Sample records for annular core research

  1. annular core research reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    261 DIRECT EXPERIMENTAL TESTS AND COMPARISON BETWEEN SUB-MINIATURE FISSION CHAMBERS AND SPND FOR FIXED IN-CORE INSTRUMENTATION OF LWR CiteSeer Summary: A fixed in-core...

  2. annular core research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Technologies Websites Summary: -rod power-density profiles from in-core neutron flux measurements J. Kenneth Shultis? Department is proposed for determining power-density...

  3. annular core pulse: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A good un- derstanding- tions. For example, the use of core-annular flows facilitates water-lubricated transport of heavy viscous oils by providing new approaches to mitigate...

  4. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe: Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe: Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe through a horizontal pipe. Since the densities of the two liq- uids are almost always different, gravity

  5. Feasibility and economics of existing PWR transition to a higher power core using annular fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beccherle, Julien

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The internally and externally cooled annular fuel is a new type of fuel for PWRs that enables an increase in core power density by 50% within the same or better safety margins as the traditional solid fuel. Each annular ...

  6. Core/corona modeling of diode-imploded annular loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, R.E.; Guillory, J.U.

    1980-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of a tenuous exterior plasma corona with anomalous resistivity on the compression and heating of a hollow, collisional aluminum z-pinch plasma are predicted by a one-dimensional code. As the interior ('core') plasma is imploded by its axial current, the energy exchange between core and corona determines the current partition. Under the conditions of rapid core heating and compression, the increase in coronal current provides a trade-off between radial acceleration and compression, which reduces the implosion forces and softens the pitch. Combined with a heuristic account of energy and momentum transport in the strongly coupled core plasma and an approximate radiative loss calculation including Al line, recombination and Bremsstrahlung emission, the current model can provide a reasonably accurate description of imploding annular plasma loads that remain azimuthally symmetric. The implications for optimization of generator load coupling are examined.

  7. Annular core liquid-salt cooled reactor with multiple fuel and blanket zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Per F.

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid fluoride salt cooled, high temperature reactor having a reactor vessel with a pebble-bed reactor core. The reactor core comprises a pebble injection inlet located at a bottom end of the reactor core and a pebble defueling outlet located at a top end of the reactor core, an inner reflector, outer reflector, and an annular pebble-bed region disposed in between the inner reflector and outer reflector. The annular pebble-bed region comprises an annular channel configured for receiving pebble fuel at the pebble injection inlet, the pebble fuel comprising a combination of seed and blanket pebbles having a density lower than the coolant such that the pebbles have positive buoyancy and migrate upward in said annular pebble-bed region toward the defueling outlet. The annular pebble-bed region comprises alternating radial layers of seed pebbles and blanket pebbles.

  8. Annular seed-blanket thorium fuel core concepts for heavy water moderated reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bromley, B.P.; Hyland, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, 1 Plant Road, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New reactor concepts to implement thorium-based fuel cycles have been explored to achieve maximum resource utilization. Pressure tube heavy water reactors (PT-HWR) are highly advantageous for implementing the use of thorium-based fuels because of their high neutron economy and on-line re-fuelling capability. The use of heterogeneous seed-blanket core concepts in a PT-HWR where higher-fissile-content seed fuel bundles are physically separate from lower-fissile-content blanket bundles allows more flexibility and control in fuel management to maximize the fissile utilization and conversion of fertile fuel. The lattice concept chosen is a 35-element bundle made with a homogeneous mixture of reactor grade Pu and Th, and with a central zirconia rod to help reduce coolant void reactivity. Several annular heterogeneous seed-blanket core concepts with plutonium-thorium-based fuels in a 700-MWe-class PT-HWR were analyzed, using a once-through thorium (OTT) cycle. Different combinations of seed and blanket fuel were tested to determine the impact on core-average burnup, fissile utilization, power distributions, and other performance parameters. It was found that the various core concepts can achieve a fissile utilization that is up to 30% higher than is currently achieved in a PT-HWR using conventional natural uranium fuel bundles. Up to 67% of the Pu is consumed; up to 43% of the energy is produced from thorium, and up to 363 kg/year of U-233 is produced. Seed-blanket cores with ?50% content of low-power blanket bundles may require power de-rating (?58% to 65%) to avoid exceeding maximum limits for peak channel power, bundle power and linear element ratings. (authors)

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Annular Core Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    13. The ACRR is a mission critical asset - the only remaining NNSA capability for high-power, short pulse environments needed to simulate nuclear weapons effects on full-scale...

  11. Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Sandia National Laboratories achieves 10,000th reactor pulse operation | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  12. Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories achieves

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. Behavior of an heterogeneous annular FBR core during an unprotected loss of flow accident: Analysis of the primary phase with SAS-SFR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massara, S.; Schmitt, D.; Bretault, A.; Lemasson, D.; Darmet, G.; Verwaerde, D. [EDF R and D, 1, Avenue du General de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France); Struwe, D.; Pfrang, W.; Ponomarev, A. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie KIT, Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, Gebaude 521, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of a substantial improvement on FBR core safety connected to the development of a new Gen IV reactor type, heterogeneous core with innovative features are being carefully analyzed in France since 2009. At EDF R and D, the main goal is to understand whether a strong reduction of the Na-void worth - possibly attempting a negative value - allows a significant improvement of the core behavior during an unprotected loss of flow accident. Also, the physical behavior of such a core is of interest, before and beyond the (possible) onset of Na boiling. Hence, a cutting-edge heterogeneous design, featuring an annular shape, a Na-plena with a B{sub 4}C plate and a stepwise modulation of fissile core heights, was developed at EDF by means of the SDDS methodology, with a total Na-void worth of -1 $. The behavior of such a core during the primary phase of a severe accident, initiated by an unprotected loss of flow, is analyzed by means of the SAS-SFR code. This study is carried-out at KIT and EDF, in the framework of a scientific collaboration on innovative FBR severe accident analyses. The results show that the reduction of the Na-void worth is very effective, but is not sufficient alone to avoid Na-boiling and, hence, to prevent the core from entering into the primary phase of a severe accident. Nevertheless, the grace time up to boiling onset is greatly enhanced in comparison to a more traditional homogeneous core design, and only an extremely low fraction of the fuel (<0.1%) enters into melting at the end of this phase. A sensitivity analysis shows that, due to the inherent neutronic characteristics of such a core, the gagging scheme plays a major role on the core behavior: indeed, an improved 4-zones gagging scheme, associated with an enhanced control rod drive line expansion feed-back effect, finally prevents the core from entering into sodium boiling. This major conclusion highlights both the progress already accomplished and the need for more detailed future analyses, particularly concerning: the neutronic burn-up scheme, the modeling of the diagrid effect and the control rod drive line expansion feed-backs, as well as the primary/secondary systems thermal-hydraulics behavior. (authors)

  14. Advanced reactor safety research quarterly report, January-March 1982. Vol. 21

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning core debris behavior (inherent retention); containment analysis; elevated temperature design assessment; Clinch River risk assessment study; advanced reactor core phenomenology; LWR damaged fuel relocation phenomenology; and Annular Core Research Reactor facilities and operation.

  15. Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons Design,

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office of the Administrator| National

  16. The design of high power density annular fuel for LWRs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Yi, 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel performance models have been developed to assess the performance of internally and externally cooled LWR annular fuel. Such fuel may be operated at 30-50% higher core power density than the current operating LWRs, and ...

  17. Annular recuperator design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Yungmo

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An annular heat recuperator is formed with alternating hot and cold cells to separate counter-flowing hot and cold fluid streams. Each cold cell has a fluid inlet formed in the inner diameter of the recuperator near one axial end, and a fluid outlet formed in the outer diameter of the recuperator near the other axial end to evenly distribute fluid mass flow throughout the cell. Cold cells may be joined with the outlet of one cell fluidly connected to the inlet of an adjacent downstream cell to form multi-stage cells.

  18. Cretaceous shallow drilling, US Western Interior: Core research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur, M.A.

    1993-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is a continuing multidisciplinary study of middle to Upper Cretaceous marine carbonate and clastic rocks in the Utah-Colorado-Kansas corridor of the old Cretaceous seaway that extended from the Gulf Coast to the Arctic during maximum Cretaceous transgressions. It is collaborative between in the US Geological Survey (W.E. Dean, P.I.) and University researchers led by The Pennsylvania State University(M.A. Arthur, P.I.) and funded by DOE and the USGS, in part. Research focusses on the Greenhom, Niobrara and lower Pierre Shale units and their equivalents, combining biostratigraphic/paleoecologic studies, inorganic, organic and stable isotopic geochemical studies, mineralogical investigations and high-resolution geophysical logging. This research requires unweathered samples and continuous smooth exposures'' in the form of cores from at least 4 relatively shallow reference holes (i.e. < 1000m) in transect from east to west across the basin. The major initial effort was recovery in Year 1 of the project of continuous cores from each site in the transect. This drilling provided samples and logs of strata ranging from pelagic sequences that contain organic-carbon-rich marine source rocks to nearshore coal-bearing units. This transect also will provide information on the extent of thermal maturation and migration of hydrocarbons in organic-carbon-rich strata along a burial gradient.

  19. Evaluation of high power density annular fuel application in the Korean OPR-1000 reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Liang, Ph. D.. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compared to the traditional solid fuel geometry for PWRs, the internally and externally cooled annular fuel offers the potential to increase the core power density while maintaining or increasing safety margins. It is ...

  20. Annular atrophic lichen planus of the lip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugashima, Yumi; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18 (2): 14 Department of Dermatology, Fukushima MedicalUniversity, Fukushima, Japan Abstract Annular atrophic

  1. Manufacture of annular cermet articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to produce annular-shaped, metal-clad cermet components directly produces the form and avoids multiple fabrication steps such as rolling and welding. The method includes the steps of: providing an annular hollow form with inner and outer side walls; filling the form with a particulate mixture of ceramic and metal; closing, evacuating, and hermetically sealing the form; heating the form to an appropriate temperature; and applying force to consolidate the particulate mixture into solid cermet.

  2. Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacox, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Drexler, Robert L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hunt, Robert N. M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

  3. Thermal hydraulics analysis of the MIT research reactor in support of a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density monolithic UMo fuel. The design of an optimum LEU core for the ...

  4. The DF-4 fuel damage experiment in ACRR (Annual Core Research Reactor) with a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) control blade and channel box

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.; Ott, L.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DF-4 test was an experimental investigation into the melt progression behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) core components under high temperature severe core damage conditions. In this study 14 zircaloy clad UO{sub 2} fuel rods, and representations of the zircaloy fuel canister and stainless steel/B{sub 4}C control blade were assembled into a 0.5 m long test bundle. The test bundle was fission heated in a flowing steam environment, using the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia Laboratories, simulating the environmental conditions of an uncovered BWR core experiencing high temperature damage as a result residual fission product decay heating. The experimental results provide information on the thermal response of the test bundle components, the rapid exothermic oxidation of the zircaloy fuel cladding and canister, the production of hydrogen from metal-steam oxidation, and the failure behavior of the progressively melting bundle components. This information is provided in the form of thermocouple data, steam and hydrogen flow rate data, test bundle fission power data and visual observation of the damage progression. In addition to BWR background information, this document contains a description of the experimental hardware with details on how the experiment was instrumented and diagnosed, a description of the test progression, and a presentation of the on-line measurements. Also in this report are the results of a thermal analysis of the fueled test section of the fueled test section of the experiment demonstrating an overall consistency in the measurable quantities from the test. A discussion of the results is provided. 38 refs., 72 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopes, J C.B.; Dukler, A E

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data.

  6. annular si drift: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drift configurations Yong, Alexander 5 THE ANNULAR HULL THEOREMS FOR THE KINEMATIC DYNAMO OPERATOR Mathematics Websites Summary: THE ANNULAR HULL THEOREMS FOR THE...

  7. Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) Institut de statistique, biostatistique et sciences actuarielles (ISBA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) Institut de statistique, biostatistique et sciences actuarielles (ISBA) Vacancy PhD positions in statistics, econometrics and actuarial catholique de Louvain opens up to four PhD positions in statistics, econometrics or actuarial sciences

  8. Asymptotically radial solutions in expanding annular domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clapp, Mónica

    Asymptotically radial solutions in expanding annular domains Thomas Bartsch M´onica Clapp Massimo- mail: Thomas.Bartsch@math.uni-giessen.de Instituto de Matem´aticas, Universidad Nacional Aut´onoma de M

  9. Neutronic calculations for the conversion to LEU of a research reactor core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varvayanni, M.; Catsaros, N.; Stakakis, E. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Grigoriadis, D. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, Nicosia 1678 (Cyprus)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For a five-year transitional period the Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1) was operating with a mixed core, containing both Low Enrichment (LEU) and High Enrichment (HEU) Uranium MTR- type fuel assemblies. The neutronic study of the GRR-1 conversion to LEU has been performed using a code system comprising the core-analysis code CITATION-LDI2 and the cell-calculation modules XSDRNPM and NITAWL-II of the SCALE code. A conceptual LEU core configuration was defined and analyzed with respect to the three dimensional multi-group neutron fluxes, the power distribution, the control-rod worth and the compliance with pre-defined Operation Limiting Conditions. Perturbation calculations and reactivity feedback computations were also carried out to provide input to a subsequent thermal-hydraulic study. (author)

  10. Dual annular rotating [open quotes]windowed[close quotes] nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacox, M.G.; Drexler, R.L.; Hunt, R.N.M.; Lake, J.A.

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core. 4 figures.

  11. annular tank array: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectrum of the group belongs to the annular hull of the exponent of the spectrum of the kinematic dynamo operator Montgomery-Smith, Stephen 7 Baroclinic annular variability in...

  12. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  13. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  14. Cretaceous shallow drilling, US Western Interior: Core research. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur, M.A.

    1993-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is a continuing multidisciplinary study of middle to Upper Cretaceous marine carbonate and clastic rocks in the Utah-Colorado-Kansas corridor of the old Cretaceous seaway that extended from the Gulf Coast to the Arctic during maximum Cretaceous transgressions. It is collaborative between in the US Geological Survey (W.E. Dean, P.I.) and University researchers led by The Pennsylvania State University(M.A. Arthur, P.I.) and funded by DOE and the USGS, in part. Research focusses on the Greenhom, Niobrara and lower Pierre Shale units and their equivalents, combining biostratigraphic/paleoecologic studies, inorganic, organic and stable isotopic geochemical studies, mineralogical investigations and high-resolution geophysical logging. This research requires unweathered samples and continuous smooth ``exposures`` in the form of cores from at least 4 relatively shallow reference holes (i.e. < 1000m) in transect from east to west across the basin. The major initial effort was recovery in Year 1 of the project of continuous cores from each site in the transect. This drilling provided samples and logs of strata ranging from pelagic sequences that contain organic-carbon-rich marine source rocks to nearshore coal-bearing units. This transect also will provide information on the extent of thermal maturation and migration of hydrocarbons in organic-carbon-rich strata along a burial gradient.

  15. On the Persistence of Cold-Season SST Anomalies Associated with the Annular Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    England, Matthew

    . In the North Atlantic, however, the simple climate model overestimates the persistence of the coldOn the Persistence of Cold-Season SST Anomalies Associated with the Annular Modes LAURA M. CIASTO Climate Change Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia MICHAEL

  16. IDRC/Next Generation Sequencing Research Associate I Open Applicant Pool IDRC (Next Generation Sequencing Core)/OVPR/CSU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    IDRC/Next Generation Sequencing Research Associate I Open Applicant Pool IDRC (Next Generation description of the Research Associate I position: The Next Generation Sequencing Core Facility are desired. 3) Flexible and team oriented individual preferred as hours will often be variable and all

  17. Reactor core design and modeling of the MIT research reactor for conversion to LEU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, Thomas H. Jr. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Olson, Arne P.; Stillman, John A. [RERTR Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Feasibility design studies for conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) to LEU are described. Because the reactor fuel has a rhombic cross section, a special input processor was created in order to model the reactor in great detail with the REBUS-PC diffusion theory code, in 3D (triangular-z) geometry. Comparisons are made of fuel assembly power distributions and control blade worth vs. axial position, between REBUS-PC results and Monte Carlo predictions from the MCNP code. Results for the original HEU core at zero burnup are also compared with measurement. These two analysis methods showed remarkable agreement. Ongoing fuel cycle studies are summarized. A status report will be given as to results thus far that affect key design decisions. Future work plans and schedules to achieve completion of the conversion are presented. (author)

  18. annular proliferation resistance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the horizontal redistribution of atmospheric mass. The resulting changes in the pressure patterns ... Chan, Cegeon J 2006-01-01 15 Ergodicity and annular homeomorphisms of...

  19. Temperature/Heat Analysis of Annular Fins of Hyperbolic Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huston, Dryver R.

    streams of hot fluids to surrounding cold gases is attainable by attaching arrays of annular fins to the outer surface of the tubes Kraus et al. 1 , Webb 2 . Typical industrial applications involv- ing annular for refrigeration, in storage tanks of waste nuclear materials, etc. From a historical perspective, Schmidt 3

  20. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Gonzalez, Manuel E. (Kingwood, NM); Llewellyn, Brian C. (Kingwood, TX); Bloys, James B. (Katy, TX); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  1. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  2. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Gonzalez, Manuel E. (Kingwood, TX); Llewellyn, Brian C. (Kingwood, TX); Bloys, James B. (Katy, TX)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  3. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Gonzalez, Manuel E. (Kingwood, TX); Llewellyn, Brian C. (Kingwood, TX); Bloys, James B. (Katy, TX)

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  4. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Gonzalez, Manuel E. (Kingwood, TX); Llewellyn, Brian C. (Kingwood, TX); Bloys, James B. (Katy, TX); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  5. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology Research Call (Round 6)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce four selections in response to the Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Core...

  6. On the use of high performance annular fuel in PWRs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, MIT's Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems developed a new high burnup annular fuel that features both internal and external cooling. Implementation of this fuel design in current pressurized water reactors ...

  7. annular film condensation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Annular Bose-Einstein Condensates in the Lowest Landau Level Mathematical Physics (arXiv) Summary: A rotating...

  8. CORE SIM: A multi-purpose neutronic tool for research and education Christophe Demazire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Division of Nuclear Engineering, SE-412 96 eigenfunctions of any nuclear core. For each situation, the static neutron flux, the different eigenmodes is required. The present version of the tool, which is based on two-group diffusion theory, is mostly suited

  9. The Center for Family and Demographic Research at Bowling Green State University has core funding from the National Institute of Child Health and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    The Center for Family and Demographic Research at Bowling Green State University has core funding and Research Centerfor Bowling Green State University Beyond a Variable-Centered Approach to Place: Identifying: Neighborhood Context Conclusions Department of Sociology Bowling Green State University ·Classifies emergent

  10. Mean flow and turbulence characteristics in whirling annular seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thames, Howard Davis

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the test rig with the annular seal installed 15: Dimensions of the Annular Rotor . 16: Components of the 3D Laser Doppler Velocimetry System 15 17 . . 19 Figure 17: Raw Doppler signal with high frequency noise and pedestal Figure 18: Doppler signal... 64: Figure 65: Figure 66: Figure 67: Figure 68: Figure 69: Figure 70: Figure 71: Figure 72: Figure 73: Figure 74: Figure 75: Figure 76: Figure 77: Case 2 Vector Plots at Constant Axial Positions 13-17 99 Case 2 Mean Velocity Contours...

  11. Research subjects for analytical estimation of core degradation at Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagase, F.; Ishikawa, J.; Kurata, M.; Yoshida, H.; Kaji, Y.; Shibamoto, Y.; Amaya, M; Okumura, K.; Katsuyama, J. [Fukushima Project Team, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimation of the accident progress and status inside the pressure vessels (RPV) and primary containment vessels (PCV) is required for appropriate conductance of decommissioning in the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP. For that, it is necessary to obtain additional experimental data and revised models for the estimation using computer codes with increased accuracies. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has selected phenomena to be reviewed and developed, considering previously obtained information, conditions specific to the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP accident, and recent progress of experimental and analytical technologies. As a result, research and development items have been picked up in terms of thermal-hydraulic behavior in the RPV and PCV, progression of fuel bundle degradation, failure of the lower head of RPV, and analysis of the accident. This paper introduces the selected phenomena to be reviewed and developed, research plans and recent results from the JAEA's corresponding research programs. (authors)

  12. A tool to study azimuthal standing and spinning modes in annular combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A tool to study azimuthal standing and spinning modes in annular combustors C. Sensiau CERFACS combustion insta- bilities which can occur in annular combustors is proposed in this work. A thermoacoustic in Annular Combustor (ISAAC) which states that the heat release fluctuations in a given sector are driven

  13. 12th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, 8-10 May 2006, Cambridge, MA, USA Sound Radiation from an Annular Duct with Jet Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    an Annular Duct with Jet Flow and a Lined Centerbody A. Demir Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands. S.W. Rienstra Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven, in particular the afterbody. Post-doctoral Researcher, Department of Mathematics & Computer Science, Eindhoven

  14. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 547 (2005) 663678 Determining axial fuel-rod power-density profiles from in-core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shultis, J. Kenneth

    is proposed for determining power-density profiles in nuclear reactor fuel rods from neutron flux measurementsNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 547 (2005) 663­678 Determining axial fuel-rod power-density profiles from in-core neutron flux measurements J. Kenneth Shultis� Department

  15. Annular gap solitons in Kerr media with circular gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheuer, Jacob [School of Electrical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Malomed, Boris [School of Electrical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce standing-light patterns trapped in a Bragg grating written along the radial direction in a self-focusing (SF) or self-defocusing (SDF) optical medium. Unlike previously studied axisymmetric settings that deal with the axial propagation, we consider the propagation of light in the radial directions (outward and inward), which may give rise to annular gap solitons (AGSs), supported by the circular grating. An estimate for the threshold of the modulational instability of the AGS against azimuthal perturbations in the SF medium is obtained analytically, and verified by direct simulations. In the SDF model, stable annular and dipole solitons are found in a numerical form, while multipole patterns and vortex rings are unstable. Similar solitons are possible in the Bose-Einstein condensate.

  16. Ignition sequence of an annular multi-injector combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip, Maxime; Vicquelin, Ronan; Schmitt, Thomas; Durox, Daniel; Bourgoin, Jean-François; Candel, Sébastien

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ignition is a critical process in combustion systems. In aeronautical combustors, altitude relight capacities are required in case of accidental extinction of the chamber. A simultaneous study of light-round ignition in an annular multi-injector combustor has been performed on the experimental and numerical sides. This effort allows a unique comparison to assess the reliability of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) in such a configuration. Results are presented in fluid dynamics videos.

  17. Experimental characterization of the initial zone of an annular jet with a very large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    an annular jet flow and a flow around a valve during the admission cycle of an explosion engine. The r value

  18. Electron beam diagnostic system using computed tomography and an annular sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for analyzing an electron beam including a circular electron beam diagnostic sensor adapted to receive the electron beam, the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor having a central axis; an annular sensor structure operatively connected to the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor, wherein the sensor structure receives the electron beam; a system for sweeping the electron beam radially outward from the central axis of the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor to the annular sensor structure wherein the electron beam is intercepted by the annular sensor structure; and a device for measuring the electron beam that is intercepted by the annular sensor structure.

  19. Laser window with annular grooves for thermal isolation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Horton, J.A.; Alger, T.W.

    1983-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser window or other optical element which is thermally loaded, heats up and causes optical distortions because of temperature gradients between the center and the edge. A number of annular grooves, one to three or more, are formed in the element between a central portion and edge portion, producing a web portion which concentrates the thermal gradient and thermally isolates the central portion from the edge portion, producing a uniform temperature profile across the central portion and therefore reduce the optical distortions. The grooves are narrow and closely spaced with respect to the thickness of the element, and successive grooves are formed from alternate sides of the element.

  20. A simple analytical model to study and control azimuthal instabilities in annular combustion chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A simple analytical model to study and control azimuthal instabilities in annular combustion analytical method to compute the azimuthal modes appearing in annular combustion chambers and help analyzing exper- imental, acoustic and LES (Large Eddy Simulation) data obtained in these combustion chambers

  1. Comparison of the Leakage Characteristics of the Straight Annular and Convergent Seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ustun, Serafettin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    independent analysis) ........ 17 Fig. 7 Comparison of the standard k-? and enhanced wall treatment models (convergent seal, Cex=0.1 mm) ..................................................................... 19 Fig. 8 Comparison of the standard k...-? and enhanced wall treatment models (straight annular seal, Cex=0.1 mm) ............................................................... 20 Fig. 9 Pressure contours for the convergent and straight annular seals (rotor wall, 20,200 rpm...

  2. Development of an internally cooled annular fuel bundle for pressurized heavy water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, H.; Armstrong, J.; Kittmer, A.; Zhuchkova, A.; Xu, R.; Hyland, B.; King, M.; Nava-Dominguez, A.; Livingstone, S.; Bergeron, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of preliminary studies have been conducted at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited to explore the potential of using internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) in CANDU reactors including finite element thermo-mechanical modelling, reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, fabrication and mechanical design. The most compelling argument for this design compared to the conventional solid-rod design is the significant reduction in maximum fuel temperature for equivalent LERs (linear element ratings). This feature presents the potential for power up-rating or higher burnup and a decreased defect probability due to in-core power increases. The thermal-mechanical evaluation confirmed the significant reduction in maximum fuel temperatures for ICAF fuel compared to solid-rod fuel for equivalent LER. The maximum fuel temperature increase as a function of LER increase is also significantly less for ICAF fuel. As a result, the sheath stress induced by an equivalent power increase is approximately six times less for ICAF fuel than solid-rod fuel. This suggests that the power-increase thresholds to failure (due to stress-corrosion cracking) for ICAF fuel should be well above those for solid-rod fuel, providing improvement in operation flexibility and safety.

  3. Continuum-kinetic-microscopic model of lung clearance due to core-annular fluid entrainment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitran, Sorin, E-mail: mitran@unc.edu

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The human lung is protected against aspirated infectious and toxic agents by a thin liquid layer lining the interior of the airways. This airway surface liquid is a bilayer composed of a viscoelastic mucus layer supported by a fluid film known as the periciliary liquid. The viscoelastic behavior of the mucus layer is principally due to long-chain polymers known as mucins. The airway surface liquid is cleared from the lung by ciliary transport, surface tension gradients, and airflow shear forces. This work presents a multiscale model of the effect of airflow shear forces, as exerted by tidal breathing and cough, upon clearance. The composition of the mucus layer is complex and variable in time. To avoid the restrictions imposed by adopting a viscoelastic flow model of limited validity, a multiscale computational model is introduced in which the continuum-level properties of the airway surface liquid are determined by microscopic simulation of long-chain polymers. A bridge between microscopic and continuum levels is constructed through a kinetic-level probability density function describing polymer chain configurations. The overall multiscale framework is especially suited to biological problems due to the flexibility afforded in specifying microscopic constituents, and examining the effects of various constituents upon overall mucus transport at the continuum scale.

  4. LMFBR in-core thermal-hydraulics: the state of the art and US research and development needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, E.U.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed critical review is presented of the literature relevant to predicting coolant flow and temperature fields in LMFBR core assemblies for nominal and non-nominal rod bundle geometries and reactor operating conditions. The review covers existing thermal-hydraulic models, computational methods, and experimental data useful for the design of an LMFBR core. The literature search made for this review included publications listed by Nuclear Science Abstracts and Energy Data Base as well as papers presented at key nuclear conferences. Based on this extensive review, the report discusses the accuracy with which the models predict flow and temperature fields in rod assemblies, identifying areas where analytical, experimental, and model development needs exist.

  5. Radiation characterization summary : ACRR 44-inch lead-boron bucket located in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline (ACRR-LB44-CC-32-cl).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parma, Edward J.,; Quirk, Thomas J.; Lippert, Lance L.; Griffin, Patrick Joseph; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, Spencer Michael

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the facility-recommended characterization of the neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the 44-inch-long lead-boron bucket in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environment is ACRR-LB44-CC-32-cl. The neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray energy spectra are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma-ray flux profiles within the experiment area of the bucket. Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse and steady-state operations are presented with conversion examples.

  6. The Inverse Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Inverse Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the Annular Core Research Reactor by Benjamin Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the Annular Core Research Reactor by Benjamin Garnas ABSTRACT Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the Annular Core Research Reactor by Benjamin Garnas B.S. General

  7. Visualization of flow boiling in an annular heat exchanger under reduced gravity conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westheimer, David Thomas

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examines the effects of gravitational acceleration on the flow boiling process. A test facility focusing on an annular heat exchanger was designed, built out of borosilicate glass, and flown on NASA's KC-135 reduced gravity airplane...

  8. The transition from the annular to the slug flow regime in two-phase flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberstroh, Robert D.

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted to determine the transition from annular to semiannular flow regimes for two-phase, gas-liquid upflow in vertical tubes. The influencesof liquid flow rate, tube diameter, liquid viscosity, surface ...

  9. Conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor (ASBWR) is outlined. The proposed design, ASBWR, combines the boiler and superheater regions into one fuel assembly. This ensures good neutron ...

  10. Effect of the annular region on the performance of a cylindrical Hall plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Mihui; Lee, Jongsub; Choe, Wonho [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seon, Jongho [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deokyoungdaero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); June Lee, Hae [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busandaehak-ro 63beon-gil, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance characteristics of a cylindrical Hall thruster depending on the depth of the annular region (L{sub a}) in front of the anode were investigated. The effect of the annular region was examined by operating thrusters corresponding to four different values of L{sub a} (0, 4, 6, and 10 mm) and a fixed length of the cylindrical region (25 mm). Various measurements such as electron and ion currents, thrust, anode efficiency, current and propellant utilizations, and ion energy distribution functions were performed. Such measurements lead to an interpretation that (1) a considerable potential difference may exist between the anode and the ionization region, which is presumably located near the end of the annular region where magnetic field lines converge; (2) this potential difference increases with respect to increasing L{sub a}; and (3) the presence of the annular region near the anode reduces the specific impulse and anode efficiency for the examined thrusters.

  11. Annular mode-like responses to external forcings in a simple atmospheric general circulation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ring, Michael J., 1979-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I investigate the response of a simple atmospheric general circulation model to applied forcings to learn whether the annular mode patterns are a preferred model response to the forcings. The thesis is ...

  12. An Evaluation of the Annular Fuel and Bottle-Shaped Fuel Concepts for Sodium Fast Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memmott, Matthew

    Two innovative fuel concepts, the internally and externally cooled annular fuel and the bottle-shaped fuel, were investigated with the goal of increasing the power density and reduce the pressure drop in the sodium-cooled ...

  13. NEUTRONIC AND THERMAL HYDRAULIC DESIGNS OF ANNULAR FUEL FOR HIGH POWER DENSITY BWRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morra, P.

    As a promising new fuel for high power density light water reactors, the feasibility of using annular fuel for BWR services is explored from both thermal hydraulic and neutronic points of view. Keeping the bundle size ...

  14. Notes 12. (a) Annular pressure (damper) seals, and (b) Hydrostatic journal bearings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanism of centering stiffness in seals. Force coefficients for short-length pressure seals. Design of annular seals: swirl brakes, impact on rotordynamics. Hydrostatic bearings in modern applications. The principle of hydrostatic lubrication...

  15. A study of the effects of eccentricity on honeycomb annular gas seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weatherwax, Mark

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented which show the effects of eccentricity on high pressure honeycomb and smooth annular gas seals. The results of the experiments indicate the ability to utilize centered seal solutions for rotordynamic coefficients and seal...

  16. Thermal hydraulic limits analysis for the MIT Research Reactor low enrichment uranium core conversion using statistical propagation of parametric uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Keng-Yen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is evaluating the conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. In addition to the fuel element re-design from 15 to 18 plates per element, a reactor ...

  17. Evaluation of the thermal-hydraulic operating limits of the HEU-LEU transition cores for the MIT Research Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yunzhi (Yunzhi Diana)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is in the process of conducting a design study to convert from High Enrichment Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) fuel. The currently selected LEU fuel design contains 18 ...

  18. Theory versus experiment of the rotordynamic and leakage characteristics of smooth annular bushing oil seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culotta, Vittorio G.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    THEORY VERSUS EXPERIMENT OF THE ROTORDYNAMIC AND LEAKAGE CHARACTERISTICS OF SMOOTH ANNULAR BUSHING OIL SEALS A Thesis by VITTORIO GIUSEPPE CULOTTA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2004 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THEORY VERSUS EXPERIMENT OF THE ROTORDYNAMIC AND LEAKAGE CHARACTERISTICS OF SMOOTH ANNULAR BUSHING OIL SEALS A...

  19. Core Specialization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cores per node for handling system services, and thus reduce the effects of timing jitter due to interruptions from the operating system at the expense of (possibly) requiring...

  20. Convective heat transfer to CO{sub 2} at a supercritical pressure flowing vertically upward in tubes and an annular channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bae, Yoon-Yeong; Kim, Hwan-Yeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Super-Critical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) has been chosen by the Generation IV International Forum as one of the candidates for the next generation nuclear reactors. Heat transfer to water from a fuel assembly may deteriorate at certain supercritical pressure flow conditions and its estimation at degraded conditions as well as in normal conditions is very important to the design of a safe and reliable reactor core. Extensive experiments on a heat transfer to a vertically upward flowing CO{sub 2} at a supercritical pressure in tubes and an annular channel have been performed. The geometries of the test sections include tubes of an internal diameter (ID) of 4.4 and 9.0 mm and an annular channel (8 x 10 mm). The heat transfer coefficient (HTC) and Nusselt numbers were derived from the inner wall temperature converted by using the outer wall temperature measured by adhesive K-type thermocouples and a direct (tube) or indirect (annular channel) electric heating power. From the test results, a correlation, which covers both a deteriorated and a normal heat transfer regime, was developed. The developed correlation takes different forms in each interval divided by the value of parameter Bu. The parameter Bu (referred to as Bu hereafter), a function of the Grashof number, the Reynolds number and the Prandtl number, was introduced since it is known to be a controlling factor for the occurrence of a heat transfer deterioration due to a buoyancy effect. The developed correlation predicted the HTCs for water and HCFC-22 fairly well. (author)

  1. annular bragg lasers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coefficients and leakage... Kerr, Bradley Gray 2005-02-17 315 Ultra-large bandwidth hollow-core guiding in all-silica Bragg fibers with nano-supports CERN Preprints Summary:...

  2. Design of annular fuel for high power density BWRs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morra, Paolo

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enabling high power density in the core of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is economically profitable for existing or new reactors. In this work, we examine the potential for increasing the power density in BWR plants by ...

  3. Barotropic and baroclinic annular variability in the Southern Hemisphere David. W. J. Thompson1 and Jonathan D. Woodworth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barotropic and baroclinic annular variability in the Southern Hemisphere David. W. J. Thompson1. Thompson, Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. USA 80523 E

  4. Summary of benchmark experiments for simulation of fusion reactors using an annular blanket with a line deuterium-tritium source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maekawa, H.; Abdou, M.A.; Oyama, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research lnstitute (JAERI)/U.S. Department of Energy collaborative program was performed using the Fusion Neutronics Source facility at JAERI. In Phase III of this program, tritium breeding measurements were conducted in prototypical blankets driven by a simulated deuterium-tritium neutron line source. This phase differed from the earlier two phases in respect to the spatial distribution of the source as the earlier experiments were done with a point neutron source. This series basically consisted of an annular test blanket and a pseudoline source to investigate the effect of source spread on the neutronic performance. A concise description is on the outlines of the simulated line source, the test blanket systems for Phases-IIIA, -IIIB, and -IIIC, measured items, experimental results, and their analyses. 23 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Experimental versus theoretical comparison of the effects of taper and static eccentricity on the rotordynamic coefficients of short, smooth, high-speed, liquid annular seals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, William Todd

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In this research, the clearance was held constant (C/R = 0. 0045) while the seal length was varied (L/D = 0. 25, 0. 75, and 1. 00). The tests were conducted at pressure drops of 10, 18, 25, and 35 bars and angular rotational speed ranging between 750 and 5000 rpm... to increase with increased taper angles, while the remaining rotordynamic coefficients decreased. Kanki and Kawakamai (1984) presented experimental data, which included leakage, load, and rotordynamic coefficients, for two annular seals with L/D = 1. 0...

  6. Roll Wave Effects on Annular Condensing Heat Transfer in Horizontal PCCS Condenser Tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masaya Kondo; Hideo Nakamura; Yoshinari Anoda [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura 319-1195 (Japan); Sadanori Saishu; Hiroyuki Obata; Rumi Shimada [Japan Atomic Power Company (Japan); Shinichi Kawamura [Tokyo Electric Power Company, Incorporated, 1-3, Uchisaiwai-cho 1-chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 1008560 (Japan)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A horizontal in-tube condensation heat exchanger is under investigation to be used for a passive containment cooling system (PCCS) of a next generation-type BWR. The flow conditions in the horizontal condenser tube were observed both visually and by local void fraction fluctuation. The observed flow regimes at a rated condition were annular flow at the tube inlet, and turned gradually into wavy flow and smooth stratified flow along the length of the tube. It was found further that frequency of the roll waves that appear on the liquid film in the annular flow is closely related to the measured local condensation heat transfer coefficient. Based on the flow observation, the roll wave frequency and measured condensation heat transfer coefficient, a model is proposed which predicts the condensation heat transfer coefficient particularly for annular flows around the tube inlet region. The proposed heat transfer model predicts well the influences of pressure, local gas-phase velocity and film thickness. (authors)

  7. Three-dimensional instabilities in a discretely heated annular flow: Onset of spatio-temporal complexity via defect dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marques, Francisco

    . INTRODUCTION Interest in natural convection in enclosures has a long history,1 motivated by both relevanceThree-dimensional instabilities in a discretely heated annular flow: Onset of spatio- temporal of the flow in an annular rotor-stator cavity Phys. Fluids 21, 064106 (2009); 10.1063/1.3156859 Stability

  8. Production and delivery of a fluid mixture to an annular volume of a wellbore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermes, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bland, Ronald Gene (Houston, TX); Foley, Ron Lee (Magnolia, TX); Bloys, James B. (Katy, TX); Gonzalez, Manuel E. (Kingwood, NM); Daniel, John M. (Germantown, TN); Robinson, Ian M. (Guisborough, GB); Carpenter, Robert B. (Tomball, TX)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The methods described herein generally relate to preparing and delivering a fluid mixture to a confined volume, specifically an annular volume located between two concentrically oriented casing strings within a hydrocarbon fluid producing well. The fluid mixtures disclosed herein are useful in controlling pressure in localized volumes. The fluid mixtures comprise at least one polymerizable monomer and at least one inhibitor. The processes and methods disclosed herein allow the fluid mixture to be stored, shipped and/or injected into localized volumes, for example, an annular volume defined by concentric well casing strings.

  9. Influence of present day and glacial surface conditions on the Antarctic Oscillation/Southern Annular Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    /Southern Annular Mode Fla´vio Justino1,2 and W. Richard Peltier1 Received 23 May 2006; revised 5 October 2006., and W. R. Peltier (2006), Influence of present day and glacial surface conditions on the Antarctic around the Antarctic Peninsula [e.g., Peltier and Solheim, 2004], it might be expected that significantly

  10. On the effect of perforated plates on the acoustics of annular combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On the effect of perforated plates on the acoustics of annular combustors E. Gullaud1 CERFACS], acoustic Helmholtz solvers can prove to be sufficient to compute the thermoacoustic modes of a combustor accuracy of these computations, the whole complex geometry of the combustor, including the combustion

  11. On the effect of perforated plates on the acoustics of annular combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    On the effect of perforated plates on the acoustics of annular combustors E. Gullaud1 CERFACS [9, 10], the thermoacoustic modes of a combustor can be computed more 3 #12;efficiently by using to account for the complex geometry of the combustor, including the combustion chamber, casing, swirlers

  12. Experimental and theoretical rotordynamic coefficients and leakage of straight smooth annular gas seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerr, Bradley Gray

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2004 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL ROTORDYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS AND LEAKAGE OF STRAIGHT SMOOTH ANNULAR GAS SEALS A...: _____________________________ _____________________________ Dara W. Childs Paul G.A. Cizmas (Chair of Committee) (Member) _____________________________ _____________________________ John M. Vance Dennis O?Neal (Member) (Head of Department) December 2004 Major...

  13. Experimental critical parameters of enriched uranium solution in annular tank geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 61 critical configurations are reported for experiments involving various combinations of annular tanks into which enriched uranium solution was pumped. These experiments were performed at two widely separated times in the 1980s under two programs at the Rocky Flats Plant`s Critical Mass Laboratory. The uranyl nitrate solution contained about 370 g of uranium per liter, but this concentration varied a little over the duration of the studies. The uranium was enriched to about 93% [sup 235]U. All tanks were typical of sizes commonly found in nuclear production plants. They were about 2 m tall and ranged in diameter from 0.6 m to 1.5 m. Annular thicknesses and conditions of neutron reflection, moderation, and absorption were such that criticality would be achieved with these dimensions. Only 13 of the entire set of 74 experiments proved to be subcritical when tanks were completely filled with solution. Single tanks of several radial thicknesses were studied as well as small line arrays (1 x 2 and 1 x 3) of annular tanks. Many systems were reflected on four sides and the bottom by concrete, but none were reflected from above. Many experiments also contained materials within and outside the annular regions that contained strong neutron absorbers. One program had such a thick external moderator/absorber combination that no reflector was used at all.

  14. Quantitative study of mixing in annular and raschig ring filled tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, M. A.

    1980-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative study of mixing, which utilized the exit age distribution theory, has been completed for bench-scale annular and raschig ring filled tanks, in addition to a pilot-scale annular tank. A study of mixing and fluid flow in a full-scale, single-entry, raschig ring filled tank also was initiated. Results showed the bench-scale raschig ring filled tank approached plug-flow (no mixing) behavior. In a bench-scale annular tank, regardless of whether fluid entered tangentially or nontangentially, the vessel approached continuously stirred tank reactor behavior (perfect mixing). The pilot-scale annular tank approached continuously stirred tank reactor behavior only when tangential entry was used. Mixing in the full-scale raschig ring filled tank he tank did not approach eithr the perfect or the no mixing situations. Instead, the tank had a flow pattern in which solution channeled through a small volume of the tank, leaving the regions outside the channel effectively inactive.

  15. 3-D laser doppler velocimeter measurements of eccentric annular and labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Purandar Gururaj

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .27 mm. The eccentricity ratios of the annular and labyrinth seals were 0.10 and 0.50 respectively. The whirl ratio for both seals were 1.00. For both seals the maximum axial velocity is not located at the maximum clearance over the length of the seals...

  16. Experimental measurement of phase averaged wall-pressure distributions for a 25% eccentric whirling annular seal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cusano, Domenic

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Instantaneous wall-pressure data were recorded for a 25% eccentric whirling annular seal for rotor speeds of 1800RPM and 3600RPM, axial Reynolds numbers of 24000 and 12000, and whirl ratios of 0.1-1.0 following the procedure ...

  17. Circumpolar response of Southern Ocean eddy activity to a change in the Southern Annular Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Michael P. Meredith1 and Andrew M. Hogg2 Received 4 April 2006; revised 29 June 2006; accepted 7 July 2006 Energy (EKE) in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) during the period 2000­2002. Around 2­3 years earlier (1998), the circumpolar eastward wind stress (as quantified by the Southern Annular Mode; SAM

  18. Dynamic pressure and shear stress measurements on the stator wall of whirling annular seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winslow, Robert Bradley

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic pressure and shear stress measurements on the stator wall of whirling annular seals are presented. Two flow conditions (Re=12,000 & 24,000), two seal speeds (Ta=3,300 & 6,600) and three eccentricity ratios (0, 10, & 50% of the clearance...

  19. Fuel and core testing plan for a target fueled isotope production reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coats, Richard Lee; Dahl, James J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years there has been an unstable supply of the critical diagnostic medical isotope 99Tc. Several concepts and designs have been proposed to produce 99Mo the parent nuclide of 99Tc, at a commercial scale sufficient to stabilize the world supply. This work lays out a testing and experiment plan for a proposed 2 MW open pool reactor fueled by Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) 99Mo targets. The experiments and tests necessary to support licensing of the reactor design are described and how these experiments and tests will help establish the safe operating envelop for a medical isotope production reactor is discussed. The experiments and tests will facilitate a focused and efficient licensing process in order to bring on line a needed production reactor dedicated to supplying medical isotopes. The Target Fuel Isotope Reactor (TFIR) design calls for an active core region that is approximately 40 cm in diameter and 40 cm in fuel height. It contains up to 150 cylindrical, 1-cm diameter, LEU oxide fuel pins clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy), in an annular hexagonal array on a {approx}2.0 cm pitch surrounded, radially, by a graphite or a Be reflector. The reactor is similar to U.S. university reactors in power, hardware, and safety/control systems. Fuel/target pin fabrication is based on existing light water reactor fuel fabrication processes. However, as part of licensing process, experiments must be conducted to confirm analytical predictions of steady-state power and accident conditions. The experiment and test plan will be conducted in phases and will utilize existing facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories. The first phase is to validate the predicted reactor core neutronics at delayed critical, zero power and very low power. This will be accomplished by using the Sandia Critical Experiment (CX) platform. A full scale TFIR core will be built in the CX and delayed critical measurements will be taken. For low power experiments, fuel pins can be removed after the experiment and using Sandia's metrology lab, relative power profiles (radially and axially) can be determined. In addition to validating neutronic analyses, confirming heat transfer properties of the target/fuel pins and core will be conducted. Fuel/target pin power limits can be verified with out-of-pile (electrical heating) thermal-hydraulic experiments. This will yield data on the heat flux across the Zircaloy clad and establish safety margin and operating limits. Using Sandia's Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) a 4 MW TRIGA type research reactor, target/fuel pins can be driven to desired fission power levels for long durations. Post experiment inspection of the pins can be conducted in the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility to observe changes in the mechanical properties of the LEU matrix and burn-up effects. Transient tests can also be conducted at the ACRR to observe target/fuel pin performance during accident conditions. Target/fuel pins will be placed in double experiment containment and driven by pulsing the ACRR until target/fuel failure is observed. This will allow for extrapolation of analytical work to confirm safety margins.

  20. Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program. Semiannual report, October 1982-March 1983. [Molten fuel/concrete interaction; core melt-coolant interaction; hydrogen detonation (Grand Gulf igniter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Molten Fuel/Concrete Interactions (MFCI) Study investigates the mechanism of concrete erosion by molten core materials, the nature and rate of generation of evolved gases, and the effects on fission product release. The Core Melt/Coolant Interactions (CMCI) Study investigates the characteristics of explosive and nonexplosive interactions between molten core materials and concrete, and the probabilities and consequences of such interactions. In the Hydrogen Program, the HECTR code for modelling hydrogen deflagration is being developed, experiments (including those in the FITS facility) are being conducted, and the Grand Gulf Hydrogen Igniter System II is being reviewed. All activities are continuing.

  1. Core Specialization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi Site Office (FSO) FSOConvertingCopy ServicesCore

  2. Parameters defining flow resistance and the friction factor behavior in liquid annular seals with deliberately roughened surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villasmil Urdaneta, Larry Alfonso

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-contacting annular seals are internal sealing devices used in rotating machinery, such as multistage centrifugal pumps and compressors. Their design affects both efficiency and rotor stability. Traditional plain and ...

  3. A comparison of experimental and theoretical results for leakage, pressure gradient, and rotordynamic coefficients for tapered annular gas seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elrod, David Alan

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL RESULTS FOR LEAKAGE, PRESSURE GRADIENT, AND ROTORDYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS FOR TAPERED ANNULAR GAS SEALS A Thesis by DAVID ALAN ELROD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... FOR TAPERED ANNULAR GAS SEALS A Thesis by DAVID ALAN ELROD Approved as to style and content by: Dar a Childs (Co-Chair of Committee) Clayton Ne son (C -Chair of Committee) Der aid Hantfiel (Member ) W. D. Tun ner (Head of Department) December 1986...

  4. Scaling Turbo Boost to a 1000 cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S, Ananth Narayan; Fedorova, Alexandra

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intel Core i7 processor code named Nehalem provides a feature named Turbo Boost which opportunistically varies the frequencies of the processor's cores. The frequency of a core is determined by core temperature, the number of active cores, the estimated power consumption, the estimated current consumption, and operating system frequency scaling requests. For a chip multi-processor(CMP) that has a small number of physical cores and a small set of performance states, deciding the Turbo Boost frequency to use on a given core might not be difficult. However, we do not know the complexity of this decision making process in the context of a large number of cores, scaling to the 100s, as predicted by researchers in the field.

  5. Transport of ion beam in an annular magnetically expanding helicon double layer thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yunchao, E-mail: yunchao.zhang@anu.edu.au; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Bldg 60, Mills Road, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion beam generated by an annular double layer has been measured in a helicon thruster, which sustains a magnetised low-pressure (5.0?×?10{sup ?4}?Torr) argon plasma at a constant radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) power of 300?W. After the ion beam exits the annular structure, it merges into a solid centrally peaked structure in the diffusion chamber. As the annular ion beam moves towards the inner region in the diffusion chamber, a reversed-cone plasma wake (with a half opening angle of about 30°) is formed. This process is verified by measuring both the radial and axial distributions of the beam potential and beam current. The beam potential changes from a two-peak radial profile (maximum value???30?V, minimum value???22.5?V) to a flat (?28?V) along the axial direction; similarly, the beam current changes from a two-peak to one-peak radial profile and the maximum value decreases by half. The inward cross-magnetic-field motion of the beam ions is caused by a divergent electric field in the source. Cross-field diffusion of electrons is also observed in the inner plume and is determined as being of non-ambipolar origin.

  6. 2001 BTS Core Databook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment of Energy with6, 2014, 6:32 p.m. (MST)BTS CORE

  7. 510 Plant Disease / Vol. 97 No. 4 Etiology of Moldy Core, Core Browning, and Core Rot of Fuji Apple in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggs, Alan R.

    Province, 712000, P. R. China; and Alan R. Biggs, Kearneysville Tree Fruit Research and Education Center., Zhang, R., Sun, G. Y., Zha, Y. L., and Biggs, A. R. 2013. Etiology of moldy core, core browning

  8. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Lentz, E. J. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Baird, Mark L [ORNL; Chertkow, Merek A [ORNL; Lee, Ching-Tsai [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Blondin, J. M. [North Carolina State University; Bruenn, S. W. [Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  9. Feasibility of Partial ZrO[subscript 2] Coatings on Outer Surface of Annular UO[subscript 2] Pellets to Control Gap Conductance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feinroth, H.

    The viability of depositing a thin porous coating of zirconia on the outer surface of an annular UO[subscript 2] pellet

  10. ESPP Functional Genomics and Imaging Core: Cell wide analysis of Metal-Reducing Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL Program throughESPP Functional Genomics and Imaging Core: Cell widemetals. The Functional Genomics and Imaging Core (FGIC)

  11. Technique for controlling shrinkage distortion in cold-pressed annular pellets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, R.G.R.; Burke, T.J.

    1982-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus are described for the production of annular fuel pellets comprising locating particulate fuel material in a compaction chamber having side walls, a moveable punch located opposite a fixed member and a frustoconical element having a taper of between about 0.010 to 0.015 inches/inch located in about the center of the chamber. The punch is moved toward the fixed surface to compact the particulate material. The compacted pellet is fired to produce sintered pellets having substantially straight inner side walls essentially parallel to the pellet axis.

  12. Startup testing of Romania dual-core test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, W.L. [General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Late in 1979 both the Annular Core Pulsed Reactor (ACPR) and the 14-MW steady-state reactor (SSR) were loaded to critical. The fuel loading in both was then carried to completion and low-power testing was conducted. Early in 1980 both reactors successfully underwent high-power testing. The ACPR was operated for several hours at 500 kW and underwent pulse tests culminating in pulses with reactivity insertions of $4.60, peak power levels of about 20,000 MW, energy releases of 100 MW-sec, and peak measured fuel temperatures of 830 deg. C. The SSR was operated in several modes, both with natural convection and forced cooling with one or more pumps. The reactor successfully completed a 120-hr full-power test. Subsequent fuel element inspections confirmed that the fuel has performed without fuel damage or distortion. (author)

  13. Development and exploration of the core-corona model of imploding plasma loads. Final report, 5 February 1979-5 March 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guillory, J.; Terry, R.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program has as its primary objective the quantitative exploration and generalization of the core-corona model of imploding plasma load dynamics in close collaboration with radiation physics and modeling work. As a qualitative summary, one may say that the core-corona model arises from four physical considerations, all interrelated. The first assumption is that of a sharp density falloff in the outer regions of the annular plasma load. The transition region between the dense core plasma and the halo of corona plasma surrounding it is associated with a change from classical to anomalous resistivity, due to the onset of marginally stable microturbulence in the low density corona plasma. The second assumption is that the high-density annular wire/plasma core stops a penetrating coronal electron in distances short compared to the core dimensions, so that the coronal heating can couple to the core and soften the implosion. However, it is important to note that coronal electrons will not tend to execute straight orbits into the core, due to the large magnetic fields in the current carrying zone on the core surface. A third ingredient in the core/corona equation is an isothermal corona, and for this one must assume the corona to be sufficiently limited in space that equilibration to an isothermal pressure balance can be established rapidly as the core annulus implodes. The corona continuously re-established its pressure balance as the transition interface moves inward. The final constraint in the original core-corona model equations was that of quasi-static heat balance between ohmic heating in the corona, net deposition of hot electron energy into the core, and coronal radiative losses.

  14. Modifications to a two-control-volume, frequency dependent, transfer-function analysis of hole-pattern gas annular seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Yoon Shik

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................................ 12 5. EFFECT OF REAL GAS PROPERTIES .................................................................. 24 6. EFFECT OF STATOR-HOLE-DEPTH VARIATION ............................................. 32 7. EFFECT OF DEEP ANNULAR GROOVE................................................ 4 3 Flow in and out through control volume surface ...................................................... 5 4 Direct stiffness K(f) vs. non-dimensional frequency f for smooth seal.................... 13 5 Cross-coupled stiffness k(f) vs. non...

  15. J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 142 (2007) 135142 Cessation of annular Poiseuille flows of Bingham plastics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgiou, Georgios

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plastics Maria Chatziminaa, Christos Xenophontosa, Georgios C. Georgioua,, Ioannis Argyropaidasb, Evan plastics for various values of the diameter ratio, using the regularized constitutive equation proposed, 1984]. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Annular Poiseuille flow; Bingham plastic

  16. Core Drilling Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tank Farms workers demonstrate core drilling capabilities for Hanford single-shell tanks. Core drilling is used to determine the current condition of each tank to assist in the overall assessment...

  17. apple core rot: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    China Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Province, 712000, P. R. China; and Alan R. Biggs, Kearneysville Tree Fruit Research and Education Center, moldy core was very common in...

  18. Slonakar carried out research to manufacture forty percent core area fly ash bricks using sodium silicate as the binder, and bottom as the coarse aggregate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    produced at a pilot plant which is operated by the Coal Research Bureau, West Virginia University was reduced. The fired compressive strength was relatively unaffected by the silicate contents used.8 1.7 1.6 Silicate Grade 47 47 47 47 47 47 47 Water 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 Firing Rate, o F

  19. Annular wave packets at Dirac points and probability oscillation in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji Luo; Junqiang Lu; Daniel Valencia

    2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave packets in graphene whose central wave vector is at Dirac points are investigated by numerical calculations. Starting from an initial Gaussian function, these wave packets form into annular peaks that propagate to all directions like ripple-rings on water surface. At the beginning, electronic probability alternates between the central peak and the ripple-rings and transient oscillation occurs at the center. As time increases, the ripple-rings propagate at the fixed Fermi speed, and their widths remain unchanged. The axial symmetry of the energy dispersion leads to the circular symmetry of the wave packets. The fixed speed and widths, however, are attributed to the linearity of the energy dispersion. Interference between states that respectively belong to two branches of the energy dispersion leads to multiple ripple-rings and the probability-density oscillation. In a magnetic field, annular wave packets become confined and no longer propagate to infinity. If the initial Gaussian width differs greatly from the magnetic length, expanding and shrinking ripple-rings form and disappear alternatively in a limited spread, and the wave packet resumes the Gaussian form frequently. The probability thus oscillates persistently between the central peak and the ripple-rings. If the initial Gaussian width is close to the magnetic length, the wave packet retains the Gaussian form and its height and width oscillate with a period determined by the first Landau energy. The wave-packet evolution is determined jointly by the initial state and the magnetic field, through the electronic structure of graphene in a magnetic field.

  20. Magnetic core mounting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ronning, Jeffrey J. (Fishers, IN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mounting apparatus for an electromagnetic device such as a transformer of inductor includes a generally planar metallic plate as a first heat sink, and a metallic mounting cup as a second heat sink. The mounting cup includes a cavity configured to receive the electromagnetic device, the cavity being defined by a base, and an axially-extending annular sidewall extending from the base to a flange portion of the mounting cup. The mounting cup includes first and second passages for allowing the leads of first and second windings of the electromagnetic device to be routed out of the cavity. The cavity is filled with a polyurethane potting resin, and the mounting cup, including the potted electromagnetic device, is mounted to the plate heat sink using fasteners. The mounting cup, which surrounds the electromagnetic device, in combination with the potting resin provides improved thermal transfer to the plate heat sink, as well as providing resistance to vibration and shocks.

  1. Study of Impact of Orbit Path, Whirl Ratio and Clearance on the Flow Field and Rotordynamic Coefficients for a Smooth Annular Seal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekaran, Aarthi

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the effect of different orbit paths and whirl ratios on the rotordynamic coefficients of a smooth eccentric annular seal, using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was performed. The flow was simulated for two different orbits - linear...

  2. Numerical Simulation of the Flow Field in 3D Eccentric Annular and 2D Centered Labyrinth Seals for Comparison with Experimental LDA Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijaykumar, Anand

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The flow field in an annular seal is simulated for synchronous circular whirl orbits with 60Hz whirl frequency and a clearance/radius ratio of 0.0154 using the Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code. Fluent's Moving ...

  3. Processing of Activated Core Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friske, A.; Gestermann, G.; Finkbeiner, R.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Used activated components from the core of a NPP like control elements, water channels from a BWR, and others like in-core measurement devices need to be processed into waste forms suitable for interim storage, and for the final waste repository. Processing of the activated materials can be undertaken by underwater cutting and packaging or by cutting and high-pressure compaction in a hot cell. A hot cell is available in Germany as a joint investment between GNS and the Karlsruhe Research Center at the latter's site. Special transport equipment is available to transport the components ''as-is'' to the hot cell. Newly designed underwater processing equipment has been designed, constructed, and operated for the special application of NPP decommissioning. This equipment integrates an underwater cutting device with an 80 ton force underwater in-drum compactor.

  4. An experimental and analytical study of annular two phase flow friction pressure drop in a reduced acceleration field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Montgomery

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the same mass fluxes and mass qualities. The reduced acceleration pressure drops were found to be 45% greater overall than the 1-g pressure drops. In addition, the reduced acceleration flows were modeled using a universal velocity profile integral... approach to determine the liquid film thickness and the interfacial friction factor. The reduced acceleration annular flow interfacial friction factors were compared with current models for vertical up-flow in a 1-g environment. The reduced acceleration...

  5. A comparison of experimental results and theoretical predictions for the rotordynamic coefficients of stepped annular gas seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Mark Stephen

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FLOV r eser volr (o, ) sump (lo) Fig. 3. Cross-section of stepped annular seal. CHAPTER II STEP SEAL THEORY Fleming [2] developed a, bulk-flow solution for the rotordynamic coeffi- cients for stepped (figure 3) and tapered (figure 4) liquid seals.... His work showed that the use of a, taper or a step resulted in significant increases in the direct stiffness over the corresponding straight seal. However, Fleming's anal- ysis neglects the circumferential velocity. Childs [3, 4] developed a finite...

  6. Secure Core Contact Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secure Core Contact Information C. E. Irvine irvine@nps.edu 831-656-2461 Department of Computer for the secure management of local and/or remote information in multiple contexts. The SecureCore project Science Graduate School of Operations and Information Sciences www.cisr.nps.edu Project Description

  7. Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliabilityPrincipal Investigators PostdoctoralResearch

  8. Numerical simulation of turbulent heat transfer in an annular fuel channel augmented by spacer ribs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takase, Kazuyuki; Akino, Norio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Dept. of High Temperature Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal-hydraulic characteristics of fuel channels with three dimensional trapezoidal spacer ribs for high temperature gas-cooled reactors were investigated under the same coolant conditions as the reactor operation, maximum fuel channel outlet temperature of 1,000 C and pressure of 4 MPa, and analytically by numerical simulations using the {kappa}-{var_epsilon} turbulence model. The turbulent heat transfer coefficients in the spacer ribbed fuel channel were 20 to 100% higher than those in a concentric smooth annulus for a region of Reynolds number exceeding 2,000. Furthermore, the predicted Nusselt number in the spacer ribbed fuel channel was in good agreement with the empirical correlation obtained from the present experimental data within an error of 10% with Reynolds number of more than 5000. On the other hand, the friction factors in the spacer ribbed fuel channel were higher than those in the smooth duct in the turbulent region, and also they could be predicted with sufficient accuracy. In addition, the present numerical simulation could clarify quantitatively the effects of the heat transfer augmentation due to the spacer ribs and the axial velocity increase due to a reduction in the annular channel cross-section.

  9. Nuclear analysis of an annular Li{sub 2}O blanket system surrounding an artificially simulated 14-MeV line source and comparison of calculations to measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youssef, M.Z.; Abdou, M.A.; Kumar, A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental simulation to a line source has been realized at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) Fusion Neutronics Source within the U.S. Department of Energy/JAERI collaborative program on fusion neutronics. This simulation, achieved by cyclic movement of an annular Li{sub 2}O test assembly relative to a stationary point source, was a step forward in better simulation of the energy and angular distributions of the incident neutron source found in tokamak plasmas. Thus, compared with other experiments previously performed with a stationary point source, the uncertainties (that are system dependent) in calculating important neutronics parameters, such as tritium production rate (TPR), will be more representative of those anticipated in a fusion reactor. Calculations were performed independently by the United States and JAERI for many measured items that included TPR from {sup 6}Li(T{sub 6}), {sup 7}Li(T{sub 7}), in-system spectrum measurements, and various activation measurements. In this paper, the calculated-to-measured values for the aforementioned measured items are given, as obtained separately by the United States and JAERI. In addition, the mean value of the prediction uncertainties of the local and line-integrated TPR and the associated standard deviations are given based on the calculational and experimental results obtained in all the experiments. 34 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Core shroud corner joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  11. Fermilab | Illinois Accelerator Research Center | Fermilab Core

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A This photophoto Fermilab atContact

  12. Midland Core Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, Noel

    2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes activities for the repository during this quarter. The repository holds drill cores and cuttings samples from oil wells that can be viewed or checked out by users.

  13. Emergency core cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenewerk, William E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Glasgow, Lyle E. (Westlake Village, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  14. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Noah A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  15. Core Values | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Core Values Core Values People - People are our most important resource. We respect and use our experience and skills and appreciate our diversity. Business Excellence - We are...

  16. Heat transfer and pressure drop in an annular channel with downflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, F.X.; Crowley, C.J. (Creare, Inc., Hanover, NH (United States)); Qureshi, Z.H. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The onset of a flow instability (OFI) determines the minimum flow rate for cooling in the flow channels of a nuclear fuel assembly. A test facility was constructed with full-scale models (length and diameter) of annular flow channels incorporating many instruments to measure heat transfer and pressure drop with downflow in the annulus. Tests were performed both with and without axial centering ribs at prototypical values of pressure, flow rate and uniform wall heat flux. The axial ribs have the effect of subdividing the annulus into quadrants, so the problem becomes one of parallel channel flow, unlike previous experiments in tubes (upflow and downflow). Other tests were performed to determine the effects if any of asymmetric and non-uniform circumferential wall heating, operating pressure level and dissolved gas concentration. Data from the tests are compared with models for channel heat transfer and pressure drop profiles in several regimes of wall heating from single-phase forced convection through partially and fully developed nucleate boiling. Minimum stable flow rates were experimentally determined as a function of wall heat flux and heat distribution and compared with the model for the transition to fully developed boiling which is a key criterion in determining the OFI condition in the channel. The heat transfer results in the channel without ribs are in excellent agreement with predictions from a computer model of the flow in the annulus and with empirical correlations developed from similar tests. The test results with centering ribs show that geometrical variations between the channels can lead to differences in subchannel behavior which can make the effect of the ribs and the geometry an important factor when assessing the power level at which the fuel assembly (and the reactor) can be operated to prevent overheating in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA).

  17. Heat transfer and pressure drop in an annular channel with downflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, F.X.; Crowley, C.J. [Creare, Inc., Hanover, NH (United States); Qureshi, Z.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The onset of a flow instability (OFI) determines the minimum flow rate for cooling in the flow channels of a nuclear fuel assembly. A test facility was constructed with full-scale models (length and diameter) of annular flow channels incorporating many instruments to measure heat transfer and pressure drop with downflow in the annulus. Tests were performed both with and without axial centering ribs at prototypical values of pressure, flow rate and uniform wall heat flux. The axial ribs have the effect of subdividing the annulus into quadrants, so the problem becomes one of parallel channel flow, unlike previous experiments in tubes (upflow and downflow). Other tests were performed to determine the effects if any of asymmetric and non-uniform circumferential wall heating, operating pressure level and dissolved gas concentration. Data from the tests are compared with models for channel heat transfer and pressure drop profiles in several regimes of wall heating from single-phase forced convection through partially and fully developed nucleate boiling. Minimum stable flow rates were experimentally determined as a function of wall heat flux and heat distribution and compared with the model for the transition to fully developed boiling which is a key criterion in determining the OFI condition in the channel. The heat transfer results in the channel without ribs are in excellent agreement with predictions from a computer model of the flow in the annulus and with empirical correlations developed from similar tests. The test results with centering ribs show that geometrical variations between the channels can lead to differences in subchannel behavior which can make the effect of the ribs and the geometry an important factor when assessing the power level at which the fuel assembly (and the reactor) can be operated to prevent overheating in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA).

  18. A computational study of ultrasonic film thickness measurements in annular two-phase flows under microgravity conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pautz, Shawn Daniel

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wave equation: 11 V p(x, t) ? z z' = S(x, t), o p(x, t) c'(x) cl' (2. 1) where p(x, t) is the sound pressure, c(x) is the sound speed of propagation, and S(x, t) is a time-dependent source. Equation (2. 1) is derived from conservation laws... of level liquid film with epoxy layer, 2D approximation . . . . . 55 4. 13 Return signal of level liquid film with epoxy layer, 2D approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 5. 1 Maximum return amplitude vs. interfacial slope for smooth annular flow...

  19. Direct imaging of light elements by annular dark-field aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotnyk, Andriy, E-mail: andriy.lotnyk@iom-leipzig.de; Poppitz, David; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Rauschenbach, Bernd [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we show that an annular dark-field detector in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope allows the direct observation of light element columns in crystalline lattices. At specific imaging conditions, an enhancement of the intensities of light element columns in the presence of heavy element columns is observed. Experimental results are presented for imaging the nitrogen and carbon atomic columns at the GaN-SiC interface and within the GaN and SiC compounds. The crystal polarity of GaN at the interface is identified. The obtained findings are discussed and are well supported by image simulations.

  20. New Research Projects Request for Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in their translational research activities, the RMRCE has developed core facilities that provide high-throughput genomics

  1. Complex Modulus Prediction of Asphalt Concrete Pavement Cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Meng

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    . For field cores complex modulus measuring methods, except some expensive pavement field testers, empirical and semiempirical models are widely used, but an accurate mechanical test method is more desired. In this research, Arizona, Yellowstone National Park...

  2. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA); Dahl, Leslie R. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

  3. Flows and torques in Brownian ferrofluids subjected to rotating uniform magnetic fields in a cylindrical and annular geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres-Diaz, I.; Cortes, A.; Rinaldi, C., E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681-9000 (United States); Cedeño-Mattei, Y. [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681-9019 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681-9019 (United States); Perales-Perez, O. [Department of Engineering Science and Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681-9044 (United States)] [Department of Engineering Science and Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681-9044 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ferrofluid flow in cylindrical and annular geometries under the influence of a uniform rotating magnetic field was studied experimentally using aqueous ferrofluids consisting of low concentrations (<0.01 v/v) of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with Brownian relaxation to test the ferrohydrodynamic equations, elucidate the existence of couple stresses, and determine the value of the spin viscosity in these fluids. An ultrasound technique was used to measure bulk velocity profiles in the spin-up (cylindrical) and annular geometries, varying the intensity and frequency of the rotating magnetic field generated by a two pole stator winding. Additionally, torque measurements in the cylindrical geometry were made. Results show rigid-body like velocity profiles in the bulk, and no dependence on the axial direction. Experimental velocity profiles were in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the spin diffusion theory, with a value of the spin viscosity of ?10{sup ?8} kg m/s, two orders of magnitude larger than the value estimated earlier for iron oxide based ferrofluids, and 12 orders of magnitude larger than estimated using dimensional arguments valid in the infinite dilution limit. These results provide further evidence of the existence of couple stresses in ferrofluids and their role in driving the spin-up flow phenomenon.

  4. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

  5. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  6. Numerical Simulation of the Flow Field in 3D Eccentric Annular and 2D Centered Labyrinth Seals for Comparison with Experimental LDA Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijaykumar, Anand

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The flow field in an annular seal is simulated for synchronous circular whirl orbits with 60Hz whirl frequency and a clearance/radius ratio of 0.0154 using the Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code. Fluent's Moving Reference Frame model...

  7. A comparison of the static and dynamic characteristics of straight-bore and convergent tapered-bore honeycomb annular gas seals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Matthew Peter

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from tests conducted with straight-bore and convergent tapered-bore honeycomb annular gas seals. The test seals had a 114.3 mm bore with an L/D = 0.75 and a nominal radial clearance of 0.19 mm. The honeycomb cell depth for both...

  8. Characterization of Composite Cores for High Temperature-Low Sag (HTLS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of Composite Cores for High Temperature-Low Sag (HTLS) Conductors Final Project project T-33 titled "Characterization of Composite Cores for High Temperature-Low Sag (HTLS) Conductors/University Cooperative Research Center since 1996 PSERC #12;Characterization of Composite Cores for High Temperature-Low

  9. ARM - Ice Cores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, FeatureListGeneralPastIce Cores Outreach Home Room

  10. Convective cores in galactic cooling flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kritsuk; T. Plewa; E. Mueller

    2001-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We use hydrodynamic simulations with adaptive grid refinement to study the dependence of hot gas flows in X-ray luminous giant elliptical galaxies on the efficiency of heat supply to the gas. We consider a number of potential heating mechanisms including Type Ia supernovae and sporadic nuclear activity of a central supermassive black hole. As a starting point for this research we use an equilibrium hydrostatic recycling model (Kritsuk 1996). We show that a compact cooling inflow develops, if the heating is slightly insufficient to counterbalance radiative cooling of the hot gas in the central few kiloparsecs. An excessive heating in the centre, instead, drives a convectively unstable outflow. We model the onset of the instability and a quasi-steady convective regime in the core of the galaxy in two-dimensions assuming axial symmetry. Provided the power of net energy supply in the core is not too high, the convection remains subsonic. The convective pattern is dominated by buoyancy driven large-scale mushroom-like structures. Unlike in the case of a cooling inflow, the X-ray surface brightness of an (on average) isentropic convective core does not display a sharp maximum at the centre. A hybrid model, which combines a subsonic peripheral cooling inflow with an inner convective core, appears to be stable. We also discuss observational implications of these results.

  11. Advanced design concepts for PWR and BWR high-performance annular fuel assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Tyler Shawn

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sobering electricity supply and demand projections, coupled with the current volatility of energy prices, have underscored the seriousness of the challenges which lay ahead for the utility industry. This research addresses ...

  12. HTTF Core Stress Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

  13. Laboratory methods for enhanced oil recovery core floods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, E.P.; Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current research at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is investigating microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) systems for application to oil reservoirs. Laboratory corefloods are invaluable in developing technology necessary for a field application of MEOR. Methods used to prepare sandstone cores for experimentation, coreflooding techniques, and quantification of coreflood effluent are discussed in detail. A technique to quantify the small volumes of oil associated with laboratory core floods is described.

  14. Electron Abundance in Protostellar Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Padoan; Karen Willacy; William Langer; Mika Juvela

    2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of the fractional electron abundance, Xe, in protostellar cores relies on observations of molecules, such as DCO+, H13CO+ and CO, and on chemical models to interpret their abundance. Studies of protostellar cores have revealed significant variations of Xe from core to core within a range 10^-8core age, extinction and density. We compute numerically the intensity of the radiation field within a density distribution generated by supersonic turbulence. Taking into account the lines of sight in all directions, the effective visual extinction in dense regions is found to be always much lower than the extinction derived from the column density along a fixed line of sight. Dense cores with volume and column densities comparable to observed protostellar cores have relatively low mass-averaged visual extinction, 2mag <= A_V <= 5mag, such that photo-ionization can sometimes be as important as cosmic ray ionization. Chemical models, including gas-grain chemistry and time dependent gas depletion and desorption, are computed for values of visual extinction in the range 2mag <= A_V <= 6mag, and for a hydrogen gas density of 10^4cm^-3$, typical of protostellar cores. The models presented here can reproduce some of the observed variations of ion abundance from core to core as the combined effect of visual extinction and age variations. The range of electron abundances predicted by the models is relatively insenstive to density over 10^4 to 10^6 cm^{-3}.

  15. Bent core liquid crystal elastomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verduzco, R.; DiMasi, E.; Luchette, P.; Ho Hong, S.; Harden, J.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.; Kilbey II, S.M.; Sprunt, S.; Gleeson, G.T. Jakli, A.

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid crystal (LC) elastomers with bent-core side-groups incorporate the properties of bent-core liquid crystals in a flexible and self-supporting polymer network. Bent-core liquid crystal elastomers (BCEs) with uniform alignment were prepared by attaching a reactive bent-core LC to poly(hydrogenmethylsiloxane) and crosslinking with a divinyl crosslinker. Phase behavior studies indicate a nematic phase over a wide temperature range that approaches room temperature, and thermoelastic measurements show that these BCEs can reversibly change their length by more than a factor of two upon heating and cooling. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies reveal multiple, broad low-angle peaks consistent with short-range smectic C order of the bent-core side groups. A comparison of these patterns with predictions of a Landau model for short-range smectic C order shows that the length scale for smectic ordering in BCEs is similar to that seen in pure bent-core LCs. The combination of rubber elasticity and smectic ordering of the bent-core side groups suggests that BCEs may be promising materials for sensing, actuating, and other advanced applications.

  16. Ice chemistry in starless molecular cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalvans, Juris

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starless molecular cores are natural laboratories for interstellar molecular chemistry research. The chemistry of ices in such objects was investigated with a three-phase (gas, surface, and mantle) model. We considered the center part of five starless cores, with their physical conditions derived from observations. The ice chemistry of oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and complex organic molecules (COMs) was analyzed. We found that an ice-depth dimension, measured, e.g., in monolayers, is essential for modeling of chemistry in interstellar ices. Particularly, the H2O:CO:CO2:N2:NH3 ice abundance ratio regulates the production and destruction of minor species. It is suggested that photodesorption during core collapse period is responsible for high abundance of interstellar H2O2 and O2H, and other species synthesized on the surface. The calculated abundances of COMs in ice were compared to observed gas-phase values. Smaller activation barriers for CO and H2CO hydrogenation may help explain the production of a number of...

  17. Essential Ingredients in Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Lentz, E. J. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Endeve, Eirik [ORNL; Baird, Mark L [ORNL; Chertkow, Merek A [ORNL; Harris, James A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL; Bruenn, S. W. [Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton; Blondin, J. M. [North Carolina State University

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{44}$ joules of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  18. Gas core nuclear rocket feasibility project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, S.D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The gas core concept relies on the use of fluid dynamic forces to create and maintain a vortex. The vortex is composed of a fissile material which will achieve criticality and produce high power levels. By radiatively coupling to the surrounding fluids, extremely high temperatures in the propellant and, thus, high specific impulses can be generated. The ship velocities enabled by such performance may allow a 9 month round trip, manned Mars mission to be considered. Alternatively, one might consider slightly longer missions in ships that are heavily shielded against the intense Galactic Cosmic Ray flux to further reduce the radiation dose to the crew. The current status of the research program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory into the gas core nuclear rocket feasibility will be discussed.

  19. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hix, W. Raphael [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States) [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Lentz, Eric J.; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Endeve, Eirik [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States)] [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Baird, Mark [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States)] [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States) [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Joint Institute for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6173 (United States); Bruenn, Stephen [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Blondin, John [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)] [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carrying 10{sup 44} joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  20. 2000 BTS Core Databook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment of Energy with6, 2014, 6:32 p.m. (MST) -200BTS

  1. The Mind Body Programs reduce the impact of stress through a variety of research driven skill-building exercises to improve medical symptoms, mood, and well-being. The six core components of our mind body programs are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    The Mind Body Programs reduce the impact of stress through a variety of research driven skill programs are: the relaxation response; social support; physical activity; nutrition; recuperative sleep services in the care of medical conditions. Relaxation Response Resiliency Program (Formerly the Symptom

  2. Meeting Name Score Rank Grant Reference Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title Call Panel A 10 1 NE/L011328/1 Christopher Davies University of Leeds A New Energy Budget for Earth's Core and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meeting Name Score Rank Grant Reference Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title Call Panel Rethinking carbonate diagenesis: clues to past carbon cycling from an overlooked carbon sink IRF OCT13 Panel of Criegee Biradical Chemistry IRF OCT13 Panel B 8 3 NE/L011166/1 James Brearley NERC British Antarctic

  3. Nursing Systems Management (NSM) Degree Plan: Upon admission nursing students must meet with faculty and staff advisors to develop plan of progression. Successful completion of core courses in theory and research are essential to success in all MSN majors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Theory and Culture: Examination of organizational and management theories and research that guide Management Roles and Operations: This course focuses on theories and principles of leadership, administration, and management for mid-level managers in supervision and administration. Social changes and trends are discussed

  4. Highly Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Annular Tanks with Concrete Reflection: 1 x 3 Line Array of Nested Pairs of Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Cleaver; John D. Bess; Nathan Devine; Fitz Trumble

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of seven experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory beginning in August, 1980 (References 1 and 2). Highly enriched uranyl nitrate solution was introduced into a 1-3 linear array of nested stainless steel annular tanks. The tanks were inside a concrete enclosure, with various moderator and absorber materials placed inside and/or between the tanks. These moderators and absorbers included boron-free concrete, borated concrete, borated plaster, and cadmium. Two configurations included placing bottles of highly enriched uranyl nitrate between tanks externally. Another experiment involved nested hemispheres of highly enriched uranium placed between tanks externally. These three configurations are not evaluated in this report. The experiments evaluated here are part of a series of experiments, one set of which is evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-033. The experiments in this and HEU-SOL-THERM-033 were performed similarly. They took place in the same room and used the same tanks, some of the same moderators and absorbers, some of the same reflector panels, and uranyl nitrate solution from the same location. There are probably additional similarities that existed that are not identified here. Thus, many of the descriptions in this report are either the same or similar to those in the HEU-SOL-THERM-033 report. Seventeen configurations (sixteen of which were critical) were performed during seven experiments; six of those experiments are evaluated here with thirteen configurations. Two configurations were identical, except for solution height, and were conducted to test repeatability. The solution heights were averaged and the two were evaluated as one configuration, which gives a total of twelve evaluated configurations. One of the seventeen configurations was subcritical. Of the twelve critical configurations evaluated, nine were judged as acceptable as benchmarks.

  5. Introduction of biotin or folic acid into polypyrrole magnetite core-shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nan, Alexandrina; Turcu, Rodica [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Donath 65-103, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Donath 65-103, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Liebscher, Jürgen [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Donath 65-103, Cluj-Napoca, Romania and Institute of Chemistry, Humboldt-University Berlin, Brook-Taylor 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)] [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Donath 65-103, Cluj-Napoca, Romania and Institute of Chemistry, Humboldt-University Berlin, Brook-Taylor 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to contribute to the trend in contemporary research to develop magnetic core shell nanoparticles with better properties (reduced toxicity, high colloidal and chemical stability, wide scope of application) in straightforward and reproducible methods new core shell magnetic nanoparticles were developed based on polypyrrole shells functionalized with biotin and folic acid. Magnetite nanoparticles stabilized by sebacic acid were used as magnetic cores. The morphology of magnetite was determined by transmission electron microscopy TEM, while the chemical structure investigated by FT-IR.

  6. Gelcasting Alumina Cores for Investment Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janney, M A; Klug, F J

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General Electric currently uses silica investment casting cores for making superalloy turbine blades. The silica core technology does not provide the degree of dimensional control needed for advanced turbine system manufacture. The sum of the various process variables in silica core manufacturing produces cores that have more variability than is allowed for in advanced, power-generation gas turbine airfoils.

  7. Intrinsic Shapes of Molecular Cloud Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Jones; Shantanu Basu; John Dubinski

    2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We conduct an analysis of the shapes of molecular cloud cores using recently compiled catalogs of observed axis ratios of individual cores mapped in ammonia or through optical selection. We apply both analytical and statistical techniques to deproject the observed axis ratios in order to determine the true distribution of cloud core shapes. We find that neither pure oblate nor pure prolate cores can account for the observed distribution of core shapes. Intrinsically triaxial cores produce distributions which agree with observations. The best-fit triaxial distribution contains cores which are more nearly oblate than prolate.

  8. Enclosure Requirements to Protect Personnel from Spinning Rotor Frailures at the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, John W [ORNL

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance evaluation of electric motors is a major function of the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC). Normally these motors have a fixed wire-wound stator and a rotating rotor, which may have conductors embedded in a ferromagnetic core (induction motors), magnets mounted on the surface of the ferromagnetic core with a thin metal or composite cylinder or ring to hold them in place, or magnets embedded in the ferromagnetic core. Most of the work currently involves the last two permanent magnet (PM) configurations. Although the stator of a radial-gap motor can absorb energy from many of the fragments ejected from the rotor during operation, the stator of an axial-gap motor is not positioned to provide significant protection. The housing of each motor can also absorb some of the energy. The most conservative approach, however, is to assume that all fragments from the rotor must be contained by a protective enclosure. An ideal enclosure is transparent. Manufacturers of such plastics as Lexan, Tuffak, and Cyrolon sell different variations of transparent enclosure material. Lexan is a polycarbonate sheet. Lexgard{reg_sign} is a penetration resistant material made by layering polycarbonate material between pieces of ordinary glass. A fragment striking a sheet of enclosure material will pierce the surface layer, but the layered polycarbonate-glass material is able to absorb the fragment's energy before it completes penetration. Tuffak{reg_sign} is Lexan polycarbonate. Cyrolon{reg_sign} bullet resistant material is acrylic sheet. The ability of the enclosure to stop a fragment depends on its thickness as well as the penetration capability of the fragment; for example, a lead fragment has much less penetrating capability than a steel fragment. Enclosure thicknesses are commercially available to provide several levels of protection. These levels depend on the momentum of the fragments and have been evaluated for some common types of ammunition. This summary quantifies four typical worst-case fragments which have maximum translational kinetic energy when ejected from a rotating annulus. (1) The first fragment is released from a rotating annular titanium ring. (2) The second fragment is a magnet released from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) 30-kW axial-gap PM motor. Analysis of the second fragment which is like a segment of half-angle, {alpha}, from a thin annular ring is similar to that of the titanium ring segment except that the angle is 10{sup o} instead of 133{sup o}. (3) The third fragment is a magnet from the radial-gap 6-kW fractional-slot surface-mounted PM (SPM) motor with concentrated windings. Analysis of the third fragment is similar to the analysis of the second fragment. (4) The fourth fragment is a 133{sup o} segment of an entire rotor which assumes that the laminates and magnets in the rotor fail as a single fragment, truly a worst case assumption.

  9. Grain alignment in starless cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, T. J.; Bagley, M. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Krejny, M. [Cree Inc., 4600 Silicon Dr., Durham, NC (United States); Andersson, B.-G. [SOFIA Science Center, USRA, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Bastien, P., E-mail: tjj@astro.umn.edu [Centre de recherche en astrophysique du Québec and Départment de Physique, Université de Montréal, Montréal (Canada)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present near-IR polarimetry data of background stars shining through a selection of starless cores taken in the K band, probing visual extinctions up to A{sub V}?48. We find that P{sub K}/?{sub K} continues to decline with increasing A{sub V} with a power law slope of roughly ?0.5. Examination of published submillimeter (submm) polarimetry of starless cores suggests that by A{sub V}?20 the slope for P versus ? becomes ??1, indicating no grain alignment at greater optical depths. Combining these two data sets, we find good evidence that, in the absence of a central illuminating source, the dust grains in dense molecular cloud cores with no internal radiation source cease to become aligned with the local magnetic field at optical depths greater than A{sub V}?20. A simple model relating the alignment efficiency to the optical depth into the cloud reproduces the observations well.

  10. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

  11. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, F.E.

    1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

  12. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

  13. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

  14. Massive Quiescent Cores in Orion. -- II. Core Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, D; Goldsmith, P F; Langer, W D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have surveyed submillimeter continuum emission from relatively quiescent regions in the Orion molecular cloud to determine how the core mass function in a high mass star forming region compares to the stellar initial mass function. Such studies are important for understanding the evolution of cores to stars, and for comparison to formation processes in high and low mass star forming regions. We used the SHARC II camera on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory telescope to obtain 350 \\micron data having angular resolution of about 9 arcsec, which corresponds to 0.02 pc at the distance of Orion. Our analysis combining dust continuum and spectral line data defines a sample of 51 Orion molecular cores with masses ranging from 0.1 \\Ms to 46 \\Ms and a mean mass of 9.8 \\Ms, which is one order of magnitude higher than the value found in typical low mass star forming regions, such as Taurus. The majority of these cores cannot be supported by thermal pressure or turbulence, and are probably supercritical.They are th...

  15. Kansalliskirjasto Dublin Core Dublin Core metadataformaatin suomalainen versio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    - Medical Subject Headings 3. DDC - Dewey Decimal Classification 4. LCC - Library of Congress Classification: - Merkintäjärjestelmät: #12;Kansalliskirjasto Dublin Core 2(6) 1. LCSH - Library of Congress Subject Headings 2. MESH 5. UDC - Universal Decimal Classification Suomalaiset merkintäjärjestelmät katso sfs_aihe.pdf Kuvaus

  16. Core Values | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCool MagneticCoos BayCore FileCore

  17. Laminated grid and web magnetic cores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sefko, John (Monroeville, PA); Pavlik, Norman M. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laminated magnetic core characterized by an electromagnetic core having core legs which comprise elongated apertures and edge notches disposed transversely to the longitudinal axis of the legs, such as high reluctance cores with linear magnetization characteristics for high voltage shunt reactors. In one embodiment the apertures include compact bodies of microlaminations for more flexibility and control in adjusting permeability and/or core reluctance.

  18. A core reload pattern and composition optimization methodology for pressurized water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sauer, Ildo Luis

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this research was the development of a comprehensive, rapid and conceptually simple methodology for PWR core reload pattern and fuel composition optimization, capable of systematic incorporation ...

  19. A Summary of Convective-Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    A Summary of Convective-Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois # University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma @ Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia & Cooperative Institute for Research

  20. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, J.M.

    1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 {micro}m. 30 figs.

  1. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, John M. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 .mu.m.

  2. Stability of Molten Core Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INL’s LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

  3. Two-component Bose gas trapped by harmonic and annular potentials: Supercurrent, vortex flow and instability of superfluidity by Rabi coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ino, Hayato; Ichinose, Ikuo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study a system of two-component Bose gas in an artificial magnetic field trapped by concentric harmonic and annular potentials, respectively. The system is realized by gases with two-internal states like the hyperfine states of $^{87}$Rb. We are interested in effects of a Rabi oscillation between them. Two-component Bose Hubbard model is introduced to describe the system, and Gross-Pitaevskii equations are used to study the system. We first study the Bose gas system in the annular trap by varying the width of the annulus and strength of the magnetic field, in particular, we focus on the phase slip and superflow. Then we consider the coupled Bose gas system in a magnetic field. In a strong magnetic field, vortices form a Abrikosov triangular lattice in both Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), and locations of vortices in the BECs correlate with each other by the Rabi coupling. However, as the strength of the Rabi coupling is increased, vortices start to vibrate around their equilibrium location...

  4. Logging-while-coring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David S.; Myers, Gregory J.

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

  5. Logging-while-coring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David S. (New York, NY); Myers, Gregory J. (Cornwall, NY)

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

  6. Geologic analysis of Devonian Shale cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company was awarded a DOE contract in December 1977 for field retrieval and laboratory analysis of cores from the Devonian shales of the following eleven states: Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. The purpose of this project is to explore these areas to determine the amount of natural gas being produced from the Devonian shales. The physical properties testing of the rock specimens were performed under subcontract at Michigan Technological University (MTU). The study also included LANDSAT information, geochemical research, structural sedimentary and tectonic data. Following the introduction, and background of the project this report covers the following: field retrieval procedures; laboratory procedures; geologic analysis (by state); references and appendices. (ATT)

  7. Extended core for motor/generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An extended stator core in a motor/generator can be utilized to mitigate losses in end regions of the core and a frame of the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses, the stator core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent to or greater than a length of a magnetically active portion in the rotor. Alternatively, a conventional length stator core can be utilized with a shortened magnetically active portion to mitigate losses in the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses in the core caused by stator winding, the core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent or greater than a length of stator winding.

  8. Extended core for motor/generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An extended stator core in a motor/generator can be utilized to mitigate losses in end regions of the core and a frame of the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses, the stator core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent to or greater than a length of a magnetically active portion in the rotor. Alternatively, a conventional length stator core can be utilized with a shortened magnetically active portion to mitigate losses in the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses in the core caused by stator winding, the core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent or greater than a length of stator winding.

  9. Annular vortex combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nieh, Sen (Burtonsville, MD); Fu, Tim T. (Camarillo, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for burning coal water fuel, dry ultrafine coal, pulverized l and other liquid and gaseous fuels including a vertically extending outer wall and an inner, vertically extending cylinder located concentrically within the outer wall, the annnular space between the outer wall and the inner cylinder defining a combustion chamber and the all space within the inner cylinder defining an exhaust chamber. Fuel and atomizing air are injected tangentially near the bottom of the combustion chamber and secondary air is introduced at selected points along the length of the combustion chamber. Combustion occurs along the spiral flow path in the combustion chamber and the combined effects of centrifugal, gravitational and aerodynamic forces cause particles of masses or sizes greater than the threshold to be trapped in a stratified manner until completely burned out. Remaining ash particles are then small enough to be entrained by the flue gas and exit the system via the exhaust chamber in the opposite direction.

  10. Dermatomyofibroma mimicking granuloma annulare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martínez, Natividad Cano; Martínez, Carmen Fernández-Antón; Ortiz, Lucía Barchino; Echevarría, Manuel Lecona; Domínguez, Minia Campos

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is more cellular thanregard to immunohistochemistry, DFSP stains for CD34. It is

  11. EARLY EVOLUTION OF PRESTELLAR CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horedt, G. P., E-mail: g.horedt@online.de [Kronwinkler 50, D-81245, Munich (Germany)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Prestellar cores are approximated by singular polytropic spheres. Their early evolution is studied analytically with a Bondi-like scheme. The considered approximation is meaningful for polytropic exponents {gamma} between 0 and 6/5, implying radial power-law density profiles between r {sup -1} and r {sup -2.5}. Gravitationally unstable Jeans and Bonnor-Ebert masses differ at most by a factor of 3.25. Tidally stable prestellar cores must have a mean density contrast {approx}> 8 with respect to the external parent cloud medium. The mass-accretion rate relates to the cube of equivalent sound speed, as in Shu's seminal paper. The prestellar masses accreted over 10{sup 5} years cover the whole stellar mass spectrum; they are derived in simple closed form, depending only on the polytropic equation of state. The stellar masses that can be formed via strict conservation of angular momentum are at most of the order of a brown dwarf.

  12. Laminated electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.

    1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially abutting tapered laminations extending radially outwardly from a centerline axis to collectively define a radially inner bore and a radially outer circumference. Each of the laminations includes radially inner and outer edges and has a thickness increasing from the inner edge toward the outer edge to provide a substantially continuous path adjacent the circumference. This pump is used in nuclear fission reactors. 19 figs.

  13. TMI-2 core shipping preparations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, L.J.; (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Barkanic, R.J. (Bechtel North American Power Corporation (United States)); Conaway, W.T. II (GPU Nuclear Corporation, Three Mile Island, Middletown, PA (United States)); Schmoker, D.S. (Nuclear Packaging, Inc., Federal Way, WA (United States))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hardware systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience.

  14. False Vacuum Lumps with the Fermionic Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yutaka Hosotani; Ramin G. Daghigh

    2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable gravitating lumps with a false vacuum core surrounded by the true vacuum in a scalar field potential exist in the presence of fermions at the core. These objects may exist in the universe at various scales.

  15. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laufer, Michael Robert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a simulant fluid to match the dynamics of fuel pebbles andfuel pebbles through reactor cores with and without coupled fluid

  17. FISSION REACTORS KEYWORDS: core-barrel vibra-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    FISSION REACTORS KEYWORDS: core-barrel vibra- tions, in-core neutron noise, shell- mode vibrations CALCULATION OF THE NEUTRON NOISE INDUCED BY SHELL-MODE CORE-BARREL VIBRATIONS IN A 1-D, TWO-GROUP, TWO-REGION SLAB REACTOR MODEL CARL SUNDE,* CHRISTOPHE DEMAZI�RE, and IMRE PÁZSIT Chalmers University of Technology

  18. UW-Milwaukee Strategic Planning Core Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    UW-Milwaukee Strategic Planning Core Team MINUTES November 19, 2012 Regents Room, Chapman Hall, 10 Strategic Planning Core team with oversight, coordination, and providing campus leadership with strategic strategic planning framework. c. Distinguished Core Team from Operational teams (Functional and Thematic). 4

  19. NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY (NRAD) REACTOR 64-ELEMENT CORE UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA (registered) (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The interim critical configuration developed during the core upgrade, which contains only 62 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The final 64-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (approximately +/-1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  20. Research Summary Carbon Additionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of muchResearch Summary Carbon Additionality Additionality is widely considered to be a core aspect controversy in national carbon accounting, international regulatory frameworks and carbon markets. A review

  1. Generator stator core vent duct spacer posts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, John Wesley (Schenectady, NY); Tong, Wei (Clifton Park, NY)

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Generator stator cores are constructed by stacking many layers of magnetic laminations. Ventilation ducts may be inserted between these layers by inserting spacers into the core stack. The ventilation ducts allow for the passage of cooling gas through the core during operation. The spacers or spacer posts are positioned between groups of the magnetic laminations to define the ventilation ducts. The spacer posts are secured with longitudinal axes thereof substantially parallel to the core axis. With this structure, core tightness can be assured while maximizing ventilation duct cross section for gas flow and minimizing magnetic loss in the spacers.

  2. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    current drivers integrated with each panel, and a base station that interfaces with user control input, provides power to the OLED panels, and translates the control input to...

  3. Ice Core Paleoclimate Research Group Ellen Mosley-Thompson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    is in the "Here and Now" #12;today Energy consumption growing Coal ­ 40% Natural gas ­ 20% Renewables ­ 20% Nuclear ­ 15% Oil / Other Petroleum ­ 5% World electricity 65% fossil fuels #12;... to unprecedented demands Looking ahead to 2030 ... the sustained growth in global demand for electricity is inevitable

  4. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    hours of testing. Recipient: Soraa, Inc. Title: Light Emitting Diodes on Semipolar Bulk GaN Substrate with IQE >80% at 150 Acm2 and 100C Summary: This project seeks to develop...

  5. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 10),

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentI OfficeDepartment of EnergyDOEProduct

  6. Core Competencies Performing topical research in plasma boundary physics, fueling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    activities. #12;Contact: Stan Milora phone: (865) 574-0988 email: fusion@ornl.gov Scientists and engineers from China, Europe, Japan, Korea, Russia, and the United States are working in an unprecedented

  7. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of heat transfer in an annular fuel channel with periodic spacer ribs under a fully developed turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takase, Kazuyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal-hydraulic characteristics in a spacer-ribbed annular fuel channel for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors were analyzed numerically by three-dimensional computations under a fully developed turbulent flow. The two-equation {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model was applied in the present turbulent analysis, and the turbulence model constants for eddy viscosity and the turbulent Prandtl number were improved from the previous standard values to increase the accuracy of numerical simulations. Consequently, heat transfer coefficients and friction factors in the spacer-ribbed fuel channel were predicted with sufficient accuracy in the range of Reynolds number >3,000. It was clarified quantitatively that the main mechanism for heat transfer augmentation in the spacer-ribbed fuel channel was a combined effect of the turbulence promoter effect by the spacer rib and the velocity acceleration effect by a reduction in the channel cross section.

  8. Core Competencies | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergy Copy of FINAL SG DemoCore

  9. Core Universities | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCool MagneticCoos BayCore File

  10. Core Holes | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open EnergyAl., 1987) | Open

  11. Core Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands Jump|Information Dobson, EtCore

  12. national-lab-research-network | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high-pressuretemperature core flow units), NETL researchers are improving pore-scale to reservoir-scale predictive methods to provide accurate and reliable simulations in...

  13. The core legion object model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, M.; Grimshaw, A. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Legion project at the University of Virginia is an architecture for designing and building system services that provide the illusion of a single virtual machine to users, a virtual machine that provides secure shared object and shared name spaces, application adjustable fault-tolerance, improved response time, and greater throughput. Legion targets wide area assemblies of workstations, supercomputers, and parallel supercomputers, Legion tackles problems not solved by existing workstation based parallel processing tools; the system will enable fault-tolerance, wide area parallel processing, inter-operability, heterogeneity, a single global name space, protection, security, efficient scheduling, and comprehensive resource management. This paper describes the core Legion object model, which specifies the composition and functionality of Legion`s core objects-those objects that cooperate to create, locate, manage, and remove objects in the Legion system. The object model facilitates a flexible extensible implementation, provides a single global name space, grants site autonomy to participating organizations, and scales to millions of sites and trillions of objects.

  14. Test Planning for Mixed-Signal SOCs with Wrapped Analog Cores Anuja Sehgal, Fang Liu, Sule Ozev and Krishnendu Chakrabarty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Test Planning for Mixed-Signal SOCs with Wrapped Analog Cores Anuja Sehgal, Fang Liu, Sule Ozev. Even though the test cost for such mixed-signal SOCs is significantly higher than that for digital SOCs, most prior research in this area has focused exclusively on digital cores. We propose a low-cost test

  15. Compilation of cores and cuttings from U. S. Government-sponsored geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, M.; Gambill, D.T.; Rowley, J.C.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compendium lists the repositories holding geothermal core and well cuttings from US government-sponsored geothermal wells. Also, a partial listing of cores and cutting from these wells is tabulated, along with referenced reports and location maps. These samples are available to the public for research investigations and studies, usually following submission of an appropriate request for use of the samples. The purpose of this compilation is to serve as a possible source of cores and cuttings that might aid in enhancing rock property studies in support of geothermal log interpretation.

  16. Coupled Full-Core Problem witssh VERA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inc Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Core Physics, Inc. Southern States Energy Board City University of New York Texas A&M University Florida State University University of...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: QD core shell heterostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    QD core shell heterostructures Introduction of Prof. David Kelley and UC Merced to SSLS On January 11, 2012, in Energy Efficiency, News, News & Events, Partnership, Solid-State...

  18. Material with core-shell structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhrs, Claudia (Rio Rancho, NM); Richard, Monique N. (Ann Arbor, MI); Dehne, Aaron (Maumee, OH); Phillips, Jonathan (Rio Rancho, NM); Stamm, Kimber L. (Ann Arbor, MI); Fanson, Paul T. (Brighton, MI)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

  19. RESEARCH REPORT 2012 ResearchResearchResearch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    research on batteries and energy storage, and are part of a multimillion- dollar investment by Johnson Controls that aims to make Wisconsin a hub for energy-storage technology. #12;Chancellor's Welcome A great powerful UW-MILWAUKEE RESEARCH REPORT 2012 As Wisconsin's premier public urban institution, the University

  20. Gas-phase transport of WF6 through annular nanopipes in TiN during chemical vapor deposition of W on TiN/Ti/SiO2 structures for integrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Leslie H.

    Gas-phase transport of WF6 through annular nanopipes in TiN during chemical vapor deposition of W through the 106-nm-thick TiN film. W piles up at the TiN/Ti interface, while F rapidly saturates the TiN-sectional and scanning transmission electron microscopy analyses demonstrate that WF6 penetrates into the TiN layer

  1. Core-Level Activity Prediction for Multi-Core Power Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    1 Core-Level Activity Prediction for Multi-Core Power Management W. Lloyd Bircher1 and Lizy, University of Texas at Austin Abstract - Existing power management techniques operate by reducing performance generated by the workloads on individual cores. This causes sub-optimal power management and over

  2. Core Science Requirement Final Document Page 1 THE CORE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagalante, Anthony F.

    Core Science Requirement ­ Final Document ­ Page 1 THE CORE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT and MENDEL SCIENCE EXPERIENCE COURSES Core requirement of 2 semesters of science with laboratory; requirement to be met by the end of the sophomore year Rationale Science literacy is an integral part of the intellectual

  3. Pre-supernova neutrino emissions from ONe cores in the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae: are they distinguishable from those of Fe cores?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kato, Chinami; Yamada, Shoichi; Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Takashi; Ishidoshiro, Koji

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aiming to distinguish two types of progenitors of core collapse supernovae, i.e., one with a core composed mainly of oxygen and neon (abbreviated as ONe core) and the other with an iron core (or Fe core), we calculated the luminosities and spectra of neutrinos emitted from these cores prior to gravitational collapse, taking neutrino oscillation into account. We found that the total energies emitted as $\\bar{\

  4. The Formation and Evolution of Prestellar Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe André; Shantanu Basu; Shu-ichiro Inutsuka

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving our understanding of the initial conditions and earliest stages of star formation is crucial to gain insight into the origin of stellar masses, multiple systems, and protoplanetary disks. We review the properties of low-mass dense cores as derived from recent millimeter/submillimeter observations of nearby molecular clouds and discuss them in the context of various contemporary scenarios for cloud core formation and evolution. None of the extreme scenarios can explain all observations. Pure laminar ambipolar diffusion has relatively long growth times for typical ionization levels and has difficulty satisfying core lifetime constraints. Purely hydrodynamic pictures have trouble accounting for the inefficiency of core formation and the detailed velocity structure of individual cores. A possible favorable scenario is a mixed model involving gravitational fragmentation of turbulent molecular clouds close to magnetic criticality. The evolution of the magnetic field and angular momentum in individual cloud cores after the onset of gravitational collapse is also discussed. In particular, we stress the importance of radiation-magnetohydrodynamical processes and resistive MHD effects during the protostellar phase. We also emphasize the role of the formation of the short-lived first (protostellar) core in providing a chance for sub-fragmentation into binary systems and triggering MHD outflows. Future submillimeter facilities such as Herschel and ALMA will soon provide major new observational constraints in this field. On the theoretical side, an important challenge for the future will be to link the formation of molecular clouds and prestellar cores in a coherent picture.

  5. UW-Milwaukee Strategic Planning Core Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    UW-Milwaukee Strategic Planning Core Team Minutes Tuesday, December 18, 2012 Regents Room, Chapman Hall, 8-10 a.m. 1. Welcome and meeting objectives 2. Core Team Suggested Guidelines ("Ground Rules") a. Communication (within team and with across campus and others) Input is always welcomed Open communication

  6. UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

  7. Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablonowski, Christiane

    Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments Christiane Jablonowski (University of Michigan-13/2006 #12;Motivation · Test cases for 3D dynamical cores on the sphere ­ are hard to find in the literature groups ­ lack standardized & easy-to-use analysis techniques · Idea: Establish a collection of test cases

  8. Lateral restraint assembly for reactor core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorholt, Wilhelm (San Diego, CA); Luci, Raymond K. (Del Mar, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A restraint assembly for use in restraining lateral movement of a reactor core relative to a reactor vessel wherein a plurality of restraint assemblies are interposed between the reactor core and the reactor vessel in circumferentially spaced relation about the core. Each lateral restraint assembly includes a face plate urged against the outer periphery of the core by a plurality of compression springs which enable radial preloading of outer reflector blocks about the core and resist low-level lateral motion of the core. A fixed radial key member cooperates with each face plate in a manner enabling vertical movement of the face plate relative to the key member but restraining movement of the face plate transverse to the key member in a plane transverse to the center axis of the core. In this manner, the key members which have their axes transverse to or subtending acute angles with the direction of a high energy force tending to move the core laterally relative to the reactor vessel restrain such lateral movement.

  9. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  10. Experto Universitario Java Sesin 1: Spring core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA Spring core Puntos a tratar 2 #12;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA Spring core

  11. Method and apparatus for recovering unstable cores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGuire, Patrick L. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus suitable for stabilizing hydrocarbon cores are given. Such stabilized cores have not previously been obtainable for laboratory study, and such study is believed to be required before the hydrate reserves can become a utilizable resource. The apparatus can be built using commercially available parts and is very simple and safe to operate.

  12. Module Handbook Core Univ. of Oldenburg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    Energy Conversion Process · Location Dependence of Wind Energy Potential and Wind Energy Forecasting/EUREC Course 2008/2009 #12;EUREC Core Courses at University of Oldenburg, 1st Semester Wind Energy Module Module Description: Wind Energy Field: Core Oldenburg Courses: Wind Energy Wind Energy

  13. PV Module Reliability Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This National Center for Photovoltaics sheet describes the capabilities of its PV module reliability research. The scope and core competencies and capabilities are discussed and recent publications are listed.

  14. Petroleum Engineering Research Building Naming Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    Petroleum Engineering Research Building Naming Opportunities Area Naming of the Building Upstream Faculty Office Faculty Office Core and Rheology Laboratory Fracturing and Production Laboratory Mercury Apache Occidental Petroleum Anadarko Chevron Pioneer Natural Resources Terry and Linda Fuller & James

  15. CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandvik, Tobias

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    cores with 4 · 106 transistors each gives 10 times the performance as 1 big core 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 x 108Number of transistors P e r f o r m a n c e CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors – p.8/36 Everyone is going parallel Every major chip vendor... on Many-core Processors – p.22/36 Stencil operations Evaluate ?2u?x2 on a regular grid: DO K=2,NK-1 DO J=2,NJ-1 DO I=2,NI-1 D2UDX2(I,J,K) = (U(I+1,J,K) - 2.0*U(I,J,K) + & U(I-1,J,K))/(DX*DX) END DO END DO END DO CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors – p.23...

  16. PRISMATIC CORE COUPLED TRANSIENT BENCHMARK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ortensi; M.A. Pope; G. Strydom; R.S. Sen; M.D. DeHart; H.D. Gougar; C. Ellis; A. Baxter; V. Seker; T.J. Downar; K. Vierow; K. Ivanov

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  17. Research Associate Position Defense Analysis Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in analyzing social network data as well as geospatial, temporal, and standard statistical analysis of largeResearch Associate Position Defense Analysis Department Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA Research Associate The Department of Defense Analysis is home to the CORE (Common Operational Research

  18. Analysis of fusion integral experiments on a Li{sub 2}O annular blanket system of various configurations surrounding a 14 MeV simulated line source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youssef, M.Z.; Abdou, M.A.; Kumar, A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental simulation of a line source has been successfully achieved at FNS, JAERI, within Phase III of the USDOE/JAERI Collaborative Program on Fusion Neutronics. In this Phase, the first-of-its-kind simulated 14 MeV line source was generated and the cylindrical test assembly totally surrounded the source. This simulation, realized by cyclic movement of the annular Li{sub 2}O test assembly relative to a stationary point source, was a step forward in better simulation of the energy and angular distributions of the incident neutron source found in Tokamak plasmas. The simulation has been achieved through two modes of operation, namely stepwise mode and continuous mode of operation. It was shown that both modes of operation produce the same neutronics effects inside the assembly. Thus, in comparison to other experiments previously performed with a stationary point source in the program, the uncertainties (that are system-dependent) in calculating important neutronics parameters, such as tritium production rate, will be more representative of those anticipated in a fusion reactors.

  19. Impact of 15 Jan 2010 annular solar eclipse on the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere over Indian region from Magnetometer, Ionosonde and GPS observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panda, Sampad Kumar; Rajaram, Girija; Sripathi, Samireddipalle; Bhaskar, Ankush

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annular eclipse of Jan 15, 2010 over southern India was studied with a network of multi-instrumental observations consisting magnetometer, ionosonde and GPS receivers. By selecting the day before and the normal EEJ days as the control days, it is intrinsically proved that the regular eastward electric field for the whole day at the equator was not just weakened but actually was flipped for several hours by the influence of tides related to the spectacular Sun-Moon-Earth alignment near the middle of the day. The effect of flipping the electric field was clearly seen in the equatorial ionosonde data and through the large array of GPS receivers that accomplished the TEC data. The main impact of the change in the electric field was the reduced EIA at all latitudes, with the anomaly crest that shifted towards the equator. The equatorial F-region density profile was also showing an enhanced F region peak in spite of a reduced VTEC. By comparison to the plasma density depletion associated with the temporary lack...

  20. Core design studies for advanced burner test reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, W. S.; Kim, T. K.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. government announced in February 2006 the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. The advanced burner reactor (ABR) based on a fast spectrum is one of the three major technologies to be demonstrated in GNEP. In FY06, a pre-conceptual design study was performed to develop an advanced burner test reactor (ABTR) that supports development of a prototype full-scale ABR, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR were (1) to demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics (TRU) as part of an advanced fuel cycle, (2) to qualify the TRU-containing fuels and advanced structural materials needed for a full-scale ABR, (3) to support the research, development and demonstration required for certification of an ABR standard design by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Based on these objectives, core design and fuel cycle studies were performed to develop ABTR core designs, which can accommodate the expected changes of the TRU feed and the conversion ratio. Various option and trade-off studies were performed to determine the appropriate power level and conversion ratio. Both ternary metal alloy (U-TRU-10Zr) and mixed oxide (UO{sub 2}-TRUO{sub 2}) fuel forms have been considered with TRU feeds from weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) and TRU recovered from light water reactor spent fuel (LWR-SF). Reactor performances were evaluated in detail including equilibrium cycle core parameters, mass flow, power distribution, kinetic parameters, reactivity feedback coefficient, reactivity control requirements and shutdown margins, and spent fuel characteristics. Trade-off studies on power level suggested that about 250 MWt is a reasonable compromise to allow a low project cost, at the same time providing a reasonable prototypic irradiation environment for demonstrating TRU-based fuels. Preliminary design studies showed that it is feasible to design the ABTR to accommodate a wide range of conversion ratio (CR) by employing different assembly designs. The TRU enrichments required for various conversion ratios and the irradiation database suggested a phased approach with initial startup using conventional enrichment plutonium-based fuel and gradual transitioning to full core loading of transmutation fuel after its qualification phase (resulting in {approx}0.6 CR). The low CR transmutation fuel tests can be accommodated in the designated test assemblies, and if fully developed, core conversion to low CR fuel can be envisioned. Reference ABTR core designs with a rated power of 250 MWt were developed for ternary metal alloy and mixed oxide fuels based on WG-Pu feed. The reference core contains 54 driver, 6 test fuel, and 3 test material assemblies. For the startup core designs, the calculated TRU conversion ratio is 0.65 for the metal fuel core and 0.64 for the oxide fuel core. Both the metal and oxide cores show good performances. The metal fuel core requires an average TRU enrichment of 18.8% and yields a reactivity swing of 1.2 %{Delta}k over the 4-month cycle. The core average flux level is {approx}2.4 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}s, and test assembly flux level is {approx}2.8 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}s. Compared to the metal fuel core, the lower density oxide fuel core requires an average TRU enrichment of 21.8%, which results in a 780 kg TRU loading (as compared to 732 kg for metal) despite a {approx}9% smaller heavy metal inventory. The lower heavy metal inventory increases the burnup reactivity swing by {approx}10% and reduces the flux levels by {approx}8%. Alternative designs were also studied for a LWR-SF TRU feed and a low conversion ratio, including the recycle of the ABTR spent fuel TRU. The lower fissile contents of the LWR-SF TRU relative to the WG-Pu TRU significantly increase the required TRU enrichment of the startup cores to maintain the same cycle length. The even lower fissile fraction of the ABTR spent fuel TRU furt

  1. Power distributions in fresh and depleted LEU and HEU cores of the MITR reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, E.H.; Horelik, N.E.; Dunn, F.E.; Newton, T.H., Jr.; Hu, L.; Stevens, J.G. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (2MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory and Nuclear Science and Engineering Department)

    2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Toward this goal, core geometry and power distributions are presented. Distributions of power are calculated for LEU cores depleted with MCODE using an MCNP5 Monte Carlo model. The MCNP5 HEU and LEU MITR models were previously compared to experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. This same model was used with a finer spatial depletion in order to generate power distributions for the LEU cores. The objective of this work is to generate and characterize a series of fresh and depleted core peak power distributions, and provide a thermal hydraulic evaluation of the geometry which should be considered for subsequent thermal hydraulic safety analyses.

  2. Natural thorium isotopes in marine sediment core off Labuan port

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hafidz, B. Y.; Asnor, A. S.; Terence, R. C.; Mohamed, C. A. R. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediment core was collected from Labuan port and analyzed to determine the radioactivity of thorium (Th) isotopes. The objectives of this study are to determine the possible sources of Th isotopes at Labuan port and estimates the sedimentation rate based on {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The results suggest the {sup 230}Th and {sup 232}Th might be originated from terrestrial sedimentary rock while {sup 228}Th originated by authigenic origin. High ratio value of {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th detected at the top surface sediment indicates the increasing of {sup 230}Th at the recent years which might be contributed from the anthropogenic sources. The sedimentation rate of core sediment from Labuan Port was successfully estimated by using {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The result show high sedimentation rate with 4.67 cm/year indicates rapid deposition occurred at this study area due to the high physical activity at the Labuan port. By assume the constant sedimentation rate at this area; we estimated the age of 142 cm core sediment obtained from Labuan port is 32 years started from 1981 to 2012. This chronology will be used in forthcoming research to investigate the historical profile of anthropogenic activities affecting the Labuan port.

  3. Beamed Core Antimatter Propulsion: Engine Design and Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronan Keane; Wei-Ming Zhang

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual design for beamed core antimatter propulsion is reported, where electrically charged annihilation products directly generate thrust after being deflected and collimated by a magnetic nozzle. Simulations were carried out using the Geant4 (Geometry and tracking) software toolkit released by the CERN accelerator laboratory for Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of particles with matter and fields. Geant permits a more sophisticated and comprehensive design and optimization of antimatter engines than the software environment for simulations reported by prior researchers. The main finding is that effective exhaust speeds Ve ~ 0.69c (where c is the speed of light) are feasible for charged pions in beamed core propulsion, a major improvement over the Ve ~ 0.33c estimate based on prior simulations. The improvement resulted from optimization of the geometry and the field configuration of the magnetic nozzle. Moreover, this improved performance is realized using a magnetic field on the order of 10 T at the location of its highest magnitude. Such a field could be produced with today's technology, whereas prior nozzle designs anticipated and required major advances in this area. The paper also briefly reviews prospects for production of the fuel needed for a beamed core engine.

  4. Attack of fragmented-core debris on concrete in the presence of water. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Bradley, D.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the unlikely event that core debris escapes the reactor pressure vessel, the interactions of the debris with concrete, structural materials, and coolant become the driving force for severe accident phenomena. The Ex-Vessel Core Debris Interactions Program at Sandia National Laboratories is an experimental research effort to characterize these interactions and the magnitude of safety-related phenomena such as flammable gas generation, aerosol production, fission product release, and concrete attack. Major areas of study within the program include molten core simultants in contact with concrete, high pressure melt streaming into scaled reactor cavities, the addition of coolant to high-temperature melt/concrete interactions, and the attack of hot, solid core debris on concrete. This paper describes results from the last of these efforts, i.e., hot, but not molten debris attacking concrete.

  5. Self-actuated nuclear reactor shutdown system using induction pump to facilitate sensing of core coolant temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sievers, Robert K. (N. Huntingdon, PA); Cooper, Martin H. (Churchill, PA); Tupper, Robert B. (Greensburg, PA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-actuated shutdown system incorporated into a reactivity control assembly in a nuclear reactor includes pumping means for creating an auxiliary downward flow of a portion of the heated coolant exiting from the fuel assemblies disposed adjacent to the control assembly. The shutdown system includes a hollow tubular member which extends through the outlet of the control assembly top nozzle so as to define an outer annular flow channel through the top nozzle outlet separate from an inner flow channel for primary coolant flow through the control assembly. Also, a latching mechanism is disposed in an inner duct of the control assembly and is operable for holding absorber bundles in a raised position in the control assembly and for releasing them to drop them into the core of the reactor for shutdown purposes. The latching mechanism has an inner flow passage extending between and in flow communication with the absorber bundles and the inner flow channel of the top nozzle for accommodating primary coolant flow upwardly through the control assembly. Also, an outer flow passage separate from the inner flow passage extends through the latching mechanism between and in flow communication with the inner duct and the outer flow channel of the top nozzle for accommodating inflow of a portion of the heated coolant from the adjacent fuel assemblies. The latching mechanism contains a magnetic material sensitive to temperature and operable to cause mating or latching together of the components of the latching mechanism when the temperature sensed is below a known temperature and unmating or unlatching thereof when the temperature sensed is above a given temperature. The temperature sensitive magnetic material is positioned in communication with the heated coolant flow through the outer flow passage for directly sensing the temperature thereof. Finally, the pumping means includes a jet induction pump nozzle and diffuser disposed adjacent the bottom nozzle of the control assembly and in flow communication with the inlet thereof. The pump nozzle is operable to create an upward driving flow of primary coolant through the pump diffuser and then to the absorber bundles. The upward driving flow of primary coolant, in turn, creates a suction head within the outer flow channel of the top nozzle and thereby an auxiliary downward flow of the heated coolant portion exiting from the upper end of the adjacent fuel assemblies through the outer flow channel to the pump nozzle via the outer flow passage of the latching mechanism and an annular space between the outer and inner spaced ducts of the control assembly housing. The temperature of the heated coolant exiting from the adjacent fuel assemblies can thereby be sensed directly by the temperature sensitive magnetic material in the latching mechanism.

  6. Core analysis workstation development and verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, C.W.; Kochendarfer, R.A.; Mays, B.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering workstation utilizing a three-dimensional reactor simulator along with a series of auxiliary programs has been developed for use in predicting core reactivity and power distributions. This workstation can be used by both core analysis and core operations personnel. Expected applications are power distribution analyses, technical specification limit verification, and various types of reactivity analyses. Reactor operations personnel can quickly simulate load follow or other reactor maneuvers and, through the interactive graphics capability of the personal computer, the reactor responses, such as power distribution and control rod position, can be displayed and understood by operations personnel.

  7. Incorporation of silica into baroplastic core-shell nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hewlett, Sheldon A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core-shell baroplastics are nanophase materials that exhibit pressure-induced flow at low temperatures and high pressures. Core-shell baroplastics used in this work are comprised of a low Tg poly(butyl acrylate) (PBA) core ...

  8. KSI's Cross Insulated Core Transformer Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhmeyer, Uwe [Kaiser Systems, Inc, 126 Sohier Road, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross Insulated Core Transformer (CCT) technology improves on Insulated Core Transformer (ICT) implementations. ICT systems are widely used in very high voltage, high power, power supply systems. In an ICT transformer ferrite core sections are insulated from their neighboring ferrite cores. Flux leakage is present at each of these insulated gaps. The flux loss is raised to the power of stages in the ICT design causing output voltage efficiency to taper off with increasing stages. KSI's CCT technology utilizes a patented technique to compensate the flux loss at each stage of an ICT system. Design equations to calculate the flux compensation capacitor value are presented. CCT provides corona free operation of the HV stack. KSI's CCT based High Voltage power supply systems offer high efficiency operation, high frequency switching, low stored energy and smaller size over comparable ICT systems.

  9. Magnetic core studies at LBNL and LLNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molvik, A.W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LLNL) and DE-AC03-76SF00098 (LBNL). References Wayne Meier,Magnetic Core Studies at LBNL and LLNL A. W. Molvik a,* , A.Livermore, CA 94550, USA LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA c

  10. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  11. Viscosity anomaly in core-softened liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. D. Fomin; V. N. Ryzhov

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present article presents a molecular dynamics study of several anomalies of core-softened systems. It is well known that many core-softened liquids demonstrate diffusion anomaly. Usual intuition relates the diffusion coefficient to shear viscosity via Stockes-Einstein relation. However, it can break down at low temperature. In this respect it is important to see if viscosity also demonstrates anomalous behavior.

  12. Formed Core Sampler Hydraulic Conductivity Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. H.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

  13. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Young, J.E.

    1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

  14. Core-Shell Structured Magnetic Ternary Nanocubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Wang, Chong M.; Chernova, Natalya; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Yao; Bae, In-Tae; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While transition metal-doped ferrite nanoparticles constitute an important class of soft magnetic nanomaterials with spinel structures, the ability to control the shape and composition would enable a wide range of applications in homogeneous or heterogeneous reactions such as catalysis and magnetic separation of biomolecules. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of core-shell structured MnZn ferrite nanocubes synthesized in organic solvents by manipulating the reaction temperature and capping agent composition in the absence of the conventionally-used reducing agents. The core-shell structure of the highly-monodispersed nanocubes (~20 nm) are shown to consist of an Fe3O4 core and an (Mn0.5Zn0.5)(Fe0.9, Mn1.1)O4 shell. In comparison with Fe3O4 and other binary ferrite nanoparticles, the core-shell structured nanocubes were shown to display magnetic properties regulated by a combination of the core-shell composition, leading to a higher coercivity (~350 Oe) and field-cool/zero-field-cool characteristics drastically different from many regular MnZn ferrite nanoparticles. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique core-shell composition, the understanding of which has important implication to the exploration of this class of soft magnetic nanomaterials in many potential applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, fuel cells, and batteries.

  15. The compactness of presupernova stellar cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Woosley, S. E., E-mail: sukhbold@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success or failure of the neutrino-transport mechanism for producing a supernova in an evolved massive star is known to be sensitive not only to the mass of the iron core that collapses, but also to the density gradient in the silicon and oxygen shells surrounding that core. Here we study the systematics of a presupernova core's 'compactness' as a function of the mass of the star and the physics used in its calculation. Fine-meshed surveys of presupernova evolution are calculated for stars from 15 to 65 M {sub ?}. The metallicity and the efficiency of semiconvection and overshoot mixing are both varied and bare carbon-oxygen cores are explored as well as full hydrogenic stars. Two different codes, KEPLER and MESA, are used for the study. A complex interplay of carbon and oxygen burning, especially in shells, can cause rapid variations in the compactness for stars of very nearly the same mass. On larger scales, the distribution of compactness with main sequence mass is found to be robustly non-monotonic, implying islands of 'explodabilty,' particularly around 8-20 M {sub ?} and 25-30 M {sub ?}. The carbon-oxygen (CO) core mass of a presupernova star is a better, (though still ambiguous) discriminant of its core structure than the main sequence mass.

  16. CSAT Role-Based/Core Competency Training Program | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services Training Cybersecurity Training Warehouse DOE Training & Education CSAT Role-BasedCore Competency Training Program CSAT Role-BasedCore Competency Training...

  17. Probing the Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy . Probing the Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron Solid-State...

  18. Synthesis of Lutetium Phosphate/Apoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential Applications in Radioimmunoimaging and Synthesis of Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...

  19. Nanoscale Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell Evolution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell Evolution of Gold-Platinum Nanoparticles and Their Electrocatalytic Effect Nanoscale Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell...

  20. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Abstract: Non-toxic magnetic...

  1. CEMENT RELATED RESEARCH HYDROGEOCHEMISTRY GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    CEMENT RELATED RESEARCH HYDROGEOCHEMISTRY GROUP Josep M. Soler Jordi Cama Carles Ayora Ana Trapote.soler@idaea.csic.es #12;NOMECLATURE cement + water = hardened cement paste cement + water + sand = mortar cement + waterC) clinker + gypsum portland cement PORTLAND CEMENT #12;GTS-HPF Core Infiltration Experiment Experimental

  2. Continuous Flow Analysis of Total Organic Carbon in Polar Ice Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    Continuous Flow Analysis of Total Organic Carbon in Polar Ice Cores U R S F E D E R E R , * , , P, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland, Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland, and British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom Received May 6, 2008. Revised manuscript

  3. Lomonosovfonna and Holtedahlfonna ice cores reveal eastwest disparities of the Spitsbergen environment since AD 1700

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    and the northernmost Norwegian coast. The location of Svalbard, at the southern edge of the permanent sea-ice coverLomonosovfonna and Holtedahlfonna ice cores reveal east­west disparities of the Spitsbergen and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands 6 Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram

  4. The Search for Supernova Signatures in an Ice Core A. L. Colea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    , Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 b Physics and Astronomy Departments, The Ohio StateThe Search for Supernova Signatures in an Ice Core A. L. Colea , R. N. Boydb , M. E. Davisc , L. G University, Columbus, OH 43210 c Byrd Polar Research Center and Department of Geological Sciences, The Ohio

  5. THE SEARCH FOR SUPERNOVA GRAINS IN AN ICE CORE A. L. Cole1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 R. N. Boyd Physics and Astronomy DepartmentsTHE SEARCH FOR SUPERNOVA GRAINS IN AN ICE CORE A. L. Cole1 National Superconducting Cyclotron, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 M. E. Davis and L. G. Thompson The Byrd Polar Research Center

  6. CRN Course Title Days Time Location Instructor Core/Elective Undergraduate Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staff EB Core W = Wednesday 80233 305A FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING MWF 12:00-12:50 BE 243 Dozoretz EB Elective R = Thursday 82810 310 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS MW 6:00 - 7:15 GC 265 Worley EB Elective F = Friday 82811 320 ECONOMICS AND TECHNOLOGY TR 12:30 - 1:45 GC 265 Houser 80238 325 OPERATIONS RESEARCH TR 9

  7. Plasmonic Enhancement of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Using Core-Shell-Shell Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plasmonic Enhancement of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Using Core- Shell-Shell Nanostructures Stafford and demonstrate near-field plasmonic enhancement of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) incorporating them being researched, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are a promising alternative to traditional solar

  8. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  9. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, Francisco

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of singlephase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014. The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 kVA transformer passed the impulse test in KEMA high-voltage laboratories. Additional products include: nine papers published in the IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, one patent has been filed, three PhD students weresupported from beginning to graduation, five postdoctoral fellows, and three MSc students were partially supported. The electrical characteristics of our dry-type toroidal transformers are similar to those of the oil-immersed pole mounted transformers currently in use by many utilities, but toroids have higher efficiency. The no-load losses of the 50 kVA prototype are only 45 W. A standard transformer has no-load losses between 90 and 240 W. Thus, even the finest transformer built today with standard technology has double the amount of no-load losses than the prototype toroidal transformer. When the manufacturing process is prepared for mass production, the cost of a dry-type toroidal transformer would be similar to the price of an oil-filed standard design. However, because of the greatly reduced losses, the total ownership cost of a toroidal transformer could be about half of a traditional design. We got a grant from Power Bridge NY in the amount of $149,985 from June 2014 to May 2015 to continue developing the transformer with commercialization objectives. We are considering the possibility to incorporate a company to manufacture the transformers and have contacted investors. The current status of the real life testing is as follows: after several months of silence, Con Edison has re-started conversations and has shown willingness to test the transformer. Other companies, PSE&G and National Grid have recently also shown interest and we will present our product to them soon.

  10. Enhancement of the inherent self-protection of the fast sodium reactor cores with oxide fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliseev, V.A.; Malisheva, I.V.; Matveev, V.I.; Egorov, A.V.; Maslov, P.A. [SSC RF - IPPE, Obninsk, Kaluga region (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the development and research into the generation IV fast sodium reactors, great attention is paid to the enhancement of the core inherent self-protection characteristics. One of the problems dealt here is connected with the reduction of the reactivity margin so that the control rods running should not result in the core overheating and melting. In this paper we consider the possibilities of improving the core of BN-1200 with oxide fuel by a known method of introducing an axial fertile layer into the core. But unlike earlier studies this paper looks at the possibility of using such a layer not only for improving breeding, but also for reducing sodium void reactivity effect (SVRE). This proposed improvement of the BN-1200 core does not solve the problem of strong interference in control and protection system (CPS) rods of BN-1200, but they reduce significantly the reactivity margin for burn-up compensation. This helps compensate all the reactivity balances in the improved core configurations without violating constraints on SVRE value.

  11. CORE GAS SLOSHING IN ABELL 1644

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Ryan E.; Wegner, Gary A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wilder Lab, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Markevitch, Maxim; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R., E-mail: ryan.e.johnson@dartmouth.ed, E-mail: gary.a.wegner@bellz.dartmouth.ed, E-mail: mmarkevitch@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: cjf@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: wrf@cfa.harvard.ed [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of a 72 ks Chandra observation of the double cluster Abell 1644 (z = 0.047). The X-ray temperatures indicate that the masses are M{sub 500} = (2.6 +- 0.4) x 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub sun} for the northern sub-cluster and M{sub 500} = (3.1 +- 0.4) x 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub sun} for the southern, main cluster. We identify a sharp edge in the radial X-ray surface brightness of the main cluster, which we find to be a cold front, with a jump in temperature of a factor of {approx}3. This edge possesses a spiral morphology characteristic of core gas sloshing around the cluster potential minimum. We present observational evidence, supported by hydrodynamic simulations, that the northern sub-cluster is the object that initiated the core gas sloshing in the main cluster at least 700 Myr ago. We discuss reheating of the main cluster's core gas via two mechanisms brought about by the sloshing gas: first, the release of gravitational potential energy gained by the core's displacement from the potential minimum, and second, a dredging inward of the outer, higher entropy cluster gas along finger-shaped streams. We find that the available gravitational potential energy is small compared to the energy released by the cooling gas in the core.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween, and each interconnect wall consists of thin layers of the cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of interconnect material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002-0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002-0.05 cm thick.

  13. University of Michigan Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and the Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    University of Michigan Institute for Research on Labor, Employment and the Economy (IRLEE) Mission innovation, increasing entrepreneurship, and improving the economy; (5) Foster a core of interdisciplinary

  14. Neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherry, John F.; Cherry, John F.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Collapse Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mechanisms of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Simulation Results

  15. 2.0 CORE LOGO 2.01 OVERVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellaire, Graham

    2.0 CORE LOGO 2.01 OVERVIEW 2.02 CLEAR SPACE AND MINIMUM SIZE 2.03 EXAMPLES OF PLACEMENT APPLIED TO THE CORE LOGO 2.08 APPLYING THE LOGO PROPERLY 2.09 LINKS TO DALHOUSIE AUTHORIZED CORE LOGO as a university with real substance and stature, and seen as a vibrant, welcoming community. Our core logo

  16. Journal of NUCLEAR SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY, Vol. 39, No. 11, p. 11691181 (November 2002) Conceptual Design of a Modular Island Core Fast Breeder Reactor "RAPID-M"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Journal of NUCLEAR SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY, Vol. 39, No. 11, p. 1169­1181 (November 2002) Conceptual Design of a Modular Island Core Fast Breeder Reactor "RAPID-M" Mitsuru KAMBE Central Research Institute and accepted September 10, 2002) A metal fueled modular island core sodium cooled fast breeder reactor concept

  17. Asteroseismic Diagnostics of Stellar Convective Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anwesh Mazumdar; Sarbani Basu; Braxton L. Collier; Pierre Demarque

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of the small frequency separations as diagnostics of the mass of the convective core and evolutionary stage of solar-type stars. We demonstrate how the small separations can be combined to provide sensitive tests for the presence of convective overshoot at the edge of the core. These studies are focused on low degree oscillation modes, the only modes expected to be detected in distant stars. Using simulated data with realistic errors, we find that the mass of the convective core can be estimated to within 5% if the total stellar mass is known. Systematic errors arising due to uncertainty in the mass could be up to 20%. The evolutionary stage of the star, determined in terms of the central hydrogen abundance using our proposed technique, however, is much less sensitive to the mass estimate.

  18. Nuclear reactor with low-level core coolant intake

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A natural-circulation boiling-water reactor has skirts extending downward from control rod guide tubes to about 10 centimeters from the reactor vessel bottom. The skirts define annular channels about control rod drive housings that extend through the reactor vessel bottom. Recirculating water is forced in through the low-level entrances to these channels, sweeping bottom water into the channels in the process. The sweeping action prevents cooler water from accumulating at the bottom. This in turn minimizes thermal shock to bottom-dwelling components as would occur when accumulated cool water is swept away and suddenly replaced by warmer water.

  19. Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be useful in defining a roadmap for what future capability needs to look like.

  20. Core Capabilities and Technical Enhancement -- FY-98 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David Lynn

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Core Capability and Technical Enhancement (CC&TE) Program, a part of the Verification, Validation, and Engineering Assessment Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening the technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Office of Environmental Management (EM). An analysis of EM's science and technology needs as well as the technology investments currently being made by EM across the complex was used to formulate a portfolio of research activities designed to address EM's needs without overlapping work being done elsewhere. An additional purpose is to enhance and maintain the technical capabilities and research infrastructure at the INEEL. This is a progress report for fiscal year 1998 for the five CC&TE research investment areas: (a) transport aspects of selective mass transport agents, (b) chemistry of environmental surfaces, (c) materials dynamics, (d) characterization science, and (e) computational simulation of mechanical and chemical systems. In addition to the five purely technical research areas, this report deals with the science and technology foundations element of the CC&TE from the standpoint of program management and complex-wide issues. This report also provides details of ongoing and future work in all six areas.

  1. Core capabilities and technical enhancement, FY-98 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.L.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Core Capability and Technical Enhancement (CCTE) Program, a part of the Verification, Validation, and Engineering Assessment Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening the technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). An analysis of EM's science and technology needs as well as the technology investments currently being made by EM across the complex was used to formulate a portfolio of research activities designed to address EM's needs without overlapping work being done elsewhere. An additional purpose is to enhance and maintain the technical capabilities and research infrastructure at the INEEL. This is a progress report for fiscal year 1998 for the five CCTE research investment areas: (a) transport aspects of selective mass transport agents, (b) chemistry of environmental surfaces, (c) materials dynamics, (d) characterization science, and (e) computational simulation of mechanical and chemical systems. In addition to the five purely technical research areas, this report deals with the science and technology foundations element of the CCTE from the standpoint of program management and complex-wide issues. This report also provides details of ongoing and future work in all six areas.

  2. Thermal metastabilities in the solar core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attila Grandpierre; Gabor Agoston

    2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear stability analysis indicates that solar core is thermally stable for infinitesimal internal perturbations. For the first time, thermal metastabilities are found in the solar core when outer perturbations with significant amplitude are present. The obtained results show that hot bubbles generated by outer perturbations may travel a significant distance in the body of the Sun. These deep-origin hot bubbles have mass, energy, and chemical composition that may be related to solar flares. The results obtained may have remarkable relations to activity cycles in planets like Jupiter and also in extrasolar planetary systems.

  3. Effect of various solvents on core behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irby, Tom L

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Section of Core Holder with Core 12 6. Effect of Dri-Film on Sessile Drop Ratios of Kerosene on Silica Crystals in Brine 7. Bar Graph Showing Results of Water Flood Test 8. Plot of Resistivity vs. Brine Saturation for Tests No. 1, 4, 7, 9 and 14 27 9. Plot... Resistance Measurements at Various Brine Saturations For Displacement of Brine with Kerosene 35 III. Electrical Resistance Measurements at Various Brine Saturations for Displacement of Brine with East Texas Crude-Kerosene Mixture 36 ABSTRACT Recently...

  4. Core Values Postcard | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi Site Office (FSO) FSOConvertingCopy ServicesCoreCore

  5. University of New Orleans/ Advanced Materials Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    solar cells. Their synthesis, characterization and application as photoanode materials in dye sensitized of sciences research award to fund the proposal on making efficient dye sensitized solar cells by plasmonic Core-Shell Metal-Metal Oxide 3D Nanoarchitectures for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells, Gordon Research

  6. Plasma-wall interaction data needs critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Division of Development and Technology has sponsored a four day US-Japan workshop ''Plasma-Wall Interaction Data Needs Critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)'', held at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California on June 24 to 27, 1985. The workshop, which brought together fifty scientists and engineers from the United States, Japan, Germany, and Canada, considered the plasma-material interaction and high heat flux (PMI/HHF) issues for the next generation of magnetic fusion energy devices, the Burning Core Experiment (BCX). Materials options were ranked, and a strategy for future PMI/HHF research was formulated. The foundation for international collaboration and coordination of this research was also established. This volume contains the last three of the five technical sessions. The first of the three is on plasma materials interaction issues, the second is on research facilities and the third is from smaller working group meetings on graphite, beryllium, advanced materials and future collaborations.

  7. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  8. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  9. Fabricating the Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ring, Peter J.; Sayre, Edwin D. [Advanced Methods and Materials, Inc., 1190 Mountain View-Alviso Road, Suite P, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Houts, Mike [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid core heatpipe nuclear reactor has the potential to be the most dependable concept for the nuclear space power system. The design of the conversion system employed permits multiple failure modes instead of the single failure mode of other concepts. Regardless of the material used for the reactor, either stainless steel, high-temperature alloys, Nb1Zr, Tantalum Alloys or MoRe Alloys, making the solid core by machining holes in a large diameter billet is not satisfactory. This is because the large diameter billet will have large grains that are detrimental to the performance of the reactor due to grain boundary diffusion. The ideal fabrication method for the solid core is by hot isostatic pressure diffusion bonding (HIPing). By this technique, wrought fine-grained tubes of the alloy chosen are assembled into the final shape with solid cusps and seal welded so that there is a vacuum in between all surfaces to be diffusion bonded. This welded structure is then HIPed for diffusion bonding. A solid core made of Type 321 stainless steel has been satisfactorily produced by Advanced Methods and Materials and is undergoing evaluation by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

  10. UW-Milwaukee Strategic Planning Core Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    UW-Milwaukee Strategic Planning Core Team MINUTES Wednesday, February 13, 2013 Lubar Hall, N440, 9 a.m. 1. Welcome 2. Finalized Thematic Team memberships Thematic Team members were identified with the student association to identify potential students to serve on the Thematic teams. 3. Updates

  11. Power excursion analysis for high burnup cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, D.J.; Neymotin, L.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was undertaken of power excursions in high burnup cores. There were three objectives in this study. One was to identify boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) transients in which there is significant energy deposition in the fuel. Another was to analyze the response of BWRs to the rod drop accident (RDA) and other transients in which there is a power excursion. The last objective was to investigate the sources of uncertainty in the RDA analysis. In a boiling water reactor, the events identified as having significant energy deposition in the fuel were a rod drop accident, a recirculation flow control failure, and the overpressure events; in a pressurized water reactor, they were a rod ejection accident and boron dilution events. The RDA analysis was done with RAMONA-4B, a computer code that models the space- dependent neutron kinetics throughout the core along with the thermal hydraulics in the core, vessel, and steamline. The results showed that the calculated maximum fuel enthalpy in high burnup fuel will be affected by core design, initial conditions, and modeling assumptions. The important uncertainties in each of these categories are discussed in the report.

  12. Interactive Termination Proofs using Termination Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manolios, Panagiotis "Pete"

    Interactive Termination Proofs using Termination Cores Panagiotis Manolios and Daron Vroon College@ccs.neu.edu, daron.vroon@gmail.com Abstract. Recent advances in termination analysis have yielded new methods and determining how to proceed. In this paper, we address the issue of building termination analysis engines

  13. Magnetic Fields in Quasar Cores II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. B. Taylor

    1999-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-frequency polarimetry with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) telescope has revealed absolute Faraday Rotation Measures (RMs) in excess of 1000 rad/m/m in the central regions of 7 out of 8 strong quasars studied (e.g., 3C 273, 3C 279, 3C 395). Beyond a projected distance of ~20 pc, however, the jets are found to have |RM| < 100 rad/m/m. Such sharp RM gradients cannot be produced by cluster or galactic-scale magnetic fields, but rather must be the result of magnetic fields organized over the central 1-100 pc. The RMs of the sources studied to date and the polarization properties of BL Lacs, quasars and galaxies are shown to be consistent so far with the predictions of unified schemes. The direct detection of high RMs in these quasar cores can explain the low fractional core polarizations usually observed in quasars at centimeter wavelengths as the result of irregularities in the Faraday screen on scales smaller than the telescope beam. Variability in the RM of the core is reported for 3C 279 between observations taken 1.5 years apart, indicating that the Faraday screen changes on that timescale, or that the projected superluminal motion of the inner jet components samples a new location in the screen with time. Either way, these changes in the Faraday screen may explain the dramatic variability in core polarization properties displayed by quasars.

  14. Positron annihilation with core and valence electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, D G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $\\gamma$-ray spectra for positron annihilation with the core and valence electrons of the noble gas atoms Ar, Kr and Xe is calculated within the framework of diagrammatic many-body theory. The effect of positron-atom and short-range positron-electron correlations on the annihilation process is examined in detail. Short-range correlations, which are described through non-local corrections to the vertex of the annihilation amplitude, are found to significantly enhance the spectra for annihilation on the core orbitals. For Ar, Kr and Xe, the core contributions to the annihilation rate are found to be 0.55\\%, 1.5\\% and 2.2\\% respectively, their small values reflecting the difficulty for the positron to probe distances close to the nucleus. Importantly however, the core subshells have a broad momentum distribution and markedly contribute to the annihilation spectra at Doppler energy shifts $\\gtrsim3$\\,keV, and even dominate the spectra of Kr and Xe at shifts $\\gtrsim5$\\,keV. Their inclusion brings the theoretical ...

  15. Core-mantle interactions for Mercury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemaitre, B Noyelles J Dufey A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury is the target of two space missions: MESSENGER (NASA) which orbit insertion is planned for March 2011, and ESA/JAXA BepiColombo, that should be launched in 2014. Their instruments will observe the surface of the planet with a high accuracy (about 1 arcsec for BepiColombo), what motivates studying its rotation. Mercury is assumed to be composed of a rigid mantle and an at least partially molten core. We here study the influence of the core-mantle interactions on the rotation perturbed by the solar gravitational interaction, by modeling the core as an ellipsoidal cavity filled with inviscid fluid of constant uniform density and vorticity. We use both analytical (Lie transforms) and numerical tools to study this rotation, with different shapes of the core. We express in particular the proper frequencies of the system, because they characterize the response of Mercury to the different solicitations, due to the orbital motion of Mercury around the Sun. We show that the longitudinal motion of Mercury is not...

  16. IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

  17. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Pigarov, Alexander

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project of Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program was aimed at providing a high-fidelity whole-tokamak modeling for the U.S. magnetic fusion energy program and ITER through coupling separate components for each of the core region, edge region, and wall, with realistic plasma particles and power sources and turbulent transport simulation. The project also aimed at developing advanced numerical algorithms, efficient implicit coupling methods, and software tools utilizing the leadership class computing facilities under Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). The FACETS project was conducted by a multi-discipline, multi-institutional teams, the Lead PI was J.R. Cary (Tech-X Corp.). In the FACETS project, the Applied Plasma Theory Group at the MAE Department of UCSD developed the Wall and Plasma-Surface Interaction (WALLPSI) module, performed its validation against experimental data, and integrated it into the developed framework. WALLPSI is a one-dimensional, coarse grained, reaction/advection/diffusion code applied to each material boundary cell in the common modeling domain for a tokamak. It incorporates an advanced model for plasma particle transport and retention in the solid matter of plasma facing components, simulation of plasma heat power load handling, calculation of erosion/deposition, and simulation of synergistic effects in strong plasma-wall coupling.

  18. GeophysicalResearchLetters RESEARCH LETTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the core, neutralizing the corona sheath charge and causing rapid heating in the core, which in turn referred to as the "core") is created either by the downward stepped leader for the first return stroke or by a dart leader for the subsequent return stroke. It is generally believed that the core is sur- rounded

  19. CT Scans of Cores Metadata, Barrow, Alaska 2015

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich

    Individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, throughout 2013 and 2014. Cores were drilled along different transects to sample polygonal features (i.e. the trough, center and rim of high, transitional and low center polygons). Most cores were drilled around 1 meter in depth and a few deep cores were drilled around 3 meters in depth. Three-dimensional images of the frozen cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. TIFF files can be uploaded to ImageJ (an open-source imaging software) to examine soil structure and densities within each core.

  20. Annular flow control safety valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, P.W.; Pringle, R.E.

    1981-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A tubular housing having an inner tubular member forms an inner passageway inside of the inner member and an outer passageway between the inner member and the housing. The housing has valve openings leading from the outer passageway to the exterior of the housing and a tubular valve closure member telescopically moves on the interior of the housing. First means move the valve closure member in an upper direction for closing the openings and at least one actuating piston is telescopically movable within and has its longitudinal axis in the wall of the housing and engages the valve closure member. The piston is in communication with a hydraulic passageway adapted to extend to the well surface for actuating the closure member in a direction to open the valve openings. The closure member is positioned whereby upward flow through the outer passageway acts on the closure member to close the valve opening. At least one lockout piston telescopically moves within the housing and is actuated from the surface and is engageable with holding means in the housing for providing a hydraulic lockout for the valve. Shear means may be provided between the lockout piston and the housing for controlling the hydraulic lockout. A single seal is provided between the closure member and the housing and is positioned below the opening and exposed to the pressure on both sides when the valve is opened. Preferably the actuating pistons are connected to the valve closure member but the hydraulic lockout pistons engage but are unconnected to the valve closure member.

  1. Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mount Elbert Well) during drilling and coring operationsWell in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drillingWell, pressure coring was not used, thus the core was depressurized upon ascent. Drilling

  2. The Neutronics Design and Analysis of a 200-MW(electric) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinkler, Daniel R.; Downar, Thomas J. [Purdue University (United States)

    2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 200-MW(electric) simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) was designed and analyzed under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative program. The compact size of a 200-MW(electric) reactor makes it attractive for countries with a less well developed engineering infrastructure, as well as for developed countries seeking to tailor generation capacity more closely to the growth of their electricity demand. The 200-MW(electric) core design reported here is based on the 600-MW(electric) General Electric SBWR core, which was first analyzed in the work performed here in order to qualify the computer codes used in the analysis. Cross sections for the 8 x 8 fuel assembly design were generated with the HELIOS lattice physics code, and core simulation was performed with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission codes RELAP5/PARCS. In order to predict the critical heat flux, the Hench-Gillis correlation was implemented in the RELAP5 code. An equilibrium cycle was designed for the 200-MW(electric) core, which provided a cycle length of more than 2 yr and satisfied the minimum critical power ratio throughout the core life.

  3. The core helium flash revisited: I. One and two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mocak; E. Mueller; A. Weiss; K. Kifonidis

    2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the hydrodynamics of the core helium flash near its peak. Past research concerned with the dynamics of this event is inconclusive. However, the most recent multidimensional hydrodynamic studies suggest a quiescent behavior and seem to rule out an explosive scenario. Previous work indicated, that depending on initial conditions, employed turbulence models, grid resolution, and dimensionality of the simulation, the core helium flash leads either to the disruption of a low-mass star or to a quiescent quasi-hydrostatic evolution. We try to clarify this issue by simulating the evolution with advanced numerical methods and detailed microphysics. Assuming spherical or axial symmetry, we simulate the evolution of the helium core of a $1.25 M_{\\odot}$ star with a metallicity Z=0.02 during the core helium flash at its peak with a grid-based hydrodynamics code. We find that the core helium flash neither rips the star apart, nor that it significantly alters its structure, as convection plays a crucial role in keeping the star in hydrostatic equilibrium. In addition, our simulations show the presence of overshooting, which implies new predictions concerning mixing of chemical species in red giants.

  4. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb, Kevin R [ORNL; Farmer, Mitchell [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Francis, Matthew W [ORNL

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  5. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This National Center for Photovoltaics sheet describes the capabilities of its polycrystalline thin-film research in the area of cadmium telluride. The scope and core competencies and capabilities are discussed.

  6. Independent analysis of selected core-concrete interaction and fission product release experiments with CORCON-MOD2 and VANESA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, G.A.; Sanborn, Y.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discrepancies between experimental findings and the Reactor Safety Study predictions, as well as the rapidly developing data base enabling phenomenological modeling of core-concrete interactions and ex-vessel fission product release, have prompted the development of several new computer models of core-concrete interactions and fission product release during severe accidents. Two such models are the CORCON-MOD2 model of core-concrete interactions and the VANESA model of ex-vessel aerosol and fission product release during core-concrete interactions. The final judge on the adequacy of the development of models of core debris-concrete interactions is, of course, comparison of the model predictions with the results of experiments. The research into ex-vessel core debris behavior differs from research into many aspects of reactor accidents in that there are many experimental results for comparison. Comparisons of code predictions with results of tests using realistic temperatures and conditions should provide an indication of the progress that has been made and, with appropriately chosen tests, an indication of work that needs to be done. 9 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Differential stoichiometry among core ribosomal proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolai Slavov; Sefan Semrau; Edoardo Airoldi; Bogdan Budnik; Alexander van Oudenaarden

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its deregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass-spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function.

  8. The core structure of presolar graphite onions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Fraundorf; Martin Wackenhut

    2001-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Of the ``presolar particles'' extracted from carbonaceous chondrite dissolution residues, i.e. of those particles which show isotopic evidence of solidification in the neighborhood of other stars prior to the origin of our solar system, one subset has an interesting concentric graphite-rim/graphene-core structure. We show here that single graphene sheet defects in the onion cores (e.g. cyclopentane loops) may be observable edge-on by HREM. This could allow a closer look at models for their formation, and in particular strengthen the possibility that growth of these assemblages proceeds atom-by-atom with the aid of such in-plane defects, under conditions of growth (e.g. radiation fluxes or grain temperature) which discourage the graphite layering that dominates subsequent formation of the rim.

  9. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kantrowitz, M.L.; Rosenstein, R.G.

    1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly. 38 figs.

  10. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

  11. Mox fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

    2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion. characteristics of the assembly.

  12. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

    2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

  13. Resilient Core Networks for Energy Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuntze, Nicolai; Rudolph, Carsten; Leivesley, Sally; Manz, David O.; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara E.

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—Substations and their control are crucial for the availability of electricity in today’s energy distribution. Ad- vanced energy grids with Distributed Energy Resources require higher complexity in substations, distributed functionality and communication between devices inside substations and between substations. Also, substations include more and more intelligent devices and ICT based systems. All these devices are connected to other systems by different types of communication links or are situated in uncontrolled environments. Therefore, the risk of ICT based attacks on energy grids is growing. Consequently, security measures to counter these risks need to be an intrinsic part of energy grids. This paper introduces the concept of a Resilient Core Network to interconnected substations. This core network provides essen- tial security features, enables fast detection of attacks and allows for a distributed and autonomous mitigation of ICT based risks.

  14. Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

  15. Glacier-climate studies in New Zealand Researchers in the Antarctic Research Centre have increasingly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IceSked Glacier-climate studies in New Zealand Researchers in the Antarctic Research Centre have glacier fluctuations, mass balance measurements and ice core records in Antarctica and New Zealand allows of the Franz Josef Glacier. Andrew has recently secured a Victoria University Post-doctoral Fellowship

  16. Thomson scattering for core plasma on DEMO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhin, E. E.; Kurskiev, G. S.; Tolstyakov, S. Yu.; Bukreev, I. M.; Chernakov, P. V.; Kochergin, M. M.; Koval, A. N.; Litvinov, A. E.; Masyukevich, S. V.; Razdobarin, A. G.; Semenov, V. V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 26 Polytechnicheskaya St., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kukushkin, A. B.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A. [NRC Kurchatov Institute, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); Andrew, P. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the challenges of Thomson scattering implementation for core plasma on DEMO and evaluates the capability to measure extremely high electron temperature range 0.5-40keV. A number of solutions to be developed for ITER diagnostics are suggested in consideration of their realization for DEMO. New approaches suggested for DEMO may also be of interest to ITER and currently operating magnetic confinement devices.

  17. Core/Multishell Nanowire Heterostructures as Multicolor,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yat

    of dislocations originating from lattice mismatch between GaN and a planar growth substrate. Second, alloys of III by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition with an n-GaN core and InxGa1-xN/GaN/p-AlGaN/p-GaN shells, where controlled during synthesis. Electrical measurements show that the p-AlGaN/p-GaN shell structure yields

  18. DOE GIS core team - a best practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, J. (James); Bhaduri, Budhendra; Bleakly, D. R. (Denise R.); Brady-Sabeff, Liz; Guber, Al; Guziel, K. A.; Hargrove, Susan; Lee, J. (John); Lee, R. (Randy); Mickus, Kurt; Morehouse, David; Moore, K. (Kevin); Ramsdell, Amy; Rich, P. M. (Paul M.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large government organizations such as the Department of Energy (DOE) are challenged with identifying and implementing best geospatial information management practices to ensure that operational needs are met and government objectives are achieved. Geographic Information System (GIS) professionals, complex wide within the Department, conduct spatial information management practices on a daily basis to complete a wide variety of science and engineering tasks. The DOE Office of the CIO recognized the wealth of geospatial information management knowledge within the DOE complex and formed the DOE GIS Core Team in 2001 as a result. The team is comprised of GIS experts-representing all major DOE labs, site facilities, and programs-who volunteer their time to address issues impacting the entire complex. These include the President's management agenda (with emphasis on the Geospatial One-Stop), homeland security, emergency response, site management, software and geospatial data licensing, and federal, national, and international standards governing the creation and dissemination of geospatial data. The strength of the DOE GIS Core Team is the wide diversity of GIS and scientific expertise represented on the team, which allows it to provide the DOE CIO's office with sound guidance on complex wide issues from a GIS practitioner's perspective. The Core Team's mission is 'to foster technical excellence and communication, to identify and advocate best business practices, and to provide sound recommendations on policy and standards.' As a first step toward identifying best practices the feam conducted a survey of all known GIS assets across the DOE complex. The survey identified each site's GIS expertise, operating systems architecture and software applications, major project areas supported, and a number of other metrics important to the operation of a GIS organization. Results of the survey will be discussed, along with the mission of the Core Team. A broad overview of best practices utilized by many of the leading GIS organizations across the complex will also be provided.

  19. CORE BUSINESS COURSES ACCT 210 ACCOUNTING CR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    P.O.Box: CORE BUSINESS COURSES ACCT 210 ACCOUNTING CR ACCT 215 ACCT 217 to ACCT 250 3 BUSS 200 ACCT 217 to ACCT 250 3 BUSS 211 ACCT 217 to ACCT 250 3 BUSS 230 ACCT 217 to ACCT 250 3 BUSS 239 Any business elective 3 BUSS 240 Total Crs 15 BUSS 245 BIDS CR BUSS 248 INFO 205 3 BUSS 249 DCSN 205 3 DCSN 200

  20. Armored spring-core superconducting cable and method of construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter M. (611 Montclair, College Station, TX 77840); Soika, Rainer H. (1 Hensel, #X4C, College Station, TX 77840)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) is provided. The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may include a spring-core (20), at least one superconducting strand (24) wound onto the spring-core (20), and an armored shell (22) that encases the superconducting strands (24). The spring-core (20) is generally a perforated tube that allows purge gases and cryogenic liquids to be circulated through the armored superconducting cable (12), as well as managing the internal stresses within the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12). The armored shell (22) manages the external stresses of the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) to protect the fragile superconducting strands (24). The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may also include a conductive jacket (34) formed outwardly of the armored shell (22).

  1. Clocking the Rise and Fall of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Rise and Fall of Core-Collapse Supernovae The Rise and Fall of Core-Collapse Supernovae 2D and 3D Models Shed New Light on What Fuels an Exploding Star July 2, 2015 | Tags:...

  2. aml1 core site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    but also helps improve the QoS of the core network and saves the carriers' OPEX and CAPEX on their core networks. Ouyang, Ye; 10.5121ijngn.2010.2105 2010-01-01 6...

  3. arabidopsis core cell: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    but also helps improve the QoS of the core network and saves the carriers' OPEX and CAPEX on their core networks. Ouyang, Ye; 10.5121ijngn.2010.2105 2010-01-01 53 Systematic...

  4. Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    v3102014 Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR/1/2013 Page 1 of 5 #12;Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR

  5. Au34-: A Fluxional Core-Shell Cluster. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Au34-: A Fluxional Core-Shell Cluster. Au34-: A Fluxional Core-Shell Cluster. Abstract: Among the large Aun – clusters for n > 20, the photoelectron spectra of Au34...

  6. STRUCTURE OF THE SUN'S CORE: EVOLUTIONAL AND SEISMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­generating core where the thermonuclear reactions are significant; there is definitely variable hydrogen approximate, of course. We set the core's upper boundary at 10 million K assuming that thermonuclear reactions

  7. Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kempf, Stephanie Anne

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to increasing demands for the services of research reactors, a 5 MW LEU-fueled research reactor core is developed and optimized to provide high thermal flux within specified limits upon thermal hydraulic ...

  8. Shear viscosity in neutron star cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Shternin; D. G. Yakovlev

    2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the shear viscosity $\\eta = \\eta_{e\\mu}+\\eta_{n}$ in a neutron star core composed of nucleons, electrons and muons ($\\eta_{e\\mu}$ being the electron-muon viscosity, mediated by collisions of electrons and muons with charged particles, and $\\eta_{n}$ the neutron viscosity, mediated by neutron-neutron and neutron-proton collisions). Deriving $\\eta_{e\\mu}$, we take into account the Landau damping in collisions of electrons and muons with charged particles via the exchange of transverse plasmons. It lowers $\\eta_{e\\mu}$ and leads to the non-standard temperature behavior $\\eta_{e\\mu}\\propto T^{-5/3}$. The viscosity $\\eta_{n}$ is calculated taking into account that in-medium effects modify nucleon effective masses in dense matter. Both viscosities, $\\eta_{e\\mu}$ and $\\eta_{n}$, can be important, and both are calculated including the effects of proton superfluidity. They are presented in the form valid for any equation of state of nucleon dense matter. We analyze the density and temperature dependence of $\\eta$ for different equations of state in neutron star cores, and compare $\\eta$ with the bulk viscosity in the core and with the shear viscosity in the crust.

  9. Identification of Human Gene Core Promoters Michael Q. Zhang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identification of Human Gene Core Promoters in Silico Michael Q. Zhang1 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724 USA Identification of the 5 -end of human genes requires--CorePromoter. Our experiments indicate that when given a 1- to 2-kb extended promoter, CorePromoter will correctly

  10. OSCAR Parallelizing Compiler Cooperative Heterogeneous Multi-core Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasahara, Hironori

    OSCAR Parallelizing Compiler Cooperative Heterogeneous Multi-core Architecture Akihiro Hayashi,kamiyama,watanabe,takeshi,mase}@kasahara.cs.waseda.ac.jp 1. Background Heterogeneous multi-core architectures, which integrates multiple general purpose CPU, powerful parallelizing compiler for hetero- geneous multi-core architectures is expected. Furthermore

  11. Transforming A Linear Algebra Core to An FFT Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batory, Don

    Transforming A Linear Algebra Core to An FFT Accelerator Ardavan Pedram, John McCalpin, Andreas the modifications required to transform a highly-efficient, specialized linear algebra core into an efficient engine computations and propose extensions to the micro-architecture of the baseline linear algebra core. Along

  12. Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Additional Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Benjamin P.

    Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Today Subscribe Podcast Home Additional Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core Written by Nancy Atkinson If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks for visiting! Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Today

  13. NREL Core Program; Session: Wafer Silicon (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Q.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project supports the Solar America Initiative by working on: (1) wafer Si accounts for 92% world-wide solar cell production; (2) research to fill the industry R and D pipeline for the issues in wafer Si; (3) development of industry collaborative research; (4) improvement of NREL tools and capabilities; and (5) strengthen US wafer Si research.

  14. LDRD final report : a lightweight operating system for multi-core capability class supercomputers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Hudson, Trammell B. (OS Research); Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Bridges, Patrick G. (University of New Mexico); Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two primary objectives of this LDRD project were to create a lightweight kernel (LWK) operating system(OS) designed to take maximum advantage of multi-core processors, and to leverage the virtualization capabilities in modern multi-core processors to create a more flexible and adaptable LWK environment. The most significant technical accomplishments of this project were the development of the Kitten lightweight kernel, the co-development of the SMARTMAP intra-node memory mapping technique, and the development and demonstration of a scalable virtualization environment for HPC. Each of these topics is presented in this report by the inclusion of a published or submitted research paper. The results of this project are being leveraged by several ongoing and new research projects.

  15. MIC-SVM: Designing A Highly Efficient Support Vector Machine For Advanced Modern Multi-Core and Many-Core Architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    You, Yang; Song, Shuaiwen; Fu, Haohuan; Marquez, Andres; Mehri Dehanavi, Maryam; Barker, Kevin J.; Cameron, Kirk; Randles, Amanda; Yang, Guangwen

    2014-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Support Vector Machine (SVM) has been widely used in data-mining and Big Data applications as modern commercial databases start to attach an increasing importance to the analytic capabilities. In recent years, SVM was adapted to the ?eld of High Performance Computing for power/performance prediction, auto-tuning, and runtime scheduling. However, even at the risk of losing prediction accuracy due to insuf?cient runtime information, researchers can only afford to apply of?ine model training to avoid signi?cant runtime training overhead. To address the challenges above, we designed and implemented MICSVM, a highly efficient parallel SVM for x86 based multi-core and many core architectures, such as the Intel Ivy Bridge CPUs and Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor (MIC).

  16. Research Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    entries in the natural numbers, into an undergraduate research project. ..... and developing the undergraduate research project described at the end of Section 2,

  17. Hydrogen issue in Core Collapse Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Elmhamdi; I. J. Danziger; D. Branch; B. Leibundgut

    2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss results of analyzing a time series of selected photospheric-optical spectra of core collapse supernovae (CCSNe). This is accomplished by means of the parameterized supernovae synthetic spectrum (SSp) code ``SYNOW''. Special attention is addressed to traces of hydrogen at early phases, especially for the stripped-envelope SNe (i.e. SNe Ib-c). A thin low mass hydrogen layer extending to very high ejection velocities above the helium shell, is found to be the most likely scenario for Type Ib SNe.

  18. Multilevel transport solution of LWR reactor cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jose Ignacio Marquez Damian; Cassiano R.E. de Oliveira; HyeonKae Park

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a multilevel approach for the solution of the transport equation in typical LWR assemblies and core configurations. It is based on the second-order, even-parity formulation of the transport equation, which is solved within the framework provided by the finite element-spherical harmonics code EVENT. The performance of the new solver has been compared with that of the standard conjugate gradient solver for diffusion and transport problems on structured and unstruc-tured grids. Numerical results demonstrate the potential of the multilevel scheme for realistic reactor calculations.

  19. Hunton Group core workshop and field trip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.S. [ed.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Late Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group is a moderately thick sequence of shallow-marine carbonates deposited on the south edge of the North American craton. This rock unit is a major target for petroleum exploration and reservoir development in the southern Midcontinent. The workshop described here was held to display cores, outcrop samples, and other reservoir-characterization studies of the Hunton Group and equivalent strata throughout the region. A field trip was organized to complement the workshop by allowing examination of excellent outcrops of the Hunton Group of the Arbuckle Mountains.

  20. GreenCore Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,IISrl Jump to: navigation,GreenCore

  1. VERA Core Physics Benchmark Progression Problems Specifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN THEVERA Core Physics

  2. Core File Settings | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCool MagneticCoos BayCore File Settings

  3. Paleo-Climate and Glaciological Reconstruction in Central Asia through the Collection and Analysis of Ice Cores and Instrumental Data from the Tien Shan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vladimir Aizen; Donald Bren; Karl Kreutz; Cameron Wake

    2001-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    While the majority of ice core investigations have been undertaken in the polar regions, a few ice cores recovered from carefully selected high altitude/mid-to-low latitude glaciers have also provided valuable records of climate variability in these regions. A regional array of high resolution, multi-parameter ice core records developed from temperate and tropical regions of the globe can be used to document regional climate and environmental change in the latitudes which are home to the vase majority of the Earth's human population. In addition, these records can be directly compared with ice core records available from the polar regions and can therefore expand our understanding of inter-hemispheric dynamics of past climate changes. The main objectives of our paleoclimate research in the Tien Shan mountains of middle Asia combine the development of detailed paleoenvironmental records via the physical and chemical analysis of ice cores with the analysis of modern meteorological and hydrological data. The first step in this research was the collection of ice cores from the accumulation zone of the Inylchek Glacier and the collection of meteorological data from a variety of stations throughout the Tien Shan. The research effort described in this report was part of a collaborative effort with the United State Geological Survey's (USGS) Global Environmental Research Program which began studying radionuclide deposition in mid-latitude glaciers in 1995.

  4. conductivity of Santa Fe Group aquifer systemsediments from the 98th Street core hole. Albuquerque. New Mexico: New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haneberg, William C.

    systemsediments from the 98th Street core hole. Albuquerque. New Mexico: New Mexico Geology. Vol. 20, pp. 14 Grande Basin, proceedings of the 39th Annual New Mexico Water Conference, Albuquerque. New Mexico. November 3-4.1994: New Mexico Water Re- sources Research Insitute Report No. 200, pp. 37-55. HEYWOOD, C

  5. Magnetic Fields in Molecular Cloud Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shantanu Basu

    2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of magnetic field strengths imply that molecular cloud fragments are individually close to being in a magnetically critical state, even though both magnetic field and column density measurements range over two orders of magnitude. The turbulent pressure also approximately balances the self-gravitational pressure. These results together mean that the one-dimensional velocity dispersion $\\sigv$ is proportional to the mean \\Alf speed of a cloud $\\va$. Global models of MHD turbulence in a molecular cloud show that this correlation is naturally satisfied for a range of different driving strengths of the turbulence. For example, an increase of turbulent driving causes a cloud expansion which also increases $\\va$. Clouds are in a time averaged balance but exhibit large oscillatory motions, particularly in their outer rarefied regions. We also discuss models of gravitational fragmentation in a sheet-like region in which turbulence has already dissipated, including the effects of magnetic fields and ion-neutral friction. Clouds with near-critical mass-to-flux ratios lead to subsonic infall within cores, consistent with some recent observations of motions in starless cores. Conversely, significantly supercritical clouds are expected to produce extended supersonic infall.

  6. 1.2 CORE INTERPRETATION AND SEDIMENTOLOGICAL ANALYSIS 1.2.1 Generalized Core Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    reservoir quality. Carbonate rocks are not very common in the analyzed cores. Lithofacies L2: Shales. Shale infrequently; the black color of these shales is a function of their high organic carbon content. Organics siltstone. This lithofacies is characterized by alternations of light and dark colored fine laminae, each

  7. Investigation on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, Yassin

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties associated with the core bypass flow are some of the key issues that directly influence the coolant mass flow distribution and magnitude, and thus the operational core temperature profiles, in the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR). Designers will attempt to configure the core geometry so the core cooling flow rate magnitude and distribution conform to the design values. The objective of this project is to study the bypass flow both experimentally and computationally. Researchers will develop experimental data using state-of-the-art particle image velocimetry in a small test facility. The team will attempt to obtain full field temperature distribution using racks of thermocouples. The experimental data are intended to benchmark computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes by providing detailed information. These experimental data are urgently needed for validation of the CFD codes. The following are the project tasks: • Construct a small-scale bench-top experiment to resemble the bypass flow between the graphite blocks, varying parameters to address their impact on bypass flow. Wall roughness of the graphite block walls, spacing between the blocks, and temperature of the blocks are some of the parameters to be tested. • Perform CFD to evaluate pre- and post-test calculations and turbulence models, including sensitivity studies to achieve high accuracy. • Develop the state-of-the art large eddy simulation (LES) using appropriate subgrid modeling. • Develop models to be used in systems thermal hydraulics codes to account and estimate the bypass flows. These computer programs include, among others, RELAP3D, MELCOR, GAMMA, and GAS-NET. Actual core bypass flow rate may vary considerably from the design value. Although the uncertainty of the bypass flow rate is not known, some sources have stated that the bypass flow rates in the Fort St. Vrain reactor were between 8 and 25 percent of the total reactor mass flow rate. If bypass flow rates are on the high side, the quantity of cooling flow through the core may be considerably less than the nominal design value, causing some regions of the core to operate at temperatures in excess of the design values. These effects are postulated to lead to localized hot regions in the core that must be considered when evaluating the VHTR operational and accident scenarios.

  8. Fuel Breeding and Core Behavior Analyses on In Core Fuel Management of Water Cooled Thorium Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Permana, Sidik [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-17, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Sekimoto, Hiroshi [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-17, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Waris, Abdul; Subhki, Muhamad Nurul [Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Ismail, [BAPETEN (Indonesia)

    2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Thorium fuel cycle with recycled U-233 has been widely recognized having some contributions to improve the water-cooled breeder reactor program which has been shown by a feasible area of breeding and negative void reactivity which confirms that fissile of 233U contributes to better fuel breeding and effective for obtaining negative void reactivity coefficient as the main fissile material. The present study has the objective to estimate the effect of whole core configuration as well as burnup effects to the reactor core profile by adopting two dimensional model of fuel core management. About more than 40 months of cycle period has been employed for one cycle fuel irradiation of three batches fuel system for large water cooled thorium reactors. All position of fuel arrangement contributes to the total core conversion ratio which gives conversion ratio less than unity of at the BOC and it contributes to higher than unity (1.01) at the EOC after some irradiation process. Inner part and central part give the important part of breeding contribution with increasing burnup process, while criticality is reduced with increasing the irradiation time. Feasibility of breeding capability of water-cooled thorium reactors for whole core fuel arrangement has confirmed from the obtained conversion ratio which shows higher than unity. Whole core analysis on evaluating reactivity change which is caused by the change of voided condition has been employed for conservative assumption that 100% coolant and moderator are voided. It obtained always a negative void reactivity coefficient during reactor operation which shows relatively more negative void coefficient at BOC (fresh fuel composition), and it becomes less negative void coefficient with increasing the operation time. Negative value of void reactivity coefficient shows the reactor has good safety properties in relation to the reactivity profile which is the main parameter in term of criticality safety analysis. Therefore, this evaluation has confirmed that breeding condition and negative coefficient can be obtained simultaneously for water-cooled thorium reactor obtains based on the whole core fuel arrangement.

  9. Documented Safety Analysis Addendum for the Neutron Radiography Reactor Facility Core Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutron Radiography Reactor Facility (NRAD) is a Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics (TRIGA) reactor which was installed in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) in the mid 1970s. The facility provides researchers the capability to examine both irradiated and non-irradiated materials in support of reactor fuel and components programs through non-destructive neutron radiography examination. The facility has been used in the past as one facet of a suite of reactor fuels and component examination facilities available to researchers at the INL and throughout the DOE complex. The facility has also served various commercial research activities in addition to the DOE research and development support. The reactor was initially constructed using Fuel Lifetime Improvement Program (FLIP)- type highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel obtained from the dismantled Puerto Rico Nuclear Center (PRNC) reactor. In accordance with international non-proliferation agreements, the NRAD core will be converted to a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and will continue to utilize the PRNC control rods, control rod drives, startup source, and instrument console as was previously used with the HEU core. The existing NRAD Safety Analysis Report (SAR) was created and maintained in the preferred format of the day, combining sections of both DOE-STD-3009 and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.70. An addendum was developed to cover the refueling and reactor operation with the LEU core. This addendum follows the existing SAR format combining required formats from both the DOE and NRC. This paper discusses the project to successfully write a compliant and approved addendum to the existing safety basis documents.

  10. Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Joseph...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Joseph Mondloch Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Joseph Mondloch Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Joseph Mondloch poster presentation....

  11. CORRELATING INFALL WITH DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION IN DENSE CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnee, Scott; Brunetti, Nathan; Friesen, Rachel [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Pon, Andy [National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Caselli, Paola, E-mail: sschnee@nrao.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a survey of HCO{sup +} (3-2) observations pointed toward dense cores with previous measurements of N(N{sub 2}D{sup +})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}). Of the 26 cores in this survey, 5 show the spectroscopic signature of outward motion, 9 exhibit neither inward nor outward motion, 11 appear to be infalling, and 1 is not detected. We compare the degree of deuterium fractionation with infall velocities calculated from the HCO{sup +} spectra and find that those cores with [D]/[H] > 0.1 are more likely to have the signature of inward motions than cores with smaller [D]/[H] ratios. Infall motions are also much more common in cores with masses exceeding their thermal Jeans masses. The fastest infall velocity measured belongs to one of the two protostellar cores in our survey, L1521F, and the observed motions are typically on the order of the sound speed.

  12. Radio Galaxies in Cooling Cores: Insights from a Complete Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Eilek; F. N. Owen

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed a new, complete, cooling-core sample with the VLA, in order to understand how the massive black hole in the central galaxy interacts with the local cluster plasma. We find that every cooling core is currently being energized by an active radio jet, which has probably been destabilized by its interaction with the cooling core. We argue that current models of cooling-core radio galaxies need to be improved before they can be used to determine the rate at which the jet is heating the cooling core. We also argue that the extended radio haloes we see in many cooling-core clusters need extended, in situ re-energization, which cannot be supplied solely by the central galaxy.

  13. Supernova Seismology: Gravitational Wave Signatures of Rapidly Rotating Core Collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Jim; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational waves (GW) generated during a core-collapse supernova open a window into the heart of the explosion. At core bounce, progenitors with rapid core rotation rates exhibit a characteristic GW signal which can be used to constrain the properties of the core of the progenitor star. We investigate the dynamics of rapidly rotating core collapse, focusing on hydrodynamic waves generated by the core bounce and the GW spectrum they produce. The centrifugal distortion of the rapidly rotating proto-neutron star (PNS) leads to the generation of axisymmetric quadrupolar oscillations within the PNS and surrounding envelope. Using linear perturbation theory, we estimate the frequencies, amplitudes, damping times, and GW spectra of the oscillations. Our analysis provides a qualitative explanation for several features of the GW spectrum and shows reasonable agreement with nonlinear hydrodynamic simulations, although a few discrepancies due to non-linear/rotational effects are evident. The dominant early postbounce...

  14. Turbine component casting core with high resolution region

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamel, Ahmed; Merrill, Gary B.

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A hollow turbine engine component with complex internal features can include a first region and a second, high resolution region. The first region can be defined by a first ceramic core piece formed by any conventional process, such as by injection molding or transfer molding. The second region can be defined by a second ceramic core piece formed separately by a method effective to produce high resolution features, such as tomo lithographic molding. The first core piece and the second core piece can be joined by interlocking engagement that once subjected to an intermediate thermal heat treatment process thermally deform to form a three dimensional interlocking joint between the first and second core pieces by allowing thermal creep to irreversibly interlock the first and second core pieces together such that the joint becomes physically locked together providing joint stability through thermal processing.

  15. A Core Equilibrium Convergence in a Public Goods Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allouch, N

    A core-equilibrium convergence in a public goods economy? Nizar Allouch Queen Mary University of London School of Economics and Finance n.allouch@qmul.ac.uk April 15, 2010 Abstract This paper shows a core-equilibrium convergence in a public goods... economy where consumers’ preferences display warm glow effects. We demonstrate that if each consumer becomes satiated to other con- sumers’ provision, then as the economy grows large the core shrinks to the set of Edgeworth allocations. Moreover, we show...

  16. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and shapped nanorods are disclosed comprising Group II-VI, Group III-V and Group IV semiconductors and methods of making the same. Also disclosed are nanorod barcodes using core/shell nanorods where the core is a semiconductor or metal material, and with or without a shell. Methods of labeling analytes using the nanorod barcodes are also disclosed.

  17. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul (Oakland, CA); Scher, Erik C. (San Francisco, CA); Manna, Liberato (Palo Del Collie, IT)

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a graded core/shell semiconductor nanorod having at least a first segment of a core of a Group II-VI, Group III-V or a Group IV semiconductor, a graded shell overlying the core, wherein the graded shell comprises at least two monolayers, wherein the at least two monolayers each independently comprise a Group II-VI, Group III-V or a Group IV semiconductor.

  18. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul (Oakland, CA); Scher, Erik C. (San Francisco, CA); Manna, Liberato (Lecce, IT)

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and shaped nanorods are disclosed comprising Group II-VI, Group III-V and Group IV semiconductors and methods of making the same. Also disclosed are nanorod barcodes using core/shell nanorods where the core is a semiconductor or metal material, and with or without a shell. Methods of labeling analytes using the nanorod barcodes are also disclosed.

  19. Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared Spectroscopy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rapid...

  20. Core excitation effects in the breakup of halo nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, A. M.; Diego, R. de; Lay, J. A.; Crespo, R.; Johnson, R. C.; Arias, J. M.; Gomez-Camacho, J. [Departamento de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal) and Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Cavaco Silva, Taguspark (Portugal); Physics Department, University of Surrey, Guildford Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Departamento de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Departamento de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain) and Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Universidad de Sevilla/Junta de Andalucia, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of core excitation in the structure and dynamics of two-body halo nuclei is investigated. We present calculations for the resonant breakup of {sup 11}Be on protons at an incident energy of 63.7 MeV/nucleon, where core excitation effects were shown to be important. To describe the reaction, we use a recently developed extension of the DWBA formalism which incorporates these core excitation effects within the no-recoil approximation. The validity of the no-recoil approximation is also examined by comparing with DWBA calculations which take into account core recoil. In addition, calculations with two different continuum representations are presented and compared.

  1. Physics-based multiscale coupling for full core nuclear reactor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    multiscale coupling for full core nuclear reactor simulation Numerical simulation of nuclear reactors is a key technology in the quest for improvements in efficiency, safety,...

  2. 2006-7 Alphabetical Listing of Core Courses Area Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    and Civilization 7 BSE 4394 Water Supply and Sanitation in Developing Countries core2006.xls 1 8/1/2006 #12

  3. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of core holes were drilled from 1984 to 1988 as a part of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) to better understand the stratigraphy, structure, hydrothermal...

  4. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of core holes were drilled from 1984 to 1988 as a part of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) to better understand the stratigraphy, structure, hydrothermal...

  5. PE06 -Beginning & Intermediate Core Training Class Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PE06 - Beginning & Intermediate Core Training Class Syllabus Instructor: Sandra Marbut Office attendance requirements as outlined on this syllabus 3. Pass midterm examination 4. Submit their final

  6. Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Pribnow...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Pribnow, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity...

  7. Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995) Exploration...

  8. Core Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Brookins &...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Brookins & Laughlin, 1983) Exploration Activity...

  9. Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    history. Earth's present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle would have required mechanisms to separate iron alloy from a silicate phase....

  10. Super-Resolution Fluorescence Nanoscopy Applied to Image Core...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Super-Resolution Fluorescence Nanoscopy Applied to Image Core-Shell Photoswitching Nanoparticles and their Self-Assemblies . Super-Resolution Fluorescence Nanoscopy Applied to...

  11. Rapid characterization of drill core and cutting mineralogy using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    characterization of drill core and cutting mineralogy using infrared spectroscopy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rapid...

  12. Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the Valles caldera system. Notes Core samples were waxed upon retrieval to reduce drying and atmospheric alteration, and thermal conductivities were measured at a mean...

  13. Matrix Acidizing Core Flooding Apparatus: Equipment and Procedure Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grabski, Elizabeth 1985-

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ..................................................................... 3 1.4 Apparatus Requirements .................................................................................. 4 1.5 Objective and Approach .................................................................................. 7 II... ............................................................................ 10 2.3 Core Holders .................................................................................................. 15 2.4 Overburden Pump .......................................................................................... 17...

  14. Microbiological Research ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    ) or to expand on previous research addressing the fate of nitrogen from agrochemicals (Bichat et al., 1999

  15. Burnup concept for a long-life fast reactor core using MCNPX.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Parma, Edward J.,

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a reactor design with a burnup concept for a long-life fast reactor core that was evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). The current trend in advanced reactor design is the concept of a small modular reactor (SMR). However, very few of the SMR designs attempt to substantially increase the lifetime of a reactor core, especially without zone loading, fuel reshuffling, or other artificial mechanisms in the core that %E2%80%9Cflatten%E2%80%9D the power profile, including non-uniform cooling, non-uniform moderation, or strategic poison placement. Historically, the limitations of computing capabilities have prevented acceptable margins in the temporal component of the spatial excess reactivity in a reactor design, due primarily to the error in burnup calculations. This research was performed as an initial scoping analysis into the concept of a long-life fast reactor. It can be shown that a long-life fast reactor concept can be modeled using MCNPX to predict burnup and neutronics behavior. The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs. For the purpose of this study, a single core design was investigated: a relatively small reactor core, yielding a medium amount of power (~200 to 400 MWth). The results of this scoping analysis were successful in providing a preliminary reactor design involving metal U-235/U-238 fuel with HT-9 fuel cladding and sodium coolant at a 20% volume fraction.

  16. Accident source terms for boiling water reactors with high burnup cores.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this report is to provide the technical basis for development of recommendations for updates to the NUREG-1465 Source Term for BWRs that will extend its applicability to accidents involving high burnup (HBU) cores. However, a secondary objective is to re-examine the fundamental characteristics of the prescription for fission product release to containment described by NUREG-1465. This secondary objective is motivated by an interest to understand the extent to which research into the release and behaviors of radionuclides under accident conditions has altered best-estimate calculations of the integral response of BWRs to severe core damage sequences and the resulting radiological source terms to containment. This report, therefore, documents specific results of fission product source term analyses that will form the basis for the HBU supplement to NUREG-1465. However, commentary is also provided on observed differences between the composite results of the source term calculations performed here and those reflected NUREG-1465 itself.

  17. TiN/VN composites with core/shell structure for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Shanmu; Chen, Xiao [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China)] [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Gu, Lin [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 9808577 (Japan)] [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 9808577 (Japan); Zhou, Xinhong [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266101 (China)] [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266101 (China); Wang, Haibo; Liu, Zhihong; Han, Pengxian; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Li [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China)] [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Cui, Guanglei, E-mail: cuigl@qibebt.ac.cn [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China)] [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Chen, Liquan [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China) [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} Vanadium and titanium nitride nanocomposite with core-shell structure was prepared. {yields} TiN/VN composites with different V:Ti molar ratios were obtained. {yields} TiN/VN composites can provide promising electronic conductivity and favorable capacity storage. -- Abstract: TiN/VN core-shell composites are prepared by a two-step strategy involving coating of commercial TiN nanoparticles with V{sub 2}O{sub 5}.nH{sub 2}O sols followed by ammonia reduction. The highest specific capacitance of 170 F g{sup -1} is obtained when scanned at 2 mV s{sup -1} and a promising rate capacity performance is maintained at higher voltage sweep rates. These results indicate that these composites with good electronic conductivity can deliver a favorable capacity performance.

  18. 0 1 2 3 4 5 Fig. S1. Core photograph combined with Ca, Mn, Fe counts and Mn/Fe ratio determined by XRF core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    1. Core photograph combined with Ca, Mn, Fe counts and Mn/Fe ratio determined by XRF core scanning determined by XRF core scanning on core ZH10-19 from Lake Zurich recovered in 135 m water depth (2 m above counts and Mn/Fe ratio determined by XRF core scanning on core ZH10-21 from Lake Zurich recovered in 123

  19. Full Core 3-D Simulation of a Partial MOX LWR Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bays; W. Skerjanc; M. Pope

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative analysis and comparison of results obtained between 2-D lattice calculations and 3-D full core nodal calculations, in the frame of MOX fuel design, was conducted. This study revealed a set of advantages and disadvantages, with respect to each method, which can be used to guide the level of accuracy desired for future fuel and fuel cycle calculations. For the purpose of isotopic generation for fuel cycle analyses, the approach of using a 2-D lattice code (i.e., fuel assembly in infinite lattice) gave reasonable predictions of uranium and plutonium isotope concentrations at the predicted 3-D core simulation batch average discharge burnup. However, it was found that the 2-D lattice calculation can under-predict the power of pins located along a shared edge between MOX and UO2 by as much as 20%. In this analysis, this error did not occur in the peak pin. However, this was a coincidence and does not rule out the possibility that the peak pin could occur in a lattice position with high calculation uncertainty in future un-optimized studies. Another important consideration in realistic fuel design is the prediction of the peak axial burnup and neutron fluence. The use of 3-D core simulation gave peak burnup conditions, at the pellet level, to be approximately 1.4 times greater than what can be predicted using back-of-the-envelope assumptions of average specific power and irradiation time.

  20. Ecological Research Division Theoretical Ecology Program. [Contains abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the goals of the Theoretical Ecology Program and abstracts of research in progress. Abstracts cover both theoretical research that began as part of the terrestrial ecology core program and new projects funded by the theoretical program begun in 1988. Projects have been clustered into four major categories: Ecosystem dynamics; landscape/scaling dynamics; population dynamics; and experiment/sample design.

  1. A new method of coating oilfield core for laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.; Shadizadeh, R.S.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method has been developed for coating oilfield core for laboratory studies. It consists of applying a steel coating and aluminum wraps around the outer surface of a core. The strength of the coating, the short time needed to apply it, and its low cost are the major advantages of this new method.

  2. PWR core monitoring and simulation during load follow operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beard, C. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Commercial Nuclear Fuel Div.); Winter, M.; Niederer, R. (Commonwealth Edison Co., Zion, IL (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new operation core support system developed for pressurized water reactors. This system provides an enhanced understanding of the operating core with significant benefits in operational flexibility. It also permits evaluation of alternatives and specific situations that allows for enhanced operation of the unit, which provides benefits in power capability and minimizes potential operational issues.

  3. Abell 1201: a Minor merger at second core passage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Nulsen, Paul E J; McNamara, Brian R; Murray, Stephen S; Couch, Warrick J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the structures and dynamics of the merging cluster Abell~1201, which has two sloshing cold fronts around a cooling core, and an offset gas core approximately 500kpc northwest of the center. New Chandra and XMM-Newton data reveal a region of enhanced brightness east of the offset core, with breaks in surface brightness along its boundary to the north and east. This is interpreted as a tail of gas stripped from the offset core. Gas in the offset core and the tail is distinguished from other gas at the same distance from the cluster center chiefly by having higher density, hence lower entropy. In addition, the offset core shows marginally lower temperature and metallicity than the surrounding area. The metallicity in the cool core is high and there is an abrupt drop in metallicity across the southern cold front. We interpret the observed properties of the system, including the placement of the cold fronts, the offset core and its tail in terms of a simple merger scenario. The offset cor...

  4. Monday, March 13, 2006 MARS: CORE TO CLOUDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    with current orbital configurations. We run the model for five years with a northern water ice cap then release Core [#1500] We present new melting data in the system Fe-Ni-S at Martian core pressures, using multi. Clouds, Cap, and Consequences: Outflow Events and Mars Hesperian Climate [#1484] We focus on how outflows

  5. How good are the Common Core Mathematics Standards?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Hung-Hsi

    the grade 8 CA standards. Rather, there is a trade-off: each does some things that the other doesn't. #12How good are the Common Core Mathematics Standards? Concord, CA October 29, 2012 H. Wu sets of math standards in the nation, maybe the best. Why did it adopt the CCSSM (Common Core State

  6. Advanced reactor safety research. Quarterly report, July-September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, is conducting the Advanced Reactor Safety Research Program on behalf of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Sandia has been given the task to investigate seven major areas of interest which are intimately related to over-all NRC needs. These are: core debris behavior - inherent retention; containment analysis; elevated temperature design assessment; LMFBR accident delineation; advanced reactor core phenomenology; light water reactor (LWR) fuel damage phenomenology; and test and facility technology.

  7. Vector spectropolarimetry of dark-cored penumbral filaments with Hinode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. R. Bellot Rubio; S. Tsuneta; K. Ichimoto; Y. Katsukawa; B. W. Lites; S. Nagata; T. Shimizu; R. A. Shine; Y. Suematsu; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title; J. C. del Toro Iniesta

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spectropolarimetric measurements of dark-cored penumbral filaments taken with Hinode at a resolution of 0.3". Our observations demonstrate that dark-cored filaments are more prominent in polarized light than in continuum intensity. Far from disk center, the Stokes profiles emerging from these structures are very asymmetric and show evidence for magnetic fields of different inclinations along the line of sight, together with strong Evershed flows of at least 6-7 km/s. In sunspots closer to disk center, dark-cored penumbral filaments exhibit regular Stokes profiles with little asymmetries due to the vanishing line-of-sight component of the horizontal Evershed flow. An inversion of the observed spectra indicates that the magnetic field is weaker and more inclined in the dark cores as compared with the surrounding bright structures. This is compatible with the idea that dark-cored filaments are the manifestation of flux tubes carrying hot Evershed flows.

  8. The Aquila prestellar core population revealed by Herschel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Könyves, V; Men'shchikov, A; Schneider, N; Arzoumanian, D; Bontemps, S; Attard, M; Motte, F; Didelon, P; Maury, A; Abergel, A; Ali, B; Baluteau, J -P; Bernard, J -Ph; Cambrésy, L; Cox, P; Di Francesco, J; di Giorgio, A M; Griffin, M J; Hargrave, P; Huang, M; Kirk, J; Li, J Z; Martin, P; Minier, V; Molinari, S; Olofsson, G; Pezzuto, S; Russeil, D; Roussel, H; Saraceno, P; Sauvage, M; Sibthorpe, B; Spinoglio, L; Testi, L; Ward-Thompson, D; White, G; Wilson, C D; Woodcraft, A; Zavagno, A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin and possible universality of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a major issue in astrophysics. One of the main objectives of the Herschel Gould Belt Survey is to clarify the link between the prestellar core mass function (CMF) and the IMF. We present and discuss the core mass function derived from Herschel data for the large population of prestellar cores discovered with SPIRE and PACS in the Aquila Rift cloud complex at d ~ 260 pc. We detect a total of 541 starless cores in the entire ~11 deg^2 area of the field imaged at 70-500 micron with SPIRE/PACS. Most of these cores appear to be gravitationally bound, and thus prestellar in nature. Our Herschel results confirm that the shape of the prestellar CMF resembles the stellar IMF, with much higher quality statistics than earlier submillimeter continuum ground-based surveys.

  9. Process to make core-shell structured nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhrs, Claudia; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a process for making a composite material that contains core-shell structured nanoparticles. The process includes providing a precursor in the form of a powder a liquid and/or a vapor of a liquid that contains a core material and a shell material, and suspending the precursor in an aerosol gas to produce an aerosol containing the precursor. In addition, the process includes providing a plasma that has a hot zone and passing the aerosol through the hot zone of the plasma. As the aerosol passes through the hot zone of the plasma, at least part of the core material and at least part of the shell material in the aerosol is vaporized. Vapor that contains the core material and the shell material that has been vaporized is removed from the hot zone of the plasma and allowed to condense into core-shell structured nanoparticles.

  10. Solid oxide fuel cell with monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPheeters, C.C.; Mrazek, F.C.

    1988-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell in which fuel and oxidant gases undergo an electrochemical reaction to produce an electrical output includes a monolithic core comprised of a corrugated conductive sheet disposed between upper and lower generally flat sheets. The corrugated sheet includes a plurality of spaced, parallel, elongated slots which form a series of closed, linear, first upper and second lower gas flow channels with the upper and lower sheets within which a fuel gas and an oxidant gas respectively flow. Facing ends of the fuel cell are generally V-shaped and provide for fuel and oxidant gas inlet and outlet flow, respectively, and include inlet and outlet gas flow channels which are continuous with the aforementioned upper fuel gas and lower oxidant gas flow channels. The upper and lower flat sheets and the intermediate corrugated sheet are preferably comprised of ceramic materials and are securely coupled together such as by assembly in the green state and sintering together during firing at high temperatures. A potential difference across the fuel cell, or across a stacked array of similar fuel cells, is generated when an oxidant gas such as air and a fuel such as hydrogen gas is directed through the fuel cell at high temperatures, e.g., between 700 C and 1,100 C. 8 figs.

  11. Advanced High Temperature Reactor Neutronic Core Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, Dan [ORNL] [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL] [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AHTR is a 3400 MW(t) FHR class reactor design concept intended to serve as a central generating station type power plant. While significant technology development and demonstration remains, the basic design concept appears sound and tolerant of much of the remaining performance uncertainty. No fundamental impediments have been identified that would prevent widespread deployment of the concept. This paper focuses on the preliminary neutronic design studies performed at ORNL during the fiscal year 2011. After a brief presentation of the AHTR design concept, the paper summarizes several neutronic studies performed at ORNL during 2011. An optimization study for the AHTR core is first presented. The temperature and void coefficients of reactivity are then analyzed for a few configurations of interest. A discussion of the limiting factors due to the fast neutron fluence follows. The neutronic studies conclude with a discussion of the control and shutdown options. The studies presented confirm that sound neutronic alternatives exist for the design of the AHTR to maintain full passive safety features and reasonable operation conditions.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cell with monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPheeters, Charles C. (Plainfield, IL); Mrazek, Franklin C. (Hickory Hills, IL)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell in which fuel and oxidant gases undergo an electrochemical reaction to produce an electrical output includes a monolithic core comprised of a corrugated conductive sheet disposed between upper and lower generally flat sheets. The corrugated sheet includes a plurality of spaced, parallel, elongated slots which form a series of closed, linear, first upper and second lower gas flow channels with the upper and lower sheets within which a fuel gas and an oxidant gas respectively flow. Facing ends of the fuel cell are generally V-shaped and provide for fuel and oxidant gas inlet and outlet flow, respectively, and include inlet and outlet gas flow channels which are continuous with the aforementioned upper fuel gas and lower oxidant gas flow channels. The upper and lower flat sheets and the intermediate corrugated sheet are preferably comprised of ceramic materials and are securely coupled together such as by assembly in the green state and sintering together during firing at high temperatures. A potential difference across the fuel cell, or across a stacked array of similar fuel cells, is generated when an oxidant gas such as air and a fuel such as hydrogen gas is directed through the fuel cell at high temperatures, e.g., between 700.degree. C. and 1100.degree. C.

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.; Duncan, A.

    2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    During the month of September 2008, grout core samples were collected from the Saltstone Disposal Facility, Vault 4, cell E. This grout was placed during processing campaigns in December 2007 from Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment Batch 2 salt solution. The 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria sample collected on 11/16/07 represents the salt solution in the core samples. Core samples were retrieved to initiate the historical database of properties of emplaced Saltstone and to demonstrate the correlation between field collected and laboratory prepared samples. Three samples were collected from three different locations. Samples were collected using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit. In April 2009, the core samples were removed from the evacuated sample container, inspected, transferred to PVC containers, and backfilled with nitrogen. Samples furthest from the wall were the most intact cylindrically shaped cored samples. The shade of the core samples darkened as the depth of coring increased. Based on the visual inspection, sample 3-3 was selected for all subsequent analysis. The density and porosity of the Vault 4 core sample, 1.90 g/cm{sup 3} and 59.90% respectively, were comparable to values achieved for laboratory prepared samples. X-ray diffraction analysis identified phases consistent with the expectations for hydrated Saltstone. Microscopic analysis revealed morphology features characteristic of cementitious materials with fly ash and calcium silicate hydrate gel. When taken together, the results of the density, porosity, x-ray diffraction analysis and microscopic analysis support the conclusion that the Vault 4, Cell E core sample is representative of the expected waste form.

  14. Eroding Core Economic Assets: A Growing Concern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    economic tailwinds. The great American job creation machine revved up sub- stantially during the past two to expand in 2006. (continued, next page) November 2005 Sitar­Rutgers Regional Report A quarterly report Asakawa, Director of Research #12;2 Eroding, continued The great American job creation machine revved up

  15. Research Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Monitoring and Research Nanotechnology: The Science of the Small Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum Living with Wildfire: A Shared Community...

  16. An In-Core Power Deposition and Fuel Thermal Environmental Monitor for Long-Lived Reactor Cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don W. Miller

    2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this program is to develop the Constant Temperature Power Sensor (CTPS) as in-core instrumentation that will provide a detailed map of local nuclear power deposition and coolant thermal-hydraulic conditions during the entire life of the core.

  17. EVERY BCG WITH A STRONG RADIO AGN HAS AN X-RAY COOL CORE: IS THE COOL CORE-NONCOOL CORE DICHOTOMY TOO SIMPLE?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, M., E-mail: msun@virginia.ed [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The radio active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in X-ray cool cores has been proposed as a crucial ingredient in the evolution of baryonic structures. However, it has long been known that strong radio AGNs also exist in 'noncool core' clusters, which brings up the question whether an X-ray cool core is always required for the radio feedback. In this work, we present a systematic analysis of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and strong radio AGNs in 152 groups and clusters from the Chandra archive. All 69 BCGs with radio AGN more luminous than 2 x 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1} at 1.4 GHz are found to have X-ray cool cores. BCG cool cores can be divided into two classes: the large cool core (LCC) class and the corona class. Small coronae, easily overlooked at z > 0.1, can trigger strong heating episodes in groups and clusters, long before LCCs are formed. Strong radio outbursts triggered by coronae may destroy embryonic LCCs and thus provide another mechanism to prevent the formation of LCCs. However, it is unclear whether coronae are decoupled from the radio feedback cycles as they have to be largely immune to strong radio outbursts. Our sample study also shows the absence of groups with a luminous cool core while hosting a strong radio AGN, which is not observed in clusters. This points to a greater impact of radio heating on low-mass systems than clusters. Few L {sub 1.4GHz} > 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup -1} radio AGNs (approx16%) host an L {sub 0.5-10keV} > 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} X-ray AGN, while above these thresholds, all X-ray AGNs in BCGs are also radio AGNs. As examples of the corona class, we also present detailed analyses of a BCG corona associated with a strong radio AGN (ESO 137-006 in A3627) and one of the faintest coronae known (NGC 4709 in the Centaurus cluster). Our results suggest that the traditional cool core/noncool core dichotomy is too simple. A better alternative is the cool core distribution function, with the enclosed X-ray luminosity or gas mass.

  18. Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program. Semiannual report, April-September 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents progress made in Light Water Reactor Safety research conducted by Division 6441 in the period from April 1982 to September 1982. The programs conducted under investigation include Core Concrete Interactions, Core Melt-Coolant Interactions, Containment Emergency Sump Performance, the Hydrogen Program, and Combustible Gas in Containment Program. 50 references.

  19. Plasma-wall interaction data needs critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Division of Development and Technology has sponsored a four day US-Japan workshop ''Plasma-Wall Interaction Data Needs Critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)'', held at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California on June 24 to 27, 1985. The workshop, which brought together fifty scientists and engineers from the United States, Japan, Germany, and Canada, considered the plasma-material interaction and high heat flux (PMI/HHF) issues for the next generation of magnetic fusion energy devices, the Burning Core Experiment (BCX). Materials options were ranked, and a strategy for future PMI/HHF research was formulated. The foundation for international collaboration and coordination of this research was also established. This volume contains the first two of the five technical sessions. The first one being the BCX overview, the second on the BCX candidate materials. The remaining three sessions in volume two are on the plasma materials interaction issues, research facilities and small working group meeting on graphite, beryllium, advanced materials and future collaborations.

  20. Apparatus and method for controlling the temperature of the core of a super-conducting transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golner, Thomas; Pleva, Edward; Mehta, Shirish

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for controlling the temperature of a core of a transformer is provided that includes a core, a shield surrounding the core, a cast formed between the core and the shield, and tubing positioned on the shield. The cast directs heat from the core to the shield and cooling fluid is directed through the tubing to cool the shield.

  1. Researchers, Appointments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Aviation Gas Turbine Combustion/Emissions Research and Design System Optimization (UTIAS) Luca ScardoviInnovative Researchers, Devoted Educators Academic Appointments 2009­2012 #12;Innovative is a centre of immense inspiration, remarkable innovation and endless possibilities. And since 2009, we have

  2. Heterogeneous-k-core versus Bootstrap Percolation on Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. J. Baxter; S. N. Dorogovtsev; A. V. Goltsev; J. F. F. Mendes

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the heterogeneous-$k$-core, which generalizes the $k$-core, and contrast it with bootstrap percolation. Vertices have a threshold $k_i$ which may be different at each vertex. If a vertex has less than $k_i$ neighbors it is pruned from the network. The heterogeneous-$k$-core is the sub-graph remaining after no further vertices can be pruned. If the thresholds $k_i$ are $1$ with probability $f$ or $k \\geq 3$ with probability $(1-f)$, the process forms one branch of an activation-pruning process which demonstrates hysteresis. The other branch is formed by ordinary bootstrap percolation. We show that there are two types of transitions in this heterogeneous-$k$-core process: the giant heterogeneous-$k$-core may appear with a continuous transition and there may be a second, discontinuous, hybrid transition. We compare critical phenomena, critical clusters and avalanches at the heterogeneous-$k$-core and bootstrap percolation transitions. We also show that network structure has a crucial effect on these processes, with the giant heterogeneous-$k$-core appearing immediately at a finite value for any $f > 0$ when the degree distribution tends to a power law $P(q) \\sim q^{-\\gamma}$ with $\\gamma < 3$.

  3. One pass core design of a super fast reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Qingjie; Oka, Yoshiaki [Cooperative Major in Nuclear Energy, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One pass core design for Supercritical-pressure light water-cooled fast reactor (Super FR) is proposed. The whole core is cooled with upward flow in one through flow pattern like PWR. Compared with the previous two pass core design; this new flow pattern can significantly simplify the core concept. Upper core structure, coolant flow scheme as well as refueling procedure are as simple as in PWR. In one pass core design, supercritical-pressure water is at approximately 25.0 MPa and enters the core at 280 C. degrees and is heated up in one through flow pattern upwardly to the average outlet temperature of 500 C. degrees. Great density change in vertical direction can cause significant axial power offset during the cycle. Meanwhile, Pu accumulated in the UO{sub 2} fuel blanket assemblies also introduces great power increase during cycle, which requires large amount of flow for heat removal and makes the outlet temperature of blanket low at the beginning of equilibrium cycle (BOEC). To deal with these issues, some MOX fuel is applied in the bottom region of the blanket assembly. This can help to mitigate the power change in blanket due to Pu accumulation and to increase the outlet temperature of the blanket during cycle. Neutron transport and thermohydraulics coupled calculation shows that this design can satisfy the requirement in the Super FR principle for both 500 C. degrees outlet temperature and negative coolant void reactivity. (authors)

  4. Report on ignitability testing of flammable gasses in a core sampling drill string

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witwer, K.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the results from testing performed at the Pittsburgh Research Center to determine the effects of an ignition of flammable gasses contained in a core sampling drill string. Testing showed that 1) An ignition of stoichiometric hydrogen and air in a vented 30 or 55 ft length of drill string will not force 28`` or more of water out the bottom of the drill string, and 2) An ignition of this same gas mixture will not rupture a vented or completely sealed drill string.

  5. Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Padmaja...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Padmaja Gunda Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Padmaja Gunda Poster Presentation at 2012 EERE Annual Research Meeting, Postdoctoral Research Awards, from the...

  6. Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Brandon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Brandon Mercado Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Brandon Mercado Poster Presentation at 2012 EERE Annual Research Meeting, Postdoctoral Research Awards, from...

  7. Reflector modelling of small high leakage cores making use of multi-group nodal equivalence theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theron, S. A. [South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa), PO Box 582, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Reitsma, F. [Calvera Consultants, PO Box 150, Strubensvallei, 1735 (South Africa)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on modelling reflectors in typical material testing reactors (MTRs). Equivalence theory is used to homogenise and collapse detailed transport solutions to generate equivalent nodal parameters and albedo boundary conditions for reflectors, for subsequent use in full core nodal diffusion codes. This approach to reflector modelling has been shown to be accurate for two-group large commercial light water reactor (LWR) analysis, but has not been investigated for MTRs. MTRs are smaller, with much larger leakage, environment sensitivity and multi-group spectrum dependencies than LWRs. This study aims to determine if this approach to reflector modelling is an accurate and plausible homogenisation technique for the modelling of small MTR cores. The successful implementation will result in simplified core models, better accuracy and improved efficiency of computer simulations. Codes used in this study include SCALE 6.1, OSCAR-4 and EQUIVA (the last two codes are developed and used at Necsa). The results show a five times reduction in calculational time for the proposed reduced reactor model compared to the traditional explicit model. The calculated equivalent parameters however show some sensitivity to the environment used to generate them. Differences in the results compared to the current explicit model, require more careful investigation including comparisons with a reference result, before its implementation can be recommended. (authors)

  8. Automatic whole core depletion and criticality calculations by MCNPX 2.7.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E. [SCKCEN, BR2 Reactor Dept., Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Different approaches to perform automatic whole core criticality and depletion calculations in a research reactor using MCNPX 2.7.0 are presented. An approximate method is to use the existing symmetries of the burned fuel material distribution in the core, i.e., the axial, radial and azimuth symmetries around the core center, in order to significantly reduce the computation time. In this case it is not necessary to give a unique material number to each burn up cell. Cells having similar burn up and power, achieved during similar irradiation history at same initial fuel composition, will experience similar composition evolution and can therefore be given the same material number. To study the impact of the number of unique burn up materials on the computation time and utilized RAM memory, several MCNPX models have been developed. The paper discusses the accuracy of the model on comparison with measurements of BR2 operation cycles in function of the number of unique burn up materials and the impact of the used Q-value (MeV/fission) of the recoverable fission energy. (authors)

  9. Determination of the kinetic parameters of the CALIBAN metallic core reactor from stochastic neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Chapelle, A. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et Aux Energies Alternatives, CEA, DAM, F-21120 Is sur Tille (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several experimental devices are operated by the Criticality and Neutron Science Research Dept. of the CEA Valduc Laboratory. One of these is the Caliban metallic core reactor. The purpose of this study is to develop and perform experiments allowing to determinate some of fundamental kinetic parameters of the reactor. The prompt neutron decay constant and particularly its value at criticality can be measured with reactor noise techniques such as Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman variance-to-mean methods. Subcritical, critical, and even supercritical experiments were performed. Fission chambers detectors were put nearby the core and measurements were analyzed with the Rossi-{alpha} technique. A new value of the prompt neutron decay constant at criticality was determined, which allows, using the Nelson number method, new evaluations of the effective delayed neutron fraction and the in core neutron lifetime. As an introduction of this paper, some motivations of this work are given in part 1. In part 2, principles of the noise measurements experiments performed at the CEA Valduc Laboratory are reminded. The Caliban reactor is described in part 3. Stochastic neutron measurements analysis techniques used in this study are then presented in part 4. Results of fission chamber experiments are summarized in part 5. Part 6 is devoted to the current work, improvement of the experimental device using He 3 neutron detectors and first results obtained with it. Finally, conclusions and perspectives are given in part 7. (authors)

  10. Benchmark Evaluation of the HTR-PROTEUS Absorber Rod Worths (Core 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PROTEUS was a zero-power research reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. The critical assembly was constructed from a large graphite annulus surrounding a central cylindrical cavity. Various experimental programs were investigated in PROTEUS; during the years 1992 through 1996, it was configured as a pebble-bed reactor and designated HTR-PROTEUS. Various critical configurations were assembled with each accompanied by an assortment of reactor physics experiments including differential and integral absorber rod measurements, kinetics, reaction rate distributions, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects [1]. Four benchmark reports were previously prepared and included in the March 2013 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook) [2] evaluating eleven critical configurations. A summary of that effort was previously provided [3] and an analysis of absorber rod worth measurements for Cores 9 and 10 have been performed prior to this analysis and included in PROTEUS-GCR-EXP-004 [4]. In the current benchmark effort, absorber rod worths measured for Core Configuration 4, which was the only core with a randomly-packed pebble loading, have been evaluated for inclusion as a revision to the HTR-PROTEUS benchmark report PROTEUS-GCR-EXP-002.

  11. Chronological refinement of an ice core record at Upper Fremont Glacier in south central North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, Paul F. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Boulder, Colorado (United States); White, David E. [Golden Software, Golden, Colorado (United States)] [Golden Software, Golden, Colorado (United States); Naftz, David L. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Cecil, L. DeWayne [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

    2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to use ice cores from alpine glaciers in the midlatitudes to reconstruct paleoclimatic records has not been widely recognized. Although excellent paleoclimatic records exist for the polar regions, paleoclimatic ice core records are not common from midlatitude locations. An ice core removed from the Upper Fremont Glacier in Wyoming provides evidence for abrupt climate change during the mid-1800s. Volcanic events (Krakatau and Tambora) identified from electrical conductivity measurements (ECM) and isotopic and chemical data from the Upper Fremont Glacier were reexamined to confirm and refine previous chronological estimates of the ice core. At a depth of 152 m the refined age-depth profile shows good agreement (1736{+-}10 A.D.) with the {sup 14}C age date (1729{+-}95 A.D.). The {delta}{sup 18}O profile of the Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG) ice core indicates a change in climate known as the Little Ice Age (LIA). However, the sampling interval for {delta}{sup 18}O is sufficiently large (20 cm) such that it is difficult to pinpoint the LIA termination on the basis of {delta}{sup 18}O data alone. Other research has shown that changes in the {delta}{sup 18}O variance are generally coincident with changes in ECM variance. The ECM data set contains over 125,000 data points at a resolution of 1 data point per millimeter of ice core. A 999-point running average of the ECM data set and results from f tests indicates that the variance of the ECM data decreases significantly at about 108 m. At this depth, the age-depth profile predicts an age of 1845 A.D. Results indicate the termination of the LIA was abrupt with a major climatic shift to warmer temperatures around 1845 A.D. and continuing to present day. Prediction limits (error bars) calculated for the profile ages are {+-}10 years (90% confidence level). Thus a conservative estimate for the time taken to complete the LIA climatic shift to present-day climate is about 10 years, suggesting the LIA termination in alpine regions of central North America may have occurred on a relatively short (decadal) timescale. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  12. A method for reducing encapsulation stress to ferrite pot cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, R.O.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a method of reducing the mechanical stress caused when a ferrite pot core is encapsulated in a rigid epoxy. the stresses are due to the differences of coefficient of thermal expansion between the two materials. A stress relief medium, phenolic micro-balloon-filled, syntactic polysulfide, is molded into the shape of the pot core. The molded polysulfide is bonded to the core prior to encapsulation. The new package design has made a significant difference in the ability to survive temperature cycles.

  13. Exploiting Symmetry in Integer Convex Optimization using Core Points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Katrin; Schürmann, Achill

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider convex programming problems with integrality constraints that are invariant under a linear symmetry group. We define a core point of such a symmetry group as an integral point for which the convex hull of its orbit does not contain integral points other than the orbit points themselves. These core points allow us to decompose symmetric integer convex programming problems. Especially for symmetric integer linear programs we describe two algorithms based on this decomposition. Using a characterization of core points for direct products of symmetric groups, we show that prototype implementations can compete with state-of-the art commercial solvers and solve an open MIPLIB problem.

  14. Novel stacked folded cores for blast-resistant sandwich beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenk, M.; Guest, S. D.; McShane, G. J.

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    the hinge lines is likely to be large, and therefore the material will be susceptible to damage and thermal softening in practice. This would in turn influence the compressive strength of the cellular material. However, we opt to omit these details... depth (Dc) and n2 = 25 along the core length (Lc). There are a total of s = 5 layers across the width of the core (Wc), with n3 = 2 pairs of layers A and B (Fig. 1). For a fixed core envelope, specifying the number of unit cells n1, n2 and n3...

  15. Cool core cycles: Cold gas and AGN jet feedback in cluster cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Deovrat; Babul, Arif

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using high-resolution 3-D and 2-D (axisymmetric) hydrodynamic simulations in spherical geometry, we study the evolution of cool cluster cores heated by feedback-driven bipolar active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets. Condensation of cold gas, and the consequent enhanced accretion, is required for AGN feedback to balance radiative cooling with reasonable efficiencies, and to match the observed cool core properties. A feedback efficiency (mechanical luminosity $\\approx \\epsilon \\dot{M}_{\\rm acc} c^2$; where $\\dot{M}_{\\rm acc}$ is the mass accretion rate at 1 kpc) as small as $5 \\times 10^{-5}$ is sufficient to reduce the cooling/accretion rate by $\\sim 10$ compared to a pure cooling flow. This value is smaller compared to the ones considered earlier, and is consistent with the jet efficiency and the fact that only a small fraction of gas at 1 kpc is accreted on to the supermassive black hole (SMBH). We find hysteresis cycles in all our simulations with cold mode feedback: {\\em condensation} of cold gas when the ratio...

  16. Research | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the Inorganic PV thrust,ResearchResearch

  17. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has not been evaluated as it is very similar to the evaluated core configuration. The benchmark eigenvalue is 1.0012 ± 0.0029. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  18. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has not been evaluated as it is very similar to the evaluated core configuration. The benchmark eigenvalue is 1.0012 ± 0.0029. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  19. Core-Shell Nanopillar Array Solar Cells using Cadmium Sulfide Coating on Indium Phosphide Nanopillars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Bor-An Clayton

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yang, “Solution-processed core-shell nanowires for efficientYong, “Fabrication of ZnO/CdS core/shell nanowire arrays fornew fabrication method for core-shell nanopillar array solar

  20. Full Core, Heterogeneous, Time Dependent Neutron Transport Calculations with the 3D Code DeCART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hursin, Mathieu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    core layout for the 1/8th PWR core model ________________ 76and future of the NEACRP PWR core transient benchmark. 199449. Hursin, M. (2008). PWR Control Rod Ejection Analysis

  1. Ferrite-Cored Solenoidal Induction Coil Sensor for BUD (MM-1667)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, F.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    following observations: 1) A ferrite-cored solenoidal coilthe same order as L. 2) A ferrite-cored solenoidal coil canstable response. 4) Feedback ferrite-cored solenoidal coils

  2. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF NET ACCUMULATION FROM SHALLOW CORES FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF NET ACCUMULATION FROM SHALLOW CORES FROM VESTFONNA ICE CAP variability of net accumulation from shallow cores from Vestfonna ice cap (Nordaustlandet, Svalbard. We analyse ice cores from Vestfonna ice cap (Nordaustlandet, Svalbard). Oxygen isoto- pic

  3. AMD Core Math Library (ACML) at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALSfeed-image Digg:Vol.AMBERACML

  4. AR Researchers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicles with an emphasis in cooperative unmanned vehicle research and intelligent remote sensing. Cal Christensen, M.S., P.E., P.M.P Cal...

  5. Cooling, Gravity and Geometry: Flow-driven Massive Core Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabian Heitsch; Lee Hartmann; Adrianne D. Slyz; Julien E. G. Devriendt; Andreas Burkert

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study numerically the formation of molecular clouds in large-scale colliding flows including self-gravity. The models emphasize the competition between the effects of gravity on global and local scales in an isolated cloud. Global gravity builds up large-scale filaments, while local gravity -- triggered by a combination of strong thermal and dynamical instabilities -- causes cores to form. The dynamical instabilities give rise to a local focusing of the colliding flows, facilitating the rapid formation of massive protostellar cores of a few 100 M$_\\odot$. The forming clouds do not reach an equilibrium state, though the motions within the clouds appear comparable to ``virial''. The self-similar core mass distributions derived from models with and without self-gravity indicate that the core mass distribution is set very early on during the cloud formation process, predominantly by a combination of thermal and dynamical instabilities rather than by self-gravity.

  6. Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References Giday WoldeGabriel, Fraser Goff (1992) K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A...

  7. Hanging core support system for a nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burelbach, J.P.; Kann, W.J.; Pan, Y.C.; Saiveau, J.G.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1984-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    For holding the reactor core in the confining reactor vessel, a support is disclosed that is structurally independent of the vessel, that is dimensionally accurate and stable, and that comprises tandem tension linkages that act redundantly of one another to maintain stabilized core support even in the unlikely event of the complete failure of one of the linkages. The core support has a mounting platform for the reactor core, and unitary structure including a flange overlying the top edge of the reactor vessels, and a skirt and box beams between the flange and platform for establishing one of the linkages. A plurality of tension rods connect between the deck closing the reactor vessel and the platform for establishing the redundant linkage. Loaded Belleville springs flexibly hold the tension rods at the deck and separable bayonet-type connections hold the tension rods at the platform.

  8. What could a million cores do to solve Integer Programs?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorsten Koch,,,

    Jan 8, 2012 ... ensuring that the data required to perform each of these task is locally available to the core ... considered comparatively energy efficient. Since the ...... nical Report CentER Discussion Paper 2007-20, Tilburg University, The.

  9. Sterile neutrino oscillations in core-collapse supernova simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, MacKenzie L; Mathews, Grant; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have made core-collapse supernova simulations that allow oscillations between electron neutrinos (or their anti particles) with right-handed sterile neutrinos. We have considered a range of mixing angles and sterile neutrino masses including those consistent with sterile neutrinos as a dark matter candidate. We examine whether such oscillations can impact the core bounce and shock reheating in supernovae. We identify the optimum ranges of mixing angles and masses that can dramatically enhance the supernova explosion by efficiently transporting electron anti-neutrinos from the core to behind the shock where they provide additional heating leading to much larger explosion kinetic energies. We show that an interesting oscillation in the neutrino luminosity develops due to a cycle of depletion of the neutrino density by conversion to sterile neutrinos that shuts off the conversion, followed by a replenished neutrino density as neutrinos transport through the core.

  10. A many-core software framework for embedded space computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Eugene Yu-Ting

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Space computing has long called for powerful yet power-efficient hardware for on-board computation. The emergence of many-core CPUs on a single die provides one potential solution. The development of processors like Maestro ...

  11. Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory...

  12. Doubling Estimates of Light Elements in the Earth's Core | Advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    relation of both hcp-Fe and the iron-silicon alloy at 300 K. The inner core of the Earth is the remotest area on the globe, mostly impossible to study directly. It is an area...

  13. Earth's Core Reveals an Inner Weakness | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    their results to core conditions and found that the strength of iron deep within the Earth is lower than previously thought. This weakness may explain how the crystal structure...

  14. Porous Core-Shell Nanostructures for Catalytic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewers, Trevor David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium Incorporation within Silica Shell . 7.3 Pyridine5 Oxidative Growth of ZnO for Core-Shell Catalysis 5.13.3.2 Shell interaction dependent catalysis 3.3.3 Thermal

  15. Selected Data from Continental Scientific Drilling Core Holes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Selected Data from Continental Scientific Drilling Core Holes VC-1 and VC-2A, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  16. Scattering of infrared light by dielectric core-shell particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiessen, E; Heinisch, R L; Fehske, H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the scattering of infrared light by small dielectric core-shell particles taking a sapphire sphere with a CaO core as an example. The extinction efficiency of such a particle shows two intense series of resonances attached, respectively, to in-phase and out-of-phase multipolar polarization-induced surface charges build-up, respectively, at the core-shell and the shell-vacuum interface. Both series, the character of the former may be labelled bonding and the character of the latter antibonding, give rise to anomalous scattering. For a given particle radius and filling factor the Poynting vector field shows therefore around two wave numbers the complex topology of this type of light scattering. Inside the particle the topology depends on the character of the resonance. The dissipation of energy inside the particle also reflects the core-shell structure. It depends on the resonance and shows strong spatial variations.

  17. A Critique of Core--Collapse Supernova Theory Circa 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Burrows

    1997-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been a new infusion of ideas in the study of the mechanism and early character of core--collapse supernovae. However, despite recent conceptual and computational progress, fundamental questions remain. Some are summarize herein.

  18. analysis identifies core: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    not only from rotating core-collapse and bounce, the subsequent ring down of the proto-neutron star (PNS) as previously identified, but also from the formation of...

  19. The Faculty of Arts and Sciences High Performance Computing Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    The Faculty of Arts and Sciences High Performance Computing Core Advanced Computational Support/09/2010-9FAS HPC Center #12;Understanding Data Requirements 04/09/2010-10FAS HPC Center Source: Adriana Corona

  20. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dennis L. Nielson, Pisto Larry, C.W. Criswell, R. Gribble, K. Meeker, J.A. Musgrave, T. Smith, D. Wilson (1989) Scientific Core Hole Valles Caldera No. 2B (VC-2B), New Mexico:...

  1. Earth's Inner Core dynamics induced by the Lorentz force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasbleis, M; Cardin, P; Labrosse, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic studies indicate that the Earth's inner core has a complex structure and exhibits a strong elastic anisotropy with a cylindrical symmetry. Among the various models which have been proposed to explain this anisotropy, one class of models considers the effect of the Lorentz force associated with the magnetic field diffused within the inner core. In this paper we extend previous studies and use analytical calculations and numerical simulations to predict the geometry and strength of the flow induced by the poloidal component of the Lorentz force in a neutrally or stably stratified growing inner core, exploring also the effect of different types of boundary conditions at the inner core boundary (ICB). Unlike previous studies, we show that the boundary condition that is most likely to produce a significant deformation and seismic anisotropy is impermeable, with negligible radial flow through the boundary. Exact analytical solutions are found in the case of a negligible effect of buoyancy forces in the inne...

  2. High-voltage air-core pulse transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohwein, G. J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General types of air core pulse transformers designed for high voltage pulse generation and energy transfer applications are discussed with special emphasis on pulse charging systems which operate up to the multi-megavolt range. The design, operation, dielectric materials, and performance are described. It is concluded that high voltage air core pulse transformers are best suited to applications outside the normal ranges of conventional magnetic core transformers. In general these include charge transfer at high power levels and fast pulse generation with comparatively low energy. When properly designed and constructed, they are capable of delivering high energy transfer efficiency and have demonstrated superior high voltage endurance. The principal disadvantage of high voltage air core transformers is that they are not generally available from commercial sources. Consequently, the potential user must become thoroughly familiar with all aspects of design, fabrication and system application before he can produce a high performance transformer system. (LCL)

  3. Webinar: Review Core Competencies for Appraisers to Value Green Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Appraisal Foundation is developing a document to describe the fundamentals of the Valuation of Green Buildings. This document highlights the core skill sets and data necessary for appraisers to...

  4. Structural Flexibility of the Nucleosome Core Particle at Atomic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have been performed on a complete nucleosome core particle with and without N-terminal histone tails for more than 20 ns. Main purpose of the simulations was to study the...

  5. A Plastic-Core Compact Heat Exchanger for Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazaridis, A.; Rafailidis, E.

    This paper describes a compact, single-pass, cross-flow type, gas-to-gas heat exchanger with a polyolefin (polyethylene or polypropylene) core whose seams are welded through a proprietary process. It is constructed of several extruded polyolefin...

  6. The End of Core: Should Disruptive Innovation in Telecommunication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    The End of Core: Should Disruptive Innovation in Telecommunication Invoke Discontinuous Regulation, USA Master of Science, Technology and Policy Program Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA of Doctor of Philosophy in Technology, Management, and Policy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  7. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  8. A Plastic-Core Compact Heat Exchanger for Energy Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazaridis, A.; Rafailidis, E.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a compact, single-pass, cross-flow type, gas-to-gas heat exchanger with a polyolefin (polyethylene or polypropylene) core whose seams are welded through a proprietary process. It is constructed of several extruded polyolefin...

  9. Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

  10. A Critique of Core-Collapse Supernova Theory Circa 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burrows, A

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been a new infusion of ideas in the study of the mechanism and early character of core--collapse supernovae. However, despite recent conceptual and computational progress, fundamental questions remain. Some are summarize herein.

  11. Technische Universitt Mnchen Potentials and Challenges for Multi-Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Karsten

    · Object recognition · Motor control · Current Sensing Motor Motor Motor Processing Units and Workload-Core in Robotic Applications Folie 2 Technische Universität München Embedded Systems Trends Embedded Systems control · Torque control · Movement coordination Task Coordination · Platform control · Localization

  12. Summary of multi-core hardware and programming model investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes our investigations into multi-core processors and programming models for parallel scientific applications. The motivation for this study was to better understand the landscape of multi-core hardware, future trends, and the implications on system software for capability supercomputers. The results of this study are being used as input into the design of a new open-source light-weight kernel operating system being targeted at future capability supercomputers made up of multi-core processors. A goal of this effort is to create an agile system that is able to adapt to and efficiently support whatever multi-core hardware and programming models gain acceptance by the community.

  13. SBIR Final Report. Liquid Core Optical Scintillating Fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beetz, C.P.; Steinbeck, J.; Buerstler, R.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase I SBIR project focused on developing flexible scintillating liquid core optical fibers, with potential uses in high-energy calorimetry, tracking, preradiators, active targets or other fast detectors. Progress on the six tasks of the project is summarized. The technical developments involve three technology components: (1) highly flexible capillaries or tubes of relatively low n (index of refraction) to serve as cladding and liquid core containment; (2) scintillator (and clear) fluids of relatively high n to serve as a core-- these fluids must have a high light transmission and, for some applications, radiation hardness; (3) optical end plugs, plug insertion, and plug-cladding tube sealing technology to contain the core fluids in the tubes, and to transmit the light.

  14. Neutronic evaluation of GCFR core diluents and reflectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Kun, 1974-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials are evaluated for use as in-core diluents and as peripheral reflectors for Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) service, using coupled Monte Carlo (MCNP) and isotopics (ORIGEN) codes. The principal performance indices ...

  15. advanced core design: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SiCfSiC at a substantially lower temperature California at San Diego, University of 2 Fusion Engineering and Design 82 (2007) 217236 Advanced power core system for the Plasma...

  16. Gravitating Fermionic Lumps with a False Vacuum Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramin G. Daghigh; Yutaka Hosotani

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate gravitating lumps with a false vacuum core surrounded by the true vacuum in a scalar field potential. Such configurations become possible in the Einstein gravity in the presence of fermions at the core. Gravitational interactions as well as Yukawa interactions are essential for such lumps to exist. The mass and size of gravitating lumps sensitively depend on the scale characterizing the scalar field potential and the density of fermions. These objects can exist in the universe at various scales.

  17. Light water reactor safety research program. Volume 12: quarterly report, Apr-Jun 79

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress of the Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program during the 2nd quarter of 1979. Specifically, the report summarizes progress in five major areas of research. They are: (1) the molten core/concrete interactions study; (2) steam explosion research phenomena; (3) statistical LOCA analysis; (4) UHI model development; (5) two-phase jet loads.

  18. Efficiency of static core turn-off in a system-on-a-chip with variation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cher, Chen-Yong; Coteus, Paul W; Gara, Alan; Kursun, Eren; Paulsen, David P; Schuelke, Brian A; Sheets, II, John E; Tian, Shurong

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A processor-implemented method for improving efficiency of a static core turn-off in a multi-core processor with variation, the method comprising: conducting via a simulation a turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's design stage, wherein the turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's design stage includes a first output corresponding to a first multi-core processor core to turn off; conducting a turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's testing stage, wherein the turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's testing stage includes a second output corresponding to a second multi-core processor core to turn off; comparing the first output and the second output to determine if the first output is referring to the same core to turn off as the second output; outputting a third output corresponding to the first multi-core processor core if the first output and the second output are both referring to the same core to turn off.

  19. Oxide Shell Reduction and Magnetic Property Changes in Core-Shell...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shell Reduction and Magnetic Property Changes in Core-Shell Fe Nanoclusters under Ion Irradiation. Oxide Shell Reduction and Magnetic Property Changes in Core-Shell Fe Nanoclusters...

  20. Core/Shell heterojunction nanowire solar cell fabricated by lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Somnath

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Menke. Gold Core–Semiconductor Shell Nanowires Prepared bycarrier concentration in CIS shell at different depositionMerced Dissertation: Core/Shell Heterojunction Nanowires

  1. Comparative genomics of the core and accessory genomes of 48 Sinorhizobium strains comprising five genospecies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    annotation and comparative genomics. Database (Oxford) 2009,et al. : Comparative genomics of the core and accessoryComparative genomics of the core and accessory genomes of 48

  2. Core-level satellites and outer core-level multiplet splitting in Mn model compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Roos, Joseph W. [Ethyl Corporation, Richmond, Virginia 23217 (United States)] [Ethyl Corporation, Richmond, Virginia 23217 (United States)

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a systematic study of the Mn 2p, 3s, and 3p core-level photoemission and satellite structures for Mn model compounds. Charge transfer from the ligand state to the 3d metal state is observed and is distinguished by prominent shake-up satellites. We also observe that the Mn 3s multiplet splitting becomes smaller as the Mn oxidation state increases, and that 3s-3d electron correlation reduces the branching ratio of the {sup 7}S:{sup 5}S states in the Mn 3s spectra. In addition, as the ligand electronegativity decreases, the spin-state purity is lost in the 3s spectra, as evidenced by peak broadening. Our results are best understood in terms of the configuration-interaction model including intrashell electron correlation, charge transfer, and final-state screening. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society.

  3. HAZING POLICY Clemson University's core values are Integrity, Honesty and Respect. Hazing is not consistent with these core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    HAZING POLICY Clemson University's core values are Integrity, Honesty and Respect. Hazing; or · Potentially harmful to o Physical safety/health o Psychological well-being o Opportunities for Academic

  4. FY13 Annual Progress Report for SECA Core Technology Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Koeppel, Brian J.

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report covers technical work performed during fiscal year 2013 at PNNL under Field Work Proposal (FWP) 40552. The report highlights and documents technical progress in tasks related to advanced cell and stack component materials development and computational design and simulation. Primary areas of emphasis for the materials development work were metallic interconnects and coatings, cathode and anode stability/degradation, glass seals, and advanced testing under realistic stack conditions: Metallic interconnects and coatings • Effects of surface modifications to AISI 441 (prior to application of protective spinel coatings) on oxide scale growth and adhesion were evaluated as a function of temperature and time. Cathode stability/degradation • Effects of cathode air humidity on performance and stability of SOFC cathodes were investigated by testing anode-supported cells as a function of time and temperature. • In-situ high temperature XRD measurements were used to correlate changes in cathode lattice structure and composition with performance of anode-supported button cells. Anode stability/degradation • Effects of high fuel steam content on Ni/YSZ anodes were investigated over a range of time and temperature. • Vapor infiltration and particulate additions were evaluated as a potential means of improving tolerance of Ni/YSZ anodes to sulfur-bearing fuel species. Glass seals • A candidate compliant glass-based seal materials were evaluated in terms of microstructural evolution and seal performance as a function of time and temperature. Stack fixture testing • The SECA CTP stack test fixture was used for intermediate and long-term evaluation of candidate materials and processes. Primary areas of emphasis for the computational modeling work were coarse methodology, degradation of stack components, and electrochemical modeling: Coarse methodology • Improvements were made to both the SOFC-MP and SOFC ROM simulation tools. Degradation of stack components • Thermo-mechanical modeling and validation experiments were performed to understand/mitigate degradation of interconnects and seals during long-term stack operation. Electrochemical modeling 4 • Modeling tools were developed to improve understanding of electrochemical performance degradation of SOFCs related to changes in electrode microstructure and chemical interactions with contaminants. During FY13, PNNL continued to work with NETL to increase the extent of interaction between the SECA Core Technology Program and the SECA Industry Teams. In addition to using established mechanisms of communication, such as the annual SECA Workshop, representatives from PNNL and NETL participated in telecons and/or face-to-face meetings with all three industry teams during FY13. During these meetings, PNNL’s Core Technology Program work was presented in detail, after which feedback was solicited regarding current and future research topics. Results of PNNL’s SECA CTP work were also distributed via topical reports for the industry teams, DOE reports, technical society presentations, and papers in peer-reviewed technical journals. 5

  5. Experiments illustrating the importance of automated reasoning in spacecraft reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, J.A. (Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany Street Cambridge, Massachusetts (USA)); Wyant, F.J. (Nuclear Technology Projects Division, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico (USA))

    1991-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of automated reasoning to the control of spacecraft nuclear reactors is discussed. Presented are results from experiments that demonstrate the role of planning, prediction, and assessment in the realization of autonomous control. These experiments were performed under closed-loop conditions on the Annular Core Research Reactor that is operated by the Sandia National Laboratories. Automated diagnostics is identified as an area that requires much further research.

  6. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014References by WebsitehomeResearch Areas

  7. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014References by WebsitehomeResearch

  8. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014References byLaboratoryResearchRegime

  9. Research Help

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliabilityPrincipalResearch Finds VitaminResearch

  10. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliabilityPrincipalResearch Finds VitaminResearchClouds,

  11. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 % A PB 2 7 7Research Form Research

  12. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 % A PB 2 7 7Research Form ResearchThe

  13. Abstract-A mimicry attack is a type of attack where the basic steps of a minimalist `core' attack are used to design multiple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zincir-Heywood, Nur

    Abstract-A mimicry attack is a type of attack where the basic steps of a minimalist `core' attack are used to design multiple attacks achieving the same objective from the same application. Research in mimicry attacks is valuable in determining and eliminating weaknesses of detectors. In this work, we

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, Fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. LDRD includes activities previously defined as ER&D, as well as other discretionary research and development activities not provided for in a DOE program.`` Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process technology; energy systems research. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. The projects are described in Section 2.0. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  15. Department of Pediatrics Core Research Support for "Wet1 Laboratories" Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    , will recommend to the Chair on an annual basis the yearly renewal and/or purchase of service contracts

  16. CHEMISTRYCHEMISTRYCHEMISTRY This major provides students with core instruction and excellent research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    techniques; error analysis, fractional distillation, extraction; chromatography; visible, ultraviolet

  17. Core, Grain-Size, and Porosity Data from the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    .9. Gamma-Spectrometry Analysis Worksheets.....................................................83 #12;iii

  18. Laboratory directed research and development annual report. Fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. This report represents Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) LDRD report for FY 1994. During FY 1994, 161 LDRD projects were selected for support through PNL`s LDRD project selection process. Total funding allocated to these projects was $13.7 million. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our {open_quotes}core competencies.{close_quotes} Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy systems development. In this report, the individual summaries of LDRD projects (presented in Section 1.0) are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. Projects within the three core competency areas were approximately 91.4 % of total LDRD project funding at PNL in FY 1994. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. Funding allocated to each of these projects is typically $35K or less. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program, the management process used for the program, and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  19. FY 1995 research highlights: PNL accomplishments in OER programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducts fundamental and applied research in support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) core missions in science and technology, environmental quality, energy resources, and national security. Much of this research is funded by the program offices of DOE`s Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER), primarily the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) and the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), and by PNL`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This document is a collection of research highlights that describe PNL`s accomplishments in DOE-ER funded programs during Fiscal Year 1995. Included are accomplishments in research funded by OHER`s Analytical Technologies, Environmental Research, Health Effects, General Life Sciences, and Carbon Dioxide Research programs; BES`s Materials Science, Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geoscience, and Applied Mathematical Sciences programs; and PNL`s LDRD Program. Summaries are given for 70 projects.

  20. Giant planet formation: episodic impacts vs. gradual core growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broeg, Christopher

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the growth of gas giant planets in the core accretion scenario. The core growth is not modeled as a gradual accretion of planetesimals but as episodic impacts of large mass ratios, i.e. we study impacts of 0.02 - 1 Earth masses onto cores of 1-15 Earth masses. Such impacts could deliver the majority of solid matter in the giant impact regime. We focus on the thermal response of the envelope to the energy delivery. Previous studies have shown that sudden shut off of core accretion can dramatically speed up gas accretion. We therefore expect that giant impacts followed by periods of very low core accretion will result in a net increase in gas accretion rate. This study aims at modelling such a sequence of events and to understand the reaction of the envelope to giant impacts in more detail. To model this scenario, we spread the impact energy deposition over a time that is long compared to the sound crossing time, but very short compared to the Kelvin-Helmholtz time. The simulations are done in spher...

  1. An expert system for PWR core operation management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ida, Toshio; Masuda, Masahiro; Nishioka, Hiromasa

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning for restartup after planned or unplanned reactor shutdown and load-follow operations is an important task in the core operation management of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). These planning problems have been solved by planning experts using their expertise and the computational prediction of core behavior. Therefore, the quality of the plan and the time consumed in the planning depend heavily on the skillfulness of the planning experts. A knowledge engineering approach has been recently considered as a promising means to solve such complicated planning problems. Many knowledge-based systems have been developed so far, and some of them have already been applied because of their effectiveness. The expert system REPLEX has been developed to aid core management engineers in making a successful plan for the restartup or the load-follow operation of PWRs within a shorter time. It can maintain planning tasks at a high-quality level independent of the skillfulness of core management engineers and enhance the efficiency of management. REPLEX has an explanation function that helps user understanding of plans. It could be a useful took, therefore, for the training of core management engineers.

  2. Research | Energy Frontier Research Centers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the Inorganic PV thrust,Research Home Below

  3. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  4. Core Microturbulence and Edge MHD Interplay and Stabilization by Fast Ions in Tokamak Confined Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Core Microturbulence and Edge MHD Interplay and Stabilization by Fast Ions in Tokamak Confined Plasmas

  5. Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qvist, Staffan Alexander

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    breeder reactors typically operate with an inner core of high fissile content surrounded by breeding blankets

  6. Energy-Aware Scheduling for Aperiodic Tasks on Multi-core Processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    consumed by processors or processing cores. To facilitate energy-efficient design, the Dynamic Voltage

  7. Containment, Equivalence and Coreness from CSP to QCSP and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madelaine, Florent

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) and its quantified extensions, whether without (QCSP) or with disjunction (QCSP_or), correspond naturally to the model checking problem for three increasingly stronger fragments of positive first-order logic. Their complexity is often studied when parameterised by a fixed model, the so-called template. It is a natural question to ask when two templates are equivalent, or more generally when one "contain" another, in the sense that a satisfied instance of the first will be necessarily satisfied in the second. One can also ask for a smallest possible equivalent template: this is known as the core for CSP. We recall and extend previous results on containment, equivalence and "coreness" for QCSP_or before initiating a preliminary study of cores for QCSP which we characterise for certain structures and which turns out to be more elusive.

  8. Assessment of HCDA energetics in the CRBRP heterogeneous reactor core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhow, S K; Switick, D M; McElroy, J L; Joe, B W; Elawar, Z J

    1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of hypothetical core disruptive event analyses for the CRBRP heterogeneous reactor core are reported. The analytical results cover a large number of parametric cases including variations in design parameters and phenomenological assumptions. Reactor core configurations at the beginning of cycle one and end of cycle four are evaluated. The energetic consequences are evaluated based upon both fuel expansion thermodynamic work potential and a relative probability assignment. It is concluded that the structural loads, which result from 101 megajoules of available expansion work at sodium slug impact on the reactor closure head (equivalent to 661 megajoules of fuel expansion work to one atmosphere), is an adequate energetic consequence envelope for use in specifying the Structural Margins Beyond the Design Basis.

  9. Heatup of the TMI-2 lower head during core relocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.K.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis has been carried out to assess the potential of a melting attack upon the reactor vessel lower head and incore instrument nozzle penetration weldments during the TMI core relocation event at 224 minutes. Calculations were performed to determine the potential for molten corium to undergo breakup into droplets which freeze and form a debris bed versus impinging upon the lower head as one or more coherent streams. The effects of thermal-hydraulic interactions between corium streams and water inside the lower plenum, the effects of the core support assembly structure upon the corium, and the consequences of corium relocation by way of the core former region were examined. 19 refs., 24 figs.

  10. MHD Simulations of Core Collapse Supernovae with Cosmos++

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akiyama, Shizuka

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed 2D, axisymmetric, MHD simulations with Cosmos++ in order to examine the growth of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in core--collapse supernovae. We have initialized a non--rotating 15 solar mass progenitor, infused with differential rotation and poloidal magnetic fields. The collapse of the iron core is simulated with the Shen EOS, and the parametric Ye and entropy evolution. The wavelength of the unstable mode in the post--collapse environment is expected to be only ~ 200 m. In order to achieve the fine spatial resolution requirement, we employed remapping technique after the iron core has collapsed and bounced. The MRI unstable region appears near the equator and angular momentum and entropy are transported outward. Higher resolution remap run display more vigorous overturns and stronger transport of angular momentum and entropy. Our results are in agreement with the earlier work by Akiyama et al. (2003) and Obergaulinger et al. (2009).

  11. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliabilityPrincipalResearch

  12. Research and Development with Full Scale Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sijpheer, N.; Bakker, E.J.; Opstelten, I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the research programs of the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) concerns the built environment. Several facilities to conduct the research activities are at ECN's disposal. One of these facilities, are five research dwellings...

  13. Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaji, Hajime

    for Passive corium cooling system under severe accident and reactor components (e.g. Fuel assembly, Steam Master's Program Doctoral Program Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction Doctoral Program Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction Application Code Name

  14. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON, TEXAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott W. Tinker; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett; Laura C. Zahm

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the U. S., and even the world. As reported in the 2003-2004 technical progress report to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently houses over 500,000 boxes of rock material, and has space to hold approximately 400,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has continued to increase during this third year of operation; over the past twelve months the HRC has averaged approximately 200 patrons per month. This usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and/or cash during this operating period. All of these funds went directly into the endowment. Outreach during 2004 and 2005 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year involve securing more donations of rock material and cash in order to fully fund the HRC endowment. BEG will also continue to increase the number of patrons using the facility, and we will strive to raise awareness of the HRC's 100,000-volume geoscience technical library.

  15. Estimate of Radiation-Induced Steel Embrittlement in the BWR Core Shroud and Vessel Wall from Reactor-Grade MOX/UOX Fuel for the Nuclear Power Plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vickers, Lisa R. [BWXT, U.S. Department of Energy, Pantex Plant, P.O. Box 30020, Hwy 60/FM 2373, Amarillo, TX 79120-0020 (United States)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest to utilize the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18 - 30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons. There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased {sup 239}Pu wt%) would increase the radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to personnel and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. The primary conclusion of this research was that the addition of the maximum fraction of 1/3 MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly accelerate the radiation-induced steel embrittlement such that without mitigation of steel embrittlement by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as, neutron fluence, core temperature and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the personnel and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. (author)

  16. Verification study of thorium cross section in MVP calculation of thorium based fuel core using experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, V. T.; Fujii, T.; Wada, K.; Kitada, T. [Osaka Univ., 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Takaki, N.; Yamaguchi, A.; Watanabe, H. [Tokai Univ., 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa, 259-1292 (Japan); Unesaki, H. [Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Inst., Asahiro-nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considering the importance of thorium data and concerning about the accuracy of Th-232 cross section library, a series of experiments of thorium critical core carried out at KUCA facility of Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Inst. have been analyzed. The core was composed of pure thorium plates and 93% enriched uranium plates, solid polyethylene moderator with hydro to U-235 ratio of 140 and Th-232 to U-235 ratio of 15.2. Calculations of the effective multiplication factor, control rod worth, reactivity worth of Th plates have been conducted by MVP code using JENDL-4.0 library [1]. At the experiment site, after achieving the critical state with 51 fuel rods inserted inside the reactor, the measurements of the reactivity worth of control rod and thorium sample are carried out. By comparing with the experimental data, the calculation overestimates the effective multiplication factor about 0.90%. Reactivity worth of the control rods evaluation using MVP is acceptable with the maximum discrepancy about the statistical error of the measured data. The calculated results agree to the measurement ones within the difference range of 3.1% for the reactivity worth of one Th plate. From this investigation, further experiments and research on Th-232 cross section library need to be conducted to provide more reliable data for thorium based fuel core design and safety calculation. (authors)

  17. Apparatus For Laminating Segmented Core For Electric Machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Robert Anthony (Kokomo, IN); Stabel, Gerald R (Swartz Creek, MI)

    2003-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A segmented core for an electric machine includes segments stamped from coated electric steel. The segments each have a first end, a second end, and winding openings. A predetermined number of segments are placed end-to-end to form layers. The layers are stacked such that each of the layers is staggered from adjacent layers by a predetermined rotation angle. The winding openings of each of the layers are in vertical alignment with the winding openings of the adjacent layers. The stack of layers is secured to form the segmented core.

  18. Prediction of core saturation instability at an HVDC converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, R.S. [Teshmont Consultants, Inc., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)] [Teshmont Consultants, Inc., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Fuchshuber, C.F. [Alberta Power Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)] [Alberta Power Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Woodford, D.A. [Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)] [Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Gole, A.M. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)] [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core saturation instability has occurred on several HVDC schemes resulting from interactions between second harmonic and dc quantities (voltages and currents) on the ac side of the converter and fundamental frequency quantities on the dc side of the converter. The instability can be reinforced by unbalanced saturation of the converter transformers. The paper presents an analytical method which can be used to quickly screen ac and dc system operating conditions to predict where core saturation instability is likely to occur. Analytical results have been confirmed using the digital transients simulation program PSCAD/EMTDC.

  19. Acknowledging the Input of Core Facilities A common question of labs when working with core facilities is how best to acknowledge or include as authors the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    Acknowledging the Input of Core Facilities A common question of labs when working with core facilities is how best to acknowledge or include as authors the Core in the publication of results, the decision of inclusion on manuscripts or acknowledgement is up to the senior author (or PI

  20. Investigating the Effects of Core Length on Pore Volume to Breakthrough (PVBT) Behavior in Carbonate Core Samples during Matrix Acidizing with Hydrochloric Acid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nour, Mohamed

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    an increased PVBT for 20 inch cores compared to the 6 inch samples. Results from CAT scan experiments show enlarged worm-holing and face dissolution on the 20 inch cores compared to the 6 inch cores, due to increased acid spending at the same acid concentration...