice. During the Phase I, catalytic direct liquefaction of sub-bituminous Wyoming coals was investigated. The process conditions and catalysts were identified that lead to a significant increase of desirable oil fraction in the products. The Phase II work focused on systematic study of solvothermal depolymerization (STD) and direct liquefaction (DCL) of carbonaceous feedstocks. The effect of the reaction conditions (the nature of solvent, solvent/lignin ratio, temperature, pressure, heating rate, and residence time) on STD was investigated. The effect of a number of various additives (including lignin, model lignin compounds, lignin-derivable chemicals, and inorganic radical initiators), solvents, and catalysts on DCL has been studied. Although a significant progress has been achieved in developing solvothermal depolymerization, the side reactions – formation of considerable amounts of char and gaseous products – as well as other drawbacks do not render aqueous media as the most appropriate choice for commercial implementation of STD for processing coals and lignins. The trends and effects discovered in DCL point at the specific features of liquefaction mechanism that are currently underutilized yet could be exploited to intensify the process. A judicious choice of catalysts, solvents, and additives might enable practical and economically efficient direct conversion of Wyoming coals into liquid fuels.

Polyakov, Oleg

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC17  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR (formerly Kellogg Brown & Root) Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results gasification operation with Illinois Basin bituminous coal in PSDF test campaign TC17. The test campaign was completed from October 25, 2004, to November 18, 2004. System startup and initial operation was accomplished with Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal, and then the system was transitioned to Illinois Basin coal operation. The major objective for this test was to evaluate the PSDF gasification process operational stability and performance using the Illinois Basin coal. The Transport Gasifier train was operated for 92 hours using PRB coal and for 221 hours using Illinois Basin coal.

Southern Company Services

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Stocks of Coal by Coal Rank: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 4. Stocks of Coal by Coal Rank: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 Electric Power Sector Period Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite Coal Total End of Year Stocks 2002 70,704 66,593 4,417 141,714 2003 57,716 59,884 3,967 121,567 2004 49,022 53,618 4,029 106,669 2005 52,923 44,377 3,836 101,137 2006 67,760 68,408 4,797 140,964 2007 63,964 82,692 4,565 151,221 2008 65,818 91,214 4,556 161,589 2009 91,922 92,448 5,097 189,467 2010 81,108 86,915 6,894 174,917 2011 82,056 85,151 5,179 172,387 2012 86,437 93,833 4,846 185,116 2010, End of Month Stocks January 86,354 86,893 4,845 178,091 February 82,469 83,721 4,836 171,026 March 86,698 86,014 5,030 177,742 April 92,621 89,545 7,095 189,260 May 93,069 91,514 7,085 191,669

220

Study of mercury oxidation by a selective catalytic reduction catalyst in a pilot-scale slipstream reactor at a utility boiler burning bituminous coal  

SciTech Connect

One of the cost-effective mercury control technologies in coal-fired power plants is the enhanced oxidation of elemental mercury in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) followed by the capture of the oxidized mercury in the wet scrubber. This paper is the first in a series of two in which the validation of the SCR slipstream test and Hg speciation variation in runs with or without SCR catalysts inside the SCR slipstream reactor under special gas additions (HCl, Cl{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 3}) are presented. Tests indicate that the use of a catalyst in a SCR slipstream reactor can achieve greater than 90% NO reduction efficiency with a NH{sub 3}/NO ratio of about 1. There is no evidence to show that the reactor material affects mercury speciation. Both SCR catalysts used in this study exhibited a catalytic effect on the elemental mercury oxidation but had no apparent adsorption effect. SCR catalyst 2 seemed more sensitive to the operational temperature. The spike gas tests indicated that HCl can promote Hg{sup 0} oxidation but not Cl{sub 2}. The effect of Cl{sub 2} on mercury oxidation may be inhibited by higher concentrations of SO{sub 2}, NO, or H{sub 2}O in real flue-gas atmospheres within the typical SCR temperature range (300-350{sup o}C). SO{sub 2} seemed to inhibit mercury oxidation; however, SO{sub 3} may have some effect on the promotion of mercury oxidation in runs with or without SCR catalysts. 25 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Yan Cao; Bobby Chen; Jiang Wu; Hong Cui; John Smith; Chi-Kuan Chen; Paul Chu; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The determination of the void structure of microporous coals by small?angle neutron scattering: Void geometry and structure in Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The access of solvents and reactants to the microvoid volume in porous materials such as coal plays an important role in determining the overall chemistry which takes place during a variety of chemical transformations including oxidation combustion and pyrolysis. The structure and surface composition of these voids were studied using small?angle neutron scattering techniques to examine selectively the subset of the overall void volume distribution which comprises the microvoid volume. Powdered Illinois No. 6 coal containing approximately 20% void volume was slurried in several different aqueous and cyclohexane solutions. The solutions used had various hydrogen?to?deuterium ratios in order to contrast match most of the open pore volume thereby making the microvoid volume visible. The microvoid volume observed is characterized as elongated voids having a fairly well?defined diameter and surface composition. The scattering intensity from the microvoid volume shows a well?defined Porod region indicating that the smallest void dimension is resolved by the instrumental configuration employed. A Guinier region exhibiting Q ? 1 behavior which is characteristic of elongated structures is also observed. The average radius of a circular cross section of these voids is found to be 25.4 Å. The microvoids are found to be completely filled by aqueous solutions so that the residual neutron scattering which is not eliminated by the contrast?matching aqueous solution is due to the organic matrix structure. Nonaqueous mixtures of cyclohexane cannot fill the entire microvoid volume as effectively as the aqueous mixtures. The scattering differences observed between the aqueous and nonaqueous filled coal indicates that the surface of the microvoids is predominantly aliphatic in character with the principal compositional variation being the presence or absence of acidic functionality on the surface.

Jon S. Gethner

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Effect of co-precipitation and impregnation on K-decorated Fe2O3/Al2O3 oxygen carrier in Chemical Looping Combustion of bituminous coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) of coal is an innovative combustion technology for CO2 inherent capture, which uses oxygen carrier (OC) to transfer lattice oxygen to coal. However, coal gasification is the rate-limiting process for CLC of coal. Although carbon conversion and gasification rate are substantially improved with oxygen carriers in the presence of alkali additives, alkali loss in oxygen carrier is still a serious problem in the process of CLC of coal. The present work focuses on the OC–potassium interaction for two preparation methods of K-decorated OC. Different contents of catalyst (K2CO3) were added into the preparation of Fe-based oxygen carrier by both co-precipitation and impregnation. And the effect of K-decorated methods on oxygen carriers was investigated in a fluidized bed reactor. For co-precipitated oxygen carriers, CO2 gas yields (fCO2) were higher and CO gas yields (fCO) were lower than the ones for impregnated oxygen carriers. Total carbon conversions for co-precipitated oxygen carriers were also higher than those for impregnated oxygen carriers, and a shorter time of fast reaction stage always corresponded to co-precipitated oxygen carrier. 9 redox cycles were also conducted to investigate the stability of oxygen carrier reactivity and the potassium loss with cycle number. It was concluded that the reactivity of co-precipitated oxygen carriers was more stable during 9 redox cycles. Especially for K10-cp (oxygen carriers of 10% potassium content by co-precipitation), fCO2 increased slightly and fCO changed very little with cycle number. According to morphological features of oxygen carriers, co-precipitation was superior to impregnation in preventing oxygen carrier particle sintering. On the other hand, although potassium contents of all K-decorated oxygen carriers decreased with cycle number, the potassium loss for co-precipitated oxygen carriers was smaller. K10-cp performed the best characteristic in avoiding potassium loss: the potassium content decreased from 8.47% (fresh oxygen carrier) to 7.79% (after 9 cycles). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis showed that the potassium ferrite, K2Fe22O34, was presented in K-decorated oxygen carriers. Based on the peak intensity ratio of I K 2 Fe 22 O 34 / I Fe 2 O 3 , the higher the content of \\{K2Fe22O34\\} in K-decorated Fe2O3/Al2O3 oxygen carrier was, the larger the conversion of CO to CO2 was, and the shorter the time of fast reaction stage was. Therefore, it was inferred that \\{K2Fe22O34\\} acted as a support with catalytic effect. In addition, the content of \\{K2Fe22O34\\} was higher in co-precipitated oxygen carriers than that in impregnation oxygen carriers. It can be used to explain that why a better reactivity was always found for co-precipitated oxygen carriers.

Huijun Ge; Laihong Shen; Haiming Gu; Shouxi Jiang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Characterization of Liquids Derived From Laboratory Coking of Decant Oil and Co-Coking of Pittsburgh Seam Bituminous Coal with Decant Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(41-43) Co-coking of decant oil/coal blend produced higher coke and gas yields but less liquid product than those of coking. ... When the same decant oil was blended with the Pittsburgh Seam coal and then delayed co-coked, the overhead liquid contained 2.1% gasoline, 3.6% jet fuel, 4.6% diesel, and 88.8% fuel oil on average. ... It is also possible that catalytic cracking reactions may occur via the coal mineral matter (e.g., clays, which are abundant minerals in coals, can serve as cracking catalysts) (Table 1). ...

Ömer Gül; Caroline Clifford; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

224

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. U.S. Coal Production by Coal-Producing Region and State, 2006 - 2010 2. U.S. Coal Production by Coal-Producing Region and State, 2006 - 2010 (Million Short Tons) Coal-Producing Region and State 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Percent Change 2009 - 2010 Appalachia Total 391.2 377.8 390.2 341.4 334.3 -2.1 Alabama 18.8 19.3 20.6 18.8 20.2 7.6 Kentucky, Eastern 93.6 87.1 90.3 74.7 67.4 -9.7 Maryland 5.1 2.3 2.9 2.3 2.5 7.4 Ohio 22.7 22.6 26.3 27.5 27.3 -0.8 Pennsylvania Total 66.0 65.0 65.4 57.9 58.0 0.1 Anthracite 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.7 0.3 Bituminous 64.5 63.5 63.7 56.2 56.3 0.1 Tennessee 2.8 2.7 2.3 2.0 1.7 -16.1 Virginia 29.7 25.3 24.7 21.0 21.6 2.9 West Virginia Total 152.4 153.5 157.8 137.1 135.6 -1.1 Northern 42.4 42.2 41.1 38.4 41.4 7.9 Southern 110.0 111.3 116.7 98.7 94.2 -4.6

225

Postcombustion and its influences in 135 MWe CFB boilers  

SciTech Connect

In the cyclone of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, a noticeable increment of flue gas temperature, caused by combustion of combustible gas and unburnt carbon content, is often found. Such phenomenon is defined as post combustion, and it could introduce overheating of reheated and superheated steam and extra heat loss of exhaust flue gas. In this paper, mathematical modeling and field measurements on post combustion in 135MWe commercial CFB boilers were conducted. A novel one-dimensional combustion model taking post combustion into account was developed. With this model, the overall combustion performance, including size distribution of various ashes, temperature profile, and carbon content profiles along the furnace height, heat release fraction in the cyclone and furnace were predicted. Field measurements were conducted by sampling gas and solid at different positions in the boiler under different loads. The measured data and corresponding model-calculated results were compared. Both prediction and field measurements showed post combustion introduced a temperature increment of flue gas in the cyclone of the 135MWe CFB boiler in the range of 20-50{sup o}C when a low-volatile bituminous coal was fired. Although it had little influence on ash size distribution, post combustion had a remarkable influence on the carbon content profile and temperature profile in the furnace. Moreover, it introduced about 4-7% heat release in the cyclone over the total heat release in the boiler. This fraction slightly increased with total air flow rate and boiler load. Model calculations were also conducted on other two 135MWe CFB boilers burning lignite and anthracite coal, respectively. The results confirmed that post combustion was sensitive to coal type and became more severe as the volatile content of the coal decreased. 15 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Shaohua Li; Hairui Yang; Hai Zhang; Qing Liu; Junfu Lu; Guangxi Yue [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Small boiler uses waste coal  

SciTech Connect

Burning coal waste in small boilers at low emissions poses considerable problem. While larger boiler suppliers have successfully installed designs in the 40 to 80 MW range for some years, the author has been developing small automated fluid bed boiler plants for 25 years that can be applied in the range of 10,000 to 140,000 lbs/hr of steam. Development has centered on the use of an internally circulating fluid bed (CFB) boiler, which will burn waste fuels of most types. The boiler is based on the traditional D-shaped watertable boiler, with a new type of combustion chamber that enables a three-to-one turndown to be achieved. The boilers have all the advantages of low emissions of the large fluid boilers while offering a much lower height incorporated into the package boiler concept. Recent tests with a waste coal that had a high nitrogen content of 1.45% demonstrated a NOx emission below the federal limit of 0.6 lbs/mm Btu. Thus a NOx reduction on the order of 85% can be demonstrate by combustion modification alone. Further reductions can be made by using a selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system and sulfur absorption of up to 90% retention is possible. The article describes the operation of a 30,000 lbs/hr boiler at the Fayette Thermal LLC plant. Spinheat has installed three ICFB boilers at a nursing home and a prison, which has been tested on poor-grade anthracite and bituminous coal. 2 figs.

Virr, M.J. [Spinheat Ltd. (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

The structural alignment of coal and the analogous case of Argonne Upper Freeport coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has long been recognized that coal is somewhat aligned. Multiple techniques imply a structural alignment but its quantification has been challenging. Moreover, discrepancies exist among techniques as to whether low-rank coals are aligned. The extent of structural alignment for the rank range was quantified directly via image analysis of high-resolution transmission electron micrograph lattice fringes. Alignment was quantified, for each coal, by the contribution to the total fringe length within the prominent 45° of orientation over random orientation (1/4 of the possible orientations). It was evident that there is structural alignment across the rank range. Thus it is time for the community to desist from making the erroneous statement that: low-rank coals are randomly oriented. The slight orientation was similar for low-rank Beulah-Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous coals (24% and 22%) with Pocahontas (lvb) coal showing slightly greater (39%) alignment with extensive alignment (65%) in the case of an anthracite coal. The degree of ordering is illustrated with the aid of false-color lattice fringe images and Rose diagrams. The fringe contribution 90° opposed to the maximum length contribution had the minimum or near minimum percentage length contribution for all coals except Upper Freeport and to a lesser degree Illinois No. 6. For the Upper Freeport coal the alignment is lower than expected given its mvb rank (14% over random) and is attributed to a variant of T-stacking for the small aromatic moieties sited perpendicular and between horizontal displaced fringes.

Jonathan P. Mathews; Atul Sharma

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Subsurface definition of the Allegheny Group coalbed methane prospect interval in Southwestern Pennsylvania and new gas content results  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary reconnaissance of coalbed methane gas content data from exploratory coal cores and pre-existing data implies that the greater the depth and rank, the greater the total and cumulative gas content. The coal seams studied, ranging in age from the Pennsylvanian-Permian Dunkard Group to the Middle Pennsylvanian Allegheny Group, are from the Main Bituminous Field and two of the anthracite fields. Consequently, the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey conducted a mapping investigation to evaluate the regional geology of the coal-bearing intervals and its influence on coalbed methane potential. Phase I of this study involved the entire Pennsylvanian coal-bearing interval; Phase II focused on a stratigraphic delineation and evaluation of Allegheny coalbeds and associated sandstones. A variety of cross sections and isopach maps show several prospective coalbeds and facies relationships with channel-fill sandstones. This suggests that some of these sandstones may be traps for coalbed methane. Often overlooked in reservoir characterization is the quality of a coal seam. Coal rank, grade, and type influence the reserves and production of coalbed methane; the higher the rank, the greater adsorptive capacity of the coal. The integration of coal quality with other critical tools of exploration may increase the success rate of finding {open_quotes}sweet spots.{close_quotes} Additional Pennsylvania Geological Survey drilling occurred in Beaver, Lawrence, Somerset, and Washington counties. Gas contents were graphically displayed against depth, thickness, and time for a variety of samples from 21 coal seams; average gas composition and Btu values were determined for selected samples.

Markowski, A.K. [Pennsylvania Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources-Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey, Harrisburg, PA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

MARKET ASSESSMENT AND TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY STUDY OF PRESSURIZED FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION ASH USE  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute, in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute, Foster Wheeler International, Inc. and the US Department of Energy, has undertaken a research and demonstration program designed to examine the market potential and the technical feasibility of ash use options for PFBC ashes. Ashes from the Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot-scale circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, combusting (1) low-sulfur subbituminous and (2) high-sulfur bituminous coal, and ash from the AEP's high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing at WR1. The technical feasibility study examined the use of PFBC ash in construction-related applications, including its use as a cementing material in concrete and use in cement manufacturing, fill and embankment materials, soil stabilization agent, and use in synthetic aggregate production. Testing was also conducted to determine the technical feasibility of PFBC ash as a soil amendment for acidic and sodic problem soils and spoils encountered in agricultural and reclamation applications. The results of the technical feasibility testing indicated the following conclusions. PFBC ash does not meet the chemical requirements as a pozzolan for cement replacement. However, it does appear that potential may exist for its use in cement production as a pozzolan and/or as a set retardant. PFBC ash shows relatively high strength development, low expansion, and low permeability properties that make its use in fills and embankments promising. Testing has also indicated that PFBC ash, when mixed with low amounts of lime, develops high strengths, suitable for soil stabilization applications and synthetic aggregate production. Synthetic aggregate produced from PFBC ash is capable of meeting ASTM/AASHTO specifications for many construction applications. The residual calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in the PFE3C ash has been shown to be of value in making PFBC ash a suitable soil amendment for acidic and sodic problem soils and mine spoils. In conclusion, PFBC ash represents a viable material for use in currently established applications for conventional coal combustion ashes. As such, PFBC ash should be viewed as a valuable resource, and commercial opportunities for these materials should be explored for planned PFBC installations.

A.E. Bland; T.H. Brown

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical reaction mechanism for the NBFZ tests.

Stefano Orsino

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

231

ADVANCED MULTI-PRODUCT COAL UTILIZATION BY-PRODUCT PROCESSING PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. The ash produced by the plant was found to be highly variable as the plant consumes high and low sulfur bituminous coal, in Units 1 and 2 and a mixture of subbituminous and bituminous coal in Units 3 and 4. The ash produced reflected this consisting of an iron-rich ({approx}24%, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), aluminum rich ({approx}29% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and high calcium (6%-7%, CaO) ash, respectively. The LOI of the ash typically was in the range of 5.5% to 6.5%, but individual samples ranged from 1% to almost 9%. The lower pond at Ghent is a substantial body, covering more than 100 acres, with a volume that exceeds 200 million cubic feet. The sedimentation, stratigraphy and resource assessment of the in place ash was investigated with vibracoring and three-dimensional, computer-modeling techniques. Thirteen cores to depths reaching nearly 40 feet, were retrieved, logged in the field and transported to the lab for a series of analyses for particle size, loss on ignition, petrography, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence. Collected data were processed using ArcViewGIS, Rockware, and Microsoft Excel to create three-dimensional, layered iso-grade maps, as well as stratigraphic columns and profiles, and reserve estimations. The ash in the pond was projected to exceed 7 million tons and contain over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon, and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. The size, quality and consistency of the ponded material suggests that it is the better feedstock for the beneficiation plant.

Robert Jewell; Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The configuration of the subscale combustor has evolved during the six years of this program from a system using only an impact separator to remove particulates to a system which also included a slagging cyclone separator before the lean-quench combustor. The system also now includes active slag tapping after the impact separator rather than a bucket to collect the slag. The subscale 12 MM Btu/hr (higher heating value, HHV) slagging combustor has demonstrated excellent coal-fired operation at 6 atm. The combustor has fired both coal-water mixtures (CWM) and pulverized coal (PC). Three Wyoming subbituminous coals and two bituminous coals have been successfully fired in the TVC. As a result of this active testing, the following conclusions may be drawn: (1) it was possible to achieve the full design thermal capacity of 12 MM Btu/hr with the subscale slagging combustor, while burning 100% pulverized coal and operating at the design pressure of 6 atm; (2) because of the separate-chamber, rich-lean design of the subscale slagging combustor, NO{sub x} emissions that easily meet the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) limits were achieved; (3) carbon burnout efficiency was in excess of 99% when 100% coal-fired; (4) ninety percent of the ash can be separated as slag in the impact separator, and a total 98 to 99% removed with the addition of the slagging cyclone separator; (5) Objectives for third-stage exit temperature (1850{degrees}F), and exit temperature pattern factor (14%) were readily achieved; (6) overall pressure loss is currently an acceptable 5 to 6% without cyclone separator and 7 to 9% with the cyclone; and (7) feeding pulverized coal or sorbent into the combustor against 6 atm pressure is achievable.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Investigation of chemical looping combustion by solid fuels. 2. redox reaction kinetics and product characterization with coal, biomass, and solid waste as solid fuels and CuO as an oxygen carrier  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the second in a series of two on the investigation of the chemical looping combustion (CLC) of solid fuels. The first paper put forward the concept of the CLC of solid fuels using a circulating fluidized bed as a reactor and Cu-CuO as the oxygen carrier, which was based on an analysis of oxygen transfer capability, reaction enthalpy, and chemical equilibrium. In this second paper, we report the results of the evaluation of the reduction of CuO reduced by solid fuels such as coal and some other 'opportunity' solid fuels. Tests on the reduction of CuO by the selected solid fuels were conducted using simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, which simulates a microreactor. An attached mass spectrometer (MS) was used for the characterization of evolved gaseous products. The X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for the characterization of the solid residues. Results strongly supported the feasibility of CuO reduction by selected solid fuels. CuO can be fully converted into Cu in a reduction process, either in a direct path by solid fuels, which was verified by MS analysis under a N{sub 2} atmosphere, or in an indirect path by pyrolysis and gasification products of solid fuels in the reducer. No Cu{sub 2}O exists in reducing atmospheres, which was characterized by an XRD analysis and mass balance calculations. No carbon deposit was found on the surface of the reduced Cu, which was characterized by SEM analysis. CuO reduction by solid fuels can start at temperatures as low as approximately 500 C. Tests indicated that the solid fuels with higher reactivity (higher volatile matter) would be desirable for the development of the chemical looping combustion process of solid fuels, such as sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal and solid waste and biomass. 4 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Yan Cao; Bianca Casenas; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

ENHANCED CONTROL OF MERCURY BY WET FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI co-funded this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project has investigated catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installations. Field tests were conducted to determine whether candidate catalyst materials remain active towards mercury oxidation after extended flue gas exposure. Catalyst life will have a large impact on the cost effectiveness of this potential process. A mobile catalyst test unit was used to test the activity of four different catalyst materials for a period of up to six months each at three utility sites. Catalyst testing was completed at the first site, which fires Texas lignite, in December 1998; at the second test site, which fires a Powder River Basin subbituminous coal, in November 1999; and at the third site, which fires a medium- to high-sulfur bituminous coal, in January 2001. Results of testing at each of the three sites were reported in previous technical notes. At Site 1, catalysts were tested only as powders dispersed in sand bed reactors. At Sites 2 and 3, catalysts were tested in two forms, including powders dispersed in sand and in commercially available forms such as extruded pellets and coated honeycomb structures. This final report summarizes and presents results from all three sites, for the various catalyst forms tested. Field testing was supported by laboratory tests to screen catalysts for activity at specific flue gas compositions, to investigate catalyst deactivation mechanisms and methods for regenerating spent catalysts. Laboratory results are also summarized and discussed in this report.

Unknown

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Classification of carbon in Canadian fly ashes and their implications in the capture of mercury  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fly ashes produced from Canadian power plants using pulverized coal and fluidized bed combustors were examined for their carbon content to determine their ability to capture mercury. The feed coal used in these power plants were lignite, subbituminous, high and medium volatile bituminous, their blends, and also blends of coal with petroleum coke (Petcoke). The carbon and mercury content of the coals and fly ashes were determined using the ASTM standard method and by the cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry method. The carbon content of the fly ash was concentrated by strong acid digestion using \\{HCl\\} and HF. The quantitative and qualitative analyses of the carbon concentrate were made by using a reflected light microscope. The results show that the carbon content of fly ash appears to be partially related to depositional environment during coalification and to the rank of the coal. The Hg captured by the fly ash depends on the rank and blend of the feed coals and the type of carbon in the fly ash. The isotropic vitrinitic char is mostly responsible for the capture of most Hg in fly ash. The inadvertent increase in carbon content due to the blending of coal with petroleum coke did not increase the amount Hg captured by the fly ash. The fly ash collected by the hot side electrostatic precipitator has a low Hg content and no relation between the Hg and carbon content of the ash was observed. These results indicate that the quantity of carbon in the fly ash alone does not determine the amount Hg captured. The types of carbon present (isotropic and anisotropic vitrinitic, isotropic inertinitic and anisotropic Petcoke), the halogen content, the types of fly ash control devices, and the temperatures of the fly ash control devices all play major roles in the capture of Hg.

Fariborz Goodarzi; James C. Hower

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

ASSESSMENT OF LOW COST NOVEL SORBENTS FOR COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT MERCURY CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

The injection of sorbents upstream of a particulate control device is one of the most promising methods for controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired utility boilers with electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters. Studies carried out at the bench-, pilot-, and full-scale have shown that a wide variety of factors may influence sorbent mercury removal effectiveness. These factors include mercury species, flue gas composition, process conditions, existing pollution control equipment design, and sorbent characteristics. The objective of the program is to obtain the necessary information to assess the viability of lower cost alternatives to commercially available activated carbon for mercury control in coal-fired utilities. Prior to injection testing, a number of sorbents were tested in a slipstream fixed-bed device both in the laboratory and at two field sites. Based upon the performance of the sorbents in a fixed-bed device and the estimated cost of mercury control using each sorbent, seventeen sorbents were chosen for screening in a slipstream injection system at a site burning a Western bituminous coal/petcoke blend, five were chosen for screening at a site burning a subbituminous Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, and nineteen sorbents were evaluated at a third site burning a PRB coal. Sorbents evaluated during the program were of various materials, including: activated carbons, treated carbons, other non-activated carbons, and non-carbon material. The economics and performance of the novel sorbents evaluated demonstrate that there are alternatives to the commercial standard. Smaller enterprises may have the opportunity to provide lower price mercury sorbents to power generation customers under the right set of circumstances.

Sharon Sjostrom

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Co-pyrolysis of low rank coals and biomass: Product distributions  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis and gasification of combined low rank coal and biomass feeds are the subject of much study in an effort to mitigate the production of green house gases from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While co-feeding has the potential to reduce the net carbon footprint of commercial gasification operations, the effects of co-feeding on kinetics and product distributions requires study to ensure the success of this strategy. Southern yellow pine was pyrolyzed in a semi-batch type drop tube reactor with either Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal or Mississippi lignite at several temperatures and feed ratios. Product gas composition of expected primary constituents (CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) was determined by in-situ mass spectrometry while minor gaseous constituents were determined using a GC-MS. Product distributions are fit to linear functions of temperature, and quadratic functions of biomass fraction, for use in computational co-pyrolysis simulations. The results are shown to yield significant nonlinearities, particularly at higher temperatures and for lower ranked coals. The co-pyrolysis product distributions evolve more tar, and less char, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, than an additive pyrolysis process would suggest. For lignite co-pyrolysis, CO and H{sub 2} production are also reduced. The data suggests that evolution of hydrogen from rapid pyrolysis of biomass prevents the crosslinking of fragmented aromatic structures during coal pyrolysis to produce tar, rather than secondary char and light gases. Finally, it is shown that, for the two coal types tested, co-pyrolysis synergies are more significant as coal rank decreases, likely because the initial structure in these coals contains larger pores and smaller clusters of aromatic structures which are more readily retained as tar in rapid co-pyrolysis.

Soncini, Ryan M.; Means, Nicholas C.; Weiland, Nathan T.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Speciation of Selenium, Arsenic, and Zinc in Class C Fly Ash  

SciTech Connect

A major environmental concern associated with coal fly ash is the mobilization of trace elements that may contaminate water. To better evaluate proper use of fly ash, determine appropriate disposal methods, and monitor postdisposal conditions, it is important to understand the speciation of trace elements in fly ash and their possible environmental impact. The speciation of selenium, arsenic, and zinc was determined in five representative Class C fly ash samples from combustion of sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy to provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms of trace element association with the fly ash. Selenium in all fly ash samples occurs predominantly as Se(IV), with the exception of one sample, in which there was a minor amount of Se(0). Se(0) is likely associated with the high content of unburned coal in the sample. Arsenic exists in the fly ash as a single phase most consistent with calcium pyroarsenate. In contrast, zinc occurs as two distinct species in the silicate glass matrix of the fly ash. This work demonstrates that residual carbon in fly ash may reduce potential Se mobility in the environment by retaining it as less soluble elemental Se instead of Se(IV). Further, this work suggests that As and Zn in Class C fly ash will display substantially different release and mobilization behaviors in aquatic environments. While As release will primarily depend upon the dissolution and hydrolysis of calcium pyroarsenate, Zn release will be controlled by the dissolution of alkaline aluminosilicate glass in the ash.

Luo, Yun; Giammar, Daniel E.; Huhmann, Brittany L.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

239

The use of PFBC ashes to ameliorate acid conditions: An equilibrium and greenhouse study  

SciTech Connect

Pilot-scale development at the Foster Wheeler Energia Oy 10 MW{sub th} circulating PFBC at Karhula, Finland, has demonstrated the advantages of pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) technology. Commercial scale deployment of the technology at the Lakeland Utilities MacIntosh Unit No. 4 has been proposed. Development of uses for the ashes from PFBC systems is being actively pursued as part of commercial demonstration of PFBC technologies. Western Research Institute (WRI), in conjunction with the US Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc., and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), conducted a laboratory scale investigation of the technical feasibility of PFBC ash as an amendment for acidic soils and spoils encountered in agricultural and reclamation applications. Ashes were collected from the Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, operating on (1) low-sulfur subbituminous and (2) high-sulfur bituminous coals. The results of the technical feasibility testing indicated the following: (1) PFBC fly ash (Karhula-low S fly ash) and ag-lime (CaCO{sub 3}) were used as amendments attempting to ameliorate acid spoil conditions. These materials were found to be effective acid mine spoil amendments. (2) The greenhouse study demonstrated that PFBC ash and/or bed ash amended spoils resulted in similar seed germination numbers as compared to the ag-lime amended spoils. (3) The greenhouse study also demonstrated that PFBC fly ash and/or bed ash amended spoils resulted in comparable plant productivity to the ag-lime amended spoils. In fact, all amendments resulted in statistically the same levels of plant production for each plant species.

Brown, T.H.; Bland, A.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Measurement and Modeling of Sorption-Induced Strain and Permeability Changes in Coal  

SciTech Connect

Strain caused by the adsorption of gases was measured in samples of subbituminous coal from the Powder River basin of Wyoming, U.S.A., and high-volatile bituminous coal from the Uinta-Piceance basin of Utah, U.S.A. using a newly developed strain measurement apparatus. The apparatus can be used to measure strain on multiple small coal samples based on the optical detection of the longitudinal strain. The swelling and shrinkage (strain) in the coal samples resulting from the adsorption of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, methane, helium, and a mixture of gases was measured. Sorption-induced strain processes were shown to be reversible and easily modeled with a Langmuir-type equation. Extended Langmuir theory was applied to satisfactorily model strain caused by the adsorption of gas mixtures using the pure gas Langmuir strain constants. The amount of time required to obtain accurate strain data was greatly reduced compared to other strain measurement methods. Sorption-induced changes in permeability were also measured as a function of pres-sure. Cleat compressibility was found to be variable, not constant. Calculated variable cleat-compressibility constants were found to correlate well with previously published data for other coals. During permeability tests, sorption-induced matrix shrinkage was clearly demonstrated by higher permeability values at lower pore pressures while holding overburden pressure constant. Measured permeability data were modeled using three dif-ferent permeability models from the open literature that take into account sorption-induced matrix strain. All three models poorly matched the measured permeability data because they overestimated the impact of measured sorption-induced strain on permeabil-ity. However, by applying an experimentally derived expression to the measured strain data that accounts for the confining overburden pressure, pore pressure, coal type, and gas type, the permeability models were significantly improved.

Eric P. Robertson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program: POC bench option run 01 (227-90). Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of bench-scale work, Bench Run PB-01, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept-Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. The Bench Run PB-01 was the first of nine runs planned under the POC Bench Option Contract between the US DOE and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. The primary goal of this bench run was to evaluate the most successful of the process improvements concepts, evolving out of the earlier CMSL Project, for conventional direct liquefaction as well as coprocessing of a sub-bituminous Black Thunder mine coal with waste organics such as waste plastics and heavy resid. The interstage separation of light ends and gases was indeed found to reduce the overall light gas-make from the liquefaction process. The organic waste feeds such as mixed plastics and vacuum resid, employed during Bench Run PB-01, in combined processing with coal, resulted in making the overall process more hydrogen efficient by virtue of reducing the light gas make and also decreasing the hydrogen consumption from the process, while at the same time improving the yields and quality of the distillate products. A definite synergy was found during the combined processing of coal with mixtures of vacuum resid and mixed waste plastics. The application of an all dispersed catalyst conversion reactor resulted in higher feed throughput at equivalent process performance, but also necessitated the use of an in-line hydrotreater for improving the quality of IBP-400{degrees}C distillate products. The combination of HTI`s iron gel catalyst and Molyvan-A was found very effective in achieving high levels of process performance; although, in recycled form, these catalysts were not as effective as the freshly added precursors.

Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program: Bench Run 05 (227-97). Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results Bench Run PB-05, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept - Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Bench Run PB-05 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and included the evaluation of the effect of using dispersed slurry catalyst in direct liquefaction of a high volatile bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal and in combined coprocessing of coal with organic wastes, such as heavy petroleum resid, MSW plastics, and auto-shredder residue. PB-05 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Coprocessing of waste plastics with Illinois No. 6 coal did not result in the improvement observed earlier with a subbituminous coal. In particular, decreases in light gas yield and hydrogen consumption were not observed with Illinois No. 6 coal as they were with Black Thunder Mine coal. The higher thermal severity during PB-05 is a possible reason for this discrepancy, plastics being more sensitive to temperatures (cracking) than either coal or heavy resid. The ASR material was poorer than MSW plastics in terms of increasing conversions and yields. HTI`s new dispersed catalyst formulation, containing phosphorus-promoted iron gel, was highly effective for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal under the reaction conditions employed; over 95% coal conversion was obtained, along with over 85% residuum conversion and over 73% distillate yields.

Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A novel concept for high conversion of coal to liquids. Final report, 1 September 1988--31 August 1992  

SciTech Connect

A batch microreactor was designed and fabricated as a means of investigating maximum yields of liquids obtainable in very short reaction times of the order of a few seconds, and the maximum ratios of liquids/hydrocarbon (HC) gases obtainable under those conditions. A Wyodak sub-bituminous coal, crushed and sieved to {minus}200 mesh particle size, was used in the experiments, with a temperature of 500{degrees}C and a pressure of 1500 psi. The fine coal particles were fed dry to the reactor and heated to reaction temperature in times of one to two seconds. At a time of 3 seconds at reaction temperature, in a single pass a liquid yield of 60% by weight of the coal was obtained, accompanied by a ratio of liquids/(HC) gases of 30/1. When the unreacted solids were recycled to the reactor, and the results combined with those of the first pass, a liquid yield of 82% by weight of the coal was achieved, accompanied by a ratio of liquids/HC gases of 30/1. This ratio represents only about 3 wt percent HC gases, much lower that is produced in current advanced technologies, and represents a large saving in hydrogen consumption. A simulated distillation technique was applied to the liquids. The liquid product contained 86% by weight (of the liquids) total distillables (boiling point below 538{degrees}C), including 70% by weight of low-boiling fractions in the gasoline, kerosene and gas oil range (boiling point up to 325{degrees}C). The liquid product exhibited a H/C ratio of 1.5, which is considerably higher than observed in current advanced technologies for the primary liquids. Several catalysts were investigated. Iron catalysts, specifically ferric chloride hexahydrate and ferric sulfate pentahydrate, each produced these high conversions and high ratios of liquids/HC gases.

Wiser, W.H.; Shabtai, J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Assessment of atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion recycle systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a technical and economic evaluation of AFBC power plants with recycle systems, and a comparison of these plants with AFBC power plants with carbon burnup beds (CBB) and with pulverized coal-fired (PCF) power plants with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The analysis considers 1000 MWe plants burning both eastern and western coals. The capital and operating cost estimates are based on boiler designs developed by Babcock and Wilcox, Inc., and on sorbent requirements estimated by Burns and Roe, Inc. The economic analyses are based on a plant located in the East Central region of the United States with a 30-year life and a 70 percent capacity factor. The eastern coal-fired plants are designed to burn Illinois bituminous coal with a higher heating value of 10,100 Btu/lb and a sulfur content of 4%. The required calcium to sulfur mole ratios for the eastern plants are 3.8:1 and 2.5:1 for the AFBC/CBB and AFBC/recycle plants, respectively. The western coal-fired plants are designed to burn Wyoming subbituminous coal with a higher heating value of 8,020 Btu/lb and a sulfur content of 0.48%. The required calcium to sulfur mole ratios for the western plants are 0.7:1 and 0.4:1 for the AFBC/CBB and AFBC/recycle plants, respectively. These Ca/S mole ratios allow for 30 percent utilization of the alkaline coal ash to reduce sorbent requirements to the fluidized bed combustor. The analyses indicate that the AFBC/recycle plants have an economic advantage over the AFBC/CBB plants and over the PCF/FGD plants for both eastern and western coal.

Rogali, R.; Wysocki, J.; Kursman, S.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Inspection of integrated two-stage liquefaction products as petroleum refining feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

Regardless of the specific technology used to produce transportation fuels from coal, the net product of the liquefaction process will have to undergo additional refining to make finished products. Consequently, there is a need to characterize the material that exits the liquefaction plant as net product and enters the refinery as feed. The net product of the Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) process, as practiced at the 6 ton/day (5.5 tonne/day) Wilsonville, Alabama (USA) plant, is a distillable liquid boiling predominantly below 650{degrees}F (343{degrees}C). Products from ITSL operations at the Wilsonville plant were evaluated through the use of standard petroleum tests on several occasions. However, those evaluations were performed on materials generated much earlier in the ITSL campaign and, thus, may not be representative of products generated from the process as it is currently configured. For this work, net products were obtained for analysis from ITSL operations during fully lined-out material balance operating periods.Samples were taken fro Run 259G, which was operated with Ireland Mine coal (hvAb, Pittsburgh seam, West Virginia, USA) and from Run 260D, which was operated with Black Thunder Mine coal (subbituminous, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA). A complete suite of light crude oil assay tests was performed on each sample. These assays included tests on the whole coal liquid, and the separated naphtha (<380{degrees}F/193{degrees}C), jet fuel or kerosene (380{degrees}F/193{degrees}C {times} 510{degrees}F/266{degrees}C), and diesel fuel (>510{degrees}F/266{degrees}C) fractions. The results of the assays were compared against typical petroleum product specifications. The discussion will concentrate on the test results of the bituminous coal product.

Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P. [Consolidation Coal Co., Library, PA (United States); Zhou, P. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a particular type of coal, each of which is inherentlyThere are four classes of coal: bituminous, sub-bituminous,minerals Metallic ores Coal Crude petroleum Gasoline Fuel

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Design, construction, operation and evaluation of a prototype culm combustion boiler/heater unit. Final design of prototype unit  

SciTech Connect

A final design of a prototype anthracite culm combustion boiler has been accomplished under Phase I of DOE Contract ET-78-C-01-3269. The prototype boiler has been designed to generate 20,000 pounds per hour of 150 psig saturated steam using low Btu (4000 Btu per pound) anthracite culm as a fuel. This boiler will be located at the industrial park of the Shamokin Area Industrial Corporation (SAIC). This program is directed at demonstrating the commercial viability of anthracite culm fueled FBC steam generation systems.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Steam-Coal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture  

SciTech Connect

We present experimental results of coal gasification with and without the addition of calcium oxide and potassium hydroxide as dual-functioning catalyst–capture agents. Using two different coal types and temperatures between 700 and 900 °C, we studied the effect of these catalyst–capture agents on (1) the syngas composition, (2) CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S capture, and (3) the steam–coal gasification kinetic rate. The syngas composition from the gasifier was roughly 20% methane, 70% hydrogen, and 10% other species when a CaO/C molar ratio of 0.5 was added. We demonstrated significantly enhanced steam–coal gasification kinetic rates when adding small amounts of potassium hydroxide to coal when operating a CaO–CaCO{sub 3} chemical looping gasification reactor. For example, the steam–coal gasification kinetic rate increased 250% when dry mixing calcium oxide at a Ca/C molar ratio of 0.5 with a sub-bituminous coal, and the kinetic rate increased 1000% when aqueously mixing calcium oxide at a Ca/C molar ratio of 0.5 along with potassium hydroxide at a K/C molar ratio of 0.06. In addition, we conducted multi-cycle studies in which CaCO{sub 3} was calcined by heating to 900 °C to regenerate the CaO, which was then reused in repeated CaO–CaCO{sub 3} cycles. The increased steam–coal gasification kinetics rates for both CaO and CaO + KOH persisted even when the material was reused in six cycles of gasification and calcination. The ability of CaO to capture carbon dioxide decreased roughly 2–4% per CaO–CaCO{sub 3} cycle. We also discuss an important application of this combined gasifier–calciner to electricity generation and selling the purge stream as a precalcined feedstock to a cement kiln. In this scenario, the amount of purge stream required is fixed not by the degradation in the capture ability but rather by the requirements at the cement kiln on the amount of CaSO{sub 4} and ash in the precalcined feedstock.

Siefert, Nicholas S.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Litster, Shawn; Berry, David, A

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program were to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel and to develop a greater understanding of mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts in the form of a simple model. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH provided co-funding for this program. REI used a multicatalyst slipstream reactor to determine oxidation of mercury across five commercial SCR catalysts at a power plant that burned a blend of 87% subbituminous coal and 13% bituminous coal. The chlorine content of the blend was 100 to 240 {micro}g/g on a dry basis. Mercury measurements were carried out when the catalysts were relatively new, corresponding to about 300 hours of operation and again after 2,200 hours of operation. NO{sub x}, O{sub 2} and gaseous mercury speciation at the inlet and at the outlet of each catalyst chamber were measured. In general, the catalysts all appeared capable of achieving about 90% NO{sub x} reduction at a space velocity of 3,000 hr{sup -1} when new, which is typical of full-scale installations; after 2,200 hours exposure to flue gas, some of the catalysts appeared to lose NO{sub x} activity. For the fresh commercial catalysts, oxidation of mercury was in the range of 25% to 65% at typical full-scale space velocities. A blank monolith showed no oxidation of mercury under any conditions. All catalysts showed higher mercury oxidation without ammonia, consistent with full-scale measurements. After exposure to flue gas for 2,200 hours, some of the catalysts showed reduced levels of mercury oxidation relative to the initial levels of oxidation. A model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III Year 6 - Activity 1.10 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been conducting research on gasification for six decades. One of the objectives of this gasification research has been to maximize carbon conversion and the water–gas shift process for optimal hydrogen production and syngas quality. This research focus and experience were a perfect fit for the National Center for Hydrogen Technology ® (NCHT®) Program at the EERC for improving all aspects of coal gasification, which ultimately aids in the production and purification of hydrogen. A consortia project was developed under the NCHT Program to develop an improved predictive model for ash formation and deposition under the project entitled “Coal Ash Behavior in Reducing Environments (CABRE) III: Development of the CABRE III Model.” The computer-based program is now applicable to the modeling of coal and ash behavior in both entrained-flow and fluidized-bed gasification systems to aid in overall gasification efficiency. This model represents a significant improvement over the CABRE II model and runs on a Microsoft Windows PC platform. The major achievements of the CABRE III model are partitioning of inorganic transformations between various phases for specific gas cleanup equipment; slag property predictions, including standard temperature–viscosity curves and slag flow and thickness; deposition rates in gasification cleanup equipment; provision for composition analysis for all input and output streams across all process equipment, including major elements and trace elements of interest; composition analysis of deposit streams for various deposit zones, including direct condensation on equipment surfaces (Zone A), homogeneous particulate deposition (Zone B), and entrained fly ash deposition (Zone C); and physical removal of ash in cyclones based on D50 cut points. Another new feature of the CABRE III model is a user-friendly interface and detailed reports that are easily exportable into Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, or as pdf files. The user interface provides stepwise guides with built-in checks for efficient entry of required input data on fuels of interest to allow a successful execution of the model. The model was developed with data from several fuels selected by the sponsors, including bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, and petroleum coke (petcoke). The data from these fuels were obtained using small pilot-scale entrained-flow and fluidized-bed gasifiers at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The CABRE III model is expected to further advance the knowledge base for the NCHT® Program and, more importantly, allow for prediction of the slagging and fouling characteristics of fuels in reducing environments. The information obtained from this program will potentially also assist in maintaining prolonged gasifier operation free from failure or facilitate troubleshooting to minimize downtime in the event of a problem.

Stanislowski, Joshua; Azenkeng, Alexander; McCollor, Donald; Galbreath, Kevin; Jensen, Robert; Lahr, Brent

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the research and development conducted on an Advanced Hydrogasification Process (AHP) conceived and developed by Arizona Public Service Company (APS) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract: DE-FC26-06NT42759 for Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) production from western coal. A double-wall (i.e., a hydrogasification contained within a pressure shell) down-flow hydrogasification reactor was designed, engineered, constructed, commissioned and operated by APS, Phoenix, AZ. The reactor is ASME-certified under Section VIII with a rating of 1150 pounds per square inch gage (psig) maximum allowable working pressure at 1950 degrees Fahrenheit ({degrees}F). The reaction zone had a 1.75 inch inner diameter and 13 feet length. The initial testing of a sub-bituminous coal demonstrated ~ 50% carbon conversion and ~10% methane yield in the product gas under 1625{degrees}F, 1000 psig pressure, with a 11 seconds (s) residence time, and 0.4 hydrogen-to-coal mass ratio. Liquid by-products mainly contained Benzene, Toluene, Xylene (BTX) and tar. Char collected from the bottom of the reactor had 9000-British thermal units per pound (Btu/lb) heating value. A three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic model simulation of the hydrodynamics around the reactor head was utilized to design the nozzles for injecting the hydrogen into the gasifier to optimize gas-solid mixing to achieve improved carbon conversion. The report also presents the evaluation of using algae for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) management and biofuel production. Nannochloropsis, Selenastrum and Scenedesmus were determined to be the best algae strains for the project purpose and were studied in an outdoor system which included a 6-meter (6M) radius cultivator with a total surface area of 113 square meters (m{sup 2}) and a total culture volume between 10,000 to 15,000 liters (L); a CO{sub 2} on-demand feeding system; an on-line data collection system for temperature, pH, Photosynthetically Activate Radiation (PAR) and dissolved oxygen (DO); and a ~2 gallons per minute (gpm) algae culture dewatering system. Among the three algae strains, Scenedesmus showed the most tolerance to temperature and irradiance conditions in Phoenix and the best self-settling characteristics. Experimental findings and operational strategies determined through these tests guided the operation of the algae cultivation system for the scale-up study. Effect of power plant flue gas, especially heavy metals, on algae growth and biomass adsorption were evaluated as well.

Sun, Xiaolei; Rink, Nancy

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

Montana Integrated Carbon to Liquids (ICTL) Demonstration Program  

SciTech Connect

Integrated carbon?to?liquids technology (ICTL) incorporates three basic processes for the conversion of a wide range of feedstocks to distillate liquid fuels: (1) Direct Microcatalytic Coal Liquefaction (MCL) is coupled with biomass liquefaction via (2) Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation and Isomerization (CHI) of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) or trigylceride fatty acids (TGFA) to produce liquid fuels, with process derived (3) CO{sub 2} Capture and Utilization (CCU) via algae production and use in BioFertilizer for added terrestrial sequestration of CO{sub 2}, or as a feedstock for MCL and/or CHI. This novel approach enables synthetic fuels production while simultaneously meeting EISA 2007 Section 526 targets, minimizing land use and water consumption, and providing cost competitive fuels at current day petroleum prices. ICTL was demonstrated with Montana Crow sub?bituminous coal in MCL pilot scale operations at the Energy and Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota (EERC), with related pilot scale CHI studies conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Applied Research Center (PARC). Coal?Biomass to Liquid (CBTL) Fuel samples were evaluated at the US Air Force Research Labs (AFRL) in Dayton and greenhouse tests of algae based BioFertilizer conducted at Montana State University (MSU). Econometric modeling studies were also conducted on the use of algae based BioFertilizer in a wheat?camelina crop rotation cycle. We find that the combined operation is not only able to help boost crop yields, but also to provide added crop yields and associated profits from TGFA (from crop production) for use an ICTL plant feedstock. This program demonstrated the overall viability of ICTL in pilot scale operations. Related work on the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of a Montana project indicated that CCU could be employed very effectively to reduce the overall carbon footprint of the MCL/CHI process. Plans are currently being made to conduct larger?scale process demonstration studies of the CHI process in combination with CCU to generate synthetic jet and diesel fuels from algae and algae fertilized crops. Site assessment and project prefeasibility studies are planned with a major EPC firm to determine the overall viability of ICTL technology commercialization with Crow coal resources in south central Montana.

Fiato, Rocco; Sharma, Ramesh; Allen, Mark; Peyton, Brent; Macur, Richard; Cameron, Jemima

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

NEW SOLID FUELS FROM COAL AND BIOMASS WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Under DOE sponsorship, McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI), Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W), and Minergy Corporation developed and evaluated a sludge derived fuel (SDF) made from sewage sludge. Our approach is to dry and agglomerate the sludge, combine it with a fluxing agent, if necessary, and co-fire the resulting fuel with coal in a cyclone boiler to recover the energy and to vitrify mineral matter into a non-leachable product. This product can then be used in the construction industry. A literature search showed that there is significant variability of the sludge fuel properties from a given wastewater plant (seasonal and/or day-to-day changes) or from different wastewater plants. A large sewage sludge sample (30 tons) from a municipal wastewater treatment facility was collected, dried, pelletized and successfully co-fired with coal in a cyclone-equipped pilot. Several sludge particle size distributions were tested. Finer sludge particle size distributions, similar to the standard B and W size distribution for sub-bituminous coal, showed the best combustion and slagging performance. Up to 74.6% and 78.9% sludge was successfully co-fired with pulverized coal and with natural gas, respectively. An economic evaluation on a 25-MW power plant showed the viability of co-firing the optimum SDF in a power generation application. The return on equity was 22 to 31%, adequate to attract investors and allow a full-scale project to proceed. Additional market research and engineering will be required to verify the economic assumptions. Areas to focus on are: plant detail design and detail capital cost estimates, market research into possible project locations, sludge availability at the proposed project locations, market research into electric energy sales and renewable energy sales opportunities at the proposed project location. As a result of this program, wastes that are currently not being used and considered an environmental problem will be processed into a renewable fuel. These fuels will be converted to energy while reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from power generating boilers and mitigating global warming concerns. This report describes the sludge analysis, solid fuel preparation and production, combustion performance, environmental emissions and required equipment.

Hamid Farzan

2001-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

254

DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROOF OF CONCEPT  

SciTech Connect

The eighth bench scale test of POC program, Run PB-08, was successfully completed from August 8 to August 26, 1997. A total of five operating conditions were tested aiming at evaluating the reactivity of different pyrolysis oils in liquefaction of a Wyoming sub-bituminous coal (Black Thunder coal). For the first time, water soluble promoters were incorporated into the iron-based GelCat to improve the dispersion of the promoter metals in the feed blend. The concentration of the active metals, Mo and Fe, was 100 and 1000 ppm of moisture-free coal, respectively. Black Thunder coal used in this run was the same batch as tested in HTI?s Run POC-02. Similar to Runs PB-01 through 7, this run employed two back mixed slurry reactors, an interstage gas/slurry separator and a direct-coupled hydrotreater. In addition to the hot vapor from the second stage separator, the first stage separator overhead liquid was also fed to the hydrotreater, which was packed with Criterion C-411 hydrotreating catalyst. Pyrolysis oil was produced off-line from a pyrolysis unit acquired from University of Wyoming. Solids rejection was achieved by purging out pressure filter solid. The recycle solvents consisted of O-6 separator bottoms and pressure filter liquid (PFL). The Run PB-08 proceeded very smoothly without any interruptions. Coal conversion consistently above 90W% was achieved. High resid conversion and distillate yield have been obtained from co-processing of coal and 343°C+ (650°F+) pyrolysis oil. Light gas (C1-C3 ) yield was minimized and hydrogen consumption was reduced due to the introduction of pyrolysis oil, compared with conventional coal-derived solvent. Catalytic activity was improved by incorporating a promoter metal into the iron-based GelCat. It seemed that lowering the first stage temperature to 435°C might increase the hydrogenation function of the promoter metal. In comparison with previous coal-waste coprocessing run (PB-06), significant improvements in the process performance were achieved due to catalyst modification and integration of pyrolysis technique into liquefaction.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

EFFECTS OF COFIRING LIGNIN AND BIOSOLIDS WITH COAL ON FIRESIDE PERFORMANCE AND COMBUSTION PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

Lignin, derived from municipal solid waste and biosolid feedstocks using Masada Resource Group's patented CES OxyNol{trademark} process, and acidified biosolids were evaluated as supplemental fuels with coal for producing steam and electricity. Tests were conducted in a pilot-scale (550,000-Btu/hr [580-MJ/hr]) combustion system to evaluate the effects of coal characteristics, blend mixture (on a dry wt% basis) and furnace exit gas temperature (FEGT) on boiler heat-exchange surface slagging and fouling, NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} production, fly ash characteristics, and combustion efficiency. The effects of blending lignin and acidified biosolids with coal on fuel handling and pulverization characteristics were also addressed. An 80 wt% Colorado--20 wt% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal blend from the Tennessee Valley Authority Colbert Steam Plant, hereafter referred to as the Colbert coal, and a bituminous Pittsburgh No. 8 coal were tested. The lignin and acidified biosolids were characterized by possessing higher moisture content and lower carbon, hydrogen, and heating values relative to the coals. Ash contents of the fuels were similar. The lignin also possessed higher concentrations of TiO{sub 2}, CaO, and SO{sub 3} and lower concentrations of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, K{sub 2}O, and N relative to the coals. The sulfur content of lignin could be reduced through a more thorough washing and drying of the lignin in an efficient commercial-scale dewatering device. Acidified biosolids were distinguished by higher concentrations of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and MgO and lower SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} relative to the other fuels. Trace element concentrations, especially for Cr, Pb, Hg, and Ni, were generally greater in the lignin and acidified biosolid fuels relative to the Colbert coal. Maximum trace element emission factors were calculated for 95:5 Colbert coal--lignin and 90:5:5 Colbert coal--lignin--acidified biosolid blends and compared to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emission factors for pulverized coal-fired units that are unequipped with pollution control devices. Calculated maximum trace element emission factors for the fuel blends were generally less than or within the range of those for the uncontrolled coal-fired units, except for Cr and Pb which were greater.

Kevin C. Galbreath

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Coal and Environmental Systems has as its mission to develop advanced gasification-based technologies for affordable, efficient, zero-emission power generation. These advanced power systems, which are expected to produce near-zero pollutants, are an integral part of DOE's Vision 21 Program. DOE has also been developing advanced gasification systems that lower the capital and operating costs of producing syngas for chemical production. A transport reactor has shown potential to be a low-cost syngas producer compared to other gasification systems since its high-throughput-per-unit cross-sectional area reduces capital costs. This work directly supports the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the KBR transport reactor located at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville, Alabama, site. Over 2800 hours of operation on 11 different coals ranging from bituminous to lignite along with a petroleum coke has been completed to date in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The EERC has established an extensive database on the operation of these various fuels in both air-blown and oxygen-blown modes utilizing a pilot-scale transport reactor gasifier. This database has been useful in determining the effectiveness of design changes on an advanced transport reactor gasifier and for determining the performance of various feedstocks in a transport reactor. The effects of different fuel types on both gasifier performance and the operation of the hot-gas filter system have been determined. It has been demonstrated that corrected fuel gas heating values ranging from 90 to 130 Btu/scf have been achieved in air-blown mode, while heating values up to 230 Btu/scf on a dry basis have been achieved in oxygen-blown mode. Carbon conversions up to 95% have also been obtained and are highly dependent on the oxygen-coal ratio. Higher-reactivity (low-rank) coals appear to perform better in a transport reactor than the less reactive bituminous coals. Factors that affect TRDU product gas quality appear to be coal type, temperature, and air/coal ratios. Testing with a higher-ash, high-moisture, low-rank coal from the Red Hills Mine of the Mississippi Lignite Mining Company has recently been completed. Testing with the lignite coal generated a fuel gas with acceptable heating value and a high carbon conversion, although some drying of the high-moisture lignite was required before coal-feeding problems were resolved. No ash deposition or bed material agglomeration issues were encountered with this fuel. In order to better understand the coal devolatilization and cracking chemistry occurring in the riser of the transport reactor, gas and solid sampling directly from the riser and the filter outlet has been accomplished. This was done using a baseline Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the Peabody Energy North Antelope Rochelle Mine near Gillette, Wyoming.

Michael Swanson; Daniel Laudal

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification  

SciTech Connect

The transport reactor development unit (TRDU) was modified to accommodate oxygen-blown operation in support of a Vision 21-type energy plex that could produce power, chemicals, and fuel. These modifications consisted of changing the loop seal design from a J-leg to an L-valve configuration, thereby increasing the mixing zone length and residence time. In addition, the standpipe, dipleg, and L-valve diameters were increased to reduce slugging caused by bubble formation in the lightly fluidized sections of the solid return legs. A seal pot was added to the bottom of the dipleg so that the level of solids in the standpipe could be operated independently of the dipleg return leg. A separate coal feed nozzle was added that could inject the coal upward into the outlet of the mixing zone, thereby precluding any chance of the fresh coal feed back-mixing into the oxidizing zone of the mixing zone; however, difficulties with this coal feed configuration led to a switch back to the original downward configuration. Instrumentation to measure and control the flow of oxygen and steam to the burner and mix zone ports was added to allow the TRDU to be operated under full oxygen-blown conditions. In total, ten test campaigns have been conducted under enriched-air or full oxygen-blown conditions. During these tests, 1515 hours of coal feed with 660 hours of air-blown gasification and 720 hours of enriched-air or oxygen-blown coal gasification were completed under this particular contract. During these tests, approximately 366 hours of operation with Wyodak, 123 hours with Navajo sub-bituminous coal, 143 hours with Illinois No. 6, 106 hours with SUFCo, 110 hours with Prater Creek, 48 hours with Calumet, and 134 hours with a Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coal were completed. In addition, 331 hours of operation on low-rank coals such as North Dakota lignite, Australian brown coal, and a 90:10 wt% mixture of lignite and wood waste were completed. Also included in these test campaigns was 50 hours of gasification on a petroleum coke from the Hunt Oil Refinery and an additional 73 hours of operation on a high-ash coal from India. Data from these tests indicate that while acceptable fuel gas heating value was achieved with these fuels, the transport gasifier performs better on the lower-rank feedstocks because of their higher char reactivity. Comparable carbon conversions have been achieved at similar oxygen/coal ratios for both air-blown and oxygen-blown operation for each fuel; however, carbon conversion was lower for the less reactive feedstocks. While separation of fines from the feed coals is not needed with this technology, some testing has suggested that feedstocks with higher levels of fines have resulted in reduced carbon conversion, presumably due to the inability of the finer carbon particles to be captured by the cyclones. These data show that these low-rank feedstocks provided similar fuel gas heating values; however, even among the high-reactivity low-rank coals, the carbon conversion did appear to be lower for the fuels (brown coal in particular) that contained a significant amount of fines. The fuel gas under oxygen-blown operation has been higher in hydrogen and carbon dioxide concentration since the higher steam injection rate promotes the water-gas shift reaction to produce more CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} at the expense of the CO and water vapor. However, the high water and CO{sub 2} partial pressures have also significantly reduced the reaction of (Abstract truncated)

Michael L. Swanson

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

like blast furnace slag, fly ash, coal gangue, limestone,In ordinary VSKs, high-ash anthracite coal and raw materialsAsh Limestone Gypsum Other (please specify) Other (please specify) Total Yearly Energy Consumption (ton) Coal

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.

Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Neutron Activated Coal Fly Ash," Environmental ScienceDistribution in Coal Fly Ash Particles," EnvironmentalLignite Subbituminous Coal- - Wyodak Ash H/C 0/C Do alcohols

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

TECHNOLOGY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fluidized Carbonization of Lignite Produces Cheap Fuel ... Developed by the Bureau of Mines, this process can utilize the reserves of lignite and subbituminous coal in that area to produce industrial fuel that will compete with natural gas at prevailing prices. ...

1953-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

262

Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank The Argonne Premium Coal (APC) Sample Bank can supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The sample bank consists of eight coals, including lignite, subbituminous coal, high volatile, medium by a variety of techniques. Five-gallon carboys hold about 80% of the batch in reserve for filling more

Maranas, Costas

263

Proceedings of ASME Turbo Expo 2010 June 14-18, 2010, Glasgow, Scotland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) steam electric plants [1, 2]. For lower rank subbituminous coals and lignites, which comprise fully half of the world's coal reserves [3], the relative economics are less clear. To help clarify this issue, we

264

baseline-studies | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coal, pulverized coal (PC) plants fueled with bituminous coal, and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants all with and without carbon capture and sequestration. The analyses...

265

E-Print Network 3.0 - airfield test pavements Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test pavements Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: airfield test pavements Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Principles of bituminous...

266

ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ILLINOIS COAL ENTRY INTO THE TRANSPORTATION MARKET.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High oil prices and nationalist desires to reduce foreign dependency create opportunities for Illinois bituminous coal to be involved in the transportation market. Using Illinois… (more)

Starkey, Darin Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas petroleum waxes coking coal t C/TJ other bituminous coalprocesses of coal washing, coking, petroleum refineries, gaslosses include coal washing, coking, petroleum refining, gas

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In addition, the coking coal market began to deteriorateits permeability. Bituminous, or coking coal, is blended andmerchant coke plants, coking coal is heated in a low-oxygen,

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

ZINC CHLORIDE-CATALYZED REACTIONS OF OXYGEN- AND SULFUR-CONTAINING COMPOUNDS WITH MODEL STRUCTURES IN COAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. H. , ed. , "Chemistry of Coal Utilization", Suppl. Vol. ,H. H. , ed. , "Chemistry of Coal Utilization", Suppl. Vol. ,Internat. Conf. Bituminous Coal, 3d Con£. , 2, 35 (1932);

Mobley, David Paul

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

THE CHEMISTRY OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS -CLEAVAGE OF ALIPHATIC BRIDGES BETWEEN AROMATIC NUCLEI CATALYSED BY LEWIS ACIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Background I. II. III. IV. II. Coal Liquefaction . •Coal Structure • • . Lewis Acid Catalysts. Scope andOrganic Structure of Bituminous Coal", Proceedings, Stanford

Taylor, Newell D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

SECTION D  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bituminous concrete was abandoned in 1878 for sheet asphalt on hydraulic cement base, until 1888, when the in-ability to obtain...driver. It would be impossible to use standard wagons as trailers for carrying material, and a sprinkling wagon or bituminous...

G. W. Bissell

1912-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

272

METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Preparations for conducting large-scale combustion tests with caking bituminous coal continued during the start of this quarter. Major project accomplishments related to bituminous coal testing included: a CFD preheat model and evaluation, an update of the process flow diagram and a detailed preheat burner mechanical design (suitable for construction) for firing bituminous coal. Installation and testing of the 85 MMBtu/h bituminous coal preheating system was planned to take place before the end of December. Based on the inability to conduct testing in Riley's Commercial Burner Test Facility (CBTF) during freezing weather, a schedule review indicated required site work for testing bituminous coal at the CBTF could not be completed before freezing weather set in at the site. Further bituminous preheat modification work was put on hold and efforts turned to securing the test facility over the winter season. Bituminous coal tests are therefore delayed; April-May 2005 is earliest estimate of when testing can resume. A request for a time extension was submitted to DOE to extend the project through September 2005 to allow time to secure additional funding and complete the bituminous coal testing. Removal of the PRB PC Preheater from the CBTF burner deck was completed. Decommissioning of the CBTF for the winter was also completed.

Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Beginning July 2012, use of granular activated carbon (GAC) as filter media will be examined for removal of NOM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& particle filtration prior to disinfection. · Removal of additional NOM by sorption is also utilized US EPA for removal of NOM. · Current filter bed conditions at plant are 24 inches anthracite over 15 inches sand. · 30 inches Calgon FILTRASORB® 300 GAC over 9 inches sand will be piloted to assess NOM removal

Mountziaris, T. J.

274

The Second Provincial Meeting of the Iron and Steel Institute  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... a very superior coke; it continues so to Rhymney; at Dowlais it becomes free-burning; at Cyfarthfa it begins to take on the characters of anthracite; and further westward ... in the valleys of the district, the lowest seams of coal can be won by pits of less than 1,000 yards in depth throughout about two-thirds of the basin ...

JOHN MAYER

1870-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

The National Museum of Wales: Department of Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... with the successful attempts of John Budd in adding pre-heating chambers to some anthracite-burning furnaces at Ystalyfera in the Swansea Valley in 1844. Like other contemporary blast furnaces, ... been stripped from steel ingots by hydraulic and steam cranes working alongside the sunken teeming pits. The new stripping machine, hydraulically driven, made it possible for ingots to be ...

1960-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

276

Nontraditional carbon reducing agents in smelting FMn78B ferromanganese and valuable manganese slag  

SciTech Connect

The smelting of FeMn78B ferromanganese (0.7% P) by a flux-free method, with the production of valuable slag (36-38% Mn), is considered in the case where some of the coke nuts are replaced by anthracite and sometimes by long-flame coal.

P.A. Kravchenko; O.N. Sezonenko; O.L. Bespalov; S.N. Kornienko; S.D. Belikov; M.I. Gasik [OAO Zaporozhskii Zavod Ferrosplavov, Zaporozh'e (Ukraine)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Carbon Vol. 28, Nos. 213. pp. 261-279, 1990 Printed in Great Britain.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: carbon formation from catalyzed CO decomposition over iron and from liquid phase coking of hydrocarbons. preparation of carbons via catalytic cracking of CO and coking processes, 2. carbon active sites of concern. In par- ticular. we envisioned gasifying plentiful anthracite coal, with its attendant mineral matter

278

Prediction of metallurgical coke strength from the petrographic composition of coal blends  

SciTech Connect

Turkey, especially Zonguldak on the West Coast of Black Sea region, has large reserves of bituminous coal that can be used either directly or in blends with other coals for metallurgical coke production. It is possible to predict the coking properties of these coals by petrographic analysis. In this study, semi- and non-coking coals were blended with coking bituminous coals in varying proportions and an estimation was made as to their stability factors through petrographic techniques. It was established that semi- and non-coking bituminous coals could be used in the production of metallurgical coke.

Sutcu, H.; Toroglu, I.; Piskin, S. [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Rapid Coal Analysis. Part II: Slurry Atomization DCP Emission Analysis of NBS Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A McCrone Micronising Mill is used to wet grind NBS bituminous coal to a median particle diameter of 5.7 ?m within 10 min. The finely divided coal slurry is immediately nebulized...

McCurdy, D L; Wichman, M D; Fry, R C

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other bituminous coal and clean coal. The NCV used in theadded to the rest of the clean coal used in the industry andand added to the reported clean coal used as a fuel in the

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Exposure in Household Air Pollution from Solid Fuel Combustion among the Female Population of Xuanwei and Fuyuan Counties, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from burning “smoky” (bituminous) coal has been implicated as a cause of the high lung cancer incidence in the counties of Xuanwei and Fuyuan, China. Little is known about variations in PAH exposure from ...

George S. Downward; Wei Hu; Nat Rothman; Boris Reiss; Guoping Wu; Fusheng Wei; Robert S. Chapman; Lutzen Portengen; Lan Qing; Roel Vermeulen

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

282

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other bituminous coal and coking coal. Small differences incoal (used as fuel) Coking coal Coke oven coke Natural gasrange for typical NCVs of coking coal of 26.6 to 29.8Mj/kg.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Kyrgyzstan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium deposits of three types occur in the eastern Kara-mazar and northeastern Fergana region in central-western Kyrgyzstan: bituminous carbonate-type hosted in Paleogene limestone, sandstone-type in Neogene sa...

Franz J. Dahlkamp

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

FRAGMENTATION OF COAL AND IMPROVED DISPERSION OF LIQUEFACTION CATALYSTS USING IONIC LIQUIDS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal has been utilized for coal-to-liquid fuels and coal-to-chemical industries both historically in South Africa and recently in China. Abundant bituminous and low-rank coal reserves… (more)

Cetiner, Ruveyda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

18: 537–568. 26. Bell D, Towler B. Coal Gasification and Itsvolume 1: Bituminous coal and natural gas to electricity.Information Administration. Coal news and markets. http://

Lu, Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Geology and Mineral Resources of the Serb-Croat-Slovene State: Being the Report of the Geologist attached to the British Economic Mission to Serbia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... it is shown that true bituminous coal is very scarce, but that there are considerable reserves of ... of lignites, which amount probably to about 1900 millions of tons, whilst the possible ...

H. L.

1922-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

Use of High-Calcium Fly Ash in Cement-Based Construction Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, total coal ash production in the world was estimated to be 600 million tons, of which 100 million tons with ASTM 618, coal fly ash is classified into two main categories, Class F fly ash (low-calcium) and Class coal, and Class C fly ash is generated from burning of lignite and subbituminous coals. Class F fly ash

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

288

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

Coal is a combustible sedimentary rock and a valuable economic resource. During the Pennsylvanian Period  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tons in reserve. These reserves could last another 585 years at the current rate of production://IGS.indiana.edu Analyzing the Past to Provide for the Future Ro (%) Coal Rank 0.25 0.38 peat lignite subbituminous high

Polly, David

290

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performance of the SiO2­TiO2 nanocomposite. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Mercury Flue ) is the dominant species present in flue gas when burning low rank (subbituminous or lignite) coals. However

Li, Ying

291

CONDITIONING TECHNOLOGY FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE RESULTED FROM THE TREATMENT OF LIQUID WASTE FROM THE ROMANIAN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

For the conditioning of spent resins contaminated with radionuclides, such as: 137Cs, 134Cs, 60Co, 58Co, 57Co, 54Mn, etc., techniques of direct immobilization in cement, bitumen and organic polymers have been tested. The selected process was the bituminization using industrial bitumen, I 60-70, made in Romania, which had very good characteristics. The paper presents stages of the research project, technical conditions for the process and advantages of the bituminization of spent resins.

ARSENE, CARMEN; ANDREI, VERONICA; NEGOIU, DUMITRU

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

292

Laboratory measured characteristics of hot-mix asphaltic concrete as related to field performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characteristics as related to field performance. New York State Study A study ( 9 ) was initiated four years ago 'oy the New York State Department of Public Works to investigate the bituminous mixes being supplied to state highway projects. The current... characteristics as related to field performance. New York State Study A study ( 9 ) was initiated four years ago 'oy the New York State Department of Public Works to investigate the bituminous mixes being supplied to state highway projects. The current...

TenBrook, James Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

Thermal-destruction products of coal in the blast-furnace gas-purification system  

SciTech Connect

The lean, poorly clinkering coal and anthracite used to replace coke in blast furnaces has a considerable content of volatile components (low-molecular thermaldestruction products), which enter the water and sludge of the blast-furnace gas-purification system as petroleum products. Therefore, it is important to study the influence of coal on the petroleum-product content in the water and sludge within this system. The liberation of primary thermal-destruction products is investigated for anthracite with around 4 wt % volatiles, using a STA 449C Jupiter thermoanalyzer equipped with a QMC 230 mass spectrometer. The thermoanalyzer determines small changes in mass and thermal effects with high accuracy (weighing accuracy 10{sup -8} g; error in measuring thermal effects 1 mV). This permits experiments with single layers of coal particles, eliminating secondary reactions of its thermal-destruction products.

A.M. Amdur; M.V. Shibanova; E.V. Ental'tsev [Russian Academy of Sciences, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Russia Institute of Metallurgy

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Possibilities of coke manufacture in nonpollutant conditions  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents some possibilities to obtain coke briquettes from anthracite, using as binders petroleum pitch, wheat flour, cement, plaster, ashes from power-plants dried from the electrofilters. Specific thermal post-treatment were proposed for each case, such as: oxidation or heating at low temperatures (under 300 C). As a result the authors obtained coke briquettes to be used in small equipment, with no pollutant pyrogenetic treatment.

Barca, F.; Panaitescu, C.; Vidrighin, C.; Peleanu, I. [Politehnica Univ. Bucharest (Romania); Albastroiu, P. [S.C. ICEM S.A., Bucharest (Romania)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Potassium-Modified Iron Ore as Oxygen Carrier for Coal Chemical Looping Combustion: Continuous Test in 1 kW Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(20) Briefly, it consists of a fast fluidized bed as an air reactor, a cyclone, a spout-fluid bed as a fuel reactor, and an external loop-seal. ... Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research (2013), 52 (28), 9573-9585 CODEN: IECRED; ISSN:0888-5885. ... Gu, H.; Shen, L.; Xiao, J.; Zhang, S.; Song, T.; Chen, D.Iron ore as oxygen carrier improved with potassium for chemical looping combustion of anthracite coal Combust. ...

Haiming Gu; Laihong Shen; Zhaoping Zhong; Xin Niu; Huijun Ge; Yufei Zhou; Shen Xiao

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Coal liquefaction process using pretreatment with a binary solvent mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for thermal solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprises pretreating the coal with a binary mixture of an aromatic hydrocarbon and an aliphatic alcohol at a temperature below 300 C before the hydroliquefaction step. This treatment generally increases both conversion of coal and yields of oil. 1 fig.

Miller, R.N.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

297

Methane de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale combustion tests with caking bituminous coal was on hold this quarter mainly due to Riley's Commercial Burner Test Facility (CBTF) not having adequate weatherproofing to support operation under freezing conditions. The CBTF was secured and decommissioned for the winter season. CBTF bituminous coal tests shall continue to remain on hold now as a result of project funding limitations, however. No further modifications at the CBTF are planned until needed support is obtained. Activities this quarter have concentrated on finding additional support for the project. Currently, GTI has been granted a no-cost time extension through September 2005 and efforts to secure more support will continue in hopes that large-scale preheat caking bituminous combustion tests will be carried out as planned.

Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification - Power Plant Performance  

SciTech Connect

A technical feasibility assessment was performed for retrofitting oxy-fuel technology to an existing power plant burning low sulfur PRB fuel and high sulfur bituminous fuel. The focus of this study was on the boiler/power generation island of a subcritical steam cycle power plant. The power plant performance in air and oxy-firing modes was estimated and modifications required for oxy-firing capabilities were identified. A 460 MWe (gross) reference subcritical PC power plant was modeled. The reference air-fired plant has a boiler efficiency (PRB/Bituminous) of 86.7%/89.3% and a plant net efficiency of 35.8/36.7%. Net efficiency for oxy-fuel firing including ASU/CPU duty is 25.6%/26.6% (PRB/Bituminous). The oxy-fuel flue gas recirculation flow to the boiler is 68%/72% (PRB/bituminous) of the flue gas (average O{sub 2} in feed gas is 27.4%/26.4%v (PRB/bituminous)). Maximum increase in tube wall temperature is less than 10ºF for oxy-fuel firing. For oxy-fuel firing, ammonia injected to the SCR was shut-off and the FGD is applied to remove SOx from the recycled primary gas stream and a portion of the SOx from the secondary stream for the high sulfur bituminous coal. Based on CFD simulations it was determined that at the furnace outlet compared to air-firing, SO{sub 3}/SO{sub 2} mole ratio is about the same, NOx ppmv level is about the same for PRB-firing and 2.5 times for bituminous-firing due to shutting off the OFA, and CO mole fraction is approximately double. A conceptual level cost estimate was performed for the incremental equipment and installation cost of the oxyfuel retrofit in the boiler island and steam system. The cost of the retrofit is estimated to be approximately 81 M$ for PRB low sulfur fuel and 84 M$ for bituminous high sulfur fuel.

Andrew Seltzer; Zhen Fan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Transient Model for Behavior of Mercury in Portland Cement Kilns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2) Bituminous coals (median value of 0.1 ?g/g) typically contain more mercury than petcoke (0.05 ?g/g median) or tires (0.04 ?g/g median), although the range of fuel mercury content is broad. ... Figure 2. Cumulative distribution of mercury in bituminous coal, petcoke, and tires fired at coal-fired power plants(2) and limestone input to cement kilns. ... The kiln used coal and petcoke as primary fuels, while tires were burned in the precalciner. ...

Constance Senior; Christopher J. Montgomery; Adel Sarofim

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

300

Application of biofiltration system on AOC removal: Column and field studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Cheng-Ching Lake Water Treatment Plant (CCLWTP) is the main supplier of domestic water for the Greater Kaohsiung area, the second largest metropolis in Taiwan. Biological activated carbon (BAC) filtration is one of the major treatment processes in CCLWTP. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of BAC filtration on water treatment in the studied advanced water treatment plant and its capability on pollutants [e.g., AOC (assimilable organic carbon), bromide, bromate, iron] removal. In this study, water samples from each treatment process of CCLWTP were collected and analyzed periodically to assess the variations in concentrations of AOC and other water quality indicators after each treatment unit. Moreover, the efficiency of biofiltration process using granular activated carbon (GAC) and anthracite as the fillers was also evaluated through a column experiment. Results show that the removal efficiencies for AOC, bromide, bromate, and iron are 86% 100%, 17%, and 30% after the BAC filter bed, respectively. This indicates that BAC filtration plays an important role in pollutant removal. Results also show that AOC concentrations in raw water and effluent of the CCLWTP are approximately 143 and 16 ?g acetate-C l?1, respectively. This reveals that the treatment processes applied in CCLWTP is able to remove AOC effectively. Results of column study show that the AOC removal efficiencies in the GAC and anthracite columns are 60% and 17%, respectively. Microbial colonization on GAC and anthracite were detected via the observation of scanning electron microscopic images. The observed microorganisms included bacteria (rods, cocci, and filamentous bacteria), fungi, and protozoa. Results from this study provide us insight into the mechanisms of AOC removal by advanced water treatment processes. These findings would be helpful in designing a modified water treatment system for AOC removal and water quality improvement.

C.C. Chien; C.M. Kao; C.W. Chen; C.D. Dong; C.Y. Wu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Variations in AOC and microbial diversity in an advanced water treatment plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary The objective of this study was to evaluate the variations in assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and microbial diversities in an advanced water treatment plant. The efficiency of biofiltration on AOC removal using anthracite and granular activated carbon (GAC) as the media was also evaluated through a pilot-scale column experiment. Effects of hydrological factors (seasonal effects and river flow) on AOC concentrations in raw water samples and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of biofiltration on AOC treatment were also evaluated. Results show that AOC concentrations in raw water and clear water of the plant were about 138 and 27 ?g acetate-C/L, respectively. Higher AOC concentrations were observed in wet seasons probably due to the resuspension of organic-contained sediments and discharges of non-point source (NPS) pollutants from the upper catchment. This reveals that seasonal effect played an important role in the variations in influent AOC concentrations. Approximately 82% and 70% of AOC removal efficiencies were observed in GAC and anthracite columns, respectively. Results from column experiment reveal that the applied treatment processes in the plant and biofiltration system were able to remove AOC effectively. Microbial colonization on GAC and anthracite were detected via the observation of scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images. Results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and nucleotide sequence analysis reveal significant decrease in microbial diversities after the ozonation process. Higher HRT caused higher microbial contact time, and thus, more microbial colonies and higher microbial diversity were observed in the latter part of the biofilters. Some of the dominant microbial species in the biofiltration columns belonged to the beta-proteobacterium, which might contribute to the AOC degradation. Results of this study provide us insight into the variations in AOC and microbial diversity in the advanced water treatment processes.

B.M. Yang; J.K. Liu; C.C. Chien; R.Y. Surampalli; C.M. Kao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A comparison of biologically active filters for the removal of ozone by-products, turbidity, and particles  

SciTech Connect

Biofiltration tests were performed at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California`s 5.5-mgd (21,000 m{sup 3}d) demonstration plant using two 400 ft{sup 2} (37 m{sup 2}) anthracite/sand filters and a 6 ft{sup 2} (0.56 m{sup 2}) granular activated carbon (GAC)/sand filter operated in parallel. The empty-bed contact time (EBCT) within the GAC and anthracite ranged from 2.1-3.1 min. The filters were evaluated based on (1) conventional filtration performance (turbidity, particle removal, and headloss); (2) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products (assimilable organic carbon [AOC], aldehydes, and aldoketoacids) after startup; (3) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products at steady state; and (4) resistance to short-term process upsets such as intermittent chlorination or filter out-of-service time. Approximately 80 percent formaldehyde removal was achieved by the anthracite/sand filter operated at a 2.1-min EBCT (6 gpm/ft{sup 2} [15 m/h]) within 8 days of ozone operation. The GAC/sand filter operated at the same rate achieved 80 percent removal within 1 day, possibly as an additive effect of adsorption and biological removal. In-depth aldehyde monitoring at four depths (0.5-min EBCT intervals) provided additional insight into the removal kinetics. During periods of warmer water temperature, from 20 to 48 percent of the AOC was removed in the flocculation/sedimentation basins by 40-75 percent. This percentage removal typically resulted in AOC concentrations within 40 {mu}g C/L of the raw, unozonated water levels.

Coffey, B.M.; Krasner, S.W.; Sclimenti, M.J.; Hacker, P.A.; Gramith, J.T. [Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, La Verne, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Development of high temperature air combustion technology in pulverized fossil fuel fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

High temperature air combustion (HTAC) is a promising technology for energy saving, flame stability enhancement and NOx emission reduction. In a conventional HTAC system, the combustion air is highly preheated by using the recuperative or regenerative heat exchangers. However, such a preheating process is difficult to implement for pulverized fossil fuel fired boilers. In this paper, an alternative approach is proposed. In the proposed HTAC system, a special burner, named PRP burner is introduced to fulfill the preheating process. The PRP burner has a preheating chamber with one end connected with the primary air and the other end opened to the furnace. Inside the chamber, gas recirculation is effectively established such that hot flue gases in the furnace can be introduced. Combustible mixture instead of combustion air is highly preheated by the PRP burner. A series of experiments have been conducted in an industrial scale test facility, burning low volatile petroleum coke and an anthracite coal. Stable combustion was established for burning pure petroleum coke and anthracite coal, respectively. Inside the preheating chamber, the combustible mixture was rapidly heated up to a high temperature level close to that of the hot secondary air used in the conventional HTAC system. The rapid heating of the combustible mixture in the chamber facilitates pyrolysis, volatile matter release processes for the fuel particles, suppressing ignition delay and enhancing combustion stability. Moreover, compared with the results measured in the same facility but with a conventional low NOx burner, NOx concentration at the furnace exit was at the same level when petroleum coke was burnt and 50% less when anthracite was burnt. Practicability of the HTAC technology using the proposed approach was confirmed for efficiently and cleanly burning fossil fuels. 16 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Hai Zhang; Guangxi Yue; Junfu Lu; Zhen Jia; Jiangxiong Mao; Toshiro Fujimori; Toshiyuki Suko; Takashi Kiga [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Department of Thermal Engineering

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

305

"Table A42. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Dollars per Physical Units)" ,,,,,"Noncombustible Energy Sources",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Combustible Energy Sources" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Solids",,,,,,,,,,"Gases",,,,,,,,,"Liquids" " "," ",," "," ",,,,," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",,,"Wood","Wood Residues",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," " " "," ",,"Electricity","Electricity","Electricity","Steam","Steam","Steam","Industrial",," ","Bituminous and"," ",," ",,,"Harvested","and Byproducts","Wood and",,"Natural Gas",,,,,,,"Total Diesel Fuel",,,,,"Motor Gasoline",,,,," "

306

les jabots des abeilles taient beaucoup plus remplis et la dissection et l'analyse ont t  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tar of brown coal and19 million tons of mineral oil have been processed into the final-products bitumin, paraffine, fuel, petrol and coke in the tar factory Rositz (Altenburger Land) from 1917 1990, 19 millions de tonnes de goudron de lignite ont été tranformés en coke, bitume et paraffine, et19

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

307

Chemicals from Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mas-sachusetts Institute of Technology, 1974; J. B. Howard...Petras, in Coal Pro-cessing Technology (American Institute of Chem-ical...with the solidifcation of a fluid bituminous coal as it undergoes...Policy Analyst, Science and Technology Policy Office (Staff to the...

Arthur M. Squires

1976-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

308

Current Event: Vice-Minister of Environmental Protection, Zhang Lijun -China is still producing more ,,traditional pollutants than it can bear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is highly variable, above a low background concentration. Cleaning the Coal Plants: -Flue gas producing more ,,traditional pollutants than it can bear -Consumption of coal: which has rose around 1: produced by coal combustion (bituminous coal = high in S) -SO2 is a respiratory irritant- the effects

Toohey, Darin W.

309

Magnetic study of metamorphosed sedimentary rocks of the Hatrurim formation, Israel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......samples 9 and 10 from the lens of bituminous carbonate (oil shale) of the Mishash formation from the Hatrurim basin; samples...very small coercive forces (5 mT). In comparison, the oil shale (A-D/4) shows homogeneous results for similar distant......

Boris Khesin; Shimon Feinstein; Yevgeny Vapnik; Sophia Itkis; Roman Leonhardt

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Problems of Expanding Coal Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...metallurgical or coking coal marketed widely here and abroad. Appalachian coal generally has a high...are characteristic of Appalachia, al-though there has also been extensive strip mining including destructive...Mid-western bituminous coal has a large market as...

John Walsh

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

311

Size Distribution of Fine Particles from Coal Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...produce steam at a high temperature and pressure. This steam...Cleaned flue gas (2500 t/h...the high flue gas temperatures...lig-nites to high-quality bituminous...25). Flue gas samples were...atmospheric pressure. The relation...

M. W. McElroy; R. C. Carr; D. S. Ensor; G. R. Markowski

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Influence of Limestone Addition in a 10 kWth Chemical-Looping Combustion Unit Operated with Petcoke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Influence of Limestone Addition in a 10 kWth Chemical-Looping Combustion Unit Operated with Petcoke ... The fuel fed was a petcoke, and the gasifying agent was steam. ... (14) To date, continuous testing with ilmenite as an oxygen carrier has been performed with a Mexican petcoke,(15, 16) South African coal,(17) and Colombian bituminous coal. ...

Ana Cuadrat; Carl Linderholm; Alberto Abad; Anders Lyngfelt; Juan Adánez

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

313

METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale PRB testing during the current quarter was cut short due to the inability of the coal mill to meet the 85 MMBtu/h design firing rate. The project was therefore redirected toward design, installation and testing of the 85-million Btu/h preheater for bituminous coal. Based on extensive pilot-scale testing completed earlier in the project, 2-D modeling and preliminary design activities were started based on the use of staged, annular protective air films to control temperature and prevent deposition on the preheater walls. A total of 14 2-D modeling cases were completed for the modified preheater for bituminous coal. The preheater concept modeled was based on an expanding preheater chamber where the diameter of the chamber is increased in steps along its length and annular cooling/protective air is introduced at each step. A process flow diagram for the bituminous coal preheating system and a preliminary preheater design drawing were developed based on the modeling results. A project schedule to complete design, installation and testing of the 85 MMBtu/h bituminous coal preheating system before the end of December was also developed.

Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Adhesion in bitumen-aggregate systems and quantification of the effect of water on the adhesive bond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is intended to contribute toward the understanding, development, and implementation of a more fundamental design process for bituminous pavement materials, utilizing thermodynamic properties of the materials involved.... The theory developed by van Oss, Chaudhury and Good forms the basis of this research. Optimization of techniques to characterize surface energy, as well as consideration and evaluation of additional factors that influence adhesion...

Hefer, Arno Wilhelm

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

315

Erroneous coal maturity assessment caused by low temperature oxidation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Erroneous coal maturity assessment caused by low temperature oxidation Y. Copard J. R. Disnar, J. F on different outcrop coals from the French Massif Central revealed abnormally high Tmax values, which initially observed for medium to low volatile bituminous coals (Rr1.5%), was accompanied by a very clear exponential

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

316

Equations for predicting the layer stiffness moduli in pavement systems containing lime-flyash stabilized materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in site 2. Site 2 resurfaced with 2 in. NIAC jn Dctober 1980. originally constructed of one-course bituminous surface treatment. All ten sections of the test site were re-surfaced in October, 1980, with a 2-inch hot mix concrete overlay. Varying...

Alam, Shah Manzoor

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Influence of coal on coke properties and blast-furnace operation  

SciTech Connect

With unstable coal supplies and properties and a fluctuating content of coking coal in the batch at OAO Zapadno-Sibirskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (ZSMK) and of bituminous coal at Kuznetskaya enrichment facility, it is important to optimize the rank composition of the batch for coke production.

G.R. Gainieva; L.D. Nikitin [OAO Zapadno-Sibirskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

REMEDIAT1NG AT MANUFACTURED GAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, comhusti- hle gas manufactured Pfrom coke, coal, and oil 1 served as the major gas- eous fuel for urban for the three primary gas production meth- ods: coal carbonization, carbureted water gas production, and oil gas, and metals. Tar resid- uals were produced from the vola- tiIe component of bituminous coals in coal

Peters, Catherine A.

319

PREVENTTVE FACILITIES AND EMERGENCY OPERATIONS IN CASE OFFIRES IN CdF COAL MINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The upper group consists of a bituminous soft coal, the lower coke coal. The field is sharply folded alongPREVENTTVE FACILITIES AND EMERGENCY OPERATIONS IN CASE OFFIRES IN CdF COAL MINES J.P. AMARTIN HJSJL a stricl methodology. It has been possjble then to resume coal winning, which has cor.tmued until

Boyer, Edmond

320

Sorption of MS2 Bacteriophage to Layered Double Hydroxides: Effects of Reaction Time, pH, and Competing Anions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption of MS2 Bacteriophage to Layered Double Hydroxides: Effects of Reaction Time, pBatch sorption and column breakthrough studies were conducted carbon could be used for virus removal. For example very high retention capacities for from an aqueous solution by bituminous coal (Oza and MS2. Sorption

Sparks, Donald L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Sorption of the monoterpenes ?-pinene and limonene to carbonaceous geosorbents including biochar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The sorption of two monoterpenes, ? pinene and limonene to the carbonaceous geosorbents graphite, bituminous coal, lignite coke, biochar and Pahokee peat was quantified. Polyethylene (PE) passive samplers were calibrated for the first time for these compounds by determining the PE-water partitioning coefficients and used as a tool to determine sorption to the carbonaceous geosorbents. Log KPE-water values were 3.49 ± 0.58 for ? pinene and 4.08 ± 0.27 for limonene. The sorption of limonene to all materials was stronger than that for ? pinene (differences of 0.2–1.3 log units between distribution coefficients for the monoterpenes). Placing Kd values in increasing order for ? pinene gave biochar ? Pahokee peat ? bituminous coal ? lignite coke < graphite. For limonene the order was: Pahokee peat ? biochar ? bituminous coal < graphite ? lignite coke. Micropore (defined as pores <1.5 nm) and nanopore surface area (defined as pores 1.5 nm to 50 nm) normalised carbonaceous geosorbent-water distribution coefficients were also calculated. There was no clear correlation of these distribution coefficients with SA. Elemental composition was used to assess the degree of condensation (or alteration) of the carbonaceous geosorbents. The degree of carbonisation increased in the order; Pahokee peat < lignite coke < bituminous coal < biochar < graphite, however this was not correlated with an increase in the experimental distribution coefficients.

Sarah E. Hale; Satoshi Endo; Hans Peter H. Arp; Andrew R. Zimmerman; Gerard Cornelissen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Portable stove intervention reduces lung cancer mortality risk in lifetime smoky coal users  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pattern that may be associated with household coal burning Howard D. Hosgood 1 William Pao...combustion, particularly from bituminous coal. To further explore the clinical and histological...all subjects with KRAS mutations burned coal indoors for heating and cooking, our findings...

H. Dean Hosgood; Min Shen; Robert Champan; Eric Chen; Tongzhang Zheng; Kyoung-mu Lee; Xingzhou He; Qing Lan

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Study of Chemical Structure Changes of Chinese Lignite upon Drying in Superheated Steam, Microwave, and Hot Air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Study of Chemical Structure Changes of Chinese Lignite upon Drying in Superheated Steam, Microwave, and Hot Air ... An estimated 45% of the world’s coal reserves consist of low-rank coals. ... A range of samples varying from lignites to bituminous coals were used at 30-180°. ...

Arash Tahmasebi; Jianglong Yu; Yanna Han; Fengkui Yin; Sankar Bhattacharya; David Stokie

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

324

The fate of char-N at pulverized coal conditions Jennifer P. Spinti*, David W. Pershing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-free oxidant was 50­60% for lignites and 40­50% for bituminous coals. In char flames doped with NOx The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved. Keywords: Pulverized coal combustion; Char nitrogen; NOx formation The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/S0010-2180(03)00168-8 #12;the temperature

Utah, University of

325

The Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of bacteria.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lular nitrogen. The analyses of this experiment...paper chromatographic analysis of the MnO2-protein...drainage of some bituminous coal mines. J. Bacteriol...Sphaerotilus, its nature and economic significance. Adv...J. L, and M. T. Powers. 1965. For- mation...

W L van Veen; E G Mulder; M H Deinema

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oses is a, matter of well-kniowni...account of the high cost of pro-ductioni...bituminiiious coal, uponi whieh...fromji bituminous coal:, offsetting...11aterials or mineral pigzeiits to treatulellits...and if it is higher the strength is...cszaLton of so(da ash: "T. HxnARop...

Charles L. Parsons

1922-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

327

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" 7.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",,,," "

328

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",,,," "

329

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

330

Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glossary Glossary Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Glossary Add.png Add a Definition 2 2-M Probe Survey A Acoustic Logs Acoustic Televiewer Active Seismic Techniques Active Sensors Adaptive Protection Adequacy Adjacent Balancing Authority Advanced Interrupting Switch Advanced Metering Infrastructure Advanced Metering Infrastructure (Ami) / Smart Meters Advanced Transmission Applications Adverse Reliability Impact Aerial Photography Aeromagnetic Survey Air Cooling Airborne Gravity Survey Airborne Gravity Survey Algae Algae fuel Alternating current Alternative-fuel vehicle Alternator Altitude Correction Factor Ampere Analytical Modeling Ancillary Service Ancillary Services Revenue Angle of incidence Anode Anthracite coal Anti-Aliasing Filter Area Control Error Arranged Interchange Artesian Well

331

Evaluation of Activated Carbon Adsorbents for CO2 Capture in Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A linear relationship is also observed for the pore volume of the adsorbents (Figure 8b) when Vp and an estimation of the micropore volume (Vp ? Vmeso) of the adsorbents are plotted against the volume of adsorbed CO2 at 4.1 MPa. ... Modified HMS materials demonstrated to be reversibly adsorb substantially more CO2 than previously obsd. ... The anthracite with the highest CO2 adsorption capacity is the sample activated at 800 °C for 2 h, whose surface area was only 540 m2/g, and the adsorbed amt. of CO2 was 65.7 mg-CO2/g-adsorbent. ...

Trevor C. Drage; James M. Blackman; Cova Pevida; Colin E. Snape

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Create a Consortium and Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal  

SciTech Connect

The objective of these projects was to investigate alternative technologies for non-fuel uses of coal. Special emphasis was placed on developing premium carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. A total of 14 projects, which are the 2003 Research Projects, are reported herein. These projects were categorized into three overall objectives. They are: (1) To explore new applications for the use of anthracite in order to improve its marketability; (2) To effectively minimize environmental damage caused by mercury emissions, CO{sub 2} emissions, and coal impounds; and (3) To continue to increase our understanding of coal properties and establish coal usage in non-fuel industries. Research was completed in laboratories throughout the United States. Most research was performed on a bench-scale level with the intent of scaling up if preliminary tests proved successful. These projects resulted in many potential applications for coal-derived feedstocks. These include: (1) Use of anthracite as a sorbent to capture CO{sub 2} emissions; (2) Use of anthracite-based carbon as a catalyst; (3) Use of processed anthracite in carbon electrodes and carbon black; (4) Use of raw coal refuse for producing activated carbon; (5) Reusable PACs to recycle captured mercury; (6) Use of combustion and gasification chars to capture mercury from coal-fired power plants; (7) Development of a synthetic coal tar enamel; (8) Use of alternative binder pitches in aluminum anodes; (9) Use of Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore (SECO) to fuel a carbon fuel cell; (10) Production of a low cost coal-derived turbostratic carbon powder for structural applications; (11) Production of high-value carbon fibers and foams via the co-processing of a low-cost coal extract pitch with well-dispersed carbon nanotubes; (12) Use of carbon from fly ash as metallurgical carbon; (13) Production of bulk carbon fiber for concrete reinforcement; and (14) Characterizing coal solvent extraction processes. Although some of the projects funded did not meet their original goals, the overall objectives of the CPCPC were completed as many new applications for coal-derived feedstocks have been researched. Future research in many of these areas is necessary before implementation into industry.

Frank Rusinko; John Andresen; Jennifer E. Hill; Harold H. Schobert; Bruce G. Miller

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Upgrading of low-rank coals for conventional and advanced combustion systems  

SciTech Connect

Low-rank coals, subbituminous, lignitic, and brown coals, have a ubiquitous presence in the world, being found in all continents. Close to half of the world`s estimated coal resources are low- rank coals. Many countries have no alternative economic source of energy. In the lower 48 states of the United States, there are 220 billion tons of economically recoverable reserves of lignite and subbituminous coal. Add to this quantity 5 trillion tons of predominantly subbituminous coal in Alaska, and the combined amount represents the largest supply of the lowest-cost fuels available for generating electric power in the United States. However, to use these coals cost-effectively and in an environmentally acceptable way, it is imperative that their properties and combustion/gasification behavior be well understood. The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) takes a cradle-to-grave approach (i.e., mining, precleaning, combustion/gasification, postcleaning, and reuse and disposal of residues) for all aspects of coal processing and utilization. The environmental impact of these activities must be matched with the appropriate technologies. Experience over many years has shown that variations in coal and ash properties have a critical impact on design, reliability and efficiency of operation, and environmental compliance when low-rank coals are burned in conventional systems. This chapter reviews the significant technical issues of beneficiation, which includes reduction in moisture as well as ash (including sulfur), in relation to low-rank coal properties and their impact on conventional and advanced power systems. Finally, the development and utilization of low-rank coal resources are briefly discussed in view of policy, economic, and strategic issues.

Young, B.C.; Musich, M.A.; Jones, M.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Exploratory Research on Novel Coal Liquefaction Concept.  

SciTech Connect

Microautoclave tests confirmed that first-stage subbituminous coal conversions were greater in a more aromatic first-stage solvent. First-stage liquefaction tests with hydride ion `E` showed that high coal conversions can be obtained with a number of different first-stage water-gas-shift catalysts. Eight one-liter autoclave tests were completed. All tests used Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal and Reilly Industries anthracene oil. Differences among the tests were the hydride ion reagent used, the post-run flash of water, and the shift catalyst. Filtration tests were conducted with five one-liter autoclave products of subbituminous coal. The filtration rates were slower than those that had been obtained with North Dakota lignite products, but were still within a commercially acceptable range. The influence of the first-stage shift catalyst on filtration rates is being investigated. Second-stage hydrotreating of products of tests made to simulate the British coal LSE process and the Wilsonville pilot plant preheaters had lower resid conversion and higher hydrogen uptake than the products of the hydride ion liquefaction reaction. The 300 mL second-stage reactor system went on line this quarter. Refinements in the experimental procedures are under way. A conceptual commercial plant design for the hydride ion reagent `A` case was completed. Evaluations of hydride ion reagent `D` and `E` cases were initiated, and an integrated liquefaction system balance for the hydride ion reagent `E` case was begun. A preliminary review of the final technical and economic reports from the Alberta Research Council study of low-rank coal conversion using the CO-steam process generated a number of questions on the published reports; further analysis of the reports is planned.

Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

1997-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

335

C/H{sub 2}O reaction under supercritical conditions and their repercussions in the preparation of activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

Two chars prepared by carbonization of oak wood and anthracite were used to perform a comparative study of the gasification with supercritical water (SCW) and with steam. This work reports the effects of the type of char, the activating agent, temperature, flow rate, and particle size employed on the kinetics, mechanism of reaction, and the characteristics of the activated carbons obtained. The results show that the reactivity of the two chars is much higher with SCW than with steam. Although this increase can be explained in terms of the greater penetration of SCW and diffusional effects in the pore structure of the chars, some aspects suggest a possible change in the mechanism of reaction favored by the formation of clusters in SCW. The evolution of porosity was also found to differ when the char was gasified with SCW and with steam, being governed strongly by the starting material. When the oak char was activated with SCW, the smallest microporosity was broadened from the very first moments due to its very open pore structure, providing carbons with larger micropores and some mesoporosity. In contrast, in the case of the anthracite char, with a narrower pore structure, the evolution of the porosity was slower and less uniform, favoring external gasification of the particle. Accordingly, the carbons had a broader distribution of micropores, and mesoporosity was scarce.

Salvador, F.; Senchez-Montero, M.J.; Izquierdo, C. [University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Six years of ABB-CE, petcoke and fluid beds  

SciTech Connect

Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB-CE) has constructed twenty circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers and 2 bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) boilers throughout North America. The units were designed to fire a wide range of fuels from anthracite culm to coals, lignites and biomasses. Based on fuels economics, some plants have decided to use petroleum coke as a replacement or supplemental fuel. The fluid bed boiler can inherently handle a wide range of fuel types without requiring modification or down-rating. ABB-CE units have a significant amount of petroleum coke operating experience firing 100% petroleum coke with no supplemental fuel ranging from the first commercial CFB unit at New Brunswick Power to the largest CFB unit at Texas New Mexico Power. Petroleum coke is also being co-fired with anthracite culm at the Scott Paper CFB. The world`s largest operating BFB, the 160 MWe unit at TVA`s Shawnee plant, has also been co-firing petroleum coke. The ability of the fluidized bed technology to fire low volatile fuels such as petroleum cokes, efficiently and in an environmentally acceptable manner will result in the use of this technology as a preferred means of power generation. This report gives a brief description of the petroleum coke firing experiences with ABB-CE fluid bed steam generators over the last six years.

Tanca, M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Capture and conversion of SO/sub 2/ RESOX prototype demonstration in Germany  

SciTech Connect

Pilot study tests on a Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation 42 Mw RESOX prototype unit that converts SO/sub 2/-rich effluents from regenerable FGD systems into elemental sulfur by reaction with crushed coal, and was retrofitted to a Bergbau-Forschung G.m.b.H. FGD unit, showed that the 30% by vol SO/sub 2/ content of the inlet gas from the BF desorber could be reduced to 4% SO2 and 6.5% H/sub 2/S at the outlet side. A second test showed that 54% by vol inlet SO/sub 2/ was reduced to 10% SO/sub 2/ and 3.1% H/sub 2/S. Foster Wheeler laboratory tests on Sophia Jacoba (Ger.) anthracite in a 7.625 in. ID RESOX reactor at less than 2 psig showed SO/sub 2/ conversion rates of 92.5, 89.9, 89.7, and 95.1%. With testing 50% complete, the results indicate good compatibility of the RESOX system with a number of regenerative front-end FGD processes and show the applicability of coals other than anthracite.

Steiner, P.; Dalton, S.M.; Knoblauch, K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Determination of electrical resistivity of dry coke beds  

SciTech Connect

The electrical resistivity of the coke bed is of great importance when producing FeMn, SiMn, and FeCr in a submerged arc furnace. In these processes, a coke bed is situated below and around the electrode tip and consists of metallurgical coke, slag, gas, and metal droplets. Since the basic mechanisms determining the electrical resistivity of a coke bed is not yet fully understood, this investigation is focused on the resistivity of dry coke beds consisting of different carbonaceous materials, i.e., coke beds containing no slag or metal. A method that reliably compares the electrical bulk resistivity of different metallurgical cokes at 1500{sup o} C to 1600{sup o}C is developed. The apparatus is dimensioned for industrial sized materials, and the electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, petroleum coke, and metallurgical coke has been measured. The resistivity at high temperatures of the Magnitogorsk coke, which has the highest resistivity of the metallurgical cokes investigated, is twice the resistivity of the Corus coke, which has the lowest electrical resistivity. Zdzieszowice and SSAB coke sort in between with decreasing resistivities in the respective order. The electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, and petroleum coke is generally higher than the resistivity of the metallurgical cokes, ranging from about two to about eight times the resistivity of the Corus coke at 1450{sup o}C. The general trend is that the bulk resistivity of carbon materials decreases with increasing temperature and increasing particle size.

Eidem, P.A.; Tangstad, M.; Bakken, J.A. [NTNU, Trondheim (Norway)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fly ash chemical classification based on lime  

SciTech Connect

Typically, total lime content (CaO) of fly ash is shown in fly ash reports, but its significance is not addressed in US specifications. For certain applications a low lime ash is preferred. When a class C fly ash must be cementitious, lime content above 20% is required. A ternary S-A-C phase diagram pilot is given showing the location of fly ash compositions by coal rank and source in North America. Fly ashes from subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin usually contain sufficient lime to be cementitious but blending with other coals may result in calcium being present in phases other than tricalcium aluminate. 9 refs., 1 fig.

Fox, J. [BASF Construction Chemicals, LLC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Carbon Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors 3. Carbon Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Factor (Pounds of CO2 Per Million Btu)*** Bituminous Coal BIT Source: 1 205.30000 Distillate Fuel Oil DFO Source: 1 161.38600 Geothermal GEO Estimate from EIA, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting 16.59983 Jet Fuel JF Source: 1 156.25800 Kerosene KER Source: 1 159.53500 Lignite Coal LIG Source: 1 215.40000 Municipal Solid Waste MSW Source: 1 (including footnote 2 within source) 91.90000 Natural Gas NG Source: 1 117.08000 Petroleum Coke PC Source: 1 225.13000 Propane Gas PG Sources: 1 139.17800 Residual Fuel Oil RFO Source: 1 173.90600 Synthetic Coal SC Assumed to have the emissions similar to Bituminous Coal. 205.30000

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microsoft PowerPoint - ACC032503_V2_1.PPT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Coal Council American Coal Council Mercury & Multi- Emissions Compliance: Strategies & Tactics March 26-27, 2003 Charlotte, NC Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory TJF_ACC_March2003 Presentation Outline * Regulatory drivers * Program objectives * Current program * Future plans TJF_ACC_March2003 Power Plant Mercury Emissions Coal Plants Emit ~ 48 tons/year NETL Boiler Database 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 10 20 30 Lignite SubB Bituminous Lignite SubB Bituminous Total US Hg Emissions (tons per year) 0 10 20 30 0 2 4 6 8 10 Hg Emission Rate (lb per TBtu) TJF_ACC_March2003 Potential Mercury Regulations MACT Standards * Likely high levels of Hg reduction * Compliance: Dec. 2007 Clean Power Act of 2003 * Re-introduced in Senate (S.

342

Fireside Corrosion during Oxyfuel Combustion Considering Various SO2 Contents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work encompasses the evaluation of deposit and material related limitations on boiler performance and the lifetime of CO2 free, oxyfuel operated power plants. The aim of the study was to determine the reliability of advanced and conventional boiler materials. Six alloys, varying from state-of-the-art ferritic-martensitic and austenitic Fe-based steels to an advanced Ni- based superalloy, were selected for the corrosion tests. The impact on corrosion of oxy-firing of two fuels is considered in the study: S-lean bituminous coal from Indonesia and S-rich bituminous coal from Venezuela. Fireside corrosion tests were performed by two laboratories using varying me hodologies: exposures in a combustion test rig using cooled corrosion probes followed by laboratory exposures and isothermal laboratory exposures only. The tests result in a similar ranking of the alloys’ corrosion resistance, but also revealed some differences in the corrosion products formed.

G. Stein-Brzozowska; R. Norling; P. Viklund; J. Maier; G. Scheffknecht

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Fireside Corrosion during Oxyfuel Combustion Considering Various SO2 Contents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work encompasses evaluation of deposit and material related limitations on boiler performance and lifetime of CO2-free, oxyfuel operated power plants. The aim of the study was to determine the reliability of advanced and conventional boiler materials. Six alloys, varying from state-of-the-art ferritic-martensitic and austenitic Fe-based steels to an advanced Ni-based superalloy, were selected for the corrosion tests. Impact of oxy-firing of two fuels is considered in the study: S-lean bituminous coal from Indonesia and S-rich bituminous coal from Venezuela. Fireside corrosion tests were performed by two laboratories using varying methodologies: exposures in a combustion test rig using cooled corrosion probes followed by laboratory exposures and isothermal laboratory exposures only. The tests result in a similar ranking of the alloys’ corrosion resistance, but also revealed some differences in the formed corrosion products.

G. Stein-Brzozowska; R. Norling; P. Viklund; J. Maier; G. Scheffknecht

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Chemical comminution of coal  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the present research is to study the chemical reactivity of a mixture of methyl alcohol and aqueous sodium hydroxide solution in the temperature range 298 to 363 K, and a caustic concentration of 0 to 10 wt. %, on an Iowa bituminous coal. The sample studied was collected from coal zone 4, equivalent to most historical references to Laddsdale coal. The coals in this zone are typical high-sulfur, high-ash middle Pennsylvania Cherokee group coals. The apparent rank is high-volatile C bituminous coal. The relatively high content of sulfur and 23 other elements in these coals is related to near neutral (6-8) pH conditions in the depositional and early diagenetic environments, and to postdepositional sphalerite/calcite/pyrite/kaolinite/barite mineralization.

Mamaghani, A.H.; Beddow, J.K.; Vetter, A.F.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

JV Task 5 - Evaluation of Residual Oil Fly Ash As A Mercury Sorbent For Coal Combustion Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

The mercury adsorption capacity of a residual oil fly ash (ROFA) sample collected form Florida Power and Light Company's Port Everglades Power Plant was evaluated using a bituminous coal combustion flue gas simulator and fixed-bed testing protocol. A size-segregated (>38 {micro}g) fraction of ROFA was ground to a fine powder and brominated to potentially enhance mercury capture. The ROFA and brominated-ROFA were ineffective in capturing or oxidizing the Hg{sup 0} present in a simulated bituminous coal combustion flue gas. In contrast, a commercially available DARCO{reg_sign} FGD initially adsorbed Hg{sup 0} for about an hour and then catalyzed Hg{sup 0} oxidation to produce Hg{sup 2+}. Apparently, the unburned carbon in ROFA needs to be more rigorously activated in order for it to effectively capture and/or oxidize Hg{sup 0}.

Robert Patton

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Pelletizing lignite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lignite is formed into high strength pellets having a calorific value of at least 9,500 Btu/lb by blending a sufficient amount of an aqueous base bituminous emulsion with finely-divided raw lignite containing its inherent moisture to form a moistened green mixture containing at least 3 weight % of the bituminous material, based on the total dry weight of the solids, pelletizing the green mixture into discrete green pellets of a predetermined average diameter and drying the green pellets to a predetermined moisture content, preferrably no less than about 5 weight %. Lignite char and mixture of raw lignite and lignite char can be formed into high strength pellets in the same general manner.

Goksel, Mehmet A. (Houghton, MI)

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Coal Production 1992  

SciTech Connect

Coal Production 1992 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In 1992, there were 3,439 active coal mining operations made up of all mines, preparation plants, and refuse operations. The data in Table 1 cover the 2,746 mines that produced coal, regardless of the amount of production, except for bituminous refuse mines. Tables 2 through 33 include data from the 2,852 mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10 thousand or more short tons of coal during the period, except for bituminous refuse, and includes preparation plants with 5 thousand or more employee hours. These mining operations accounted for over 99 percent of total US coal production and represented 83 percent of all US coal mining operations in 1992.

Not Available

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, January--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

Previous research has suggested that using a more effective hydrogen donor solvent in the low severity coal liquefaction reaction improves coal conversion. In order to understand the results of these methods, both independently and combined, a factorial experiment was designed. Pretreating coal with hydrochloric and sulfurous acid solutions in both water and methanol is compared with pretreating coal using only methanol and with no pretreatment. The effects of these pretreatments on coal liquefaction behavior are contrasted with the ammonium acetate pretreatment. Within each of these, individual reactions are performed with the hydroaromatic 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (tetralin, TET) and the cyclic olefin 1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene (isotetralin, ISO). The final aspect of the factorial experiment is the comparison of Wyodak subbituminous coal (WY) from the Argonne Premium Sample Bank and Black Thunder subbituminous coal (BT) provided by Amoco. Half of the reactions in the matrix have now been completed. In all but one case, Black Thunder-HCl/H{sub 2}O, the ISO proved to be more reactive than TET. After the other four reactions using this combination are complete, the average conversion may be greater with the cyclic olefin. The second part of this paper describes the current and future work with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The objective of this work is to determine the kinetics of reaction of isotetralin at high temperatures and pressures. This quarter combinations of three products typically produced from isotetralin were used in spectral subtraction.

Curtis, C.W.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Development of an advanced process for drying fine coal in an inclined fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project was to demonstrate a technically feasible and economically viable process for drying and stabilizing high-moisture subbituminous coal. Controlled thermal drying of coal fines was achieved using the inclined fluidized-bed drying and stabilization process developed by the Western Research Institute. The project scope of work required completion of five tasks: (1) project planning, (2) characterization of two feed coals, (3) bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed drying studies, (4) product characterization and testing, and (5) technical and economic evaluation of the process. High moisture subbituminous coals from AMAX Eagle Butte mine located in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and from Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc. in Healy, Alaska were tested in a 10-lb/hr bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed. Experimental results show that the dried coal contains less than 1.5% moisture and has a heating value over 11,500 Btu/lb. The coal fines entrainment can be kept below 15 wt % of the feed. The equilibrium moisture of dried coal was less than 50% of feed coal equilibrium moisture. 7 refs., 60 figs., 47 tabs.

Boysen, J.E.; Cha, C.Y.; Barbour, F.A.; Turner, T.F.; Kang, T.W.; Berggren, M.H.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Released: May 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" 2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",,,," "

352

Table N8.2. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" 2. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",," ",," "

353

Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",," ",," "

354

Released: May 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",,,," "

355

RSE Table N8.1 and N8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N8.1 and N8.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 and N8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N8.1 and N8.2;" 1 and N8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N8.1 and N8.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",,," "

356

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006;" 2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",,,," "

357

Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; " " Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",," ",," "

358

Computer simulation as a NOx reduction design tool  

SciTech Connect

Nalco Mobotec engineers were charged with reducing emissions on a utility boiler converted from burning oil to eastern bituminous coal using the company's Rotamix selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) system which injects urea into the furnace. A CFD simulation of the existing boiler was first conducted and then the furnace was simulated with the SNCR system added and the design was optimised. Operating and capital costs were minimised by optimal placement of 50 injector ports. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Liu, G.; Higgins, B.S. [Nalco Mobotec (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

University of Kansas List of Publications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.d. 75 p. •Vol. 14, No. 5, January 15,1913. Engineering bulletin No. 3. Walker, P. F.: Bohnstengel, Walter: Kansas fuels: coal, oil, gas. Heating values and proximate analysis of coal. Bohnstengel, Walter: Discussion of sulphur content of bituminous... No. 6. Kansas fuels; coal, oil, gas. Walker, P. F.; Bohnstengel, Walter: Part 1—Heating values and proxi mate analysis of coal. (Reprint.) Brown, H. R.; Carpenter, C. B.: Supplement. Bohnstengel, Walter: Part II—Discussion of sulphus content...

Smelser, Mary Maud

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Simulation of a Commercial-Scale Entrained Flow Gasifier Using a Dynamic Reduced Order Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Also referred to as petcoke. ... For case 3, feed switching; case 4, coal–petroleum coke (petcoke) cofiring; and case 5, coal–biomass cofiring, properties of all types of feedstock, Illinois No. 6, and Utah Blind Canyon bituminous coals, petroleum coke, and straw, are given in Table 3. ... Syngas production history for case 2, load following; case 4, coal–petcoke cofiring; and case 5, coal–biomass cofiring. ...

Rory F. D. Monaghan; Ahmed F. Ghoniem

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

May 23, 2013 ABC and Innovative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-girders with CIP deck ­ Span length, 90-150 ft. ­ 2012 Average Cost, $125/SF · 3-span CIP slab bridge ­ Span length have bituminous overlay and one has 5" composite CIP overlay ­ Details can be modified for higher ADT in one week (vs. 4-5 weeks for CIP slab, 2-3 weeks for precast beam/CIP deck) ­ No falsework required

Minnesota, University of

362

ACS Div of Fuel Chem Preprints 44:4, 1016-1019 (August, 1999) KINETICS OF HIGH PRESSURE CHAR OXIDATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and are fairly well agreed upon; however, kinetic data for char oxidation at elevated pressures are very limited in a fixed-bed reactor from 2-10 atmospheres and 850-1200K with a bituminous coal char, and showed a decrease ­ designated P1 and P2 - were used in this study. Both were produced in a methane flat-flame burner (FFB

Fletcher, Thomas H.

363

Co-coking of Hydrotreated Decant Oil/Coal Blends: Effect of Hydrotreatment Severity on the Yield Distribution and Quality of Distillate Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coke yield from delayed co-coking of hydrotreated DOs and coal blends was observed to be in the range of 15.9–24.4%. ... The coal used in this study (EI-106) was a 50:50 blend of the Powellton and Eagle seams, both very similar coals of high-volatile A bituminous rank from West Virginia. ... One of the hydrotreated DOs (EI-133) was coked alone. ...

Ömer Gül; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert

2013-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

364

Determination of the Effects Caused by Different Polymers on Coal Fluidity during Carbonization Using High-Temperature 1H NMR and Rheometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The bituminous coal (K6) used throughout this work and the light fraction of a plastic waste in the form of shredder fluff that is used in car interiors were supplied by Voestalpine Stahl GmbH. ... The car shredder fluff is basically a shredded polyurethane waste, and its ultimate composition is shown in Table 2. ... Thus, the fraction C17-C31 showed a higher increase of n-alkenes/n-alkanes ratio than other fractions. ...

Miguel Castro Díaz; Lucky Edecki; Karen M. Steel; John W. Patrick; Colin E. Snape

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

365

Status of the Development of EDS Coal Liquefaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...commercial plant and their...vacuum bottoms) back to...petroleum gas. Ash ence ofgaseous...to relate performance to donor...subjecting the mixture to pressures...commercial plant. Of all...showing that bituminous coal quickly...increased the laboratory's ability...Early in the investigation of the donor...structural characteristics of a good...consisted of material boiling in...atmospheric bottoms are pumped...

G. K. Vick; W. R. Epperly

1982-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

366

Comparison of Two U.S. Power-Plant Carbon Dioxide Emissions Data Sets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparison of Two U.S. Power-Plant Carbon Dioxide Emissions Data Sets ... The varying proportions of CO2 emitted from each fuel type over the course of a year lead to an annual cycle in the carbon isotope ratio (?13C), with a range of about 2 ‰. ... The large range of carbon emissions within the bituminous rank class suggests that rank-specific carbon emission factors are provincial rather than global. ...

Katherine V. Ackerman; Eric T. Sundquist

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

367

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006;" Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",,,," "

368

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Sorbent Injection for Small  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas URS Group and their test team will evaluate sorbent injection for mercury control on sites with low-SCA ESPs, burning low sulfur Eastern bituminous coals. Full-scale tests will be performed at Plant Yates Units 1 and 2 to evaluate sorbent injection performance across a cold-side ESP/wet FGD and a cold-side ESP with a dual NH3/SO3 flue gas conditioning system, respectively. Short-term parametric tests on Units 1 and 2 will provide data on the effect of sorbent injection rate on mercury removal and ash/FGD byproduct composition. Tests on Unit 2 will also evaluate the effect of dual-flue gas conditioning on sorbent injection performance. Results from a one-month injection test on Unit 1 will provide insight to the long-term performance and variability of this process as well as any effects on plant operations. The goals of the long-term testing are to obtain sufficient operational data on removal efficiency over time, effects on the ESP and balance of plant equipment, and on injection equipment operation to prove process viability.

369

Formation and retention of methane in coal  

SciTech Connect

The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Formation and retention of methane in coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

EIS-0357 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in Giberton, PA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in 7 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in Giberton, PA EIS-0357 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in Giberton, PA Summary This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action to provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of facilities near Gilberton, Pennsylvania, which have been proposed by WMPI PTY, LLC, for producing electricity, steam, and liquid fuels from anthracite coal waste (culm). The project was selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES

373

EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project, Gilberton, Pennsylvania This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action to provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of facilities near Gilberton, Pennsylvania, which have been proposed by WMPI PTY, LLC, for producing electricity, steam, and liquid fuels from anthracite coal waste (culm). The project has been selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale.

374

Definition: Coal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Coal Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Coal A combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock composed mostly of carbon and hydrocarbons. It is formed from plant remains that have been compacted, hardened, chemically altered, and metamorphosed by heat and pressure over geologic time (typically millions of years). It is the most abundant fossil fuel produced in the United States.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Coal (from the Old English term col, which has meant "mineral of fossilized carbon" since the 13th century) is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock usually occurring in rock strata in layers or veins called coal beds or coal seams. The harder forms, such as anthracite coal, can be regarded as metamorphic rock because of later

375

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Los Alamos Site Office | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Alamos Site Office Los Alamos Site Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Los Alamos Site Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Los Alamos Site Office. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 16, 2013 Anthracite/Total Orange/Black Transfer of Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste to Idaho National Laboratory for Processing and Shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CX(s) Applied: B1.30 Date: 07/16/2013 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Los Alamos Site Office November 30, 2012 CX-009798: Categorical Exclusion Determination Foreign Location Source Recovery - Fiscal Year 2013 CX(s) Applied: B2.6 Date: 11/30/2012 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Los Alamos Site Office November 30, 2012 CX-009524: Categorical Exclusion Determination Foreign Location Source Recovery - Fiscal Year 2013

376

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2013 16, 2013 Anthracite/Total Orange/Black Transfer of Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste to Idaho National Laboratory for Processing and Shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CX(s) Applied: B1.30 Date: 07/16/2013 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Los Alamos Site Office July 16, 2013 CX-010582: Categorical Exclusion Determination Spring Creek Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 07/16/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 16, 2013 CX-010581: Categorical Exclusion Determination Little Shell Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 07/16/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 16, 2013 CX-010858: Categorical Exclusion Determination Demolition of the 745-N Excess Equipment Pad CX(s) Applied: B1.23

377

EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

57: Final Environmental Impact Statement 57: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project, Gilberton, Pennsylvania This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action to provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of facilities near Gilberton, Pennsylvania, which have been proposed by WMPI PTY, LLC, for producing electricity, steam, and liquid fuels from anthracite coal waste (culm). The project has been selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale.

378

Phases Energy Services County Electric Power Assn A N Electric Coop  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alpena Power Co Alpena Power Co Altamaha Electric Member Corp Amana Society Service Co Ambit Energy L P Ambit En ergy L P Maryland Ambit Energy L P New York Ameren Energy Marketing Ameren Energy Marketing Illinois Ameren Illinois Company Ameren Illinois Company Illinois AmeriPower LLC American Electric Power Co Inc American Mun Power Ohio Inc American PowerNet American PowerNet District of Columbia American PowerNet Maine American PowerNet Maryland American PowerNet New Jersey American Samoa Power Authority American Transmission Systems Inc Amicalola Electric Member Corp Amigo Energy Anadarko Public Works Auth Anchorage Municipal Light and Power Aniak Light Power Co Inc Anoka Electric Coop Anthracite Power Light Anza Electric Coop Inc Appalachian Electric Coop

379

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 22070 of 28,905 results. 61 - 22070 of 28,905 results. Download CX-010875: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine Maintenance and Custodial Services August 2013 to August 2014 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/28/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010875-categorical-exclusion-determination Event FWP Event Mound- Miamisburg, OH FWP Event Mound - Miamisburg, OH http://energy.gov/hss/events/fwp-event-mound-miamisburg-oh-3 Download Anthracite/Total Orange/Black Transfer of Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste to Idaho National Laboratory for Processing and Shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CX(s) Applied: B1.30 Date: 07/16/2013 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Los Alamos Site Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/anthracitetotal-orangeblack

380

Microsoft Word - Responses for IRS Notices 2006 24 and 25 May 4 2006.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6-24, Qualifying Advanced Coal Project Program, 6-24, Qualifying Advanced Coal Project Program, IRS Notice 2006-25, Qualifying Gasification Program May 4, 2006 DOE is answering questions related only to DOE certifications. Other questions should be directed to the IRS by calling Doug Kim or Kathy Reed at (202) 622-3110, or by faxing the questions to them at (202) 622-4779. 21. Waste Coal. Is it correct that a low-cost anthracite culm (i.e., culm is defined as coal waste that consists of coal and rock with varying amounts of carbon material remaining after removal of a higher-quality saleable coal) qualifies for clean coal investment tax credits under sections 48A and 48B? Kindly assume that the producer procured the culm from a culm bank (i.e., ubiquitous piles or other depository of culm on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Phases Energy Services County Electric Power Assn A N Electric Coop  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alliant Energy Alliant Energy Alpena Power Co Altamaha Electric Member Corp Amana Society Service Co Ambit Energy L P Ambit Energy L P Maryland Ambit Energy L P New York Ameren Energy Marketing Ameren Energy Marketing Illinois Ameren Illinois Company Ameren Illinois Company Illinois AmeriPower LLC American Electric Power Co Inc American Mun Power Ohio Inc American PowerNet American PowerNet District of Columbia American PowerNet Maine American PowerNet Maryland American PowerNet New Jersey American Samoa Power Authority American Transmission Systems Inc Amicalola Electric Member Corp Amigo Energy Anadarko Public Works Auth Anchorage Municipal Light and Power Aniak Light Power Co Inc Anoka Electric Coop Anthracite Power Light Anza Electric Coop Inc Appalachian Electric Coop

382

High-performances carbonaceous adsorbents for hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Activated carbons (ACs) with controlled microporosity have been prepared and their H2 storage performances have been tested in a gravimetric device. Such adsorbents are natural Chinese anthracites chemically activated with alkaline hydroxides, NaOH or KOH. Outstanding total storage capacities of hydrogen, as high as 6.6wt.% equivalent to excess capacity of 6.2 wt.%, have been obtained at 4MPa for some of these adsorbents. These values of hydrogen adsorption are among the best, if not the highest, ever published so far in the open literature. They are well above those of some commercial materials, e.g. Maxsorb-3, considered as a reference of high-performance adsorbent for hydrogen adsorption. Such exceptional storage capacities may be ascribed to a higher volume of micropores (

Weigang Zhao; Vanessa Fierro; E Aylon; M T Izquierdo; Alain Celzard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Biological stability of groundwater  

SciTech Connect

Conventional (e.g., coagulation, flocculation, and filtration) or membrane filtration treatment trains were used to remove organic compounds from groundwater. For the conventional train with sand-anthracite columns, the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) of the groundwater was reduced from 349 {+-} 127 {micro}g/L C to 54 {+-} 51 {micro}g/L C. For the membrane filtration train, there was no statistical difference between the AOC of the raw water influent (388 {+-} 126 {micro}g C) and that of the membrane permeate (334 {+-} 156 {micro}g/L C), suggesting that this treatment produced biologically unstable water. Similar results were obtained using the heterotrophic growth response (HGR) method. Comparison of the biostability methods showed that HGR was positively correlated with AOC (r = 0.52; P < 0.0001; n = 156), indicating that AOC only partially explains the ability of heterotrophic bacteria to grow in water samples.

Noble, P.A. [Univ. of Maryland Biotechnology Inst., Baltimore, MD (United States). Center of Marine Biotechnology; Clark, D.L. [Irvine Ranch Water District, CA (United States); Olson, B.H. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). School of Social Ecology, Environmental Analysis, and Design

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The relationship between the thermoplastic behavior of blends and their component coals  

SciTech Connect

The thermoplastic behaviors of a number of coking coal blends were measured using proton magnetic resonance thermal analysis (PMRTA) to determine to what extent they were affected by interactions between the component coals. Most blends showed evidence that at temperatures near their temperatures of maximum fluidity the extent to which they fused was different to that expected if the coals did not interact. Only blends of coking coals of different rank fused to a greater extent than expected in the absence of interactions. Semi-anthracite, low rank coals and charcoal reduced the extent of fusion of coking coals to values below those expected if they were acting as inert diluents. These interactions are interpreted as being mediated by transfer of volatile material between the coals on heating.

Sakurovs, R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Characterisation and model fitting kinetic analysis of coal/biomass co-combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The combustion behaviors of biomass, coal and their blends were studied by thermogravimetric analysis. Combustion parameters such as ignition, burnout, peak rate, ignition index, and combustibility index were analyzed. The kinetic parameters were optimized based on experimental results by a double parallel reactions random pore model (DRPM) proposed in this paper. The results show that the combustion characteristic temperature of the biomass is lower and maximum rate of combustion is higher than that of anthracite coal. With the increase of biomass content, ignition temperature and burnout temperature of blends tended to decrease, while the ignition index and combustibility index increased. Compared with the original RPM model, the DRPM model could not only describe the combustion process with a single peak rate, but also the combustion of biomass-coal blends with two rate peaks. The combustion activation energies of blends were extracted by DRPM model in the present study.

Guangwei Wang; Jianliang Zhang; Jiugang Shao; Shan Ren

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

B  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B B l a c k H i l l s R e g io n Northern Anthracite Field S o u t h e r n A n t h r a c i t e F i e l d E. Middle Anthracite F ield Rhode Island Meta-Anthrac ite Terling ua Coal Field Coos Bay Coal Field Turtle Montain Coal Field North Central Coal Region San Juan Basin G u l f C o a s t C o a l R e g i o n Ft. Union Coal Re gion (Willist on Basin) Northern Appalachian Ba sin Powder Rive r Ba sin Uinta Basin Cheroke e P la tform Ce nt ra l Appalachian Ba sin Gr ea te r Gr ee n Ri ve r Ba si n T e r t i a r y L a k e B e d s R e g i o n Arkom a Ba sin Pic eance Ba sin Big Horn Ba sin Wind River Ba sin R a to n B as in Black Mesa Basin Taylorville Basin D e e p R i v e r B a s i n N. & Mid. Park Basins C u l p e p p e r B a s in Ha nna -Carbon Ba sin J a c k s o n H o le C o a l F ie ld He nr y Mo u nta ins Co al F iel d Rock Creek Coal Field Glacier Coal Field Goshen Hole Coal Field D a n R i v e r - D a n v i l l e B a s i n Goose Creek Field

387

Effectiveness of AOC removal by advanced water treatment systems: a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, the appearance of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in the water treatment system and effluent of the treatment plant has brought more attention to the environmental engineers. In this study, AOC removal efficiency at the Cheng-Ching Lake water treatment plant (CCLWTP) was evaluated. The main objectives of this study were to: (1) evaluate the treatability of AOC by the advanced treatment system at the CCLWTP, (2) assess the relativity of AOC and the variations of other water quality indicators, (3) evaluate the effects of sodium thiosulfate on AOC analysis, and (4) evaluate the efficiency of biofiltration process using granular activated carbon (GAC) and anthracite as the fillers. Results show that the averaged influent and final effluent AOC concentrations at the CCLWTP were approximately 124 and 30 ?g acetate-C/L, respectively. Thus, the treatment plant had an AOC removal efficiency of about 76%, and the AOC concentrations in the final effluent met the criteria established by the CCLWTP (50 ?g acetate-C/L). Results indicate that the biofiltration process might contribute to the removal of the trace AOC in the GAC filtration process. Moreover, the removal of AOC had a correlation with the decrease in concentrations of other drinking water indicators. Results from a column test show that GAC was a more appropriate material than anthracite for the AOC removal. Results from this study provide us insight into the mechanisms of AOC removal by advanced water treatment processes. These findings would be helpful in designing a modified water treatment system for AOC removal and water quality improvement.

C.C. Chien; C.M. Kao; C.D. Dong; T.Y. Chen; J.Y. Chen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Low rank fuels such as subbituminous coals and lignites contain significant amounts of moisture compared to higher rank coals. Typically, the moisture content of subbituminous coals ranges from 15 to 30 percent, while that for lignites is between 25 and 40 percent, where both are expressed on a wet coal basis. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit. High fuel moisture results in fuel handling problems, and it affects heat rate, mass rate (tonnage) of emissions, and the consumption of water needed for evaporative cooling. This project deals with lignite and subbituminous coal-fired pulverized coal power plants, which are cooled by evaporative cooling towers. In particular, the project involves use of power plant waste heat to partially dry the coal before it is fed to the pulverizers. Done in a proper way, coal drying will reduce cooling tower makeup water requirements and also provide heat rate and emissions benefits. The technology addressed in this project makes use of the hot circulating cooling water leaving the condenser to heat the air used for drying the coal (Figure 1). The temperature of the circulating water leaving the condenser is usually about 49 C (120 F), and this can be used to produce an air stream at approximately 43 C (110 F). Figure 2 shows a variation of this approach, in which coal drying would be accomplished by both warm air, passing through the dryer, and a flow of hot circulating cooling water, passing through a heat exchanger located in the dryer. Higher temperature drying can be accomplished if hot flue gas from the boiler or extracted steam from the turbine cycle is used to supplement the thermal energy obtained from the circulating cooling water. Various options such as these are being examined in this investigation. This is the eleventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report.

Edward Levy

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Prog054  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PILOT-SCALE TESTING OF POTENTIAL MERCURY PILOT-SCALE TESTING OF POTENTIAL MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR TXU Description Objective This project is intended to identify and evaluate potential mercury control technologies at the pilot scale which show promise for application at plants burning Gulf Coast lignite or a blend with subbituminous coal. Gulf Coast lignite is one of the most challenging coals in regard to mercury control because of its high mercury concentration and the high percentage of elemental mercury. Background Of all the mercury control options available to be deployed to meet pending mercury control regulations, activated carbon injection (ACI) is considered to be among the most mature and, therefore, most readily available for commercial use in coal-fired power plants. However, very small amounts of carbon (generally

390

doi:10.1016/j.fuproc.2005.07.001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The The PCO process for photochemical removal of mercury from flue gas B Christopher R. McLarnon a , Evan J. Granite b, * , Henry W. Pennline b a Powerspan Corp., P.O. Box 219, 54 Old Bay Road, New Durham, NH 03855, United States b National Energy Technology Laboratory, United States Department of Energy, P.O. Box 10940, MS 58-106, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940, United States Abstract A promising technology has been developed to capture and remove elemental mercury species from coal-fired power plants. Powerspan Corp. has licensed the technology and initiated a bench and pilot test program to develop the Photochemical Oxidation, or PCOi, process for commercial application with subbituminous and lignite fuels. The process has the potential to serve as a low cost mercury oxidation technology that will facilitate elemental mercury removal in a downstream SO 2 scrubber, wet electrostatic precipitator

391

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of the Coal Quality Expert(tm) - Project Brief [PDF-313KB] Development of the Coal Quality Expert(tm) - Project Brief [PDF-313KB] ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc., and CQ, Inc. Pittsburgh, PA and Homer City, PA PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Final Report: Development of a Coal Quality Expert [PDF-6.9MB] (June 1998) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Development of a Coal Quality ExpertT: A DOE Assessment [PDF-1.5MB] (Nov 2000) Interim Reports Characterization and Evaluation of the Cleanability of Subbituminous Coals from Powder River Basin [PDF-18.4MB] (June 1993) Coal Cleanability Characterization of Pratt and Utley Seam Coal [PDF-10.1MB] (Aug 1992) Coal Cleanability Characterization of Pratt and Utley Seam Coal, Trace Element Addendum [PDF-10.1MB] (June 1993)

392

Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Research on sulfate and metal (Mo, Sn) promoted Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts in the current year focused on optimization of conditions. Parameters varied included temperature, solvent, solvent-to-coal ratio, and the effect of presulfiding versus in situ sulfiding. Oil yields were found to increase approximately proportionately with both temperature and solvent-to-coal ratio. The donor solvent, tetralin, proved to give better total conversion and oil yields than either 1-methylnaphthalene or Wilsonville recycle oil. A significant enhancement of both total liquefaction yields and oil yields from lignites and subbituminous coals has been achieved by incorporating iron into the coal matrix by cation exchange. A study has been conducted on the synthesis of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten catalysts using a laser pyrolysis technique.

Huffman, G.P. [ed.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaing TC14  

SciTech Connect

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high pressure solids handling systems. This report details test campaign TC14 of the PSDF gasification process. TC14 began on February 16, 2004, and lasted until February 28, 2004, accumulating 214 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. The gasifier operating temperatures varied from 1760 to 1810 F at pressures from 188 to 212 psig during steady air blown operations and approximately 160 psig during oxygen blown operations.

Southern Company Services

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

394

Thermodynamic properties of materials derived from coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

Few measurements of the thermodynamic properties of materials obtained from the liquefaction of coal have been reported. Because several sets of well-defined fractions of coal-derived materials existed that had been separated and characterized by the Characterization Branch of the Division of Processing and Thermodynamics of this Center, the expertise of the Thermodynamics Research Branch was utilized to measure enthalpies of combustion and heat capacities of these materials. The sets of fractions came from five sources: a synthetic crude oil derived from western Kentucky coal by the char-oil-energy development (COED) process, a synthetic crude oil derived from Utah A-seam coal by the COED process, material derived from West Virginia Pittsburgh seam coal by the Synthoil process, material derived from Illinois No. 6 coal by the H-Coal process and materials derived from subbituminous coal by the Conoco Colstrip zinc chloride hydrocracking process.

Smith, N.K.; Lee-Bechtold, S.H.; Good, W.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fluidized bed combustion of low-rank coals: (Task 4. 1)  

SciTech Connect

Results obtained in the second year of a second three-year program are described. Two 1000-hour tests were completed to evaluate corrosion/erosion effects on boiler materials. The coals tested were Kentucky {number sign}9 from the Pyro mine and Gibbons Creek, Texas, lignite. Of the variety of stainless and carbon steels tested, several meet commercial requirements despite a wide range in ash compositions of the test coals. In Fluidized Bed Combustion characterization, the River King Illinois {number sign}6 and Jacobs Ranch, Wyoming, subbituminous coals were extensively tested under a wide range of operating conditions and with and without limestone addition. The Jacobs Ranch coal was also successfully and satisfactorily fired as a coal/water fuel slurry. The low-rank coal slurry provided excellent ignition and combustion efficiency, and without ash agglomeration or accumulation. Continued progress was made in expanding the data base on FBC of low- rank coals. 11 refs., 59 figs., 22 tabs.

Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Zobeck, B.J.; Kalmanovitch, D.P.; Potas, T.A.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Evaluation of component performance in the TVA 20 MW FBC after 12,000 hours of operation  

SciTech Connect

During its first three years of operation (July, 1982 through July, 1985), the 20 MW AFBC boiler has been involved in four major campaigns of testing. The fuel used during all of these tests has been Kentucky No. 9, an eastern subbituminous coal with a sulfur content of approximately 4.1%. Two different sulfur sorbents have been used: Reed limestone (from July, 1982 through May, 1984) and Fredonia limestone. The superficial gas velocity through the bed has been 2.4 m/s for more than 90% of the operating time; the velocities used in the tests have ranged from 1.2 to 3.0 m/sec. Results of periodic inspections and measurements of the various boiler components, along with the evaluation of coupon materials exposed in the boiler, are discussed.

Not Available

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arizona Public Service's Four Corners Station with APFBC Arizona Public Service's Four Corners Station with APFBC FBC Repower APFBC AES Greenidge APFBC Dan River FBC, APFBC Four Corners CHIPPS H.F. Lee Products Summary Sheldon Summary APFBC Sheldon GFBCC Sheldon APFBC L.V. Sutton Contents: Summary Existing Units Considered for Repowering Dresser-Rand Turbomachinery Considered Phased-Construction Approach Plant Layout Performance Environmental Characteristics Cost Click on picture to enlarge The host site for this repowering evaluation is the Arizona Public Service Company's Four Corners steam generating station, shown in the photo to the right. The Four Corners station is a mine-mouth, low-sulfur subbituminous coal-fired electric generating station located near Fruitland, New Mexico, about 15 miles southwest of Farmington, New Mexico.

398

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program. Finaltopical report, Bench Run 4 (227-95)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of bench-scale work, Bench Run PB-04, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept-Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. The Bench Run PB-04 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. Bench Run PB-04 had multiple goals. These included the evaluation of the effects of dispersed slurry catalyst system on the performance of direct liquefaction of a subbituminous Wyoming Black Thunder mine coal under extinction recycle (454{degrees}C+ recycle) condition; another goal was to investigate the effects of the combined processing of automobile shredder residue (auto-fluff) with coal and other organic waste materials. PB-04 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. The HTI`s newly modified P/Fe catalyst was very effective for direct liquefaction and coprocessing of Black Thunder mine subbituminous coal with Hondo resid and auto-fluff; during `coal-only` liquefaction mode, over 93% maf coal conversion was obtained with about 90% residuum conversion and as high as 67% light distillate (C{sub 4}-975 F) yield, while during `coprocessing` mode of operation, distillate yields varied between 58 and 69%; the residuum conversions varied between 74 and 89% maf. Overall, it is concluded, based upon the yield data available from PB-04, that auto-effective as MSW plastics in improving coal hydroconversion process performance. Auto-fluff did not increase light distillate yields nor decrease light gas make and chemical hydrogen consumption in coal liquefaction, as was observed to occur with MSW plastics.

Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Development of fireside performance indices - task 8. Topical report, March 1996  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of the Fireside Performance Indices (FPI) research project at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) was to develop a series of indices to reliably predict the fireside performance of subbituminous coals in utility boilers. Individual utilities must respond quickly and effectively to changing fuel markets because of competition within the U.S. coal-fired power industry. Spot-market purchases of coal have become commonplace. The economics associated with sulfur emissions control have caused many utilities to use Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coals. The PRB coals usually provide a lower-cost, medium-heating-value, low-sulfur fuel option. Although these coals possess similar overall or bulk compositional properties, their fireside performance characteristics vary considerably within a given boiler. Consequently, bulk compositional parameters and, hence, conventional indices such as the base-to-acid ratio, stagging factor, and fouling factor are inappropriate for predicting the fireside performance of PRB coals. The development of the computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) and chemical fractionation methods, however, has enabled a more thorough characterization of the inorganic constituents of PRB, coals that contribute to the following adverse operational effects: stagging, fouling, opacity, erosion and poor grindability, slag tapping, and sootblower performance. Eight predictive indices have been developed based primarily on CCSEM and chemical fractionation analysis parameters to predict the propensity of a given coal or coal blend to cause operational problems. The indices were formulated using bench-, pilot-, and full-scale combustion testing data from previous research projects combined with bench-scale data from this project to identify the primary coal inorganic properties that cause ash-related problems in utility boilers.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Economic evaluation of losses to electric power utilities caused by ash fouling. Final technical report, November 1, 1979-April 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Problems with convection ash fouling and wall slagging were considerable during our study. The Dakota lignites posed the greatest problems, particularly with fouling. The subbituminous coals had considerable problems, related mostly with wall slagging. The Texas lignites had few problems, and those were only associated with wall slagging. The generation losses were as follows: The Dakota lignite burning stations averaged an overall availability of 87.13%. Convection fouling outages were responsible for 57.75% of this outage time for a decrease in availability of 7.43%. Fouling was responsible for curtailment losses of 317,649 Mwh or 8.25% of the remaining available generation. Slagging was responsible for losses of 2732 megawatt hours or .07% of the remaining available generation. Total ash related losses amounted to 16.08% of the total available generation. The subbituminous burning stations averaged an overall availability of 78.36%. Total ash related losses amounted to 1.54% of the total available generation. The Texas lignite burning stations averaged an overall availability of 80.63%. No ash related outage losses occurred. Slagging curtailments accounted 0.08% of the total available generation. Costs due to ash fouling and slagging related curtailments are a tremendous sum. Seven power stations were studied for a six month period to assess costs. The total cost directly attributable to ash slagging and fouling condition was $20,638,113. Recommendations for reducing the problems involve soot blowers, control of furnace gas exit temperature, water blowers and more conservative boiler design.

Burkhardt, F.R.; Persnger, M.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of work conducted under the DOE Proof-of-Concept Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, from February 1994 through April 1995. The work includes modifications to HRI`s existing 3 ton per day Process Development Unit (PDU) and completion of the second PDU run (POC Run 2) under the Program. The 45-day POC Run 2 demonstrated scale up of the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL Process) for a subbituminous Wyoming Black Thunder Mine coal to produce distillate liquid products at a rate of up to 4 barrels per ton of moisture-ash-free coal. The combined processing of organic hydrocarbon wastes, such as waste plastics and used tire rubber, with coal was also successfully demonstrated during the last nine days of operations of Run POC-02. Prior to the first PDU run (POC-01) in this program, a major effort was made to modify the PDU to improve reliability and to provide the flexibility to operate in several alternative modes. The Kerr McGee Rose-SR{sup SM} unit from Wilsonville, Alabama, was redesigned and installed next to the U.S. Filter installation to allow a comparison of the two solids removal systems. The 45-day CTSL Wyoming Black Thunder Mine coal demonstration run achieved several milestones in the effort to further reduce the cost of liquid fuels from coal. The primary objective of PDU Run POC-02 was to scale-up the CTSL extinction recycle process for subbituminous coal to produce a total distillate product using an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Of major concern was whether calcium-carbon deposits would occur in the system as has happened in other low rank coal conversion processes. An additional objective of major importance was to study the co-liquefaction of plastics with coal and waste tire rubber with coal.

Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Process and analytical studies of enhanced low severity co-processing using selective coal pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the project are to investigate various coal pretreatment techniques and to determine the effect of these pretreatment procedures on the reactivity of the coal. Reactivity enhancement will be evaluated under both direct hydroliquefaction and co-processing conditions. Coal conversion utilizing low rank coals and low severity conditions (reaction temperatures generally less than 350{degrees}C) are the primary focus of the liquefaction experiments, as it is expected that the effect of pretreatment conditions and the attendant reactivity enhancement will be greatest for these coals and at these conditions. This document presents a comprehensive report summarizing the findings on the effect of mild alkylation pretreatment on coal reactivity under both direct hydroliquefaction and liquefaction co-processing conditions. Results of experiments using a dispersed catalyst system (chlorine) are also presented for purposes of comparison. IN general, mild alkylation has been found to be an effective pretreatment method for altering the reactivity of coal. Selective (oxygen) methylation was found to be more effective for high oxygen (subbituminous) coals compared to coals of higher rank. This reactivity enhancement was evidenced under both low and high severity liquefaction conditions, and for both direct hydroliquefaction and liquefaction co-processing reaction environments. Non-selective alkylation (methylation) was also effective, although the enhancement was less pronounced than found for coal activated by O-alkylation. The degree of reactivity enhancement was found to vary with both liquefaction and/or co-processing conditions and coal type, with the greatest positive effect found for subbituminous coal which had been selectively O-methylated and subsequently liquefied at low severity reaction conditions. 5 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

Baldwin, R.M.; Miller, R.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Process and analytical studies of enhanced low severity co-processing using selective coal pretreatment. Quarterly technical progress report, March--May 1990  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the project are to investigate various coal pretreatment techniques and to determine the effect of these pretreatment procedures on the reactivity of the coal. Reactivity enhancement will be evaluated under both direct hydroliquefaction and co-processing conditions. Coal conversion utilizing low rank coals and low severity conditions (reaction temperatures generally less than 350{degrees}C) are the primary focus of the liquefaction experiments, as it is expected that the effect of pretreatment conditions and the attendant reactivity enhancement will be greatest for these coals and at these conditions. This document presents a comprehensive report summarizing the findings on the effect of mild alkylation pretreatment on coal reactivity under both direct hydroliquefaction and liquefaction co-processing conditions. Results of experiments using a dispersed catalyst system (chlorine) are also presented for purposes of comparison. IN general, mild alkylation has been found to be an effective pretreatment method for altering the reactivity of coal. Selective (oxygen) methylation was found to be more effective for high oxygen (subbituminous) coals compared to coals of higher rank. This reactivity enhancement was evidenced under both low and high severity liquefaction conditions, and for both direct hydroliquefaction and liquefaction co-processing reaction environments. Non-selective alkylation (methylation) was also effective, although the enhancement was less pronounced than found for coal activated by O-alkylation. The degree of reactivity enhancement was found to vary with both liquefaction and/or co-processing conditions and coal type, with the greatest positive effect found for subbituminous coal which had been selectively O-methylated and subsequently liquefied at low severity reaction conditions. 5 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

Baldwin, R.M.; Miller, R.L.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Advanced direct coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, September-November 1983  

SciTech Connect

Wyoming subbituminous coal was liquefied using three different two-stage process configurations in bench-scale tests. These process configurations differed in the type of fractionated deashing resid being recycled to the individual stages. The objective of these runs was to determine whether, by recycle of specific resid streams to the thermal stage, the second stage catalyst life could be improved without detrimentally affecting distillate yield or hydrogen consumption. The results indicate that the two-stage process configuration consisting of hydrotreating the Light Deashed Resid and direct recycle of heavy Deashed Resid to the thermal stage produced the best results. This process configuration resulted in a distillate yield of 54 wt % (MAF coal basis) and overall coal conversion in the 93 to 95% range, as measured by pyridine-soluble analytical test while operating in a total distillate mode. These results are very encouraging from the lower rank Wyoming subbituminous coal. Among the three two-stage process configurations tested, the particular process configuration of hydrotreating Light Deashed Resid resulted in the least amount of catalyst deactivation. As a part of this research effort, a test procedure for quick evaluation of various resids and catalysts in terms of coke precursors was also developed. This procedure utilizing as-produced oxide-form extrudates of catalyst is able to simulate closely in a batch reactor test the performance of a presulfided and extrudate form of catalyst in a continuous reactor. The CSD unit, being able to not only deash but also fractionate the resid, greatly increased the flexibility of options for coal liquefaction. New process concepts evolved incorporating reside fractionation and selective resid recycle in coal liquefaction. 17 figures, 28 tables.

Paranjape, A.S.

1984-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

405

Advanced direct coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, December 1983-February 1984  

SciTech Connect

Five Bench-Scale coal liquefaction runs were completed with Wyoming subbituminous coal in a two-stage process scheme. In this process scheme, LDAR, the lighter fraction of ash-free resid, was fed to the catalytic stage prior to its recycle to the thermal stage, whereas DAR, the heavy fraction of the deashed resid, was directly recycled to the thermal stage without any intermediate processing step. The results indicate that increasing coal space rate in the dissolver resulted in lower coal conversion and reduced distillate yield in this process configuration. The coal conversions decreased from 92 wt% to 89 wt% (MAF coal) and the distillate yield was reduced from 50 wt% to less than 40 wt% (MAF coal), as the coal space velocity increased. Attempts to duplicate the yields of Run 32, at comparable process conditions in Runs 37 and 38, were unsuccessful. Several process parameters were investigated but failed to show why the yields of Run 32 could not be duplicated. Valuable process related information was gained as a result of process parameter studies completed during these runs. At comparable process conditions, coal conversions were lower by about 3 to 4 relative percent and were only in the 87 wt% (MAF coal) range. Similarly, the distillate yield was about 40 wt% (MAF coal) which is about 10 wt% lower than observed in Run 32. Although no exact cause for these results could be determined, it appeared that the H/C atomic ratio of the solvent and possibly the flow pattern (plug-flow versus back-mixed) could have affected the coal conversion and quantity of distillate product produced. A significant decrease in coal conversion of 4 to 5 wt% was observed when the disposable catalyst (iron oxide) was removed from the reaction mixture and therefore substantiates the need for a disposable catalyst in the liquefaction of Wyoming subbituminous coal.

Paranjape, A.S.

1984-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rocks Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions  

SciTech Connect

The USA is embarking upon tackling the serious environmental challenges posed to the world by greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). The dimension of the problem is daunting. In fact, according to the Energy Information Agency, nearly 6 billion metric tons of CO2 were produced in the USA in 2007 with coal-burning power plants contributing about 2 billion metric tons. To mitigate the concerns associated with CO2 emission, geological sequestration holds promise. Among the potential geological storage sites, unmineable coal seams and shale formations in particular show promise because of the probability of methane recovery while sequestering the CO2. However. the success of large-scale sequestration of CO2 in coal and shale would hinge on a thorough understanding of CO2's interactions with host reservoirs. An important parameter for successful storage of CO2 reservoirs would be whether the pressurized CO2 would remain invariant in coal and shale formations under reasonable internal and/or external perturbations. Recent research has brought to the fore the potential of induced seismicity, which may result in caprock compromise. Therefore, to evaluate the potential risks involved in sequestering CO2 in Illinois bituminous coal seams and shale, we studied: (i) the mechanical behavior of Murphysboro (Illinois) and Houchin Creek (Illinois) coals, (ii) thermodynamic behavior of Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ? T ? 300oC, (iii) how high pressure CO2 (up to 20.7 MPa) modifies the viscosity of the host, (iv) the rate of emission of CO2 from Illinois bituminous coal and shale cores if the cores, which were pressurized with high pressure (? 20.7 MPa) CO2, were exposed to an atmospheric pressure, simulating the development of leakage pathways, (v) whether there are any fractions of CO2 stored in these hosts which are resistance to emission by simply exposing the cores to atmospheric pressure, and (vi) how compressive shockwaves applied to the coal and shale cores, which were pressurized with high pressure CO2, determine the fate of sequestered CO2 in these cores. Our results suggested that Illinois bituminous coal in its unperturbed state, i.e., when not pressurized with CO2, showed large variations in the mechanical properties. Modulus varied from 0.7 GPa to 3.4 GPa even though samples were extracted from a single large chunk of coal. We did not observe any glass transition for Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ? T ? 300oC, however, when the coal was pressurized with CO2 at ambient ? P ? 20.7 MPa, the viscosity of the coal decreased and inversely scaled with the CO2 pressure. The decrease in viscosity as a function of pressure could pose CO2 injection problems for coal as lower viscosity would allow the solid coal to flow to plug the fractures, fissures, and cleats. Our experiments also showed a very small fraction of CO2 was absorbed in coal; and when CO2 pressurized coals were exposed to atmospheric conditions, the loss of CO2 from coals was massive. Half of the sequestered gas from the coal cores was lost in less than 20 minutes. Our shockwave experiments on Illinois bituminous coal, New Albany shale (Illinois), Devonian shale (Ohio), and Utica shale (Ohio) presented clear evidence that the significant emission of the sequestered CO2 from these formations cannot be discounted during seismic activity, especially if caprock is compromised. It is argued that additional shockwave studies, both compressive and transverse, would be required for successfully mapping the risks associated with sequestering high pressure CO2 in coal and shale formations.

Malhotra, Vivak

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

Radioactive waste treatment technologies and environment  

SciTech Connect

The radioactive waste treatment and conditioning are the most important steps in radioactive waste management. At the Slovak Electric, plc, a range of technologies are used for the processing of radioactive waste into a form suitable for disposal in near surface repository. These technologies operated by JAVYS, PLc. Nuclear and Decommissioning Company, PLc. Jaslovske Bohunice are described. Main accent is given to the Bohunice Radwaste Treatment and Conditioning Centre, Bituminization plant, Vitrification plant, and Near surface repository of radioactive waste in Mochovce and their operation. Conclusions to safe and effective management of radioactive waste in the Slovak Republic are presented. (authors)

HORVATH, Jan; KRASNY, Dusan [JAVYS, PLc. - Nuclear and Decommisioning Company, PLc. (Slovakia)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Look taken at coal mining costs and trends for the 1980s  

SciTech Connect

The author examines the trends in US bituminous coal production and consumption over the past 40 years, and then looks at the growth rates than can be expected for the rest of the 1980s. Increases are likely to be substantial in absolute terms, although nominal when expressed as a percentage. Surface minable reserves in the eastern US are rapidly being depleted, so that underground mining will gain in importance in these regions. A significant contribution to supplying increased domestic coal consumption will eventually come from new longwall mines in the Illinois Basin and northern Appalachia.

Weir, J.P.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere is described. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis. 4 figs., 8 tabs.

Rashid Khan, M.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

410

Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis.

Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Assessment of solid-waste characteristics and control technology for oil-shale retorting. Final report for September 1983-February 1985  

SciTech Connect

The report presents information on oil-shale deposits in the eastern and western parts of the United States, their geological subdivisions, locations, tonnage, and physical and chemical characteristics. Characteristics of solid and liquid wastes produced from various oil-shale-processing technologies and control methods are presented. Also included are results from an experimental study to construct liners and covers for disposal of spent shale. A compilation of available data on the auto-ignition potential of raw and spent shales indicates a similarity between raw-shale fines and bituminous coals.

Agarwal, A.K.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Emissions mitigation of blended coals through systems optimization  

SciTech Connect

For coal fired power stations, such as those located in the US, that have installed NOx and SOx emissions abatement equipment substantial carbon dioxide reduction could be achieved by shifting from pure PRB coal to blended coals with local bituminous coal. Don Labbe explains how. The article is based on a presentation at Power-Gen Asia 2009, which takes place 7-9 October in Bangkok, Thailand and an ISA POWID 2009 paper (19th Annual Joint ISA POWID/EPRI Controlls and Instrumentation Conference, Chicago, Illinois, May 2009). 4 refs., 3 figs.

Don Labbe [IOM Invensys Operations Management (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Investigate the effectivness of calcium-treated coals in the capture of sulfur gases generated in staged fired combustors. Third quarterly technical progress report, May 1-July 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect

In this quarter's work, a new procedure was developed to add calcium to pulverized coal. The method has been found to increase the calcium content of bituminous coal to 12% calcium by weight, which corresponds to a Ca/S ratio of greater than 2. Progress was also made on the combustion test facility this quarter. A new modification of the low-flow coal feeder has made that system steady and reliable. With the furnace wired and plumbed, and the other subsystems complete, the facility is almost ready to burn the treated coals.

Porter, J. H.; Manning, M. P.; Benedek, K. R.; Sharma, P. K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Co-gasification of Biomass with Coal and Oil Sand Coke in a Drop Tube Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From this work, a synergistic effect was observed for blends of coal with petcoke and an increase in the production of H2 and CO was obtained. ... Finally, blending biomass with coal?petcoke blends did not produce any significant change in H2 production, although slight variations were observed in the production of CO and CO2. ... In addn., co-gasification tests of binary blends of a bituminous coal with different types of biomass (up to 10%) and petroleum coke (up to 60%), as well as ternary blends of coal-petcoke-biomass (45-45-10%) were conducted to study the effect of blending on gas prodn. ...

Chen Gao; Farshid Vejahati; Hasan Katalambula; Rajender Gupta

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

415

Sulfur Behavior in the Sasol?Lurgi Fixed-Bed Dry-Bottom Gasification Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article reports on the findings of a study regarding the sulfur behavior across a Sasol?Lurgi gasifier. ... (2) This ash, referred to as “coarse ash”, is a combination of red and white to gray sintered clinkers with heterogeneous texture varying from fine material to large irregularly shaped aggregates of sizes ranging from 4 to 75 mm. ... South African coals that are used for the Sasol?Lurgi gasification process are normally low-grade medium rank C (bituminous) coal with a total sulfur content of approximately 1?2 wt %, on an as-received basis. ...

M. Pat Skhonde; R. Henry Matjie; J. Reginald Bunt; A. Christien Strydom; Herold Schobert

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

416

METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale combustion tests with caking bituminous coal has stopped. This stoppage has come about due to limitations in current funding available to continue large scale research and development activities at Riley's Commercial Burner Test Facility (CBTF) of the PC Preheat technology. The CBTF was secured and decommissioned in the previous quarter; work this quarter has focused on disposition of PC Preheat experimental equipment at the CBTF as well as methods for disposal of about 100 tons of residual PRB test coal in storage. GTI was granted a no-cost time extension through September 2005; a final report is due in December 2005.

Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fusibility and sintering characteristics of ash  

SciTech Connect

The temperature characteristics of ash fusibility are studied for a wide range of bituminous and brown coals, lignites, and shales with ratios R{sub B/A} of their alkaline and acid components between 0.03 and 4. Acritical value of R{sub B/A} is found at which the fusion temperatures are minimal. The sintering properties of the ashes are determined by measuring the force required to fracture a cylindrical sample. It is found that the strength of the samples increases sharply at certain temperatures. The alkali metal content of the ashes has a strong effect on their sintering characteristics.

Ots, A. A., E-mail: aots@sti.ttu.ee [Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Matrix endor studies of the carbonization of West Canadian coking coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cretaceous bituminous coals of known rank R?0 max vitrinite reflectance) have been examined by ESR (electron spin resonance) and ENDOR (electron nuclear double resonance) techniques. Both highly oxidised (outcrop) and unoxidised mine?run Balmer coal from the Crowsnest field have been subjected to heat treatment (200?900°C) and the matrix proton ENDOR signal studied as a function of applied microwave and rf power. Changes in ENDOR line shape and intensity are described with particular emphasis on the presoftening region of the unoxidised coal. A comparative study of the carbonization of hvb and 1vb coking coal from the Crowsnest is reported.

P. R. West; S. E. Cannon

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Delayed Coking of Decant Oil and Coal in a Laboratory-Scale Coking Unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fact that coke quality varies with the chemical composition of the precursor feedstock creates a significant incentive to examine the process of coking and how it relates to the composition of the feedstock. ... (7)?Derbyshire, F. J.; Odoerfer, G. A.; Rudnick, L. R.; Varghese, P.; Whitehurst, D. D. Fundamental studies in the conversion of coals to fuels of increased hydrogen content. ... Bituminous coal/petroleum co-cokes were produced by coking 4:1 blends of vacuum resid (VR)/coal and decant oil (DO)/coal at temperatures of 465 and 500 °C for reaction times of 12 and 18 h, under autogenous pressure in microautoclave reactors. ...

Ömer Gül; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Role of Semifusinite in Plasticity Development for a Coking Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal rank is a factor of great importance in plasticity development during carbonization, since only some bituminous coals swell in a satisfactory manner and then resolidify to produce good commercial cokes. ... Diessel studied the carbonization behavior of the inertinite macerals in Australian coals by carrying out tests up to 1000 °C where the optical characteristics of the coked entities were correlated with their noncoked counterparts. ... For instance, large-scale coking experiments of some Australian coals containing more than 45% inertinite produced good quality coke, while a Carboniferous coal with that high of an inertinite content gave only a very poor coke. ...

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Darrell N. Taulbee; John M. Andrésen; James C. Hower; Colin E. Snape

1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anthracite bituminous subbituminous" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Dust Explosion Characteristics of Coal Dust in an Oxygen Enriched Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability to mix pulverised coal with oxygen at concentrations greater than the currently applied 21% may well provide advantages for burner design in oxy/coal fired systems. However the risk of dust explosions increases significantly with increasing oxygen concentration and temperature. In this study the influence of enriched oxygen concentrations is researched on the dust explosion characteristics of Indonesian (Sebuku) high volatile bituminous coal dust and on Pittsburgh Coal n¡8. Both ignition sensitivity characteristics (minimum ignition energy and minimum ignition temperatures) and explosion severity characteristics (maximum explosion pressure, Pmax, and maximum rate of pressure rise, Kst) are investigated.

Frederik Norman; Jan Berghmans; Filip Verplaetsen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for U.S. Coal by Origin and Destination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In-ground coal quality data, including C, S, ash, fixed carbon, and heating values, are from COALQUAL (11), IGS (12), and Keystone (13, 14). ... For example, examination of 2082 bituminous Kentucky coals led Sakulpitakphon et al. (28) to reject the notion that a single CO2 emission factor can “be used as typical for any given rank of coal.” ... Quick, J. C.; Tabet, D. E.; Wakefield, S.; Bon, R. L. Optimizing Technology to Reduce Mercury and Acid Gas Emissions from Electric Power Plants: A GIS Study of Coal Chemistry, ...

Jeffrey C. Quick

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

423

System studies guiding fossil energy RD & D  

SciTech Connect

The article describes the following recently completed studies, all of which may be accessed on NETL's website: http://netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/ref-shelf.html: Cost and performance baseline for fossil energy power plants - volume 1: bituminous coal and natural gas to electricity (May 2007); Increasing security and reducing carbon emissions of the US transportation sector: a transformational role for coal with biomass (August 2007); Industrial size gasification for syngas, substitute natural gas, and power production (April 2007); and Carbon dioxide capture from existing coal-fired power plants (December 2006). 2 figs.

NONE

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

Ash Research from Palm Coast, Florida to Banff, Canada: Entry of Biomass in Modern Power Boilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Six laboratories participated, and each performed five analyses, on three bituminous coal samples, focusing on their content of calcite, kaolinite, pyrite, and quartz. ... CCSEM of these ashes revealed that the fly ashes and deposits contained high quantities of salts, especially KCl, and varying quantities of K- and Ca-silicates, whereas the bottom ashes consisted of a mixture of quartz, K-, Ca-, and Al-silicates. ... Wang and Baxter(134) presented a work that systematically investigated the performance of biomass fly ash concrete, including mixtures of biomass fly ash and calcium hydroxide, with respect to strength, kinetics, and durability. ...

Flemming J. Frandsen

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

425

Petrographic characterization of economizer fly ash  

SciTech Connect

Policies for reducing NOx emissions have led power plants to restrict O{sub 2}, resulting in high-carbon fly ash production. Therefore, some potentially useful fly ash, such as the economizer fly ash, is discarded without a thorough knowledge of its composition. In order to characterize this type of fly ash, samples were collected from the economizer Portuguese power plant burning two low-sulfur bituminous coals. Characterization was also performed on economizer fly ash subsamples after wet sieving, density and magnetic separation. Analysis included atomic absorption spectroscopy, loss-on-ignition, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Soares, S.; Guedes, A.; Garcia, C.; Flores, D.; Oliveira, A. [University of Porto, Oporto (Portugal). Center of Geology

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Prep plant population rebounds  

SciTech Connect

Demand and higher prices allows more operators to build and upgrade plants. The 2005 US Prep Plant Census found that the number of coal preparation plants has grown from 212 to 265 in five years - a 53 plant gain or a 20% increase over that reported by Coal Age in 2000. The number of bituminous coal washing facilities grew by 43 to 250. The article discusses the survey and the companies involved and presents a table giving key details of plants arranged by state. 6 tabs.

Fiscor, S.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fundamental studies of the mechanisms of slag deposit formation: Studies on initiation, growth and sintering in the formation of utility boiler deposits: Topical technical report  

SciTech Connect

Three laboratory-scale devices were utilized to investigate the mechanisms of the initiation, growth and sintering process involved in the formation of boiler deposits. Sticking apparatus investigations were conducted to study deposit initiation by comparing the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on four types of steel-based heat exchanger materials under the conditions found in a utility boiler and an entrained slagging gasifier. In addition, the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on a reduced steel surface were investigated. All the ash drops studied in this investigation were produced from bituminous coals.

Tangsathitkulchai, M.; Austin, L.G.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Circulating fluidised-bed combustion  

SciTech Connect

Steam generators with circulating fluidized-bed combustion systems (CFBC) are characterized by a high degree of environmental comparability and a wide acceptance for FBC boiler plants involving a wide fuel spectrum which ranges from dried brown coal to high-ash coal and low-volatile bituminous coal as well as wood waste and bark. These plants incorporate a variety of CFBC systems. The choice in favor of different system options was not motivated by the inherent fuel properties but has evolved from the progressive advancement in power station FBC technology. The article elucidates several FBC system variants.

Rettemeier, W.; von der Kammer, G. (Steinmueller (L.u.C.) GmbH, Gummersbach (Germany, F.R.))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Influence of External Clay and Inherent Minerals on Lignite Optical Ignition and Volatile Flame Propagation in Air-Firing and Oxy-Firing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coal sample selected is a lignite sample collected from Xinjiang Autonomous Area, the data for which are practically nonexistent because of the low exploration degree, even though such coal contributes approximately 40% of the overall Chinese coal reserves. ... For the devolatilization rate in Table 3 and Figure 2a, the raw lignite has a devolatilisation rate that was lower than those of air-dried and ammonium acetate-washed Victorian brown coal but certainly higher than those of raw Montana lignites, other Chinese lignites, and bituminous coals examined in the literature. ...

Wirhan Prationo; Jian Zhang; Hawra Ali Abdul Abbas; Xiaojiang Wu; Xiaodong Chen; Lian Zhang

2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

430

Petrology of the Devonian gas-bearing shale along Lake Erie helps explain gas shows  

SciTech Connect

Comprehensive petrologic study of 136 thin sections of the Ohio Shale along Lake Erie, when combined with detailed stratigraphic study, helps explain the occurrence of its gas shows, most of which occur in the silty, greenish-gray, organic poor Chagrin Shale and Three Lick Bed. Both have thicker siltstone laminae and more siltstone beds than other members of the Ohio Shale and both units also contain more clayshales. The source of the gas in the Chagrin Shale and Three Lick Bed of the Ohio Shale is believed to be the bituminous-rich shales of the middle and lower parts of the underlying Huron Member of the Ohio Shale. Eleven petrographic types were recognized and extended descriptions are provided of the major ones - claystones, clayshales, mudshales, and bituminous shales plus laminated and unlaminated siltstones and very minor marlstones and sandstones. In addition three major types of lamination were identified and studied. Thirty-two shale samples were analyzed for organic carbon, whole rock hydrogen and whole rock nitrogen with a Perkin-Elmer 240 Elemental Analyzer and provided the data base for source rock evaluation of the Ohio Shale.

Broadhead, R.F.; Potter, P.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Interlaboratory comparisons of petrography of liquefaction residues from three Argonne premium coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three Argonne Premium coal samples, the Beulah-Zap lignite (North Dakota), the high volatile A bituminous Stockton (West Virginia), and the low volatile Pocahontas No. 3 Virginia), were ground to three initial sizes: ?20 mesh, ?100 mesh, and “micronized”. The samples were each subjected to liquefaction at 673 K for 30 min at a 2:1 tetralin: coal ratio and in an H2 atmosphere at 13.79 \\{MPa\\} (?2000 psi). Polished pellets of the uncoverted residues were circulated to three laboratories for a study designed to determine, albeit on a limited scale, the interlaboratory consistency in constituent identification and the problem areas in maceral/neo-maceral/mineral recognition. Within broad categories, the agreement for the Beulah-Zap and Pocahontas No. 3 residues is good. The high volatile A bituminous Stockton coal was the most plastic and most altered, resulting in a residue lending itself to more subjective interpretations. The biggest discrepancy between the laboratories is in the distinction of granular residue and mineral matter and in the transitions between “partially reacted macerals” and “vitroplast” and between “vitroplast” and “granular residue”. The initial size of the feed coal appears to influence the recognition of material in the residue.

James C. Hower; Ken B. Anderson; Glenda Mackay; Henrique Pinheiro; Deolinda Flores; Manuel J. Lemos de Sousa

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Adequacy of low-sulfur coal supplies for meeting acid rain requirements  

SciTech Connect

As we have shown, acid rain legislation would create a large demand for low-sulfur bituminous coals. These coals are primarily found in Central Appalachia and in parts of the West, and would displace much of the highersulfur coal production now coming from the Midwest and Northern Appalachia. The magnitude of the related shifts in coal production are potentially huge. Previously, it has been assumed that these shifts in demands could be met by the industry. This paper has tried to highlight possible difficulties in actually meeting such demands. In the near-term, these difficulties concern the ability of the industry to develop mines and of the transportation industry to ship the coal. In the longer-term, questions can be raised regarding the amount, the quality, and the mineability of low-sulfur bituminous coal reserves. These potential difficulties in coal supply could affect attainment of the legislative goals. If not addressed and resolved in a timely fashion, the results could be a higher cost to meeting legislative goals and/or a longer time required to meet them.

Klein, D.E.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Coal rank trends in western Kentucky coal field and relationship to hydrocarbon occurrence  

SciTech Connect

Extensive oil and gas development has occurred in the high volatile C bituminous region north of the Rough Creek fault zone, but few pools are known within the Webster syncline south of the fault zone. The rank of the Middle Pennsylvanian coals can be used to estimate the level of maturation of the Devonian New Albany Shale, a likely source rock for much of the oil and gas in the coal field. Based on relatively few data points, previous studies on the maturation of the New Albany Shale, which lies about 1 km below the Springfield coal, indicate an equivalent medium volatile bituminous (1.0-1.2% R{sub max}) rank in the Fluorspar district. New Albany rank decreases to an equivalent high volatile B/C (0.6% R{sub max}) north of the Rough Creek fault zone. Whereas the shale in the latter region is situated within the oil generation window, the higher rank region is past the peak of the level of maturation of the New Albany Shale. The significance of the New Albany reflectancy is dependent on the suppression of vitrinite reflectance in organic-rich shales. The possibility of reflectance suppression would imply that the shales could be more mature than studies have indicated.

Hower, J.C.; Rimmer, S.M.; Williams, D.A.; Beard, J.G. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Characterization of fly ashes from circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) boilers cofiring coal and petroleum coke  

SciTech Connect

The chemistry, mineralogy, morphology, and particle size distribution were investigated in fly ashes from the burning of Datong (ShanXi, China) bituminous coal and the cofiring of Mideast high-sulfur petroleum coke (PC) with 30:70 (cal %) and 50:50 (cal %) blends of Datong bituminous coal in two commercial CFBC boilers. With the exception of CaO, the amounts of major oxides in the fly ashes from cofiring PC and coal were close to those of the common coal fly ashes. The PC-coal fly ashes were enriched in Ni, V, and Mo, implying these trace elements were mainly derived from PC. Ni and V, along with several other elements, such as Cr, Cu, Se, Pb, U, Th, and possibly As and Cd, increased in content with a decrease in temperature of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The results of chemistry, mineralogy, and morphology studies suggested that the desulfurization rate of the CFBC boilers at current conditions was low, and the PC tends to coarsen the fly ash particles and increase the loss on ignition (LOI) values, making these fly ashes unsuitable for use as a cement additive or a mineral admixture in concrete. Further studies on the combustion status of the CFBC boilers are needed if we want to be able to increase the desulfurization rate and produce high-quality fly ashes for broader and full utilization. 22 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Feihu Li; Jianping Zhai; Xiaoru Fu; Guanghong Sheng [Nanjing University, Nanjing (China). State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, School of the Environment

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Forward and reverse combustion gasification of coal with production of high-quality syngas in a simulated pilot system for in situ gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This research focused on the feasibility and stability of applying the forward and reverse combustion approach to the in situ gasification of lignite and bituminous coal with oxygen or oxygen–steam mixtures as gasification agents, especially reverse combustion gasification. A high-quality syngas (H2 and CO) could be obtained using the reverse combustion gasification technique combined with forward combustion gasification in a pilot system for in situ gasification. The gasification time was extended more than 25% using the reverse combustion approach. The controlling conditions for reverse combustion gasification were obtained by comparing and analyzing experimental data. The results show the relationship between the inject gas flow within certain limits and velocity of the gasification flame was linear during reverse combustion. The underground conditions of the coal seam and strata were simulated in a pilot-scale underground gasifier during experiments. The combustion gasification of coal was carried out experimentally for over 5 days. The average effective content (H2 and CO) of syngas was in the range of 60–70%, meeting the requirement of synthesis gas. The optimal ranges of gasifying lignite and bituminous coal were found to be 1.5–2.0 and 1.3–1.75, respectively. The product gas flow was proportional to oxygen blast. These are expected to provide useful guidance on practical underground coal gasification operations and to give experimental evidence in support of theory.

Yong Cui; Jie Liang; Zhangqing Wang; Xiaochun Zhang; Chenzi Fan; Dongyu Liang; Xuan Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Mineral resources of the Desolation Canyon, Turtle Canyon, and Floy Canyon Wilderness Study Areas, Carbon Emery, and Grand counties, Utah  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the Desolation Canyon, Turtle Canyon, and Floy Canyon Wilderness Study Areas which include 242,000 acres, 33,690 acres, and 23,140 acres. Coal deposits underlie all three study areas. Coal zones in the Blackhawk and Nelsen formations have identified bituminous coal resources of 22 million short tons in the Desolation Canyon Study Area, 6.3 million short tons in the Turtle Canyon Study Area, and 45 million short tons in the Floy Canyon Study Area. In-place inferred oil shale resources are estimated to contain 60 million barrels in the northern part of the Desolation Canyon area. Minor occurrences of uranium have been found in the southeastern part of the Desolation Canyon area and in the western part of the Floy Canyon area. Mineral resource potential for the study areas is estimated to be for coal, high for all areas, for oil and gas, high for the northern tract of the Desolation Canyon area and moderate for all other tracts, for bituminous sandstone, high for the northern part of the Desolation Canyon area, and low for all other tracts, for oil shale, low in all areas, for uranium, moderate for the Floy Canyon area and the southeastern part of the Desolation Canyon area and low for the remainder of the areas, for metals other than uranium, bentonite, zeolites, and geothermal energy, low in all areas, and for coal-bed methane unknown in all three areas.

Cashion, W.B.; Kilburn, J.E.; Barton, H.N.; Kelley, K.D.; Kulik, D.M. (US Geological Survey (US)); McDonnell, J.R. (Bureau of Mines (US))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal were completed in 2005 and 2006 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 5 full-scale additive tests, conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1. Both additives were tested there.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Coal Mining Productivity 7 Coal Mining Productivity Total, 1949-2011 By Mining Method, 2011 By Location, 2011 By Mining Method, 1 1949-2011 By Region and Mining Method, 2011 210 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Mississippi 1 For 1979 forward, includes all coal; prior to 1979, excludes anthracite. Note: Beginning in 2001, surface mining includes a small amount of refuse recovery. Source: Table 7.7. 2.68 15.98 East of the West of the 0 5 10 15 20 Short Tons per Employee Hour 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 2 4 6 8 Short Tons per Employee Hour Mississippi 2.76 8.86 Underground Surface 0 3 6 9 12 Short Tons per Employee Hour 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 3 6 9 12 Short Tons per Employee Hour 2.52 3.03 5.54 19.34 Underground Surface Underground Surface 0 6 12 18 24 Short Tons

440

Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Coal NAICS TOTAL Acetylene Breeze Total Anthracite Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (cu ft) (short tons) (short tons) (short tons) Total United States 311 Food 9.12 0.26 0.00 53.43 90.85 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6.30 0.29 0.00 51.34 50.47 311221 Wet Corn Milling 4.87 0.48 0.00 47.74 50.47 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 5.02 0.31 0.00 53.34 236.66 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 9.78 0.27 0.00 90.59 0.00 3115 Dairy Products 11.21 0.10 0.00 103.12 0.00 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

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441

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 3. Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Continuous 2 Conventional and Other 3 Longwall 4 Total Alabama 139 20 12,410 12,570 Arkansas 96 - - 96 Colorado 757 - 22,889 23,646 Illinois 18,969 - 23,868 42,837 Indiana 15,565 - - 15,565 Kentucky Total 56,179 2,018 - 58,198 Kentucky (East) 22,090 2,010 - 24,100 Kentucky (West) 34,089 9 - 34,098 Maryland 797 - - 797 Montana - - 5,708 5,708 New Mexico - - 4,960 4,960 Ohio 3,903 7 14,214 18,125 Oklahoma 349 - - 349 Pennsylvania Total 11,367 52 33,623 45,041 Pennsylvania (Anthracite)

442

Low-Btu coal gasification in the United States: company topical. [Brick producers  

SciTech Connect

Hazelton and other brick producers have proved the reliability of the commercial size Wellman-Galusha gasifier. For this energy intensive business, gas cost is the major portion of the product cost. Costs required Webster/Hazelton to go back to the old, reliable alternative energy of low Btu gasification when the natural gas supply started to be curtailed and prices escalated. Although anthracite coal prices have skyrocketed from $34/ton (1979) to over $71.50/ton (1981) because of high demand (local as well as export) and rising labor costs, the delivered natural gas cost, which reached $3.90 to 4.20/million Btu in the Hazelton area during 1981, has allowed the producer gas from the gasifier at Webster Brick to remain competitive. The low Btu gas cost (at the escalated coal price) is estimated to be $4/million Btu. In addition to producing gas that is cost competitive with natural gas at the Webster Brick Hazelton plant, Webster has the security of knowing that its gas supply will be constant. Improvements in brick business and projected deregulation of the natural gas price may yield additional, attractive cost benefits to Webster Brick through the use of low Btu gas from these gasifiers. Also, use of hot raw gas (that requires no tar or sulfur removal) keeps the overall process efficiency high. 25 references, 47 figures, 14 tables.

Boesch, L.P.; Hylton, B.G.; Bhatt, C.S.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications  

SciTech Connect

CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Opportunities for coal to methanol conversion  

SciTech Connect

The accumulations of mining residues in the anthracite coal regions of Pennsylvania offer a unique opportunity to convert the coal content into methanol that could be utilized in that area as an alternative to gasoline or to extend the supplies through blending. Additional demand may develop through the requirements of public utility gas turbines located in that region. The cost to run this refuse through coal preparation plants may result in a clean coal at about $17.00 per ton. After gasification and synthesis in a 5000 ton per day facility, a cost of methanol of approximately $3.84 per million Btu is obtained using utility financing. If the coal is to be brought in by truck or rail from a distance of approximately 60 miles, the cost of methanol would range between $4.64 and $5.50 per million Btu depending upon the mode of transportation. The distribution costs to move the methanol from the synthesis plant to the pump could add, at a minimum, $2.36 per million Btu to the cost. In total, the delivered cost at the pump for methanol produced from coal mining wastes could range between $6.20 and $7.86 per million Btu.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Far- and mid-infrared spectroscopy of complex organic matter of astrochemical interest: coal, heavy petroleum fractions, and asphaltenes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coexistence of a large variety of molecular species (i.e., aromatic, cycloaliphatic and aliphatic) in several astrophysical environments suggests that unidentified IR emission (UIE) occurs from small solid particles containing a mix of aromatic and aliphatic structures (e.g., coal, petroleum, etc.), renewing the astronomical interest on this type of materials. A series of heavy petroleum fractions namely DAE, RAE, BQ-1, and asphaltenes derived from BQ-1 were used together with anthracite coal and bitumen as model compounds in matching the band pattern of the emission features of proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe). All the model materials were examined in the mid-infrared (2.5-16.7 um) and for the first time in the far-infrared (16.7-200 um), and the IR bands were compared with the UIE from PPNe. The best match of the PPNe band pattern is offered by the BQ-1 heavy aromatic oil fraction and by its asphaltenes fraction. Particularly interesting is the ability of BQ-1 to match the band pattern of the aromatic-ali...

Cataldo, F; Manchado, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Technical support to the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) demonstration projects: assessment of current research and development  

SciTech Connect

A program to demonstrate Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) technology has been initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in partnership with two industrial groups. Project management responsibility has been assigned to the Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) of DOE. ORO requested that the Oak Ridge National Laboratory assess current research and development (R and D) activities and develop recommendations for those activities that might contribute to successful completion of the SRC demonstration plant projects. The objectives of this final report are to discuss in detail the problem areas in SRC; to discuss the current and planned R and D investigations relevant to the problems identified; and to suggest appropriate R and D activities in support of designs for the SRC demonstration plants. Four types of R and D activities are suggested: continuation of present and planned activities; coordination of activities and results, present and proposed; extension/redirection of activities not involving major equipment purchase or modifications; and new activities. Important examples of the first type of activity include continuation of fired heater, slurry rheology, and slurry mixing studies at Ft. Lewis. Among the second type of activity, coordination of data acquisition and interpretation is recommended in the areas of heat transfer, vapor/liquid equilibria, and physical properties. Principal examples of recommendations for extension/redirection include screening studies at laboratory scale on the use of carbonaceous precoat (e.g., anthracite) infiltration, and 15- to 30-day continuous tests of the Texaco gasifier at the Texaco Montebello facility (using SRC residues).

Edwards, M.S.; Rodgers, B.R.; Brown, C.H.; Carlson, P.K.; Gambill, W.R.; Gilliam, T.M.; Holmes, J.M.; Krishnan, R.P.; Parsly, L.F.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Enhancing Carbon Reactivity in Mercury Control in Lignite-Fired Systems  

SciTech Connect

This project was awarded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Program Solicitation DE-PS26-03NT41718-01. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) led a consortium-based effort to resolve mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. The EERC team-the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); the URS Corporation; the Babcock & Wilcox Company; ADA-ES; Apogee; Basin Electric Power Cooperative; Otter Tail Power Company; Great River Energy; Texas Utilities; Montana-Dakota Utilities Co.; Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc.; BNI Coal Ltd.; Dakota Westmoreland Corporation; the North American Coal Corporation; SaskPower; and the North Dakota Industrial Commission-demonstrated technologies that substantially enhanced the effectiveness of carbon sorbents to remove Hg from western fuel combustion gases and achieve a high level ({ge} 55% Hg removal) of cost-effective control. The results of this effort are applicable to virtually all utilities burning lignite and subbituminous coals in the United States and Canada. The enhancement processes were previously proven in pilot-scale and limited full-scale tests. Additional optimization testing continues on these enhancements. These four units included three lignite-fired units: Leland Olds Station Unit 1 (LOS1) and Stanton Station Unit 10 (SS10) near Stanton and Antelope Valley Station Unit 1 (AVS1) near Beulah and a subbituminous Powder River Basin (PRB)-fired unit: Stanton Station Unit 1 (SS1). This project was one of three conducted by the consortium under the DOE mercury program to systematically test Hg control technologies available for utilities burning lignite. The overall objective of the three projects was to field-test and verify options that may be applied cost-effectively by the lignite industry to reduce Hg emissions. The EERC, URS, and other team members tested sorbent injection technologies for plants equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and spray dryer absorbers combined with fabric filters (SDAs-FFs). The work focused on technology commercialization by involving industry and emphasizing the communication of results to vendors and utilities throughout the project.

Chad Wocken; Michael Holmes; John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Katie Brandt; Brandon Pavlish; Dennis Laudal; Kevin Galbreath; Michelle Olderbak

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Enzymantic Conversion of Coal to Liquid Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The work in this project focused on the conversion of bituminous coal to liquid hydrocarbons. The major steps in this process include mechanical pretreatment, chemical pretreatment, and finally solubilization and conversion of coal to liquid hydrocarbons. Two different types of mechanical pretreatment were considered for the process: hammer mill grinding and jet mill grinding. After research and experimentation, it was decided to use jet mill grinding, which allows for coal to be ground down to particle sizes of 5 {mu}m or less. A Fluid Energy Model 0101 JET-O-MIZER-630 size reduction mill was purchased for this purpose. This machine was completed and final testing was performed on the machine at the Fluid Energy facilities in Telford, PA. The test results from the machine show that it can indeed perform to the required specifications and is able to grind coal down to a mean particle size that is ideal for experimentation. Solubilization and conversion experiments were performed on various pretreated coal samples using 3 different approaches: (1) enzymatic - using extracellular Laccase and Manganese Peroxidase (MnP), (2) chemical - using Ammonium Tartrate and Manganese Peroxidase, and (3) enzymatic - using the live organisms Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Spectral analysis was used to determine how effective each of these methods were in decomposing bituminous coal. After analysis of the results and other considerations, such as cost and environmental impacts, it was determined that the enzymatic approaches, as opposed to the chemical approaches using chelators, were more effective in decomposing coal. The results from the laccase/MnP experiments and Phanerochaete chrysosporium experiments are presented and compared in this final report. Spectra from both enzymatic methods show absorption peaks in the 240nm to 300nm region. These peaks correspond to aromatic intermediates formed when breaking down the coal structure. The peaks then decrease in absorbance over time, corresponding to the consumption of aromatic intermediates as they undergo ring cleavage. The results show that this process happens within 1 hour when using extracellular enzymes, but takes several days when using live organisms. In addition, live organisms require specific culture conditions, control of contaminants and fungicides in order to effectively produce extracellular enzymes that degrade coal. Therefore, when comparing the two enzymatic methods, results show that the process of using extracellular lignin degrading enzymes, such as laccase and manganese peroxidase, appears to be a more efficient method of decomposing bituminous coal.

Richard Troiano

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

CURRENT AND FUTURE IGCC TECHNOLOGIES:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16, 2008 16, 2008 DOE/NETL-2008/1337 A Pathway Study Focused on Non-Carbon Capture Advanced Power Systems R&D Using Bituminous Coal - Volume 1 Current and Future IGCC Technologies Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

450

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers: Fixed (Moving) Bed Gasifiers Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers: Fixed (Moving) Bed Gasifiers Lurgi Dry-Ash Gasifier Lurgi GmbH first developed Lurgi dry-ash gasification technology in the early 1930s to produce what was still known as town gas, in one of the first practical applications of gasification. The first commercial plant based on this technology was built in 1936. In the 1950s, Lurgi and Ruhrgas further developed the technology to handle bituminous coals in addition to the traditional lignite feedstock. Lurgi dry-ash gasification technology has since been used worldwide to produce synthesis gas (syngas), and is the basis of such major projects as the Sasol synfuel plants in South Africa, and the Great Plains Synfuels Plant in North Dakota. An estimated 150 Lurgi gasifiers are in operation today, mainly in South Africa, China and the United States (North Dakota).

451

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Full- Scale Testing of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full-Scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control in Wet FGD Full-Scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control in Wet FGD The goal of this project is to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The two specific objectives of this project are 1) ninety percent (90%) total mercury removal and 2) costs below 1/4 to 1/2 of today's commercially available activated carbon mercury removal technologies. Babcock and Wilcox and McDermott Technology, Inc's (B&W/MTI's) will demonstrate their wet scrubbing mercury removal technology (which uses very small amounts of a liquid reagent to achieve increased mercury removal) at two locations burning high-sulfur Ohio bituminous coal: 1) Michigan South Central Power Agency's (MSCPA) 55 MWe Endicott Station located in Litchfield, Michigan and 2) Cinergy's 1300 MWe Zimmer Station located near Cincinnati, Ohio.

452

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: September 2011 Highlights: September 2011 Cooler temperatures drove down retail sales of electricity in the Southeast compared to September 2010. Fossil steam generation decreased in much of the United States, except in the ERCOT portion of Texas where total generation increased from September, 2010. Bituminous coal stocks dropped 18% from September 2010. Key Indicators Sept. 2011 % Change from Sept. 2010 Total Net Generation (Thousand MWh) 336,264 -3% Residential Retail Price (cents/Kwh) 12.26 2% Retail Sales (Thousand MWh) 324,357 -1% Cooling Degree-Days 184 -6% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub ($/mmBtu) 4.04 0% Coal Stocks (Thousand Tons) 144,439 -11% Coal Consumption (Thousand Tons) 76,765 -3% Natural Gas Consumption (Mcf) 702,589 -2% Nuclear Outages (MW) 9,227 70%

453

IR-2003-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Relations Office Washington, D.C. Media Contact: 202.622.4000 Relations Office Washington, D.C. Media Contact: 202.622.4000 www.IRS.gov/newsroom Public Contact: 800.829.1040 $1 BILLION IN TAX CREDITS ALLOCATED TO CLEAN COAL PROJECTS IR-2006-184, Nov. 30, 2006 WASHINGTON - The Internal Revenue Service announced that it has allocated nearly $1 billion of tax credits to nine planned clean coal projects. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 authorized $1.65 billion in tax credits for clean coal projects. The Act allocated $800 million of credits to integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) projects, $500 million to non-IGCC advanced coal electricity generation projects and $350 million to gasification projects. The $800 million allocated to IGCC projects is required to be allocated in relatively equal amounts among bituminous coal,

454

Definition: Tar Sands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Tar Sands Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Tar Sands A resource, found in particular abundance in Canada, where viscous petroleum is mixed in with a layer of sand, clay, and water. The form of petroleum is often referred to as "bitumen". The resource has only recently been considered part of the world's oil reserves View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Oil sands, tar sands or, more technically, bituminous sands, are a type of unconventional petroleum deposit. The oil sands are loose sand or partially consolidated sandstone containing naturally occurring mixtures of sand, clay, and water, saturated with a dense and extremely viscous form of petroleum technically referred to as bitumen (or colloquially tar due to

455

Microsoft Word - CurrentFutureIGCC2Revisionfinal.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M M T R - 2 0 0 4 - 0 5 Mitretek Technical Report Current and Future IGCC Technologies: Bituminous Coal to Power AUGUST 2004 David Gray Salvatore Salerno Glen Tomlinson Customer: Concurrent Technology Corporation Customer Name Contract No.:001000045 Dept. No.: H050 H050 Project No.:0601CTC4 ©Year Mitretek Systems ©M Falls Church, Virginia ii Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States (U.S.) Government. Neither the U.S., nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

456

NYMEX Coal Futures - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NYMEX Coal Futures Near-Month Contract Final Settlement Price 2013 NYMEX Coal Futures Near-Month Contract Final Settlement Price 2013 Data as of: December 13, 2013 | Release Date: December 16, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 30, 2013 U.S. coal exports, chiefly Central Appalachian bituminous, make up a significant percentage of the world export market and are a relevant factor in world coal prices. Because coal is a bulk commodity, transportation is an important aspect of its price and availability. In response to dramatic changes in both electric and coal industry practices, the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) after conferring with coal producers