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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ant-eden ald en-lanc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

81 81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON STATE LINE ALLEN CHUR CHVILLE BATH ATT ICA ELLI COT VILLE ROU LETT E BR ADFORD BU FFALO CREEK PEN N YAN N BEECH HILL-INDEPENDENC E GERRY-CH ARLOTTE STAGECOACH CHIPMUN K HEBRON VIN CENT BALD WI NSVILLE AKELEY OLEAN COWLESVILLE AN NIN SMET HPORT BR ADLEY BR OOK BU STI FIVE MILE BLOOMFIELD W SEN EC A FALLS NILE STAGECOACH LEWIS R UN BR ADFORD CAMDEN VAN ETT EN ROAN OKE SH ARON RICHBU RG FULTON N FINN EGAN H ILL TONAWANDA

2

ALD Nanosolutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Logo: ALD Nanosolutions Name ALD Nanosolutions Address 580 E. Burbank Street, Unit 100 Place Broomfield, Colorado Zip 80020 Phone number (303) 318-4145 Website http:...

3

Stephenson Appointed ALD for Photon Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS, Other DOE Labs Help Develop New Cancer Fighting Drug APS, Other DOE Labs Help Develop New Cancer Fighting Drug Paper on Fast Pharmaceuticals by APS Authors Featured in New Journal Art Scene Investigation: Picasso goes Nanotech Linda Young of APS Elected Vice Chair of DAMOP Moffat of BioCARS and U. of C. Receives 2011 ACA Patterson Award APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Stephenson Appointed ALD for Photon Sciences SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 Bookmark and Share Brian Stephenson Argonne National Laboratory Director Eric D. Isaacs announced today that Brian Stephenson has been appointed Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Photon Sciences, effective September 1, 2011. The directorate comprises three research and support divisions centered on Argonne's

4

Stephenson is Interim ALD for Photon Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Students at Argonne on the FaST Track to New Skills Students at Argonne on the FaST Track to New Skills How Did the Caterpillar Cross the Road? R&D 100 Awards for New X-ray Technologies In Nature: Fischetti on Minibeams Sidorowicz of AES Earns UChicago Argonne, LLC Board of Governors Outstanding Service Award for 2010 APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Stephenson is Interim ALD for Photon Sciences OCTOBER 1, 2010 Bookmark and Share G. Brian Stephenson Argonne Director Eric Isaacs has appointed G. Brian Stephenson as the Interim Associate Laboratory Director for Photon Sciences, effective Oct. 1, 2010. The text of Director Isaacs' announcement is below. Sept. 30, 2010 To: All employees From: Eric Isaacs, Argonne Director

5

Environment, Safety & Health Directorate Assistant Laboratory Director (ALD)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environment, Safety & Health Directorate Assistant Laboratory Director (ALD) Environmental Division (4) Matrixed from Safety & Health Services Division (5) Matrixed from Procurement & Property Procurement Support (5) D&D Manager Work Control Manager Safety & Health Manager (4) Facility Configuration

Homes, Christopher C.

6

Impact of ALD Coating on Mn-rich Cathode Materials (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LG Chem Power Inc. (LGCPI) and NREL have collaborated to demonstrate the scalability of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating process over the last 6 months, and the benefits of ALD coatings for long-term cycling and calendar life are being quantified. The objectives of this work are two-fold: 1) to evaluate the scalability of the process to coat LGCPI cathodes with alumina using the ALD technique, and 2) to demonstrate improvements in rate capability and life of ALD-coated LGCPI electrodes. NREL received samples of baseline material to be coated from LGCPI. NREL carried out ALD coating of the samples with help from a subcontractor, ALD Nanosolutions. NREL fabricated cells from those samples for quick screening and feedback to ALD Nanosolutions. LGCPI is currently fabricating larger-format cells for further evaluation.

Santhanagopalan, S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Highly Transparent and Conducting ALD of Doped ZnO Thin Films ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and Conducting ALD of Doped ZnO Thin Films for TCO Applications Hybrid Aerogel/Nanorod Functional Materials for Energy and Sensing Applications.

8

Effects of Process Parameters of ALD on High-k Dielectric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to realize high performance nanoelectronic devices, it is required to build localized gate structures on a graphene layer. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is...

9

U-17: Selective Area Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) with E-Beam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, U-17: Selective Area Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) with E- Beam ... 3D Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) for Li-Ion Battery Anode.

10

Properties of ALD HfTaxOy high-k layers deposited on chemical silicon oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HfTa"xO"y high-k dielectric layers with different compositions were deposited using ALD on 1nm SiO"2 generated by ozone based cleaning of 200mm Si(100) surface. Physical characterization of blanket layers and C-V mapping demonstrates that the ALD layers ...

C. Zhao; T. Witters; P. Breimer; J. Maes; M. Caymax; S. De Gendt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

ALD Functionalized Nanoporous Gold: Thermal Stability, Mechanical Properties, and Catalytic Activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nanoporous metals have many technologically promising applications but their tendency to coarsen limits their long-term stability and excludes high temperature applications. Here, we demonstrate that atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to stabilize and functionalize nanoporous metals. Specifically, we studied the effect of nanometer-thick alumina and titania ALD films on thermal stability, mechanical properties, and catalytic activity of nanoporous gold (np-Au). Our results demonstrate that even only one-nm-thick oxide films can stabilize the nanoscale morphology of np-Au up to 1000 C, while simultaneously making the material stronger and stiffer. The catalytic activity of np-Au can be drastically increased by TiO{sub 2} ALD coatings. Our results open the door to high temperature sensor, actuator, and catalysis applications and functionalized electrodes for energy storage and harvesting applications.

Biener, M M; Biener, J; Wichmann, A; Wittstock, A; Baumann, T F; Baeumer, M; Hamza, A V

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

12

ALD of Al2O3 for Highly Improved Performance in Li-Ion Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant advances in energy density, rate capability and safety will be required for the implementation of Li-ion batteries in next generation electric vehicles. We have demonstrated atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a promising method to enable superior cycling performance for a vast variety of battery electrodes. The electrodes range from already demonstrated commercial technologies (cycled under extreme conditions) to new materials that could eventually lead to batteries with higher energy densities. For example, an Al2O3 ALD coating with a thickness of ~ 8 A was able to stabilize the cycling of unexplored MoO3 nanoparticle anodes with a high volume expansion. The ALD coating enabled stable cycling at C/2 with a capacity of ~ 900 mAh/g. Furthermore, rate capability studies showed the ALD-coated electrode maintained a capacity of 600 mAh/g at 5C. For uncoated electrodes it was only possible to observe stable cycling at C/10. Also, we recently reported that a thin ALD Al2O3 coating with a thickness of ~5 A can enable natural graphite (NG) electrodes to exhibit remarkably durable cycling at 50 degrees C. The ALD-coated NG electrodes displayed a 98% capacity retention after 200 charge-discharge cycles. In contrast, bare NG showed a rapid decay. Additionally, Al2O3 ALD films with a thickness of 2 to 4 A have been shown to allow LiCoO2 to exhibit 89% capacity retention after 120 charge-discharge cycles performed up to 4.5 V vs Li/Li+. Bare LiCoO2 rapidly deteriorated in the first few cycles. The capacity fade is likely caused by oxidative decomposition of the electrolyte at higher potentials or perhaps cobalt dissolution. Interestingly, we have recently fabricated full cells of NG and LiCoO2 where we coated both electrodes, one or the other electrode as well as neither electrode. In creating these full cells, we observed some surprising results that lead us to obtain a greater understanding of the ALD coatings. We have also recently coated a binder free LiNi0.04Mn0.04Co02O2 electrode containing 5 wt% single-walled carbon nanotubes as the conductive additive and demonstrated both high rate capability as well as the ability to cycle the cathode to 5 V vrs. Li/Li+. Finally, we coated a Celgard (TM) separator and enabled stable cycling in a high dielectric electrolyte. These results will be presented in detail.

Dillon, A.; Jung, Y. S.; Ban, C.; Riley, L.; Cavanagh, A.; Yan, Y.; George, S.; Lee, S. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

NOIJLVaiSINIWaV NOIlVlAldOdNI AOU3N3 Z661  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

61- 61- NOIJLVaiSINIWaV NOIlVlAldOdNI AOU3N3 Z661 This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. AH telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office McPherson Square Bookstore 1510 H Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20005 (202)653-2050 FAX (202)376-5055 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, DC 20402 (202)783-3238 FAX (202)512-2233 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., eastern time, M-F U.S. Government Printing Office c/o Mellon Bank P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such

14

C-V characteristics of epitaxial germanium metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor on GaAs substrate with ALD Al2O3 dielectric  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epitaxial germanium metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAP) were fabricated on GaAs substrate using atomic layer deposited Al"2O"3 gate dielectric with surface treatments including pure HF and HF plus rapid thermal oxidation (RTO). The electrical ... Keywords: ALD Al2O3, CMOS integration, Ge MOSCAP, Ge epitaxial film, RTO

Shih Hsuan Tang; Chien I. Kuo; Hai Dang Trinh; Mantu Hudait; Edward Yi Chang; Ching Yi Hsu; Yung Hsuan Su; Guang-Li Luo; Hong Quan Nguyen

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

2012 NNIN ALD Symposium ALD Staff Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization(%) 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 #12;Maintenance Schedule · Oil Change ­ 6-12 months · Pump Change ­ 1" (mist filter) ­ Now pumps regular last at least a year before oil changes. #12;In-line Secondary-2 years · O-rings: Lid ­ Every 2-4 months · O-rings: Pump line ­ 12 months, as indicated by drifting up

16

Ultra-low-energy ion-beam-synthesis of Ge nanocrystals in thin ALD Al2O3 layers for memory applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural and electrical properties of ALD-grown 5 and 7nm-thick Al"2O"3 layers before and after implantation of Ge ions (1keV, 0.5-1x10^1^6 cm^-^2) and thermal annealing at temperatures in the 700-1050^oC range are reported. Transmission Electron Microscopy ... Keywords: Ge nanocrystals, Ion implantation, Nanocrystal memory

P. Dimitrakis; A. Mouti; C. Bonafos; S. Schamm; G. Ben Assayag; V. Ioannou-Sougleridis; B. Schmidt; J. Becker; P. Normand

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - ALD Searches  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will consider the following characteristics when evaluating candidates: Leadership skills and previous experience in similar role Strategic planning capabilities Understanding...

18

Selective Area ALD Deposition with Nanolithography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well-defined nano-patterned surfaces after metal-oxide deposition will be ... Effect of Initial Microstructure on the Processing of Titanium Using Equal ... of Ferroelectric Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride-Trifluoroethylene) Copolymer Films ... Sonochemistry as a Tool for Synthesis of Ion-Substituted Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles.

19

Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) Preparation of Noble Metal Catalysts  

4740 Walnut Street Suite 100 ... activated by UV light and break bonds in the contaminant to make it non-toxic. TiO 2 provides many benefits in use, ...

20

Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) Preparation of Noble Metal ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; ... as particle distribution within the substrate and on the surface of complex substrates ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ant-eden ald en-lanc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Multilayer ALD Coating of Light Water Reactor Zirconium Alloy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant raised concerns about nuclear reactors safety. The plant experienced an accident in...

22

Microsoft Word - SSRL_ALD_Job_Description_052813.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) Director SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, multi-program laboratory operated...

23

Microsoft Word - LCLS_ ALD_ Job_ Description_052813.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Director SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, multi-program laboratory operated by Stanford...

24

Argonne in the marketplace: Microchannel plates with ALD | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

based on atomic layer deposition techniques are available for licensing from Argonne. If you're interested in licensing, please contact partners@anl.gov or visit...

25

Characterization of ALD Beryllium Oxide as a Potential High-? Gate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elements of Power Conversion Integration in Group-III Nitride Heterojunctions Fabrication of PLZT Dielectric Films for Power Inverters in Electric Drive Vehicles.

26

Surface Reactivity of Copper Precursors for Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) on Metal Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

110) surfaces is described; butane and a small amidine were110) surface. No butene is produced at lower butane, 3 L;only some butane is desorption observed (58 amu). However,

MA, QIANG

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

B4, Admittance Spectroscopy of GaSb(100) and ALD / PEALD Al 2 O ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PEALD was employed to reduce the thermal budget of dielectric deposition, ..... Bands and Hopping-Induced Mixed Valence for Ti and Sc in GdSc1-x TixO3 for x ...

28

G6, Study of CV and Admittance Characteristics of ALD High-K ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

L6, PECVD-SiN, Si or Si/Al2O3-Capped ED-Mode AlN/GaN Inverters Hide details for [

29

Plasma Enhanced ALD of High-k Dielectrics on GaN and AlGaN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent efforts to improve performance of high power devices have focused on the ... Characterization of Degradation for MLCC under Thermal and Electrical...

30

Public health assessment for Redwing Carriers Inc. /Saraland, Saraland, Mobile County, Alabama, Region 4. Cerclis No. ALD980844385. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Redwing Carriers, Inc.,/ Saraland Apartment site is located at 527 U.S. Highway 43 in the City of Saraland, Mobile County, Alabama. Redwing Carriers, Inc. owned and operated a trucking terminal used for parking, maintaining, and cleaning trucks and trailers. Redwing transported a variety of substances including asphalt, diesel fuel, chemicals, and pesticides. The operation began in 1961 and continued until 1971. Redwing emptied residue from cleaning the trucks into pits and surrounding ditches at the site. Investigations since then have revealed on-site contamination of soil and groundwater. Contaminants of concern include volatile organic compounds, heavy metals, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and pesticides. The Redwing Carriers/Saraland Apartments site is categorized as a public health hazard based on potential for skin irritation and exposure to benzo(a)pyrene and other PAHs from the ingestion of 5 grams per day of tar-like material by pica children at the site.

Not Available

1994-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

31

Health assessment for Redwing Carriers, Inc. (Saraland), Saraland, Alabama, Region 4. CERCLIS No. ALD980844385. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Redwing Carriers, Inc. (Saraland) site is in the community of Saraland, in Mobile County, Alabama. The site, about 1 acre, is in an urbanized area and had been used as a truck terminal between 1961 and 1971. Redwing Carriers cleaned out trucks that transported a variety of materials, including asphalt, diesel fuel, herbicides, tall oil, and sulfuric acid. Wastes were discharged onto the ground. The property was covered with fill material, and an apartment complex, housing about 180 tenants, was developed. On-site monitoring identified polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and a few other organic compounds in surface wastes and in subsurface wastes and soils. Using the information reviewed, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry concludes that the site is of potential public health concern because humans may be exposed to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Children are the most likely to be exposed to the contaminants associated with the recurring surficial waste deposits. Available monitoring data are not sufficient to clarify whether groundwater, ambient air, air in buildings, soils, sediments, surface water, and food-chain entities contain contaminants at levels that pose public health concerns or physical hazards.

Not Available

1990-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

32

Environmental Management Directorate Fiscal Year 2000 Budget Submittal (FY00-02) Michael Schlender, EM ALD March 6, 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brookhaven Science Associates Brookhaven Science Associates U.S. Department of Energy Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop May 9 and 10, 2007 Brookhaven Science Associates U.S. Department of Energy 2 BGRR Location at BNL BGRR Location at BNL BGRR Location at BNL BGRR Location at BNL Brookhaven Science Associates U.S. Department of Energy BGRR Complex BGRR Complex Brookhaven Science Associates U.S. Department of Energy 4 BGRR General Background BGRR General Background  First reactor built for peacetime research on the atom  Located in the center of BNL site  Accomplished great science from 1950 to 1968  All fuel removed in 1972  BNL Science Museum 1977 to 1997  Decommissioning efforts began in 1997 upon discovery of contaminated water in below-ground ducts Brookhaven Science Associates

33

Comparative Study of Zn(O,S) Buffer Layers and CIGS Solar Cells Fabricated by CBD, ALD, and Sputtering: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zn(O,S) thin films were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD), atomic layer deposition, and sputtering. Composition of the films and band gap were measured and found to follow the trends described in the literature. CBD Zn(O,S) parameters were optimized and resulted in an 18.5% efficiency cell that did not require post annealing, light soaking, or an undoped ZnO layer. Promising results were obtained with sputtering. A 13% efficiency cell was obtained for a Zn(O,S) emitter layer deposited with 0.5%O2. With further optimization of process parameters and an analysis of the loss mechanisms, it should be possible to increase the efficiency.

Ramanathan, K.; Mann, J.; Glynn, S.; Christensen, S.; Pankow, J.; Li, J.; Scharf, J.; Mansfield, L. M.; Contreras, M. A.; Noufi, R.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

High mobility germanium MOSFETs : study of ozone surface passivation and n-type Dopant channel implants combined with ALD dielectrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Germanium offers higher electron and hole mobility than silicon, making it an attractive option for future high-performance MOSFET applications. To date, Ge p-channel device behavior has shown promise, with many reports ...

Hennessy, John, 1980-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Solar-Thermal ALD Ferrite-Based Water Splitting Cycle - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Alan W. Weimer (Primary Contact), Darwin Arifin, Xinhua Liang, Victoria Aston and Paul Lichty University of Colorado Campus Box 596 Boulder, CO 80309-0596 Phone: (303) 492-3759 Email: alan.weimer@colorado.edu DOE Manager HQ: Sara Dillich Phone: (202) 586-7925 Email: Sara.Dillich@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-05GO15044 Project Start Date: March 31, 2005 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Demonstrate the "hercynite cycle" feasibility for * carrying out redox. Initiate design, synthesis and testing of a nanostructured * active material for fast kinetics and transport.

36

Correspondence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Functional analysis of the ALD gene family of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during anaerobic growth on glucose: the NADP +-dependent Ald6p and Ald5p isoforms play a major role in acetate formation

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Atomic layer deposition for the conformal coating of nanoporous materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is ideal for applying precise and conformal coatings over nanoporous materials. We have recently used ALD to coat two nanoporous solids: anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) and silica aerogels. AAO possesses hexagonally ordered ...

Jeffrey W. Elam; Guang Xiong; Catherine Y. Han; H. Hau Wang; James P. Birrell; Ulrich Welp; John N. Hryn; Michael J. Pellin; Theodore F. Baumann; John F. Poco; Joe H. Satcher, Jr.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Quartz crystal microbalance study of tungsten atomic layer deposition using WF6 and Si2H6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(disilane). In this paper, W ALD is explored using in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements for disilane exposures > 4?104 L. The W ALD growth rate was also weakly temperature

George, Steven M.

39

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Format for Proposal Extension Request  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From the Director: New ALDs in LCLS, SSRL and PPA and a new Directorate in the Making Wednesday lab director, I asked Jo to serve as the ALD for SSRL. Jo has been co-leading the joint light source to be the acting ALD for SSRL effective July 1. We will start an international search immediately to find

Wechsler, Risa H.

40

Study examining a DOE proposal to dispose of mixed low level waste at the Nevada test site using an alternative landfill design.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Department of Energy has set forth a proposal to use an Alternative Landfill Design (ALD) for the Mixed Low Level Waste disposal facility, in (more)

Hart, Deborah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ant-eden ald en-lanc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Surfaces Functionalization by Atomic Layer Deposition: From Supercondu...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a broad variety of subjects: from understanding the surface dissipation of superconductors under strong RF field to explore the synthesis by ALD of superconducting thin...

42

Integrated Sustainability Analysis of Atomic Layer Deposition for Microelectronics Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Manufacturing and Sustainability Improvement of Nano-Integrated Sustainability Analysis of Atomic Layergrowth at atomic scale. Sustainability of ALD technology

Yuan, Chris Yingchun; David Dornfeld

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Developing and Understanding Earth-Abundant Iron-based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ALD TiO2 coated Silicon Nanowires for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes with enhanced ... Cathode Nanomaterials for High Energy-Density Lithium-Ion Batteries.

44

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michelle Buchanan Brenda Wyatt, Assistant to the ALD Cathy Cheverton, Executive Secretary Matrix Support Canajo Moore, Business Manager Michele Lusk, HR Manager Alex DeTrana,...

45

Seagate Crystal Reports - Meeti  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thomas R. Bieler. Assoc Prof. Michigan State Univ. Matthias Blum. ALD Vacuum Technologies Inc. Robert A. Brockman. Univ of Dayton. Peter Busse. ACCESS.

46

Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 and ZnO at Atmospheric Pressure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a unique flow tube ALD reactor that operates at pressures between ~1 and 760 Torr. .... Scaling Theory of Continuum Dislocation Dynamics in Two and Three...

47

The Radius of Metric Regularity - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ann Arbor, Michigan 48107-8604,. ald@ams.org. A. S. Lewis. Department of Combinatorics and Optimization. University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada...

48

PNNL: About PNNL - People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (509) 375-2450 paula.linnen@pnnl.gov Paula Linnen serves as the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for the...

49

NSLS-II: Accelerator Systems Advisory Committee (ASAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

construction, and operations of major accelerator systems. This group will advise the NSLS-II Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) and the NSLS-II Associate Director for...

50

ZnO Nanowires Grown on ZnO Thin Film Deposited by Atomic Layer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was used to deposit the seeding ... 3D Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) for Li-Ion Battery Anode.

51

Argonne Software Licensing: SMART  

SMART. SMART (Simple Model for ALD Reaction and Transport) is a software developed by the Atomic Layer Deposition group at Argonne National ...

52

Materials characterization of WNxCy, WNx and WCx films for advanced barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ternary WN"xC"y system was deposited in a thermal ALD (atomic layer deposition) reactor from ASM at 300^oC in a process sequence using tungsten hexafluoride (WF"6), triethyl borane (TEB) and ammonia (NH"3) as precursors. The WC"x layers were deposited ... Keywords: ALD, Atomic layer deposition, Barrier, WCx, WNx, WNxCy

H. Volders; Z. Tkei; H. Bender; B. Brijs; R. Caluwaerts; L. Carbonell; T. Conard; C. Drijbooms; A. Franquet; S. Garaud; I. Hoflijk; A. Moussa; F. Sinapi; Y. Travaly; D. Vanhaeren; G. Vereecke; C. Zhao; W. -M. Li; H. Sprey; A. M. Jonas

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Texture of atomic layer deposited ruthenium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ruthenium films were grown by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si(100) and ALD TiN. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the as-deposited films on Si(100) were polycrystalline, on TiN they were (002) oriented. After annealing at 800^oC ... Keywords: Ammonia plasma, Atomic layer deposition, Ruthenium, Silicide, Texture

J. Musschoot; Q. Xie; D. Deduytsche; K. De Keyser; D. Longrie; J. Haemers; S. Van den Berghe; R. L. Van Meirhaeghe; J. D'Haen; C. Detavernier

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Interfaces of high-k dielectrics on GaAs: Their common features and the relationship with Fermi level pinning (Invited Paper)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous metal oxides have been studied worldwide as possible high-k gate dielectric candidates for MOS devices on alternative semiconductor materials (Ge, III/V compounds). We will discuss thermal and plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ... Keywords: Atomic layer deposition ALD, Atomistic modeling, GaAs MOS, High-k

Matty Caymax; Guy Brammertz; Annelies Delabie; Sonja Sioncke; Dennis Lin; Marco Scarrozza; Geoffrey Pourtois; Wei-E Wang; Marc Meuris; Marc Heyns

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

WILLIAMS ET AL. VOL. 6 ' NO. 7 ' 61856196 ' 2012 www.acsnano.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on ALD-Modified SiO2 Aerogel Frameworks Vennesa O. Williams, Nak Cheon Jeong, Chaiya Prasittichai aerogels was fabricated on transparent conducting oxides for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). These templates were coated with ZnO via atomic layer deposition (ALD) to yield an electronically interconnected

56

Essays on financial analysts' forecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. Exxon Mobil Corp Ticker AA AIG ALD AXPGeneral Motors, IBM, 3M and Exxon Mobil. Most revisions areChase, General Motors and Exxon Mobil. This high proportion

Rodriguez, Marius del Giudice

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

In-situ deposition of high-k dielectrics on III-V compound semiconductor in MOCVD system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ deposition of high-k materials to passivate the GaAs in metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system was well demonstrated. Both atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods ...

Cheng, Cheng-Wei, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Environmental Performance Characterization of Atomic Layer Deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature can only save 3~5% of total energy consumption.KJ per cycle. Although energy consumption of ALD process isfeatured with intensive energy consumption. For the studied

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of these catalysts is ongoing. In parallel, we are developing a pilot-scale ALD coating facility that will enable us to scale our catalyst manufacturing from grams to kilograms...

60

Committees | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(SAC) High-level advisory body to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for the APS. Meets a minimum of once per year to (1) evaluate the scientific output and use of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ant-eden ald en-lanc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Atomic Layer Deposition of Indium Tin Oxide Thin Films Using Nonhalogenated Jeffrey W. Elam,*, David A. Baker, Alex B. F. Martinson,, Michael J. Pellin, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

precise coatings to be applied on all exposed surfaces of nanoporous substrates such as aerogels10 using ALD techniques to apply metal oxide coatings onto porous supports such as anodic aluminum oxide

62

Atomic Layer Deposition for SRF Cavities  

SciTech Connect

We have begun using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to synthesize a variety of surface coatings on coupons and cavities as part of an effort to produce rf structures with significantly better performance and yield than those obtained from bulk niobium, The ALD process offers the possibility of conformally coating complex cavity shapes with precise layered structures with tightly constrained morphology and chemical properties. Our program looks both at the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings, and also their performance in working structures. Initial results include: 1) evidence from point contact tunneling showing magnetic oxides can be a significant limitation to high gradient operation, 2) experimental results showing the production sharp niobium/oxide interfaces from a high temperature bake of ALD coated Al2O3 on niobium surfaces, 3) results from ALD coated structures.

Norem, J; Pellin, M J; Antoine, C Z; Ciovati, G; Kneisel, P; Reece, C E; Rimmer, R A; Cooley, L; Gurevich, A V; Ha, Y; Proslier, Th

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

In-situ Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Scattering Study On The Initial Structure Of Atomic Layer Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the excellent conformality of ALD, it is not only adopted thin film, but also has been adopted for the fabrication of nanostructures. The surface reaction of ALD process is dependent on the substrate condition, thus the study on initial stage of ALD process is crucial to achieve controllable film growth. By the way, because of quite low scattering intensity of initial ultra thin layer, the high flux Synchrotron Radiation is needed. Synchrotron radiation x-ray scattering measurements allow us to investigate the atomic structure evolution of a few nanometer thickness films at the initial growth stage, nondestructively. Ru and TaN ALD films were grown. The thickness, roughness, and electron density were estimated by X-Ray Reflectivity (XRR) analysis. The island structures and its coverage also were estimated.

Park, Y. J. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Department of MSE, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D. R. [Department of Physics, Soongsil univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Baik, S. [Department of MSE, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

64

LES of Sandia Flame D with Eulerian PDF and Finite-Rate Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mixing models. Com- bust. Flame 136, 208216. Subramaniam,Ald n, M. , Kaminski, C. , e 2000. Flame front tracking andspanning trees. Combust. Flame 115, 487514. Tang, Q. , Xu,

Bisetti, Fabrizio; Chen, J Y

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Controlling Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2 in Aerogels through Surface Functionalization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report demonstrates a chemical functionalization method for controlling atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO{sub 2} in low-density nanoporous materials. Functionalization of silica aerogel with trimethylsilane is shown to strongly suppress TiO{sub 2} growth via ALD. Subsequent modification of the functionalization through selective removal of the hydrocarbon groups reactivates the aerogel towards TiO{sub 2} deposition. These results demonstrate the potential use of ALD as a selective tool for creating novel nanoporous materials. Nanoporous materials present significant technological advantage for a wide range of applications, including catalysis, energy storage and conversion, nanoelectronics to name just a few (1-4). Hence, there is considerable interest in developing synthetic pathways for the fabrication of nanoporous materials with tailored properties. Aerogels (AGs) are unique low-density, open-cell porous materials consisting of submicrometer pores and ligaments that can be used as a robust material platform for designing novel nanoporous materials. In recent years, a synthetic approach based on ALD on AG templates has emerged as a promising method for the directed growth of nanoporous materials (5-11, 18). This approach has been used successfully to prepare millimeter-sized high aspect ratio aerogels coated uniformly with zinc oxide (ZnO), tungsten (W) and alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) (10, 11). The ALD process utilizes two sequential, self-limiting surface reactions resulting in a layer-by-layer growth mode. The self limiting nature of the surface reactions makes ALD a particularly suitable technique for uniform deposition onto high aspect ratio porous substrates. Additionally, chemical specificity of the surface reactions in ALD enables one to control the deposition process through selective functionalization of the substrate surface. In fact the functionalization of planar substrates such as silicon wafers with organosilane groups (R{sub n}SiX{sub 4-n} (n = 1-3)) has been shown to deactivate the substrate towards ZrO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, ZnO, and TiO{sub 2} ALD processes (12-16). A possible mechanism for the deactivation effect is the blocking of surface functional groups, such as hydroxyl (OH) moieties, which serve as chemisorption sites for the ALD precursors and hence are essential for nucleating the deposition process. Henceforth, we shall refer to these surface functional groups as nucleation sites for the ALD process.

Ghosal, S; Baumann, T F; King, J S; Kucheyev, S; Wang, Y; Worsley, M A; Biener, J; Bent, S F; Hamza, A V

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

66

Atomic Layer Deposition of ZnO on Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Its Use for Synthesis of CNTZnO Heterostructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the atomic level. It has been applied to deposit a variety of materials including oxides and metals on various nonplanar high-aspect-ratio substrates [8]. ALD on CNTs has been an interesting topic, but there are rela- tively few reports compared to ALD... at *560 and *630 nm, a feature similar to the PL of ZnO nanowire reported by Fan et al. [21]. Emission in the green spectra range is commonly observed in bulk and nanostructure ZnO and the origin is still under debate [22, 23]. The orangered emission...

2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

67

Atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 and HfO2 on GaN: A comparative study on interfaces and electrical characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Al"2O"3, HfO"2, and composite HfO"2/Al"2O"3 films were deposited on n-type GaN using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The interfacial layer of GaON and HfON was observed between HfO"2 and GaN, whereas the absence of an interfacial layer at Al"2O"3/GaN ... Keywords: Al2O3, Atomic-layer-deposition (ALD), GaN, HfO2, High k dielectric, MOS

Y. C. Chang; M. L. Huang; Y. H. Chang; Y. J. Lee; H. C. Chiu; J. Kwo; M. Hong

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Results from Point Contact Tunnelling Spectroscopy and Atomic Layer Deposition  

SciTech Connect

We have shown previously that magnetic niobium oxides can influence the superconducting density of states at the surface of cavity-grade niobium coupons. We will present recent results obtained by Point Contact Tunneling spectroscopy (PCT) on coupons removed from hot and cold spots in a niobium cavity, as well as a comparative study of magnetic oxides on mild baked/unbaked electropolished coupons. We will also describe recent results obtained from coated cavities, ALD films properties and new materials using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

Proslier, Th. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Zasadzinski, J. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Elam, J. W. [ANL; Norem, J. [ANL; Pellin, M. J. [ANL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

LS Directorate Science Advisory Committee (SAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Sciences Science Advisory Committee (SAC) Photon Sciences Science Advisory Committee (SAC) Charter The Photon Sciences Science Advisory Committee (SAC) is responsible for advising the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Photon Sciences on issues related to the scientific utilization of Photon Sciences facilities and on developments required to achieve and maintain the highest possible scientific productivity. In keeping with this, the SAC will provide advice on the following topics: Scientific output and utilization of Photon Sciences facilities Long-term scientific directions Planning, development, and operation of Photon Sciences facilities Policies and procedures relevant to user access and utilization of scientific facilities Members are appointed by the ALD for three-year terms, renewable by mutual consent. The Chair of the Photon Sciences Users' Executive Committee will be an ex-officio member of the SAC. In general, the full SAC will meet at least annually. The ALD, in consultation with the chair of the SAC, may call additional SAC meetings as necessary. The output of the SAC will consist of a confidential report of their findings and recommendations conveyed in a written report submitted to the ALD shortly after each SAC meeting.

70

Characterization of atomic layer deposited nanoscale structure on dense dielectric substrates by X-ray reflectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interfaces play a crucial role in determining the ultimate properties of nanoscale structures. However, the characterization of such structures is difficult, as the interface can no longer be defined as the separation between two materials. The high ... Keywords: ALD, Density, Dielectrics, XRR

Y. Travaly; J. Schuhmacher; A. Martin Hoyas; T. Abell; V. Sutcliffe; A. M. Jonas; M. Van Hove; K. Maex

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Magneto-optical Kerr effect studies of Cu2O/nickel heterostructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cuprous oxide (Cu"2O) is a diamagnetic p-type semiconductor material, considered to be highly attractive for the rapidly emerging field of oxide electronics. In this work Cu"2O layers with various thicknesses were produced by atomic layer deposition ... Keywords: ALD, Cu2O, MOKE, Nickel, Spintronics

Georgeta Salvan, Peter Robaschik, Michael Fronk, Steve MLler, Thomas Waechtler, Stefan E. Schulz, Robert Mothes, Heinrich Lang, Christian Schubert, Senoy Thomas, Manfred Albrecht, Dietrich R. T. Zahn

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702781 Aerogel Templated ZnO Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells**  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702781 Aerogel Templated ZnO Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells** By Thomas W. Hamann silica aerogel films, featuring a large range of controllable thickness and porosity, are prepared as substructure templates. The aerogel templates are coated with ZnO via atomic layer deposition (ALD) to yield

73

Carbon Nanosheets and Nanostructured Electrodes in Organic Photovoltaic Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-321  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon nanosheet thin films were employed as nanostructured electrodes in organic solar cells. Due to the nanostructured texture of the carbon nanosheet electrodes, there was an increase in performance over standard ITO electrodes with very thick active layers. ZnO deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used as a hole blocking layer to provide for carrier selectivity of the carbon nanosheets.

Olson, D.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Global and Regional Solutions Directorate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Pacific NW National Lab (PNNL) ­ Founding Director Joint Global Change Research Institute (PNNL/UMd) ­ ALD (PNNL) ­ Environmental and Health Sciences Directorate; Emerging Technologies ­ Chief Scientist ­ Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ­ Director ­ PNNL Global Studies Program ­ Other (PNNL): Center

Homes, Christopher C.

75

Electrical properties and interfacial chemical environments of in situ atomic layer deposited Al2O3 on freshly molecular beam epitaxy grown GaAs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interfacial chemical analyses and electrical characterization of in situ atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al"2O"3 on freshly molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown n- and p- GaAs (001) with a (4x6) surface reconstruction are performed. The capacitance-voltage ... Keywords: Atomic layer deposition, III-V compound semiconductor, Molecular beam epitaxy

Y. H. Chang; M. L. Huang; P. Chang; C. A. Lin; Y. J. Chu; B. R. Chen; C. L. Hsu; J. Kwo; T. W. Pi; M. Hong

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Mechanisms of Atomic Layer Deposition on Substrates with Ultrahigh Aspect Ratios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a very promising method for controlled coating of the inner surfaces of monolithic nanoporous aerogel (AG suited for coating substrates with ultrahigh aspect ratios (J103), including nanoporous solids. Here, we study the ALD of Cu and Cu3N on the inner surfaces of low-density nanoporous silica aerogel monoliths

Gordon, Roy

77

BERKELEY MADONNA IMPLEMENTATION of IKEDA's MODEL Julie Fontecave Jallon and Pierre Baconnier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-level environment available for inspection, modification and extension SAPHIR project (involved in the IUPS Physiome Engineering, vol: 7, 1979, pp. 135-166. Our aim here: Showing the possibility of transposing the existing volume Plasma volume ADH ALD OSMP PAS QIN QWU STBC VEC VIC VIF VP Berkeley-Madonna Ikeda et al., 1979

Fontecave-Jallon, Julie

78

Effective passivation of In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As by HfO{sub 2} surpassing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via in-situ atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect

High {kappa} gate dielectrics of HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were deposited on molecular beam epitaxy-grown In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As pristine surface using in-situ atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) without any surface treatment or passivation layer. The ALD-HfO{sub 2}/p-In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface showed notable reduction in the interfacial density of states (D{sub it}), deduced from quasi-static capacitance-voltage and conductance-voltage (G-V) at room temperature and 100 Degree-Sign C. More significantly, the midgap peak commonly observed in the D{sub it}(E) of ALD-oxides/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As is now greatly diminished. The midgap D{sub it} value decreases from {>=}15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to {approx}2-4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for ALD-HfO{sub 2}. Further, thermal stability at 850 Degree-Sign C was achieved in the HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As, whereas C-V characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As degraded after the high temperature annealing. From in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectra, the AsO{sub x}, which is not the oxidized state from the native oxide, but is an induced state from adsorption of trimethylaluminum and H{sub 2}O, was found at the ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface, while that was not detected at the ALD-HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface.

Chang, Y. H.; Chiang, T. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, C. A.; Liu, Y. T.; Lin, H. Y.; Huang, M. L.; Kwo, J. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, T. D.; Hong, M. [Graduate Institute of Applied Physics and Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Pi, T. W. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

79

Flexible Ultra Moisture Barrier Film for Thin-Film Photovoltaic Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flexible Thin-film photovoltaic (TFPV) is a low cost alternative to incumbent c-Si PV products as it requires less volume of costly semiconductor materials and it can potentially reduce installation cost. Among the TFPV options, copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) has the highest efficiency and is believed to be one of the most attractive candidates to achieve PV cost reduction. However, CIGS cells are very moisture sensitive and require module water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of less than 1x10-4 gram of water per square meter per day (g-H2O/m2/day). Successful development and commercialization of flexible transparent ultra moisture barrier film is the key to enable flexible CIGS TFPV products, and thus enable ultimate PV cost reduction. At DuPont, we have demonstrated at lab scale that we can successfully make polymer-based flexible transparent ultra moisture barrier film by depositing alumina on polymer films using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology. The layer by layer ALD approach results in uniform and amorphous structure which effectively reduces pinhole density of the inorganic coating on the polymer, and thus allow the fabrication of flexible barrier film with WVTR of 10-5 g-H2O/m2/day. Currently ALD is a time-consuming process suitable only for high-value, relatively small substrates. To successfully commercialize the ALD-on-plastic technology for the PV industry, there is the need to scale up this technology and improve throughput. The goal of this contract work was to build a prototype demonstrating that the ALD technology could be scaled-up for commercial use. Unfortunately, the prototype failed to produce an ultra-barrier film by the close of the project.

David M. Dean

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

Energy Technology Division research summary - 1999.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization, or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book.

NONE

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ant-eden ald en-lanc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Epitaxial strontium titanate films grown by atomic layer deposition on SrTiO{sub 3}-buffered Si(001) substrates  

SciTech Connect

Epitaxial strontium titanate (STO) films have been grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si(001) substrates with a thin STO buffer layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Four unit cells of STO grown by MBE serve as the surface template for ALD growth. The STO films grown by ALD are crystalline as-deposited with minimal, if any, amorphous SiO{sub x} layer at the STO-Si interface. The growth of STO was achieved using bis(triisopropylcyclopentadienyl)-strontium, titanium tetraisopropoxide, and water as the coreactants at a substrate temperature of 250 Degree-Sign C. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed that the ALD process did not induce additional Si-O bonding at the STO-Si interface. Postdeposition XPS analysis also revealed sporadic carbon incorporation in the as-deposited films. However, annealing at a temperature of 250 Degree-Sign C for 30 min in moderate to high vacuum (10{sup -6}-10{sup -9} Torr) removed the carbon species. Higher annealing temperatures (>275 Degree-Sign C) gave rise to a small increase in Si-O bonding, as indicated by XPS, but no reduced Ti species were observed. X-ray diffraction revealed that the as-deposited STO films were c-axis oriented and fully crystalline. A rocking curve around the STO(002) reflection gave a full width at half maximum of 0.30 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.06 Degree-Sign for film thicknesses ranging from 5 to 25 nm. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed that the STO films were continuous with conformal growth to the substrate and smooth interfaces between the ALD- and MBE-grown STO. Overall, the results indicate that thick, crystalline STO can be grown on Si(001) substrates by ALD with minimal formation of an amorphous SiO{sub x} layer using a four-unit-cell STO buffer layer grown by MBE to serve as the surface template.

McDaniel, Martin D.; Posadas, Agham; Ngo, Thong Q.; Dhamdhere, Ajit; Smith, David J.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C0400, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1600, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C0400, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1600, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C0400, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A2BE Carbon Capture LLC A2BE Carbon Capture LLC Panorama Ave Boulder A2BE Carbon Capture LLC A2BE Carbon Capture LLC Panorama Ave Boulder Colorado Biofuels Developing technology for producing valuable fuel and food from CO2 using algal photosynthesis and bio harvesting http www algaeatwork com Rockies Area AC Solar Inc AC Solar Inc P O Box Florence Colorado Gateway Solar Solar and wind sales for residential http www acsolar com Rockies Area ALD Nanosolutions ALD Nanosolutions E Burbank Street Unit Broomfield Colorado http www aldnanosolutions com contact php Rockies Area Abengoa Solar Abengoa Solar W th Ave Lakewood Colorado Gateway Solar Solar developer http www abengoasolar com Rockies Area Abound Solar Abound Solar Rocky Mountain Avenue Suite Loveland Colorado Gateway Solar Thin film cadmium telluride solar modules http www abound

83

Argonne Breaks Ground on $34.5M MX Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stephenson Appointed ALD for Photon Sciences Stephenson Appointed ALD for Photon Sciences APS, Other DOE Labs Help Develop New Cancer Fighting Drug Paper on Fast Pharmaceuticals by APS Authors Featured in New Journal Art Scene Investigation: Picasso goes Nanotech Linda Young of APS Elected Vice Chair of DAMOP APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Argonne Breaks Ground on $34.5M MX Research Facility SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 Bookmark and Share Artist's rendering of the Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility (left in drawing). The Advanced Photon Source experiment hall is at right. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory broke ground on August 30, 2011, for a $34.5 million Advanced Protein

84

Argonne CNM: 2013 Colloquium Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Colloquium Series 3 Colloquium Series 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | Date Title December 18, 2013 "Monodisperse Carbon Nanomaterial Heterostructures," by Mark Hersam, Northwestern University, hosted by Tijana Rajh Abstract: Improvements in carbon nanomaterial monodispersity have yielded corresponding enhancements in the performance of electronic, optoelectronic, sensing, and energy technologies. However, in all of these cases, carbon nanomaterials are just one of many materials employed, suggesting that further device improvements can be achieved by focusing on the integration of disparate nanomaterials into heterostructures with well-defined interfaces. For example, organic self-assembled monolayers on graphene act as effective seeding layers for atomic layer deposited (ALD) dielectrics, resulting in metal-oxide-graphene capacitors with wafer-scale reliability and uniformity comparable to ALD dielectrics on silicon.

85

2003MayMFGS&T  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-Vol. 1 No. 3 3-Vol. 1 No. 3 Atomic Layer Deposition of Wear-Resistant Coatings for MicroElectroMechanical Devices F riction and wear are major concerns in the performance and reliability of microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices employing sliding contacts. While many tri- bological coating materials are available, most traditional surface coating processes are largely line-of-sight techniques and are unable to apply conformal coatings to the high aspect ratio (height/width) struc- tures such as gear hubs and teeth, typical of MEMS devices. We have demonstrated that thin, conformal, wear resistant coat- ings can be applied to silicon surface micromachined (SMM) structures by atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is a chemical vapor deposi- tion process that employs self-limit- ing surface reactions applied in a

86

APS User News, Special Issue 72  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPECIAL ISSUE 72, September 8, 2011 SPECIAL ISSUE 72, September 8, 2011 Message from Eric Isaacs: Stephenson Named APS Director To the APS User Community, I'm extremely pleased to announce that Brian Stephenson has been appointed Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Photon Sciences, effective September 1, 2011. The directorate comprises three research and support divisions centered on Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS). As you know, Brian has been interim ALD for Photon Sciences since October 2010, proving his abilities to lead both the directorate and the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project effort. He is a recognized and widely known world leader in X-ray science with vast knowledge and expertise in synchrotrons, beamlines, and instrumentation. He received an R&D 100 award

87

Atomic Layer Deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as Characterized Reference Samples for Nanolayer Metrology  

SciTech Connect

Plasma assisted Atomic Layer Deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples were studied using an approach of complementary metrology using Ellipsometry, X-Ray Reflectivity, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence. For modeling the samples, an interfacial rough SiO{sub 2} layer has to be assumed. The excellent linearity of the ALD process was used to cross check Ellipsometry and X-Ray Reflectivity. In contrast to Ellipsometry, X-Ray Reflectivity showed a residual surface layer, identified as chlorine contaminated layer by TXRF. The samples are shown to be ideal candidates for calibration of X-ray fluorescence as the Al signal linearly depends on the film thickness or ALD cycles. Furthermore, the impact of self-absorption of thick layers for TXRF was shown by the samples.

Nutsch, A.; Lemberger, M. [Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Systems and Device Technology, Schottkystrasse 10, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Petrik, P. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly Thege u. 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

Ultra-low loading Pt nanocatalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition on carbon aerogels  

SciTech Connect

Using atomic layer deposition (ALD), we show that Pt nanoparticles can be deposited on the inner surfaces of carbon aerogels (CA). The resultant Pt-loaded materials exhibit high catalytic activity for the oxidation of CO even at loading levels as low as {approx}0.05 mg Pt/cm{sup 2}. We observe a conversion efficiency of nearly 100% in the temperatures range 150-250 C, and the total conversion rate seems to be only limited by the thermal stability of our CA support in ambient oxygen. Our ALD approach described here is universal in nature, and can be applied to the design of new catalytic materials for a variety of applications, including fuel cells, hydrogen storage, pollution control, green chemistry, and liquid fuel production.

King, J S; Wittstock, A; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S O; Wang, Y M; Baumann, T F; Giri, S; Hamza, A V; Baeumer, M; Bent, S F

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

89

Ultra-thin microporous/hybrid materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ultra-thin hybrid and/or microporous materials and methods for their fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, the exemplary hybrid membranes can be formed including successive surface activation and reaction steps on a porous support that is patterned or non-patterned. The surface activation can be performed using remote plasma exposure to locally activate the exterior surfaces of porous support. Organic/inorganic hybrid precursors such as organometallic silane precursors can be condensed on the locally activated exterior surfaces, whereby ALD reactions can then take place between the condensed hybrid precursors and a reactant. Various embodiments can also include an intermittent replacement of ALD precursors during the membrane formation so as to enhance the hybrid molecular network of the membranes.

Jiang, Ying-Bing (Albuquerque, NM); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

90

Accelerated Publication: Drain current enhancement and negligible current collapse in GaN MOSFETs with atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 as a gate dielectric  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accumulation-type GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFET's) with atomic-layer-deposited HfO"2 gate dielectrics have been fabricated; a 4@mm gate-length device with a gate dielectric of 14.8nm in thickness (an equivalent SiO"2 ... Keywords: Atomic layer deposition (ALD), Current collapse, GaN, HfO2, Metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor (MOSFET)

Y. C. Chang; W. H. Chang; Y. H. Chang; J. Kwo; Y. S. Lin; S. H. Hsu; J. M. Hong; C. C. Tsai; M. Hong

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Synthesis of Pt?Pd Core?Shell Nanostructures by Atomic Layer Deposition: Application in Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation to Propylene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was employed to synthesize supported Pt?Pd bimetallic particles in the 1 to 2 nm range. The metal loading and composition of the supported Pt?Pd nanoparticles were controlled by varying the deposition temperature and by applying ALD metal oxide coatings to modify the support surface chemistry. Highresolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images showed monodispersed Pt?Pd nanoparticles on ALD Al2O3 - and TiO2 -modi?ed SiO2 gel. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the bimetallic nanoparticles have a stable Pt-core, Pd-shell nanostructure. Density functional theory calculations revealed that the most stable surface con?guration for the Pt? Pd alloys in an H2 environment has a Pt-core, Pd-shell nanostructure. In comparison to their monometallic counterparts, the small Pt?Pd bimetallic core?shell nanoparticles exhibited higher activity in propane oxidative dehydrogenation as compared to their physical mixture.

Lei, Y.; Liu, Bin; Lu, Junling; Lobo-Lapidus, Rodrigo J.; Wu, Tianpin; Feng, Hao; Xia, Xiaoxing; Mane, Anil U.; Libera, Joseph A.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Elam, J. W.

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

92

Selective atomic layer deposition with electron-beam patterned self-assembled monolayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors selectively deposited nanolines of titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) through atomic layer deposition (ALD) using an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) as a nucleation inhibition layer. Electron-beam (e-beam) patterning is used to prepare nanoline patterns in the OTS SAM on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates suitable for selective ALD. The authors have investigated the effect of an e-beam dose on the pattern width of the selectively deposited TiO{sub 2} lines. A high dose (e.g., 20 nC/cm) causes broadening of the linewidth possibly due to scattering, while a low dose (e.g., 5 nC/cm) results in a low TiO{sub 2} deposition rate because of incomplete exposure of the OTS SAMs. The authors have confirmed that sub-30 nm isolated TiO{sub 2} lines can be achieved by selective ALD combined with OTS patterned by EBL at an accelerating voltage of 2 kV and line dose of 10 nC/cm. This research offers a new approach for patterned gate dielectric layer fabrication, as well as potential applications for nanosensors and solar cells.

Huang, Jie; Lee, Mingun; Kim, Jiyoung [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 and Dongjin Semichem Co., Ltd, 625-3, Yodang-ri, Yangam-myun, Hwasung-si, Gyeonggi-do, 445-930 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Plasma-enhanced and thermal atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using dimethylaluminum isopropoxide, [Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}({mu}-O{sup i}Pr)]{sub 2}, as an alternative aluminum precursor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have been investigating the use of [Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}({mu}-O{sup i}Pr)]{sub 2} (DMAI) as an alternative Al precursor to [Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}] (TMA) for remote plasma-enhanced and thermal ALD over wide temperature ranges of 25-400 and 100-400 deg. C, respectively. The growth per cycle (GPC) obtained using in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry for plasma-enhanced ALD was 0.7-0.9 A/cycle, generally lower than the >0.9 A/cycle afforded by TMA. In contrast, the thermal process gave a higher GPC than TMA above 250 deg. C, but below this temperature, the GPC decreased rapidly with decreasing temperature. Quadrupole mass spectrometry data confirmed that both CH{sub 4} and HO{sup i}Pr were formed during the DMAI dose for both the plasma-enhanced and thermal processes. CH{sub 4} and HO{sup i}Pr were also formed during the H{sub 2}O dose but combustion-like products (CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) were observed during the O{sub 2} plasma dose. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry showed that, for temperatures >100 deg. C and >200 deg. C for plasma-enhanced and thermal ALD, respectively, films from DMAI had an O/Al ratio of 1.5-1.6, a H content of {approx}5 at. % and mass densities of 2.7-3.0 g cm{sup -3}. The film compositions afforded from DMAI were comparable to those from TMA at deposition temperatures {>=}150 deg. C At lower temperatures, there were differences in O, H, and C incorporation. 30 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films from the plasma-enhanced ALD of DMAI were found to passivate n- and p-type Si floatzone wafers ({approx}3.5 and {approx}2 {Omega} cm, respectively) with effective carrier lifetimes comparable to those obtained using TMA. Surface recombination velocities of < 3 and < 6 cm s{sup -1} were obtained for the n- and p-type Si, respectively. Using these results, the film properties obtained using DMAI and TMA are compared and the mechanisms for the plasma-enhanced and thermal ALD using DMAI are discussed.

Potts, Stephen E.; Dingemans, Gijs; Lachaud, Christophe; Kessels, W. M. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P. O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Air Liquide Research and Development, 1 Chemin de la Porte des Loges, BP 126, 78345 Jouy-en-Josas (France); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P. O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Energy Technology Division research summary 1997.  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water nuclear reactors (LWRS) is funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In addition to our ongoing work on environmentally assisted cracking and steam generator integrity, a major new multiyear program has been initiated to assess the performance of high-burnup fuel during loss-of-coolant accidents. The bulk of the NRC research work is carried out in four ET sections: Corrosion: Mechanics of Materials; Irradiation Performance: and Sensors, Instrumentation, and Nondestructive Evaluation. The Transportation of Hazardous Materials Section is the other main contributor; staff from that Section have worked closely with NRC staff to draft a new version of the NRC Standard Review Plan that will be used to provide guidance to NRC reviewers of applications for the renewal of nuclear plant licenses.

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

Energy Technology Division research summary 1997.  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water nuclear reactors (LWRS) is funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In addition to our ongoing work on environmentally assisted cracking and steam generator integrity, a major new multiyear program has been initiated to assess the performance of high-burnup fuel during loss-of-coolant accidents. The bulk of the NRC research work is carried out in four ET sections: Corrosion: Mechanics of Materials; Irradiation Performance: and Sensors, Instrumentation, and Nondestructive Evaluation. The Transportation of Hazardous Materials Section is the other main contributor; staff from that Section have worked closely with NRC staff to draft a new version of the NRC Standard Review Plan that will be used to provide guidance to NRC reviewers of applications for the renewal of nuclear plant licenses.

NONE

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

96

Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition and etching of high-k gadolinium oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of high-quality gadolinium oxide thin films is achieved using Gd(iPrCp){sub 3} and O{sub 2} plasma. Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth is observed from 150 to 350 deg. C, though the optical properties of the film improve at higher temperature. True layer-by-layer ALD growth of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} occurred in a relatively narrow window of temperature and precursor dose. A saturated growth rate of 1.4 A/cycle was observed at 250 deg. C. As the temperature increases, high-quality films are deposited, but the growth mechanism appears to become CVD-like, indicating the onset of precursor decomposition. At 250 deg. C, the refractive index of the film is stable at {approx}1.80 regardless of other deposition conditions, and the measured dispersion characteristics are comparable to those of bulk Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. XPS data show that the O/Gd ratio is oxygen deficient at 1.3, and that it is also very hygroscopic. The plasma etching rate of the ALD Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} film in a high-density helicon reactor is very low. Little difference is observed in etching rate between Cl{sub 2} and pure Ar plasmas, suggesting that physical sputtering dominates the etching. A threshold bias power exists below which etching does not occur; thus it may be possible to etch a metal gate material and stop easily on the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate dielectric. The Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} film has a dielectric constant of about 16, exhibits low C-V hysteresis, and allows a 50 x reduction in gate leakage compared to SiO{sub 2}. However, the plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) process causes formation of an {approx}1.8 nm SiO{sub 2} interfacial layer, and generates a fixed charge of -1.21 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, both of which may limit use of PE-ALD Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a gate dielectric.

Vitale, Steven A.; Wyatt, Peter W.; Hodson, Chris J. [MIT Lincoln Laboratory, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 02420 (United States); Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, Yatton, Bristol, BS49 4AP (United Kingdom)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. Final report : January 1, 2001 - December 31, 2008.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory carried out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry-specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it was desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. It was desired that selectivity be directed toward producing diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. The original goal was to produce shape-selective catalysts that had the potential to limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage.' This cage would also restrict their loss by attrition during use in slurry-bed reactors. The first stage of this program was to prepare and evaluate iron-containing particulate catalysts. Such catalysts were prepared with silica-containing fractal cages. The activity and strength was essentially the same as that of catalysts without the cages. Since there was no improvement, the program plan was modified as discussed below. A second experimental stage was undertaken to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes and particulate supports. The concept was that of depositing active metals (i.e. ruthenium, iron or cobalt) upon membranes with well defined flow channels of small diameter and length such that the catalytic activity and product molecular weight distribution could be controlled. In order to rapidly evaluate the catalytic membranes, the ALD coating processes were performed in an 'exploratory mode' in which ALD procedures from the literature appropriate for coating flat surfaces were applied to the high surface area membranes. Consequently, the Fe and Ru loadings in the membranes were likely to be smaller than those expected for complete monolayer coverage. In addition, there was likely to be significant variation in the Fe and Ru loading among the membranes due to difficulties in nucleating these materials on the aluminum oxide surfaces. The first series of experiments using coated membranes demonstrated that the technology needed further improvement. Specifically, observed catalytic FT activity was low. This low activity appeared to be due to: (1) low available surface area, (2) atomic deposition techniques that needed improvements, and (3) insufficient preconditioning of the catalyst surface prior to FT testing. Therefore, experimentation was expanded to the use of particulate silica supports having defined channels and reasonably high surface area. An effective FT catalyst consisting of ALD-deposited Co and Pt on a silica support has been prepared and demonstrated. This catalyst was more effective than a similar catalyst deposited upon a support of ALD-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on silica. This result implies that the deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to form a support is not as effective as desired. The addition of Pt as a Co-containing catalyst promoter has been demonstrated; it appears to primarily affect the catalyst pre-conditioning step. Co on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst prepared by the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) is more effective than Argonne-prepared ALD-deposited Co on ALD-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The FT activity of ALD-coated Co catalyst on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is about linear with Co level from about 9 to 25%. A cooperative research effort was undertaken to test the deposition of platinum on Co FT catalysts; this Pt influences the effectiveness of catalyst conditioning and its continuing activity. In summary, the ALD Pt at a low concentration (0.1 wt %) was as effective as that of the wet chemical deposition technique of CAER (specifically incipient deposition on a Co catalyst that had been prepared and calcined before the Pt deposition.) The ALD technique appeared to be nominally better than the incipient wetness technique that involved co-deposition of

Cronauer, D. C. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

98

Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. Final report : January 1, 2001 - December 31, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory carried out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry-specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it was desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. It was desired that selectivity be directed toward producing diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. The original goal was to produce shape-selective catalysts that had the potential to limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage.' This cage would also restrict their loss by attrition during use in slurry-bed reactors. The first stage of this program was to prepare and evaluate iron-containing particulate catalysts. Such catalysts were prepared with silica-containing fractal cages. The activity and strength was essentially the same as that of catalysts without the cages. Since there was no improvement, the program plan was modified as discussed below. A second experimental stage was undertaken to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes and particulate supports. The concept was that of depositing active metals (i.e. ruthenium, iron or cobalt) upon membranes with well defined flow channels of small diameter and length such that the catalytic activity and product molecular weight distribution could be controlled. In order to rapidly evaluate the catalytic membranes, the ALD coating processes were performed in an 'exploratory mode' in which ALD procedures from the literature appropriate for coating flat surfaces were applied to the high surface area membranes. Consequently, the Fe and Ru loadings in the membranes were likely to be smaller than those expected for complete monolayer coverage. In addition, there was likely to be significant variation in the Fe and Ru loading among the membranes due to difficulties in nucleating these materials on the aluminum oxide surfaces. The first series of experiments using coated membranes demonstrated that the technology needed further improvement. Specifically, observed catalytic FT activity was low. This low activity appeared to be due to: (1) low available surface area, (2) atomic deposition techniques that needed improvements, and (3) insufficient preconditioning of the catalyst surface prior to FT testing. Therefore, experimentation was expanded to the use of particulate silica supports having defined channels and reasonably high surface area. An effective FT catalyst consisting of ALD-deposited Co and Pt on a silica support has been prepared and demonstrated. This catalyst was more effective than a similar catalyst deposited upon a support of ALD-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on silica. This result implies that the deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to form a support is not as effective as desired. The addition of Pt as a Co-containing catalyst promoter has been demonstrated; it appears to primarily affect the catalyst pre-conditioning step. Co on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst prepared by the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) is more effective than Argonne-prepared ALD-deposited Co on ALD-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The FT activity of ALD-coated Co catalyst on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is about linear with Co level from about 9 to 25%. A cooperative research effort was undertaken to test the deposition of platinum on Co FT catalysts; this Pt influences the effectiveness of catalyst conditioning and its continuing activity. In summary, the ALD Pt at a low concentration (0.1 wt %) was as effective as that of the wet chemical deposition technique of CAER (specifically incipient deposition on a Co catalyst that had been prepared and calcined before the Pt deposition.) The ALD technique appeared to be nominally better than the incipient wetness technique that involved co-deposition of

Cronauer, D. C. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

99

Indium oxide atomic layer deposition facilitated by the synergy between oxygen and water.  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) films using cyclopentadienyl indium (InCp) and combinations of both molecular oxygen and water as the co-reactants. When either O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O were used individually as the oxygen source the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth was negligible over the temperature range 100-250 C. However, when oxygen and water were used in combination either as a simultaneous exposure or supplied sequentially, In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were deposited at growth rates of 1.0-1.6 {angstrom}/cycle over the full range of deposition temperatures. In situ quadrupole mass spectrometry and quartz crystal microbalance measurements revealed that water serves the function of releasing ligands from the surface while oxygen performs the role of oxidizing the indium. Since both processes are necessary for sustained growth, both O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O are required for the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD. The electrical resistivity, mobility, and carrier concentration of the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films varied dramatically with both the deposition temperature and co-reactant sequence and correlated to a crystallization occurring at {approx}140 C observed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Using this new process we successfully deposited ALD In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films over large area substrates (12 in. x 18 in.) with very high uniformity in thickness and resistivity.

Libera, J. A.; Hryn, J. N.; Elam, J. W. (Energy Systems)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

100

Lipidomic changes in rat liver after long-term exposure to ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a serious health problem with significant morbidity and mortality. In this study we examined the progression of ALD along with lipidomic changes in rats fed ethanol for 2 and 3 months to understand the mechanism, and identify possible biomarkers. Male Fischer 344 rats were fed 5% ethanol or caloric equivalent of maltose-dextrin in a Lieber-DeCarli diet. Animals were killed at the end of 2 and 3 months and plasma and livers were collected. Portions of the liver were fixed for histological and immunohistological studies. Plasma and the liver lipids were extracted and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A time dependent fatty infiltration was observed in the livers of ethanol-fed rats. Mild inflammation and oxidative stress were observed in some ethanol-fed rats at 3 months. The multivariate and principal component analysis of proton and phosphorus NMR spectroscopy data of extracted lipids from the plasma and livers showed segregation of ethanol-fed groups from the pair-fed controls. Significant hepatic lipids that were increased by ethanol exposure included fatty acids and triglycerides, whereas phosphatidylcholine (PC) decreased. However, both free fatty acids and PC decreased in the plasma. In liver lipids unsaturation of fatty acyl chains increased, contrary to plasma, where it decreased. Our studies confirm that over-accumulation of lipids in ethanol-induced liver steatosis accompanied by mild inflammation on long duration of ethanol exposure. Identified metabolic profile using NMR lipidomics could be further explored to establish biomarker signatures representing the etiopathogenesis, progression and/or severity of ALD. - Highlights: > Long term exposure to ethanol was studied. > A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy based lipidomic approach was used. > We examined the clustering pattern of the NMR data with principal component analysis. > NMR data were compared with histology and immunohistochemistry data. > Biochemical parameters were compared with the observed NMR lipid data.

Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Kondraganti, Shakuntala [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Kaphalia, Bhupendra S. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Shakeel Ansari, G.A., E-mail: sansari@utmb.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ant-eden ald en-lanc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin Films Thin Films PDF format (189 kb) Multi Layer Thin Films Multi Layer Thin Films Planetary Sputtering SystemsPlanetary Sputtering Systems Planetary Sputtering Systems The Thin Film laboratory within Manufacturing Science & Technology provides a variety of vapor deposition processes and facilities for cooperative research and development. Available capabilities include electron beam evaporation, sputter deposition, reactive deposition processes, atomic layer deposition (ALD) and specialized techniques such as focused ion beam induced chemical vapor deposition. Equipment can be reconfigured for prototyping or it can be dedicated to long-term research, development and manufacturing. Most sputter and evaporative deposition systems are capable of depositing multiple materials.

102

Accelerated deployment of nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts. Final CRADA Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanomanufacturing offers an opportunity to create domestic jobs and facilitate economic growth. In response to this need, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy issued a Research Call to develop nanomanufacturing capabilities at the National Laboratories. High performance catalysts represent a unique opportunity to deploy nanomanufacturing technologies. Re-refining of used lube oil offers an opportunity to create manufacturing jobs and decrease dependence on imported petroleum. Improved catalysts are required to produce a better quality product, decrease environmental impact, extend catalyst life, and improve overall economics of lube oil re-refining. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) in cooperation with Universal Lubricants, Inc. (ULI) and Chemical Engineering Partners (CEP) have carried out a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to prepare nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to exhibit superior performance for the re-refining of used lube oil. We investigated the upgrading of recycled lube oil by hydrogenation using commercial, synthetically-modified commercial catalysts, and synthesized catalysts. A down-flow (trickle bed) catalytic unit was used for the hydrogenation experiments. In addition to carrying out elemental analyses of the various feed and product fractions, characterization was undertaken using H{sup 1} and C{sup 13} NMR. Initially commercial were evaluated. Second these commercial catalysts were promoted with precious metals using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Performance improvements were observed that declined with catalyst aging. An alternate approach was undertaken to deeply upgrade ULI product oils. Using a synthesized catalyst, much lower hydrogenation temperatures were required than commercial catalysts. Other performance improvements were also observed. The resulting lube oil fractions were of high purity even at low reaction severity. The products recovered from both the ALD and other processes were water-white (even those from the low temperature, low residence time (high space velocity), low conversion runs). These results indicate that highly upgraded recycle lube oils can be produced using ALD-deposited active metal catalysts. The use of H{sup 1} and C{sup 13} NMR for the characterization of the treated lube oils has been shown to be effective.

Libera, J.A.; Snyder, S.W.; Mane, A.; Elam, J.W.; Cronauer, D.C.; Muntean, J.A.; Wu, T.; Miller, J.T. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); ( ES)

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

103

ThinFilms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin Films Thin Films Manufacturing Technologies The Thin Film laboratory provides a variety of vapor deposition processes and facilities for cooperative research and development. Available capabilities include electron beam evaporation, sputter deposition, reactive deposi- tion processes, atomic layer deposition (ALD) and specialized techniques such as focused ion beam induced chemical vapor deposition. Equipment can be reconfigured for prototyping, or it can be dedicated to long-term research, development and manufacturing. Most sputter and evaporative deposition systems are capable of depositing multiple materials. Deposition capabilities and expertise * Deposition of a large variety of thin film mate- rials * Multiple sputter deposition systems - Capable of depositing four materials in a

104

Information Solutions: Database Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Database Applications Database Applications Argonne DOE-BES Central User Facility: A-Z People Query Data Warehouse Edits Registration | Registration Processing Security Admin Beamline Component Database System to manage beamline components. Beamline Downtime Report - UES Floor coordinator's downtime entry and reporting system. Beamline Directory | Beamline Entry Administration Links to the beamline websites and to detailed information about the equipment, techniques and contact information of a beamline. Beamline Usage and Scheduling System Long term schedule query and edit. Beamline schedule query and edit. Watchman and PSS data. Budget Proposal System Allows user to submit budget proposals via the web. Beamline Statistics Menu Query, entry and reporting of beamline statistics for ALD use only.

105

Role of osteopontin in hepatic neutrophil infiltration during alcoholic steatohepatitis  

SciTech Connect

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major complication of heavy alcohol (EtOH) drinking and is characterized by three progressive stages of pathology: steatosis, steatohepatitis, and fibrosis/cirrhosis. Alcoholic steatosis (AS) is the initial stage of ALD and consists of fat accumulation in the liver accompanied by minimal liver injury. AS is known to render the hepatocytes increasingly sensitive to toxicants such as bacterial endotoxin (LPS). Alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH), the second and rate-limiting step in the progression of ALD, is characterized by hepatic fat accumulation, neutrophil infiltration, and neutrophil-mediated parenchymal injury. However, the pathogenesis of ASH is poorly defined. It has been theorized that the pathogenesis of ASH involves interaction of increased circulating levels of LPS with hepatocytes being rendered highly sensitive to LPS due to heavy EtOH consumption. We hypothesize that osteopontin (OPN), a matricellular protein (MCP), plays an important role in the hepatic neutrophil recruitment due to its enhanced expression during the early phase of ALD (AS and ASH). To study the role of OPN in the pathogenesis of ASH, we induced AS in male Sprague-Dawley rats by feeding EtOH-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for 6 weeks. AS rats experienced extensive fat accumulation and minimal liver injury. Moderate induction in OPN was observed in AS group. ASH was induced by feeding male Sprague-Dawley rats EtOH-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for 6 weeks followed by LPS injection. The ASH rats had substantial neutrophil infiltration, coagulative oncotic necrosis, and developed higher liver injury. Significant increases in the hepatic and circulating levels of OPN was observed in the ASH rats. Higher levels of the active, thrombin-cleaved form of OPN in the liver in ASH group correlated remarkably with hepatic neutrophil infiltration. Finally, correlative studies between OPN and hepatic neutrophil infiltration was corroborated in a simple rat peritoneal model where enhanced peritoneal fluid neutrophil infiltration was noted in rats injected OPN intraperitoneally. Taken together these data indicate that OPN expression induced during ASH may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of ASH by stimulating neutrophil transmigration.

Apte, Udayan M. [Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A and M University, MS4467, College Station, TX 77843-4467 (United States); Banerjee, Atrayee [Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A and M University, MS4467, College Station, TX 77843-4467 (United States); McRee, Rachel [Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A and M University, MS4467, College Station, TX 77843-4467 (United States); Wellberg, Elizabeth [Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A and M University, MS4467, College Station, TX 77843-4467 (United States); Ramaiah, Shashi K. [Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A and M University, MS4467, College Station, TX 77843-4467 (United States)]. E-mail: sramaiah@cvm.tamu.edu

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

106

Citation: D.E. Groom  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

f f J (2220) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (2 + + or 4 + + ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE THE f J (2220) Updated April 2000 by M. Doser (CERN). This state has been observed in J/ψ(1S) radiative decay into KK (K + K - and K 0 S K 0 S modes seen (BALTRUSAITIS 86D, BAI 96B)). An upper limit from DM2 for these modes (AUGUSTIN 88) is at the level at which observation is claimed. There are also indications for further decay modes (π + π - and pp (BAI 96B) and π 0 π 0 (BAI 98H)) in the same production process, although again at the level at which previous upper limits had been obtained (BALTRUSAITIS 86D). This was also seen in ηη (ALDE 86B), K 0 S K 0 S (ASTON 88D), and K + K - (ALDE 88 F), albeit with very low statistics. Its J P C is determined from the angular distributions of these observations. It is not seen in Υ radiative decays (BARU 89), B inclusive decays (BEHRENDS 84), nor in γγ (GODANG 97, ALAM 98C), which is not surprising, since

107

Electromagnetic and gravitational self-force on a relativistic particle from quantum fields in curved space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a quantum field theoretical derivation of the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac (ALD) equation, describing the motion of an electric point charge sourcing an electromagnetic field, which back-reacts on the charge as a self-force, and the Mino-Sasaki-Tanaka-Quinn-Wald (MSTQW) equation describing the motion of a point mass with self-force interacting with the linearized metric perturbations caused by the mass off an otherwise vacuous curved background spacetime. We regularize the formally divergent self-force by smearing the direct part of the retarded Green's function and using a quasilocal expansion. We also derive the ALD-Langevin and the MSTQW-Langevin equations with a classical stochastic force accounting for the effect of the quantum fluctuations in the field, which causes small fluctuations on the particle trajectory. These equations will be useful for studying the stochastic motion of charges and small masses under the influence of both quantum and classical noise sources, derived either self-consistently or put in by hand phenomenologically. We also show that history-dependent noise-induced drift motions could arise from such stochastic sources on the trajectory that could be a hidden feature of gravitational wave forms hitherto unknown.

Chad R. Galley; B. L. Hu; Shih-Yuin Lin

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

A novel cell model to study the function of the adrenoleukodystrophy-related protein  

SciTech Connect

X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to mutations in the ABCD1 (ALD) gene. ALDRP, the closest homolog of ALDP, has been shown to have partial functional redundancy with ALDP and, when overexpressed, can compensate for the loss-of-function of ALDP. In order to characterize the function of ALDRP and to understand the phenomenon of gene redundancy, we have developed a novel system that allows the controlled expression of the ALDRP-EGFP fusion protein (normal or non-functional mutated ALDRP) using the Tet-On system in H4IIEC3 rat hepatoma cells. The generated stable cell lines express negligible levels of endogenous ALDRP and doxycycline dosage-dependent levels of normal or mutated ALDRP. Importantly, the ALDRP-EGFP protein is targeted correctly to peroxisome and is functional. The obtained cell lines will be an indispensable tool in our further studies aimed at the resolution of the function of ALDRP to characterize its potential substrates in a natural context.

Gueugnon, Fabien [Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Faculte des Sciences Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Volodina, Natalia [Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Faculte des Sciences Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Taouil, Jaoued Et [Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Faculte des Sciences Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Lopez, Tatiana E. [Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Faculte des Sciences Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Gondcaille, Catherine [Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Faculte des Sciences Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Grand, Anabelle Sequeira-Le [Plate-forme Commune de Cytometrie en Flux, Universite de Bourgogne, Faculte de Medecine-IFR100, 21000 Dijon (France); Mooijer, Petra A.W. [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Genetic Metabolic Diseases Laboratory, Departments of Pediatrics, Emma Children's Hospital, and Clinical Chemistry, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kemp, Stephan [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Genetic Metabolic Diseases Laboratory, Departments of Pediatrics, Emma Children's Hospital, and Clinical Chemistry, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wanders, Ronald J.A. [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Genetic Metabolic Diseases Laboratory, Departments of Pediatrics, Emma Children's Hospital, and Clinical Chemistry, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Savary, Stephane [Laboratoire de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Faculte des Sciences Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France)]. E-mail: stsavary@u-bourgogne.fr

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

109

The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced by using a leaf position constraint (LPC) that reduces the difference in the position of adjacent MLC leaves in the plan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the LPC on the quality of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans and the effect of the MLC motion pattern on the dosimetric accuracy of MLC tracking delivery. Specifically, the possibility of predicting the accuracy of MLC tracking delivery based on the plan modulation was investigated. Methods: Inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans were created on CT-data of three lung cancer patients. For each case, five plans with a single 358 deg. arc were generated with LPC priorities of 0 (no LPC), 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 (highest possible LPC), respectively. All the plans had a prescribed dose of 2 Gy x 30, used 6 MV, a maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a collimator angle of 45 deg. or 315 deg. To quantify the plan modulation, an average adjacent leaf distance (ALD) was calculated by averaging the mean adjacent leaf distance for each control point. The linear relationship between the plan quality [i.e., the calculated dose distributions and the number of monitor units (MU)] and the LPC was investigated, and the linear regression coefficient as well as a two tailed confidence level of 95% was used in the evaluation. The effect of the plan modulation on the performance of MLC tracking was tested by delivering the plans to a cylindrical diode array phantom moving with sinusoidal motion in the superior-inferior direction with a peak-to-peak displacement of 2 cm and a cycle time of 6 s. The delivery was adjusted to the target motion using MLC tracking, guided in real-time by an infrared optical system. The dosimetric results were evaluated using gamma index evaluation with static target measurements as reference. Results: The plan quality parameters did not depend significantly on the LPC (p {>=} 0.066), whereas the ALD depended significantly on the LPC (p < 0.001). The gamma index failure rate depended significantly on the ALD, weighted to the percentage of the beam delivered in each control point of the plan (ALD{sub w}) when MLC tracking was used (p < 0.001), but not for delivery without MLC tracking (p {>=} 0.342). The gamma index failure rate with the criteria of 2% and 2 mm was decreased from > 33.9% without MLC tracking to <31.4% (LPC 0) and <2.2% (LPC 1) with MLC tracking. Conclusions: The results indicate that the dosimetric robustness of MLC tracking delivery of an inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan can be improved by incorporating leaf position constraints in the objective function without otherwise affecting the plan quality. The dosimetric robustness may be estimated prior to delivery by evaluating the ALD{sub w} of the plan.

Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, Paul; Chul Cho, Byung; Aznar, Marianne; Korreman, Stine; Poulsen, Per; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per [Radiation Medicine Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology - 3994, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, DK - 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark) and Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Radiation Medicine Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital (Denmark); Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Radiation Medicine Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark and Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Radiation Medicine Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark) and Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University (Denmark); Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital (Denmark); Radiation Medicine Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital (Denmark) and Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

High Rate and High Capacity Li-Ion Electrodes for Vehicular Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant advances in both energy density and rate capability for Li-ion batteries are necessary for implementation in electric vehicles. We have employed two different methods to improve the rate capability of high capacity electrodes. For example, we previously demonstrated that thin film high volume expansion MoO{sub 3} nanoparticle electrodes ({approx}2 {micro}m thick) have a stable capacity of {approx}630 mAh/g, at C/2 (charge/dicharge in 2 hours). By fabricating thicker conventional electrodes, an improved reversible capacity of {approx}1000 mAh/g is achieved, but the rate capability decreases. To achieve high-rate capability, we applied a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposition coating to enable the high volume expansion and prevent mechanical degradation. Also, we recently reported that a thin ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating can enable natural graphite (NG) electrodes to exhibit remarkably durable cycling at 50 C. Additionally, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD films with a thickness of 2 to 4 {angstrom} have been shown to allow LiCoO{sub 2} to exhibit 89% capacity retention after 120 charge-discharge cycles performed up to 4.5 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. Capacity fade at this high voltage is generally caused by oxidative decomposition of the electrolyte or cobalt dissolution. We have recently fabricated full cells of NG and LiCoO{sub 2} and coated both electrodes, one or the other electrode as well as neither electrode. In creating these full cells, we observed some surprising results that lead us to obtain a greater understanding of the ALD coatings. In a different approach we have employed carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) to synthesize binder-free, high-rate capability electrodes, with 95 wt.% active materials. In one case, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods are employed as the active storage anode material. Recently, we have also employed this method to demonstrate improved conductivity and highly improved rate capability for a LiNi{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathode material. Raman spectroscopy was employed to understand how the SWNTs function as a highly flexible conductive additive.

Dillon, A. C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

APS User News, Issue 76  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, February 21, 2012 6, February 21, 2012 CONTENTS DIRECTOR'S CORNER Special Announcement: George Srajer Appointed Project Director for the APS Upgrade and Deputy ALD USER MATTERS -- Registration Open for 2012 APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting: Our User Science Shapes the Future! -- CALLING ALL VIDEO MAKERS! Submit Your Films for the "Usies Awards"! -- LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops March 19-22, 2012 -- NUFO Goes To Washington! -- Tax Presentation Available BRIEFLY NOTED -- Recognitions and Honors -- Users Meeting Satellite Workshop: "SAXS Software Packages Irena and Nika" -- New Web Page Offers Quick Help Links for Users -- New Mural Graces the Wall near Viewing Area -- General User Proposal Deadline for 2012-2 Run: March 9, 2012 =====================================================

112

Giant Dielectric Constant Controlled by Maxwell-Wagner Dielectric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Dielectric Constant Controlled Giant Dielectric Constant Controlled by Maxwell-Wagner Dielectric Relaxation in Al2O3/TiO2 Nanolaminates Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition Giant Dielectric Constant Controlled by Maxwell-Wagner Dielectric Relaxation in Al2O3/TiO2 Nanolaminates Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition Nanolaminate consisting of Al2O3 and TiO2 oxide sublayers were synthesized, using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to produce individual layers with atomic scale control. The main goal of this work is to produce robust high dielectric constant layers based on biocompatible materials, such as Al2O3 and TiO2, suitable to fabricate high-capacitance capacitors for microchip embedded energy storage capacitor for implantable biomedical devices. However, these capacitors based on Al2O3/TiO2 nanolaminates can provide

113

Safety Overview Committee (SOC)  

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Safety Overview Committee (SOC) Charter Safety Overview Committee (SOC) Charter 1. Purpose The Safety Overview Committee establishes safety policies and ad hoc safety committees. 2. Membership Membership will include the following individuals: APS Director APS Division Directors PSC ESH/QA Coordinator - Chair 3. Method The Committee will: Establish safety policies for the management of business within the APS. Create short-term committees, as appropriate, to address safety problems not covered by the existing committee structure. The committee chairperson meets with relevant safety representatives to discuss safety questions. 4. Frequency of Meetings Safety topics and policies normally are discussed and resolved during meetings of the Operations Directorate or the PSC ALD Division Directors. Otherwise, any committee member may request that a meeting be held of the

114

G I A. J. Brcslill, Director halt:: Protection Ci&ieerirG Divisio:l  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

G G I A. J. Brcslill, Director halt:: Protection Ci&ieerirG Divisio:l H. Glauberrrrr: iiealt;: Protection &;'ineeri::i: Division SURVEY OF IIOOD BUILDING DECO~iTX.fIi~ATIO.:i . 'L. KSH: 3G I viz&Led t.:e Hood Buildiiig on July 3, 1763 wit:. Lr. R. C;iamberli!: axd NY. F. M!sce of the &scac..zetts Institute of Teci:;iolozy, Occupational Medical Service, Mr. R. Hoxell, Massac::usetIs Insti.t.ule of Tec:fioloGy, Btlilding Maintenance, and NE. P. Russo of Cx-Rad, to perform a fhal radiatioi: survey of the site remairs. Tr.e building was completely denolisi:ed except for t e baseme:% vizlls a:.d sections of tiie colicrete flax. All ~buildir;;: materials aid debris assodiated witri the demolition p?&se ilad bee:: removed from '~:ie si.Le a;ld properly

115

Epitaxial Growth of GaN-based LEDs on Simple Sacrificial Substrates  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to produce alternative substrate technologies for GaN-based LEDs by developing an ALD interlayer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on sacrificial substrates such as ZnO and Si. A sacrificial substrate is used for device growth that can easily be removed using a wet chemical etchant leaving only the thin GaN epi-layer. After substrate removal, the GaN LED chip can then be mounted in several different ways to a metal heat sink/reflector and light extraction techniques can then be applied to the chip and compared for performance. Success in this work will lead to high efficiency LED devices with a simple low cost fabrication method and high product yield as stated by DOE goals for its solid state lighting portfolio.

Ian Ferguson; Chris Summers

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Picosun | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Picosun Picosun Jump to: navigation, search Name Picosun Place Finland Product Picosun is an international equipment manufacturer with a world-wide sales and service organization. We develop and manufacture Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) reactors for micro- and nanotechnology applications. References Picosun[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Picosun is a company located in Finland . References ↑ "Picosun" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Picosun&oldid=349740" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

117

SRF Materials: Fundamental studies of interfacial oxidation chemistry of niobium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANL/FNAL/UC Collaboration meeting 27 Nov 2007 ANL/FNAL/UC Collaboration meeting 27 Nov 2007 SRF Materials: Fundamental studies of interfacial oxidation chemistry of niobium Lance Cooley - FNAL Mike Pellin, Jim Norem - ANL Steve Sibener - UC John Zasadzinski, Thomas Prolier - IIT f ANL/FNAL/UC Collaboration meeting 27 Nov 2007 May 2007 SRF Materials Workshop @ FNAL energized 2 collaborations being reported here * Atomic layer deposition of conformal coatings onto cavities (Pellin, Zasadzinski, Prolier, Norem, Antoine/Wu/Cooley) - Directly probe surface superconductivity (SC) via 1.5 K STM + XPS surface composition - Nb oxidation layer proximity effects! - ALD Al 2 O 3 coated cavity first, for oxidation control; multilayer- coated cavity later - A new philosophy: build up, not etch down - First annealing results reveal oxidation vs

118

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RHIC Status & Plans RHIC Status & Plans Steve Vigdor NSAC Implementation Subcommittee Hearings Sept. 7, 2012 Upcoming Speakers & Topics: I. S. Vigdor (BNL ALD) - Facility status and plans; science accomplishments and goals; timeline for next decade; path to eRHIC II. U. Wiedemann (CERN) - - Theory drivers & view from LHC III. P. Sorensen (2008 George E. Valley Prize) - RHIC physics with soft probes IV. Y. Akiba (201 1 Nishina Memorial Prize) - RHIC physics with hard probes V. S. Vigdor - Take- away messages & answers to questions Incremental Upgrades ⇒ Dramatic Improvements in Collider Performance & Versatility 2 new colliding beam species in 2012 B h+v pickups Y h+v kickers B h+v kickers Y h+v pickups Measure deviations

119

APS Users Organization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APSUO APSUO By-Laws Steering Commitee Employment Meetings Compton Award Franklin Award APS Users Organization The APSUO is responsible for advising the APS Associate Laboratory Director in the following areas: The Organization will serve as an advocacy group for the Facility and its user community. The Organization will provide advice to the ALD on matters affecting the user community. The Organization will assure good communication between the APS user community and the APS management. APSUO By-Laws The by-laws upon which the APS User Organization is based. List of Steering Committee Members Steering committee for the APS Users Organization. Employment Bulletin Board APS-related employment opportunities. APSUO Steering Committee Meetings Minutes and presentations from the APSUO meetings.

120

PREPRINT  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

JC- 130518 JC- 130518 PREPRINT Synthesis, Scale-up and Characterization of 2,6-Diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-l-oxide (LLM-105) Philip F. Pagoria, Alexander R. Mitchell, Robert D. Schmidt Randall L. Simpson, Frank Garcia, Jerry W. Forbes Rosalind W. Swansiger, D. Mark Hoffman This paper was prepared for submittal to the JOWOG 9, Ald ermaston, England June 22-26,1998 April 27, 1998 This is a preprint of a paper intended for publication in a journal or proceedings Since changes may be made before publication, this preprint is made available with the understanding that it will not be cited or reproduced without the permission of the . author DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor the

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121

SOURCE_12_AUG_03.qxd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cont'd. on page 6 Cont'd. on page 6 "If we build it they will come" has never been truer than when applied to the APS and its users. More than 5,000 members of the synchrotron radiation research community are signed up to carry out research at the APS. As the num- ber of APS users continues to grow, the facility is evolving, finding new ways (and improving on established practices) to better serve our client base. Whether these changes involve reorganizing divisions or technological innovation, the goal is always to provide an environment where users can make the most of their time here. In this first of a series, we look at ways the APS Operations Division (AOD) is responding to these challenges. As one of his performance goals for the APS, ALD Murray Gibson committed to allocating more of the FY03

122

APS SAC Policy  

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APS Scientific Advisory Committee Policy Adopted 1/21/2003 The Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) inherits and expands the role of the former Program Evaluation Board (PEB). It advises the Associate Laboratory Director for the APS (ALD/APS) with the following responsibilities: Scope To evaluate the scientific output and facility utilization for all APS sectors. To examine performance and recommend appropriate beamtime allocation for existing Collaborative Access Teams (CATs). To evaluate Letters of Intent and scientific proposals for new and reconstituted CATs. To provide advice to and review decisions by APS management on special operations support for CATs. To review proposals for Partner User access, a new access mode that will guarantee 10-30% the beam time per year on any sector for a finite

123

Embedding a carbon nanotube across the diameter of a solid state nanopore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fabrication method for positioning and embedding a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) across the diameter of a solid state nanopore is presented. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is used to grow SWNTs over arrays of focused ion beam (FIB) milled pores in a thin silicon nitride membrane. This typically yields at least one pore whose diameter is centrally crossed by a SWNT. The final diameter of the FIB pore is adjusted to create a nanopore of any desired diameter by atomic layer deposition (ALD), simultaneously embedding and insulating the SWNT everywhere but in the region that crosses the diameter of the final nanopore, where it remains pristine and bare. This nanotube-articulated nanopore is an important step towards the realization of a new type of detector for biomolecule sensing and electronic characterization, including DNA sequencing.

E. S. Sadki; S. Garaj; D. Vlassarev; J. A. Golovchenko; D. Branton

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

124

Hardware authentication using transmission spectra modified optical fiber.  

SciTech Connect

The ability to authenticate the source and integrity of data is critical to the monitoring and inspection of special nuclear materials, including hardware related to weapons production. Current methods rely on electronic encryption/authentication codes housed in monitoring devices. This always invites the question of implementation and protection of authentication information in an electronic component necessitating EMI shielding, possibly an on board power source to maintain the information in memory. By using atomic layer deposition techniques (ALD) on photonic band gap (PBG) optical fibers we will explore the potential to randomly manipulate the output spectrum and intensity of an input light source. This randomization could produce unique signatures authenticating devices with the potential to authenticate data. An external light source projected through the fiber with a spectrometer at the exit would 'read' the unique signature. No internal power or computational resources would be required.

Grubbs, Robert K.; Romero, Juan A.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : atomic layer deposition of active catalytic metals. Activity report : January 1, 2005 - September 30, 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry - specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it is desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. The broad goal is to produce diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. Originally the goal was to prepare shape-selective catalysts that would limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage.' Such catalysts were prepared with silica-containing fractal cages. The activity was essentially the same as that of catalysts without the cages. We are currently awaiting follow-up experiments to determine the attrition strength of these catalysts. A second experimental stage was undertaken to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes and particulate supports. The concept was that of depositing active metals (i.e. ruthenium, iron or cobalt) upon membranes with well defined flow channels of small diameter and length such that the catalytic activity and product molecular weight distribution could be controlled. In order to rapidly evaluate the catalytic membranes, the ALD coating processes were performed in an 'exploratory mode' in which ALD procedures from the literature appropriate for coating flat surfaces were applied to the high surface area membranes. Consequently, the Fe and Ru loadings in the membranes were likely to be smaller than those expected for complete monolayer coverage. In addition, there was likely to be significant variation in the Fe and Ru loading among the membranes due to difficulties in nucleating these materials on the aluminum oxide surfaces. The first series of experiments using coated membranes demonstrated that the technology needed further improvement. Specifically, observed catalytic FT activity was low. This low activity appeared to be due to: (1) low available surface area, (2) atomic deposition techniques that needed improvements, and (3) insufficient preconditioning of the catalyst surface prior to FT testing. Therefore, experimentation was expanded to the use of particulate silica supports having defined channels and reasonably high surface area. This later experimentation will be discussed in the next progress report. Subsequently, we plan to evaluate membranes after the ALD techniques are improved with a careful study to control and quantify the Fe and Ru loadings. The preconditioning of these surfaces will also be further developed. (A number of improvements have been made with particulate supports; they will be discussed in the subsequent report.) In support of the above, there was an opportunity to undertake a short study of cobalt/promoter/support interaction using the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne. Five catalysts and a reference cobalt oxide were characterized during a temperature programmed EXAFS/XANES experimental study with the combined effort of Argonne and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) of the University of Kentucky. This project was completed, and it resulted in an extensive understanding of the preconditioning step of reducing Co-containing FT catalysts. A copy of the resulting manuscript has been submitted and accepted for publication. A similar project was undertaken with iron-containing FT catalysts; the data is currently being studied.

Cronauer, D. C. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

m005.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

270) 270) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (2 + + ) f 2 (1270) MASS f 2 (1270) MASS f 2 (1270) MASS f 2 (1270) MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1275.1± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 1275.1± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 1275.1± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 1275.1± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.1. 1262 + 1 - 2 ± 8 ABLIKIM 06V BES2 e + e - → J/ψ → γ π + π - 1275 ± 15 ABLIKIM 05 BES2 J/ψ → φ π + π - 1283 ± 5 ALDE 98 GAM4 100 π - p → π 0 π 0 n 1278 ± 5 1 BERTIN 97C OBLX 0.0 p p → π + π - π 0 1272 ± 8 200k PROKOSHKIN 94 GAM2 38 π - p → π 0 π 0 n 1269.7± 5.2 5730 AUGUSTIN 89 DM2 e + e - → 5π 1283 ± 8 400 2 ALDE 87 GAM4 100 π - p → 4π 0 n 1274 ± 5 2 AUGUSTIN 87 DM2 J/ψ → γ π + π - 1283 ± 6 3 LONGACRE 86 MPS 22 π - p → n 2K 0 S 1276 ± 7 COURAU 84 DLCO e + e - → e + e - π + π - 1273.3± 2.3 4 CHABAUD 83 ASPK 17 π - p polarized 1280 ± 4 5 CASON 82 STRC 8 π + p → ∆ ++ π 0 π 0 1281 ± 7 11600 GIDAL 81 MRK2 J/ψ decay 1282 ± 5 6 CORDEN 79 OMEG 12-15 π - p → n 2π 1269 ± 4 10k

127

m005.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 f 2 (1270) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (2 + + ) f 2 (1270) MASS f 2 (1270) MASS f 2 (1270) MASS f 2 (1270) MASS NODE=M005M NODE=M005M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1275.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 1275.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 1275.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 1275.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.1. 1262 + 1 - 2 ± 8 ABLIKIM 06V BES2 e + e - → J/ψ → γ π + π - 1275 ± 15 ABLIKIM 05 BES2 J/ψ → φ π + π - 1283 ± 5 ALDE 98 GAM4 100 π - p → π 0 π 0 n 1278 ± 5 1 BERTIN 97C OBLX 0.0 p p → π + π - π 0 1272 ± 8 200k PROKOSHKIN 94 GAM2 38 π - p → π 0 π 0 n 1269.7 ± 5.2 5730 AUGUSTIN 89 DM2 e + e - → 5π 1283 ± 8 400 2 ALDE 87 GAM4 100 π - p → 4π 0 n 1274 ± 5 2 AUGUSTIN 87 DM2 J/ψ → γ π + π - 1283 ± 6 3 LONGACRE 86 MPS 22 π - p → n 2K 0 S 1276 ± 7 COURAU 84 DLCO e + e - → e + e - π + π - 1273.3 ± 2.3 4 CHABAUD 83 ASPK 17 π - p polarized 1280 ± 4 5 CASON 82 STRC 8 π + p → ∆ ++ π 0 π 0 1281 ± 7 11600 GIDAL 81 MRK2 J/ψ decay 1282 ± 5 6 CORDEN 79 OMEG 12-15

128

High Extraction Phosphors for Solid State Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed high-index, high efficiency bulk luminescent materials and novel nano-sized phosphors for improved solid-state white LED lamps. These advances can potentially contribute to reducing the loss in luminous efficiencies due to scattering, re-absorption, and thermal quenching. The bulk and nanostructured luminescent materials investigated are index matched to GaN and have broad and size-tunable absorption bands, size and impurity tuned emission bands, size-driven elimination of scattering effects, and a separation between absorption and emission bands. These innovations were accomplished through the use of novel synthesis techniques suitable for high volume production for LED lamp applications. The program produced a full-color set of high quantum yield phosphors with high chemical stability. In the bulk phosphor study, the ZnSeS:Cu,Ag phosphor was optimized to achieve >91% efficiency using erbium (Er) and other activators as sensitizers. Detailed analysis of temperature quenching effects on a large number of ZnSeS:Cu,Ag,X and strontium- and calcium-thiogallate phosphors lead to a breakthrough in the understanding of the ??anti-quenching? behavior and a physical bandgap model was developed of this phenomena. In a follow up to this study, optimized phosphor blends for high efficiency and color performance were developed and demonstrated a 2-component phosphor system with good white chromaticity, color temperature, and high color rendering. By extending the protocols of quantum dot synthesis, ??large? nanocrystals, greater than 20 nm in diameter were synthesized and exhibited bulk-like behavior and blue light absorption. The optimization of ZnSe:Mn nanophosphors achieved ~85% QE The limitations of core-shell nanocrystal systems were addressed by investigating alternative deltadoped structures. To address the manufacturability of these systems, a one-pot manufacturing protocol was developed for ZnSe:Mn nanophosphors. To enhance the stability of these material systems, the encapsulation of ZnSeS particle phosphors and ZnSeS screens with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} using ALD was shown to improve the stability by >8X and also increased the luminescence efficiency due to improved surface passivation and optical coupling. A large-volume fluidized bed ALD system was designed that can be adapted to a commercial ALD or vapor deposition system. Throughout the program, optical simulations were developed to evaluate and optimize various phosphor mixtures and device configurations. For example, to define the scattering properties of nanophosphors in an LED device or in a stand-off screen geometry. Also this work significantly promoted and assisted in the implementation of realistic phosphor material models into commercial modeling programs.

Chris Summers; Hisham Menkara; Brent Wagner

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution better than 25 nm. Limiting factors for Stardust STXM analyses were self-imposed limits of photon dose due to radiation damage concerns, and significant attenuation of <1500 eV X-rays by {approx}80{micro}m thick, {approx}25 mg/cm{sup 3} density silica aerogel capture medium. In practice, the ISPE team characterized the major, light elements using STXM (O, Mg, Al, Si) and the heavier minor and trace elements using SXRF. The two data sets overlapped only with minor Fe and Ni ({approx}1% mass abundance), providing few quantitative cross-checks. New improved standards for cross calibration are essential for consortium-based analyses of Stardust interstellar and cometary particles, IDPs. Indeed, they have far reaching application across the whole synchrotron-based analytical community. We have synthesized three ALD multilayers simultaneously on silicon nitride membranes and silicon and characterized them using RBS (on Si), XRF (on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and STXM/XAS (holey Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). The systems we have started to work with are Al-Zn-Fe and Y-Mg-Er. We have found these ALD multi-layers to be uniform at {micro}m- to nm scales, and have found excellent consistency between four analytical techniques so far. The ALD films can also be used as a standard for e-beam instruments, eg., TEM EELS or EDX. After some early issues with the consistency of coatings to the back-side of the membrane windows, we are confident to be able to show multi-analytical agreement to within 10%. As the precision improves, we can use the new standards to verify or improve the tabulated cross-sections.

Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J. (UCB)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

130

CO.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

\j 7, b 6 - \j 7, b 6 - / :!otification of I:eeL i' lr Sor?!c POiYl Of ::cm2diS;L hcticr, - L.J. !hj:ont Pcl~c:x~i?rs and Co., IltZCptKlt~r, >!r:vr Jersey s. bleycrs, NE-90 EV/Efl has detor.nincd 3 portion of t!,e E.I. D~~TXXL~ h\:e:Y?O~ aid CO. f:icil.j.ty at Dccpwatcr, :!ew Jcrscy to k.c co;ltrzi::citnd vi-:.h rx~ionctive -."nc i dl],~ .&.-se*. 3s :I resul", Of ac-Livitics COEAiiCtCJJ .Lcor ti;c Ii:+il~iLt.tn1, i7ll~iricCr ?ii:;trict 251 ,1toilic Lncr:!y Coxl~iissioil. 1';~ consi.?cr thi 5 si'ic 191,~ pricrity 2s it is under coritrol of the E.I. h;w.75 Co. nnii rwt ncctis- sj tJ1.e to thd gi::teral ' pblic. hcloscd in a-;.F' . - .T- m The radiologic?. survey report for thz Z.J, Lui;ont i;o:,:c:;,ours and Co. facility, a:ld - The L.1. Dupont

131

Chemical Bonding, Interfaces and Defects in Hafnium Oxide/Germanium Oxynitride Gate Stacks on Ge (100)  

SciTech Connect

Correlations among interface properties and chemical bonding characteristics in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge MIS stacks were investigated using in-situ remote nitridation of the Ge (100) surface prior to HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD). Ultra thin ({approx}1.1 nm), thermally stable and aqueous etch-resistant GeO{sub x}N{sub y} interfaces layers that exhibited Ge core level photoelectron spectra (PES) similar to stoichiometric Ge{sub 3}N{sub 4} were synthesized. To evaluate GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface defects, the density of interface states (D{sub it}) was extracted by the conductance method across the band gap. Forming gas annealed (FGA) samples exhibited substantially lower D{sub it} ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}) than did high vacuum annealed (HVA) and inert gas anneal (IGA) samples ({approx} 1x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}). Germanium core level photoelectron spectra from similar FGA-treated samples detected out-diffusion of germanium oxide to the HfO{sub 2} film surface and apparent modification of chemical bonding at the GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface, which is related to the reduced D{sub it}.

Oshima, Yasuhiro; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Yun; /SLAC, SSRL; Kuzum, Duygu; /Stanford U.; Sugawara, Takuya; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL; McIntyre, Paul C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Rapid Separation Methods to Characterize Actinides and Metallic Impurities in Plutonium Scrap Materials at SRS  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage Division at SRS plans to stabilize selected plutonium scrap residue materials for long term storage by dissolution processing and plans to stabilize other plutonium vault materials via high-temperature furnace processing. To support these nuclear material stabilization activities, the SRS Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD) will provide characterization of materials required prior to the dissolution or the high-firing of these materials. Lab renovations to install new analytical instrumentation are underway to support these activities that include glove boxes with simulated-process dissolution and high- pressure microwave dissolution capability. Inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), inductively- coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) will be used to measure actinide isotopics and metallic impurities. New high-speed actinide separation methods have been developed that will be applied to isotopic characterization of nuclear materials by TIMS and ICP-MS to eliminate isobaric interferences between Pu-238 /U- 238 and Pu-241/Am-241. TEVA Resin, UTEVA Resin, and TRU Resin columns will be used with vacuum-assisted flow rates to minimize TIMS and ICP-MS sample turnaround times. For metallic impurity analysis, rapid column removal methods using UTEVA Resin, AGMP-1 anion resin and AG MP-50 cation resin have also been developed to remove plutonium and uranium matrix interferences prior to ICP-AES and ICP- MS measurements.

Maxwell, S.L. III [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Jones, V.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Cathode encapsulation of organic light emitting diodes by atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H stacks  

SciTech Connect

Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films synthesized by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) at room temperature (25 deg. C) have been tested as water vapor permeation barriers for organic light emitting diode devices. Silicon nitride films (a-SiN{sub x}:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition served as reference and were used to develop Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H stacks. On the basis of Ca test measurements, a very low intrinsic water vapor transmission rate of {<=} 2 x 10{sup -6} g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} and 4 x 10{sup -6} g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} (20 deg. C/50% relative humidity) were found for 20-40 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 300 nm a-SiN{sub x}:H films, respectively. The cathode particle coverage was a factor of 4 better for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films compared to the a-SiN{sub x}:H films and an average of 0.12 defects per cm{sup 2} was obtained for a stack consisting of three barrier layers (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}).

Keuning, W.; Weijer, P. van de; Lifka, H.; Kessels, W. M. M.; Creatore, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, P.O. Box WAG12, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

HfO2 Gate Dielectric on (NH4)2S Passivated (100) GaAs Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interface between hafnium oxide grown by atomic layer deposition and (100) GaAs treated with HCl cleaning and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S passivation has been characterized. Synchrotron radiation photoemission core level spectra indicated successful removal of the native oxides and formation of passivating sulfides on the GaAs surface. Layer-by-layer removal of the hafnia film revealed a small amount of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed at the interface during the dielectric deposition. Traces of arsenic and sulfur out-diffusion into the hafnia film were observed after a 450 C post-deposition anneal, and may be the origins for the electrically active defects. Transmission electron microscopy cross section images showed thicker HfO{sub 2} films for a given precursor exposure on S-treated GaAs versus the non-treated sample. In addition, the valence-band and the conduction-band offsets at the HfO{sub 2}/GaAs interface were deduced to be 3.18 eV and a range of 0.87-0.97 eV, respectively. It appears that HCl+(NH{sub 4})2{sub S} treatments provide a superior chemical passivation for GaAs and initial surface for ALD deposition.

Chen, P.T.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Y.; /SLAC, SSRL; Kim, E.; McIntyre, P.C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Tsai, W.; Garner, M.; /Intel, Santa Clara; Pianetta, P.; /SLAC, SSRL; Nishi, Y.; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept.; Chui, C.O.; /UCLA

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

135

Investigation of Some Transparent Metal Oxides as Damp Heat Protective Coating for CIGS Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated the protective effectiveness of some transparent metal oxides (TMO) on CIGS solar cell coupons against damp heat (DH) exposure at 85oC and 85% relative humidity (RH). Sputter-deposited bilayer ZnO (BZO) with up to 0.5-um Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer and 0.2-um bilayer InZnO were used as 'inherent' part of device structure on CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG. Sputter-deposited 0.2-um ZnSnO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) 0.1-um Al2O3 were used as overcoat on typical BZO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG solar cells. The results were all negative -- all TMO-coated CIGS cells exhibited substantial degradation in DH. Combining the optical photographs, PL and EL imaging, SEM surface micro-morphology, coupled with XRD, I-V and QE measurements, the causes of the device degradations are attributed to hydrolytic corrosion, flaking, micro-cracking, and delamination induced by the DH moisture. Mechanical stress and decrease in crystallinity (grain size effect) could be additional degrading factors for thicker AZO grown on CdS/CIGS.

Pern, F. J.; Yan, F.; Zaaunbrecher, B.; To, B.; Perkins, J.; Noufi, R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that maintains a primary mission focus the physical sciences, energy sciences, and life sciences, with additional expertise in environmental sciences, energy technologies, and national security. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2008 budget was $531.6 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Developlnent at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. Accordingly, this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2008. BNL expended $12 million during Fiscal Year 2008 in support of 69 projects. The program has two categories, the annual Open Call LDRDs and Strategic LDRDs, which combine to meet the overall objectives of the LDRD Program. Proposals are solicited annually for review and approval concurrent with the next fiscal year, October 1. For the open call for proposals, an LDRD Selection Committee, comprised of the Associate Laboratory Directors (ALDs) for the Scientific Directorates, an equal number of scientists recommended by the Brookhaven Council, plus the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning, review the proposals submitted in response to the solicitation. The Open Can LDRD category emphasizes innovative research concepts with limited management filtering to encourage the creativity of individual researchers. The competition is open to all BNL staff in programmatic, scientific, engineering, and technical support areas. Researchers submit their project proposals to the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning. A portion of the LDRD budget is held for the Strategic LDRD (S-LDRD) category. Projects in this category focus on innovative R&D activities that support the strategic agenda of the Laboratory. The Laboratory Director entertains requests or articulates the need for S-LDRD funds at any time. Strategic LDRD Proposals also undergo rigorous peer review; the approach to review is tailored to the size and scope of the proposal. These Projects are driven by special opportunities, including: (1) Research project(s) in support of Laboratory strategic initiatives as defined and articulated by the Director; (2) Research project(s) in support of a Laboratory strategic hire; (3) Evolution of Program Development activities into research and development activities; and (4) ALD proposal(s) to the Director to support unique research opportunities. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred fronl the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. To be one of the premier DOE National Laboratories, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and d

Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

SOEC efficiency and cost improvement Part 1 and 2.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Part I: Electrochemical and X-ray Characterization of Solid-Oxide Electrolysis Cell Oxygen Electrodes on Electrolyte Substrates--The governing reaction mechanisms, and the electrode and electrolyte material compositions and structures, that controls the efficiency and durability of the solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) need to be identified and well-understood for a significant improvement in nuclear hydrogen production using high temperature steam electrolysis. ANL conducted experimental analysis of SOEC electrolyte and electrodes to progress in this objective. Our study on the oxygen electrode focused on specifically the effect of electrode crystal structure on its electrochemical performance, and the evolution of the electronic and structural properties of the electrodes while under electrochemical conditions and high temperature. We found through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy experiments that, while different crystal orientations in La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3+d} (LSM) show different initial performance and different electrochemical activation under SOEC conditions, a good mixed ionic electronic conductor La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CoO{sub 3+d} (LSC) does not seem to exhibit similar variations. Our in-situ x-ray and electrochemical measurements at the Advanced Photon Source of ANL have identified the chemical states of the A-site elements of the doped lanthanum manganite electrodes. We found that the changes in the concentration and in the electronic state of the La and Sr (the A-site elements of the perovskite) occurring only at the top airelectrode film interface can be responsible from the electrochemical improvement of the SOEC anode under DC current. Our observation related to the La chemical state change is unexpected and probably unique to the electrochemical current-conditioning. Part II: Progress Towards the Atomic Layer Deposition of Lanthanum Strontium Manganate--Lanthanum strontium manganate (LSM) is the most commonly used cathode material for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and also solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) for hydrogen production through steam electrolysis. The ability to deposit LSM in the form of thin, conformal films onto high surface area support materials will enable the development of more efficient SOFC and SOEC devices. Moreover, thin, uniform LSM films prepared on flat surfaces are ideal for performing synchrotron X-ray experiments aimed at understanding the materials issues that control SOEC performance. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a very effective technology for fabricating thin, conformal films on flat surfaces as well as high surface area supports. In this study, we describe our work developing ALD methods for depositing La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnO{sub 2}, and mixtures of these oxides using cyclopentadienyl precursors. We have utilized in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements to explore the range of conditions for growth of these materials as well as to determine the appropriate oxygen sources. In addition, thin films of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MnO{sub 2} were deposited on Si(100) substrates and analyzed using spectroscopic ellipsometry to determine the refractive index and growth rates of these materials. Finally, mixed-oxide films La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MnO{sub 2} were prepared and analyzed with X-ray fluorescence to determine the composition of the films.

Yildiz, B.; Chang, K.-C.; Meyers, D. J.; You, H.; Carter, J. D.; Elam, J. W.; Honegger, D. A.; Libera, J. A.; Pellin, M. J.

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

m033.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ρ 5 (2350) I G (J PC ) = 1 + (5 - - ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE This entry was previously called U 1 (2400). See also ρ(2150), NODE=M033 f 2 (2150), ρ 3 (2250), f 4 (2300). ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS NODE=M033205 NODE=M033M π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n NODE=M033M3 NODE=M033M3 VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2330 ± 35 2330 ± 35 2330 ± 35 2330 ± 35 ALDE 95 GAM2 38 π - p → ω π 0 n NODE=M033M1 VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * ∼ 2303 HASAN 94 RVUE p p → π π ∼ 2300 1 MARTIN 80B RVUE ∼ 2250 1 MARTIN 80C RVUE ∼ 2500 2 CARTER 78B CNTR 0 0.7-2.4 p p → K - K + ∼ 2480 3 CARTER 77 CNTR 0 0.7-2.4 p p → π π S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N NODE=M033M2 NODE=M033M2 VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT * * * We do not use the following data

139

Nanomaterials Chemistry Group - CSD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links Selected Research and Development Projects The Nanomaterials Chemistry Group at Chemical Sciences Division, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts fundamental research related to synthesis and characterization of nanoscopic materials as well as ionic liquids for fundamental investigation of separation and catalysis processes. This group also conducts the applied research related to the applications of nanomaterials in advanced scintillators for radiation sensing, catalysts for fuel cells, radioactive tracers for medical imaging, novel electrodes for energy storage, and sensing devices for biological agents. Extensive synthesis capabilities exist within the group for preparation of mesoporous materials (oxides and carbons), low-dimensional materials (e.g., quantum dots and nanowires), sol-gel materials, inorganic and hybrid monoliths (e.g., membranes), and nanocatalysts. Solvothermal, ionothermal, templating synthesis, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and atomic layer deposition (ALD) methods are extensively utilized in the group for tailored synthesis of nanostructured materials. An array of techniques for characterizing physical and chemical properties related to separation and catalysis are in place or are currently being developed. This research program also takes advantage of the unique resources at ORNL such as small-angle x-ray scattering, small-angle neutron scattering at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), structural analysis by a variety of electron microscopes (SEM, TEM, STEM, HRTEM) and powdered X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. A wide variety of other facilities for routine and novel techniques are also utilized including the Center for Nanophase Materials Science. Computational chemistry tools are employed to understand experimental results related to separation and other interfacial chemical processes and design better nanomaterials and ionic liquids. Commonly used methods include first principles density functional theory (DFT) and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) techniques.

140

m033.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 (2350) I G (J PC ) = 1 + (5 - - ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE This entry was previously called U 1 (2400). See also ρ(2150), f 2 (2150), ρ 3 (2250), f 4 (2300). ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2330± 35 2330± 35 2330± 35 2330± 35 ALDE 95 GAM2 38 π - p → ω π 0 n VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * ∼ 2303 HASAN 94 RVUE p p → π π ∼ 2300 1 MARTIN 80B RVUE ∼ 2250 1 MARTIN 80C RVUE ∼ 2500 2 CARTER 78B CNTR 0 0.7-2.4 p p → K - K + ∼ 2480 3 CARTER 77 CNTR 0 0.7-2.4 p p → π π S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2300± 45 4 ANISOVICH 02 SPEC 0.6-1.9 p p → ω π 0 , ω η π 0 , π + π - 2295±

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141

m008.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 f 1 (1285) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (1 + + ) f 1 (1285) MASS f 1 (1285) MASS f 1 (1285) MASS f 1 (1285) MASS NODE=M008M NODE=M008M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.8. See the ideogram NEW below. [1282.1 ± 0.6 MeV OUR 2012 AVERAGE Scale factor = 1.7] 1281.16 ± 0.39 ± 0.45 1 LEES 12X BABR τ - → π - f 1 (1285) ν τ 1285.1 ± 1.0 + 1.6 - 0.3 2 ABLIKIM 11J BES3 J/ψ → ω(η π + π - ) 1281 ± 2 ± 1 AUBERT 07AU BABR 10.6 e + e - → f 1 (1285) π + π - γ 1276.1 ± 8.1 ± 8.0 203 BAI 04J BES2 J/ψ → γ γ π + π - 1274 ± 6 237 ABDALLAH 03H DLPH 91.2 e + e - → K 0 S K ± π ∓ + X 1280 ± 4 ACCIARRI 01G L3 1288 ± 4 ± 5 20k ADAMS 01B B852 18 GeV π - p → K + K - π 0 n 1284 ± 6 1400 ALDE 97B GAM4 100 π - p → η π 0 π 0 n 1281 ± 1 BARBERIS 97B OMEG 450 p p → p p 2(π + π - ) 1281 ± 1 BARBERIS 97C OMEG 450 p p → p p K 0 S K ± π ∓ 1280

142

m011.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 b 1 (1235) I G (J PC ) = 1 + (1 + - ) b 1 (1235) MASS b 1 (1235) MASS b 1 (1235) MASS b 1 (1235) MASS NODE=M011M NODE=M011M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT 1229.5 ± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE 1229.5 ± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE 1229.5 ± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE 1229.5 ± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.6. See the ideogram below. 1225 ± 5 WEIDENAUER 93 ASTE p p → 2π + 2π - π 0 1235 ± 15 ALDE 92C GAM2 38,100 π - p → ω π 0 n 1236 ± 16 FUKUI 91 SPEC 8.95 π - p → ω π 0 n 1222 ± 6 ATKINSON 84E OMEG ± 25-55 γ p → ω π X OCCUR=2 1237 ± 7 ATKINSON 84E OMEG 0 25-55 γ p → ω π X 1239 ± 5 EVANGELIS... 81 OMEG - 12 π - p → ω π p 1251 ± 8 450 GESSAROLI 77 HBC - 11 π - p → π - ω p 1245 ± 11 890 FLATTE 76C HBC - 4.2 K - p → π - ω Σ + 1222 ± 4 1400 CHALOUPKA 74 HBC - 3.9 π - p 1220 ± 7 600 KARSHON 74B HBC + 4.9 π + p * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1190 ± 10 AUGUSTIN 89 DM2 ± e + e - → 5π 1213 ± 5 ATKINSON

143

m008.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

285) 285) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (1 + + ) f 1 (1285) MASS f 1 (1285) MASS f 1 (1285) MASS f 1 (1285) MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.8. See the ideogram below. 1281.16± 0.39± 0.45 1 LEES 12X BABR τ - → π - f 1 (1285) ν τ 1285.1 ± 1.0 + 1.6 - 0.3 2 ABLIKIM 11J BES3 J/ψ → ω(η π + π - ) 1281 ± 2 ± 1 AUBERT 07AU BABR 10.6 e + e - → f 1 (1285) π + π - γ 1276.1 ± 8.1 ± 8.0 203 BAI 04J BES2 J/ψ → γ γ π + π - 1274 ± 6 237 ABDALLAH 03H DLPH 91.2 e + e - → K 0 S K ± π ∓ + X 1280 ± 4 ACCIARRI 01G L3 1288 ± 4 ± 5 20k ADAMS 01B B852 18 GeV π - p → K + K - π 0 n 1284 ± 6 1400 ALDE 97B GAM4 100 π - p → η π 0 π 0 n 1281 ± 1 BARBERIS 97B OMEG 450 p p → p p 2(π + π - ) 1281 ± 1 BARBERIS 97C OMEG 450 p p → p p K 0 S K ± π ∓ 1280 ± 2 3 ANTINORI 95 OMEG 300,450 p p → p p 2(π + π - ) 1282.2 ± 1.5 LEE 94 MPS2 18 π - p →

144

m027.dvi  

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7 7 η(1405) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (0 - + ) A REVIEW GOES HERE - Check our WWW List of Reviews NODE=M027 η(1405) MASS η(1405) MASS η(1405) MASS η(1405) MASS NODE=M027205 NODE=M027MX VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID 1408.8 ± 1.8 OUR AVERAGE 1408.8 ± 1.8 OUR AVERAGE 1408.8 ± 1.8 OUR AVERAGE 1408.8 ± 1.8 OUR AVERAGE Includes data from the 2 datablocks that follow this one. NEW Error includes scale factor of 2.1. See the ideogram below. [1408.9 ± 2.4 MeV OUR 2012 AVERAGE Scale factor = 2.3] WEIGHTED AVERAGE 1408.8±1.8 (Error scaled by 2.1) RATH 89 MPS 0.7 BAI 90C MRK3 0.6 BERTIN 95 OBLX 12.9 BERTIN 97 OBLX 0.1 CICALO 99 OBLX 0.6 ADAMS 01B B852 2.6 NICHITIU 02 OBLX ANDO 86 SPEC 5.0 AUGUSTIN 90 DM2 3.2 FUKUI 91C SPEC 27.1 BOLTON 92B MRK3 2.2 AMSLER 95F CBAR 0.0 ALDE 97B GAM4 6.4 MANAK 00A MPS 0.6 AMSLER 04B CBAR 3.4 AMSLER 04B CBAR ABLIKIM 11J BES3 6.4 ABLIKIM 12E BES3 0.3 ABLIKIM 12E BES3 0.0 χ 2 72.1 (Confidence Level < 0.0001)

145

m011.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 (1235) I G (J PC ) = 1 + (1 + - ) b 1 (1235) MASS b 1 (1235) MASS b 1 (1235) MASS b 1 (1235) MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT 1229.5± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE 1229.5± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE 1229.5± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE 1229.5± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.6. See the ideogram below. 1225 ± 5 WEIDENAUER 93 ASTE p p → 2π + 2π - π 0 1235 ± 15 ALDE 92C GAM2 38,100 π - p → ω π 0 n 1236 ± 16 FUKUI 91 SPEC 8.95 π - p → ω π 0 n 1222 ± 6 ATKINSON 84E OMEG ± 25-55 γ p → ω π X 1237 ± 7 ATKINSON 84E OMEG 0 25-55 γ p → ω π X 1239 ± 5 EVANGELIS... 81 OMEG - 12 π - p → ω π p 1251 ± 8 450 GESSAROLI 77 HBC - 11 π - p → π - ω p 1245 ± 11 890 FLATTE 76C HBC - 4.2 K - p → π - ω Σ + 1222 ± 4 1400 CHALOUPKA 74 HBC - 3.9 π - p 1220 ± 7 600 KARSHON 74B HBC + 4.9 π + p * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1190 ± 10 AUGUSTIN 89 DM2 ± e + e - → 5π 1213 ± 5 ATKINSON 84C OMEG 0 20-70 γ p 1271 ± 11

146

m082.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 f J (2220) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (2 + + or 4 + + ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Needs confirmation. See our mini-review in the 2004 edition of this NODE=M082 Review, PDG 04. f J (2220) MASS f J (2220) MASS f J (2220) MASS f J (2220) MASS NODE=M082M NODE=M082M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2231.1 ± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2231.1 ± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2231.1 ± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2231.1 ± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2235 ± 4 ± 6 74 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ π + π - OCCUR=2 2230 + 6 - 7 ± 16 46 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ K + K - OCCUR=3 2232 + 8 - 7 ± 15 23 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ K 0 S K 0 S OCCUR=4 2235 ± 4 ± 5 32 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ p p 2209 + 17 - 15 ± 10 ASTON 88F LASS 11 K - p → K + K - Λ 2230 ± 20 BOLONKIN 88 SPEC 40 π - p → K 0 S K 0 S n 2220 ± 10 41 1 ALDE 86B GA24 38-100 π p → n η η ' 2230 ± 6 ± 14 93 BALTRUSAIT...86D MRK3 e + e - → γ K + K - OCCUR=2 2232 ± 7 ± 7 23 BALTRUSAIT...86D MRK3 e + e - → γ K 0 S K 0 S * * * We do not use the following

147

m082.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J J (2220) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (2 + + or 4 + + ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Needs confirmation. See our mini-review in the 2004 edition of this Review, PDG 04. f J (2220) MASS f J (2220) MASS f J (2220) MASS f J (2220) MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2231.1± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2231.1± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2231.1± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2231.1± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2235 ± 4 ± 6 74 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ π + π - 2230 + 6 - 7 ± 16 46 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ K + K - 2232 + 8 - 7 ± 15 23 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ K 0 S K 0 S 2235 ± 4 ± 5 32 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ p p 2209 + 17 - 15 ± 10 ASTON 88F LASS 11 K - p → K + K - Λ 2230 ± 20 BOLONKIN 88 SPEC 40 π - p → K 0 S K 0 S n 2220 ± 10 41 1 ALDE 86B GA24 38-100 π p → n η η ' 2230 ± 6 ± 14 93 BALTRUSAIT...86D MRK3 e + e - → γ K + K - 2232 ± 7 ± 7 23 BALTRUSAIT...86D MRK3 e + e - → γ K 0 S K 0 S * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2223.9± 2.5 2 VLADIMIRSK...08

148

Hafnium-doped tantalum oxide high-k gate dielectric films for future CMOS technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel high-k gate dielectric material, i.e., hafnium-doped tantalum oxide (Hf-doped TaOx), has been studied for the application of the future generation metal-oxidesemiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET). The film's electrical, chemical, and structural properties were investigated experimentally. The incorporation of Hf into TaOx impacted the electrical properties. The doping process improved the effective dielectric constant, reduced the fixed charge density, and increased the dielectric strength. The leakage current density also decreased with the Hf doping concentration. MOS capacitors with sub-2.0 nm equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) have been achieved with the lightly Hf-doped TaOx. The low leakage currents and high dielectric constants of the doped films were explained by their compositions and bond structures. The Hf-doped TaOx film is a potential high-k gate dielectric for future MOS transistors. A 5 ?? tantalum nitride (TaNx) interface layer has been inserted between the Hf-doped TaOx films and the Si substrate to engineer the high-k/Si interface layer formation and properties. The electrical characterization result shows that the insertion of a 5 ?? TaNx between the doped TaOx films and the Si substrate decreased the film's leakage current density and improved the effective dielectric constant (keffective) value. The improvement of these dielectric properties can be attributed to the formation of the TaOxNy interfacial layer after high temperature O2 annealing. The main drawback of the TaNx interface layer is the high interface density of states and hysteresis, which needs to be decreased. Advanced metal nitride gate electrodes, e.g., tantalum nitride, molybdenum nitride, and tungsten nitride, were investigated as the gate electrodes for atomic layer deposition (ALD) HfO2 high-k dielectric material. Their physical and electrical properties were affected by the post metallization annealing (PMA) treatment conditions. Work functions of these three gate electrodes are suitable for NMOS applications after 800?°C PMA. Metal nitrides can be used as the gate electrode materials for the HfO2 high-k film. The novel high-k gate stack structures studied in this study are promising candidates to replace the traditional poly-Si-SiO2 gate stack structure for the future CMOS technology node.

Lu, Jiang

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : iron-containing particulate catalysts. Activity report : January 1, 2001 - December 31, 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry--specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it is desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. It is desired that selectivity be directed toward producing diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. The goal is to produce shape-selective catalysts that have the potential to limit the formation of longchain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage'. This cage also restricts their loss by attrition during use in slurry-bed reactors. The first stage of this program was to prepare and evaluate iron-containing particulate catalysts. This activity report centers upon this first stage of experimentation with particulate FT catalysts. (For reference, a second experimental stage is under way to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes.) To date, experimentation has centered upon the evaluation of a sample of iron-based, spray-dried catalyst prepared by B.H. Davis of the Center of Applied Energy Research (CAER) and samples of his catalyst onto which inorganic 'shells' were deposited. The reference CAER catalyst contained a high level of dispersed fine particles, a portion of which was removed by differential settling. Reaction conditions have been established using a FT laboratory unit such that reasonable levels of CO conversion can be achieved, where therefore a valid catalyst comparison can be made. A wide range of catalytic activities was observed with SiO{sub 2}-coated FT catalysts. Two techniques were used for SiO{sub 2}coating. The first involved a caustic precipitation of SiO{sub 2} from an organo-silicate onto the CAER catalyst. The second was the acidic precipitation of an organo-silicate with aging to form fractal particles that were then deposited onto the CAER catalyst. Several resulting FT catalysts were as active as the coarse catalyst on which they were prepared. The most active ones were those with the least amount of coating, namely about 2.2 wt% SiO{sub 2}. In the case of the latter acid technique, the use of HCl and HNO{sub 3} was much more effective than that of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe and analyze as-received and treated FT catalysts. It was observed that (1) spherical particles of CAER FT catalyst were made up of agglomerates of particles that were, in turn, also agglomerates; (2) the spray drying process of CAER apparently concentrated the Si precursor at the surface during drying; (3) while SEM pointed out broad differences in the appearance of the prepared catalyst particles, there was little indication that the catalysts were being uniformly coated with a cage-like protective surface, with perhaps the exception of HNO{sub 3}-precipitated catalyst; and (4) there was only a limited penetration of carbon (i.e., CO) into the FT catalyst during the conditioning and FT reaction steps.

Cronauer, D.; Chemical Engineering

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z