Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

2

Heat exchanger Exergoeconomic lifecycle cost optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering lifecycle cost analysis during the design phase of thermal systems gives the design effort more worth. Furthermore thermodynamic exergetic optimization is proven to be useful method for determining the most lifecycle cost optimal design of ... Keywords: entropy generation, exergy destruction, heat exchanger, operating cost, optimization, thermodynamics

Liaquat Ali Khan; Ali El-Ghalban

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Life-cycle cost analysis project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted to demonstrate the impact of life-cycle costing in Ohio's residential building sector. Typical single-family, townhouse, and multifamily housing units were modeled using sophisticated computer programs to predict annual energy comsumption. Energy conservation techniques were applied to the typical units and the resulting utility savings were computed. Installed costs were estimated for each energy conservation technique.

Davies, G.R.; Temming, S.J.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NISTIR 85-3273-28 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2013 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S....

5

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D....

6

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 (Rev. 510) Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010 Annual Supplement to Amy S. Rushing NIST Handbook 135 and Joshua D. Kneifel NBS Special...

7

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: National Institute of Standards and Technology Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Finance, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/information/download_blcc.html Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Building Life-Cycle Cost, BLCC References: Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Programs[1] Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BLCC[2]

8

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life-Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life, or life-cycle cost, of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability-associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select a...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

9

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 (Rev. 5/10) Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010 Annual Supplement to Amy S. Rushing NIST Handbook 135 and Joshua D. Kneifel NBS Special Publication 709 Barbara C. Lippiatt U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 May 2010 ENERGY PRICE INDICES AND DISCOUNT FACTORS FOR LIFE-CYCLE COST ANALYSIS Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 April 1, 2010 to March 31, 2011 Data for the Federal Methodology for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis, Title 10, CFR, Part 436, Subpart A; and for the Energy Conservation Mandatory Performance Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings,

10

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2005 April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-26 (Rev. 9/11) Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2011 Annual Supplement to Amy S. Rushing NIST Handbook 135 and Joshua D. Kneifel NBS Special Publication 709 Barbara C. Lippiatt U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program September 2011 NISTIR 85-3273-26 ENERGY PRICE INDICES AND DISCOUNT FACTORS FOR LIFE-CYCLE COST ANALYSIS Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012 Data for the Federal Methodology for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis, Title 10, CFR, Part 436, Subpart A; and for the Energy Conservation Mandatory Performance Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings,

11

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis October 16, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis Constructed Costs of a Net-Zero Office Building Facility: Research Support Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado Operational: August 2010 Constructed cost: $259/ft2 to achieve 50% less energy use than code Constructed cost of similar office buildings in area: $225 to $300/ft2 Reaching Net-Zero: A 1.27 MW photovoltaic system was added to the project in two phases to bring the system to net-zero. This system was financed through a power purchase agreement and did not add to the constructed cost of the building. If those costs were included in the capital costs, the total constructed cost would have been 291/ft2 to reach net-zero energy use. Learn more about the Research Support

12

Lifecycle Costs of Ultracapacitors in Electric Vehicle Applications A. G. Simpson G. R. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and cost of the battery under consideration. However, it is likely that the lifecycle cost benefits that examines the lifecycle costs of ultracapacitors in battery electric vehicle applications. The lifecycle). · The high capital cost and relatively short lifetime (commonly 3 years) of electrochemical batteries, which

Walker, Geoff

13

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis-2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2013 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-28 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-28 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2013 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt Applied Economics Office Engineering Laboratory http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-28

14

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-27 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-27 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt Applied Economics Office Engineering Laboratory http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-27

15

Life-Cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners Title Life-Cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners Publication Type...

16

SIMULATED LIFECYCLE COSTS OF ULTRACAPACITORS IN BATTERY ELECTRIC VEHICLES A.G. Simpson*, P.C. Sernia and G.R. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIMULATED LIFECYCLE COSTS OF ULTRACAPACITORS IN BATTERY ELECTRIC VEHICLES A.G. Simpson*, P, vehicle driving range, battery pack lifetime, and potential reductions in system lifecycle cost costs of ultracapacitors in battery electric vehicle applications. The lifecycle operation

Walker, Geoff

17

Guidance on Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Required by Executive Order...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

alternative 2. Federal Life-Cycle Cost Criteria (a) Discount rate (b) DOE energy price escalation rates (c) Use of constant dollars (d) Study period (e) Presumption of cost...

18

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Overhead Transmission Lines (LCCA) Version 1.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LCCA software is a tool to assist transmission line designers in selecting the optimized design for an overhead line by comparing the life-cycle cost of various design options. Windows2000, XP, and Vista Excel 2003 and 2007

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis- 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report describes the 2010 edition of energy price indices and discount factors for performing life-cycle cost analyses of energy and water conservation and renewable energy projects in federal facilities.

20

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Effect of cumulative seismic damage and corrosion on life-cycle cost of reinforced concrete bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bridge design should take into account not only safety and functionality, but also the cost effectiveness of investments throughout a bridge life-cycle. This work presents a probabilistic approach to compute the life-cycle cost (LCC) of corroding reinforced concrete (RC) bridges in earthquake prone regions. The approach is developed by combining cumulative seismic damage and damage associated to corrosion due to environmental conditions. Cumulative seismic damage is obtained from a low-cycle fatigue analysis. Chloride-induced corrosion of steel reinforcement is computed based on Fick’s second law of diffusion. The proposed methodology accounts for the uncertainties in the ground motion parameters, the distance from source, the seismic demand on the bridge, and the corrosion initiation time. The statistics of the accumulated damage and the cost of repairs throughout the bridge life-cycle are obtained by Monte-Carlo simulation. As an illustration of the proposed approach, the effect of design parameters on the life-cycle cost of an example RC bridge is studied. The results are shown to be valuable in better estimating the condition of existing bridges (i.e., total accumulated damage at any given time) and, therefore, can help schedule inspection and maintenance programs. In addition, by taking into consideration the deterioration process over a bridge life-cycle, it is possible to make an estimate of the optimum design parameters by minimizing, for example, the expected cost throughout the life of the structure.

Kumar, Ramesh

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The effect of lighting system components on lighting quality, energy use, and life-cycle cost  

SciTech Connect

A computational method was developed to examine the effect of lamp, ballast, and fixture selection on the quality and quantity of illumination, energy consumption, and life-cycle cost of lighting systems. Applying this analysis to lighting layouts using different lamp/ballast/fixture combinations suggested that combinations with higher lumen outputs reduced the uniformity of the illuminance distribution at the workplace but did not reduce visibility levels. The use of higher lumen output lamp/ballast/fixture systems and higher efficiency components tended to reduce life-cycle costs as long as the premium cost of the components was not too high.

Rubinstein, F.; Clark, T.; Siminovitch, M.; Verderber, R.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Title Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-55088 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Whitehead, Camilla Dunham, Victor H. Franco, Alexander B. Lekov, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-55088 Pagination 22 Date Published May 31 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated.The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

24

Life-Cycle Cost Study for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the life-cycle cost estimates for a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Sierra Blanca, Texas. The work was requested by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and performed by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program with the assistance of Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation.

B. C. Rogers; P. L. Walter (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation); R. D. Baird

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Management of lifecycle costs and benefits: Lessons from information systems practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the economic feasibility of information systems (IS) projects and operations remains a challenge for most organizations. This research investigates lifecycle cost and benefit management practices and demonstrates that, overall, although organizations ... Keywords: IT governance, IT value, Information management, Information system evaluation, Information system value

Egon Berghout; Menno Nijland; Philip Powell

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis- 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report provides tables of present-value factors for use in the life-cycle cost analysis of capital investment projects for federal facilities. It also provides energy price indices based on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) forecasts from 2012 to 2042.

27

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced hydrogen storage systems could also be a cost competitive alternative to pumped hydro and compressed air energy storage (CAES) under certain circumstances. Context: As...

28

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6719 6719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-560-46719 November 2009 Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage D. Steward, G. Saur, M. Penev, and T. Ramsden Prepared under Task No. H278.3400 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

29

LBNL-54244 Life-cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

44 44 Life-cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners Greg Rosenquist, Katie Coughlin, Larry Dale, James McMahon, Steve Meyers Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 March 2004 This work was supported by the Office of Building Technologies of the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. ii iii ABSTRACT This report describes an analysis of the economic impacts of possible energy efficiency standards for commercial unitary air conditioners and heat pumps on individual customers in terms of two metrics: life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period (PBP). For each of the two equipment classes considered, the 11.5 EER provides the largest mean LCC savings. The results

30

1998 Cost and Quality Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1998 Tables June 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions regarding the availability of these data should

31

Survey of life-cycle costs of glass-paper HEPA filters  

SciTech Connect

We have conducted a survey of the major users of glass-paper HEPA filters in the DOE complex to ascertain the life cycle costs of these filters. Purchase price of the filters is only a minor portion of the costs; the major expenditures are incurred during the removal and disposal of contaminated filters. Through personal interviews, site visits and completion of questionnaires, we have determined the costs associated with the use of HEPA filters in the DOE complex. The total approximate life-cycle cost for a standard (2 in. {times} 2 in. {times} 1 in.) glass-paper HEPA filter is $3,000 for one considered low-level waste (LLW), $11,780 for transuranic (TRU) and $15,000 for high-level waste (HLW). The weighted-average cost for a standard HEPA filter in the complex is $4,753.

Moore, P.; Bergman, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gilbert, H. [Gilbert (Humphrey), McLean, VA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

SciTech Connect

In 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is the economic impacts on consumers of possible revisions to energy-efficiency standards. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an appropriate comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. DOE's preferred approach involves comparing the total life-cycle cost (LCC) of owning and operating a more efficient appliance with the LCC for a baseline design. This study describes the method used to conduct the LCC analysis and presents the estimated change in LCC associated with more energy-efficient equipment. The results indicate that efficiency improvement relative to the baseline design can reduce the LCC in each of the product classes considered.

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers,Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

HANFORD RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT ENHANCED MISSION PLANNING THROUGH INNOVATIVE TOOLS LIFECYCLE COST MODELING AND AQUEOUS THERMODYNAMIC MODELING - 12134  

SciTech Connect

Two notable modeling efforts within the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) are currently underway to (1) increase the robustness of the underlying chemistry approximations through the development and implementation of an aqueous thermodynamic model, and (2) add enhanced planning capabilities to the HTWOS model through development and incorporation of the lifecycle cost model (LCM). Since even seemingly small changes in apparent waste composition or treatment parameters can result in large changes in quantities of high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glass, mission duration or lifecycle cost, a solubility model that more accurately depicts the phases and concentrations of constituents in tank waste is required. The LCM enables evaluation of the interactions of proposed changes on lifecycle mission costs, which is critical for decision makers.

PIERSON KL; MEINERT FL

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

34

Comparing Life-Cycle Costs of ESPCs and Appropriations-Funded Energy Projects: An Update to the 2002 Report  

SciTech Connect

A study was sponsored by FEMP in 2001 - 2002 to develop methods to compare life-cycle costs of federal energy conservation projects carried out through energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) and projects that are directly funded by appropriations. The study described in this report follows up on the original work, taking advantage of new pricing data on equipment and on $500 million worth of Super ESPC projects awarded since the end of FY 2001. The methods developed to compare life-cycle costs of ESPCs and directly funded energy projects are based on the following tasks: (1) Verify the parity of equipment prices in ESPC vs. directly funded projects; (2) Develop a representative energy conservation project; (3) Determine representative cycle times for both ESPCs and appropriations-funded projects; (4) Model the representative energy project implemented through an ESPC and through appropriations funding; and (5) Calculate the life-cycle costs for each project.

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Atkin, Erica [ORNL

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the spreadsheets when better information is available or to allow the performance of sensitivity studies. The selected reference plant design for this study was a 1500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant operating in the thermal-neutral mode. The plant utilized industrial natural gas-fired heaters to provide process heat, and grid electricity to supply power to the electrolyzer modules and system components. Modifications to the reference design included replacing the gas-fired heaters with electric resistance heaters, changing the operating mode of the electrolyzer (to operate below the thermal-neutral voltage), and considering a larger 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant design. Total H2A-calculated hydrogen production costs for the reference 1,500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant were $3.42/kg. The all-electric plant design using electric resistance heaters for process heat, and the reference design operating below the thermal-neutral voltage had calculated lifecycle hydrogen productions costs of $3.55/kg and $5.29/kg, respectively. Because of its larger size and associated economies of scale, the 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant was able to produce hydrogen at a cost of only $2.89/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an analysis of the economic impacts of possible energy efficiency standards for commercial unitary air conditioners and heat pumps on individual customers in terms of two metrics: life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period (PBP). For each of the two equipment classes considered, the 11.5 EER provides the largest mean LCC savings. The results show how the savings vary among customers facing different electricity prices and other conditions. At 11.5 EER, at least 80% of the users achieve a positive LCC savings. At 12.0 EER, the maximum efficiency analyzed, mean LCC savings are lower but still positive. For the {ge} $65,000 Btu/h to <135,000 Btu/h equipment class, 59% of users achieve a positive LCC savings. For the $135,000 Btu/h to <240,000 Btu/h equipment class, 91% of users achieve a positive LCC savings.

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

An Analysis of the Economic and Financial Life-Cycle Costs of Reverse-Osmosis Desalination in South Texas: A Case Study of the Southmost Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desalination provides a supply alternative for potable water for many communities, along with possible defenses against security threats potentially affecting clean water supplies. The economic and financial life-cycle costs associated with building and operating the Southmost desalination facility (near Brownsville, TX) in South Texas are investigated using the spreadsheet model DESAL ECONOMICS©. Primary data key to this analysis include actual initial construction costs, annual continued costs (i.e., for source-water acquisition and transport, pretreatment, purification, and delivery), capital replacement expenses, and desalination-process parameters. The input data used reflect the unique location and quality of source water, process-flow design, asset selection and configuration, management structure, local cost rates, and employed operational methods unique to the Southmost facility. Thus, the specific results are only applicable to the Southmost facility for a specific time, but do provide useful information and insight into life-cycle costs for public and commercial desalination facilities in a more general sense. Annuity equivalent costs are reported (on both a $/acre-foot (ac-ft) and $/1,000 gallons of finished water basis, f.o.b. (free on board) municipal delivery point) for seven individual operational/expense areas, as well as for the entire desalination facility. Results are also presented across different cost types, categories, and items. The baseline results are deterministic, but are expanded to include sensitivity analyses of useful life, initial construction costs, annual energy costs, and production efficiency rate, amongst others. The current estimated total annual life-cycle costs (in 2006 dollars) to produce and deliver desalinated water to a point in the municipal delivery-system infrastructure for the Southmost facility are $769.62/ac-ft {$2.3619/1,000 gal.}. These baseline estimates apply to the Southmost facility and are sensitive to changes in the production efficiency level, and costs incurred for energy, chemicals, initial construction, etc. Also, results indicate significant outlays, beyond those of Initial Construction, are involved with desalination. For the Southmost facility, when a commitment was made to build a facility for $26.2 million, an implicit commitment for another $39.1 million (basis 2006 dollars) was also made for Continued and Capital Replacement costs. Investigation into life-cycle costs during the design and planning stages of a desalination facility can assist with determining the least-cost asset configuration to adopt and operational methods to employ. Also included are modifications to certain key data-input parameters that provide ‘modified results’ which facilitate a more fair basis of comparing facilities and/or technologies. The modified results, which are considered appropriate to use when comparing to similarlycalculated values (for other facilities or technologies), are $615.01/ac-ft/yr {$1.8874/1,000 gal./yr} (basis 2006 dollars).

Sturdivant, A.; Rister, M.; Rogers, C.; Lacewell, R.; Norris, J.; Leal, J.; Garza, J.; Adams, J.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Levelized life-cycle costs for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technology characterizations and life-cycle costs were obtained for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems. All costs are in constant 1981 dollars. The residue-collection systems were cornstover collection, wheat-straw collection, soybean-residue collection, and wood chips from forest residue. The life-cycle costs ranged from $19/ton for cornstover collection to $56/ton for wood chips from forest residues. The gas-production systems were low-Btu gas from a farm-size gasifier, solar flash pyrolysis of biomass, methane from seaweed farms, and hydrogen production from bacteria. Life-cycle costs ranged from $3.3/10/sup 6/ Btu for solar flash pyrolysis of biomass to $9.6/10/sup 6/ Btu for hydrogen from bacteria. Sensitivity studies were also performed for each system. The sensitivity studies indicated that fertilizer replacement costs were the dominate costs for the farm-residue collection, while residue yield was most important for the wood residue. Feedstock costs were most important for the flash pyrolysis. Yields and capital costs are most important for the seaweed farm and the hydrogen from bacteria system.

Thayer, G.R.; Rood, P.L.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.; Rollett, H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

additional first cost of energy efficiency design optionsS. Meyers, Cost and Energy Consumption of Energy Efficiencyadditional first cost of energy efficiency design options

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table3 to the incre- no oil costs, and that Na/S batteries,costs, of vehicle’s Oil costs, percent ofgasoline vehicle’stires are (M&R) costs (we exclude fires and oil) than ICEVs,

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 1 filings. http://Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) website through Form 714annual data submitted to FERC from regulated utilities and

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Consumer Life-Cycle Cost Impacts of Energy-Efficiency Standards...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1) space-conditioning annual energy consumption, 2) equipment efficiency, 3) average electricity price, and 4) marginal electricity price. All four of these inputs are used in...

44

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of separate costs for natural gas or oil, and electricity.receives oil-fired boilers INPUTS First Cost Inputs The flowfurnaces, and oil-fired furnaces, we scaled the cost for

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

±metal hydride (NiMH) battery costs, several di€erent ``in other cases. The battery cost per mile is low in partstorage energy ± and hence battery cost ± required to supply

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicles: Social costs and bene®ts in France. TransportationTransportation Research Part D 6 (2001) 371±404 Table 5 The social cost

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

EIA - Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2011. ... such as investment or production tax credits for specified generation sources, ...

48

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

avoid bias in the electricity bill calculations, we assignedarrive at an annual electricity bill. The difference betweenbill and multiplied it by the ratio of the total air conditioning energy use to the total building electricity

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the product of the cost per kWh and the total number ofmethod assumes that the cost per kWh does not vary with theper kg (rather than the cost per kWh) as a function of the

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

product of an assumed cost per kWh and the total number ofmethod assumes that the cost per kWh does not vary with thethis battery has a low cost per kWh, and relatively few kWh

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Program Record 13006 (Offices of Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies: Life-Cycle Costs of Mid-Size Light-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Vehicle Technologies & Fuel Cell Program Record (Offices of Vehicle Technologies & Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 13006 Date: April 24, 2013 Title: Life-cycle Costs of Mid-Size Light-Duty Vehicles Originator: Tien Nguyen & Jake Ward Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Pat Davis Date: April 25, 2013 Items: DOE is pursuing a portfolio of technologies with the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions and petroleum consumption while being cost-effective. This record documents the assumptions and results of analyses conducted to estimate the life-cycle costs resulting from several fuel/vehicle pathways, for a future mid-size car. The results are summarized graphically in the following figure. Costs of Operation for Future Mid-Size Car

52

Dynamic life-cycle costing in asset management of production equipments with emphasis om maintenance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In the contemporary industry, companies need to make investments to grow their business volume. However each investment comes with its own risk. Cost of… (more)

Chaudhary, Osman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

LBNL-54244 Life-cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

costs (increased LCC). Moving towards the right on the axis, values greater than zero indicate reductions in LCC (LCC savings). LCC savings occur when increased total...

54

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997. Electric and hybrid electric vehicles: a technology1998. An assessment of electric vehicle life cycle costs tothe bene®ts of electric vehicles. Union of Concerned

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of ballast life-cycle cost and payback period  

SciTech Connect

The paper introduces an innovative methodology for evaluating the relative significance of energy-efficient technologies applied to fluorescent lamp ballasts. The method involves replacing the point estimates of life cycle cost of the ballasts with uncertainty distributions reflecting the whole spectrum of possible costs, and the assessed probability associated with each value. The results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses will help analysts reduce effort in data collection and carry on analysis more efficiently. These methods also enable policy makers to gain an insightful understanding of which efficient technology alternatives benefit or cost what fraction of consumers, given the explicit assumptions of the analysis.

McMahon, James E.; Liu, Xiaomin; Turiel, Ike; Hakim, Sajid; Fisher, Diane

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Auto Industry Models to Review Electric Vehicle Costing andElectric Vehicles in the Nation's Energy Future , DE86-003295, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois, November (1984). Auto industry

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Lifecycle Cost and GHG Implications of a Hydrogen Energy Storage Scenario (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overview of life cycle cost and green house gas implications of a hydrogen energy storage scenario presented at the National Hydrogen Association Conference & Expo, Long Beach, CA, May 3-6, 2010

Steward, D. M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

A discussion on life-cycle costs of residential photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the characteristics and needed improvements/enhancements required for the expansion of the grid-tied residential power systems market. The purpose of the paper is to help establish a common understanding, between the technical community and the customers of the technology, of value and costs and what is required in the longer term for reaching the full potential of this application.

THOMAS,MICHAEL G.; CAMERON,CHRISTOPHER P.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

59

Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Consumer life-cycle cost impacts of energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

In support of the federal government's efforts to raise the minimum energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps, a consumer life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was conducted to demonstrate the economic impacts on individual consumers from revisions to the standards. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing an air conditioner or heat pump and operating the unit over its lifetime. The LCC analysis is conducted on a nationally representative sample of air conditioner and heat pump consumers resulting in a distribution of LCC impacts showing the percentage of consumers that are either benefiting or being burdened by increased standards. Relative to the existing minimum efficiency standard of 10 SEER, the results show that a majority of split system air conditioner and heat pump consumers will either benefit or be insignificantly impacted by increased efficiency standards of up to 13 SEER.

Rosenquist, Gregory; Chan, Peter; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James; Van Buskirk, Robert

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007 Title Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007...

62

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006 Title Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006...

63

Gas turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. First annual publication, 1972  

SciTech Connect

By the end of 1972, gas turbine power plants owned and operated by U.S. utilities had a capacity of 27,918 MW. Data from the 1972 annual reports filed with the Federal Power Commission by utility systems are presented which show the plant cost, generating expenses, capacity and generation, and plant and equipment characteristics of 299 gas turbine plants. (LCL)

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graboski analyzes lifecycle fossil energy use only. ) Notanalyzes lifecycle fossil energy use only. ) Analysis of2003). M. S. Graboski, Fossil Energy Use in the Manufacture

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

08 Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels Draft Report (May be citedLIFECYCLE ANALYSES OF BIOFUELS Draft manuscript (may belifecycle analysis (LCA) of biofuels for transportation has

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Water Heating Systems: Life-Cycle Analyses and Opportunities for Cost Reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conference paper regarding research in potential cost-savings measures for cold-climate solar domestic water hearing systems.

Burch, J.; Salasovich, J.; Hillman, T.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Lifecycle Verification of Polymeric Storage Tank Liners - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Barton Smith (Primary Contact) and Lawrence M. Anovitz Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Phone: (865) 574-2196 Email: smithdb@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov Start Date: June 2008 Projected End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Continue temperature cycling and permeation * measurements on tank liner polymers, and use permeation data to assess ability of tank liners to retain a steady-state hydrogen discharge rate that does not exceed 110% of the 75 normal cubic centimeters per minute (Ncc)/min permeation requirement of SAE International

68

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shapouri, “Supply and Social Cost Estimates for Biomass fromBiomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply,

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal where needed) to transport LLW from generator sites to NTS.

PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

70

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

MRS/IS facility co-located with a repository: preconceptual design and life-cycle cost estimates  

SciTech Connect

A program is described to examine the various alternatives for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and interim storage (IS) of spent nuclear fuel, solidified high-level waste (HLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste until appropriate geologic repository/repositories are available. The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a preconceptual design for an MRS/IS facility that would become the principal surface facility for a deep geologic repository when the repository is opened, (2) to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facility, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such a facility, and (3) to estimate the life cycle costs of the facility when operated in response to a set of scenarios which define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, which generally span the years from 1990 until 2016. The life cycle costs estimated in this study include: the capital expenditures for structures, casks and/or drywells, storage areas and pads, and transfer equipment; the cost of staff labor, supplies, and services; and the incremental cost of transporting the waste materials from the site of origin to the MRS/IS facility. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life cycle costs of the MRS/IS facility. In the first scenario, HLW canisters are stored, starting in 1990, until the co-located repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at various intervals. In the second scenario, spent fuel is stored, starting in 1990, because the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but no HLW is stored because the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, HLW is stored, starting in 1990, because the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

Smith, R.I.; Nesbitt, J.F.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Drive Wind Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with SiemensAnnual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Historical plant cost and annual production expenses for selected electric plants, 1982  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a composite of the two prior publications, Hydroelectric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses and Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses. Beginning in 1979, Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses contained information on both steam-electric and gas-turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. The summarized historical plant cost described under Historical Plant Cost in this report is the net cumulative-to-date actual outlays or expenditures for land, structures, and equipment to the utility. Historical plant cost is the initial investment in plant (cumulative to the date of initial commercial operation) plus the costs of all additions to the plant, less the value of retirements. Thus, historical plant cost includes expenditures made over several years, as modifications are made to the plant. Power Production Expenses is the reporting year's plant operation and maintenance expenses, including fuel expenses. These expenses do not include annual fixed charges on plant cost (capital costs) such as interest on debt, depreciation or amortization expenses, and taxes. Consequently, total production expenses and the derived unit costs are not the total cost of producing electric power at the various plants. This publication contains data on installed generating capacity, net generation, net capability, historical plant cost, production expenses, fuel consumption, physical and operating plant characteristics, and other relevant statistical information for selected plants.

1984-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

74

Life-Cycle Decision Making: Volume 1: Getting Started  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Decision Making (LCDM) 2.0 is a suite of integrated tools for making a wide range of decisions based on life-cycle costs and revenues. LCDM puts powerful methods and tools at the fingertips of employees, empowering them to quickly make better day-to-day business decisions based on the true costs and benefits to the company.

1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

75

Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

costs, the levelized cost ... 4 These results do not include targeted tax credits such as the production or investment tax credit available for some technologies.

76

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 27% inAre Significant. . . . . . . 9 Wind Power Prices Are Up in

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry trends · Evolution of wind pricing · Installed wind project costs · Wind turbine transaction turbines and projects over 50 kW in size · Data sources include AWEA, EIA, FERC, SEC, etc. (see full report PercentofAnnualCapacityAdditions 0 20 40 60 80 100 TotalAnnualCapacityAdditions(GW) Wind Other Renewable Gas

78

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Balances for a Range of Biofuel Options, Project Number8. F UELCYCLE EMISSIONS FOR BIOFUEL VEHICLES IN DIFFERENTch. and LEM % ch. For a few biofuel lifecycles there can be

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

  Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 006 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 7% in 006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9

80

Lifecycle building card: toward paperless and visual lifecycle management tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel vision of paperless and visual lifecycle building management tools based on the coupling between Building Information Models (BIM) and Augmented Reality (AR) called Lifecycle Building Card. As the use of BIM increases within ... Keywords: augmented reality, building information model, building lifecycle, visual simulation

Holger Graf; Souheil Soubra; Guillaume Picinbono; Ian Keough; Alex Tessier; Azam Khan

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hydroelectric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. Eighteenth annual supplement, 1974. [1974 data  

SciTech Connect

Tabulated data are presented on the generating capacity, construction costs, and production expenses for each of 432 conventional or pumped storage hydroelectric power plants in the U.S. (LCL)

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Title Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Masanet, Eric R., Yuan Chang, Anand R. Gopal, Peter H. Larsen, William R. Morrow, Roger Sathre, Arman Shehabi, and Pei Zhai Journal Annual Review of Environment and Resources Volume 38 Date Published 2013 Keywords electricity, energy policy, environmental analysis, life-cycle impact, life-cycle inventory Abstract The application of life-cycle assessment (LCA) to electric power (EP) technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts. While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use, LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life-cycle energy, GHG emissions, air pollutant emissions, and water use implications of EP technologies. With continued progress, LCA offers promise for assessing and comparing EP technologies in an analytically-thorough and environmentally-holistic manner for more robust deployment decisions. This article summarizes: (1) major challenges in applying LCA to EP technologies thus far, (2) LCA results to date on the various impacts of EP technologies, and (3) opportunities for improving LCAs as applied to EP technologies moving forward.

83

Life-Cycle Analysis of Vehicle and Fuel Systems with the GREET Model - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Michael Wang (Primary Contact), Amgad Elgowainy, Jeongwoo Han and Hao Cai Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) ESD362 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 Phone: (630) 252-2819 Email: mqwang@anl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 2009 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Evaluate environmental benefits of hydrogen fuel * cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) with various renewable hydrogen production pathways relative to baseline gasoline pathways. Conduct vehicle-cycle analysis of hydrogen FCEVs. *

84

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in accurately modeling costs for fuel cell-based combined heat, hydrogen, and power systems. Work was performed by NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Marc W. Melaina (Primary Contact), Michael Penev and Darlene Steward National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3836 Email: Marc.Melaina@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Subcontractor: IDC Energy Insights, Framingham, MA Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: September 28, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Identify the capacity (kg/day) and capital costs * associated with "Early Commercial" hydrogen stations (defined below) Identify cost metrics for larger numbers of stations and * larger capacities Technical Barriers This project addresses the following technical barriers

86

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

87

LIFE-CYCLE COSTING WORKSHOP FOR ENERGY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... analyses throughout the government, it is required under the FEMP rule (10 ... been included along with energy conservation as a designated goal for ...

2001-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

88

Photovoltaics: Life-cycle Analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Life-cycle analysis is an invaluable tool for investigating the environmental profile of a product or technology from cradle to grave. Such life-cycle analyses of energy technologies are essential, especially as material and energy flows are often interwoven, and divergent emissions into the environment may occur at different life-cycle-stages. This approach is well exemplified by our description of material and energy flows in four commercial PV technologies, i.e., mono-crystalline silicon, multi-crystalline silicon, ribbon-silicon, and cadmium telluride. The same life-cycle approach is applied to the balance of system that supports flat, fixed PV modules during operation. We also discuss the life-cycle environmental metrics for a concentration PV system with a tracker and lenses to capture more sunlight per cell area than the flat, fixed system but requires large auxiliary components. Select life-cycle risk indicators for PV, i.e., fatalities, injures, and maximum consequences are evaluated in a comparative context with other electricity-generation pathways.

Fthenakis V. M.; Kim, H.C.

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

89

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

AFDC AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Lifecycle Energy Balance on AddThis.com... More in this section... Lifecycle Energy Balance The fossil "energy balance" of ethanol has been the subject of debate despite the fact that this metric is not as useful to policymakers as

90

Sustainability: Economics, Lifecycle Analysis, Green House Gases ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Report on Linking Transformational Materials and Processing for Energy and ... LIFECYCLE ANALYSIS, GREEN HOUSE GASES, AND CLIMATE CHANGE ...

91

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prices. . . . . 14 Installed Project Costs Are On the Rise,of Decline. . 15 Project Cost Increases Are a Function ofin installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation An Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Social Costs of Intercity Passenger Transportation: AEffects and Social Costs of Road Transport, Transportationtransportation vehicles at specific stages in the lifecycle (Table 1). These studies tend to quantify social costs

Horvath, Arpad; Chester, Mikhail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Eric Masanet, 1 Yuan Chang, 1 Anand R. Gopal, 2 Peter Larsen, 2,3 William R. Morrow III, 2 Roger Sathre, 2 Arman Shehabi, 2 and Pei Zhai 2 1 McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208; email: eric.masanet@northwestern.edu, yuan.chang@northwestern.edu 2 Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720; email: argopal@lbl.gov, wrmorrow@lbl.gov, rsathre@lbl.gov, ashehabi@lbl.gov, pzhai@lbl.gov 3 Management Science and Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305; email: phlarsen@lbl.gov Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour. 2013. 38:107-36 First published online as a Review in Advance on August 7, 2013 The Annual Review of Environment and Resources is online at http://environ.annualreviews.org

94

Stationery and Emerging Market Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Kathya Mahadevan (Primary Contact), VinceContini, Matt Goshe, and Fritz Eubanks Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 Phone: (614) 424-3197 Email: mahadevank@battelle.org DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Reg Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005250/001 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives To assist the DOE in developing fuel cell systems for stationary and emerging markets by developing independent cost models and costs estimates for manufacture and

95

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 006 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Project Performance and Capital Costs Drive Wind Power Prices . . . . .14 Installed Project Costs Are On the Rise, After a Long Period of Decline. .15 Project Cost Increases Are a Function of Turbine Prices . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Wind Project

96

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not represent wind energy generation costs, and generationXcel-UWIG We Energies Wind Capacity Penetration Cost ($/MWh)Wind Energy Program is currently funding additional efforts to better understand the drivers for O&M costs and

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006 Contents Primary authorsCost, and Performance Trends: 2006 Introduction The winda rapid pace, keeping up with trends in the marketplace has

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and incentives, and continued uncertainty about the future cost and liabilities of conventional natural gas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The principles of life-cycle analysis  

SciTech Connect

Decisionmakers representing government agencies must balance competing objectives when deciding on the purchase and sale of assets. The goal in all cases should be to make prudent or financially {open_quotes}cost-effective{close_quotes} decisions. That is, the revenues from the purchase or sale of assets should exceed any out-of-pocket costs to obtain the revenues. However, effects external to these financial considerations such as promoting environmental quality, creating or maintaining jobs, and abiding by existing regulations should also be considered in the decisionmaking process. In this paper, we outline the principles of life-cycle analysis (LCA), a framework that allows decisionmakers to make informed, balanced choices over the period of time affected by the decision, taking into account important external effects. Specifically, LCA contains three levels of analysis for any option: (1) direct financial benefits (revenues) and out-of-pocket costs for a course of action; (2) environmental and health consequences of a decision; and (3) other economic and socio-institutional effects. Because some of the components of LCA are difficult to value in monetary terms, the outcome of the LCA process is not generally a yes-no answer. However, the framework allows the decisionmaker to at least qualitatively consider all relevant factors in analyzing options, promoting sound decisionmaking in the process.

Hill, L.J.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Curlee, T.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Energy Sources Solar Water Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Office of Administration Several provisions of Missouri law govern energy efficiency in state facilities. In 1993 Missouri enacted legislation requiring life-cycle cost analysis for all new construction of state buildings and substantial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 27% in 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9 Utility Interest in Wind Asset Ownership Strengthens; Community Wind Grows Modestly . . . . . . . . . . . .

102

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Surged by 46% in 2007, with 5,329 MW Added and $9 Billion Invested . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Wind Power Contributed 35% of All New U.S. Electric Generating Capacity in 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Continued to Lead the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Texas Easily Exceeded Other States in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . .6 Data from Interconnection Queues Demonstrate that an Enormous Amount of Wind Capacity Is Under Development . . . . . . . . . .9 GE Wind Remained the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, but a Growing Number of Other Manufacturers Are Capturing Market Share .

103

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report--the first in what is envisioned to be an ongoing annual series--attempts to fill this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2006.

Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results from Major Wind Integration Studies Completed 2003-a mini- mum) show that wind integration costs are generallyA number of additional wind integration analyses are planned

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Impacts of increased outdoor air flow rates on annual HVAC energy costs in office environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of different ventilation systems has an important impact on the energy cost of office buildings. This paper examines the relationship between heating and… (more)

Destrez, Adrien

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis, Preliminary Results - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington, VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 E-mail: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Grace Ordaz Phone: (202) 586-8350 Email: Grace.Ordaz@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005253 Project Start Date: September 30, 2012 Project End Date: September 29, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop cost models of carbon fiber hydrogen storage * pressure vessels. Explore the sensitivity of pressure vessel cost to design * parameters including hydrogen storage quantity, storage

107

Annual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19 19 th Annual Triple "E" Seminar Presented by U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory and Spectroscopy Society of Pittsburgh Thursday, January 20, 2011 8:00 a.m. Registration & Breakfast 8:30 a.m. Opening Remarks/Welcome Michael Nowak, Senior Management & Technical Advisor National Energy Technology Laboratory 8:35 a.m. Overview of Energy Issues Michael Nowak, Senior Management & Technical Advisor National Energy Technology Laboratory 8:45 a.m. Introduction of Presenters McMahan Gray National Energy Technology Laboratory 8:50 a.m. Jane Konrad, Pgh Regional Center for Science Teachers "Green - What Does it Mean" 9:45 a.m. Break 10:00 a.m. John Varine, Spectroscopy Society of Pittsburgh

108

Evaluation of a Low-Cost Salmon Production Facility, 1986 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fiscal year 1986 study sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration evaluates the presently existing, low-cost salmon production facility operated and maintained by the Clatsop Economic Development Committee's Fisheries Project.

Hill, James M.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Evaluation of a Low-Cost Salmon Production Facility, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fiscal year 1985 study sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration evaluates the presently existing low-cost salmon production facility operated and maintained by the Clatsop Economic Development Committee Fisheries Project.

Hickerson, Andrew W.; Hill, James M.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Evaluation of a Low-Cost Salmon Production Facility, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fiscal year 1984 study sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration evaluates the presently existing low-cost salmon production facility operated and maintained by the Clatsop Economic Development Committee's Fisheries Project.

Hickerson, Andrew W.; Hill, James M.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Roles and Lifecycle | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roles and Lifecycle Roles and Lifecycle Roles and Lifecycle Employee Property Responsibilities by Role Director, Office of Administration The Director, Office of Administration, has the following responsibilities: *Establish a personal property management program for DOE Headquarters, except for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC); *Appoint an Organizational Property Management Officer (OPMO) who is responsible for the Headquarters personal property management program; and *Approve, conditionally approve, or disapprove contractor property management systems for all DOE direct operations at Headquarters except for the FERC. Organizational Property Management Officer (OPMO) The OPMO has the following primary responsibilities: *Manage the control, management, and disposal of personal property in the

112

Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. , 2002. A life-cycle cost analysis for setting energyM. , Nicholas Bojda, 2012b. Cost Effectiveness of High-31 Summary of Cost Effective

Letschert, Virginie E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Lifecycle Assessments and Sustainability Analyses | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lifecycle Assessments and Sustainability Analyses Lifecycle Assessments and Sustainability Analyses Jump to: navigation, search The National Renewable Energy Laboratory performs lifecycle and technoeconomic analyses to promote sustainable energy development. Conducting full life-cycle assessments for biomass products, including electricity, biodiesel, and ethanol, is important for determining environmental benefits. NREL analysts use a life-cycle inventory modeling package and supporting databases to conduct life-cycle assessments. These tools can be applied on a global, regional, local, or project basis. Integrated system analyses, technoeconomic analyses, life-cycle assessments (LCAs), and other analysis tools are essential to our research and development efforts. They provide an understanding of the economic,

114

Building technologies program. 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The 1995 annual report discusses laboratory activities in the Building Technology Program. The report is divided into four categories: windows and daylighting, lighting systems, building energy simulation, and advanced building systems. The objective of the Building Technologies program is to assist the U.S. building industry in achieving substantial reductions in building-sector energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions while improving comfort, amenity, health, and productivity in the building sector. Past efforts have focused on windows and lighting, and on the simulation tools needed to integrate the full range of energy efficiency solutions into achievable, cost-effective design solutions for new and existing buildings. Current research is based on an integrated systems and life-cycle perspective to create cost-effective solutions for more energy-efficient, comfortable, and productive work and living environments. Sixteen subprograms are described in the report.

Selkowitz, S.E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual  

SciTech Connect

In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

116

A cost analysis model for heavy equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total cost is one of the most important factors for a heavy equipment product purchase decision. However, the different cost views and perspectives of performance expectations between the different involved stakeholders may cause customer relation problems ... Keywords: Cost responsibilities, Operating costs, Ownership costs, Post-Manufacturing Product Cost (PMPC), System life-cycle cost

Shibiao Chen; L. Ken Keys

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Stationary Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington, VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Technical Advisor Bryan Pivovar Phone: (303) 275-3809 Email: bryan.pivovar@nrel.gov Sub-Contract Number No: AGB-0-40628-01 under Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08G028308 Project Start Date: July 8, 2010 Project End Date: September 7, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Perform Design for Manufacturing and Assembly * (DFMA ® ) cost analysis for low-temperature (LT)

118

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transaction prices · Wind project performance · O&M cost trends · Integration/transmission/policy · Coming up is Reasonably Broad #12;10 Interest in Offshore Wind Continues in the U.S., but No Such Projects Are Yet Online · All wind projects installed in the U.S. to date are land-based · Some interest exists in offshore wind

119

Exploring decisions' influence on life-cycle performance to aid “design for Multi-X”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem addressed in this paper is that design decisions can have a propagation effect spanning multiple life-phases influencing life-cycle metrics such as cost, time, and quality. It introduces a computational framework of a “Knowledge of ... Keywords: Concurrent Synthesis, DFX, KICAD, Knowledge Modelling, Providence

Jonathan C. Borg; Xiu-Tian Yan; Neal P. Juster

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Low-cost silicon solar array project. First annual report, January 1975--March 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LSSA) was established to greatly reduce the price of solar arrays by the improvement of manufacturing technology, by adaptation of mass production techniques, and by helping achievement of user acceptance. The Project's approach includes the development of technology, its transfer by industry to commercial practice, the evaluation of the economics involved, and the stimulation of market growth. The activities and progress of the LSSA Project during its first year are described in this document which covers all Project activities, with primary emphasis on the technical plans and accomplishments. The development of manufacturing technology is now and will continue to be performed principally by industries and universities. To date, 24 contractors are working on new silicon-refinement processes, silicon-sheet-growth techniques, encapsulants, and automated-assembly studies. Nine more contractors have been selected to perform additional technology investigations and their contracts are being negotiated. Additional contracts will be issued in the future as promising ideas appear. (WDM)

Not Available

1976-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Modeling and visualization of lifecycle building performance assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lifecycle building performance assessment (LBPA) ensures that buildings perform and operate as intended during building lifecycle. Such assessment activities are typically multi-phase and multi-disciplinary, and generate large amounts of information ...

Ipek Gursel; Sevil Sariyildiz; Ömer Akin; Rudi Stouffs

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Costs of Saving Water in South Texas with Irrigation District Infrastructure Rehabilitation - Using Capital Budgeting with RGIDECON©  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a part of the irrigation district plans, economists with Texas AgriLife Research and the Texas AgriLife Extension Service (through the Rio Grande Basin Initiative), developed and applied a spreadsheet model RGIDECON© (Rio Grande Irrigation District Economics) to facilitate unbiased comparisons of real project costs. That is, a Capital Budgeting – Net Present Value (NPV) methodology, combined with calculation of annuity equivalent (AE) values, was developed to incorporate different initial construction costs, annual operation and maintenance costs, quantity of water saved, expected useful life, etc. of the various alternative projects. Using this combined approach allows for calculation of a single, annual $/acre-foot (af) {or $/1,000 gal} life-cycle cost, comprehensive of all relevant financial and economic parameters, thereby facilitating comparisons across and priority ranking among ID projects.

Rister, E.; Lacewell, R.; Sturdivant, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Comparison of Life Cycle Costs for LLRW Management in Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a comparison of life-cycle costs of an assured isolation facility in Texas versus the life-cycle costs for a traditional belowground low-level radioactive waste disposal facility designed for the proposed site near Sierra Blanca, Texas.

Baird, R. D.; Rogers, B. C.; Chau, N.; Kerr, Thomas A

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Cost Analysis and Reduction of Power Quality Mitigation Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many power quality mitigation systems have been planned, designed, produced, and operated with very little concern for their cumulative life-cycle cost. This report describes how to conduct a life-cycle cost analysis to determine the financial implications of a chosen power quality mitigation technology versus other competing technologies.

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Life-cycle Environmental Inventory of Passenger Transportation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects and Social Costs of Road Transport; Transportation The Social Costs of Intercity Passenger  Transportation: A Transportation Research Center, Knoxville, TN.   [Delucchi 1997] Delucchi, M. ; The Annualized Social Cost 

Chester, Mikhail V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Feasibility study to update annualized cost of leaving (ACOL) procedures at the Navy Personnel Research and Development Center (NPRDC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate forecasts of officer retention rates are required in order to shape correctly the size and internal structure of the Navy manpower force through accession, promotion, and related policies. This study, conducted in 1987 for the Navy Personnel Research and Development Center (NPRDC), reviews existing forecasting and simulation methodologies and suggests new methods to implement in the future in order to improve forecasts of naval officer retention rates. The study also considers alternative sources of data to capture civilian earnings opportunities in the models. Two major types of models -- Annualized Cost of Leaving (ACOL) and Dynamic Retention (DR) -- are discussed in detail with respect to the ability to model and evaluate manpower policies of interest to NPRDC staff. A variety of other techniques which should be considered during the estimation stage are also discussed. The general study approach involved researching the subject area, the current data, the current models, and current estimation procedures. Available data and methodologies were then compared with the NPRDC problem in order to recommend potential solutions. This study did not include data collection or data analysis. This report is organized in eight sections. The Background Section discusses the history of officer retention models, the scope of officer manpower analysis at NPRDC, and NPRDC's history of officer loss-rate forecasting. Section 3 discusses the approach to model selection, which includes addition to a thorough discussion of the Dynamic Retention Model (DRM) and a comparison of the DRM and ACOL model. Section 5 presents alternative modeling directions for forecasting and a summary of compensation policy issues. The summary and conclusions appear in Section 6, and recommendations are in Section 7. References are in Section 8.2. 30 refs., 1 tab. (JF)

Trumble, D.; Flanagan, D.M.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

2 Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Capital Costs Drive Wind Power Prices . . . . .20 Installed Project Costs Continued to Rise in 2007, After. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Project Cost Increases Are a Function of Turbine Prices, and Turbine Prices Have Increased . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Operations and Maintenance Costs Are Affected by the Age and Size of the Project, Among Other

128

Life-Cycle Analysis Process Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Example of a life-cycle inventory for an unspecified product...70 Nontoxic chemicals 2,000 Water effluents, mg COD 1,000 BOD 150 Acid, as H + 75 Nitrates 5 Metals 300 Ammonium ions 5 Chloride ions 120 Dissolved organics 20 Suspended solids 400 Oil 100 Hydrocarbons 100 Phenol 1 Dissolved solids 400 Phosphate 5 Other nitrogen 10 Sulfate ions 10 COD, chemical...

129

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

waste iii Executive Summary As renewable electricity becomes a larger portion of the electricity generation mix, new strategies will be required to accommodate fluctuations in...

130

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of Energy Efficiency Design Options...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL 53950 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Lutz, James D., Alexander B. Lekov, Peter Chan, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Stephen Meyers, and James E. McMahon Document Number LBNL...

131

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of Energy Efficiency Design Options...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is the economic impacts on...

132

Lifecycle Prognostics Architecture for Selected High-Cost Active Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are an extensive body of knowledge and some commercial products available for calculating prognostics, remaining useful life, and damage index parameters. The application of these technologies within the nuclear power community is still in its infancy. Online monitoring and condition-based maintenance is seeing increasing acceptance and deployment, and these activities provide the technological bases for expanding to add predictive/prognostics capabilities. In looking to deploy prognostics there are three key aspects of systems that are presented and discussed: (1) component/system/structure selection, (2) prognostic algorithms, and (3) prognostics architectures. Criteria are presented for component selection: feasibility, failure probability, consequences of failure, and benefits of the prognostics and health management (PHM) system. The basis and methods commonly used for prognostics algorithms are reviewed and summarized. Criteria for evaluating PHM architectures are presented: open, modular architecture; platform independence; graphical user interface for system development and/or results viewing; web enabled tools; scalability; and standards compatibility. Thirteen software products were identified and discussed in the context of being potentially useful for deployment in a PHM program applied to systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These products were evaluated by using information available from company websites, product brochures, fact sheets, scholarly publications, and direct communication with vendors. The thirteen products were classified into four groups of software: (1) research tools, (2) PHM system development tools, (3) deployable architectures, and (4) peripheral tools. Eight software tools fell into the deployable architectures category. Of those eight, only two employ all six modules of a full PHM system. Five systems did not offer prognostic estimates, and one system employed the full health monitoring suite but lacked operations and maintenance support. Each product is briefly described in Appendix A. Selection of the most appropriate software package for a particular application will depend on the chosen component, system, or structure. Ongoing research will determine the most appropriate choices for a successful demonstration of PHM systems in aging NPPs.

N. Lybeck; B. Pham; M. Tawfik; J. B. Coble; R. M. Meyer; P. Ramuhalli; L. J. Bond

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

THE SOCIAL-COST CALCULATOR (SCC): DOCUMENTATION OF METHODS AND DATA, AND CASE STUDY OF SACRAMENTO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ICEV energy-use and lifecycle-cost model (8 pp. ) (M. A.and N. I. Tishchcishyna, Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000An Assessment of Benefits and Costs, ORNL-6851, Oak Ridge

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Social-Cost Calculator (SCC): Documentation of Methods and Data, and Case Study of Sacramento  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ICEV energy-use and lifecycle-cost model (8 pp. ) (M. A.and N. I. Tishchcishyna, Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000An Assessment of Benefits and Costs, ORNL-6851, Oak Ridge

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Genevieve Saur (Primary Contact), Chris Ainscough. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3783 Email: genevieve.saur@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Corroborate recent wind electrolysis cost studies using a * more detailed hour-by-hour analysis. Examine consequences of different system configuration * and operation for four scenarios, at 42 sites in five

136

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production from Biomass and Coal - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Darlene Steward (Primary Contact), Billy Roberts, Karen Webster National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3837 Email: Darlene.Steward@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE FY 2012 Objectives Elucidate the location-dependent variability of * infrastructure costs for biomass- and coal-based central hydrogen production and delivery and the tradeoffs inherent in plant-location choices Provide modeling output and correlations for use in other * integrated analyses and tools

137

Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor That Produces Low Cost Electricty - FY-02 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, plant engineering, material compatibility studies, and coolant activation. The publications derived from work on this project (since project inception) are listed in Appendix A. This is the third in a series of Annual Reports for this project, the others are also listed in Appendix A as FY-00 and FY-01 Annual Reports.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Berkeley Lab Study of Hydrogen Generating Technology's Lifecycle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab Study of Hydrogen Generating Technology's Lifecycle Net Energy Balance Designated a 'Hot' Article by Journal Photoelectrochemical hydrogen technology LCA analysis July...

139

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of life-cycle assessment and optimization in assessing such questions as: a.) How will future transportation energy production impact water resource availability in the US? b.)...

140

Vehicle Manufacturing Futures in Transportation Life-cycle Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG emissions of future transportation modes. These resultsVehicle Manufacturing Futures in Transportation Life-cycleVehicle Manufacturing Futures in Transportation Life-cycle

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Trust Anchor Lifecycle Attack Protection | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

secure software providing independent testing, monitoring, and control of energy control system component operation Trust Anchor Lifecycle Attack Protection More Documents...

142

Impact of DOE Program Goals on Hydrogen Vehicles: Market Prospect, Costs, and Benefits - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Zhenhong Lin (Primary Contact), David Greene, Jing Dong Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 Phone: (865) 946-1308 Email: linz@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 2011 Project End Date: September 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Project market penetrations of hydrogen vehicles under * varied assumptions on processes of achieving the DOE program goals for fuel cells, hydrogen storage, batteries, motors, and hydrogen supply. Estimate social benefits and public costs under different *

143

Waste management facilities cost information for transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing transuranic waste. The report`s information on treatment and storage modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biagi, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life or life-cycle cost of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select an ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

145

Design Study and Cost Estimate for an Assurred Isolation Facility in Texas  

SciTech Connect

The optimized assured isolation facility (AIF) consists of waste shipping containers being placed inside steel-reinforced concrete overpacks, which are, in turn, placed in steel-reinforced concrete vaults without an earthen cover system. The concrete vaults are designed to remain in service for hundreds of years, with the aid of ongoing active maintenance. This will be required since the facility will remain under license as long as waste is present in the facility. The estimated present value of life-cycle costs total about $318 million. Of this amount, over 30 percent is attributable to the need to accumulate the financial assurance fund which allows future management options to be implemented. The charge for waste received at the AIF in order to recover all costs and ensure proper facility function following the waste acceptance period was calculated for each year of AIF operation, considering annual variations in the volume received and the costs that must be recovered. The present value of the AID unit charges range for $84 to $420 per cubic foot with a life-cycle average of about $177 per cubic foot. When making decisions on cost factors and comparing alternatives, the lifetime average of $177 per cubic foot is most meaningful.

Baird, R. D.; Rogers, B. C.; Chau, N.; Kerr, Thomas A

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Mass-Production Cost Estimation for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Kevin Baum, Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski, Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005236 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Update 2011 automotive fuel cell cost model to include * latest performance data and system design information. Examine costs of fuel cell systems (FCSs) for light-duty * vehicle and bus applications.

147

Development of a Low-Cost 3-10 kW Tubular SOFC Power System - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Norman Bessette Acumentrics Corporation 20 Southwest Park Westwood, MA 02090 Phone: (781) 461-8251; Email: nbessette@acumentrics.com DOE Managers HQ: Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Phone: (202) 586-5463 Email: Dimitrios.Papageorgopoulos@ee.doe.gov GO: Reginald Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-03NT41838 Project Start Date: April 1, 2008 Project End Date: March 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives The goal of the project is to develop a low-cost 3-10 kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generator capable of meeting multiple market applications. This is accomplished by: Improving cell power and stability * Cost reduction of cell manufacturing

148

A Review of Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: State of Knowledge and Critical Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: State of Knowledge and Critical Needs ANL/ESD/10-7 Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401 fax (865) 576-5728 reports@adonis.osti.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express

149

What does a negawatt really cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use data from ten utility conservation programs to calculate the cost per kWh of electricity saved -- the cost of a "negawatthour" -- resulting from these programs. We first compute the life-cycle cost per kWh saved ...

Joskow, Paul L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

New Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis New Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis New Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis September 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A new, free online tool developed by a Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory allows users to customize and analyze the environmental impact of various fuels before they are used to create power. Information from the Excel™-based Upstream Dashboard - developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) - can be used with other data or models to build an emissions inventory of various feedstocks as part of a comprehensive lifecycle analysis of the fuels. Lifecycle analysis is a new and innovative way to analyze and compare different pathways for producing power and transportation fuels.

151

New Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis New Tool Yields Custom Environmental Data for Lifecycle Analysis September 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A new, free online tool developed by a Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory allows users to customize and analyze the environmental impact of various fuels before they are used to create power. Information from the Excel™-based Upstream Dashboard - developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) - can be used with other data or models to build an emissions inventory of various feedstocks as part of a comprehensive lifecycle analysis of the fuels. Lifecycle analysis is a new and innovative way to analyze and compare different pathways for producing power and transportation fuels.

152

Phase 2 of the automated array assembly task of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of investigations and analyses of an advanced process sequence for manufacturing high efficiency solar cells and modules in a cost-effective manner. The entire process sequence is presented and discussed step by step. Emphasis is on process simplicity and minimizing consumed materials. The process sequence incorporates texture etching, plasma processes for damage removal and patterning, ion implantation, low pressure silicon nitride deposition, and plated metal. A reliable module design is presented. Specific process step developments are presnted. Further, a detailed cost analysis has been performed to indicate future areas of fruitful cost reduction effort. Finally, recommendations for advanced investigations are presented.

Coleman, M.G.; Grenon, L.P.; Pastirik, E.M.; Pryor, R.A.; Sparks, T.G.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ion Torren Semiconductor Sequencing Allows Rapid, Low Cost Sequencing of the Human Exome ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

David Jenkins on "Ion Torrent semiconductor sequencing allows rapid, low-cost sequencing of the human exome" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Jenkins, David [EdgeBio

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

PEM Electrolyzer Incorporating an Advanced Low-Cost Membrane - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Monjid Hamdan (Primary Contact), Tim Norman Giner, Inc. (Formerly Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC.) 89 Rumford Ave. Newton, MA 02466 Phone: (781) 529-0526 Email: mhamdan@ginerinc.com DOE Managers HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO18065 Subcontractors: * Virginia Polytechnic Institute and University, Blacksburg, VA * Parker Hannifin Ltd domnick hunter Division, Hemel Hempstead, United Kingdom Project Start Date: May 1, 2008

155

High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Dr. Katherine Ayers (Primary Contact), Andy Roemer Proton Energy Systems d/b/a Proton OnSite 10 Technology Drive Wallingford, CT 06492 Phone: (203) 678-2190 Email: kayers@protononsite.com DOE Managers HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov GO: Dave Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE000276 Subcontractors: * Entegris, Inc., Chaska, MN * The Electrochemical Engine Center at Penn State, University Park, PA * Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Project Start Date: September 1, 2009

156

Cost analysis methodology: Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project. Annual subcontract report, 11 March 1991--11 November 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work done under Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project. PVMaT is a five-year project to support the translation of research and development in PV technology into the marketplace. PVMaT, conceived as a DOE/industry partnership, seeks to advanced PV manufacturing technologies, reduce PV module production costs, increase module performance, and expand US commercial production capacities. Under PVMaT, manufacturers will propose specific manufacturing process improvements that may contribute to the goals of the project, which is to lessen the cost, thus hastening entry into the larger scale, grid-connected applications. Phase 1 of the PVMaT project is to identify obstacles and problems associated with manufacturing processes. This report describes the cost analysis methodology required under Phase 1 that will allow subcontractors to be ranked and evaluated during Phase 2.

Whisnant, R.A. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Effects of Technology Cost Parameters on Hydrogen Pathway Succession - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Mark F. Ruth* (Primary Contact), Victor Diakov*, Brian James † , Julie Perez ‡ , Andrew Spisak † *National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Pkwy. Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 817-6160 Email: Mark.Ruth@nrel.gov and Victor.Diakov@nrel.gov † Strategic Analysis, Inc. ‡ New West Technologies DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: Strategic Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA Project Start Date: February 1, 2009 Project End Date: October 31, 2011 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop a macro-system model (MSM): * Aimed at performing rapid cross-cutting analysis - Utilizing and linking other models - Improving consistency between models -

158

High Speed, Low Cost Fabrication of Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Membrane Electrode Assemblies - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Emory S. De Castro BASF Fuel Cell, Inc. 39 Veronica Avenue Somerset, NJ 08873 Phone: (732) 545-5100 ext 4114 Email: Emory.DeCastro@BASF.com DOE Managers HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000384 Subcontractor: Dr. Vladimir Gurau Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio Project Start Date: July 1, 2009 Project End Date: June 30, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Reduce cost in fabricating gas diffusion electrodes * through the introduction of high speed coating technology, with a focus on materials used for the high- temperature membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs)

159

Development of standardized, low-cost AC PV systems. Phase I annual report, 7 September 1995--7 November 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this two-year program are to improve the reliability and safety and reduce the cost of installed grid-connected PV systems by creating standardized, pre-engineered components and an enhanced, low-cost, 250-Watt micro inverter. These advances will be combined with the new, large area Solarex MSX-240 PV module resulting in standard, modular AC PV {open_quotes}building blocks{close_quotes} used to create utility-interactive PV systems as small as one module to many thousands of modules to suit virtually any application. AC PV building blocks will be developed to meet the requirements of the U.S., Japanese and European markets.

Strong, S.J.; Wohlgemuth, J.H.; Kaelin, M.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Speaker(s): Roger Sathre Date: December 5, 2011 - 3:30pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner Barbara Adams In this presentation we describe the prospective life-cycle modeling of metal-organic frameworks (MOF), a novel type of material with the potential for efficiently capturing CO2. Life-cycle modeling of emerging technologies, conducted early in the innovation process, can generate knowledge that can feed back to inform scientific discovery and development. We discuss the challenges of credibly modeling a system that does not yet exist, and describe methodological approaches including parametric system modeling (quantifying relations between system elements), scenario projections (defining plausible pathways for system scale-up),

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Economics of Lifecycle Analysis and Greenhouse Gas Regulation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deepak Rajagopal Date: May 28, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Unlike with conventional fossil fuels, lifecycle GHG emissions from energy sources such as biofuels, batteries, oil...

162

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Speaker(s): Roger Sathre Date: December 5, 2011 - 3:30pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Anita...

163

MARVEL: A PC-based interactive software package for life-cycle evaluations of hybrid/electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

As a life-cycle analysis tool, MARVEL has been developed for the evaluation of hybrid/electric vehicle systems. It can identify the optimal combination of battery and heat engine characteristics for different vehicle types and performance requirements, on the basis of either life-cycle cost or fuel efficiency. Battery models that allow trade-offs between specific power and specific energy, between cycle life and depth of discharge, between peak power and depth of discharge, and between other parameters, are included in the software. A parallel hybrid configuration, using an internal combustion engine and a battery as the power sources, can be simulated with a user-specified energy management strategy. The PC-based software package can also be used for cost or fuel efficiency comparisons among conventional, electric, and hybrid vehicles.

Marr, W.W.; He, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Review of Electricity Generation Technology Lifecycle GHG Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents and discusses results from a selection of published cross-technology assessments and two recent meta-analyses evaluating life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions from different electricity generation technologies. Differences in life-cycle GHG estimates reflect differing assessment methodologies, plant and equipment construction practices, power plant conversion efficiencies, power plant size and operating characteristics, practices in fuel preparation and transport, and system boundary as...

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

165

PVMaT Cost Reductions in the EFG High-Volume PV Manufacturing Line: Annual Report, August 1998-December 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The PVMaT 5A2 program at ASE Americas is a three-year program that addresses topics in the development of manufacturing systems, low-cost processing approaches, and flexible manufacturing methods. The three-year objectives are as follows: (1) implementation of computer-aided manufacturing systems, including Statistical Process Control, to aid in electrical and mechanical yield improvements of 10%, (2) development and implementation of ISO 9000 and ISO 14000, (3) deployment of wafer production from large-diameter (up to 1 m) EFG cylinders and wafer thicknesses down to 95 microns, (4) development of low-damage, high-yield laser-cutting methods for thin wafers, (5) cell designs for >15% cell efficiencies on 100-micron-thick EFG wafers, (6) development of Rapid Thermal Anneal processing for thin high-efficiency EFG cells, and (7) deployment of flexible manufacturing methods for diversification in wafer size and module design. In the second year of this program, the significant accomplishments in each of three tasks that cover these areas are as follows: Task 4-Manufacturing systems, Task 5-Low-cost processes, and Task 6-Flexible manufacturing.

Bathey, B.; Brown, B.; Cao, J.; Ebers, S.; Gonsiorawski, R.; Heath, B.; Kalejs, J., Mackintosh, B.; Ouellette, M.; Piwczyk, B., Rosenblum, M.; Southimath, B. (ASE Americas, Inc.)

2001-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Life-cycle of Operons  

SciTech Connect

Operons are a major feature of all prokaryotic genomes, but how and why operon structures vary is not well understood. To elucidate the life-cycle of operons, we compared gene order between Escherichia coli K12 and its relatives and identified the recently formed and destroyed operons in E. coli. This allowed us to determine how operons form, how they become closely spaced, and how they die. Our findings suggest that operon evolution is driven by selection on gene expression patterns. First, both operon creation and operon destruction lead to large changes in gene expression patterns. For example, the removal of lysA and ruvA from ancestral operons that contained essential genes allowed their expression to respond to lysine levels and DNA damage, respectively. Second, some operons have undergone accelerated evolution, with multiple new genes being added during a brief period. Third, although most operons are closely spaced because of a neutral bias towards deletion and because of selection against large overlaps, highly expressed operons tend to be widely spaced because of regulatory fine-tuning by intervening sequences. Although operon evolution seems to be adaptive, it need not be optimal: new operons often comprise functionally unrelated genes that were already in proximity before the operon formed.

Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, Eric J.

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

167

Renewable Energy Planning: Multiparametric Cost Optimization; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for determining the combination of renewable energy technologies that minimize life-cycle cost at a facility, often with a specified goal regarding percent of energy use from renewable sources. Technologies include: photovoltaics (PV); wind; solar thermal heat and electric; solar ventilation air preheating; solar water heating; biomass heat and electric (combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion); and daylighting. The method rests upon the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) capabilities in characterization of technology cost and performance, geographic information systems (GIS) resource assessment, and life-cycle cost analysis. The paper discusses how to account for the way candidate technologies interact with each other, and the solver routine used to determine the combination that minimizes life-cycle cost. Results include optimal sizes of each technology, initial cost, operating cost, and life-cycle cost, including incentives from utilities or governments. Results inform early planning to identify and prioritize projects at a site for subsequent engineering and economic feasibility study.

Walker, A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Renewable Energy Planning: Multiparametric Cost Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for determining the combination of renewable energy technologies that minimize life-cycle cost at a facility, often with a specified goal regarding percent of energy use from renewable sources. Technologies include: photovoltaics (PV); wind; solar thermal heat and electric; solar ventilation air preheating; solar water heating; biomass heat and electric (combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion); and daylighting. The method rests upon the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) capabilities in characterization of technology cost and performance, geographic information systems (GIS) resource assessment, and life-cycle cost analysis. The paper discusses how to account for the way candidate technologies interact with each other, and the solver routine used to determine the combination that minimizes life-cycle cost. Results include optimal sizes of each technology, initial cost, operating cost, and life-cycle cost, including incentives from utilities or governments. Results inform early planning to identify and prioritize projects at a site for subsequent engineering and economic feasibility study.

Walker, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 -- a fee levied on electricity generated in commercial nuclear power plants -- is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans contained in the DOE`s Draft 1988 Mission Plan Amendment. The total-system cost for the system with a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $24 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $31 to $33 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel to be disposed of. The $7 billion cost savings for the single-repository system in comparison with the two-repository system is due to the elimination of $3 billion for second-repository development and $7 billion for the second-repository facility. These savings are offset by $2 billion in additional costs at the first repository and $1 billion in combined higher costs for the MRS facility and transportation. 55 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

171

Development of cost-effective surfactant flooding technology. First annual report for the period, September 30, 1992--September 29, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research consists of the parallel development of a new chemical flooding simulator and the application of existing UTCHEM simulation code to model surfactant flooding. The new code is based upon a completely new numerical method that combines for the first time higher order finite difference methods, flux limiters, and implicit algorithms. Early results indicate that this approach has significant advantages in some problems and will likely enable simulation of much larger and more realistic chemical floods once it is fully developed. Additional improvements have also been made to the UTCHEM code and it has been applied for the first time to the study of stochastic reservoirs with and without horizontal wells to evaluate methods to reduce the cost and risk of surfactant flooding. During the first year of this contract, significant progress has been made on both of these tasks. The authors have found that there are indeed significant differences between the performance predictions based upon the traditional layered reservoir description and the more realistic and flexible descriptions using geostatistics. These preliminary studies of surfactant flooding using horizontal wells shows that although they have significant potential to greatly reduce project life and thus improve the economics of the process, their use requires accurate reservoir descriptions and simulations to be effective. Much more needs to be done to fully understand and optimize their use and develop reliable design criteria.

Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Cost analysis guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

173

Economic costs of conventional surface-water treatment: A case study of the Mcallen northwest facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional water treatment facilities are the norm for producing potable water for U.S. metropolitan areas. Rapidly-growing urban populations, competing demands for water, imperfect water markets, and uncertainty of future water supplies contribute to high interests in alternative sources of potable water for many U.S. municipalities. In situations where multiple supply alternatives exist, properly analyzing which alternative is the most-economically efficient over the course of its useful life requires a sound economic and financial analysis of each alternative using consistent methodology. This thesis discusses such methodology and provides an assessment of the life-cycle costs of conventional water treatment using actual data from an operating surface-water treatment facility located in McAllen, Texas: the McAllen Northwest facility. This facility has a maximum-designed operating capacity of 8.25 million gallons per day (mgd), but due to required shutdown time and other limitations, it is currently operating at 78% of the designed capacity (6.44 mgd). The economic and financial life-cycle costs associated with constructing and operating the McAllen Northwest facility are analyzed using a newly-developed Excel 2 spreadsheet model, CITY H O ECONOMICS . Although specific results are applicable only to the McAllen Northwest facility, the baseline results of $771.67/acre-foot (acft)/ yr {$2.37/1,000 gallons/yr} for this analysis provide insight regarding the life-cycle costs for conventional surface-water treatment. The baseline results are deterministic (i.e., noninclusive of risk/uncertainty about datainput values), but are expanded to include sensitivity analyses with respect to several critical factors including the facility’s useful life, water rights costs, initial construction costs, and annual operations and maintenance, chemical, and energy costs. For example, alternative costs for water rights associated with sourcing water for conventional treatment facilities are considered relative to the assumed baseline cost of $2,300/ac-ft, with results ranging from a low of $653.34/ac-ft/yr (when water rights are $2,000/ac-ft) to a high of $1,061.83/ac-ft/yr (when water rights are $2,600/ac-ft). Furthermore, modifications to key data-input parameters and results are included for a more consistent basis of comparison to enable comparisons across facilities and/or technologies. The modified results, which are considered appropriate to compare to other similarly calculated values, are $667.74/ac-ft/yr {2.05/1,000 gallons/yr}.

Rogers, Callie Sue

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Preliminary estimates of the total-system cost for the restructured program: An addendum to the May 1989 analysis of the total-system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 - a fee levied on electricity generated and sold by commercial nuclear power plants - is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee. The costs contained in this report represent a preliminary analysis of the cost impacts associated with the Secretary of Energy`s Report to Congress on Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program issued in November 1989. The major elements of the restructured program announced in this report which pertain to the program`s life-cycle costs are: a prioritization of the scientific investigations program at the Yucca Mountain candidate site to focus on identification of potentially adverse conditions, a delay in the start of repository operations until 2010, the start of limited waste acceptance at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility in 1998, and the start of waste acceptance at the full-capability MRS facility in 2,000. Based on the restructured program, the total-system cost for the system with a repository at the candidate site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $26 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $34 to $35 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) requiring disposal. 17 figs., 17 tabs.

NONE

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Waste Management Facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing mixed low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are at the locus of three trends driving China's increased energy use and emissions: urbanization, growing personal consumption, and surging heavy industrial production. Migration to cities and urban growth create demand for new building construction. Higher levels of per-capita income and consumption drive building operational energy use with demand for higher intensity lighting, thermal comfort, and plug-load power. Demand for new buildings, infrastructure, and electricity requires heavy industrial production. In order to quantify the implications of China's ongoing urbanization, rising personal consumption, and booming heavy industrial sector, this study presents a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the energy use and carbon emissions related to residential and commercial buildings. The purpose of the LCA model is to quantify the impact of a given building and identify policy linkages to mitigate energy demand and emissions growth related to China's new building construction. As efficiency has become a higher priority with growing energy demand, policy and academic attention to buildings has focused primarily on operational energy use. Existing studies estimate that building operational energy consumption accounts for approximately 25% of total primary energy use in China. However, buildings also require energy for mining, extracting, processing, manufacturing, and transporting materials, as well as energy for construction, maintenance, and decommissioning. Building and supporting infrastructure construction is a major driver of industry consumption--in 2008 industry accounted for 72% of total Chinese energy use. The magnitude of new building construction is large in China--in 2007, for example, total built floor area reached 58 billion square meters. During the construction boom in 2007 and 2008, more than two billion m{sup 2} of building space were added annually; China's recent construction is estimated to account for half of global construction. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed an integrated LCA model to capture the energy and emissions implications of all aspects of new buildings from material mining through construction, operations, and decommissioning. Over the following four sections, this report describes related existing research, the LBNL building LCA model structure and results, policy linkages of this lifecycle assessment, and conclusions and recommendations for follow-on work. The LBNL model is a first-order approach to gathering local data and applying lifecycle assessment to buildings in the Beijing area--it represents one effort among a range of established, predominantly American and European, LCA models. This report identifies the benefits, limitations, and policy applications of lifecycle assessment modeling for quantifying the energy and emissions impacts of specific residential and commercial buildings.

Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are at the locus of three trends driving China's increased energy use and emissions: urbanization, growing personal consumption, and surging heavy industrial production. Migration to cities and urban growth create demand for new building construction. Higher levels of per-capita income and consumption drive building operational energy use with demand for higher intensity lighting, thermal comfort, and plug-load power. Demand for new buildings, infrastructure, and electricity requires heavy industrial production. In order to quantify the implications of China's ongoing urbanization, rising personal consumption, and booming heavy industrial sector, this study presents a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the energy use and carbon emissions related to residential and commercial buildings. The purpose of the LCA model is to quantify the impact of a given building and identify policy linkages to mitigate energy demand and emissions growth related to China's new building construction. As efficiency has become a higher priority with growing energy demand, policy and academic attention to buildings has focused primarily on operational energy use. Existing studies estimate that building operational energy consumption accounts for approximately 25% of total primary energy use in China. However, buildings also require energy for mining, extracting, processing, manufacturing, and transporting materials, as well as energy for construction, maintenance, and decommissioning. Building and supporting infrastructure construction is a major driver of industry consumption--in 2008 industry accounted for 72% of total Chinese energy use. The magnitude of new building construction is large in China--in 2007, for example, total built floor area reached 58 billion square meters. During the construction boom in 2007 and 2008, more than two billion m{sup 2} of building space were added annually; China's recent construction is estimated to account for half of global construction. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed an integrated LCA model to capture the energy and emissions implications of all aspects of new buildings from material mining through construction, operations, and decommissioning. Over the following four sections, this report describes related existing research, the LBNL building LCA model structure and results, policy linkages of this lifecycle assessment, and conclusions and recommendations for follow-on work. The LBNL model is a first-order approach to gathering local data and applying lifecycle assessment to buildings in the Beijing area--it represents one effort among a range of established, predominantly American and European, LCA models. This report identifies the benefits, limitations, and policy applications of lifecycle assessment modeling for quantifying the energy and emissions impacts of specific residential and commercial buildings.

Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Lifecycle-analysis for heavy vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various alternative fuels and improved engine and vehicle systems have been proposed in order to reduce emissions and energy use associated with heavy vehicles (predominantly trucks). For example, oil companies have proposed improved methods for converting natural gas to zero-aromatics, zero-sulfur diesel fuel via the Fischer-Tropsch process. Major heavy-duty diesel engine companies are working on ways to simultaneously reduce particulate-matter and NOX emissions. The trend in heavy vehicles is toward use of lightweight materials, tires with lower rolling resistance, and treatments to reduce aerodynamic drag. In this paper, we compare the Mecycle energy use and emissions from trucks using selected alternatives, such as Fisher-Tropsch diesel fuel and advanced fuel-efficient engines. We consider heavy-duty, Class 8 tractor-semitrailer combinations for this analysis. The total life cycle includes production and recycling of the vehicle itself, extraction, processing, and transportation of the fuel itself, and vehicle operation and maintenance. Energy use is considered in toto, as well as those portions that are imported, domestic, and renewable. Emissions of interest include greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants. Angonne's Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model is used to generate per-vehicle fuel cycle impacts. Energy use and emissions for materials manufacturing and vehicle disposal are estimated by means of materials information from Argonne studies. We conclude that there are trade-offs among impacts. For example, the lowest fossil energy use does not necessarily result in lowest total energy use, and lower tailpipe emissions may not necessarily result in lower lifecycle emissions of all criteria pollutants.

Gaines, L.

1998-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

Emission control cost-effectiveness of alternative-fuel vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although various legislation and regulations have been adopted to promote the use of alternative-fuel vehicles for curbing urban air pollution problems, there is a lack of systematic comparisons of emission control cost-effectiveness among various alternative-fuel vehicle types. In this paper, life-cycle emission reductions and life-cycle costs were estimated for passenger cars fueled with methanol, ethanol, liquefied petroleum gas, compressed natural gas, and electricity. Vehicle emission estimates included both exhaust and evaporative emissions for air pollutants of hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and air-toxic pollutants of benzene, formaldehyde, 1,3-butadiene, and acetaldehyde. Vehicle life-cycle cost estimates accounted for vehicle purchase prices, vehicle life, fuel costs, and vehicle maintenance costs. Emission control cost-effectiveness presented in dollars per ton of emission reduction was calculated for each alternative-fuel vehicle types from the estimated vehicle life-cycle emission reductions and costs. Among various alternative-fuel vehicle types, compressed natural gas vehicles are the most cost-effective vehicle type in controlling vehicle emissions. Dedicated methanol vehicles are the next most cost-effective vehicle type. The cost-effectiveness of electric vehicles depends on improvements in electric vehicle battery technology. With low-cost, high-performance batteries, electric vehicles are more cost-effective than methanol, ethanol, and liquified petroleum gas vehicles.

Wang, Q. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sperling, D.; Olmstead, J. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation CTS 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference costs #12;Potential Applications · Roadway Project Feasibility Studies ­ Identified potential roadway infrastructure improvement ­ Documentation of estimated project costs ­ Determine property assessments

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Low Cost Titanium Powder Development for Additive Manufacturing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Cost Affordable Titanium IV. Presentation Title, Low Cost Titanium Powder ...

182

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - April 2008. Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook ...

183

Stochastic Life-cycle Analysis of Deteriorating Infrastructure Systems and an Application to Reinforced Concrete Bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrastructure systems are critical to a country’s prosperity. It is extremely important to manage the infrastructure systems efficiently in order to avoid wastage and to maximize benefits. Deterioration of infrastructure systems is one of the primary issues in civil engineering today. This problem has been widely acknowledged by engineering community in numerous studies. We need to evolve efficient strategies to tackle the problem of infrastructure deterioration and to efficiently operate infrastructure. In this research, we propose stochastic models to predict the process of deterioration in engineering systems and to perform life-cycle analysis (LCA) of deteriorating engineering systems. LCA has been recognized, over the years, as a highly informative tool for helping the decision making process in infrastructure management. In this research, we propose a stochastic model, SSA, to accurately predict the effect of deterioration processes in engineering systems. The SSA model addresses some of the important and ignored areas in the existing models such as the effect of deterioration on both capacity and demands of systems and accounting for different types of failures in assessing the life-span of a deteriorating system. Furthermore, this research proposes RTLCA, a renewal theory based LCA model, to predict the life-cycle performance of deteriorating systems taking into account not only the life-time reliability but also the costs associated with operating a system. In addition, this research investigates the effect of seismic degradation on the reliability of reinforced concrete (RC) bridges. For this purpose, we model the seismic degradation process in the RC bridge columns which are the primary lateral load resisting system in a bridge. Thereafter, the RTLCA model along with SSA model is used to study the life-cycle of an example RC bridge located in seismic regions accounting for seismic degradation. It is expected that the models proposed in this research will be helpful in better managing our infrastructure systems.

Ramesh Kumar, - 1982-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Solid-State Lighting: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmenta...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and...

185

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy intensity (Energy consumption/real $ GDP) About the Annual Energy Outlook. Contact Information and Staff; ... Updated capital cost for ...

186

Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2011. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Innovation and Development's (OTID) mission is to transform science into viable solutions for environmental cleanup. In 2010, OTID developed the Impact Plan, Science and Technology to Reduce the Life Cycle Cost of Closure to outline the benefits of research and development of the lifecycle cost of cleanup across the DOE complex. This plan outlines OTID's ability to reduce by $50 billion, the $200 billion life-cycle cost in waste processing, groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning. The projected life-cycle costs and return on investment are based on actual savings realized from technology innovation, development, and insertion into remedial strategies and schedules at the Fernald, Mound, and Ashtabula sites. To achieve our goals, OTID developed Applied Field Research Initiatives to facilitate and accelerate collaborative development and implementation of new tools and approaches that reduce risk, cost and time for site closure. The primary mission of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) is to protect our nation's water resources, keeping them clean and safe for future generations. The DVZ-AFRI was established for the DOE to develop effective, science-based solutions for remediating, characterizing, monitoring, and predicting the behavior and fate of deep vadose zone contamination. Subsurface contaminants include radionuclides, metals, organics, and liquid waste that originated from various sources, including legacy waste from the nation's nuclear weapons complexes. The DVZ-AFRI project team is translating strategy into action by working to solve these complex challenges in a collaborative environment that leverages technology and scientific expertise from DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, and the broad scientific research community. As project manager for the DVZ-AFRI, I have had the privilege this past year to team with creative, talented members of the scientific community nationwide to develop effective long-term solutions to address deep vadose zone contamination. This report highlights how the DVZ-AFRI project team is delivering results by achieving significant programmatic accomplishments, and developing and field-testing transformational technologies to address the nation's most pressing groundwater and vadose zone contamination problems.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Smith, Ronald M.; Truex, Michael J.; Matthews, Hope E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2011. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Innovation and Development's (OTID) mission is to transform science into viable solutions for environmental cleanup. In 2010, OTID developed the Impact Plan, Science and Technology to Reduce the Life Cycle Cost of Closure to outline the benefits of research and development of the lifecycle cost of cleanup across the DOE complex. This plan outlines OTID's ability to reduce by $50 billion, the $200 billion life-cycle cost in waste processing, groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning. The projected life-cycle costs and return on investment are based on actual savings realized from technology innovation, development, and insertion into remedial strategies and schedules at the Fernald, Mound, and Ashtabula sites. To achieve our goals, OTID developed Applied Field Research Initiatives to facilitate and accelerate collaborative development and implementation of new tools and approaches that reduce risk, cost and time for site closure. The primary mission of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) is to protect our nation's water resources, keeping them clean and safe for future generations. The DVZ-AFRI was established for the DOE to develop effective, science-based solutions for remediating, characterizing, monitoring, and predicting the behavior and fate of deep vadose zone contamination. Subsurface contaminants include radionuclides, metals, organics, and liquid waste that originated from various sources, including legacy waste from the nation's nuclear weapons complexes. The DVZ-AFRI project team is translating strategy into action by working to solve these complex challenges in a collaborative environment that leverages technology and scientific expertise from DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, and the broad scientific research community. As project manager for the DVZ-AFRI, I have had the privilege this past year to team with creative, talented members of the scientific community nationwide to develop effective long-term solutions to address deep vadose zone contamination. This report highlights how the DVZ-AFRI project team is delivering results by achieving significant programmatic accomplishments, and developing and field-testing transformational technologies to address the nation's most pressing groundwater and vadose zone contamination problems.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Smith, Ronald M.; Truex, Michael J.; Matthews, Hope E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The development of a life cycle cost model for railroad tunnels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today, Life Cycle Costing is one of the most popular ways of assessing a project's or an investment's worth to a company. This method of assessment is often applied to all stages of a investment's lifecycle, starting from ...

Angeles, Jon Virgil V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Performance metrics and life-cycle information management for building performance assurance  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for over $85 billion per year in energy costs, which is far more energy than technically necessary. One of the primary reasons buildings do not perform as well as intended is that critical information is lost, through ineffective documentation and communication, leading to building systems that are often improperly installed and operated. A life-cycle perspective on the management of building information provides a framework for improving commercial building energy performance. This paper describes a project to develop strategies and techniques to provide decision-makers with information needed to assure the desired building performance across the complete life cycle of a building project. A key element in this effort is the development of explicit performance metrics that quantitatively represent performance objectives of interest to various building stakeholders. The paper begins with a discussion of key problems identified in current building industry practice, and ongoing work to address these problems. The paper then focuses on the concept of performance metrics and their use in improving building performance during design, commissioning, and on-going operations. The design of a Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS) is presented. BLISS is intended to provide an information infrastructure capable of integrating a variety of building information technologies that support performance assurance. The use of performance metrics in case study building projects is explored to illustrate current best practice. The application of integrated information technology for improving current practice is discussed.

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Design and life-cycle considerations for unconventional-reservoir wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of design and life-cycle considerations for certain unconventional-reservoir wells. An overview of unconventional-reservoir definitions is provided. Well design and life-cycle considerations are addressed from three aspects: upfront reservoir development, initial well completion, and well-life and long-term considerations. Upfront-reservoir-development issues discussed include well spacing, well orientation, reservoir stress orientations, and tubular metallurgy. Initial-well-completion issues include maximum treatment pressures and rates, treatment diversion, treatment staging, flowback and cleanup, and dewatering needs. Well-life and long-term discussions include liquid loading, corrosion, refracturing and associated fracture reorientation, and the cost of abandonment. These design considerations are evaluated with case studies for five unconventional-reservoir types: shale gas (Barnett shale), tight gas (Jonah feld), tight oil (Bakken play), coalbed methane (CBM) (San Juan basin), and tight heavy oil (Lost Hills field). In evaluating the life cycle and design of unconventional-reservoir wells, 'one size' does not fit all and valuable knowledge and a shortening of the learning curve can be achieved for new developments by studying similar, more-mature fields.

Miskimins, J.L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the U.S., 1990-1991: Summary of Theory, Data, Methods, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specific transportation projects, the social-cost analysisold analyses of the social costs of transportation in the U.the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. by

Delucchi, Mark A.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Stochastic Modeling of Future Highway Maintenance Costs for Flexible Type Highway Pavement Construction Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transportation infrastructure systems in the United States were built between the 50's and 80's, with 20 years design life. As most of them already exceeded their original life expectancy, state transportation agencies (STAs) are now under increased needs to rebuild deteriorated transportation networks. For major highway maintenance projects, a federal rule enforces to perform a life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA). The lack of analytical methods for LCCA creates many challenges of STAs to comply with the rule. To address these critical issues, this study aims at developing a new methodology for quantifying the future maintenance cost to assist STAs in performing a LCCA. The major objectives of this research are twofold: 1) identify the critical factors that affect pavement performances; 2) develop a stochastic model that predicts future maintenance costs of flexible-type pavement in Texas. The study data were gathered through the Pavement Management Information System (PMIS) containing more than 190,000 highway sections in Texas. These data were then grouped by critical performance-driven factor which was identified by K-means cluster analysis. Many factors were evaluated to identify the most critical factors that affect pavement maintenance need. With these data, a series of regression analyses were carried out to develop predictive models. Lastly, a validation study with PRESS statistics was conducted to evaluate reliability of the model. The research results reveal that three factors, annual average temperature, annual precipitation, and pavement age, were the most critical factors under very low traffic volume conditions. This research effort was the first of its kind undertaken in this subject. The maintenance cost lookup tables and stochastic model will assist STAs in carrying out a LCCA, with the reliable estimation of maintenance costs. This research also provides the research community with the first view and systematic estimation method that STAs can use to determine long-term maintenance costs in estimating life-cycle costs. It will reduce the agency's expenses in the time and effort required for conducting a LCCA. Estimating long-term maintenance cost is a core component of the LCCA. Therefore, methods developed from this project have the great potential to improve the accuracy of LCCA.

Kim, Yoo Hyun

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Reducing Home Heating and Cooling Costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . . . . 19 B1. Annual Cost of Oil Heat in Various Climates for a Range of Heating Oil Prices and System Efficiencies . . . . . 21 B2. Annual Cost of Gas Heat in...

194

Information Resources: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products This March 28, 2013 webcast reviewed DOE's recently completed three-part study of the life-cycle energy and environmental impacts of LED lighting products relative to incandescent and CFL alternatives. The reports for Parts 1 and 2 were published in February 2012 and June 2012, respectively, providing a literature review and life-cycle assessment (LCA) for lamps utilizing these three light source technologies. Presenters Jason Tuenge of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Brad Hollomon of Compa Industries focused on findings from Part 3, which augments the LCA results with chemical analysis of a variety of lamps using standard testing procedures from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the State of California. A total of 22 samples, representing 11 different lamps, were tested to ascertain whether potentially toxic elements are present in concentrations that exceed regulatory thresholds for hazardous waste.

195

Totally green: evaluating and designing servers for lifecycle environmental impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental impact of servers and datacenters is an important future challenge. System architects have traditionally focused on operational energy as a proxy for designing green servers, but this ignores important environmental implications from ... Keywords: datacenter design, dematerialization, disaggregation, environmental sustainability, exergy, green computing, lifecycle impact, server architecture

Jichuan Chang; Justin Meza; Parthasarathy Ranganathan; Amip Shah; Rocky Shih; Cullen Bash

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Ambient Intelligence in Product Life-cycle Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To fulfil the increasing demands today the short innovation time and the high quality of production itself is not enough in production of goods, but all phases of a product (from idea to recycling) should be managed by advanced tools and means. Nowadays ... Keywords: Ambient Intelligence, Product Life-cycle Management, Service engineering

G. Kovács; S. Kopácsi; G. Haidegger; R. Michelini

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Incorporating UCD into the software development lifecycle: a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study addresses how we applied user centered design (UCD) to the software development lifecycle for the new City of Austin Utilities Online Customer Care website. The case study focuses on the use of personas, prototypes, and user testing, ... Keywords: personas, prototypes, simulations, ucd, usability, user centered design, user experience

Andy Switzky

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

International Association of Hydrogeologists (Irish Group) 23rd Annual Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, implementation costs, long-term maintenance requirements, and life-cycle costs. The most promising and best urban hydrological cycle. These combinations of unit processes, termed treatment trains, can be applied understood stormwater control practices are wet detention ponds. Less reliable in terms of predicting

Pitt, Robert E.

199

Cost and Reliability Improvement for CIGS-Based PV on Flexible Substrate: Annual Technical Report, 24 May 2006 - 25 September 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Global Solar Energy has enhanced module reliability, reduced cost and improved performance of its CIGS deposition process, and reduced cost of materials and processes for contacts.

Weideman, S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Annual Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Radiation Exposure Occupational Radiation Exposure Home Welcome What's New Register Dose History Request Data File Submittal REMS Data Selection HSS Logo Annual Reports User Survey on the Annual Report Please take the time to complete a survey on the Annual Report. Your input is important to us! The 2012 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2011 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2010 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2009 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2008 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2007 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2006 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2005 Annual Report

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Social Costs of Intercity Passenger Transportation: AEffects and Social Costs of Road Transport, TransportationTransportation Research Center, Knoxville, TN [Delucchi 1997] Delucchi, M. , The Annualized Social Cost

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

FY 1996 solid waste integrated life-cycle forecast characteristics summary. Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past six years, a waste volume forecast has been collected annually from onsite and offsite generators that currently ship or are planning to ship solid waste to the Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Central Waste Complex (CWC). This document provides a description of the physical waste forms, hazardous waste constituents, and radionuclides of the waste expected to be shipped to the CWC from 1996 through the remaining life cycle of the Hanford Site (assumed to extend to 2070). In previous years, forecast data has been reported for a 30-year time period; however, the life-cycle approach was adopted this year to maintain consistency with FY 1996 Multi-Year Program Plans. This document is a companion report to two previous reports: the more detailed report on waste volumes, WHC-EP-0900, FY1996 Solid Waste Integrated Life-Cycle Forecast Volume Summary and the report on expected containers, WHC-EP-0903, FY1996 Solid Waste Integrated Life-Cycle Forecast Container Summary. All three documents are based on data gathered during the FY 1995 data call and verified as of January, 1996. These documents are intended to be used in conjunction with other solid waste planning documents as references for short and long-term planning of the WHC Solid Waste Disposal Division`s treatment, storage, and disposal activities over the next several decades. This document focuses on two main characteristics: the physical waste forms and hazardous waste constituents of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic waste (both non-mixed and mixed) (TRU(M)). The major generators for each waste category and waste characteristic are also discussed. The characteristics of low-level waste (LLW) are described in Appendix A. In addition, information on radionuclides present in the waste is provided in Appendix B. The FY 1996 forecast data indicate that about 100,900 cubic meters of LLMW and TRU(M) waste is expected to be received at the CWC over the remaining life cycle of the site. Based on ranges provided by the waste generators, this baseline volume could fluctuate between a minimum of about 59,720 cubic meters and a maximum of about 152,170 cubic meters. The range is primarily due to uncertainties associated with the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program, including uncertainties regarding retrieval of long-length equipment, scheduling, and tank retrieval technologies.

Templeton, K.J.

1996-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the U.S., 1990-1991: Summary of Theory, Data, Methods, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Use of Persian-Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles (M. Delucchirunoff polluted by oil from motor vehicles, and pollutionuse of Persian-Gulf oil by motor vehicles B, D Annualized

Delucchi, Mark A.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

To Recycle or Not to Recycle: That Is the Question - Insights from Life-Cycle Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MRS BULLETIN MRS BULLETIN * VOLUME 37 * APRIL 2012 * www.mrs.org/bulletin © 2012 Materials Research Society MANUFACTURING * RECYCLING Why recycle? The most commonly stated reason for recycling is to reduce burdens associated with the disposal of our never-ending stream of wastes. Waste disposal potentially causes air and water pollution and is costly; moreover, landfi lls compete with other land uses. In addition, recycling can extend our supply of materials to alleviate scarcity and to moderate rising prices of raw materials. Furthermore, recycling is often more environmentally benign than using virgin raw materials and can reduce energy use and emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants. Life-cycle analysis Despite these positive attributes, not all recycling processes

205

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Std Dev Cost Per Annual Cost Per kWh Usage Peak kW AverageStd Dev Cost Per Annual Cost Per kWh Usage Peak kW Average3-2. Logged Outage Cost per Annual kWh Figure 3-3. Logged

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the U.S., 1990-1991: Summary of Theory, Data, Methods, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to count all price-times-quantity oil revenues as the cost,cost simply as the quantity of crude oil embodied in highwaythe actual price-times-quantity payment for oil. That is, in

Delucchi, Mark A.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Velocity of Money in a Life-Cycle Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The determinants of the velocity of money have been examined based on life-cycle hypothesis. The velocity of money can be expressed by reciprocal of the average value of holding time which is defined as interval between participating exchanges for one unit of money. This expression indicates that the velocity is governed by behavior patterns of economic agents and open a way to constructing micro-foundation of it. It is found that time pattern of income and expense for a representative individual can be obtained from a simple version of life-cycle model, and average holding time of money resulted from the individual's optimal choice depends on the expected length of relevant planning periods.

Wang, Y; Wang, Yougui; Qiu, Hanqing

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

GREET Life-Cycle Analysis of Biofuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Li Li 收件人 School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology Battery Recycling: How to Make It Happen Analysis can help identify a clear path for battery production and recycling  Purpose is to clear the road for mass-market introduction of battery-powered vehicles by identifying any roadblocks on the way  Life cycle analysis (LCA) is used to identify significant environmental issues  Availability of recycling processes can:  Assure against major waste problems at end-of-life  Reduce environmental impacts  Reduce raw material supply issues  Reduce net material costs  Create viable business opportunities  Economic and institutional constraints must also be accounted for

209

Costs of Urban Stormwater Control Practices Arvind Narayanan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The life-cycle project costs include the initial construction costs, in addition to long- term maintenance)......................................................................................................................76 Table 64. Estimated Capital Cost of a 1.5-foot Deep, 10-feet Wide, 1,000-feet Long Grass Swale (SEWRPC)......................................................................................................................78 Table 65. Estimated Capital Cost of a 3.0-feet Deep, 21-feet Wide, 1,000-feet Long Grass Swale (SEWRPC

Pitt, Robert E.

210

Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.  

SciTech Connect

The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

211

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

212

Interoperable, life-cycle tools for assuring building performance: An overview of a commercial building initiative  

SciTech Connect

A key impediment to improving the energy efficiency and reducing the environmental impact of buildings is the complexity and cost of managing information over the life cycle of a building. A surprisingly large fraction of the total cost of buildings is embodied in the decision making and information management process due to the structure of the building industry, the numerous people and companies involved in the process, the current nature of the building acquisition process, and the long time periods over which buildings operate once design and construction are completed. The authors suggest that new interoperable software tools could greatly facilitate and rationalize this complex process, thereby reducing time and cost, and greatly improving the habitability and environmental impact of these buildings. They describe a series of projects in which they are building and testing several prototype toolkits as part of a building life-cycle information system that will allow interoperable software tools to function more effectively throughout the design, construction, commissioning, and operations phases.

Selkowitz, S.; Piette, M.A.; Papamichael, K.; Sartor, D.; Hitchcock, R.; Olken, F.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lifecycle Assessment (LCA) is undergoing a period of rapid change as it strives to become more policy-relevant. Attributional LCA, the traditional LCA category, is beginning… (more)

Gopal, Anand Raja

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Comparison of Li-Ion Battery Recycling Processes by Life-Cycle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory Comparison of Li-Ion Battery Recycling Processes by Life-Cycle Analysis Electric Vehicles and the Environment...

215

Cost objective PLM and CE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concurrent engineering taking into account product life-cycle factors seems to be one of the industrial challenges of the next years. Cost estimation and management are two main strategic tasks that imply the possibility of managing costs at the earliest stages of product development. This is why it is indispensable to let people from economics and from industrial engineering collaborates in order to find the best solution for enterprise progress for economical factors mastering. The objective of this paper is to present who we try to adapt costing methods in a PLM and CE point of view to the new industrial context and configuration in order to give pertinent decision aid for product and process choices. A very important factor is related to cost management problems when developing new products. A case study is introduced that presents how product development actors have referenced elements to product life-cycle costs and impacts, how they have an idea bout economical indicators when taking decisions during the progression of the project of product development.

Nicolas Perry; Alain Bernard

2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

TriBITS lifecycle model. Version 1.0, a lean/agile software lifecycle model for research-based computational science and engineering and applied mathematical software.  

SciTech Connect

Software lifecycles are becoming an increasingly important issue for computational science and engineering (CSE) software. The process by which a piece of CSE software begins life as a set of research requirements and then matures into a trusted high-quality capability is both commonplace and extremely challenging. Although an implicit lifecycle is obviously being used in any effort, the challenges of this process - respecting the competing needs of research vs. production - cannot be overstated. Here we describe a proposal for a well-defined software lifecycle process based on modern Lean/Agile software engineering principles. What we propose is appropriate for many CSE software projects that are initially heavily focused on research but also are expected to eventually produce usable high-quality capabilities. The model is related to TriBITS, a build, integration and testing system, which serves as a strong foundation for this lifecycle model, and aspects of this lifecycle model are ingrained in the TriBITS system. Here, we advocate three to four phases or maturity levels that address the appropriate handling of many issues associated with the transition from research to production software. The goals of this lifecycle model are to better communicate maturity levels with customers and to help to identify and promote Software Engineering (SE) practices that will help to improve productivity and produce better software. An important collection of software in this domain is Trilinos, which is used as the motivation and the initial target for this lifecycle model. However, many other related and similar CSE (and non-CSE) software projects can also make good use of this lifecycle model, especially those that use the TriBITS system. Indeed this lifecycle process, if followed, will enable large-scale sustainable integration of many complex CSE software efforts across several institutions.

Willenbring, James M.; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Heroux, Michael Allen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Accelerating PV Cost Effectiveness Through Systems Design, Engineering, and Quality Assurance: Phase I Annual Technical Report, 4 November 2004 - 3 November 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Phase I of this PV Manufacturing R&D subcontract, PowerLight Corporation has made significant progress toward the reduction of installed costs for commercial-scale, rooftop PV systems. PowerLight has worked to reduce operating costs by improving long-term reliability and performance through the development of more sophisticated tools used in system design and monitoring. Additionally, PowerLight has implemented design improvements with the goal of reducing cost while maintaining and/or improving product quality. As part of this effort, PowerLight also modified manufacturing and shipping processes to accommodate these design changes, streamline material flow, reduce cost, and decrease waste streams. During Phase II of this project, PowerLight plans to continue this work with the goal of reducing system cost and improving system performance.

Botkin, J.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Renewable Diesel from Algal Lipids: An Integrated Baseline for Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential from a Harmonized Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Program has begun an initiative to obtain consistent quantitative metrics for algal biofuel production to establish an 'integrated baseline' by harmonizing and combining the Program's national resource assessment (RA), techno-economic analysis (TEA), and life-cycle analysis (LCA) models. The baseline attempts to represent a plausible near-term production scenario with freshwater microalgae growth, extraction of lipids, and conversion via hydroprocessing to produce a renewable diesel (RD) blendstock. Differences in the prior TEA and LCA models were reconciled (harmonized) and the RA model was used to prioritize and select the most favorable consortium of sites that supports production of 5 billion gallons per year of RD. Aligning the TEA and LCA models produced slightly higher costs and emissions compared to the pre-harmonized results. However, after then applying the productivities predicted by the RA model (13 g/m2/d on annual average vs. 25 g/m2/d in the original models), the integrated baseline resulted in markedly higher costs and emissions. The relationship between performance (cost and emissions) and either productivity or lipid fraction was found to be non-linear, and important implications on the TEA and LCA results were observed after introducing seasonal variability from the RA model. Increasing productivity and lipid fraction alone was insufficient to achieve cost and emission targets; however, combined with lower energy, less expensive alternative technology scenarios, emissions and costs were substantially reduced.

Davis, R.; Fishman, D.; Frank, E. D.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Aden, A.; Coleman, A. M.; Pienkos, P. T.; Skaggs, R. J.; Venteris, E. R.; Wang, M. Q.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Sensitivity Analysis of H2-Vehicles' Market Prospects, Costs and Benefits - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program David L. Greene (Primary Contact), Zhenhong Lin, Jing Dong Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 Phone: (865) 946-1310 Email: dlgreene@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Subcontractor: Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN Project Start Date: October, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Project market shares of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles * (FCVs) under varying market conditions using the Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) model.

220

Finished Prokaryotic Genome Assemblies from a Low-cost Combination of Short and Long Reads (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shuangye Yin on "Finished prokaryotic genome assemblies from a low-cost combination of short and long reads" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Yin, Shuangye (Broad Institute)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Electricity Energy Storage Technology Options 2012 System Cost Benchmarking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the current capital and lifecycle costs estimates of electric energy storage options for a variety of grid and end-user applications. Data presented in this report update 2010 data provided in EPRI Technical Report 1020676. The goal of this research was to develop objective and consistent installed costs and operational and maintenance costs for a set of selected energy storage systems in the identified applications. Specific objectives included development of ...

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

222

Implementing data security in student lifecycle management system at the university of Prishtina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper is presented a novel approach for fulfilling the data security criteria in a Student Lifecycle Management System at the University of Prishtina. The four main criteria of data security such as: privacy, authentication, integrity and non-repudiation ... Keywords: X.509 certificate, authentication, digital signature, non-repudiation, privacy, security, smart cards, student lifecycle management

Blerim Rexha; Haxhi Lajqi; Myzafere Limani

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Experiences with early life-cycle performance modeling for architecture assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe our preliminary experiences of a performance modeling "Blending" approach for early life-cycle architecture assessment and risk mitigation in a large enterprise integration project. The goal was to use performance modeling to ... Keywords: blended performance modeling, early life-cycle risk mitigation

Paul C. Brebner

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Year 2006 UCD-ITS-RR-06-08 Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Year 2006 UCD-ITS-RR-06-08 Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels Draft Report (May be cited as draft://its.ucdavis.edu/ #12;DRAFT WORKING MANUSCRIPT LIFECYCLE ANALYSES OF BIOFUELS Draft manuscript (may be cited as draft analysis (LCA) of biofuels for transportation has three major parts: I. An analysis of greenhouse

Delucchi, Mark

225

Cost reduction and manufacture of the SunSine{reg_sign} AC module: Phase I Annual Report : 21 April 1998 -- 31 October 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made by Ascension Technology in Phase 1 of the cost reduction and manufacturing improvements of the SunSine{reg_sign} AC Module. This work, conducted under NREL subcontract, is a two-phase effort consisting of investigations into improving inverter packaging, soft switching, circuit optimization, design for manufacturing, manufacturing processes, and pilot production manufacturing. The objective of this subcontract is to significantly reduce the cost of the SunSine{reg_sign} inverter, enhance its performance, and streamline and expand the manufacturing process. During Phase 1, the soft-switching topology was designed, then refined to meet stringent cost and performance goals. This design resulted in improved performance, smaller overall footprint, and reduced costs. The aluminum inverter housing was redesigned, and the decision was made to conformal coat the circuit boards, which was verified through the HAST (Highly Accelerated Stress Testing) method. Potential international markets were identified, and the inverter is designed to be easily modified to meet the requirements of other countries. Significant cost reduction and performance improvements have been achieved in Phase I, and accomplishments during Phase I include: (1) SunSine{reg_sign} AC Module costs have been reduced enough to be able to reduce the suggested list price; (2) successful implementation of soft-switching; (3) power circuit-board size reduced 53{percent}; (4) power circuit-board component count reduced 34{percent}; (5) total inverter parts count reduced 49{percent}; (6) anticipated inverter manufacturing cost reduced 57{percent} on a $/Wp rating; (7) transformer efficiency improved 1.4{percent}; and (8) inverter efficiency improved 4.7{percent} to 91.0{percent} at 275 Wac.

Kern, E.; Kern, G.

2000-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

Synergistically Enhanced Materials and Design Parameters for Reducing the Cost of Hydrogen Storage Tanks - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Kevin L. Simmons (Primary Contact), Kenneth Johnson, and Kyle Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 Phone: (509) 375-3651 Email: Kevin.Simmons@pnnl.gov Norman Newhouse (Lincoln Composites, Inc.), Mike Veenstra (Ford Motor Company), Anand V. Rau (TORAY Carbon Fibers America) and Thomas Steinhausler (AOC, L.L.C.) DOE Managers HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams

227

Development of Low-Cost, High Strength Commercial Textile Precursor (PAN-MA) - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report C.D. Warren and Felix L. Paulauskas Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1 Bethel Valley Road Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Phone: (865) 574-9693 Email: warrencd@ornl.gov Email: paulauskasfl@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov Contributors: * Hippolyte Grappe (ORNL) * Fue Xiong (ORNL) * Ana Paula Vidigal (FISIPE) * Jose Contrerias (FISIPE) Project Start Date: April 21, 2011 Project End Date: July 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Down-select from 11 polymer candidate polymer *

228

New MEA Materials for Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) Performance, Durability, and Cost - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report James Fletcher (Primary Contact), Philip Cox University of North Florida (UNF) 1 UNF Drive Jacksonville, FL 32224 Phone: (904) 620-1844 Email: jfletche@UNF.edu DOE Managers HQ: Donna Ho Phone: (202) 586-8000 Email: Donna.Ho@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000475 Subcontractors: * University of Florida, Gainesville, FL * Northeastern University, Boston, MA * Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells, Swindon, UK

229

TMS 2013: Annual Meeting & Exhibition - Students  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

(A detailed cost breakdown is included below.) ... My participation in the TMS 2013 Annual Meeting & Exhibition is a wise investment of time and energy that will ...

230

Phase I of the automated array assembly task of the low cost silicon solar array project. Annual technical report. Motorola report No. 2258/4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed to analyze, both technically and economically, the state of technology readiness for the automated production of solar cells and modules is compiled and reviewed critically. The long-term objective solar module characteristics include a selling price of less than $.50/peak watt and a mean-time-before-failure (MTBF) of 20 years in any terrestrial environment. While efficiency is important to attaining the cost goal, it is a most significant factor in array economics; accordingly, this program has stressed high efficiency, with a suggested cell goal of 15 percent. The analysis emphasized technical evaluation of individual process steps first, and then concentrated upon process sequences for making solar cells and modules. Further analysis was performed to yield a detailed cost study of individual process steps; this was applied to the cost analysis of potential process sequences. Potentially economical process sequences formed from process steps deemed to have high technical merit were then identified. Potentially promising technologies needing further development to achieve satisfactory maturity were then identified. It is concluded that, while specific areas of technology need advanced development and the source of silicon needs definition, no fundamentally new technology needs to be developed to permit manufacture of solar cells which will meet the 1985 LSSA Program cost goals.

Coleman, M.G.; Pryor, R.A.; Grenon, L.A.; Lesk, I.A.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the U.S., 1990-1991: Summary of Theory, Data, Methods, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gasoline excludes retail sales taxes and the motor-fuelmotor gasoline, and add to it the refineriesÕ actual private cost (exclusive of taxes)motor vehicles, and certainly not to forward any particular position about what, for example, gasoline taxes

Delucchi, Mark A.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Photovoltaic Manufacturing Cost and Throughput Improvements for Thin-Film CIGS-Based Modules; Phase II Annual Subcontract Technical Report, July 1999 - August 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin-film photovoltaics (PV) has expanded dramatically in the last five years, but commercial use remains limited by performance, cost, and reliability. Of all the thin-film systems, copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) has demonstrated the greatest potential for achieving high performance at a low cost. The highest-quality CIGS has been formed by multi-source co-evaporation, a technique pioneered in this country by researchers at NREL. Multi-source co-evaporation is also potentially the fastest and most cost-effective method of CIGS absorber deposition. Global Solar Energy (GSE) has adapted multi-source co-evaporation of CIGS to large-area, roll-to-roll processing on flexible substrates, enabling several manufacturing and product capability advantages. Roll-to-roll processing enables a low-cost, automated continuous manufacturing process. Flexible substrates enable product application in unique, as well as traditional, areas. The primary objectives of the GSE Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract are to reduce cost and expand the production rate of thin-film CIGS-based PV modules on flexible substrates. Improvements will be implemented in monolithic integration, CIGS deposition, contact deposition, and in-situ CIGS control and monitoring. Specific goals of the three-year contract are: - Monolithic Integration - Increase integration speed by developing high-speed, all-laser scribing processes that are more than 100% faster than the baseline process and offer clean, selective scribing; increase capacity and substantially reduce module area losses by insulating materials with high accuracy into laser scribes. - Absorber Deposition - Increase absorber-layer deposition rate by 75% in the large-area, continuous GSE process, increasing throughput and reducing labor and capital costs. Integrate a parallel detector spectroscopic ellipsometer (PDSE) with mathematical algorithms for in-situ control of the CIGS absorber, enabling runs of over 300 meters of moving substrate, while ensuring uniform properties; enhance health and safety by reducing selenium waste generation through modifications to the reactor and Se delivery method. - Back Contact Deposition - Reduce back-contact cost and increase operation yield by using improved back-contact materials.

Wendt, T.G.; Wiedeman, S. (Global Solar Energy, L.L.C.)

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy generation from wind, geothermal, biomass, and central station solar thermal, with a 5% annual increase in the real cost

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

DOE Annual Progress Report: Water Needs and Constraints for Hydrogen Pathways  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water is a critical feedstock in the production of hydrogen. In fact, water and many of the energy transformations upon which society depends are inextricably linked. Approximately 39% of freshwater withdrawals are used for cooling of power plants, and another 8% are used in industry and mining (including oil and gas extraction and refining). Major changes in the energy infrastructure (as envisioned in a transformation to a hydrogen economy) will necessarily result in changes to the water infrastructure. Depending on the manner in which a hydrogen economy evolves, these changes could be large or small, detrimental or benign. Water is used as a chemical feedstock for hydrogen production and as a coolant for the production process. Process and cooling water must meet minimum quality specifications (limits on mineral and organic contaminants) at both the inlet to the process and at the point of discharge. If these specifications are not met, then the water must be treated, which involves extra expenditure on equipment and energy. There are multiple options for water treatment and cooling systems, each of which has a different profile of equipment cost and operational requirements. The engineering decisions that are made when building out the hydrogen infrastructure will play an important role in the cost of producing hydrogen, and those decisions will be influenced by the regional and national policies that help to manage water resources. In order to evaluate the impacts of water on hydrogen production and of a hydrogen economy on water resources, this project takes a narrowly-scoped lifecycle analysis approach. We begin with a process model of hydrogen production and calculate the process water, cooling, electricity and energy feedstock demands. We expand beyond the production process itself by analyzing the details of the cooling system and water treatment system. At a regional scale, we also consider the water use associated with the electricity and fuel that feed hydrogen production and distribution. The narrow scope of the lifecycle analysis enables economic optimization at the plant level with respect to cooling and water treatment technologies. As water withdrawal and disposal costs increase, more expensive, but more water-efficient technologies become more attractive. Some of the benefits of these technologies are offset by their increased energy usage. We use the H2A hydrogen production model to determine the overall cost of hydrogen under a range of water cost and technology scenarios. At the regional level, we are planning on following the hydrogen roll-out scenarios envisioned by Greene and Leiby (2008) to determine the impact of hydrogen market penetration on various watersheds. The economics of various water technologies will eventually be incorporated into the temporal and geographic Macro System Model via a water module that automates the spreadsheet models described. At the time of this progress report, the major achievement for FY2009 has been the completion of the framework and analytical results of the economic optimization of water technology for hydrogen production. This accomplishment required the collection of cost and performance data for multiple cooling and water treatment technologies, as well as the integration of a water and energy balance model with the H2A framework. 22 (twenty-two) different combinations of production method (SMR, electrolysis), scale (centralized, forecourt), cooling (evaporative tower, dry) and water treatment (reverse osmosis, ion exchange) were evaluated. The following data were collected: water withdrawal, water discharge, electricity consumption, equipment footprint, equipment cost, installation cost, annual equipment and material costs and annual labor costs. These data, when consolidated, fit into a small number of input cells in H2A. Items such as capital cost end up as line-items for which there is space in the existing H2A spreadsheets. Items such as electricity use are added to the values that already exist in H2A. Table 1 lists eight potential technology combina

Simon, A; Daily, W

2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

235

Process-Based Cost Modeling to Support Target Value Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Designing to Target Cost. ” 12th Annual Conference of thethe Hurdle of First Cost: Action Research in TargetD.T. (1987). “A Future for Cost Modelling: Building Cost

Nguyen, Hung Viet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Very Low Cost Manufacturing of Titanium Alloy Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Cost-Affordable Titanium III. Presentation Title, Very Low Cost Manufacturing ...

237

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

more efficient system. When considering a water heater model for your home, estimate its energy efficiency and annual operating cost. Then, compare costs with other more andor...

238

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than 6 million in cost savings, 3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin...

239

Manufacturing of Low-Cost, Durable Membrane Electrode Assemblies Engineered for Rapid Conditioning - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program F. Colin Busby W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc (Gore) Gore Electrochemical Technologies Team 201 Airport Road Elkton, MD 21921 Phone: (410) 392-3200 Email: CBusby@WLGore.com DOE Managers HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FСЗ6-08G018052 Subcontractors: * UTC Power, South Windsor, CT * University of Delaware, Newark, DE (UD) * University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (UTK) Project Start Date: October 1, 2008 Project End Date: June 30, 2014

240

Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Mark Leavitt Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide, Inc. 25242 Arctic Ocean Drive Lake Forest, CA 92630 Phone: (949) 399-4584 Email: mleavitt@qtww.com DOE Managers HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO18055 Subcontractors: * Boeing Research and Technology, Seattle, WA * Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA Project Start Date: September 1, 2008 Project End Date: March 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop new methods for manufacturing Type IV

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Low-Cost Large-Scale PEM Electrolysis for Renewable Energy Storage - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Dr. Katherine Ayers (Primary Contact), Chris Capuano Proton Energy Systems d/b/a Proton OnSite 10 Technology Drive Wallingford, CT 06492 Phone: (203) 678-2190 Email: kayers@protononsite.com DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0001338 Subcontractors: * 3M, Minneapolis, MN * University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY Project Start Date: June 19, 2010 (Phase 1) Project End Date: August 18, 2013 (with Phase 2 continuation) Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Project Objectives Demonstrate optimal membrane electrode assembly * (MEA) efficiency through: Refinement of catalyst compositions based on -

242

Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on High-Stability Low-Cost Supports - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Radoslav Adzic (Primary Contact), Miomir Vukmirovic, Kotaro Sasaki, Jia Wang, Yang Shao-Horn 1 , Rachel O'Malley 2 Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Bldg. 555 Upton, NY 11973-5000 Phone: (631) 344-4522 Email: adzic@bnl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: 1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge MA 2 Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells (JMFC), London, England Project Start Date: July 1, 2009 Project End Date: September 30, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Developing high-performance fuel cell electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) comprising contiguous Pt monolayer (ML) on stable, inexpensive metal

243

Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Tri-Generation Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Mark F. Ruth* (Primary Contact), Michael E. Goldsby † , Timothy J. Sa † , Victor Diakov* *National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Pkwy. Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 817-6160 Email: Mark.Ruth@nrel.gov † Sandia National Laboratories DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: December 1, 2010 Project End Date: October 31, 2011 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop a macro-system model (MSM): * Aimed at performing rapid cross-cutting analysis - Utilizing and linking other models - Improving consistency between models - Incorporate tri-generation systems into the MSM and * develop a methodology for MSM users to analyze

244

Critical Research for Cost-Effective Photoelectrochemical Production of Hydrogen - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Liwei Xu (Primary Contact) 1 , Anke E. Abken 2 , William B. Ingler 3 , John Turner 4 1 Midwest Optoelectronics LLC (MWOE) 2801 W. Bancroft Street Mail Stop 230 Toledo, OH 43606 Phone: (419) 215-8583 Email: xu@mwoe.com 2 Xunlight Corporation (Xunlight) 3 University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (UT) 4 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (NREL) DOE Managers HQ: Eric Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-05GO15028 Subcontractors: * Xunlight Corporation, Toledo, OH * University of Toledo, Toledo, OH * National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO

245

New High Performance Water Vapor Membranes to Improve Fuel Cell Balance of Plant Efficiency and Lower Costs (SBIR Phase I) - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Earl H. Wagener (Primary Contact), Brad P. Morgan, Jeffrey R. DiMaio Tetramer Technologies L.L.C. 657 S. Mechanic St. Pendleton, SC 29670 Phone: (864) 646-6282 Email: earl.wagener@tetramertechnologies.com DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0006172 Project Start Date: June 17, 2011 Project End Date: March 16, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Demonstrate water vapor transport membrane with * >18,000 gas permeation units (GPU) Water vapor membrane with less than 20% loss in * performance after stress tests Crossover leak rate: <150 GPU * Temperature Durability of 90°C with excursions to * 100°C Cost of <$10/m

246

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Social Costs of Intercity Passenger Transportation: AEffects and Social Costs of Road Transport, TransportationTransportation Research Center, Knoxville, TN [Delucchi 1997] Delucchi, M. , The Annualized Social Cost

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Labor costs may be reduced . . . Research yields size-controlling rootstocks for peach production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Doyle David Ramming Production costs in peaches are highlyby UC and USDA. production costs could be substantiallyDRAFT T he annual production costs for peaches grown in

DeJong, Theodore M.; Johnson, R. Scott; Doyle, James F.; Ramming, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Metracker version 1.5: Life-cycle performance metricstracking  

SciTech Connect

Buildings often do not perform as well in practice as expected during pre-design planning, nor as intended at the design stage, nor even as measured during commissioning and maintenance operations. While this statement is generally considered to be true, it is difficult to quantify the impacts and long-term economic implications of a building in which performance does not meet expectations. This leads to a building process that is devoid of quantitative feedback that could be used to detect and correct problems both in an individual building and in the building process itself. A key element in this situation is the lack of a standardized method for documenting and communicating information about the intended and actual performance of a building. This deficiency leads to several shortcomings in the life-cycle management of building information. Planners have no means of clearly specifying their expectations. Designers do not concisely document their design intent. Commissioning personnel have no standardized method for documenting the results of performance testing. Post-occupancy building performance cannot readily be compared to expectations in an attempt to evaluate and improve design and operation decisions. Lastly, without quantification of the magnitude of performance problems it is difficult to motivate building process participants to alter their current practice. This document describes an information management concept and a prototype tool based on this concept that has been developed to address this situation. The Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS) has been designed to manage a wide range of building related information across the life cycle of a building project. Metracker is a prototype implementation of BLISS based on the International Alliance for Interoperability's (IAI) Industry Foundation Classes (IFC). The IFC is an evolving data model under development by a variety of architectural, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry firms and organizations (IAI, 2001). Metracker has been developed to demonstrate and explore the process of tracking performance metrics across the building life cycle.

Hitchcock, Robert J.

2002-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

249

Monitoring and Evaluation; Statistical Support for Life-cycle Studies, Annual Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the statistical analysis and consulting activities performed under Contract No. 00025093, Project No. 199105100, funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) during 2006. These efforts are focused on providing real-time predictions of outmigration timing, assessment of life-history performance measures, evaluation of status and trends in recovery, and guidance on the design and analysis of Columbia Basin fish and wildlife studies monitoring and evaluation studies. The overall objective of the project is to provide BPA and the rest of the fisheries community with statistical guidance on design, analysis, and interpretation of monitoring data, which will lead to improved monitoring and evaluation of salmonid mitigation programs in the Columbia/Snake River Basin. This overall goal is being accomplished by making fisheries data readily available for public scrutiny, providing statistical guidance on the design and analyses of studies by hands-on support and written documents, and providing real-time analyses of tagging results during the smolt outmigration for review by decision makers. For over a decade, this project has been providing in-season projections of smolt outmigration timing to assist in spill management. As many as 52 different fish stocks at 10 different hydroprojects are tracked in real-time to predict the 'percent of run to date' and 'date to specific percentile'. The project also conducts added-value analyses of historical tagging data to understand relationships between fish responses, environmental factors, and anthropogenic effects. The statistical analysis of historical tagging data crosses agency lines in order to assimilate information on salmon population dynamics irrespective of origin. The lessons learned from past studies are used to improve the design and analyses of future monitoring and evaluation efforts. Through these efforts, the project attempts to provide the fisheries community with reliable analyses and interpretations of monitoring data to evaluate hydrosystem operations and the recovery of endangered and threatened salmonid stocks.

Skalski, John

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Monitoring and Evaluation; Statistical Support for Life-cycle Studies, 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the statistical analysis and consulting activities performed under Contract No. 00004134, Project No. 199105100 funded by Bonneville Power Administration during 2003. These efforts are focused on providing real-time predictions of outmigration timing, assessment of life-history performance measures, evaluation of status and trends in recovery, and guidance on the design and analysis of Columbia Basin fish and wildlife studies monitoring and evaluation studies. The overall objective of the project is to provide BPA and the rest of the fisheries community with statistical guidance on design, analysis, and interpretation of monitoring data, which will lead to improved monitoring and evaluation of salmonid mitigation programs in the Columbia/Snake River Basin. This overall goal is being accomplished by making fisheries data readily available for public scrutiny, providing statistical guidance on the design and analyses of studies by hands-on support and written documents, and providing real-time analyses of tagging results during the smolt outmigration for review by decision makers. For a decade, this project has been providing in-season projections of smolt outmigration timing to assist in spill management. As many as 50 different fish stocks at 8 different hydroprojects are tracked and real-time to predict the 'percent of run to date' and 'date to specific percentile'. The project also conducts added-value analyses of historical tagging data to understand relationships between fish responses, environmental factors, and anthropogenic effects. The statistical analysis of historical tagging data crosses agency lines in order to assimilate information on salmon population dynamics irrespective of origin. The lessons learned from past studies are used to improve the design and analyses of future monitoring and evaluation efforts. Through these efforts, the project attempts to provide the fisheries community with reliable analyses and interpretations of monitoring data to evaluate hydrosystem operations and the recovery of endangered and threatened salmonid stocks.

Skalski, John

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Monitoring and Evaluation: Statistical Support for Life-cycle Studies, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ongoing mission of this project is the development of statistical tools for analyzing fisheries tagging data in the most precise and appropriate manner possible. This mission also includes providing statistical guidance on the best ways to design large-scale tagging studies. This mission continues because the technologies for conducting fish tagging studies continuously evolve. In just the last decade, fisheries biologists have seen the evolution from freeze-brands and coded wire tags (CWT) to passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, balloon-tags, radiotelemetry, and now, acoustic-tags. With each advance, the technology holds the promise of more detailed and precise information. However, the technology for analyzing and interpreting the data also becomes more complex as the tagging techniques become more sophisticated. The goal of the project is to develop the analytical tools in parallel with the technical advances in tagging studies, so that maximum information can be extracted on a timely basis. Associated with this mission is the transfer of these analytical capabilities to the field investigators to assure consistency and the highest levels of design and analysis throughout the fisheries community. Consequently, this project provides detailed technical assistance on the design and analysis of tagging studies to groups requesting assistance throughout the fisheries community. Ideally, each project and each investigator would invest in the statistical support needed for the successful completion of their study. However, this is an ideal that is rarely if every attained. Furthermore, there is only a small pool of highly trained scientists in this specialized area of tag analysis here in the Northwest. Project 198910700 provides the financial support to sustain this local expertise on the statistical theory of tag analysis at the University of Washington and make it available to the fisheries community. Piecemeal and fragmented support from various agencies and organizations would be incapable of maintaining a center of expertise. The mission of the project is to help assure tagging studies are designed and analyzed from the onset to extract the best available information using state-of-the-art statistical methods. The overarching goals of the project is to assure statistically sound survival studies so that fish managers can focus on the management implications of their findings and not be distracted by concerns whether the studies are statistically reliable or not. Specific goals and objectives of the study include the following: (1) Provide consistent application of statistical methodologies for survival estimation across all salmon life cycle stages to assure comparable performance measures and assessment of results through time, to maximize learning and adaptive management opportunities, and to improve and maintain the ability to responsibly evaluate the success of implemented Columbia River FWP salmonid mitigation programs and identify future mitigation options. (2) Improve analytical capabilities to conduct research on survival processes of wild and hatchery chinook and steelhead during smolt outmigration, to improve monitoring and evaluation capabilities and assist in-season river management to optimize operational and fish passage strategies to maximize survival. (3) Extend statistical support to estimate ocean survival and in-river survival of returning adults. Provide statistical guidance in implementing a river-wide adult PIT-tag detection capability. (4) Develop statistical methods for survival estimation for all potential users and make this information available through peer-reviewed publications, statistical software, and technology transfers to organizations such as NOAA Fisheries, the Fish Passage Center, US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey (USGS), US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Public Utility Districts (PUDs), the Independent Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB), and other members of the Northwest fisheries community. (5) Provide and maintain statistical software for tag analysis

Skalski, John

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Life-cycle energy savings potential from aluminum-intensive vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The life-cycle energy and fuel-use impacts of US-produced aluminum-intensive passenger cars and passenger trucks are assessed. The energy analysis includes vehicle fuel consumption, material production energy, and recycling energy. A model that stimulates market dynamics was used to project aluminum-intensive vehicle market shares and national energy savings potential for the period between 2005 and 2030. We conclude that there is a net energy savings with the use of aluminum-intensive vehicles. Manufacturing costs must be reduced to achieve significant market penetration of aluminum-intensive vehicles. The petroleum energy saved from improved fuel efficiency offsets the additional energy needed to manufacture aluminum compared to steel. The energy needed to make aluminum can be reduced further if wrought aluminum is recycled back to wrought aluminum. We find that oil use is displaced by additional use of natural gas and nonfossil energy, but use of coal is lower. Many of the results are not necessarily applicable to vehicles built outside of the United States, but others could be used with caution.

Stodolsky, F.; Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R.; Gaines, L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Waste management facilities cost information: System cost model product description. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

In May of 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) in Idaho Falls, Idaho and subcontractors developed the System Cost Model (SCM) application. The SCM estimates life-cycle costs of the entire US Department of Energy (DOE) complex for designing; constructing; operating; and decommissioning treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, transuranic, and mixed transuranic waste. The SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing facilities at DOE installations. In addition, SCM can model new facilities based on capacity needs over the program life cycle. The SCM also provides transportation costs for DOE wastes. Transportation costs are provided for truck and rail and include transport of contact-handled, remote-handled, and alpha (transuranic) wastes. The user can provide input data (default data is included in the SCM) including the volume and nature of waste to be managed, the time period over which the waste is to be managed, and the configuration of the waste management complex (i.e., where each installation`s generated waste will be treated, stored, and disposed). Then the SCM uses parametric cost equations to estimate the costs of pre-operations (designing), construction costs, operation management, and decommissioning these waste management facilities.

Lundeen, A.S.; Hsu, K.M.; Shropshire, D.E.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Innovative Approaches to Low Cost Module Manufacturing of String Ribbon Si PV Modules: Phase II, Annual Technical Progress Report, 1 April 2003--31 May 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This subcontract resulted in a number of important advances for Evergreen Solar Inc. Foremost amongst these is the production implementation of dual ribbon growth from a single crucible (Gemini) using the String Ribbon continuous ribbon technology. This project has resulted in the flattest ribbon and the highest yields and machine uptime ever seen at Evergreen Solar. This then has resulted in significantly lowered consumables costs and lower overall direct manufacturing costs. In addition, methods to control the as-grown surface of Gemini ribbon have permitted the usage of the so-called no-etch process that allows for direct transfer of as-grown ribbon to diffusion without any intermediate etching step. In-line diagnostics for Gemini were further developed--these included more accurate methods for measuring and controlling melt depth and more accurate means to measure and control ribbon thickness. Earlier in the project, the focus was on monolithic module development. With the Gemini advances described above, monolithic module work was brought to a close during this second year of the overall three year project. A significant advance in this technology was the development of a conductive adhesive in combination with Evergreen's proprietary backskin and encapsulant. 25-W size experimental monolithic modules have been tested and found to be able to withstand up to 1400 thermal cycles.

Hanoka, J. I.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

9 Energy Information Administration Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 State Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Consumption (thousand cubic feet) Cost...

256

Life-cycle assessment of municipal solid waste management alternatives with consideration of uncertainty: SIWMS development and application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development and application of the Stochastic Integrated Waste Management Simulator (SIWMS) model. SIWMS provides a detailed view of the environmental impacts and associated costs of municipal solid waste (MSW) management alternatives under conditions of uncertainty. The model follows a life-cycle inventory approach extended with compensatory systems to provide more equitable bases for comparing different alternatives. Economic performance is measured by the net present value. The model is verified against four publicly available models under deterministic conditions and then used to study the impact of uncertainty on Sydney's MSW management 'best practices'. Uncertainty has a significant effect on all impact categories. The greatest effect is observed in the global warming category where a reversal of impact direction is predicted. The reliability of the system is most sensitive to uncertainties in the waste processing and disposal. The results highlight the importance of incorporating uncertainty at all stages to better understand the behaviour of the MSW system.

El Hanandeh, Ali, E-mail: alel5804@uni.sydney.edu.a [School of Civil Engineering, Building J05, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); El-Zein, Abbas [School of Civil Engineering, Building J05, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Petroleum marketing annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysis, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the fob and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Annual. For this production, all estimates have been recalculated since their earlier publication in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM). These calculations made use of additional data and corrections that were received after the PMM publication date.

NONE

1995-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

258

Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low Cost Electricity FY-01 Annual Report, October 2001  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, plant engineering, material compatibility studies, and coolant activation. The publications derived from work on this project (since project inception) are listed in Appendix A.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Herring, James Stephen; Loewen, Eric Paul; Smolik, Galen Richard; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Todreas, N.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 FURNACE AND BOILER TECHNOLOGY19 Furnace and Boiler Lifetimes Used in the LCC Analysis (PBP RESULTS FOR GAS BOILERS USING ALTERNATIVE INSTALLATION

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equipment = furnace Heating fuel = oil Home type = single orequipment = boiler Heating fuel = oil Home type = single orHOME HEATING FUEL CON 3 NATURAL GAS FROM UNDERGROUND PIPES = 1 BOTTLED GAS (LPG OR PROPANE) = 2 FUEL OIL

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the type of the car, usage, and location (scaled tothe quality of the car and its usage” (p. 212). This finding

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Consumer Life-Cycle Cost Impacts of Energy-Efficiency Standards...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conference Name 2002 Winter Meeting of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE), January 11-16, 2002 Date Published 102001...

263

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for project alternatives over their designated study period. ... At the request of FEMP, EIA extrapolated energy ... t = index used to designate the year of ...

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

264

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for project alternatives over their designated study period ... FEMP, EIA extrapolated energy prices after the year ... o t = index used to designate the year ...

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

265

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supply Fan Motor Median Mean LCC Savings Ranges By DesignSupply Fan Motor Median Mean LCC Savings Ranges By DesignSupply Fan Motor Median Mean LCC Savings Ranges By Design

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maximum, and restricts regenerative energy to be less thanafter accounting for regenerative energy made available, andthat the amount of regenerative energy returned to the

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy from the battery ter- most common, produces results close to the av- minals (including regenerative

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

18 2.3.1 Electricity Price19 2.3.2 Electricity PriceELECTRICITY PRICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C-1 Residential Electricity Price Forecast (AEOC.1.2 Residential Electricity Price Forecast (AEO 2003) AEOdoes not require electricity price trends and discount

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

37 RESULTS USING TARIFF-BASED ELECTRICITYHourly-based Electricity Price Models Tariff-based HourlyRESULTS USING TARIFF-BASED ELECTRICITY PRICES LCC Results

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2030. Estimating future electricity rates is very difficult,payback, the required electricity rate is only for the yearcase, the year 2008. The electricity rate used in the PBP

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Unintended effects of federal transportation policy: a look at the lifecycle costs of the interstate system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The federal surface transportation program in the United States stands at a crossroads. Short on money and lacking vision, the program is in need of reevaluation and reform. This thesis attempts to illustrate the current ...

Lukmann, Andrew T

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Comparative analysis of the VRF system and conventional HVAC systems, focused on life-cycle cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As concern for the environment has been dramatically raised over the recent decade, all fields have increased their efforts to reduce impact on environment. The… (more)

Park, Jaesuk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND PAYBACK PERIOD RESULTS USING ALTERNATIVE ENERGY PRICEPERIOD RESULTS USING ALTERNATIVE ENERGY PRICE SCENARIOS C.1and payback results using alternative energy price scenarios

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. Davis I. (1988) R. ETX-II propulsion system industry..,sulfur batteryfor the ETX-II propuLsion system. Proca. ,9thsulphur battery, in the ETX-II test vehicle. The ETX-II test

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Tool for Chem/Bio Protection of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Bio protection strategies based on user-defined scenarios. ... produces the types of analysis results that ... Based on the analyses performed, the results ...

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

277

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Engineer- an electric car practical with existingN. (1987) The BMW electric car--current devel- for electricinfrastructure for electric cars. TRRL Report LR812.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ground water source), electrically operated, unitary central air conditioners and central air conditioning heat pumps

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (Workshop Proceedings,J. Oros, President, Electric Vehicle Infrastructure, Inc. ,Hydride Batteries for Electric Vehicles,” presented at the

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prices Computed from Air Conditioning Load Reductions UsingRefrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE)/Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE),

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .AND PAYBACK PERIOD RESULTS USING ALTERNATIVE ENERGY PRICEUSING ALTERNATIVE ENERGY PRICE SCENARIOS C.1 INTRODUCTION

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Consumer Life-Cycle Cost Impacts of Energy-Efficiency Standards...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by increased standards. Relative to the existing minimum efficiency standard of 10 SEER, the results show that a majority of split system air conditioner and heat pump...

284

NISTIR6327 Modelling Service Life and Life-Cycle Cost of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... was held in the Hilton Hotel, Gaithersburg, Maryland ... used, is an activation energy (U) detennined ... R Latanision (ed.), NACE, Houston, Texas, 1998. ...

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage techno

286

Pages that link to "Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program"...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis Toolkit ( links) Financing Initiatives Toolkit ( links) Building Energy Assessment Toolkit ( links) BLCC (redirect page) ( links) Create...

287

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a about a 5% decrease in battery capacity after 40,000 km (exhausted, the battery capacity will be drawn down to acalculate EIs, the battery “interior” capacity at each trip

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mi/kwh battery, from city Passenger capacity Power train dcS/kwh nominal rated capacity of or Battery energydensity,and the capacity of the battery. Faster charging essaryfor

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy expenses based upon electricity prices that customers may pay if electricity markets become deregulated. Electricity price trends:

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

Steward, D.; Saur, G.; Penev, M.; Ramsden, T.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The state of North Dakota is considering updating its commercial building energy code. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to North Dakota residents from updating and requiring compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in the analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST simulation combined with a Life-cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess correspodning economic costs and benefits.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the lifecycle of gasoline: crude oil recovery, petroleummaterials are input to the crude-oil recovery process, whichresults in an output of crude oil. This crude oil output is

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the lifecycle of gasoline: crude oil recovery, petroleummaterials are input to the crude-oil recovery process, whichresults in an output of crude oil. This crude oil output is

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

144 Figure 63: Impact of Hydroelectricity on the Life-Cycle157 Figure 64: Impact of Hydroelectricity on the Water68 Table 14: Hydroelectricity-Related FWSE (Data Source: (

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production Transportation Energy The Issue Algae biofuels directly address the Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research fuels more carbonintensive than conventional biofuels. Critics of this study argue that alternative

296

Solid-State Lighting: Text Alternative Version: Life-Cycle Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Text Alternative Version: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Text Alternative...

297

Literature Review and Sensitivity Analysis of Biopower Life-Cycle Assessments and Greenhouse Gas Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass power offers utilities a potential pathway to increase their renewable generation portfolios for compliance with renewable energy standards and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current fossil-based technologies. To date, a large body of life-cycle assessment (LCA) literature assessing biopower’s life-cycle GHG emissions has been published.Phase A of this project performed an exhaustive search of the biopower LCA literature yielding 117 references that ...

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

Survey of life-cycle measures and metrics for concurrent product and process design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concurrent Engineering needs a series of measures (or measurement criteria) that are distinct to each process, and a set of metrics to check (and validate) the outcome when two or more of the life-cycle processes are overlapped or required to be executed ... Keywords: Concurrent Engineering, Knowledge-based Systems, Life-cycle Measures and Metrics, Rule-based Optimization, Rule-based Simulation

Biren Prasad

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

State of the Science of Biopower Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass power offers utilities a potential pathway to increase their renewable generation portfolio for compliance with renewable energy standards and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions relative to current fossil-based technologies. To date, a large body of life-cycle assessment (LCA) literature assessing biopower's life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions has been published. An exhaustive search of the biopower LCA literature yielded 117 references that passed quality and relevance screening criteria. ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Documenting performance metrics in a building life-cycle information system  

SciTech Connect

In order to produce a new generation of green buildings, it will be necessary to clearly identify their performance requirements, and to assure that these requirements are met. A long-term goal is to provide building decision-makers with the information and tools needed to cost-effectively assure the desired performance of buildings, as specified by stakeholders, across the complete life cycle of a building project. A key element required in achieving this goal is a method for explicitly documenting the building performance objectives that are of importance to stakeholders. Such a method should clearly define each objective (e.g., cost, energy use, and comfort) and its desired level of performance. This information is intended to provide quantitative benchmarks useful in evaluating alternative design solutions, commissioning the newly constructed building, and tracking and maintaining the actual performance of the occupied building over time. These quantitative benchmarks are referred to as performance metrics, and they are a principal element of information captured in the Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS). An initial implementation of BLISS is based on the International Alliance for Interoperability`s (IAI) Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), an evolving data model under development by a variety of architectural, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry firms and organizations. Within BLISS, the IFC data model has been extended to include performance metrics and a structure for archiving changing versions of the building information over time. This paper defines performance metrics, discusses the manner in which BLISS is envisioned to support a variety of activities related to assuring the desired performance of a building across its life cycle, and describes a performance metric tracking tool, called Metracker, that is based on BLISS.

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

2007 Annual Peer Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2007 Annual Peer Review 2007 Annual Peer Review September 27, 2007 San Francisco, California Welcoming Remarks Imre Gyuk US Dept. of Energy DOE / ESS Program Overview (View .pdf) John Boyes Sandia National Laboratories PRESENTATIONS\ ECONOMICS - BENEFIT STUDIES Evaluating Value Propositions for Four Modular Electricity Storage Demonstrations in California (View .pdf) Jim Eyer (Distributed Utility Assoc.) Update on Benefit and Cost Comparison of Modular Energy Storage Technologies for Four Viable Value Propositions (View .pdf) Susan Schoenung (Longitude 122 West, Inc.) ECONOMICS - ENVIRONMENT BENEFITS STUDIES Emissions from Traditional & Flywheel Plants for Regulation Services (View .pdf) Rick Fioravanti (KEMA, Inc.) UTILITY & COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS OF ADVANCED ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS

302

Optimized low-cost-array field designs for photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As manager of the US Department of Energy Photovoltaic Systems Definition Project, Sandia National Laboratories is engaged in a comprehensive program to define and develop array field subsystems which can achieve the lowest possible lifecycle costs. The major activity of this program is described, namely, the design and development of optimized, modular array fields for photovoltaic (PV) systems. As part of this activity, design criteria and performance requirements for specific array subsystems including support structures, foundations, intermodule connections, field wiring, lightning protection, system grounding, site preparation, and monitoring and control have been defined and evaluated. Similarly, fully integrated flat-panel array field designs, optimized for lowest lifecycle costs, have been developed for system sizes ranging from 20 to 500 kW/sub p/. Key features, subsystem requirements, and projected costs for these array field designs are presented and discussed.

Post, H.N.; Carmichael, D.C.; Castle, J.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on the cost estimates for private parking, in Report #and institutional parking The cost estimates for 1991 area complete social-cost estimate would include, in addition,

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on the cost estimates for private parking, in Report #and institutional parking The cost estimates for 1991 area complete social-cost estimate would include, in addition,

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES--INTEGRATED LIFE-CYCLE OPTIMIZATION INITIATIVES FOR THE HANFORD RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT--WASTE TREATMENT PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the ongoing integrated life-cycle optimization efforts to achieve both design flexibility and design stability for activities associated with the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford. Design flexibility is required to support the Department of Energy Office of River Protection Balance of Mission objectives, and design stability to meet the Waste Treatment Plant construction and commissioning requirements in order to produce first glass in 2007. The Waste Treatment Plant is a large complex project that is driven by both technology and contractual requirements. It is also part of a larger overall mission, as a component of the River Protection Project, which is driven by programmatic requirements and regulatory, legal, and fiscal constraints. These issues are further complicated by the fact that both of the major contractors involved have a different contract type with DOE, and neither has a contract with the other. This combination of technical and programmatic drivers, constraints, and requirements will continue to provide challenges and opportunities for improvement and optimization. The Bechtel National, Inc. team is under contract to engineer, procure, construct, commission and test the Waste Treatment Plant on or ahead of schedule, at or under cost, and with a throughput capacity equal to or better than specified. The Department of Energy is tasked with the long term mission of waste retrieval, treatment, and disposal. While each mission is a compliment and inextricably linked to one another, they are also at opposite ends of the spectrum, in terms of expectations of one another. These mission requirements, that are seemingly in opposition to one another, pose the single largest challenge and opportunity for optimization: one of balance. While it is recognized that design maturation and optimization are the normal responsibility of any engineering firm responsible for any given project, the aspects of integrating requirements and the management of issues across contract boundaries is a more difficult matter. This aspect, one of a seamless systems approach to the treatment of tank wastes at the Hanford site, is the focus of the Optimization Studies. This ''big O''Optimization of Life-Cycle operations is what is meant when the term ''optimization'' is used on the River Protection Project and initiatives cited in this paper. From the early contractor centric methods and processes used to move toward an integrated solution, through extensive partnering approaches, to the current quality initiatives with multi-organizational participation, significant progress is being made towards achieving the goal of truly integrated life-cycle optimization for the Department of Energy's River Protection Project and Waste Treatment Plant.

Auclair, K. D.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

306

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2009 Petroleum Marketing Annual 2009 Released: August 6, 2010 Monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Notice: Changes to EIA Petroleum Data Program Petroleum Marketing Annual --- Full report in PDF (1.2 MB) Previous Issues --- Previous reports are available on the historical page. Summary Statistics Summary Statistics Tables PDF 1 Crude Oil Prices PDF TXT 1A Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil by PAD Districts HTML PDF TXT 2 U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products to End Users HTML PDF TXT 3 U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products to End Users PDF TXT Motor Gasoline to End Users HTML Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel to End Users HTML Other Petroleum Products to End Users HTML

307

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL - HOLDING COSTS .AND MANAGEMENT, AND OIL-HOLDING COSTS 7.12.1 Background TheO & M costs, and oil–holding costs -- can be estimated from

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost of crude oil and the cost of the products is notare related to the amount and cost of oil imported from theDivision, The External Costs of Oil Used in Transportation,

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL - HOLDING COSTS .AND MANAGEMENT, AND OIL-HOLDING COSTS 7.12.1 Background TheO & M costs, and oil–holding costs -- can be estimated from

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gases are emitted throughout the production lifecycle, during "uranium mining (open pit and underground), milling, conversion, enrich- ment (diffusion and centrifuge),

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET  

SciTech Connect

The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet fuel production unless carbon management practices, such as carbon capture and storage, are used.

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

312

Section 2.2 Economic and Environmental Analysis: Greening Federal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates: for private-sector analyses References Life-Cycle Costing Manual for the Federal Energy Man- agement Program (NIST Handbook 135) and Annual Supplement (ASHB) of Energy...

313

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Production Speaker(s): Corinne Scown Date: January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Sohn If the goal of science is to understand the structure and behavior of the physical and natural world, and the goal of engineering is to design, build, and manage systems that serve society's needs, then the study of civil infrastructure systems acts as a link between the two. Understanding the reliance of engineered systems on constrained natural resources, as well as their impact on human well-being and the environment, is key to building and maintaining infrastructure that is sustainable in the broader sense. This talk will explore the important role of life-cycle assessment and optimization in assessing such questions as: a.)

315

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Room Air Conditioner Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Room Air Conditioner Cost Estimator Room Air Conditioner Cost Estimator Screen capture of Room Air Conditioner Cost Estimator The cost estimator compares high-efficiency room air conditioners to standard equipment in terms of life cycle cost. It provides an alternative to complicated building simulation models, while offering more precision than simplified estimating tools that are commonly available. The cost estimator assists decision-making regarding the purchase or replacement of room air conditioning equipment, by estimating a product�s lifetime energy cost savings at various efficiency levels. Screen Shots Keywords air conditioner, life-cycle cost, energy performance, residential buildings, energy savings Validation/Testing Internal reviews at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

316

Molasses for ethanol: The economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol Anand R Gopal1,4,6 and Daniel M Kammen1,2,3,5 1 Energy lifecycle results of the existing GREET model for Brazilian ethanol to derive lifecycle greenhouse gas this in regulation. Keywords: LCA, biofuels, sugarcane ethanol, greenhouse gas emissions, GREET 6 Corresponding

Kammen, Daniel M.

317

TAX AND FEE PAYMENTS BY MOTOR VEHICLE USERS FOR THE USE OF HIGHWAYS, FUELS, AND VEHICLES Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bythe Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bytransportation infrastructure and services, then we should set prices on the infrastructure and services equal to marginal social costs.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Annual Planning Summaries: 2010 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Annual Planning Summaries: 2010 February 24, 2010 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, any EAs expected to be prepared in the next 12 months, any EISs expected to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. February 2, 2010 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Chief Financial Officer (CFO) Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, any EAs expected to be prepared in the next 12 months, any EISs expected to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. February 1, 2010 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Oak Ridge (OR)

319

Annual ENSO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using various observational data, the seasonal cycle of the tropical Pacific is investigated, suggesting the existence of an “annual El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO).” A positive sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) appearing off Peru in ...

Tomoki Tozuka; Toshio Yamagata

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Development Pathways to Low-Cost Engineering Beta Gamma TiAl ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Cost-Affordable Titanium III. Presentation Title, Development Pathways to ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Petroleum marketing annual 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) contains statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the free-on-board (f.o.b.) and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented. For this publication, all estimates have been recalculated since their earlier publication in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM). These calculations made use of additional data and corrections that were received after the PMM publication dates.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

cost | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cost cost Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

323

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:09am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 4 When estimating the cost of implementing the greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies, Federal agencies should consider the life-cycle costs and savings of the efforts. The major cost elements associated with developing and implementing a project are identified in Table 1. Table 1. Major Costs for Project Development and Implementation Cost Element Description Variables Project planning costs Preparatory work by building owners and design team. Benchmarking activities. Building audits. Developing statements of work for subcontractors. Selecting contractors. Integrated design process (for major renovations). Type of project; previous team experience; local markets; number of stakeholders

324

levelized cost of energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

levelized cost of energy levelized cost of energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.Upload

325

TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING K. Smarsly1) strategies can enable wind turbine manufacturers, owners, and operators to precisely schedule maintenance behavior of wind turbines and to reduce (epistemic) uncertainty. Both the resistance parameters

Stanford University

326

A review of battery life-cycle analysis : state of knowledge and critical needs.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A literature review and evaluation has been conducted on cradle-to-gate life-cycle inventory studies of lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, sodium-sulfur, and lithium-ion battery technologies. Data were sought that represent the production of battery constituent materials and battery manufacture and assembly. Life-cycle production data for many battery materials are available and usable, though some need updating. For the remaining battery materials, lifecycle data either are nonexistent or, in some cases, in need of updating. Although battery manufacturing processes have occasionally been well described, detailed quantitative information on energy and material flows is missing. For all but the lithium-ion batteries, enough constituent material production energy data are available to approximate material production energies for the batteries, though improved input data for some materials are needed. Due to the potential benefit of battery recycling and a scarcity of associated data, there is a critical need for life-cycle data on battery material recycling. Either on a per kilogram or per watt-hour capacity basis, lead-acid batteries have the lowest production energy, carbon dioxide emissions, and criteria pollutant emissions. Some process-related emissions are also reviewed in this report.

Sullivan, J. L.; Gaines, L.; Energy Systems

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

327

APPENDIX A: ENERGY USE AND EMISSIONS FROM THE LIFECYCLE OF DIESEL-LIKE FUELS DERIVED FROM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho, 83209-8007, U.S.A. (e-mail: smitrose@isu.edu). #12 Committee, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho. References Anderson, R.S., and Peck, S.B. 1985 and reporting life-cycle duration in insects and arachnids. Eur. J. Entomol. 97: 285­303. Eggert, A

Delucchi, Mark

328

Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Initiative Life-cycle Cost Analysis Canada and Mexico –baseline energy consumption. Canada’s and Mexico’s marketsMexico minimum efficiency performance standard million tons (of CO 2 ) national equipment cost National Electric Manufacturers Association national energy

Letschert, Virginie E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

NERSC Annual Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Annual Reports NERSC Annual Reports Sort by: Default | Name anrep2000.png NERSC Annual Report 2000 Download Image: anrep2000.png | png | 203 KB Download File:...

330

BCP Annual Rate Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 BCP Annual Rate Process 2013 BCP Annual Rate Process Informal Process Rate Activity Schedule (doc) Informal Customer Meeting Thursday March 6, 2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms 3&4 Informal Customer Meeting Presentation (Pdf) PRS Executive Summary (Mar 07, 2013) (Pdf) FY2014 Final Ten Year Operating Plan PRS Executive Summary (PDF) FORM for Foreign Visits (doc) Formal Process Initial Federal Register Notice (pdf) Public Information Forum March 27,2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms3&4 Customer Meeting Presentation PIF Presentation (PPT) Presentation Details (pdf) Reclamation Fund Status Report PIF PRS Executive Summary (pdf) PIF Transcripts (PDF) Visitor Center Cost Analysis Questions - Responses Public Comment Forum April 10, 2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms3&4 PCF Transcripts Customer Letters

331

Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

H2A Delivery: Miscellaneous Cost and H2 Losses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Reviewed primarily to ensure that proper annual maintenance and repair costs for compressor - New value allowed longer compressor lifetime Forecourt Item New Old Notes...

333

Capital costs have major impact on projected power sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas-fired power plants dominate the 2011 Annual ... AEO2011 also includes several alternative cases with lower assumed capital costs of nuclear, fossil fuel ...

334

Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 51 Table 29. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued...

335

Five Low Cost Methods to Improve Energy Efficiency on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Energy Conservation in Metals. Presentation Title, Five Low Cost Methods to ...

336

Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 09 THROUGH 09/30/2010 The following Annual Freedom of Information Act report covers the Period 10/01/2009, through 09/30/2010, as required by 5 U.S.C. 552. I. BASIC INFORMATION REGARDING REPORT 1. Kevin T. Hagerty, Director Office of Information Resources, MA-90 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 Alexander Morris, FOIA Officer Sheila Jeter, FOIA/Privacy Act Specialist FOIA Office, MA-90 Office of Information Resources U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 2. An electronic copy of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) report can be obtained at http://management.energy.gov/documents/annual_reports.htm. The report can then be accessed by clicking FOIA Annual Reports.

337

Combustion Turbine/Combined-Cycle Operations and Maintenance Cost Analyzer, Version 8.61  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CTCC O&M Cost Analyzer is a spreadsheet software product that estimates operations and maintenance (O&M) costs for combustion turbine and combined-cycle plants for specific gas turbine models over the operating life of the asset The CTCC O&M Cost Analyzer software contains powerful capabilities to assist users in evaluating non-fuel O&M costs and in supporting a life-cycle cost evaluation perspective.  The software uses a "bottoms-up" approach for ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

338

Interim report: Waste management facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for treating alpha and nonalpha mixed low-level radioactive waste. This report contains information on twenty-seven treatment, storage, and disposal modules that can be integrated to develop total life cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also summarized in this report.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blincoe, The Economic Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 1994,M. Faigin, The Economic Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 1990,Q. Wang, and D. L. Greene, Motor Vehicle Fuel Economy, The

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blincoe, The Economic Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 1994,M. Faigin, The Economic Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes, 1990,Q. Wang, and D. L. Greene, Motor Vehicle Fuel Economy, The

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Home > Groups > Water Power Forum Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.

342

Estimating and understanding DOE waste management costs`  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines costs associated with cleaning up the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) nuclear facilities, with particular emphasis on the waste management program. Life-cycle waste management costs have been compiled and reported in the DOE Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). Waste management costs are a critical issue for DOE because of the current budget constraints. The DOE sites are struggling to accomplish their environmental management objectives given funding scenarios that are well below anticipated waste management costs. Through the BEMR process, DOE has compiled complex-wide cleanup cost estimates and has begun analysis of these costs with respect to alternative waste management scenarios and policy strategies. From this analysis, DOE is attempting to identify the major cost drivers and prioritize environmental management activities to achieve maximum utilization of existing funding. This paper provides an overview of the methodology DOE has used to estimate and analyze some waste management costs, including the key data requirements and uncertainties.

Kang, J.S. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Sherick, M.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Actions You Can Take to Reduce Cooling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact Sheet Actions You Can Take to Reduce Cooling Costs Cooling costs can be a substantial part of your facility's annual utility bill. A number of energy savings opportunities...

344

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

cost reported here could be higher than the actual annual average for 2008. However, some production costs (labor and equipment) are not as volatile as drilling, pipe, and other...

345

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per kWh produced than baseload coal, nuclear or combined-even. The model includes a baseload technology with high ?annual production cost are: Baseload (coal) Cost = $208247/M

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hydrogen Pathways: Updated Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Ten Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a life-cycle assessment conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of 10 hydrogen production, delivery, dispensing, and use pathways that were evaluated for cost, energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This evaluation updates and expands on a previous assessment of seven pathways conducted in 2009. This study summarizes key results, parameters, and sensitivities to those parameters for the 10 hydrogen pathways, reporting on the levelized cost of hydrogen in 2007 U.S. dollars as well as life-cycle well-to-wheels energy use and GHG emissions associated with the pathways.

Ramsden, T.; Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from coal- or natural gas-fired power plants occur "up-of natural gas is lost before reaching the power plant." 30power plant. Yet, when it comes to upstream emissions, the lifecycle for natural gas

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Incorporating the Effect of Price Changes on CO2-Equivalent Emissions From Alternative-Fuel Lifecycles: Scoping the Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and solids produced by corn-to-ethanol plants) Coproducts ofCoproducts of the corn-to-ethanol background GHG emissionsimpact on LCGE in the corn-to-ethanol lifecycle. In the

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

INCORPORATING THE EFFECT OF PRICE CHANGES ON CO2- EQUIVALENT EMSSIONS FROM ALTERNATIVE-FUEL LIFECYCLES: SCOPING THE ISSUES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and solids produced by corn-to-ethanol plants) Coproducts ofCoproducts of the corn-to-ethanol background GHG emissionsimpact on LCGE in the corn-to-ethanol lifecycle. In the

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to close the gap on unregulated greenhouse gas emissions.a higher lifecycle greenhouse gas content than conventionalIN- FORMATION ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONs AssocIATEIDn wrri

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11) | April 2011 11) | April 2011 with Projections to 2035 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 For further information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2011 was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.gov, 202-586-2222), Assistant Administrator of Energy Analysis; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.gov, 202/586-1284), Co-Acting Director, Office of Integrated and International Energy Analysis, and Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team; Joseph A. Beamon (joseph.beamon@eia.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis; A. Michael Schaal (michael.schaal@eia.gov, 202/586-5590), Director, Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuel Analysis;

352

ANNUAL ENERGY  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(93) (93) ANNUAL ENERGY OUTLOOK 1993 With Projections to 2010 EIk Energy Information Administration January 1993 For Further Information ... The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222). General questions concerning energy demand or energy markets may be addressed to Mark E. Rodekohr (202/586-1130), Director of the Energy Demand and Integration Division. General questions regarding energy supply and conversion activities may be addressed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Acting Director of the Energy Supply and Conversion Division. Detailed questions may be addressed to the following EIA analysts: Framing the 1993 Energy Outlook ............. Susan H. Shaw (202/586-4838)

353

Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 2011 Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Community Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Community DOE/ORO/2399 Progress Cleanup P Progress Cleanup P 2 This report was produced by URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, DOE's Environmental Management contractor for the Oak Ridge Reservation. About the Cover After recontouring and revegetation, the P1 Pond at East Tennessee Technology Park is flourishing. The contaminated pond was drained, recontoured, and restocked with fish that would not disturb the pond sediment. 1 Message from the Acting Manager Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office To the Oak Ridge Community: Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 marked many accomplishments in Oak Ridge. Our Environmental Management (EM) program completed a majority of its American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded projects,

354

Step 6: Complete the ENERGY STAR lifecycle | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: Complete the ENERGY STAR lifecycle 6: Complete the ENERGY STAR lifecycle Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Why design to earn ENERGY STAR Design to earn ENERGY STAR Step 1: Include efficiency in your project specs Step 2: Meet with your team and set a goal Step 3: Apply for Designed to Earn the ENERGY STAR recognition Step 4: Market your project as Designed to Earn the ENERGY STAR

355

GEOCITY: a computer model for systems analysis of geothermal district heating and cooling costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOCITY is a computer-simulation model developed to study the economics of district heating/cooling using geothermal energy. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating/cooling based on climate, population, resource characteristics, and financing conditions. The basis for our geothermal-energy cost analysis is the unit cost of energy which will recover all the costs of production. The calculation of the unit cost of energy is based on life-cycle costing and discounted-cash-flow analysis. A wide variation can be expected in the range of potential geothermal district heating and cooling costs. The range of costs is determined by the characteristics of the resource, the characteristics of the demand, and the distance separating the resource and the demand. GEOCITY is a useful tool for estimating costs for each of the main parts of the production process and for determining the sensitivity of these costs to several significant parameters under a consistent set of assumptions.

Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Life-cycle energy analyses of electric vehicle storage batteries. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of several life-cycle energy analyses of prospective electric vehicle batteries are presented. The batteries analyzed were: Nickel-zinc; Lead-acid; Nickel-iron; Zinc-chlorine; Sodium-sulfur (glass electrolyte); Sodium-sulfur (ceramic electrolyte); Lithium-metal sulfide; and Aluminum-air. A life-cycle energy analysis consists of evaluating the energy use of all phases of the battery's life, including the energy to build it, operate it, and any credits that may result from recycling of the materials in it. The analysis is based on the determination of three major energy components in the battery life cycle: Investment energy, i.e., The energy used to produce raw materials and to manufacture the battery; operational energy i.e., The energy consumed by the battery during its operational life. In the case of an electric vehicle battery, this energy is the energy required (as delivered to the vehicle's charging circuit) to power the vehicle for 100,000 miles; and recycling credit, i.e., The energy that could be saved from the recycling of battery materials into new raw materials. The value of the life-cycle analysis approach is that it includes the various penalties and credits associated with battery production and recycling, which enables a more accurate determination of the system's ability to reduce the consumption of scarce fuels. The analysis of the life-cycle energy requirements consists of identifying the materials from which each battery is made, evaluating the energy needed to produce these materials, evaluating the operational energy requirements, and evaluating the amount of materials that could be recycled and the energy that would be saved through recycling. Detailed descriptions of battery component materials, the energy requirements for battery production, and credits for recycling, and the operational energy for an electric vehicle, and the procedures used to determine it are discussed.

Sullivan, D; Morse, T; Patel, P; Patel, S; Bondar, J; Taylor, L

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Lifecycle Management of Protection, Control and Associated Data Acquisition Infrastructure: Challenges and R&D Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection and control technologies are experiencing fundamental and revolutionary changes. In the transition from legacy electro-mechanical relays to the state of the art digital assets, utilities are facing the emerging challenges in the life-cycle management of a highly diverse and increasingly complicated P&C infrastructure. Most installed electro-mechanical devices are aging and close to their designed life cycle; meanwhile, new generation of microprocessor relays tend to have a much ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

358

TAX AND FEE PAYMENTS BY MOTOR VEHICLE USERS FOR THE USE OF HIGHWAYS, FUELS, AND VEHICLES Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July (1996). Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association of theaddition, some motor-vehicle manufacturers have been finedEPA charges motor-vehicle manufacturers to cover the cost of

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACF = B + AF (short-run cost) ACF 91 (1.0) ACF 0 ACF ²ACM ²ACM ACF = AF k (long-run cost) B ²AM AF ²AM AF 0 AF 91 (1.0)is simply: DRAFT FOR REVIEW ACF = AF k ACF ? AF ? where: ACF

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACF = B + AF (short-run cost) ACF 91 (1.0) ACF 0 ACF ²ACM ²ACM ACF = AF k (long-run cost) B ²AM AF ²AM AF 0 AF 91 (1.0)is simply: DRAFT FOR REVIEW ACF = AF k ACF ? AF ? where: ACF

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

payback time versus building size Project costs and energyPayback time (commissioning cost/annual energy savings) lessenergy payback time of 41 years, while the proper allocation of costs and

Mills, Evan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Thermal energy storage for space cooling. Technology for reducing on-peak electricity demand and cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off-peak hours when electricity rates are lower. In addition, some system configurations may result in lower first costs and/or lower operating costs. Cool storage systems of one type or another could potentially be cost-effectively applied in most buildings with a space cooling system. A survey of approximately 25 manufacturers providing cool storage systems or components identified several thousand current installations, but less than 1% of these were at Federal facilities. With the Federal sector representing nearly 4% of commercial building floor space and 5% of commercial building energy use, Federal utilization would appear to be lagging. Although current applications are relatively few, the estimated potential annual savings from using cool storage in the Federal sector is $50 million. There are many different types of cool storage systems representing different combinations of storage media, charging mechanisms, and discharging mechanisms. The basic media options are water, ice, and eutectic salts. Ice systems can be further broken down into ice harvesting, ice-on-coil, ice slurry, and encapsulated ice options. Ice-on-coil systems may be internal melt or external melt and may be charged and discharged with refrigerant or a single-phase coolant (typically a water/glycol mixture). Independent of the technology choice, cool storage systems can be designed to provide full storage or partial storage, with load-leveling and demand-limiting options for partial storage. Finally, storage systems can be operated on a chiller-priority or storage priority basis whenever the cooling load is less than the design conditions. The first section describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. The next three sections define the savings potential in the Federal sector, present application advice, and describe the performance experience of specific Federal users. A step-by-step methodology illustrating how to evaluate cool storage options is presented next, followed by a case study of a GSA building using cool storage. Latter sections list manufacturers, selected Federal users, and reference materials. Finally, the appendixes give Federal life-cycle costing procedures and results for a case study.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Price of electricity tracks cost of living  

SciTech Connect

The retail price of electricity and the consumer price index are rising at about the same rate: 241.5 and 242.6, respectively, based on a 1967 index of 100. Increases in fossil fuel costs, wages, and the cost of borrowed funds have contributed to these changes. Details of the annual percentage changes are summarized in five tables. (DCK)

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Annual Reports | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documents Documents » Annual Reports Annual Reports Note: Some of the following documents are in PDF and will require Adobe Reader for viewing. Freedom of Information Act Annual Reports Annual Report for 2012 Annual Report for 2011 Annual Report for 2010 Annual Report for 2009 Annual Report for 2008 (pdf) Annual Report for 2007 (pdf) Annual Report for 2006 (pdf) Annual Report for 2005 (pdf) Annual Report for 2004 (pdf) Annual Report for 2003 (pdf) Annual Report for 2002 (pdf) (Revised 11/03/03) Annual Report for 2001 (pdf) Annual Report for 2000 (pdf) Annual Report for 1999 (pdf) Annual Report for 1998 (pdf) Annual Report for 1997 (pdf) Annual Report for 1996 (pdf) Annual Report for 1995 (pdf) Annual Report for 1994 (pdf) Chief FOIA Officers Reports Aviation Management Green Leases

365

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation An Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selection in Life-Cycle Inventories Using Hybrid Approaches,and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses,Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation

Horvath, Arpad; Chester, Mikhail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Comprehensive Lifecycle Planning and Management System For Addressing Water Issues Associated With Shale Gas Development In New York, Pennsylvania, And West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a modeling system to allow operators and regulators to plan all aspects of water management activities associated with shale gas development in the target project area of New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia (â??target areaâ?), including water supply, transport, storage, use, recycling, and disposal and which can be used for planning, managing, forecasting, permit tracking, and compliance monitoring. The proposed project is a breakthrough approach to represent the entire shale gas water lifecycle in one comprehensive system with the capability to analyze impacts and options for operational efficiency and regulatory tracking and compliance, and to plan for future water use and disposition. It will address all of the major water-related issues of concern associated with shale gas development in the target area, including water withdrawal, transport, storage, use, treatment, recycling, and disposal. It will analyze the costs, water use, and wastes associated with the available options, and incorporate constraints presented by permit requirements, agreements, local and state regulations, equipment and material availability, etc. By using the system to examine the water lifecycle from withdrawals through disposal, users will be able to perform scenario analysis to answer "what if" questions for various situations. The system will include regulatory requirements of the appropriate state and regional agencies and facilitate reporting and permit applications and tracking. These features will allow operators to plan for more cost effective resource production. Regulators will be able to analyze impacts of development over an entire area. Regulators can then make informed decisions about the protections and practices that should be required as development proceeds. This modeling system will have myriad benefits for industry, government, and the public. For industry, it will allow planning all water management operations for a project or an area as one entity to optimize water use and minimize costs subject to regulatory and other constraints. It will facilitate analysis of options and tradeoffs, and will also simplify permitting and reporting to regulatory agencies. The system will help regulators study cumulative impacts of development, conserve water resources, and manage disposal options across a region. It will also allow them to track permits and monitor compliance. The public will benefit from water conservation, improved environmental performance as better system wide decisions are made, and greater supply of natural gas, with attendant lower prices, as costs are reduced and development is assisted through better planning and scheduling. Altogether, better economics and fewer barriers will facilitate recovery of the more than 300 trillion cubic feet of estimated recoverable natural gas resource in the Marcellus Shale in a manner that protects the environment.

J. Daniel Arthur

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as a Commercial Building Energy Code in Illinois Jurisdictions  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for energy efficienty design and construction of new commercial buildings. This report assesses the benefits and costs of adopting this standard as the building energy code in Illinois. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using BLAST combined with a Life-Cycle Cost approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits.

Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.; Friedrich, Michele

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NERSC Annual Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Reports NERSC Annual Reports Sort by: Default | Name annrep2011.png NERSC Annual Report 2011 Download Image: annrep2011.png | png | 2.7 MB Download File: annrep2011.pdf |...

369

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

370

U. S. Military Expenditures to Protect the Use of Persian Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles: Report #15 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on U.S. dependence on foreign oil: “…protecting againston U.S. dependence on foreign oil, that the cost of the 1991U.S. dependence on foreign oil is not to reduce military

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 - DRAFT - June 12, 2012 1 Table B1. Total energy...

372

Annual Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4) January 2004 Annual Energy Outlook 2004 With Projections to 2025 January 2004 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004) was prepared by the Energy...

373

Annual Coal Distribution Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: December 19, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report | RevisionCorrection Revision to the Annual Coal Distribution...

374

2007 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Report United States Department of Energy Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 1 Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2007 Annual Report US Department of...

375

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 January 2013 Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 2018 1 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Early Release Reference case. 2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents the per-kilowatthour cost (in real dollars) of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle. Key

376

Low cost modular designs for photovoltaic array fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Described are the design and development of optimized, modular array fields for photovoltaic (PV) systems. Design criteria and performance requirements have been defined and evaluated for specific array subsystems. These subsystems include support structures, foundations, intermodule connection, field wiring, lightning protection, system grounding, site preparation, and monitoring and control. Fully integrated flat-panel array-field designs, optimized for lowest life-cycle costs, have been developed for systems ranging in size from 20 to 500 kW/sub p/. These designs are applicable for near-term implementation (1982 to 1983) and reduce the array-field balance-of-system (BOS) costs to a fraction of previous costs. Key features, subsystem requirements, and projected costs are presented and discussed.

Post, H.N.; Carmichael, D.C.; Castle, J.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: August 27, 2009 Petroleum Marketing Annual --- Full report in PDF (1.2 MB) Summary Statistics Summary Statistics Tables PDF 1 Crude Oil Prices PDF TXT 1A Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil by PAD Districts PDF TXT 2 U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products to End Users PDF TXT 3 U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products to End Users PDF TXT 4 U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products for Resale PDF TXT 5 U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products for Resale PDF TXT 6 U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT 7 U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT 8 U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT 9 U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT

378

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: August 6, 2010 Released: August 6, 2010 Notice: Price data for petroleum products will be changed from cents per gallon to dollars per gallon later this year for the 2010 data. Petroleum Marketing Annual --- Full report in PDF (1.2 MB) Summary Statistics Summary Statistics Tables PDF 1 Crude Oil Prices PDF TXT 1A Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil by PAD Districts PDF TXT 2 U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products to End Users PDF TXT 3 U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products to End Users PDF TXT 4 U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products for Resale PDF TXT 5 U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products for Resale PDF TXT 6 U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT 7 U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT

379

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: August 29, 2008 Petroleum Marketing Annual --- Full report in PDF (1.2 MB) Summary Statistics Summary Statistics Tables PDF 1 Crude Oil Prices PDF TXT 1A Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil by PAD Districts PDF TXT 2 U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products to End Users PDF TXT 3 U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products to End Users PDF TXT 4 U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products for Resale PDF TXT 5 U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products for Resale PDF TXT 6 U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT 7 U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT 8 U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT 9 U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT

380

C:\ANNUAL\Vol2chps.v8\ANNUAL2.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Energy Information Administration / Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 Energy Information Administration / Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 38. Average Consumption and Annual Cost of Natural Gas per Consumer by State, 1967-1989 Table State Residential Commercial Industrial Consumption (thousand cubic feet) Cost (dollars) Consumption (thousand cubic feet) Cost (dollars) Consumption (thousand cubic feet) Cost (dollars) 1967 Alabama ...................... 91 103 844 475 NA NA Alaska.......................... 218 329 1,361 1,348 NA NA Arizona ........................ 69 67 667 338 NA NA Arkansas ..................... 152 108 751 374 NA NA California ..................... 98 91 548 372 NA NA Colorado...................... 159 106 701 389 NA NA Connecticut ................. 73 134 312 476 NA NA DC............................... a a a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

High-Intensity Discharge Industrial Lighting Design Strategies for the Minimization of Energy Usage and Life-Cycle Cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Worldwide, the electrical energy consumed by artificial lighting is second only to the amount consumed by electric machinery. Of the energy usage attributed to lighting… (more)

Flory IV, Isaac L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

LNG Annual Report - 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Report - 2012 LNG Annual Report - 2012 LNG Annual Report - 2012 (Revised 3212013) LNG Annual Report - 2012...

384

Draft 2013 Annual Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft 2013 Annual Plan Draft 2013 Annual Plan Section 999: Draft 2013 Annual Plan Section 999 - Draft 2013 Annual Plan...

385

Development of a low-cost integrated 20-kW ac solar tracking sub- array for grid-connected PV power system applications. Phase 1, Annual technical report, 11 July 1995--31 July 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this effort is to reduce the installed cost of utility scale grid connected photovoltaic power systems. The focus of the effort is on ``BOS`` (Balance-Of-System) component manufacturing technology, which essentially involves all PV power system engineering, manufacturing, assembly and construction tasks from the receipt of a PV module to the deliver of grid connected electricity.

Stern, M.; West, R.; Fourer, G.; Whalen, W.; Van Loo, M.; Duran, G. [Utility Power Group, Chatsworth, CA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supplemental data) -- natural gas supply and disposition (petroleum, coal, or natural-gas supply of the U. S. (or ofAnnual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Estimation of the social costs of natural gas  

SciTech Connect

This study determines the extent to which it is possible to develop monetary estimates of the marginal social cost of fuels, using natural gas to test a methodology that could be applied to other fuels. This requires review of previous estimates of both market and nonmarket costs to the extent that such are available. For some components of social cost, calculation of estimates from secondary data is required. The feasibility of using these estimates to develop marginal social-cost estimates for the country and for states or regions must then be evaluated. In order to develop estimates of marginal social cost for use in determining minimum life-cycle costs of building space conditioning, economic theory is used to develop a conceptual model of the market cost of fuel extraction and conversion. Then, estimation methodologies for each component of nonmarket costs are examined to assess the applicability and validity of each methodology. On the basis of this analysis, empirical estimates of both market and nonmarket components of social cost are aggregated to calculate a social-cost estimate for natural gas. 38 references.

Nieves, L.A.; Lemon, J.R.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings June 4, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov (509) 376-4171 Dee Millikin, CHPRC Dee_Millikin@rl.gov (509) 376-1297 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company is using a treatment material that has delivered more than $6 million in cost savings to date and is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiencies in treatment

389

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

390

Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion.

Kirkeby, Janus T.; Birgisdottir, Harpa [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)], E-mail: thc@er.dtu.dk

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Design and Manufacturing Optimization of Fuel Cells in Stationary and Emerging Market Applications - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Max Wei (Primary Contact), Tom McKone, Tim Lipman 1 , David Dornfeld 2 , Josh Chien 2 , Chris Marnay, Adam Weber, Paul Beattie 3 , Patricia Chong 3 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R-4000 Berkeley, CA 94706 Phone: (510) 486-5220 Email: mwei@lbl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: 1 University of California, Berkeley, Transportation Sustainability Research Center and DOE Pacific Region Clean Energy Application Center, Berkeley, CA 2 University of California, Berkeley, Laboratory for Manufacturing and Sustainability, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Berkeley, CA

392

SYSPLAN. Load Leveling Battery System Costs  

SciTech Connect

SYSPLAN evaluates capital investment in customer side of the meter load leveling battery systems. Such systems reduce the customer`s monthly electrical demand charge by reducing the maximum power load supplied by the utility during the customer`s peak demand. System equipment consists of a large array of batteries, a current converter, and balance of plant equipment and facilities required to support the battery and converter system. The system is installed on the customer`s side of the meter and controlled and operated by the customer. Its economic feasibility depends largely on the customer`s load profile. Load shape requirements, utility rate structures, and battery equipment cost and performance data serve as bases for determining whether a load leveling battery system is economically feasible for a particular installation. Life-cycle costs for system hardware include all costs associated with the purchase, installation, and operation of battery, converter, and balance of plant facilities and equipment. The SYSPLAN spreadsheet software is specifically designed to evaluate these costs and the reduced demand charge benefits; it completes a 20 year period life cycle cost analysis based on the battery system description and cost data. A built-in sensitivity analysis routine is also included for key battery cost parameters. The life cycle cost analysis spreadsheet is augmented by a system sizing routine to help users identify load leveling system size requirements for their facilities. The optional XSIZE system sizing spreadsheet which is included can be used to identify a range of battery system sizes that might be economically attractive. XSIZE output consisting of system operating requirements can then be passed by the temporary file SIZE to the main SYSPLAN spreadsheet.

Hostick, C.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

393

Geothermal completion technology life cycle cost model (GEOCOM). Volume I. Final report. Volume II. User instruction manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Just as with petroleum wells, drilling and completing a geothermal well at minimum original cost may not be the most cost-effective way to exploit the resource. The impacts of the original completion activities on production and costs later in the life of the well must also be considered. In order to evaluate alternate completion and workover technologies, a simple computer model has been developed to compare total life-cycle costs for a geothermal well to total production or injection. Volume I discusses the mechanics of the model and then presents detailed results from its application to different completion and workover questions. Volume II is the user instruction manual.

Anderson, E.R.; Hoessel, W.C.; Mansure, A.J.; McKissen, P.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

2010 Annual Planning Summary for Nevada Site Office | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Nevada Site Office More Documents &...

395

2010 Annual Planning Summary Livermore Site Office (LSO) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. 2010 Annual Planning Summary Livermore Site Office (LSO) More Documents...

396

2010 Annual Planning Summary for Kansas City Site Office (KCSO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Kansas City Site Office (KCSO) More...

397

2010 Annual Planning Summary for Los Alamos Site Office (LASO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) More...

398

2010 Annual Planning Summary for Richland Operations Office ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Richland Operations Office (RL) More...

399

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Argonne Site Office (Argonne...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Argonne Site Office (ArSO) More...

400

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Pacific Northwest Site Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

2010 Annual Planning Summary for Idaho Operations Office (ID...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Idaho Operations Office (ID) More...

402

2010 Annual Planning Summary for Savannah River Operations Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Savannah River Operations Office (SRS)...

403

DOE/IG Annual Performance Report FY 2008, Annual Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Report FY 2008, Annual Performance Plan FY 2009 More Documents & Publications Office Inspector General DOE Annual Performance Report FY 2008, Annual Performance Plan FY...

404

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types of power plants? EIA has historical data on the average annual operation, maintenance, ...

405

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 53 Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued...

406

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 53 Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued...

407

Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 53 Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued...

408

Trends in the cost of efficiency for appliances and consumer electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and costs, and includes projections of annual shipments,calibrate future shipment projections in the NIA. Figure 1the default price trend projection. The resulting experience

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

ArkansasEnergy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table A.11 shows the estimated annual energy costs, including heating, cooling, water heating, and lighting per home that result from meeting the requirements in the 2006,...

410

OHA 2011 ANNUAL REPORT | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 ANNUAL REPORT 1 ANNUAL REPORT OHA 2011 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2011 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA). Here are highlights for the past year: Alternative DisputeResolution. In FY 2011, we were happy to welcome aboard the DOE's Office of Conflict Resolution and Prevention (OCPR), which joined OHA in February 2011. OCPR, formerly a part of the Office of General Counsel, serves as a resource to all DOE components and contractors to explore efficient and cost effective means of preventing conflicts and resolving disputes, without the formalities or costs of litigation. Personnel security hearings. Under DOE's personnel security program, OHA conducts administrative hearings concerning individuals' eligibility for access to classified information or special nuclear material. In FY

411

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand for biomass approaches the practical supply. The “Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply.

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for a typical land-based wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011, as well as the modeled LCOE for a fixed-bottom offshore wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011. Each of the four major components of the LCOE equation are explained in detail, such as installed capital cost, annual energy production, annual operating expenses, and financing, and including sensitivity ranges that show how each component can affect LCOE. These LCOE calculations are used for planning and other purposes by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program.

Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for a typical land-based wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011, as well as the modeled LCOE for a fixed-bottom offshore wind turbine installed in the United States in 2011. Each of the four major components of the LCOE equation are explained in detail, such as installed capital cost, annual energy production, annual operating expenses, and financing, and including sensitivity ranges that show how each component can affect LCOE. These LCOE calculations are used for planning and other purposes by the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program.

Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Program on Technology Innovation: An Optimization Approach for Life-Cycle Management Applied to Large Power Transformers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results and insights from a study of the life-cycle management (LCM) of main transformers at Constellation Energy Nuclear Group's (CENG's) five nuclear power plants. The study used two asset management (AM) tools developed by Electricit de France (EDF).

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

415

A cloud approach to unified lifecycle data management in architecture, engineering, construction and facilities management: Integrating BIMs and SNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of data integration throughout the lifecycle of a construction project among multiple collaborative enterprises remains unsolved due to the dynamics and fragmented nature of the construction industry. This study presents a novel cloud approach ... Keywords: Building information modeling, Business social networking services, Cloud computing, Life cycle data management, Self-organisation, Version control

Yi Jiao, Yinghui Wang, Shaohua Zhang, Yin Li, Baoming Yang, Lei Yuan

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Will Model-based Definition replace engineering drawings throughout the product lifecycle? A global perspective from aerospace industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model-based Definition (MBD) approach is gaining popularity in various industries. MBD represents a trend in Computer-aided Design (CAD) that promises reduced time-to-market and improved product quality. Its main goal is to improve and accelerate ... Keywords: CAD, Engineering drawing, MBD, Model-based Definition, Product lifecycle

Virgilio Quintana; Louis Rivest; Robert Pellerin; Frédérick Venne; Fawzi Kheddouci

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT:1 A LIFE-CYCLE ENERGY CASE STUDY AND ANALYSIS2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models for petroleum use (from driving) and26 residential and commercial power and natural gas use infrastructure) made up 44 to 47% of the life-cycle energy demands34 tallied. Energy elasticity calculations across the neighborhoods suggest that increased population35 density and reduced residential unit size

Kockelman, Kara M.

419

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Food Structure presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultural analysis anal

420

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Food Structure presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultural analysis anal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Protein and Co-Products presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Protein and Co-Products agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents Detoxification and deallergenation division div

422

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Biotechnology presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Biotechnology articles biotech Biotechnology biotransformation cloning detergents division divisions edible food genetics journal lipids methods molecul

423

2006 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Emergency Preparedness Program 2006 Annual Report US Department of Energy - Offi ce of Environmental Management Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2006 Annual Report 2 2 Table of Contents Executive Summary.......................................................................................................................4 I. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Purpose.......................................6

424

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Analytical presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemistr

425

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Edible Applications Technology presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultur

426

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Sterols presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Meetings, Conferences and Short Courses aocs

427

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Health and Nutrition presented at the 102ndrd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods

428

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Phospholipids presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Phospholipid agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions emulsification systems fats industrial industries

429

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Surfactants and Detergents presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergents division divisions fabric fats home care jaocs journal jsd laundry methods oils papers

430

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Health and Nutrition presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods g

431

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Surfactants and Detergents presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergents division divisions fabric fats home care jaocs journal jsd laundry methods oils papers p

432

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Biotechnology presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Biotechnology articles biotech Biotechnology biotransformation cloning detergents division divisions edible food genetics journal lipids methods molecula

433

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from The Forum presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemistry

434

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from the Agricultural Microscopy presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents di

435

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Industrial Oil Products presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food food

436

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Industrial Oil Products presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food food

437

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Phospholipids presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Phospholipid agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions emulsification systems fats industrial industries

438

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Health and Nutrition presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods g

439

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Protein and Co-Products presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Protein and Co-Products agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents Detoxification and deallergenation division div

440

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Exhibitor Showcase presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Meetings, Conferences and Short Course

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Exhibitor Showcase presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Meetings, Conferences and Short Course

442

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Processing presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division divisions Environment

443

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from the Agricultural Microscopy presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents di

444

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Analytical presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemistr

445

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Food Structure presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultural analysis anal

446

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Protein and Co-Products presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Protein and Co-Products agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents Detoxification and deallergenation division divi

447

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Processing presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division divisions Environment

448

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Lipid Oxidation and Quality presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Lipid Oxidation and Quality agricultural analytical Antioxidants aocs articles Biological Oxidation biotechnology Chemical Analyses course

449

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Health and Nutrition presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods gl

450

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Biotechnology presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Biotechnology articles biotech Biotechnology biotransformation cloning detergents division divisions edible food genetics journal lipids methods molecul

451

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Industrial Oil Products presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food food

452

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Edible Applications Technology presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultur

453

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Edible Applications Technology presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultur

454

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Industrial Oil Products presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food food

455

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Surfactants and Detergents presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergents division divisions fabric fats home care jaocs journal jsd laundry methods oils papers

456

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Surfactants and Detergents presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergents division divisions fabric fats home care jaocs journal jsd laundry methods oils papers

457

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Surfactants and Detergents presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergents division divisions fabric fats home care jaocs journal jsd laundry methods oils papers

458

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Processing presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division divisions Environment

459

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Biotechnology presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Biotechnology articles biotech Biotechnology biotransformation cloning detergents division divisions edible food genetics journal lipids methods molecul

460

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Biotechnology presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Biotechnology articles biotech Biotechnology biotransformation cloning detergents division divisions edible food genetics journal lipids methods molecul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Lipid Oxidation and Quality presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Lipid Oxidation and Quality agricultural analytical Antioxidants aocs articles Biological Oxidation biotechnology Chemical Analyses course

462

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Phospholipids presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Phospholipid agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions emulsification systems fats industrial industries

463

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Analytical presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemistry

464

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Biotechnology presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Biotechnology articles biotech Biotechnology biotransformation cloning detergents division divisions edible food genetics journal lipids methods molecul

465

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Analytical presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemistr

466

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Protein and Co-Products presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Protein and Co-Products agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents Detoxification and deallergenation division div

467

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Protein and Co-Products presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Protein and Co-Products agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents Detoxification and deallergenation division div

468

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Food Structure presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultural analysis anal

469

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Edible Applications Technology presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultura

470

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Surfactants and Detergents presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Surfactants and Detergents aocs articles Detergents division divisions fabric fats home care jaocs journal jsd laundry methods oils papers

471

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Exhibitor Showcase presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Meetings, Conferences and Short Course

472

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Phospholipids presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Phospholipid agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions emulsification systems fats industrial industries

473

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Lipid Oxidation and Quality presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Lipid Oxidation and Quality agricultural analytical Antioxidants aocs articles Biological Oxidation biotechnology Chemical Analyses courses

474

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from the Agricultural Microscopy presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents div

475

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from The Bruce McDonald Memorial Session: Advances in Canola Research presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils p

476

Methane Hydrate Annual Reports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the results of Methane Hydrate research. Listed are the Annual Reports per...

477

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from the Agricultural Microscopy presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents di

478

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Phospholipids presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Phospholipid agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions emulsification systems fats industrial industries

479

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Industrial Oil Products presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods

480

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Processing presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division divisions Environmenta

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annualized lifecycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Food Structure presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultural analysis analy

482

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Edible Applications Technology presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultur

483

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Food Structure presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultural analysis anal

484

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Edible Applications Technology presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Food Science acid agricultur

485

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Exhibitor Showcase presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Meetings, Conferences and Short Course

486

2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Exhibitor Showcase presented at the 99th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2008 Annual Meeting Abstacts Topics/ Subject Matter aocs book books cdrom cdroms course echapters fats lipid methods oils press Meetings, Conferences and Short Courses

487

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Processing presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division divisions Environment

488

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Industrial Oil Products presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food food

489

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Processing presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division divisions Environment

490

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Health and Nutrition presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods g

491

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Health and Nutrition presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods g

492

2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Protein and Co-Products presented at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2013 Annual Meeting Abstacts Protein and Co-Products agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents Detoxification and deallergenation division div

493

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Lipid Oxidation and Quality presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Lipid Oxidation and Quality agricultural analytical Antioxidants aocs articles Biological Oxidation biotechnology Chemical Analyses course

494

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Phospholipids presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Phospholipid agricultural analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions emulsification systems fats industrial industries

495

2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from the Agricultural Microscopy presented at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting. 2010 Annual Meeting Abstacts Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents di

496

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Lipid Oxidation and Quality presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Lipid Oxidation and Quality agricultural analytical Antioxidants aocs articles Biological Oxidation biotechnology Chemical Analyses course

497

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Innovations in Teaching presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished division Divisions fats job Join lipid lipids Member member g

498

2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Analytical presented at the 100th AOCS Annual Meeting. 2009 Annual Meeting Abstacts Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemistr

499

2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Lipid Oxidation and Quality presented at the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2011 Annual Meeting Abstacts Lipid Oxidation and Quality agricultural analytical Antioxidants aocs articles Biological Oxidation biotechnology Chemical Analyses course

500

2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts from Analytical presented at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting. 2012 Annual Meeting Abstacts Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemist chemistr