Sample records for annual water sampling

  1. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  2. Deleware Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of best management practices (BMPs) by private businesses, and improved storm water management & wetlandsDeleware Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Delaware Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report Introduction and Program Management/Administration Description FY

  3. Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction Colorado Water Institute Annual Report for the period: March 1, 2012 ­ February 28, 2013 Water research is more pertinent than ever in Colorado. Whether the project explores

  4. Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Iowa Water Center is a multi-campus and multi-organizational center focusing-institutional water research that can improve Iowa's water quality and provide adequate water supplies to meet both

  5. Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Iowa Water Center is a multi-campus and multi-organizational center focusing-institutional water research that can improve Iowa's water quality and provide adequate water supplies to meet both

  6. Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Iowa Water Center is a multi-campus and multi-organizational center focusing-institutional water research that can improve Iowa's water quality and provide adequate water supplies to meet both

  7. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Arkansas Water Resources Center is part of the network of 54 water institutes established by the Water Resources Research Act of 1964 and is located

  8. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Rhode Island Water Resources Center has supported one information transfer project, "Clean Drinking Water in Rhode Island" and one research project "Enhancing Drinking Water

  9. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and heavy metals to surface runoff following storm events. Evaluating runoff water quality response, innovative domestic wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and landuse mapping, erosionArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Arkansas Water Resources Center

  10. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inactivation of Microorganisms in Drinking Water using Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation and Residual Chlorine. DrWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction This is a report on the projects of the Rhode Island Water Resources

  11. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Arkansas Water Resources Center located at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas is part of the network of 54 water institutes established

  12. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Arkansas Water Resources Center located at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, is part of the network of 54 water institutes established

  13. Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction Water research is more pertinent than ever in Colorado. Whether the project explores the effects of decentralized wastewater treatment systems on water quality, optimal

  14. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Arkansas Water Resources Center located at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas is part of the network of 54 water institutes established

  15. Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction Water research is more important than ever in Colorado. Whether the project explores the effects of decentralized wastewater treatment systems on water quality, optimal

  16. Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction Water research is more pertinent than ever in Colorado. Whether the research explores the effects of decentralized wastewater treatment systems on water quality, optimal

  17. Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Colorado Water Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction Water research is more pertinent than ever in Colorado. Whether the project explores the effects of decentralized wastewater treatment systems on water quality, optimal

  18. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction ABSTRACT The FY 1999 Oregon Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) program included four research projects funded Coastal Lakes: Water Quality Status and Management Implications Based on Nutrient Loading OWRRI sponsored

  19. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Mission of the Texas Water Resources Institute is to: (1) Provide leadership for Experiment Station and Extension research and education water programs statewide, coordinating with scientists, specialists, county agents

  20. Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Ground-water Flow and Transport Focus Category: Non Point Pollution, Surface Water, Toxic Substances Descriptors: Benthos, Bioindicators, Biomonitoring, Ecosystems, Heavy metals, Insects, Land use, PollutantsWater Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Introduction - Research

  1. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and issues in the State of Missouri can be separated into three general areas: 1) water quality, 2) water quantity, and 3) water policy. Each of Missouri's specific

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;:: A'Salmon,SepWater

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;:: A'Salmon,SepWaterSalmon,

  4. Water and Sediment Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsDNitrateEnergyNews3 Water VaporL)

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100B100WWNASCUBA80 AmbrosiaWater

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central NevadaGreenL-Bar,3 Water

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater, Surface Water,

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater, Surface Water,5

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;::Sampling at the Sherwood,

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling at the

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling at the4

  12. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling at

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,SamplingTuba

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,SamplingTubaand

  16. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Nebraska Water Resources Center of the University of Nebraska Water Center as of September 2009. Lorrie Benson, J.D. serves as the assistant, respectively. The Water Center staff also includes Rachael Herpel as the water outreach specialist. Duane

  17. Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Research Program In the west, water is critical to survival. Data and information concerning this resource are very valuable by the Water Research Program. Basic Project Information Category Data Title Water Resources Data System Water

  18. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Florida Water for Wetlands and Water Resources Research in 1995. Historically, since 1964, the WRRC as a separate or combined center has been a university-wide focus for water-resources research and has served as the Water

  19. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Groundwater, Models, Water Use Descriptors: Aquifer parameters, conjuntive use, groundwater modeling, surface-groundwater modeling, Surface- groundwater Relationships, Well hydraulics Problem and research objectives: ProblemNebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction Welcome

  20. Water Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph HomeWaranaWater Power Forum - Q &Water

  1. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute (PRWRERI) is one of 54 water research centers objectives of the Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute are (1) to conduct

  2. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Nebraska Water Resources Center Engineering Department at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, took over as the interim director of the Water Liedle serve as the communications specialist and program specialist, respectively. The Water Center

  3. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Water Resources Research Center of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the University of Arizona Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) has a mission to promote understanding of critical state and regional water management and policy issues through research

  4. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , more widespread use of best management practices (BMPs) by private businesses, and improved storm waterWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Delaware Water Resources Center the federal Clean Water Act's rating system of protected "designated uses" for purposes of drinking, swimming

  5. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Mission of the Texas Water Resources Institute is to: (1) Serve as the designated Water Resources Research Institute for the State of Texas, as part of the National Institutes for Water Resources Research Program and established

  6. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction PROGRAM REPORT FLORIDA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER FEDERAL GRANT NO. 1434-HQ-96-GRO2663 PERIOD: March 1, 1999 - February 29, 2000 The Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) was re-established as a separate entity from

  7. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was fed cyanide laden wastewater and produced treated water with no measurable cyanide. The results from to test a pilot-scale plant for treatment of cyanide contaminated water. During the first yearWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1998 Introduction Research Program Basic Project

  8. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Hydroclimatic Controls on the Conjunctive Use of Surface and Ground Water in the Platte River Basin; and (3 for organic, emerging contaminants, heavy metals, and for stable isotope mass spectrometry. Faculty, staffNebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Nebraska Water Resources Center

  9. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Idaho Water an autonomous statewide source of support for water research and training without regard to specific topic soils contain appreciable amounts of active clay minerals and exhibit shrink-swell behavior in response

  10. West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction West Virginia Water Research Institute Introduction The West Virginia Water Research Institute (WVWRI) addresses

  11. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    projects in 2011-12 conducted by graduate students at Texas A&M University (4 projects), West Texas A State University, and a multi-state, international project. Jacob Becker, of West Texas A&M UniversityTexas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Texas Water Resources Institute

  12. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    &M University (7 projects), Texas Tech University (1), West Texas A&M University (1), and the University. West Texas A&M University Student, Robert Taylor, conducted a pricing model to assess the effectsTexas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The Texas Water

  13. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Three research projects were. The technical transfer project set up a RI Water Resources Center Website to allow easy access to the Center treatment devices, such as oil/sediment separators, that have been widely installed in urbanized areas have

  14. Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction The Environmental Institute at Oklahoma State University has as its mission to serve as a center for stimulation and promotion two programs: Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) funded by the Department

  15. Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Environmental Institute at Oklahoma State University has as its mission to serve as a center for stimulation and promotion and sustaining the natural environment. The federally supported Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute

  16. Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction The Environmental Institute at Oklahoma State University has as its mission to serve as a center for stimulation and promotion through two programs: Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI)funded by the Department

  17. Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction The Environmental Institute at Oklahoma State University has as its mission to serve as a center for stimulation and promotion research funded through two programs: Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) funded by the U

  18. Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction The Environmental Institute at Oklahoma State University has as its mission to serve as a center for stimulation and promotion research funded through two programs: ¨ Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) funded by the U

  19. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011-2012 WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and issues

  20. Water Quality and Water Law Headline UNL's Fifth Annual Water Law, Policy and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Water Quality and Water Law Headline UNL's Fifth Annual Water Law, Policy and Science Conference "Water Quality Challenges in the Great Plains" is the theme of this year's University of Nebraska-Lincoln Water, Law, Policy and Science conference. The fifth annual UNL conference is April 22 and 23 at Lincoln

  1. Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Research Program #12;MtBE in Groundwater: The Maine Experiment Basic Information Title: MtBE in Groundwater: The Maine Experiment Project, J.M. (2002) The occurrence and persistence of MtBE in groundwater in Windham, Maine, NE FOCUS Conf

  2. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Wilcox; and the Gulf Coast Aquifer. A series of minor aquifers called West Texas Bolsons also cross TexasÕ borderTexas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Research Program #12;Texas Groundwater Management and Global Applications Basic Information Title: Texas Groundwater

  3. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , including Texas A&M University, Baylor University, Rice University, West Texas A&M University at selected sites throughout Texas. Kevin Heflin of West Texas A&M University tested whether the use of cattleTexas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Research Program

  4. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water harvesting are the principal sources of fresh water. Ground water supplies are very limited. WaterVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The Virgin Islands

  5. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tributaries for their water sources continue to face severe water shortage problems. All across the state manyTennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction Water Resources Issues and Problems

  6. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tributaries for their water sources continue to face severe water shortage problems. All across the state manyTennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction Water Resources Issues

  7. University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modeling studies and applications designed to preserve or improve groundwater quality. The following reportUniversity of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction: groundwater, surface water, groundwater/surface water interactions, and drinking water initiatives. Faculty

  8. West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The West Virginia Water Research Institute with industry, government agencies, academia and the public. Water is one of West Virginia's most precious

  9. West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction West Virginia Water Research Institute The West. Introduction Water is one of West Virginia's most precious resources. It is essential for life and our economic

  10. West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction West Virginia Water Research Institute The West. Introduction Water is one of West Virginia's most precious resources. It is essential for life and our economic

  11. West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 West Virginia Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction West Virginia Water Research Institute The West. Introduction Water is one of West Virginia's most precious resources. It is essential for life and our economic

  12. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Virginia Water Resources Research-135.7:8). Mission The VWRRC promotes research on practical solutions to water resources problems; provides research

  13. Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Alabama Water Resources Research with the newly created Auburn University Water Resources Center (AU-WRC), and in 2008 it was designated as part

  14. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Virginia Water Resources Research-135.7:8). Mission The VWRRC provides research and educational opportunities to future water scientists; promotes

  15. New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and ground water aquifers. Sae-Khow and her advisor developed a microscale solid phase extraction methodNew Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The New Jersey Water

  16. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the islands' geology. Rain water harvesting is required by law and serves as the principal water sourceVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The U. S. Virgin

  17. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    always been a major concern in these small volcanic islands where rain water harvesting, ground waterVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The United States

  18. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to face severe water shortage problems. All across the state many private, domestic, and commercial useTennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction Introduction Water Resources Issues

  19. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to face severe water shortage problems. All across the state many private, domestic, and commercial useTennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction Water Resources Issues and Problems

  20. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to face severe water shortage problems. All across the state many private, domestic, and commercial useTennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction Introduction Water Resources Issues

  1. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    continue to face severe water shortage problems. All across the state many private, domesticTennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction Introduction Water Resources Issues

  2. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to face severe water shortage problems. All across the state many private, domestic, and commercial useTennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction Introduction Water Resources Issues

  3. Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water of Puerto Rico. The Institute is one of 54 water research centers established throughout the United States

  4. Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water of Puerto Rico. The Institute is one of 54 water research centers established throughout the United States

  5. Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water of the Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute are... (1) to conduct research aimed

  6. South Dakota Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    characteristics, along with water age and temperature, are primary factors affecting disinfectant residual decaySouth Dakota Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction South Dakotas Water Resources Research Institutes program is administered through the College of Agricultural

  7. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Oklahoma Water for Sustainable Environments (ISE) at Oklahoma State University promotes interdisciplinary environmental research development of the natural environment. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) is located

  8. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Oklahoma Water for Sustainable Environments (ISE) at Oklahoma State University promotes interdisciplinary environmental research development of the natural environment. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) is located

  9. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Oklahoma Water for Sustainable Environments (ISE) at Oklahoma State University continues to promote interdisciplinary, and sustainably developing the natural environment. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI

  10. University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modeling studies and applications designed to preserve or improve groundwater quality. ChargedUniversity of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction into the following four thematic areas: groundwater, surface water, groundwater/surface water interactions

  11. West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The West Virginia staff and the public. Our research program is guided by the West Virginia Advisory Committee for Water

  12. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction During 2012 the Oklahoma Sciences and Natural Resources at Oklahoma State University (OSU). Together with the Water Research

  13. annual water storage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a program for farmer storage of surface irrigation water in Elephant Butte Reservoir, New Mexico. This program would allow individual farmers to store part of their annual surface...

  14. Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

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    Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction WATER Water Institute Program for FY1999, the Advisory Council on Water Research Policy (ACWRP) for the Colorado Water Resources Research Institute (CWRRI) was activated. The Council held its initial meeting

  15. Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction As water managers work to solve the integrated water problems facing Colorado today, the dimensions of each issue demand a better understanding of basic water science, technology and policy. Whether water managers work

  16. D.C. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

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    projects that address the three components of integrated urban water system: storm water runoff and sewer developing and maintaining new environmental quality testing and modeling tools to advance water researchD.C. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 D.C. Water Resources

  17. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The Environmental Institute (EI) at Oklahoma State University promotes interdisciplinary environmental research developing the natural environment. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute, located within the EI

  18. annual bathing water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    annual bathing water First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Water Resources Center Annual...

  19. Third Annual Report The Climate, Water, and Carbon Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    i Third Annual Report The Climate, Water, and Carbon Program A Targeted Investment in Excellence, Water, and Carbon Program (CWC) is pleased to provide this Third Annual Report for review by OAA and OR the CWC. These groups include: CWC Advisory Board: Heather Allen, Department of Chemistry, MPS, allen

  20. South Carolina Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

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    South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The South Carolina losses of both agricultural and forest land covers to urban uses. These losses could significantly impact

  1. Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The FY 2004 Annual Technical Report of the Mississippi Water Resources Research - GeoResources Institute of Nutrient and Pesticide Runoff Losses from Golf Courses and Residential Lawns in the South Atlantic

  2. Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

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    Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The FY 2005 Annual Technical Report for the Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute summarizes USGS and Pesticide Runoff Losses from Golf Courses and Residential Lawns in the South Atlantic-Gulf Region Basic

  3. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  4. West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction West Virginia Water Research Institute Introduction The West Virginia Water Research Institute (WVWRI) addresses is guided by the West Virginia Advisory Committee for Water Research. It includes representatives from

  5. West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction West Virginia Water Research Institute Introduction The West Virginia Water Research Institute (WVWRI) addresses is guided by the West Virginia Advisory Committee for Water Research. It includes representatives from

  6. West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 West Virginia;Research Program Introduction West Virginia Water Research Institute Introduction The West Virginia Water and the public. Our research program is guided by the West Virginia Advisory Committee for Water Research

  7. West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction West Virginia Water Research Institute Introduction The West Virginia Water Research Institute (WVWRI program is guided by the West Virginia Advisory Committee for Water Research. It includes representatives

  8. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , rain water harvesting has been a principal source of potable water for the residents of the USVI such as rain water harvesting, alternative on-site sewage disposal systems and investigation of applicableVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Virgin Islands

  9. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Historically, rain water harvesting has been a principal source of potable water for the residents of the USVI such as rain water harvesting, alternative on-site sewage disposal systems and investigation of applicableVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Virgin Islands

  10. New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    harvesting. The results of this research will help to develop guidelines for water testing and best management practices for applying harvested rain water to backyard and community gardens. In the secondNew Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 New Jersey Water

  11. D.C. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D.C. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 D.C. Water Resources Research of the District of Columbia (DC) Water Resources Research Institute (the Institute) for the period of March 1 relevant water resources research results and transfer information to assist policy makers and residents

  12. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the IWRRC director is now serving on the state's Water Shortage Task Force. For this reporting period, weIndiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Indiana Water Resources Overview: This report covers the activities of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center (IWRRC

  13. Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Puerto Rico Water are summarized herein. The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute is located at the Mayagüez Campus of the University of Puerto Rico. The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental

  14. Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute (PRWRERI) is one of 54 water research-242). The general objectives of the Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute are (1

  15. Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute (PRWRERI) is one of 54 water research-242). The general objectives of the Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute are (1

  16. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Oklahoma Water the Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI, part of the Oklahoma Water Resources Center) continued its integration in to the Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources at Oklahoma State

  17. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Oklahoma Water changes to the Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI). OWRRI moved from the Division of the Vice President for Research at Oklahoma State University (OSU) to join the Water Research and Extension

  18. Transition Path Sampling of Water Exchange Rates and Mechanisms...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Path Sampling of Water Exchange Rates and Mechanisms around Aqueous Ions . Transition Path Sampling of Water Exchange Rates and Mechanisms around Aqueous Ions . Abstract: The rates...

  19. D.C. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and among agencies, universities, and other area researchers; and to support the development and Guidelines under the Water Resources Development Act, and other federal spending and activities relatedD.C. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 D.C. Water Resources Research

  20. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    involved with water resource issues. The oil and gas industry, the chemical industry, port activitiesLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute

  1. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cultural and economic life involved with water resource issues. The oil and gas industry, the chemicalLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute

  2. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    involved with water resource issues. The oil and gas industry, the chemical industry, port activitiesLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute

  3. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    involved with water resource issues. The oil and gas industry, the chemical industry, port activitiesLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute

  4. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    areas. In the U. S. Virgin Islands rain water harvesting and seawater desalination are the principalVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute (VI-WRRI) is located at the University of the Virgin

  5. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the few places in the world where rain water harvesting is required by law. Buildings are constructed and quality issues of water harvesting, development of alternative on-site sewage disposal systems and nonVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Virgin Islands

  6. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    harvesting had been a principal source of potable water for the residents of the USVI with some reliance such as rain water harvesting, development of alternative on-site sewage disposal systems and investigationVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Virgin Islands

  7. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resources Board. Decision Support System for Long Term Planning of Rural and Urban Water Supply Systems CostOklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction developing the natural environment. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI), located within

  8. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the biological contamination of waters that have been used for the last 100 years have been shown to lack certainVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction The Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute (WRRI) is a unit of the University of the Virgin

  9. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Oklahoma Water Institute at Oklahoma State University was renamed the Institute for Sustainable Environments, or ISE. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) is located within the ISE and is responsible

  10. New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 New Mexico Water is based on a July-June fiscal year rather than the March-February USGS Grant Award period. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State University

  11. New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 New Mexico Water is based on a July-June fiscal year rather than the March-February USGS Grant Award period. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NM WRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State University

  12. New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 New Mexico Water is based on a July-June fiscal year rather than the March-February USGS Grant Award period. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State University

  13. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Roles identified by the state. These three projects included: 1. Measuring ssepage losses from waste treatment-push technology for site characterization investigations. #12;Measuring Seepage Losses from Waste

  14. Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    include: evaluation of water treatment technology, source water protection planning, mitigation of nitrate; integrated water management for multiple users; wetland processes; and emerging issues, including other

  15. June 2011 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analyses. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743. Produced water samples were not collected at locations 30-039-30161 and 30-039-21744 because of the lack of water. Samples were not collected from location 30-039-29988 because the well was shut-in.

  16. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and quality, and explored new ideas to address water problems and expand understanding of water and water at conditions mediating bioavailability and transport of specific uranium species in non-regulated water sources

  17. Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    influence water quality and restoration potential? How does stream channelization influence water quality of the United States. Human activities have altered stream hydrology that affects water quality. Stream-2010 Iowa Water Center research program is on stream dynamics affecting water quality. We are interested

  18. Institute of Water Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and ground water protection. One project entitled "Decision Support System for Natural Resource Planning" (02 analysis, technology transfer, urban water systems, water quality, water quality management, watershed) was funded to address these problems and issues. In addition, support for the Institute of Water Research

  19. July 2010 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis was conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites. (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analysis. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. An additional water sample was collected from well 29-6 Water Hole for analysis of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743.

  20. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Island Water Resources Center supported one research project; MTBE Drinking Water Contamination Aquifer. The MTBE contamination problem in Pascoag, which contaminated the only public drinking water well allowed researchers from URI to investigate the MTBE bedrock contamination and suggest remediation

  1. Institute of Water Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . One project entitled "Decision Support System for Natural Resource Planning" (02) was funded transfer, urban water systems, water quality, water quality management, watershed management, wetlands and research program on the development of environmental information systems for environmental decision making

  2. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; integrated water management for multiple users; wetland processes; and emerging issues, including other began funding four new projects in 2003. These projects include: evaluation of water treatment

  3. Nevada Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nevada Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Nevada Water Resources of copper ore at the Yerington NV mine site was accomplished by leaching with sulfuric acid. Residual materials, both solid residual ore and process fluids, pose considerable hazard to the local environment

  4. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Environmental Institute at Oklahoma State University has as its mission to serve as a center for stimulation, protecting, utilizing and sustaining the natural environment. The federally supported Oklahoma Water

  5. Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modeling efforts, quantify the flux of groundwater nutrients to the lower Truckee River; 2. Using benchWater Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Research Program #12;A Multi-Level Approach to Modeling Ground- and Surface Water Exchange

  6. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for overall water quality and quantity research and implementation in Delaware include: enhanced management the federal Clean Water Act's rating system of designated uses (such as drinking water supply, swimming, fishing, etc.). Delaware has promulgated surface water quality standards which are designed to protect

  7. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and land use mapping, erosion and pollution, water quality focused on helping local, state and federal agencies understand, manage and protect water resources within Arkansas. AWRC has contributed substantially to the understanding and management of water resources through

  8. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for managing valuable water resources in systems with high competitive demands. This management class also-related problems facing the population centers in the mainland U.S. and the world. Water shortages and quality' Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) mainly address research related to water quantity and quality

  9. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for overall water quality and quantity research and implementation in Delaware include: enhanced management that have been classified using the federal Clean Water Act's rating system of designated uses (such as drinking water supply, swimming, fishing, etc.). Delaware has promulgated surface water quality standards

  10. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and together these model- data results will highlight potential areas of concern. Introduction structures. Preventing the failure of these structures and sedimentation in inlets alone costs federal and state agencies billions of dollars annually. In addition to being costly, the manual monitoring

  11. PHD STUDENT ANNUAL REVIEW FORM -----SAMPLE Instructions: Under each of the prompts below, provide the requested

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHD STUDENT ANNUAL REVIEW FORM ----- SAMPLE Instructions: Under each of the prompts below, provide started the program: Autumn 2006 Sample Completed Form ­ Student Responses are marked in Purple #12;PHD in Evaluation at MobileHCI 2007. #12;PHD STUDENT ANNUAL REVIEW FORM | 3 Posters: · Student, S. and D. Farkas

  12. Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . National Mine Land Reclamation Center which focuses on watershed restoration to correct the effects of mine Descriptors: post mining land use, waste water,water quality, site selection, waste reduction, parameter

  13. Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will be used in developing Best Management Practices for golf course water supply, demand and quality institutions in Connecticut and the State government agency most responsible for implementing water policy

  14. Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : water quality, water chemistry, wastewater treatment, toxic substances wastewater, organic compounds, nutrients, nitrogen,denitrification eutrophication, biological treatment, bacteria,activated sludge Tools to Infer Inhibition of Biological Nitrogen Removal at POTWs via Long Term Bench-Scale and Full

  15. Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program Introduction 1 #12;Biomass Harvest and Nutrient Management Systems Impacts on Water Quality. Basic Information Title: Biomass Harvest and Nutrient Management Systems Impacts on Water Quality. Project Number There are no publications. Biomass Harvest and Nutrient Management Systems Impacts on Water Quality. Biomass Harvest

  16. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and explored new ideas to address water problems or expand understanding of water and water-related phenomena of Uranium plumes in groundwater. An on-going project on Uranium contamination is using fish tissue to detect the presence of Uranium and Lead isotopes in the Lower Colorado River. The WRRC also manages a research program

  17. Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 2001). CBM extraction involves pumping methane and ground water out of coal seams. The gas and water://wwweng.uwyo.edu/civil/research/water/epmodeler.html. University of Wyoming, Laramie. 4. Wilkerson, G. V., 2002. A GIS model for evaluating the impacts of coal bed of America, Boulder, CO. #12;Problem and Research Objectives: Coal bed methane (CBM) development

  18. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    irrigation, ground water modeling, non-point source pollution, quality of ground water and surface water heavy metals from pasture soil amended with varying rates of poultry litter Basic Information Title: Vadose-zone losses of soluble heavy metals from pasture soil amended with varying rates of poultry litter

  19. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water and how it can be protected. With the large agricultural activity in the state, non-point source waste disposal, acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. Water of the 1987-1989 drought years, and the flood of 93 and 95, water quantity has become a major topic of concern

  20. Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the area of physical,chemical, and biological treatment processes for water and wastewater. The mission on water and wastewater treatment processes. The Center continues to be administered through the College, chemical engineering, environmental science, biology and other water related fields were supported

  1. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciences Focus Category: Wetlands, Management and Planning, Water Quality Descriptors: wetlands, wetland-soil managed wetlands by comparison with nearby non-managed systems. Proceedings of the 32nd Mississippi Water Audubon Society to evaluate effects of moist-soil habitat management practices on water quality

  2. North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    total PCBs and PCDFs in water samples. The objective was accomplished coupling solid-liquid extraction, namely water extraction, application of phosphorescence enhancers to the extraction membrane, and direct RTP detection on the extracting substrate. The water sample (10-100 mL) is processed through

  3. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amherst; "Elucidating the impact of upgrading wastewater treatment for nitrogen removal on eutrophication as nutrients; and water quality problems such as eutrophication, salt intrusion in groundwater, and stormwater

  4. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Data Title Economic and Hydrologic Analysis of Integrated Wetland Reservoir and Subirrigated State University 02 #12;the watershed. Wetlands, however, may provide a means of managing water quality

  5. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    saline water, especially in the shallower Alluvial Aquifer, that has resulted from oil and gas operations corrosion and taste problems with dr

  6. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and quantity Water quality standards and regulation for Hawaii Pipeline forensics and asset replacement of Hawaii Water Resources Research Center, in the FY2006 reporting period, initiated three new projects under the 104(b) program and renewed funding for a fourth project. Work continued on a 104(g) award

  7. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivers are major generators of electrical power and support a rapidly growing population and economy government and various tribes, many water use issues will be controlled by outcomes of complex legal battles consumption are rising steadily driven by Oregons population and economic growth. Water competition

  8. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , none is more important for long-term sustainability than the potential impacts on water resources of Honolulu, is truly the "canary in the coal mine" for many water- and energy-related issues that may face2008 budget cycle, Professor Clark Liu and Assistant Professor Tao Yan (Civil & Environmental

  9. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , none is more important for long-term sustainability than the potential impacts on water resources of Honolulu, is truly the "canary in the coal mine" for many water- and energy-related issues that may face-reliance in aquaculture production while sustaining environmental health. The four main objectives were to: (1) identify

  10. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the northeastern U.S. (Frink 1991). Forested riparian areas are among the best management practices (BMPs in the Chipuxet Basin, studies the water demands in the Chipuxet water basin to determine the feasibility response to low levels of inorganic P, and its production and activityareinhibited by elevated levels

  11. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) INFORM: Integrated Forecast and Reservoir Management System for Northern California, Aris Georgakakos PI Water Resources Institute GWRI mission is to help improve water resources management in Georgia, the US planning and management framework for Georgia. The GWRI planning tools are used to (i) determine flow

  12. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /USGS104G; 5. INFORM: Integrated Forecast and Reservoir Management System for Northern California and management; b) Educate scientists, engineers, and water professionals in state-of-the-science methods and their potential applications; and c) Disseminate useful information to policy makers, water managers, industry

  13. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the quality of Missouri drinking water and how it can be protected. With the large agricultural activity mine areas, hazardous waste disposal, acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems. Because of the 1987-1989 drought years, and the flood of '93 and '95, water quantity has become a major

  14. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the area of physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes for water and wastewater. The mission and wastewater treatment processes. The Center continues to be administered through the College of Engineering and Elimelech 1996). Colloidal interactions are also important in water and wastewater treatment

  15. Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the area of physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes for water and wastewater. The mission and wastewater treatment processes. The Center continues to be administered through the College of Engineering, Isabel Escobar progressed in developing new membranes for drinking water treatment and will continue her

  16. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the area of physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes for water and wastewater. The mission and wastewater treatment processes. The Center continues to be administered through the College of Engineering Photocatalytic Films for Water Treatment, University of Cinncinatti. 1. Yongjun Chen, Suzanne Lunsford

  17. May 2013 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 14-16, 2013, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location CER #1 Black Sulphur. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional and enrichment methods.

  18. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Trainer, 1974)...

  19. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Situ Bioremediation of MTBE Contaminated Ground Water Using Biobarriers, Marc Deshusses & Mark Matsumoto, UC Riverside of Using Bioaugmentation with Bacterial Strain PM 1 for Bioremediation of MTBE-Contaminated Vadose

  20. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dissemination, and works collaboratively with various local, state, and federal agencies. These include #35334). (5) Tidal Streams: A Renewable Energy Source for Georgia , Kevin Haas, Georgia Institute, environmental organizations, lake associations, California Energy Commission, California Department of Water

  1. Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    irrigation systems range from 45% to 60%, while sprinkler, and user oriented bulletins. Results are also available through the Wyoming Water Resources Data Systems library. Research Program #12;Hydrologic Impacts of Improved Irrigation Efficiencies and Land Use Changes

  2. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Commission, California Department of Water Resources, National Oceanic and Atmospheric.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Finally, GWRI has significant international involvement in China, Africa) Integrated Forecast and Reservoir Management (INFORM) for Northern California, Phase II: Operational

  3. annual maximum water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    annual maximum water First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ORIGINAL PAPER The distribution of...

  4. New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Research, and to represent the loss of land applied manure in runoff in a patchwork of manured and non-manured fields. One losses in overland flow in Northeastern US settings; septic system pollution prevention BMP

  5. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1998 Introduction Research, and bioavailable P losses in runoff are influenced by a variety of factors. The purpose of this project is to quantify the impact of best management practices on P losses in runoff. The specific objectives are: 1

  6. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) describes planned water sampling activities and provides the regulatory and technical basis for ground water sampling in 1994 at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Maybell, Colorado. The WSAP identifies and justifies sampling locations, analytical parameters, and sampling frequencies at the site. The ground water data will be used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for the ground water and surface water monitoring activities is derived from the EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1993) and the proposed EPA standards of 1987 (52 FR 36000). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. This WSAP also includes a summary and the results of water sampling activities from 1989 through 1992 (no sampling was performed in 1993).

  7. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and surrounding states. Recycling of nutrients and organic matter is essential in reducing the need. AWRC cooperates closely with colleges, universities and other organizations in Arkansas to address Pollution Descriptors: animal waste, feed additive, water quality, land application, non-point source

  8. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to solve these problems through research, education, and technology transfer activities. The objectives, and technology transfer are required; + assure recognition of capabilities of water resources research in support of that research. Research Program #12;Temperature Effects of Streambed Heating Basic Information

  9. Institute of Water Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decision support systems (SDSS). These geospatial decision support systems provide an analytical framework in partnership with other states in EPA Region 5 using state-of-the-art decision support systems. The Institute. The Institute also provides important support to MSU-WATER, a major university initiative dealing with urban

  10. Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and environmental impact analysis. Agriculture: Combined animal feeding operations, nutrient and pathogen impacts Bryant, Environmental Engineer U.S. EPA, Region III Carl Bauer, Associate Director for Coal recognized program which focuses on water issues: acid mine drainage and coal combustion byproducts. West

  11. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and non-point source nutrient loading of surface streams and reservoirs in northwest Arkansas, identifying and evaluating the viability of alternate water supplies using abandoned, flooded coal mines for the City and Sediment Phosphorus Flux in Streams and Reservoirs: Effect of Chemical Amendments Basic Information Title

  12. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , sponsored by NOAA, California Energy Commission, and CalFed; #12;EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER: USGS (Burundi, Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda) and is used their information needs. In the US, INFORM is a project that is motivated by the water and energy shortages

  13. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , California Energy Commission, and CalFed; 6. Epidemiological and Environmental Malaria Information System. The Nile DST has now been disseminated to all 10 Nile countries (Burundi, Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia that is motivated by the water and energy shortages in California. INFORM brings together all relevant agencies

  14. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Reservoir Management System for Northern California; sponsored by NOAA, the California Energy Commission necessary to support integrated river basin management. #12;At the state level, the project sponsored and management; b) Educate scientists, engineers, and water professionals in state-of-the-science methods

  15. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be protected. With the large agricultural activity in the state, non-point source pollution is of major precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. Water Quantity: Missouri has a history of either inadequate amounts of rainfall, or spring floods. Because of the 1987-1989 drought years

  16. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : "Sustainable Oil and Grease Removal from Stormwater Runoff Hotspots using Bioretention" and "Atmospheric Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Program to Reduce Nonpoint Source Pollution to Meet the States Water Quality/Computer Data Management, 9 Non-Point Source Pollution Measurement and Control, 10 Nutrients, 11 Remote Sensing

  17. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and nitrogen in non-conventional onsite wastewater treatment processes: a technical and economic analysis Basic treatment processes: a technical and economic analysis Project Number: 2002CA1B Start Date: 3/1/2002 End for the Onsite Treatment of Wastewater in California, Center for Water Resources Engineering, University

  18. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Wildlife Service. GWRI also has a significant international involvement in Europe, Africa, China, and South-based Hydrologic Forecasts, Aris Georgakakos PI, Georgia Institute of Technology, sponsored by NOAA OGP Climate graduate education, applied research, and technology transfer in the areas of water, energy

  19. Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and it conducted an extensive program of research on water and wastewater treatment processes. The Center continues on encouraging and supporting research in the area of physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes of nutrient stream pollution resulting from on-site wastewater treatment units. Three projects were not yet

  20. Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the area of physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes for water and wastewater. The mission and wastewater treatment processes. The Center continues to be administered through the College of Engineering, School of Energy, Environmental, Biological, and Medical Engineering, University of Cincinnati

  1. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -use industrial surfactants. Included in this list are potent natural and synthetic estrogens which find their way for microbial degradation of steroid hormones in activated sludge. In support of the above, during the first sludge samples. Phase IIa - Toxicity Identification and Evaluation. The estrogenic activity of wastewater

  2. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in this list are potent natural and synthetic estrogens which find their way to the aquatic environment through hormones in activated sludge. In support of the above, during the first year of investigation, wastewater-estradiol and other 14C- compounds were assessed in two activated sludge samples. Phase IIa - Toxicity Identification

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - annual tree rings Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sample search results for: annual tree rings Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 D Smith and D b d s , Univemily of Victorfa, V'ictoriq I@ XKn Ekevier B.V. All rightsr w w d ....

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - annual growth rings Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sample search results for: annual growth rings Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 D Smith and D b d s , Univemily of Victorfa, V'ictoriq I@ XKn Ekevier B.V. All rightsr w w d ....

  5. May 2011 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 16-17, 2011, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location Johnson Artesian WL. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry, and for tritium using the conventional method. Tritium was not measured using the enrichment method because the EPA laboratory no longer offers that service. Results of this monitoring at the Rio Blanco site demonstrate that groundwater and surface water outside the boundaries have not been affected by project-related contaminants.

  6. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan -- Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is required for each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site to provide a basis for ground water and surface water sampling at disposal and former processing sites. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the monitoring stations at the Navaho Reservation in Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project site. The purposes of the water sampling at Shiprock for fiscal year (FY) 1994 are to (1) collect water quality data at new monitoring locations in order to build a defensible statistical data base, (2) monitor plume movement on the terrace and floodplain, and (3) monitor the impact of alluvial ground water discharge into the San Juan River. The third activity is important because the community of Shiprock withdraws water from the San Juan River directly across from the contaminated alluvial floodplain below the abandoned uranium mill tailings processing site.

  7. Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Evans...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling Activity Date - 2002 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "Detailed chemical and isotopic studies not only help quantify the discharge, but also may provide...

  8. Interpretation of Water Sample Analysis, Waunita Hot Spring Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    R. H. Carpenter (Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy). 1981. Interpretation of Water Sample Analysis, Waunita Hot Spring Project,...

  9. Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Janik & Goff, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration...

  10. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date - 1982 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Field,...

  11. Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson & Dellechaie, 1976)...

  12. Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., 1992)...

  13. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

  14. Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration...

  15. May 2012 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 9-10, 2012, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location Johnson Artesian WL. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional and enrichment methods. Results of this monitoring at the Rio Blanco site demonstrate that groundwater and surface water outside the site boundaries have not been affected by project-related contaminants.

  16. Annual Report: 2011-2012 Storm Season Sampling, Non-Dry Dock Stormwater Monitoring for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Rupert, Brian; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhart, Christine

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual PSNS non-dry dock storm water monitoring results for 2011-2012 storm season. Included are a brief description of the sampling procedures, storm event information, laboratory methods and data collection, a results and discussion section, and the conclusions and recommendations.

  17. Complementary relationship of evaporation and the mean annual water-energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Complementary relationship of evaporation and the mean annual water-energy balance Jozsef Szilagyi1 and the mean annual water-energy balance, Water Resour. Res., 45, W09201, doi:10.1029/2009WR008129. [2] Gerrits balance necessarily operates at the catchment scale, plus E0 depends predominantly on the available energy

  18. Water Sampling (Healy, 1970) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search ContentsWater Power ForumGround

  19. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Tuba City, Arizona, are described in the following sections of this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP). This plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the stations routinely monitored at the site. The ground water data are used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and the final EPA standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), and the most effective technical approach for the site.

  20. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Cane Valley is a former uranium mill that has undergone surface remediation in the form of tailings and contaminated materials removal. Contaminated materials from the Monument Valley (Arizona) UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat (Utah) UMTRA Project site for consolidation with the Mexican Hat tailings. Tailings removal was completed in February 1994. Three geologic units at the site contain water: the unconsolidated eolian and alluvial deposits (alluvial aquifer), the Shinarump Conglomerate (Shinarump Member), and the De Chelly Sandstone. Water quality analyses indicate the contaminant plume has migrated north of the site and is mainly in the alluvial aquifer. An upward hydraulic gradient in the De Chelly Sandstone provides some protection to that aquifer. This water sampling and analysis plan recommends sampling domestic wells, monitor wells, and surface water in April and September 1994. The purpose of sampling is to continue periodic monitoring for the surface program, evaluate changes to water quality for site characterization, and provide data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples taken in April will be representative of high ground water levels and samples taken in September will be representative of low ground water levels. Filtered and nonfiltered samples will be analyzed for plume indicator parameters and baseline risk assessment parameters.

  1. TRITIUM UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS FOR SURFACE WATER SAMPLES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, R.

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiochemical analyses of surface water samples, in the framework of Environmental Monitoring, have associated uncertainties for the radioisotopic results reported. These uncertainty analyses pertain to the tritium results from surface water samples collected at five locations on the Savannah River near the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). Uncertainties can result from the field-sampling routine, can be incurred during transport due to the physical properties of the sample, from equipment limitations, and from the measurement instrumentation used. The uncertainty reported by the SRS in their Annual Site Environmental Report currently considers only the counting uncertainty in the measurements, which is the standard reporting protocol for radioanalytical chemistry results. The focus of this work is to provide an overview of all uncertainty components associated with SRS tritium measurements, estimate the total uncertainty according to ISO 17025, and to propose additional experiments to verify some of the estimated uncertainties. The main uncertainty components discovered and investigated in this paper are tritium absorption or desorption in the sample container, HTO/H{sub 2}O isotopic effect during distillation, pipette volume, and tritium standard uncertainty. The goal is to quantify these uncertainties and to establish a combined uncertainty in order to increase the scientific depth of the SRS Annual Site Environmental Report.

  2. RAPID DETERMINATION OF {sup 210} PO IN WATER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that can be used for emergency response or routine water analyses. If a radiological dispersive device (RDD) event or a radiological attack associated with drinking water supplies occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of water samples, including drinking water, ground water and other water effluents. Current analytical methods for the assay of {sup 210}Po in water samples have typically involved spontaneous auto-deposition of {sup 210}Po onto silver or other metal disks followed by counting by alpha spectrometry. The auto-deposition times range from 90 minutes to 24 hours or more, at times with yields that may be less than desirable. If sample interferences are present, decreased yields and degraded alpha spectrums can occur due to unpredictable thickening in the deposited layer. Separation methods have focused on the use of Sr Resin?, often in combination with 210Pb analysis. A new rapid method for {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that utilizes a rapid calcium phosphate co-precipitation method, separation using DGA Resin? (N,N,N?,N? tetraoctyldiglycolamide extractant-coated resin, Eichrom Technologies or Triskem-International), followed by rapid microprecipitation of {sup 210}Po using bismuth phosphate for counting by alpha spectrometry. This new method can be performed quickly with excellent removal of interferences, high chemical yields and very good alpha peak resolution, eliminating any potential problems with the alpha source preparation for emergency or routine samples. A rapid sequential separation method to separate {sup 210} Po and actinide isotopes was also developed. This new approach, rapid separation with DGA Resin plus microprecipitation for alpha source preparation, is a significant advance in radiochemistry for the rapid determination of {sup 210}Po.

  3. Minutes of the 28th Annual Plutonium Sample Exchange Meeting. Part II: metal sample exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents of this publication include the following list of participating laboratories; agenda; attendees; minutes of October 25 and 26 meeting; and handout materials supplied by speakers. The handout materials cover the following: statistics and reporting; plutonium - chemical assay 100% minus impurities; americium neptunium, uranium, carbon and iron data; emission spectroscopy data; plutonium metal sample exchange; the calorimetry sample exchange; chlorine determination in plutonium metal using phyrohydrolysis; spectrophotometric determination of 238-plutonium in oxide; plutonium measurement capabilities at the Savannah River Plant; and robotics in radiochemical laboratory.

  4. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second annual storm water report prepared in accordance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) on December 1, 2011, and the corresponding Y-12 Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3) which became effective on September 7, 2012. However, Appendix A does contain some analytical data gathered under the previous NPDES permit and SWP3 for comparison purposes. The quality of storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek remained relatively stable from 2012 to 2013. However, there was one largely unexpected high concentration of mercury noted in an area that is not known to have previously been a mercury use area. This was noted in Sector AA, Outfall 014. This outfall is normally sampled on a rotating basis but, due this elevated concentration, will be sampled again in 2014. The Y-12 Complex will continue to implement appropriate BMPs and reduce outside material storage ares where possible. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and timely implementation of proper storm water control measures.

  5. Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    include: water quality, surface and groundwater management, water quality management and water resources Category: Water Quality Focus Category: Wetlands, Water Quality, Management and Planning Descriptors; to assist state agencies in the development and maintenance of a state water management plan

  6. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in assessing the susceptibility of surface water supplies to pollution from current and future activities, Hydrology, Models Descriptors: Drinking Water, Source Water, Pollution Sources, Watershed Management Supply Descriptors: Drinking water, source water, pollution sources, watershed management Primary PI

  7. Links Between Flood Frequency and Annual Water Balance Behaviors: A Basis for Similarity and Regionalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jiali; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Guo, Shenglian; Liu, Pan; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a data based comparative study of several hundred catchments across continental United States belonging to the MOPEX dataset, which systematically explored the connection between the flood frequency curve and measures of mean annual water balance. Two different measures of mean annual water balance are used: (i) a climatic aridity index, AI, which is a measure of the competition between water and energy availability at the annual scale; and, (ii) baseflow index, BFI, the ratio of slow runoff to total runoff also at the annual time scale, reflecting the role of geology, soils, topography and vegetation. The data analyses showed that the aridity index, AI, has a first order control on both the mean and Cv of annual maximum floods. While mean annual flood decreases with increasing aridity, Cv increases with increasing aridity. BFI appeared to be a second order control on the magnitude and shape of the flood frequency curve. Higher BFI, meaning more subsurface flow and less surface flow leads to a decrease of mean annual flood whereas lower BFI leads to accumulation of soil moisture and increased flood magnitudes that arise from many events acting together. The results presented in this paper provide innovative means to delineate homogeneous regions within which the flood frequency curves can be assumed to be functionally similar. At another level, understanding the connection between annual water balance and flood frequency will be another building block towards developing comprehensive understanding of catchment runoff behavior in a holistic way.

  8. Effects of Alder Mine on the Water, Sediments, and Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Alder Creek, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peplow, Dan

    1999-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alder Mine, an abandoned gold, silver, copper, and zinc mine in Okanogan County, Washington, produces heavy metal-laden effluent that affects the quality of water in a tributary of the Methow River. The annual mass loading of heavy metals from two audits at the Alder Mine was estimated to exceed 11,000 kg per year. In this study, water samples from stations along Alder Creek were assayed for heavy metals by ICP-AES and were found to exceed Washington State's acute freshwater criteria for cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn).

  9. Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida Water Management District and Florida Geologic Survey) to investigate arsenic mobilization during between Florida's Universities and the state agencies that are responsible for managing Florida's water Management District, Southwest Florida Water Management District, St. Johns River Water Management District

  10. South Dakota Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in South Dakota and wise use of irrigation water is important if other water needs like ethanol production

  11. Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    include: water quality, surface and groundwater management, water quality management and water resources, Water Quality, Management and Planning Descriptors: Principal Investigators: Todd Tietjen, Gary N. Ervin; to assist state agencies in the development and maintenance of a state water management plan

  12. South Dakota Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nutrients and bacteria in feedlot runoff, arsenic removal from drinking water, study of pharmaceuticals in surface water and uranium detoxification in ground water using bacteria. These projects were scheduled

  13. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Fifth Research Category: Ground-water Flow and Transport Focus Category: Non Point Pollution, Water Quality, Hydrogeochemistry Descriptors: Non-point pollutants, lindane, triallate, pesticides, water agricultural mass discharges using enviro

  14. annual spring water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    living in vehicle Escher, Christine 9 CE475 WATER QUALITY ANALYSIS SPRING 2009 Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: 1 CE475 - WATER QUALITY...

  15. Renewable Energy Desalination: An Emerging Solution to Close MENA's Water Gap 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy: A Conference Linking Desalination and Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    .S. While at the World Bank, Dr. Debele has worked in many regions, including South Asia, Latin AmericaRenewable Energy Desalination: An Emerging Solution to Close MENA's Water Gap 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy: A Conference Linking Desalination and Renewable Energy 45 Renewable Energy

  16. ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    . These activities and structural improvements are referred to as Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs9/14/11 1 ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal. Permittee (Agency Name): University of California Santa Cruz 2. Contact Person: _Courtney Trask, Storm Water

  17. ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    . These activities and structural improvements are referred to as Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs9/14/10 1 ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal. Permittee (Agency Name): University of California Santa Cruz 2. Contact Person: _Courtney Trask, Storm Water

  18. ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , 2013 to June 30, 2014 (Year 5) The University of California at Santa Cruz's Storm Water Management improvements are referred to as Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs will be updated as appropriate1 ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

  19. South Dakota Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    treatment for the removal of uranium from water, vegetative treatment for feedlot runoff, and conservation

  20. Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wastewater treatment systems on water quality, optimal irrigation scheduling, household conservation patterns and federal agencies. Water allocations and agreements and the potential treatment and reuse of industrial of Reclamation asked us to help stage a workshop on produced waters those waters resulting from the extraction

  1. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in assessing the susceptibility of surface water supplies to pollution from current and future activities water, source water, pollution sources, watershed management Primary PI: Darwin L. Sorensen Other PIs of surface water supplies to pollution from current and future activities in the watershed. The major

  2. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in assessing the susceptibility of surface water supplies to pollution from current and future activities, Hydrology, Models Descriptors: drinking water, source water, pollution sources, watershed management, source water, pollution sources, watershed management Primary PI: Darwin L. Sorensen Other PIs David G

  3. Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    investigates agricultural sources of water quality impairments. The decision of the interdisciplinary student) and Cathleen Hapeman (USDA Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, Md.) · Demonstration of Integrated Stormwater & Wastewater Treatment in WaterShed, Maryland's Solar Decathlon 2011 Entry, Amy Gardner

  4. The Institute for Water & Watersheds Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    timber and salmon to solar panels and semiconductors. But water supply and demand in the state of the United States. In the academic community there is growing recognition that the solutions to future water

  5. Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik & Goff, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water-Gas...

  6. Iowa State Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , prioritize water quality improvement need, and establish total maximum daily loads or TMDLs for such impaired Congressional District: Iowa 3rd Research Category: Not Applicable Focus Category: Water Quality, Models, Law, Institutions, and Policy Descriptors: TMDL, water quality, GIS, modeling, environmental policy Principal

  7. Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ); this could include the development of vegetation management plans for drainage canal systems; and 3) Human and groundwater management, water quality management and water resources development, contaminant transport;Water quality and other ecosystem services in wetlands managed for waterfowl in Mississippi Basic

  8. INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES FY 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ), and is recognized as a national center of expertise in water resources planning methods, risk analysis, hydrologic, and analytical tools used for water resources and water systems planning, investment decision support, conflict-looking analysis and state-of-the-art methodologies. IWR fulfills this mission by supporting the Civil Works

  9. Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Drought Management of Western Water Resources l River-Basin Level Nonpoint Source Pollution Control l Management l Impacts of Air Pollution on Recharge and Quality of Surface Water and Ground Water Supplies l, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington State and Wyoming. Twenty

  10. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water and how it can be protected. With the large agricultural activity in the state, non-point source waste disposal acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. Water of the 1987-89 drought years and the floods of 1993 and 1995, water quantity has become a major topic

  11. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's drinking water and how it can be protected. With the large agricultural activity in the state, non, hazardous waste disposal acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. Water of the 1987-89 drought years and the floods of 1993 and 1995, water quantity has become a major topic

  12. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and administrative system for the management of water resources in Tennessee. While the situation is improving to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee, have been the primary contributors to the management and monitoring of water resources. In recent years

  13. Water Science and Technology Board. Annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the Water Science and Technology Board during 1991. The WSTB is intended to be a dynamic forum, a mechanism by which the broad community of water science, technology, and policy professionals can help assure high-quality national water programs. The principal products of WSTB studies are written reports which cover a wide range of water resources issues of current national concern. A few recent examples are: Restoration of aquatic ecosystems - science, technologies and public policy; Water transfers in the West - efficiency, equity and the environment; Opportunities in the hydrologic sciences; and Ground water models - scientific and regulatory applications. Projects completed, ongoing studies and published reports are described in detail in their respective sections of this report.

  14. Water Science and Technology Board. Annual report 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the Water Science and Technology Board during 1993-1994. The WSTB is intended to be a dynamic forum, a mechanism by which the broad community of water science, technology, and policy professionals can help assure high-quality national water programs. The principal products of WSTB studies are written reports which cover a wide range of water resources issues of current national concern. A few recent examples are: Alternatives for ground water cleanup; Managing wastewater in coastal urban areas; and, Water transfers in the West - efficiency, equity and the environment. Projects completed, ongoing studies and published reports are described in detail in their respective sections of this report.

  15. Water Science and Technology Board. Annual report 1992-1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the Water Science and Technology Board during 1992. The WSTB is intended to be a dynamic forum, a mechanism by which the broad community of water science, technology, and policy professionals can help assure high-quality national water programs. The principal products of WSTB studies are written reports which cover a wide range of water resources issues of current national concern. A few recent examples are: Managing wastewater in coastal urban areas; Ground water vulnerability assessment; Water transfers in the West - efficiency, equity and the environment; and Opportunities in the hydrologic sciences. Projects completed, ongoing studies and published reports are described in detail in their respective sections of this report.

  16. Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of acoustic Doppler current profiler data to estimate sediment and total phosphorus loads to Lake Champlain Quality Focus Category: Nutrients, Non Point Pollution, Water Quality Descriptors: None Principal

  17. Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Number C-04 Start Date 07/01/1997 End Date 06/30/1999 Research Category Water Quality Focus Category #1 Methods Focus Category #2 Water Quality Focus Category #3 Toxic Substances Lead Institution University column), and the blood plasma surrogate (growth media) maintained on the basolateral side (facing blood

  18. New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to evaluating the optimal placement of BMPs for water quality improvement in an agricultural watershed and wastewater residuals to female hormone inputs to receiving waters. Graduate student projects include 1 and abandoned cranberry bogs, as an approach to managing wetland agricultural systems for better ecological

  19. Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a Computer-Assisted Decision Support System Using Realistic Interactive Visualization as a Learning Tool Water Resources Research Center (MWRRC) supported a variety of research and outreach activities to restore natural hydro-ecological function in urban headwater streams; analyzing the water-holding capacity

  20. Montana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    drinking water supplies, a Prairie County sugar beet grower contemplating the possible impacts of coal-bed, drying streams and falling reservoir levels were the norm throughout Montana in FY 2003. But drought methane brines on soil and water, or a Madison County fishing guide coping with the effects of whirling

  1. North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The institute also continued its efforts to enhance communications between the State and Federal agency The State Water Commission continued its support to the 2010 2011 federal 104(B) funding for the Graduate Survey. Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act requires the NDWRRI to apply its Federal

  2. North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    projects. The institute also continued its efforts to enhance communications between the State and Federal The State Water Commission continued its support to the 2008 2009 federal 104(B) funding for the Graduate Survey. Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act requires the NDWRRI to apply its Federal

  3. North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    projects. The institute also continued its efforts to enhance communications between the State and Federal The State Water Commission continued its support to the 2009 2010 federal 104(B) funding for the Graduate Survey. Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act requires the NDWRRI to apply its Federal

  4. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    moved to establish an integrated and coordinated policy and administrative system for the management of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply to the management and monitoring of water resources. In recent years, however, the State, through the Tennessee

  5. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Utah. The "Data Fusion for Improved Management of Large Western Water Systems" project described under the information needs of public health and environmental quality managers in Utah with respect to the protection of water quantity and quality through collaboration with government and the private sector. The UCWRR

  6. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Utah. The "Data Fusion for Improved Management of Large Western Water Systems" project described under management issues for large irrigation systems in Utah at the request for assistance from the Sevier River of water quantity and quality through collaboration with government and the private sector. The UCWRR

  7. Annual Logging Symposium, June 21-24, 2009 Wireline and While-Drilling Formation-Tester Sampling with Oval, Focused,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    . Extending the existing wireline technology requires a new pumping system capable of removing invasion fluidsSPWLA 50th Annual Logging Symposium, June 21-24, 2009 1 Wireline and While-Drilling Formation about the potential of developing new fluid sampling methods with probe-type formation testers has

  8. Water Science and Technology Board annual report, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB) during 1990, its eighth year of existence. It describes current and recently completed projects, new activities scheduled to begin in 1991, and plans for the future. The WSTB is intended to be a dynamic forum, a mechanism by which the board community of water science, technology, and policy professionals can help assure high-quality national water programs. As such, the Board considers out-reach and communications of much importance.

  9. Water Science and Technology Board annual report, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB) during 1990, its eighth year of existence. It describes current and recently completed projects, new activities scheduled to begin in 1991, and plans for the future. The WSTB is intended to be a dynamic forum, a mechanism by which the board community of water science, technology, and policy professionals can help assure high-quality national water programs. As such, the Board considers out-reach and communications of much importance.

  10. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  11. D.C. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    turbine that can generate energy to pump water from a depth of more than 100 feet, was also highlighted Garman, the Under Secretary of Energy from the U.S. Department of Energy and Congressman Mike Honda (D

  12. Wyoming Water Resources Research Centter Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems, Irrigation Systems, Water Use Efficiency Lead Institute: University of Wyoming Principle objectives: Star Valley is an irrigated agricultural area where irrigation systems were converted from levels are being investigated for periods before and after irrigation system changeover. Although

  13. Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wastewater treatment systems on water quality, optimal irrigation scheduling, household conservation patterns the treatment options for onsite wastewater treatment systems in the management of organic wastewater and multi-family residential systems, commercial systems for restaurants, convenience stores, and retail

  14. Water and Energy Research Institute of the Western Pacific Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water and Energy Research Institute of the Western Pacific Annual Technical Report FY 1999, the WERI research program covered all the costs of materials, equipment, supplies, and other expenses, the private business sector, the media and/or the general community. In fact the 25th Guam Legislatures re

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - agro-ecosystems annual progress Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6... . Follow the Sun to the 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for Range Management San Antonio, ... Source: Owensby, Clenton E. - Department of Agronomy, Kansas State University...

  16. Water Quality Trends in the Entiat River Subbasin: Final 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodsmith, Richard; Bookter, Andy [PNW Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Wenatchee, WA

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The ISEMP program monitors the status and trend of water quality elements that may affect restoration project effectiveness in the Entiat subbasin. As part of this effort, the PNW Research Station (PNW) measures, analyzes and interprets temporal trends in natural stream water pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductivity and temperature. The Entiat River is currently on the Clean Water Act 303(d) list for pH exceedence, and there is insufficient information to determine the spatial and temporal extent or potential causes of this exceedence. In the spring 2008, PNW redeployed data-logging, multiparameter probes at four locations in the Entiat subbasin to measure water quality parameters, focusing on pH. This resumed previous data collection that was interrupted by river ice in early December 2007. Instruments were again removed from the river in early December 2008. This annual report covers the period from December 2007 through December 2008. The highest pH values occurred during the low-flow period from midsummer through the following midspring then dropped sharply during the annual snowmelt runoff period from late spring through early summer. Water temperature began rapidly increasing during the receding limb of the annual snowmelt hydrograph. Highest mean monthly temperatures occurred in July and August, while instantaneous maxima occurred during the period July-September. Dissolved oxygen reached its lowest levels during the period of highest water temperature in July-September. Specific conductivity remained very low at all sites throughout the year.

  17. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the mentoring team. Renewable Energy Ground source heat pump technology is being studied with application with the Water Center, is installing ground source systems on turkey farms in Central Missouri. The energy system to the agriculture sector. The constant temperature of the ground represents an incredible source of environmentally

  18. New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    partners is undertaken in order to: 1) Build and maintain a broad, active network of water resources. Introduction 1 #12;Research Program Introduction The NYS WRI's FY11 competitive grants research program was conducted in partnership with the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation and the Hudson River Estuary

  19. New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    partners is undertaken in order to: 1) Build and maintain a broad, active network of water resources, and the public. Introduction 1 #12;Research Program Introduction The NYS WRI's FY2013 competitive grants research program was conducted in partnership with the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Hudson

  20. New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    partners is undertaken in order to: 1) Build and maintain a broad, active network of water resources. Introduction 1 #12;Research Program Introduction The NYS WRI's FY10 competitive grants research program was conducted in partnership with the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation and the Hudson River Estuary

  1. New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    partners is undertaken in order to: 1) Build and maintain a broad, active network of water resources in partnership with the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation and the Hudson River Estuary Program (HREP Survey, the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), and faculty from Cornell University

  2. New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    partners is undertaken in order to: 1) Build and maintain a broad, active network of water resources, and the public. Introduction 1 #12;Research Program Introduction The NYS WRI's FY2012 competitive grants research program was conducted in partnership with the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Hudson

  3. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and educational; (2) to develop a suite of research programs that encompass several water issues; and (3 and two projects on residential development and hydrological systems. I have been and will be spending graduate and undergraduate research and service-learning projects, development of #12;a community

  4. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico. History of the Institute Louisiana has an abundance of water resources of pollution are estimated to account for approximately one-half of Louisiana's pollution. Because of the potential impact of this pollution and the need to mitigate its effects while maintaining the state

  5. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico. Louisiana has an abundance of water resources, and while reaping are also subsets of the southeastern/island region priorities: Nonpoint sources of pollution are estimated to account for approximately one-half of Louisiana's pollution. Because of the potential impact

  6. Water and Environmental Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    availability, river discharge, permafrost-groundwater interactions, remote water/wastewater treatment options of the Center. Research Program Introduction Research Program Introduction 1 #12;Integrating Remote Sensing and Local Knowledge to Monitor Seasonal River Ice Dynamics Basic Information Title: Integrating Remote

  7. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at all levels of irrigation distribution systems. The projects all involved collaboration of local, state the 104-b program. These projects, respectively entitled "Drought Index Information System Development", and " Increasing Data Accuracy, Reliability, Accessibility, and Understandability to Improve Basin-Wide Water

  8. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Biotic Systems, Groundwater Systems, Irrigated Systems, and Outreach and Education. These programs have removal at small systems, emergency response and vulnerability, and storm water runoff regulations proposals on its own behalf. #12;Integration of Surface Irrigation Techniques to Reduce Sediment

  9. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . With the large agricultural activity in the state, non-point source pollution is of major interest. Because effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. Water Quantity: Missouri has a history of either inadequate amounts of rainfall, or spring floods. Because of the 1987-89 drought years and the floods of 1993

  10. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . With the large agricultural activity in the state, non-point source pollution is of major interest. Because reclamation of strip mine areas, hazardous waste disposal, acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects, or spring floods. Because of the 1987-89 drought years and the floods of 1993 and 1995, water quantity has

  11. Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Agriculture and others, have begun to develop a more active and aggressive role in the management another major drought period which severely strained the water supplies of many communities across impact of recharge areas, is needed in order to develop an effective management and protection program

  12. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . With the large agricultural activity in the state, non-point source pollution is of major interest. Because effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. Water Quantity : Missouri has a history of either inadequate amounts of rainfall, or spring floods. Because of the 1987-1989 drought years, and the flood of 93 and 95

  13. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . With the large agricultural activity in the state, non-point source pollution is of major interest. Because effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. B>Water Quantity : Missouri has a history of either inadequate amounts of rainfall, or spring floods. Because of the 1987-1989 drought years, and the flood of 93 and 95

  14. Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    facing the State of Idaho. These projects addressed a wide range of physical, engineering and social subject to increased nutrient loads in northern Idaho; the regional economic demand for irrigation water Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer Project Basic Information Title: Award No. 04HQAG0205 Initial Model Development

  15. North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    communications between the State and Federal agency personnel and university faculty and students. The sustained Water Commission provided 15% matching to the 2005 2006 federal 104(B) funding for the GRF program part-time for the Institute to assist the director with Institute finances, communications

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - annual epri conference Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: 13th North American Waste to Energy Conference May 23-25, 2005, Orlando, Florida USA NAWTEC13... , containing nearly 80 short tons of Hg are combusted annually in the U.S....

  17. Field Sampling Report -Water 2005 SFEI PRISM-Methods Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of aquatic toxicity by Pacific Eco-Risk (PER) (2 twenty-liter carboys). 2.2 Personnel The personnel and work transferred remaining samples to AMS in Livermore April 18, 2005 0800-1200 Mr. Salop shipped remaining samples

  18. Impact of Pilot Light Modeling on the Predicted Annual Performance of Residential Gas Water Heaters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling residential water heaters with dynamic simulation models can provide accurate estimates of their annual energy consumption, if the units? characteristics and use conditions are known. Most gas storage water heaters (GSWHs) include a standing pilot light. It is generally assumed that the pilot light energy will help make up standby losses and have no impact on the predicted annual energy consumption. However, that is not always the case. The gas input rate and conversion efficiency of a pilot light for a GSWH were determined from laboratory data. The data were used in simulations of a typical GSWH with and without a pilot light, for two cases: 1) the GSWH is used alone; and 2) the GSWH is the second tank in a solar water heating (SWH) system. The sensitivity of wasted pilot light energy to annual hot water use, climate, and installation location was examined. The GSWH used alone in unconditioned space in a hot climate had a slight increase in energy consumption. The GSWH with a pilot light used as a backup to an SWH used up to 80% more auxiliary energy than one without in hot, sunny locations, from increased tank losses.

  19. Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (McKenzie...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date 1976 - 1976 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration...

  20. Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

  1. Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown,Jump to:Locations In The Us

  2. 384 Power plant waste water sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagerty, K.J.; Knotek, H.M.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the 384 Power House Sampling and Analysis Plan. The Plan describes sampling methods, locations, frequency, analytes, and stream descriptions. The effluent streams from 384, were characterized in 1989, in support of the Stream Specific Report (WHC-EP-0342, Addendum 1).

  3. Sample Annual and Monthly Energy Consumption Reports for Zachry Engineering Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staff, Energy Systems Laboratory

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    weekdays ? offices: 7:30 am to 5:30 pm weekdays ? computer facility: 24 hrs/day Building HVAC: ? 12 variable volume dual duct AHUs (12-40hp) ? 3 constant volume multizone AHU (1-1 hp, l-7hp, l-10hp) ? 4 constant volume single zone AHU (4-3hp) ? 10 fan coils... duct system: 3/30/91. Savings Calculations: ? Estimated savings are the annual savings from the audit report. Zachry Engineering Center - Texas A&M University Teiu Governor's Energy Office 1991 Annual Energy Consumption Report? Energy Sy.temi Lib Loin...

  4. DOE Annual Progress Report: Water Needs and Constraints for Hydrogen Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, A; Daily, W

    2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is a critical feedstock in the production of hydrogen. In fact, water and many of the energy transformations upon which society depends are inextricably linked. Approximately 39% of freshwater withdrawals are used for cooling of power plants, and another 8% are used in industry and mining (including oil and gas extraction and refining). Major changes in the energy infrastructure (as envisioned in a transformation to a hydrogen economy) will necessarily result in changes to the water infrastructure. Depending on the manner in which a hydrogen economy evolves, these changes could be large or small, detrimental or benign. Water is used as a chemical feedstock for hydrogen production and as a coolant for the production process. Process and cooling water must meet minimum quality specifications (limits on mineral and organic contaminants) at both the inlet to the process and at the point of discharge. If these specifications are not met, then the water must be treated, which involves extra expenditure on equipment and energy. There are multiple options for water treatment and cooling systems, each of which has a different profile of equipment cost and operational requirements. The engineering decisions that are made when building out the hydrogen infrastructure will play an important role in the cost of producing hydrogen, and those decisions will be influenced by the regional and national policies that help to manage water resources. In order to evaluate the impacts of water on hydrogen production and of a hydrogen economy on water resources, this project takes a narrowly-scoped lifecycle analysis approach. We begin with a process model of hydrogen production and calculate the process water, cooling, electricity and energy feedstock demands. We expand beyond the production process itself by analyzing the details of the cooling system and water treatment system. At a regional scale, we also consider the water use associated with the electricity and fuel that feed hydrogen production and distribution. The narrow scope of the lifecycle analysis enables economic optimization at the plant level with respect to cooling and water treatment technologies. As water withdrawal and disposal costs increase, more expensive, but more water-efficient technologies become more attractive. Some of the benefits of these technologies are offset by their increased energy usage. We use the H2A hydrogen production model to determine the overall cost of hydrogen under a range of water cost and technology scenarios. At the regional level, we are planning on following the hydrogen roll-out scenarios envisioned by Greene and Leiby (2008) to determine the impact of hydrogen market penetration on various watersheds. The economics of various water technologies will eventually be incorporated into the temporal and geographic Macro System Model via a water module that automates the spreadsheet models described. At the time of this progress report, the major achievement for FY2009 has been the completion of the framework and analytical results of the economic optimization of water technology for hydrogen production. This accomplishment required the collection of cost and performance data for multiple cooling and water treatment technologies, as well as the integration of a water and energy balance model with the H2A framework. 22 (twenty-two) different combinations of production method (SMR, electrolysis), scale (centralized, forecourt), cooling (evaporative tower, dry) and water treatment (reverse osmosis, ion exchange) were evaluated. The following data were collected: water withdrawal, water discharge, electricity consumption, equipment footprint, equipment cost, installation cost, annual equipment and material costs and annual labor costs. These data, when consolidated, fit into a small number of input cells in H2A. Items such as capital cost end up as line-items for which there is space in the existing H2A spreadsheets. Items such as electricity use are added to the values that already exist in H2A. Table 1 lists eight potential technology combina

  5. A STATEWIDE SUMMARY OF SMALLMOUTH BASS SAMPLING DATA FROM SOUTH DAKOTA WATERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    r SOUTH c·~ o -0 . ~ o ] A STATEWIDE SUMMARY OF SMALLMOUTH BASS SAMPLING DATA FROM SOUTH DAKOTA WATERS Department Of Game, Fish & Parks Wildlife Division Anderson Building -- Pierre. South Dakota 57501 Progress Report No. 90-9 #12;A STATEWIDE SUMMARY OF SMALLMOUTH BASS SAMPLING DATA FROM SOUTH DAKOTA WATERS

  6. {sup 222}Rn in water: A comparison of two sample collection methods and two sample transport methods, and the determination of temporal variation in North Carolina ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hightower, J.H. III [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering] [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives of this field experiment were: (1) determine whether there was a statistically significant difference between the radon concentrations of samples collected by EPA`s standard method, using a syringe, and an alternative, slow-flow method; (2) determine whether there was a statistically significant difference between the measured radon concentrations of samples mailed vs samples not mailed; and (3) determine whether there was a temporal variation of water radon concentration over a 7-month period. The field experiment was conducted at 9 sites, 5 private wells, and 4 public wells, at various locations in North Carolina. Results showed that a syringe is not necessary for sample collection, there was generally no significant radon loss due to mailing samples, and there was statistically significant evidence of temporal variations in water radon concentrations.

  7. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Durango, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Durango, Colorado, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the routine monitoring stations at the site. The ground water data are used to characterize the site ground water compliance strategies and to monitor contaminants of potential concern identified in the baseline risk assessment (DOE, 1995a). Regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site.

  8. 400 area secondary cooling water sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penn, L.L.

    1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a total rewrite of the Sampling and Analysis Plan in response to, and to ensure compliance with, the State Waste Discharge Permit ST 4501 issued on July 31, 1996. This revision describes changes in facility status and implements requirements of the permit.

  9. Water Sampling At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry, 1985) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation, search Name:Waste2EnergyandWaterOpen

  10. Water Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search ContentsWater Power

  11. Annual Logging Symposium, May 25-28, 2008 COMPARISON OF WIRELINE FORMATION-TESTER SAMPLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    -TESTER SAMPLING WITH FOCUSED AND CONVENTIONAL PROBES IN THE PRESENCE OF OIL-BASE MUD-FILTRATE INVASION Mayank miscibility with reservoir hydrocarbons. In the course of fluid sampling, varying concentrations of OBM to properly quantify the relative performance of focused and conventional probes for a wide range of field

  12. Field evaluation of ground water sampling devices for volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muska, C F; Colven, W P; Jones, V D; Scogin, J T; Looney, B B; Price, V Jr

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies conducted under laboratory conditions demonstrated that the type of device used to sample ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds can significantly influence and analytical results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, under field conditions, both commercial and developmental ground water sampling devices as part of an ongoing ground water contamination investigation and remediation program at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Ground water samples were collected using six types of sampling devices in monitoring wells of different depths and concentrations of volatile organic contaminants (primarily trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene). The study matrix was designed to statistically compare the reuslts of each sampling device under the test conditions. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation criteria were used to determine the relative performance of each device. Two categories of sampling devices were evaluated in this field study, positive displacement pumps and grab samplers. The positive displacement pumps consisted of a centrifugal (mechanical) pump and a bladder pump. The grab samples tested were a syringe sampler, a dual-check valve bailer, a surface bomb sampler, and a pressurized bailer. Preliminary studies were conducted to establish the analytical and sampling variability associated with each device. All six devices were then used to collect ground water samples in water table (unconfined), semi-confined aquifer, and confined aquifer monitoring wells. Results were evaluated against a set of criteria that included intrasampling device variability (precision), volatile organic concentration (accuracy), sampling and analytical logistics, and cost. The study showed that, by using careful and reproducible procedures, overall sampling variability is low regardless of sampling device.

  13. Cruise Report 2008 RMP Water Cruise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water 8L samples from 6 (and 1 rep) sites for analysis of PAHs by AXYS 13. Whole water 4L samples from 3Cruise Report 2008 RMP Water Cruise July 9 ­ 18, 2008 #12;CRUISE Report: 2008 Water Cruise July 9 with the annual Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary (RMP) dry season water

  14. Robots Help with Sample Preparation and Analysis at UNL Water Sciences Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Robots Help with Sample Preparation and Analysis at UNL Water Sciences Lab By Daniel Snow, Ph of compounds. The other robotic system recently installed is a Spark Holland Symbiosys Environ coupled

  15. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities for calendar year 1995 to 1997 at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Naturita, Colorado, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan. The following plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, sampling frequency, and specific rationale for each routine monitoring station at the site. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site.

  16. Supplement to the UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) provides the regulatory and technical basis for ground water and surface water sampling at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Union Carbide (UC) and North Continent (NC) processing sites and the Burro Canyon disposal site near Slick Rock, Colorado. The initial WSAP was finalized in August 1994 and will be completely revised in accordance with the WSAP guidance document (DOE, 1995) in late 1996. This version supplements the initial WSAP, reflects only minor changes in sampling that occurred in 1995, covers sampling scheduled for early 1996, and provides a preliminary projection of the next 5 years of sampling and monitoring activities. Once surface remedial action is completed at the former processing sites, additional and more detailed hydrogeologic characterization may be needed to develop the Ground Water Program conceptual ground water model and proposed compliance strategy. In addition, background ground water quality needs to be clearly defined to ensure that the baseline risk assessment accurately estimated risks from the contaminants of potential concern in contaminated ground water at the UC and NC sites.

  17. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clean Water Compliance Section of the Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  18. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  19. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Falls City, Texas. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Falls City, Texas, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP). The following plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, and sampling frequency for the routine monitoring stations at the site. The ground water data are used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. The Falls City site is in Karnes County, Texas, approximately 8 miles [13 kilometers southwest of the town of Falls City and 46 mi (74 km) southeast of San Antonio, Texas. Before surface remedial action, the tailings site consisted of two parcels. Parcel A consisted of the mill site, one mill building, five tailings piles, and one tailings pond south of Farm-to-Market (FM) Road 1344 and west of FM 791. A sixth tailings pile designated Parcel B was north of FM 791 and east of FM 1344.

  20. RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF {sup 228}Ra IN WATER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in natural water samples has been developed at the SRNL/EBL (Savannah River National Lab/ Environmental Bioassay Laboratory) that can be used for emergency response or routine samples. While gamma spectrometry can be employed with sufficient detection limits to determine {sup 228}Ra in solid samples (via {sup 228}Ac) , radiochemical methods that employ gas flow proportional counting techniques typically provide lower MDA (Minimal Detectable Activity) levels for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in water samples. Most radiochemical methods for {sup 228}Ra collect and purify {sup 228}Ra and allow for {sup 228}Ac daughter ingrowth for ~36 hours. In this new SRNL/EBL approach, {sup 228}Ac is collected and purified from the water sample without waiting to eliminate this delay. The sample preparation requires only about 4 hours so that {sup 228}Ra assay results on water samples can be achieved in < 6 hours. The method uses a rapid calcium carbonate precipitation enhanced with a small amount of phosphate added to enhance chemical yields (typically >90%), followed by rapid cation exchange removal of calcium. Lead, bismuth, uranium, thorium and protactinium isotopes are also removed by the cation exchange separation. {sup 228}Ac is eluted from the cation resin directly onto a DGA Resin cartridge attached to the bottom of the cation column to purify {sup 228}Ac. DGA Resin also removes lead and bismuth isotopes, along with Sr isotopes and {sup 90}Y. La is used to determine {sup 228}Ac chemical yield via ICP-MS, but {sup 133}Ba can also be used instead if ICP-MS assay is not available. Unlike some older methods, no lead or strontium holdback carriers or continual readjustment of sample pH is required.

  1. Summary of Inorganic Compositional Data for Groundwater, Soil-Water, and Surface-Water Samples at the Headgate Draw Subsurface Drip Irrigation Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Zupanic, John W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a 5-year project on the impact of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) application of coalbed-methane (CBM) produced waters, water samples were collected from the Headgate Draw SDI site in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. This research is part of a larger study to understand short- and long-term impacts on both soil and water quality from the beneficial use of CBM waters to grow forage crops through use of SDI. This document provides a summary of the context, sampling methodology, and quality assurance and quality control documentation of samples collected prior to and over the first year of SDI operation at the site (May 2008-October 2009). This report contains an associated database containing inorganic compositional data, water-quality criteria parameters, and calculated geochemical parameters for samples of groundwater, soil water, surface water, treated CBM waters, and as-received CBM waters collected at the Headgate Draw SDI site.

  2. Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

  3. Entrainment sampling at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Savannah River water intakes (1991)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling water for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) L-Reactor, K-Reactor, and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pumphouses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water. They are passed through the reactor heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70{degree}C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is presumably 100%. Apart from a small pilot study conducted in 1989, ichthyoplankton samples have not been collected from the vicinity of the SRS intake canals since 1985. The Department of Energy (DOE) has requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) resume ichthyoplankton sampling for the purpose of assessing entrainment at the SRS Savannah River intakes. This request is due to the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River. The following scope of work presents a sampling plan that will collect information on the spatial and temporal distribution of fish eggs and larvae near the SRS intake canal mouths. This data will be combined with information on water movement patterns near the canal mouths in order to determine the percentage of ichthyoplankton that are removed from the Savannah River by the SRS intakes. The following sampling plan incorporates improvements in experimental design that resulted from the findings of the 1989 pilot study. 1 fig.

  4. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) supplement supports the regulatory and technical basis for water sampling at the Maybell, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, as defined in the 1994 WSAP document for Maybell (DOE, 1994a). Further, this supplement serves to confirm our present understanding of the site relative to the hydrogeology and contaminant distribution as well as our intention to continue to use the sampling strategy as presented in the 1994 WSAP document for Maybell. Ground water and surface water monitoring activities are derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and 60 CFR 2854 (1 995). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. Additional site-specific documents relevant to the Maybell site are the Maybell Baseline Risk Assessment (currently in progress), the Maybell Remedial Action Plan (RAP) (DOE, 1994b), and the Maybell Environmental Assessment (DOE, 1995).

  5. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) supplement supports the regulatory and technical basis for water sampling at the Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, as defined in the 1994 WSAP document for Riverton (DOE, 1994). Further, the supplement serves to confirm the Project`s present understanding of the site relative to the hydrogeology and contaminant distribution as well as the intent to continue to use the sampling strategy as presented in the 1994 WSAP document for Riverton. Ground water and surface water monitoring activities are derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 and 60 FR 2854. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. Additional site-specific documents relevant to the Riverton site are the Riverton Baseline Risk Assessment (BLRA) (DOE, 1995a) and the Riverton Site Observational Work Plan (SOWP) (DOE, 1995b).

  6. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) supplement supports the regulatory and technical basis for water sampling at the Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, as defined in the 1994 WSAP document for Riverton (DOE, 1994). Further, the supplement serves to confirm the Project`s present understanding of the site relative to the hydrogeology and contaminant distribution as well as the intent to continue to use the sampling strategy as presented in the 1994 WSAP document for Riverton. Ground water and surface water monitoring activities are derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 and 60 FR 2854. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. Additional site-specific documents relevant to the Riverton site are the Riverton Baseline Risk Assessment (BLRA) (DOE, 1995a) and the Riverton Site Observational Work Plan (SOWP) (DOE, 1995b).

  7. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) supplement supports the regulatory and technical basis for water sampling at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, as defined in the 1994 WSAP document for Mexican Hat (DOE, 1994). Further, the supplement serves to confirm our present understanding of the site relative to the hydrogeology and contaminant distribution as well as our intention to continue to use the sampling strategy as presented in the 1994 WSAP document for Mexican Hat. Ground water and surface water monitoring activities are derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1991) and 60 FR 2854 (1995). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. Additional site-specific documents relevant to the Mexican Hat site are the Mexican Hat Long-Term Surveillance Plan (currently in progress), and the Mexican Hat Site Observational Work Plan (currently in progress).

  8. Sample survey of traditional water wheels and small water turbines in nepal: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, C.B.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purposes of this survey were to study the technical, economical, and social aspects of water wheels and turbines; to assess the possibility of developing these modern and traditional technologies together or improving them separately; to assess the awareness of the local people of the need for improvement on their existing technologies; and to find out the possible role of RECAST for mutual cooperation. This survey is intended to provide planners financiers, researchers, and manufacturers with further information regarding better use of small hydro resources and locally available skills for development.

  9. UMTRA ground water sampling techniques: Comparison of the traditional and low flow methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the potential changes in water quality data that may occur with the conversion from MBV (multiple bore volume) to LF (low flow) sampling and provides two examples of how such a change might impact Project decisions. The existing scientific literature on LF sampling is reviewed and the new LF data from three UMTRA Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites are evaluated seeking answers to the questions posed above. Several possible approaches, that the UMTRA Project may take to address issues unanswered by the literature are presented and compared, and a recommendation is offered for the future direction of the LF conversion effort.

  10. Evaluation of Management of Water Release for Painted Rocks Reservoir, Bitterroot River, Montana, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lere, Mark E. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Missoula, MT)

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Baseline fisheries and habitat data were gathered during 1983 and 1984 to evaluate the effectiveness of supplemental water releases from Painted Rocks Reservoir in improving the fisheries resource in the Bitterroot River. Discharge relationships among main stem gaging stations varied annually and seasonally. Flow relationships in the river were dependent upon rainfall events and the timing and duration of the irrigation season. Daily discharge monitored during the summers of 1983 and 1984 was greater than median values derived at the U.S.G.S. station near Darby. Supplemental water released from Painted Rocks Reservoir totaled 14,476 acre feet in 1983 and 13,958 acre feet in 1984. Approximately 63% of a 5.66 m{sup 3}/sec test release of supplemental water conducted during April, 1984 was lost to irrigation withdrawals and natural phenomena before passing Bell Crossing. A similar loss occurred during a 5.66 m{sup 3}/sec test release conducted in August, 1984. Daily maximum temperature monitored during 1984 in the Bitterroot River averaged 11.0, 12.5, 13.9 and 13.6 C at the Darby, Hamilton, Bell and McClay stations, respectively. Chemical parameters measured in the Bitterroot River were favorable to aquatic life. Population estimates conducted in the Fall, 1983 indicated densities of I+ and older rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were significantly greater in a control section than in a dewatered section (p < 0.20). Numbers of I+ and older brown trout (Salmo trutta) were not significantly different between the control and dewatered sections (p > 0.20). Population and biomass estimates for trout in the control section were 631/km and 154.4 kg/km. In the dewatered section, population and biomass estimates for trout were 253/km and 122.8 kg/km. The growth increments of back-calculated length for rainbow trout averaged 75.6 mm in the control section and 66.9mm in the dewatered section. The growth increments of back-calculated length for brown trout averaged 79.5 mm in the control section and 82.3mm in the dewatered section. Population estimates conducted in the Spring, 1984 indicated densities of mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni) greater than 254 mm in total length were not significantly different between the control and dewatered sections (p > 0.20). Young of the year rainbow trout and brown trout per 10m of river edge electrofished during 1984 were more abundant in the control section than the dewatered section and were more abundant in side channel habitat than main channel habitat. Minimum flow recommendations obtained from wetted perimeter-discharge relationships averaged 8.5m{sup 3}/sec in the control section and 10.6m{sup 3}/sec in the dewatered section of the Bitterroot River. The quantity of supplemental water from Painted Rocks Reservoir needed to maintain minimum flow recommendations is discussed in the Draft Water Management Plan for the Proposed Purchase of Supplemental Water from Painted Rocks Reservoir, Bitterroot River, Montana (Lere 1984).

  11. Estimating the Annual Water and Energy Savings in Texas A & M University Cafeterias using Low Flow Pre-Rinse Spray Valves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebello, Harsh Varun

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ESTIMATING THE ANNUAL WATER AND ENERGY SAVINGS IN TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY CAFETERIAS USING LOW FLOW PRE-RINSE SPRAY VALVES A Thesis by HARSH VARUN REBELLO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of TexasA&MUniversity in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2010 Major Subject: Construction Management Estimating the Annual Water and Energy Savings in Texas A&MUniversity Cafeterias Using Low...

  12. Reference samples for water-related programs in the US Environmental Protection Agency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, J.A.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory at Cincinnati provides quality assurance (QA) support for US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) water-related programs. Two important segments of this support are the Quality Control Sample Program, which furnishes samples of known concentrations for use as independent checks on intralaboratory QA activities, and the EPA's Repository for Toxic and Hazardous Materials, which provides calibration standards and spiking solutions for trace organic analyses of interest to the Agency. Each series contains one or more analytes, with true or reference values. The samples and standards are prepared as stable concentrated solutions in all-glass ampuls for dilution to volume, and analyses by EPA, its contractors and grantees, and other federal, state, and local agencies. 1 reference, 6 tables.

  13. Cruise Report 2007 RMP Water Cruise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for analysis of PAHs by AXYS 12. Whole water 4L samples from 2 sites for analysis of PCBs by AXYS UnfilteredCruise Report 2007 RMP Water Cruise August 7-16, 2007 #12;CRUISE Report: 2007 Water Cruise August 7 with the annual Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary (RMP) dry season water

  14. H02 WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEM WATER CHEMISTRY SAMPLING AND RESULTS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bach, M; Michael Serrato, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The H-02 Wetland Treatment System (Figure 1) is used to remove heavy metals (e.g., copper and zinc) from the H-Area process and storm water discharge. Routine flow enters an equalization basin by inlets on either the east (Location 1) or west end (Location 2). The west end influent constitutes 75% of the average flow into the basin which has an average residence time of approximately 3 days at low pool (i.e., 120 gal/min. through a volume of 0.5 million gallons). The water then exits via the basin outlet on the east end. Next, the water flows to a splitter box (Location 3) which evenly separates the flow between two wetland cells for a design flow of 60 gal/min. per wetland cell with a residence time in the cell of approximately 2 days. The wetland effluent is then combined (Location 4) and flows through a spillway before reaching the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) measurement point near Road 4. During initial operation, it was observed that the pH of the water leaving the equalization basin was elevated compared to the influent pH. Furthermore, the elevated pH remained through the wetland cells so that there was an average pH of 10 leaving the wetland cells during the daytime which exceeds the upper NPDES limit of 8.5. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the cause of the increase in pH within the equalization basin of the H-02 Wetland Treatment System. Possible mechanisms included algal activity and inorganic chemistry interactions (e.g., interactions with the clay and/or bentonite liner). Water quality parameters were evaluated throughout the H-02 Wetland Treatment system and over time in order to determine the cause of high pH values measured in the basin and wetland. Fluctuations in dissolved oxygen (DO) and accompanying changes in pH would be expected in systems where algae are an influencing factor. An unexpected increase or decrease in the concentration of inorganic substances may indicate operational changes or an inorganic chemistry influence on pH. In addition, alternative methods to alleviate or mitigate the pH increase were evaluated. This study documents the results of sampling activities undertaken and conveys the analytical results along with suggestions for operation of the H-02 Wetland Treatment System. The water samples collected and the water quality data generated from this activity are for analytical purposes only, and as such, were not collected in support of compliance activities.

  15. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface remedial action was completed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Canonsburg and Burrell Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in southwestern Pennsylvania in 1985 and 1987, respectively. The Burrell disposal site, included in the UMTRA Project as a vicinity property, was remediated in conjunction with the remedial action at Canonsburg. On 27 May 1994, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the DOE final Long-Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) (DOE, 1993) for Burrell thus establishing the site under the general license in 10 CFR {section}40.27 (1994). In accordance with the DOE guidance document for long-term surveillance (DOE, 1995), all NRC/DOE interaction on the Burrell site`s long-term care now is conducted with the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and is no longer the responsibility of the DOE UMTRA Project Team in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Therefore, the planned sampling activities described in this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) are limited to the Canonsburg site. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring at the Canonsburg site for calendar years 1995 and 1996. Currently, the analytical data further the site characterization and demonstrate that the disposal cell`s initial performance is in accordance with design requirements.

  16. Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring - Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure - 13060

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilborn, Bill; Knapp, Kathryn [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (United States); Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Intera (United States)] [Navarro-Intera (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs. (authors)

  17. Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring -- Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilborn, Bill [NNSA/NFO, Nevada Site Office (United States); Farnham, Irene [Navarro-Interra LLC, Las Vegas (United States); Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Interra LLC, Las Vegas (United States); Knapp, Kathryn [NNSA/NFO, Nevada Site Office (United States)

    2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs.

  18. annual technical meeting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 New Jersey Water 322 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report Geosciences Websites...

  19. annual meeting technical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 New Jersey Water 322 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report Geosciences Websites...

  20. annual international technical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 New Jersey Water 286 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report Geosciences Websites...

  1. Thermochemical water-splitting cycle, bench-scale investigations and process engineering. Annual report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caprioglio, G.; McCorkle, K.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Rode, J.S.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program to investigate thermochemical water splitting has been under way at General Atomic Company (GA) since October 1972. This document is an annual progress report of Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored process development work on the GA sulfur-iodine thermochemical water splitting cycle. The work consisted of laboratory bench-scale investigations, demonstration of the process in a closed-loop cycle demonstrator, and process engineering design studies. A bench-scale system, consisting of three subunits, has been designed to study the cycle under continuous flow conditions. The designs of subunit I, which models the main solution reaction and product separation, and subunit II, which models the concentration and decomposition of sulfuric acid, were presented in an earlier annual report. The design of subunit III, which models the purification and decomposition of hydrogen iodide, is given in this report. Progress on the installation and operation of subunits I and II is described. A closed-loop cycle demonstrator was installed and operated based on a DOE request. Operation of the GA sulfur-iodine cycle was demonstrated in this system under recycle conditions. The process engineering addresses the flowsheet design of a large-scale production process consisting of four chemical sections (I through IV) and one helium heat supply section (V). The completed designs for sections I through V are presented. The thermal efficiency of the process calculated from the present flowsheet is 47%.

  2. Water Budget Managers Report to Northwest Power Planning Council, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karr, Malcolm H., Maher, Mark (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1985 was the third year of operation of the Water Budget Center under the guidance and supervision of the fishery agencies and tribal Water Budget Managers, and the second year of formal water budget implementation. The Water Budget Managers also directed the Smolt Monitoring and Water Budget Evaluation Programs of Section 304(d) of the Fish and wildlife Program. The Water Budget Managers work to implement policies and priorities of the state and federal fishery agencies and Indian tribes in carrying out applicable measures of the Fish and Wildlife Program. This report summarizes Water Budget Manager activities in implementing program measures, including 1985 flow conditions, water budget usage and spill management and problems encountered, and the 1985 Smolt Monitoring Program and preliminary results. Recommendations are included.

  3. Allison Lab Protocol: Fluorimetric Enzyme Assays for Water Samples, 6/2008, Steve Allison Fluorimetric Enzyme Assay Protocol for Streamwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    German, Donovan P.

    . Label plates with the enzyme names. For an assay with more than three samples, multiple plates for eachL amber glass bottles using sterile water. Store solutions in the 4°C refrigerator. Substrates substrate will be necessary (e.g. LAP 1, LAP 2, LAP 3...). At least 3 samples can be run per plate, so

  4. Cruise Report 2009 RMP Water Cruise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    organics analysis by AXYS Analytical (100-liter solid phase extraction) 22. Water dissolved samples from 22Cruise Report 2009 RMP Water Cruise August 23 ­ September 3, 2009 #12;CRUISE Report: 2009 Water activities associated with the annual Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco

  5. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common examples of saline formation waters. Therefore, they are expected to be representative of saline formation waters at actual and potential future CCS sites. We are using a produced waters database (Breit, 2002) covering most of the United States compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In one instance to date, we have used this database to find a composition corresponding to the brine expected at an actual CCS site (Big Sky CSP, Nugget Formation, Sublette County, Wyoming). We have located other produced waters databases, which are usually of regional scope (e.g., NETL, 2005, Rocky Mountains basins).

  6. A suspended-particle rosette multi-sampler for discrete biogeochemical sampling in low-particle-density waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breier, J. A.; Rauch, C. G.; McCartney, K.; Toner, B. M.; Fakra, S. C.; White, S. N.; German, C. R.

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To enable detailed investigations of early stage hydrothermal plume formation and abiotic and biotic plume processes we developed a new oceanographic tool. The Suspended Particulate Rosette sampling system has been designed to collect geochemical and microbial samples from the rising portion of deep-sea hydrothermal plumes. It can be deployed on a remotely operated vehicle for sampling rising plumes, on a wire-deployed water rosette for spatially discrete sampling of non-buoyant hydrothermal plumes, or on a fixed mooring in a hydrothermal vent field for time series sampling. It has performed successfully during both its first mooring deployment at the East Pacific Rise and its first remotely-operated vehicle deployments along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It is currently capable of rapidly filtering 24 discrete large-water-volume samples (30-100 L per sample) for suspended particles during a single deployment (e.g. >90 L per sample at 4-7 L per minute through 1 {mu}m pore diameter polycarbonate filters). The Suspended Particulate Rosette sampler has been designed with a long-term goal of seafloor observatory deployments, where it can be used to collect samples in response to tectonic or other events. It is compatible with in situ optical sensors, such as laser Raman or visible reflectance spectroscopy systems, enabling in situ particle analysis immediately after sample collection and before the particles alter or degrade.

  7. Production-management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Annual Report, August 1990-December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Abbott, W.A.; Arsenault, J.W.; Jones, R.E.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project was designed to investigate production management strategies through a field study approach. The initial task was to prepare a summary of industry experience with water-drive gas and water-drive gas storage reservoirs. This activity was necessary to define the variety of reservoir situations in which water influx occurs, to identify those cases where alternative production practices will increase ultimate recovery, and to develop techniques to better characterize these reservoirs for further analysis. Four fields were selected for study: 1 onshore Gulf Coast gas reservoir, 2 offshore Gulf Coast reservoirs, and 1 mid-continent aquifier gas storage field. A modified material balance technique was developed and validated which predicts the pressure and production performance of water-drive gas reservoirs. This method yields more accurate results than conventional water influx techniques.

  8. Arizona law now requires that community water systems record and submit an Annual Water Use Report and Sys-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    of this project was to develop an online drought trigger analysis tool and supporting guidance materials to help community water systems more effectively assess their drought risk and make informed decisions to prevent systems need indicators and triggers for each stage. No such tool was previously available. PROJECT TEAM

  9. Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project. Annual report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomax, J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful water flood of the Green River Formation in the Monument Butte unit was analyzed in detail in the last yearly report. It was shown that primary recovery and the water flood in the unit were typical of oil production from an undersaturated oil reservoir close its bubble point. The reservoir performance of the smaller Travis unit was also analyzed. The Monument Butte unit is currently producing at around 300 barrels per day of oil. Two of the new wells drilled in the unit had zones pressurized by the water flood. The third well produced from pressurized as well as from zones which were unaffected by the water flood. The water flood response of the Travis unit is slow possibly due to problems of reservoir continuity. Plans for water flooding the Boundary unit were drawn. Core description and Formation Micro Imaging log of well 14a-28 provided insight about the important Lower Douglas Creek sandstone. It was determined that this sandstone was extensively fractured and detailed fracture characteristics were obtained through comprehensive interpretation of the FMI log. Reservoir modeling and simulation studies of all the three units were also continued. A larger, more detailed model of the Monument Butte unit was built in order to study the performance of the new development wells being drilled. Three alternate models developed to explain the performance of the Travis flood revealed that intersecting hydraulic fractures may have also provided paths for water channeling observed in this unit. The reservoir characterization activities identified new reservoirs in the Travis unit. Reservoir simulations helped design an injection program in Travis, unit expansion plans on the west and north sides of the Monument Butte until and to evaluate the infill drilling. The reservoir simulations are being used to examine the role of the aquifer underlying the oil bearing D2 sandstone in Boundary on water flood strategies and injection patterns.

  10. Analytical Data Report of Water Samples Collected For I-129 Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, Michael J.

    2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an analytical data report for samples received from the central plateau contractor. The samples were analyzed for iodine-129.

  11. Annual Logging Symposium, May 25-28, 2008 PREDICTION OF FORMATION-TESTER FLUID-SAMPLE QUALITY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    with formation testers are often contaminated with mud filtrate. In some cases, it may take hours or even days to achieve acceptable levels of mud-filtrate contamination, thereby rendering the fluid- sampling operation the high spatial asymmetry of the mud-filtrate invaded zone (especially for the case of point probes

  12. Improved methods for water shutoff. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seright, R.S.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the US, more than 20 billion barrels of water are produced each year during oilfield operations. There is a tremendous economic incentive to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without significantly sacrificing hydrocarbon production. In an earlier project, the authors determined that the ability of blocking agents to reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil is critical to the success of these blocking treatments in production wells if zones are not protected during placement of the blocking agent. This research project has three objectives: (1) to identify chemical blocking agents that will during placement, flow readily through fractures without penetrating significantly into porous rock and without screening out or developing excessive pressure gradients and at a predictable and controllable time, become immobile and resist breakdown upon exposure to moderate to high pressure gradients; (2) to identify schemes that optimize placement of blocking agents; and (3) to explain why gels and other chemical blocking agents reduce permeability to one phase (e.g., water) more than that of another phase (e.g., oil or gas). Chapter 2 examines the validity of using water/oil ratio plots to distinguish between coning and channeling water production mechanisms. Chapter 3 develops a method to size gelant treatments in hydraulically fractured production wells. Chapter 4 identifies characteristics of naturally fractured reservoirs where gel treatments have the greatest potential. Chapter 5 reports experimental results from studies of gel properties in fractures. Finally, Chapter 6, the authors investigate the mechanism responsible for gels reducing the permeability to water more than that to oil.

  13. Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes - annual report for FY 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J. (Energy Systems)

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation without using an external power supply or circuitry. This project grew from an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen production by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen using OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

  14. Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes - annual report for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.; Energy Systems

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that, without using an external power supply or circuitry, can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation. This project grew from an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen production by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen by means of OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

  15. Using synchrotron X-ray scattering to study the diffusion of water in a weakly-hydrated clay sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Meheust; B. Sandnes; G. Lovoll; K. J. Maloy; J. O. Fossum; G. J. da Silva; M. S. P. Mundim; R. Droppa; D. d. Miranda Fonseca

    2005-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the diffusion of water in weakly-hydrated samples of the smectite clay Na-fluorohectorite. The quasi one-dimensional samples are dry compounds of nano-layered particles consisting of ~ 80 silicate platelets. Water diffuses into a sample through the mesoporosity in between the particles, and can subsequently intercalate into the adjacent particles. The samples are placed under controlled temperature. They are initially under low humidity conditions, with all particles in a 1WL intercalation state. We then impose a high humidity at one sample end, triggering water penetration along the sample length. We monitor the progression of the humidity front by monitoring the intercalation state of the particles in space and time. This is done by determining the characteristic spacing of the nano-layered particles in situ, from synchrotron wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements. The spatial width of the intercalation front is observed to be smaller than 2mm, while its velocity decreases with time, as expected from a diffusion process.

  16. Analyzing Water Samples for Sources of Contamination using PCR and qPCR Berenise Rivera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    . Channah Rock Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Fellowship Program #12;Introduction/Importance: Understanding the origins, transport and fate of contamination is essential to effective management of water resources and public health in resource waters

  17. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors annual report January - December 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.

    2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work performed from January to December 2005 by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors (LWRs). Existing statistical models for estimating the fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) as a function of material, loading, and environmental conditions were updated. Also, the ASME Code fatigue adjustment factors of 2 on stress and 20 on life were critically reviewed to assess the possible conservatism in the current choice of the margins. An approach, based on an environmental fatigue correction factor, for incorporating the effects of LWR environments into ASME Section III fatigue evaluations is discussed. The susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels and their welds to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is being evaluated as a function of the fluence level, water chemistry, material chemistry, and fabrication history. For this task, crack growth rate (CGR) tests and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests are being conducted on various austenitic SSs irradiated in the Halden boiling water reactor. The SSRT tests are currently focused on investigating the effects of the grain boundary engineering process on the IASCC of the austenitic SSs. The CGR tests were conducted on Type 316 SSs irradiated to 0.45-3.0 dpa, and on sensitized Type 304 SS and SS weld heat-affected-zone material irradiated to 2.16 dpa. The CGR tests on materials irradiated to 2.16 dpa were followed by a fracture toughness test in a water environment. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed. The susceptibility of austenitic SS core internals to IASCC and void swelling is also being evaluated for pressurized water reactors. Both SSRT tests and microstructural examinations are being conducted on specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor in Russia to doses up to 20 dpa. Crack growth rate data, obtained in the pressurized water reactor environment, are presented on Ni-alloy welds prepared in the laboratory or obtained from the nozzle-to-pipe weld of the V. C. Summer reactor. The experimental CGRs under cyclic and constant load are compared with the existing CGR data for Ni-alloy welds to determine the relative susceptibility of these materials to environmentally enhanced cracking under a variety of loading conditions.

  18. Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes. Annual report for FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, U.; Chen, L.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.; Song, S. J.; Energy Systems

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that, without using an external power supply or circuitry, can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation. This project grew out of an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions [1]. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen to be produced by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting [1, 2]. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen by means of OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

  19. Colorimetric Determination of Nitrite in Foods Principle: The sample is extracted with distilled water and the aqueous extract clarified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    water and the aqueous extract clarified with zinc hydroxide. Sulfanilic acid is diazotisedColorimetric Determination of Nitrite in Foods Principle: The sample is extracted with distilled/50 mL. The absorbance range should extend from 0 to 0.6 approx. E. Extraction Procedure Weigh ca 100g

  20. HLY-04-04, SBI Mooring Cruise. 2 Sep 1 Oct, 2004 CTD and Water Sampling Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    organic carbon, particulate organic carbon, total carbon dioxide, alkalinity, and radium samples were of Oceanography (SIO), chlorophyll measurements were taken by the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, and carbon to avoid the extremely large surface gradients and the change in water properties due to ship's presence

  1. Task 16 -- Sampling and analysis at the Vortec vitrification facility in Paducah, Kentucky. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laudal, D.L.; Lilemoen, C.M.; Hurley, J.P.; Ness, S.R.; Stepan, D.J.; Thompson, J.S.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{reg_sign}) facility, to be located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, is designed to treat soil contaminated with low levels of heavy metals and radioactive elements, as well as organic waste. To assure that costs of sampling and analysis are contained, Vortec and the DOE Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) have decided that initially the primary focus of the sampling activities will be on meeting permitting requirements of the state of Kentucky. Therefore, sampling will be limited to the feedstock entering the system, and the glass, flue gas, and water leaving the system. The authors provide suggestions for optional sampling points and procedures in case there is later interest in operations or mass balance data. The permits do not require speciation of the materials in the effluents, only opacity, total radioactivity, total particulate, and total HCl emissions for the gaseous emissions and total radioactivity in the water and solid products. In case future testing to support operations or mass balances is required, the authors include in this document additional information on the analyses of some species of interest. They include heavy metals (RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] and Cu and Ni), radionuclides (Th{sub 230}, U{sub 235}, Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and Pu{sup 239}), and dioxins/furans.

  2. April 2012 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling and analysis were conducted on April 16-19, 2012, as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office Of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Duplicate samples were collected from locations SA1-1-H, HMH-5R, SA3-4-H, SA1-2-H, Pond W of GZ, and SA5-4-4. One trip blank was collected during this sampling event.

  3. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 1 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. King, CHP, PMP

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on August 22, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses. The comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER ? 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty. The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties. Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. A comparison of split sample results, using the DER equation, indicates one set with a DER greater than 3. A DER of 3.1 is calculated for gross alpha results from ORAU sample 5198W0003 and NFS sample MCU-310212003. The ORAU result is 0.98 ± 0.30 pCi/L (value ± 2 sigma) compared to the NFS result of -0.08 ± 0.60 pCi/L. Relatively high DER values are not unexpected for low (e.g., background) analyte concentrations analyzed by separate laboratories, as is the case here. It is noted, however, NFS uncertainties are at least twice the ORAU uncertainties, which contributes to the elevated DER value. Differences in ORAU and NFS minimum detectable activities are even more pronounced. comparison of ORAU and NFS split samples produces reasonably consistent results for low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  4. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF SURFACE WATER pCO2 AND SAMPLING STRATEGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeney, Colm

    on wind speed. It should be noted that the sampling frequencies needed for investigation of governing is regulated by physical processes (i. e. solar energy input, sea-air heat exchanges and mixed layer thickness observations; and (2) to recommend sampling frequencies in space and time needed for estimating net sea-air CO2

  5. Estimation of land surface water and energy balance flux components and closure relation using conditional sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farhadi, Leila

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of terrestrial water and energy balance include numerical treatment of heat and moisture diffusion in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. These two diffusion and exchange processes are linked only at a few ...

  6. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ambrosia Lake Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is in McKinley County, New Mexico. As part of UMTRA surface remediation, residual radioactive materials were consolidated on the site in a disposal cell that was completed July 1995. The need for ground water monitoring was evaluated and found not to be necessary beyond the completion of the remedial action because the ground water in the uppermost aquifer is classified as limited use.

  7. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 5 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE ERWIN TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on August 21, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference, are tabulated. All DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  8. Compost Analysis Samples provided by the Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory at Texas A&M, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Compost Analysis Samples provided by the Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory at Texas A ppm ppm % % dS/m Dairy Manure Compost 0.6171 .2680 1.4345 3.5041 .2737 .4371 319.7 249.1 33.53 173.1 30.0 16.02 9.3 1.280 Dairy Manure Compost 1.0704 .3866 2.4949 6.7455 .5472 .7320 155.6 381.5 47

  9. Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker-Hess, Janet; Clancey, Patrick (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Kalispell, MT)

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was initiated in the fall of 1981 to delineate the extent of successful shoreline spawning of kokanee salmon in Flathead Lake and determine the impacts of the historic and present operations of Kerr and Hungry Horse dams. An investigation of the quantity and quality of groundwater and other factors affecting kokanee reproductive success in Flathead Lake began in the spring of 1982. A total of 719 redds were counted in 17 shoreline areas of Flathead Lake in1983 compared to 592 in 1981 and 1,029 in 1982. Shoreline spawning contributed three percent to the total kokanee spawning in the Flathead drainage in 1983. Fifty-nine percent of the redds were located above 2883 ft, the operational minimum pool. The majority of those redds were constructed between 2885 and 2889 ft. In areas above minimum pool, intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations were adequate for embryo survival and exhibited a decrease with depth. Limited data indicated apparent velocity may be the key in determining redd distribution. Seventy-five percent of the redds located below minimum pool were constructed in a zone between 2869 and 2883 ft. In individual areas, apparent velocity measurements and intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations were related to redd density. The variation in intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Yellow Bay spawning area was partially explained by lake stage fluctuation. As lake stage declined, groundwater apparent velocity increased which increased intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations. Mean survival to the eyed stage in the three areas below minimum pool was 43 percent. Prior to exposure by lake drawdown, mean survival to the eyed stage in spawning areas above minimum pool was 87 percent. This indicated habitat most conducive to successful embryo survival was in gravels above 2883 ft. prior to significant exposure. Survival in redds exposed to either extended periods of drawdown or to temperatures less than -10% was significantly reduced to a mean of 20-30 percent. Survival in individual spawning areas exposed by lake drawdown varied from 0 to 65 percent. Groundwater reaction to lake stage explained some of the variation in individual spawning area survival. Three types of groundwater reaction to lake stage were identified. Increased survival in exposed redds resulted from two of the three types. A significant statistical relationship was determined between embryo survival and the number of days exposed by lake drawdown. The operation of Kerr Dam in 1983-84 was characterized by an early decline in lake stage, a longer period near minimum pool and a later and more rapid filling compared to the operation seen in 1981-82 and 1982-83. Based on the survival relationship observed in natural redds exposed by drawdown in 1983-84, complete mortality from exposure would have occurred to all redds constructed above 2884.7 ftor 90 percent of all redds constructed above minimum pool. Emergence traps placed over redds below minimum pool in Gravel, Blue, and Yellow bays captured fry in Gravel and Blue bays only. Duration of fry emergence in1984 was three weeks longer than in 1982 or 1983, but was not related to the date of initial redd construction. Survival to fry emergence in Gravel Bay was calculated to be 28.9 percent of egg deposition or 57,484 fry. Survival to fry emergence above and below the zone of greatest redd density was 33.6 and 245 percent, respectively, indicating a relationship between survival and spawner site selection. After analysis of the historic operation of Kerr Dam, it is believed that the dam has, and is continuing to have, a significant impact on successful shoreline spawning of kokanee salmon in Flathead Lake. Based on the evidence that prolonged exposure of salmonid embryo by dewatering causes significant mortality, the number of days the lake was held below various foot increments (2884 ft to 2888 ft) during the incubation period was investigated. The annual change in the number of days the lake was held below 2885 ft was further investigated because 80-90 percent of the redds cons

  10. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 2 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on November 15, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the results are compared using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2012). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, all DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  11. Results of analyses of fur samples from the San Joaquin Kit Fox and associated soil and water samples from the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Tupman, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II; Rosen, A.E.; Beauchamp, J.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kato, T.T. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether analysis of the elemental content of fur from San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) and of water and soil from kit fox habitats could be used to make inferences concerning the cause of an observed decline in the kit fox population on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Fur samples that had been collected previously from NPR-1, another oil field (NPR-2), and two sites with no oil development were subjected to neutron activation analysis. In addition, soil samples were collected from the home ranges of individual foxes from undisturbed portions of major soil types on NPR-1 and from wastewater samples were collected from tanks and sumps and subjected to neutron activation analysis. Most elemental concentrations in fur were highest at Camp Roberts and lowest on the undeveloped portions of NPR-I. Fur concentrations were intermediate on the developed oil fields but were correlated with percent disturbance and with number of wells on NPR-1 and NPR-2. The fact that most elements covaried across the range of sites suggests that some pervasive source such as soil was responsible. However, fur concentrations were not correlated with soft concentrations. The kit foxes on the developed portion of NPR-1 did not have concentrations of elements in fur relative to other sites that would account for the population decline in the early 1980s. The oil-related elements As, Ba, and V were elevated in fox fur from oil fields, but only As was sufficiently elevated to suggest a risk of toxicity in individual foxes. However, arsenic concentrations suggestive of sublethal toxicity were found in only 0.56% of foxes from developed oil fields, too few to account for a population decline.

  12. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 4 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUELS SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on June 12, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER ≤ 3 indicates at a 99% confidence interval that split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report specifies 95% confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0014 was the exception. The ORAU gross beta result of 6.30 ? 0.65 pCi/L from location NRD is well above NFS?s non-detected result of 1.56 ? 0.59 pCi/L. NFS?s data package includes no detected result for any radionuclide at location NRD. At NRC?s request, ORAU performed gamma spectroscopic analysis of sample 5198W0014 to identify analytes contributing to the relatively elevated gross beta results. This analysis identified detected amounts of naturally-occurring constituents, most notably Ac-228 from the thorium decay series, and does not suggest the presence of site-related contamination.

  13. 2001 annual report 2001 annual report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual reportelectrical & computer engineering 2001 annual report the university of new mexico department of 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual

  14. Sampling and analysis of water from Upper Three Runs and its wetlands near Tank 16 and the Mixed Waste Management Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.L.; Cummins, C.L.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April and September 1993, sampling was conducted to characterize the Upper Three Runs (UTR) wetland waters near the Mixed Waste Management Facility to determine if contaminants migrating from MWMF are outcropping into the floodplain wetlands. For the spring sampling event, 37 wetlands and five stream water samples were collected. Thirty-six wetland and six stream water samples were collected for the fall sampling event. Background seepline and stream water samples were also collected for both sampling events. All samples were analyzed for RCRA Appendix IX volatiles, inorganics appearing on the Target Analyte List, tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and gross radiological activity. Most of the analytical data for both the spring and fall sampling events were reported as below method detection limits. The primary exceptions were the routine water quality indicators (e.g., turbidity, alkalinity, total suspended solids, etc.), iron, manganese, and tritium. During the spring, cadmium, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, potassium-40, ruthenium-106, and trichloroethylene were also detected above the MCLs from at least one location. A secondary objective of this project was to identify any UTR wetland water quality impacts resulting from leaks from Tank 16 located at the H-Area Tank Farm.

  15. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling and Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2009 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2009 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2009 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2009 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2009 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3; sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4; and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information.

  16. Determination of tritium activity in environmental water samples using gas analyzer techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salsman, John Matthew

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    undesirable when looking for low levels of tritium activity in water. In general, gas analyzer techniques consist of dispersing the radioactive material in some type of gaseous medium and then pressurizing the system with this gas. The analyzer then uses... by reaction with gaseous hydrogen. The vapor HTO is formed readily, as shown by. Equation 2, and is the most commonly encountered form of tritium in the environment. HT + 820 H2 + HTO (2) The accumulation of tritium on the Earth occurs both naturally...

  17. Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,Area (Wood,Wall Turbine Jump to:Water

  18. Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,Area (Wood,Wall Turbine Jump to:Water2003)

  19. Water Sampling At Alvord Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search ContentsWater PowerInformation

  20. Water Sampling At Belknap-Foley-Bigelow Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search ContentsWater

  1. Water Sampling At Beowawe Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search ContentsWaterInformation Beowawe

  2. Water Sampling At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search ContentsWaterInformation

  3. Water Sampling At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search ContentsWaterInformationEnergy

  4. Water Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy & Soest, 2006) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, searchOpen Energy Information Water

  5. Water Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, searchOpen Energy Information WaterOpen

  6. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 3 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on March 20, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and Table 1 presents the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2013). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, most DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations. The gross beta result for sample 5198W0012 was the exception. The ORAU result of 9.23 {+-} 0.73 pCi/L from location MCD is well above NFS?s result of -0.567 {+-} 0.63 pCi/L (non-detected). NFS?s data package included a detected result for U-233/234, but no other uranium or plutonium detection, and nothing that would suggest the presence of beta-emitting radionuclides. The ORAU laboratory reanalyzed sample 5198W0012 using the remaining portion of the sample volume and a result of 11.3 {+-} 1.1 pCi/L was determined. As directed, the laboratory also counted the filtrate using gamma spectrometry analysis and identified only naturally occurring or ubiquitous man-made constituents, including beta emitters that are presumably responsible for the elevated gross beta values.

  7. Analysis of water and soil from the wetlands of Upper Three Runs Creek. Volume 2A, Analytical data packages September--October 1991 sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haselow, L.A.; Rogers, V.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Riordan, C.J. [Metcalf and Eddy, Inc. (United States); Eidson, G.W.; Herring, M.K. [Normandeau Associates, Inc. (United States)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shallow water and soils along Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and associated wetlands between SRS Road F and Cato Road were sampled for nonradioactive and radioactive constituents. The sampling program is associated with risk evaluations being performed for various regulatory documents in these areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). WSRC selected fifty sampling sites bordering the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF), F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB), and the Sanitary Landfill (SL). The analytical results from this study provided information on the water and soil quality in UTRC and its associated wetlands. The analytical results from this investigation indicated that the primary constituents and radiological indicators detected in the shallow water and soils were tritium, gross alpha, radium 226, total radium and strontium 90. This investigation involved the collection of shallow water samples during the Fall of 1991 and the Spring of 1992 at fifty (50) sampling locations. Sampling was performed during these periods to incorporate high and low water table periods. Samples were collected from three sections along UTRC denoted as Phase I (MWMF), Phase II (FHSB) and Phase III (SL). One vibracored soil sample was also collected in each phase during the Fall of 1991. This document is compiled solely of experimental data obtained from the sampling procedures.

  8. January 2011 Groundwater Sampling at the Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual sampling was conducted January 19, 2011, to monitor groundwater for potential radionuclide contamination at the Gnome-Coach site in New Mexico. The sampling was performed as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Well LRL-7 was not sampled per instruction from the lead. A duplicate sample was collected from well USGS-1.Water levels were measured in the monitoring wells onsite.

  9. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface water Sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2006 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2006 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: {sm_bullet} to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; {sm_bullet} to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; {sm_bullet} to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and ! to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2006 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2006 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2006 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3; sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4; and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. The monitoring frequency and selection criteria for each sampling location is in Appendix C. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix D. If issued, addenda to this plan will be inserted in Appendix E, and Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued) will be inserted in Appendix F. Guidance for managing purged groundwater is provided in Appendix G.

  10. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2008 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2008 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2008 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2008 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2008 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3; sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4; and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E. The updated sampling frequency for each monitoring well is in Appendix F, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix G.

  11. Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2000 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant that will be managed by tie Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2000 will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at the Y-12 Plant: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of the Y-12 Plant (Figure 1). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant GWPP during CY 2000 will comply with: Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation regulations governing detection monitoring at nonhazardous Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (SWDF); and DOE Order 5400.1 surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring. Some of the data collected for these monitoring drivers also will be used to meet monitoring requirements of the Integrated Water Quality Program, which is managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC. Data from five wells that are monitored for SWDF purposes in the Chestnut Ridge Regime will be used to comply with requirements specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act post closure permit regarding corrective action monitoring. Modifications to the CY 2000 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in regulatory or programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells, or wells could be added or removed from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 Plant GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan.

  12. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2011 will be in accordance with requirements of DOE Order 540.1A and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2011 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2011 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2011 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2011) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

  13. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental, LLC

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2012 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2012 is in accordance with the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2012 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. Each modification to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as an addendum to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2012 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding a data summary table presented in Section 4) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2012) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

  14. Stir bar sorptive extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the2 determination of pesticides in water samples: method validation and measurement uncertainty3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    carry-over between consecutive extractions with the same stir21 bar. Pesticide quantification in water1 Title :1 Stir bar sorptive extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the2 determination of pesticides in water samples: method validation and measurement uncertainty3

  15. annual general assembly: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report Geosciences Websites Summary: Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and...

  16. annual meeting held: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction WATER Water Institute Program for FY1999, the Advisory Council...

  17. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted hydrologic and natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 16, and 17, 2009. Hydrologic sampling consists of collecting water samples from water wells and surface water locations. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. The water well samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. Surface water samples were analyzed for tritium. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. Water samples were analyzed by ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, and natural gas samples were analyzed by Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois. Concentrations of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides in water samples collected in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy site continue to demonstrate that the sample locations have not been impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Results from the sampling of natural gas from producing wells demonstrate that the gas wells nearest the Gasbuggy site are not currently impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Annual sampling of the gas production wells nearest the Gasbuggy site for gas and produced water will continue for the foreseeable future. The sampling frequency of water wells and surface water sources in the surrounding area will be reduced to once every 5 years. The next hydrologic sampling event at water wells, springs, and ponds will be in 2014.

  18. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;:: A'Salmon,Sep Nov Jan

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;:: A'Salmon,Sep Nov

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;:: A'Salmon,Sep

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;::

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100B100WWNASCUBA80 Ambrosia

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100B100WWNASCUBA80

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100B100WWNASCUBA80Bluewater, New

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100B100WWNASCUBA80Bluewater,

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central Nevada Test Area March 2014

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central Nevada Test Area March

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central Nevada Test Area

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central Nevada Test Areaand

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central Nevada Test

  12. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central Nevada TestNatural Gas and

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central Nevada TestNatural Gas

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central Nevada TestNatural

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central Nevada

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central NevadaGreen River, Utah,

  17. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central NevadaGreen River, Utah,and

  18. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central NevadaGreen River,

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central NevadaGreen

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central NevadaGreenL-Bar, New

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central NevadaGreenL-Bar, New3

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central NevadaGreenL-Bar, New3and

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central NevadaGreenL-Bar,

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central NevadaGreenL-Bar,3

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central NevadaGreenL-Bar,3Rio

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central NevadaGreenL-Bar,3Rio Rio

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central NevadaGreenL-Bar,3Rio

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central NevadaGreenL-Bar,3Rio4

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1Central

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater, Surface

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater, Surface

  12. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater, SurfaceNatural

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D I O L O GSea

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D I O L O GSeaFebruary

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D I O L O

  17. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D I O L OSampling at the

  18. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D I O L OSampling at the4

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D I O L OSampling at

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D I O L OSampling atOld

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D I O L OSampling atOld

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D I O L OSampling

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D I O L OSampling4

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D I O L

  5. Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

  6. UMTRA water sampling technical (peer) review: Responses to observations, comments, and recommendations submitted by Don Messinger (Roy F. Weston, Inc.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An independent technical review (peer review) was conducted during the period of September 15--17, 1992. The review was conducted by C. Warren Ankerberg (Geraghty and Miller, Inc., Tampa, Florida) and Don Messinger (Roy F. Weston, Inc., West Chester, Pennsylvania). The review was held at Jacobs Engineering in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and at the Shiprock, New Mexico, site. The peer review included a review of written documentation [water sampling standard operating procedures (SOP)], an inspection of technical reports and other deliverables, a review of staff qualifications and training, and a field visit to evaluate the compliance of field procedures with SOPS. Upon completion of the peer review, each reviewer independently prepared a report of findings from the review. The reports listed findings and recommended actions. This document responds to the observations, comments, and recommendations submitted by Don Messinger following his review. The format of this document is to present the findings and recommendations verbatim from Mr. Messinger`s report, followed by responses from the UMTRA Project staff. Included in the responses from the UMTRA Project staff are recommended changes in SOPs and strategies for implementing the charges.

  7. Vol. XXXV, No. 1 January 2012 Participants in the 56th Annual New Mexico Water Conference came away with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    -yield photovoltaic and solar thermal system that produces sufficient power to support advanced treatment of brackish technology. Guillermo Zaragoza, a researcher in Spain's ProDes (Promotion of Renewable Energy for Water

  8. Environmentally assisted cracking in light-water reactors: Semi-annual report, January--June 1997. Volume 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from January 1997 to June 1997. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Types 304 and 304L SS, and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle is equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water at 288 C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in low-DO, simulated pressurized water reactor environments.

  9. Method for determination of .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O and .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H ratios and .sup.3 H (tritium) concentrations of xylem waters and subsurface waters using time series sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Brian (1126 Delaware St., Berkeley, CA 94702); Menchaca, Leticia (1126 Delaware St., Berkeley, CA 94702)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determination of .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O and .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H ratios and .sup.3 H concentrations of xylem and subsurface waters using time series sampling, insulating sampling chambers, and combined .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O, .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H and .sup.3 H concentration data on transpired water. The method involves collecting water samples transpired from living plants and correcting the measured isotopic compositions of oxygen (.sup.18 O/.sup.16 O) and hydrogen (.sup.2 H/.sup.1 H and/or .sup.3 H concentrations) to account for evaporative isotopic fractionation in the leafy material of the plant.

  10. UMTRA water sampling technical (peer) review. Responses to observations, comments, and recommendations submitted by C. Warren Ankerberg (Geraghty & Miller, Inc.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the Office of Independent Technical Review for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, an independent technical review (peer review) was conducted during the period of September 15-17, 1992. The review was conducted by C. Warren Ankerberg (Geraghty & Miller, Inc., Tampa, Florida) and Don Messinger (Roy F. Weston, Inc., West Chester, Pennsylvania). The peer review included a review of written documentation [water sampling standard operating procedures (SOP)], an inspection of technical reports and other deliverables, a review of staff qualifications and training, and a field visit to evaluate the compliance of field procedures with SOPs. The approach of the peer reviewers was to verify that the program meets the following criteria: Reported results are traceable to and consistent with recorded data. The basic assumptions and acceptance criteria are valid. Data are traceable to their origin and to reported analytical results. The procedures employed are consistent both internally and externally with written SOPs and regulatory guidelines. Inferences and conclusions are soundly based. The procedures and/or reports generated present work that satisfies the local, state and/or Federal regulatory requirements as applicable. The approach is consistent with industry standards and/or state-of-the-art technology, as practical. The data generated by activities are legally defensible and technically sound. UMTRA staff are adequately trained and qualified for the work. This document is a response to the observations, comments, and recommendations submitted by C. Warren Ankerberg following his review. The format of this document is to present the findings and recommendations verbatim from Mr. Ankerberg`s report, followed by responses from the UMTRA Project staff. Included in the responses from the UMTRA Project staff are recommended changes in SOPs and strategies for implementing the changes.

  11. Annual hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek Watershed: Water Year 1990 (October 1989--September 1990)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Moore, G.K.; Watts, J.A.; Broders, C.C.; Bednarek, A.T.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes, for the Water Year 1990 (October 1989-- September 1990), the dynamic hydrologic data collected on the Whiteoak Creek (WOC) Watershed's surface and subsurface flow systems. These systems affect the quality or quantity of surface water and groundwater. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to 1. characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow system, 2. plan and assess remedial action activities, and 3. provide long-term availability of data and assure quality. Characterizing the hydrology of the WOC watershed provides a better understanding of the processes which drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identifying of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. Hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. The majority of the data summarized in this report are available from the Remedial Action Programs Data and Information Management System data base. Surface water data available within the WOC flow system include discharge and runoff, surface water quality, radiological and chemical contamination of sediments, and descriptions of the outfalls to the WOC flow system. Climatological data available for the Oak Ridge area include precipitation, temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction. Information on groundwater levels, aquifer characteristics, and groundwater quality are presented. Anomalies in the data and problems with monitoring and accuracy are discussed. 58 refs., 54 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. annual seminex technical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institutes for Water and the U. S. Geological Survey, Alabama Department of Environmental Management, Geological Survey 2 Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report Geosciences...

  13. applications annual technical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The National Institutes for Water and the U. S. Geological Survey, Alabama Department of Environmental Management, Geological Survey 3 Water Resources Center Annual Technical...

  14. Combined use of passive sampling and in vitro bioassays for the detection of emerging pollutants in surface water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in surface water Nicolas Creusot1,3 , Nathalie Tapie3 , Karyn Lemach3 , Patrick Balaguer2 , Emmanuelle classical ones such as PCBs, PAHs, pesticides or alkylphenols as well as emerging pollutants of emerging compounds are polar and occur mainly in surface water at very low concentration

  15. Advanced light water reactor plants system 80+{trademark} design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80{sup +}{trademark} during the U.S. government`s 1994 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems. Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units and the System 80+ design form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The Nuclear Island portion of the System 80+ standard design has also been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their bid specification for an ALWR. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was docketed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1991 and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report (DSER) was issued in October 1992.

  16. Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic water level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Changes in chronology of seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding and erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Our 1985 pair count data indicated that 95 to 143 nests may have been present. Hatching success for 1985 nests (55%) was low compared to long-term averages for the region. Predation was the predominant cause of ground nest failure (25 nests); we documented 2 nest failures due to flooding. The maximum gosling count in the study area for 1985 was 197. Six key brood-rearing areas were identified. Most (80%) sites were located in the herbaceous or pasture cover type and the riparian bench landform. Analysis of aerial photographs taken prior to construction of Kerr Dam documented the loss of 1859 acres of habitat along the north shore of Flathead Lake. Losses were attributed to inundation and to continuing erosion due to operation of Kerr Dam. Lake and river water level regimes were compared with the chronology of important periods in the nesting cycle. Low lake levels in May and early June coincide with the breed-rearing period. Mudflats are heavily used by broods, but their effect on survival must still be documented. Preliminary recommendations to protect and enhance Canada goose habitat and production are being developed.

  17. Annual Report: 2010-2011 Storm Season Sampling For NON-DRY DOCK STORMWATER MONITORING FOR PUGET SOUND NAVAL SHIPYARD, BREMERTON, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhardt, Christine; Hsu, Larry

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This interim report summarizes the stormwater monitoring conducted for non-dry dock outfalls in both the confined industrial area and the residential areas of Naval Base Kitsap within the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (referred to as the Shipyard). This includes the collection, analyses, and descriptive statistics for stormwater sampling conducted from November 2010 through April 2011. Seven stormwater basins within the Shipyard were sampled during at least three storm events to characterize non-dry dock stormwater discharges at selected stormwater drains located within the facility. This serves as the Phase I component of the project and Phase II is planned for the 2011-2012 storm season. These data will assist the Navy, USEPA, Ecology and other stakeholders in understanding the nature and condition of stormwater discharges from the Shipyard and inform the permitting process for new outfall discharges. The data from Phase I was compiled with current stormwater data available from the Shipyard, Sinclair/Dyes Inlet watershed, and Puget Sound in order to support technical investigations for the Draft NPDES permit. The permit would require storm event sampling at selected stormwater drains located within the Shipyard. However, the data must be considered on multiple scales to truly understand potential impairments to beneficial uses within Sinclair and Dyes Inlets.

  18. Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding or erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Counts of indicated pairs suggest there were 73-125 occupied nests in the study area; 44 were located in 1984. Twenty were island ground nests, 19 were tree nests, and 5 were on man-made structures. Hatching success was 76 percent. Sixty-one percent of all nests were in deciduous forest habitat; 87 percent were on riparian bench or island landforms. Seventy-four percent of all nests were within 5 m of the seasonal high water mark (HWM) and 85 percent of ground nests were 1 m or less above the HWM. Production, habitat use, and distribution of broods were documented through aerial, boat, ground, and observation tower surveys. 28 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Bull Trout Distribution and Abundance in the Waters on and Bordering the Warm Springs Reservation : 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brun, Christopher V.; Dodson, Rebekah

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The range of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Deschutes River basin has decreased from historic levels due to many factors including dam construction, habitat degradation, brook trout introduction and eradication efforts. While the bull trout population appears to be healthy in the Metolius River-Lake Billy Chinook system they have been largely extirpated from the upper Deschutes River (Buchanan et al. 1997). Little was known about bull trout in the lower Deschutes basin until BPA funded project No.9405400 began during 1998. In this progress report we describe the findings to date from this multi-year study aimed at determining the life history, habitat needs and limiting factors of bull trout in the lower Deschutes subbasin. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) relative abundance has been assessed in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek since 1999. In the Warm Springs R. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .003 fish/m{sup 2} and .001 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. These densities were the lowest recorded in the Warm Springs River during the period of study. In Shitike Cr. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .025 fish/m{sup 2} and .01 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. The utility of using index reaches to monitor trends in juvenile bull trout and brook trout relative abundance in the Warm Springs R. has been assessed since 1999. During 2002 the mean relative densities of juvenile bull trout within the 2.4 km study area was higher than what was observed in four index reaches. However, the mean relative densities of brook trout was slightly higher in the index reaches than what was observed in the 2.4 km study area. Habitat use by both juvenile bull trout and brook trout was determined in the Warm Springs R. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout were most abundant in pools and glides. However pools and glides comprised less than 20% of the available habitat in the study area during 2002. Multiple-pass spawning ground surveys were conducted during late August through October in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. during 2002. One-hundred and thirteen (113) redds were enumerated in the Warm Springs R. and 204 redds were found in Shitike Cr. The number of redds enumerated in both the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. were the most redds observed since surveys began in 1998. Spatial and temporal distribution in spawning within the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. is discussed. Juvenile emigration has been monitored in Shitike Creek since 1996. A total of 312 juveniles were estimated to have emigrated from Shitike Cr. during the spring, 2002. Adult escapement was monitored in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. Thirty adults were recorded at the Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery weir during 2002. This was the highest number of spawning adults recorded to date. A weir equipped with an underwater video camera near the spawning grounds was operated in the Warm Springs R. Thirty-one adults were recorded at the weir in day counts. The adult trap in Shitike Cr. was unsuccessful in capturing adult bull trout during 2002 due to damage from a spring high water event. Thermographs were placed throughout Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. to monitor water temperatures during bull trout migration, holding and spawning/rearing periods. During 1999-2002 water temperatures ranged from 11.8-15.4 C near the mouths during adult migration; 11.4-14.6 C during pre-spawning holding; and 6.5-8.4 C during adult spawning and juvenile rearing.

  20. Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 20131 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute (PRWRERI) is located

  1. Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 20121 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute (PRWRERI) is located

  2. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2014 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring is performed by the GWPP during CY 2014 to achieve the following goals: 􀁸 to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; 􀁸 to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; 􀁸 to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; 􀁸 to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and 􀁸 to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12.

  3. January 2012 Groundwater Sampling at the Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual sampling was conducted January 18, 2012, to monitor groundwater for potential radionuclide contamination at the Gnome-Coach site in New Mexico. The sampling was performed as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Well LRL-7 was not sampled per instruction from the lead. A duplicate sample was collected from well USGS-1 and water levels were measured in the monitoring wells onsite.

  4. Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maerefat, Nicida L. (Sugar Land, TX); Parmeswar, Ravi (Marlton, NJ); Brinkmeyer, Alan D. (Tulsa, OK); Honarpour, Mehdi (Bartlesville, OK)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample.

  5. Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maerefat, N.L.; Parmeswar, R.; Brinkmeyer, A.D.; Honarpour, M.

    1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample. 11 figs.

  6. pre-acts -6th annual international conference of Territorial Intelligence -caENTI October 2008 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT METHODS IN HUNGARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    extraction protocols; more sophisticated water treatment methods, drilling deeper wells result in additional a useful sustainable water management model based on the rainwater harvesting practices. Key words: Rainwater, sustainable water management, drinking water, rainwater harvesting, cistern, precipitation

  7. Subseabed Disposal Project annual report, FY85 to termination of project: Physical Oceanography and Water Column Geochemistry Studies, October 1984 through May 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kupferman, S.L. (ed.)

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the work of the Physical Oceanography and Water Column Geochemistry (POWCG) Studies Group of the Subseabed Disposal Project (SDP) from October 1984 to termination of the project in May 1986. The overview of the work includes an introduction, general descriptions of the activities, and a summary. Detailed discussions are included as appendices. During the period of this report the POWCG Studies Group held a meeting to develop a long-term research plan for the Nares Abyssal Plain, which was recently designated as a study area for the Environmental Study Group of the SDP. The POWCG Studies Group has also planned and participated in two interdisciplinary oceanographic missions to the Nares which have resulted in the acquisition of data and samples which can be used to begin to understand the workings of the ecosystem at the site, and for developing a preliminary site assessment. The papers in the appendices have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  8. Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Water Resources Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 2009, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketelle R.H.

    2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP) was established by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1996 to implement a consistent approach to long-term environmental monitoring across the ORR. The WRRP has four principal objectives: (1) to provide the data and technical analysis necessary to assess the performance of completed Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) actions on the ORR; (2) to perform monitoring to establish a baseline against which the performance of future actions will be gauged and to support watershed management decisions; (3) to perform interim-status and post-closure permit monitoring and reporting to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) requirements; and (4) to support ongoing waste management activities associated with WRRP activities. Water quality projects were established for each of the major facilities on the ORR: East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including Bethel Valley and Melton Valley; and the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex or Y-12), including Bear Creek Valley (BCV), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC), and Chestnut Ridge. Off-site (i.e., located beyond the ORR boundary) sampling requirements are also managed as part of the Y-12 Water Quality Project (YWQP). Offsite locations include those at Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC), the Clinch River/Poplar Creek (CR/PC), and Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR). The Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) South Campus Facility (SCF) is also included as an 'off-site' location, although it is actually situated on property owned by DOE. The administrative watersheds are shown in Fig. A.l (Appendix A). The WRRP provides a central administrative and reporting function that integrates and coordinates the activities of the water quality projects, including preparation and administration of the WRRP Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP). A brief summary is given of the organization of the SAP appendices, which provide the monitoring specifics and details of sampling and analytical requirements for each of the water quality programs on the ORR. Section 2 of this SAP provides a brief overview and monitoring strategy for the ETTP. Section 3 discusses monitoring strategy for Bethel Valley, and Melton Valley background information and monitoring strategy is provided in Section 4. BCV and UEFPC monitoring strategies are presented in Sect. 5 and 6, respectively. Section 7 provides background information and monitoring strategy for all off-site locations.

  9. Hanford Site ground-water surveillance for 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.C.; Bryce, R.W.; Bates, D.J.; Kemner, M.L.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report of ground-water surveillance activities provides discussions and listings of results for ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site during 1989. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) assesses the impacts of Hanford operations on the environment for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The impact Hanford operations has on ground water is evaluated through the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance program. Five hundred and sixty-seven wells were sampled during 1989 for Hanford ground-water monitoring activities. This report contains a listing of analytical results for calendar year (CY) 1989 for species of importance as potential contaminants. 30 refs., 29 figs,. 4 tabs.

  10. Annual Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta3 Table 3.EnergyAug412 Archive DataAnnualAnnual

  11. Annual Training Plan Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Annual Training Plan Template is used by an organization's training POC to draft their organization's annual training plan.

  12. annual research progress: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farnham i-vi and 1-182 pp. Keywords: disease: control, management, monitoring 199 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report Geosciences Websites...

  13. annual publication ngs: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is 28 C and for which Calvanese, Diego 9 Annual report 2008 | 1Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management | Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute Royal...

  14. Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Shane Ardo...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Meeting Posters White Papers on Materials for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting EXPERIENCES ON PID TESTING OF PV MODULES IN 2012...

  15. Annual Review 2012 University of Surrey Annual Review 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    researchers are changing the world in vital fields such as safe water, sustainable energy, telecommunications Annual Review 32 of our research units are rated world-leading, internationally excellent, or recognised of Surrey nurtures a truly global outlook. Source: latest available Research Assessment Exercise data World

  16. SPENT SHALE AS A CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL SHALE RETORT WATER. ANNUAL REPORT FOR PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 1978 - SEPTEMBER 30, 1979.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water from Green River Oil Shale, 11 Chem. Ind. 1, 485 (Effluents from In-Situ Oil Shale Processing," in ProceedingsControl Technology for Oil Shale Retort Water," August 1978.

  17. Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Years 2005-2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virginia L. Finley

    2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Contained in the following report are data for radioactivity in the environment collected and analyzed by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's Princeton Environmental, Analytical, and Radiological Laboratory (PEARL). The PEARL is located on-site and is certified for analyzing radiological and non-radiological parameters through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's Laboratory Certification Program, Certification Number 12471. Non-radiological surface and ground water samples are analyzed by NJDEP certified subcontractor laboratories - QC, Inc. and Accutest Laboratory. To the best of our knowledge, these data, as contained in the "Annual Site Environmental Report for 2005 and 2006," are documented and certified to be correct.

  18. Annual Reports | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2000 (pdf) Annual Report for 1999 (pdf) Annual Report for 1998 (pdf) Annual Report for 1997 (pdf) Annual Report for 1996 (pdf) Annual Report for 1995 (pdf) Annual Report for 1994...

  19. As was hypothesized, annual ET water losses appears to be driven by seasonal variations in the total aboveground biomass of the treatment wetland. We found that only air temperature and PAR were significant climatic drivers of ET. However, unlike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    in the total aboveground biomass of the treatment wetland. We found that only air temperature and PAR were budget of an aridland" urban wastewater treatment wetland" Experimental Design and Field Sampling! · 10.T.A. 2003. Water and mass budgets of a vertical=-flow constructed wetland used for wastewater treatment

  20. Annual Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA NewslettersPartnership of the Americas |AnchorageAnnaofAnnual

  1. Annual Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartment ofATVMAgriculturalAn1 Annual FOIA09 THROUGH 09/30/2010

  2. Annual Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s Reply Comments AT&T,FACT SAmesEnergyAnnual Planning Summaries:1

  3. Annual Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystemsProgram OverviewAdvocate -AmirAnnual Report Fiscal Year 2011 Office of

  4. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling for Bacteria in Wells E-126 11/01 Water samples for bacteria tests must always be col- lected in a sterile container. The procedure for collect- ing a water sample is as follows: 1. Obtain a sterile container from a Health Department...

  5. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling for Bacteria in Wells E-126 11/01 Water samples for bacteria tests must always be col- lected in a sterile container. The procedure for collect- ing a water sample is as follows: 1. Obtain a sterile container from a Health Department... immediately after collecting water sample. Refrigerate the sample and transport it to the laborato- ry (in an ice chest) as soon after collection as possible (six hours is best, but up to 30 hours). Many labs will not accept bacteria samples on Friday so check...

  6. Annual Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Both the water intake and thermal discharge can cause significant damage to local fish populations. In a closed-cycle cooling system, heat from the power plant is removed...

  7. Heavy water lattice project annual report / editors: T.J. Thompson, I. Kaplan, [and] M.J. Driscoll ; contributors J.H. Barch ... [et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Theos Jardin, 1918-1970

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental and theoretical program on the physics of heavy water moderated, slightly enriched lattices is being conducted at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. During the past year, work was completed on studies ...

  8. Estimating the Annual Water and Energy Savings in Texas A & M University Cafeterias using Low Flow Pre-Rinse Spray Valves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebello, Harsh Varun

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving the efficiency of a Pre- Rinse Spray Valve (PRSV) is one of the most cost effective water conservation methods in the Food Services Industry. A significant contributor to this cost efficiency is the reduction in the energy costs required...

  9. SPENT SHALE AS A CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL SHALE RETORT WATER. ANNUAL REPORT FOR PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 1978 - SEPTEMBER 30, 1979.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J.P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of Spent Shales. Surface Area Measurements.Carbon. Effects. ~~ co 2,and Oil~Shale Partial-pressure andWater from Green River Oil Shale, 11 Chem. Ind. 1, 485 (

  10. Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides in Marine Waters Near the United Heckathorn Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antrim, Liam D.; Kohn, Nancy P.

    2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site was completed in April 1997. Water and mussel tissues were sampled in January 1998 from four stations near Lauritzen Canal in Richmond, California, for the first post-remediation monitoring of marine areas near the United Heckathorn Site. Dieldrin and DDT were analyzed in water samples, tissue samples from resident mussels, and tissue samples from transplanted mussels deployed for 4 months. Concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared to pre-remediation data available from the California State Mussel Watch program (tissues) and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site (tissues and water). Biomonitoring results indicated that pesticides were still bioavailable in the water column, and have not been reduced from pre-remediation levels. Annual biomonitoring will continue to assess the effectiveness of remedial actions at the United Heckathorn Site.

  11. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring, Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A slightly dryer than normal year yielded flows in Lake Roosevelt that were essentially equal to the past ten year average. Annual mean inflow and outflow were 3,160.3 m3/s and 3,063.4 m3/s respectively. Mean reservoir elevation was 387.2 m above sea level at the Grand Coulee Dam forebay. The forebay elevation was below the mean elevation for a total of 168 days. During the first half of the 2000 forebay elevation changed at a rate of 0.121 m/d and during the last half changed at a rate of 0.208 m/d. The higher rate of elevation change earlier in the year is due to the drawdown to accommodate spring runoff. Mean annual water retention time was 40 days. Annual mean total dissolved gas was 108%. Total dissolved gas was greatest at upriver locations (110% = US/Canada Border annual mean) and decreased moving toward Grand Coulee Dam (106% = Grand Coulee Dam Forebay annual mean). Total dissolved gas was greatest in May (122% reservoir wide monthly mean). Gas bubble trauma was observed in 16 fish primarily largescale suckers and was low in severity. Reservoir wide mean temperatures were greatest in August (19.5 C) and lowest in January (5.5 C). The Spokane River and Sanpoil River Arms experienced higher temperatures than the mainstem reservoir. Brief stratification was observed at the Sanpoil River shore location in July. Warm water temperatures in the Spokane Arm contributed to low dissolved oxygen concentrations in August (2.6 mg/L at 33 m). However, decomposition of summer algal biomass was likely the main cause of depressed dissolved oxygen concentrations. Otherwise, dissolved oxygen profiles were relatively uniform throughout the water column across other sampling locations. Annual mean Secchi depth throughout the reservoir was 5.7 m. Nutrient concentrations were generally low, however, annual mean total phosphorus (0.016 mg/L) was in the mesotrophic range. Annual mean total nitrogen was in the meso-oligotrophic range. Total nitrogen to total phosphorus ratios were large (31:1 annual mean) likely indicating phosphorus limitations to phytoplankton.

  12. 1994 MCAP annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmony, S.C.; Boyack, B.E.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VELCOR is an integrated, engineering-level computer code that models the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants. The entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena, including reactor coolant system and containment thermal-hydraulic response, core heatup, degradation and relocation, and fission product release and transport is treated in MELCOR in a unified framework for both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Its current uses include the estimation of severe accident source terms and their sensitivities and uncertainties in a variety of applications. Independent assessment efforts have been successfully completed by the US and international MELCOR user communities. Most of these independent assessment efforts have been conducted to support the needs and fulfill the requirements of the individual user organizations. The resources required to perform an extensive set of model and integral code assessments are large. A prudent approach to fostering code development and maturation is to coordinate the individual assessment efforts of the MELCOR user community. While retaining individual control over assessment resources, each organization using the MELCOR code could work with the other users to broaden assessment coverage and minimize duplication. In recognition of these considerations, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) has initiated the MELCOR Cooperative Assessment Program (MCAP), a vehicle for coordinating and standardizing the assessment practices of the various MELCOR users. In addition, the user community will have a forum to better communicate lessons learned regarding MELCOR applications, capabilities, and user guidelines and limitations and to provide a user community perspective on code development needs and priorities. This second Annual Report builds on the foundation laid with the first Annual Report.

  13. Task 15 -- Remediation of organically contaminated soil using hot/liquid (subcritical) water. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, S.B.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This activity involves a pilot-scale demonstration of the use of hot/liquid water for the removal of organic contaminants from soil at the pilot (20 to 40 kg) scale. Lab-scale studies are being performed to determine the optimum temperature, contact time, and flow rates for removal of the organic contaminants. Initial investigations into using carbon sorbents to clean the extractant water for recycle use and to concentrate the extracted contaminants in a small volume for disposal are also being performed. Liquid water is normally considered to be too polar a solvent to be effective for removal of organic contaminants from contaminated soils and sludges. However, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that the polarity of liquid water can be changed from that of a very polar solvent at ambient conditions to that of an organic solvent (e.g., ethanol or acetonitrile) by simply raising the temperature. The EERC has exploited this unique property of liquid water to obtain highly selective extractions of polar (at lower temperatures) to nonpolar (at 200 to 250 C) organics from contaminated soils and sludges. Only moderate pressures (a maximum of about 45 atm at 250 C and lower pressures at lower temperatures) are required. With this procedure, all detectable hazardous organics were removed from the sludge, thus making the remaining material (about 99% of the original mass) a nonhazardous material. The present understanding of hot/liquid water extraction for the removal of hazardous organics from contaminated soils and sludges is being used to develop the engineering parameters needed to perform a pilot-scale demonstration of the remediation technology. Progress during the report period is summarized.

  14. 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report includes: a brief overview of Western; FY 2008 operational highlights; and financial data.

  15. AGENDA ADEP Surface Water Protection Project NPDES Storm Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADEP Surface Water Protection Project NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit Bi-Annual Update Public Meeting January 22, 2014 5:30-7:30 p.m. Cities of Gold Conference Center...

  16. Annual Report 2006 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , there was efficient competition with better service to clients and significant price cuts. Industries and households of the British electricity industry demonstrates how impor- tant the practical implementation of a theoretical in the case of electricity, gas, and water ­ the same design. Open access Deregulation should open a closed

  17. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2003, 2nd Annual/8th Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation-IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% vs. about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors, LWRs) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus the need for recirculation and jet pumps, a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies, LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which is also in use around the world.

  18. ANNUAL COMPREHENSIVE SITE COMPLIANCE EVALUATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...........................................................................................................12 3.1 REVIEW OF EXISTING BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES of Best Management Practices LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1-1 Facility Location Map Figure 1-2 Facility Plan ........................................................................................................................2 2.3 STORM WATER SAMPLING

  19. Auditing School Facilities for High-Value Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Auditing School Facilities for High-Value Water Conservation Opportunities #12;· WaterWise has gallons). · WaterWise has surveyed over 150 schools throughout California. · Total annual savings based the top two water uses at elementary schools. · The total potential annual water savings from elementary

  20. Impacts of Water Levels on Breeding Canada Geese and the Methodology for Mitigation and Enhancement in the Flathead Drainage, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, Dennis L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lower Flathead System Canada Goose Study was initiated to determine population trends and the effects of water level fluctuations on nest and brood habitat on the southern half of Flathead Lake and the lower Flathead River as a result of the operations of Kerr Dam. This report presents data collected during the 1984 field season as part of an ongoing project. Geese used Pablo, Kicking Horse, Ninepipe Reservoirs heavily during late summer and fall. Use of the river by geese was high during the winter, when the reservoirs were frozen, and during the breeding period. Most breeding geese left the river after broods fledged. Thirteen percent of the artificial tree nest structures on the river were used by nesting geese. Goose nest initiation on the river peaked the last week in March through the first week in April, and hatching peaked the first week in May. Predation was the most significant cause of nest loss on the river, and nest loss by flooding was not observed. Avian predation was the single largest factor contributing to nest loss on the lake. Habitat use was studied in 4 brood areas on the river and 8 brood areas on the lake, and available habitat was assessed for 2 portions of both the lake and the river. Brood habitat use was significantly different from the available habitat in all areas studied. On the lower river, broods used wheat fields, gravel bars, and shrub habitats. On the upper river, coniferous forest and shrub habitats were preferred. On the West Bay of the lake, brood areas consisted primarily of lawns and tall herbaceous habitat, while on the South Bay, marshes dominated the brood areas studied. Water levels on the river and lake affect both accessibility of these areas to brooding geese, and the ecology of the habitats preferred by geese. 43 refs., 24 figs., 31 tabs.