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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Operating Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

2

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

3

1998 Cost and Quality Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1998 Tables June 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions regarding the availability of these data should

4

Utility Name Retail Sales for 2010 (MWh) Projected Annual Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All POUs Utility Name Retail Sales for 2010 (MWh) Projected Annual Cost 20122013 ($) Projected Annual Cost 20132014 ($) Projected Annual Cost 20142015 ($) Legend LADWP 22,856,346 720,123 720,123 720 Attachment B Response Utility Name Retail Sales for 2010 (MWh) Projected Annual Cost 2012 2013 ($) LADWP 22

5

Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies October 7, 2013 - 1:17pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 4 To help estimate costs of implementing greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies for vehicles, the table below provides the initial investment, operating costs, and operating savings for each strategy. Table 1. Types and Ranges of Initial Investment Requirements and Annual Operating Costs and Savings. Strategies Initial Investment Operating Costs Operating Savings Consolidate trips Time to research & coordinate routes None Eliminate fleet vehicle trips; reduce cost & time (fuel, maintenance, etc) associated with fleet vehicle use. Could result in decreasing inventory & need for vehicles leading to long-term savings

6

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Savannah River Operations...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

for Savannah River Operations Office 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Savannah River Operations Office (SRS) 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Bonneville Power Administration...

8

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operating Costs with an Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project Energy costs are a school district's second highest expenditure after personnel. Public schools currently spend more than $8 billion per year for energy. School ener- gy expenditures rose, on average, 20 percent per year between 2000 and 2002-and the costs continue to rise. Natural gas prices alone increased 14 percent annually between 2003 and 2006. Improving a school's energy efficiency doesn't have to cost millions. In fact, schools can cut their energy expenses by 5 to 20 percent simply by efficiently managing and operating physical plants. This holds true regardless of the age of a school building. A smart O&M program can improve an existing school's energy performance An O&M program can be a simple initiative or a

9

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Released: September 28, 2010 Next Release: Discontinued Excel Spreadsheet Model - 1994-2009 XLS (1,178 KB) Overview Oil and gas well equipment and operating costs, including coal bed methane costs, stopped their upward trend from the 1990s and fell sharply in 2009. The extremely high oil and gas prices during the first half of 2008 followed by an unprecedented drop to very low prices by the end of the year had a major impact on equipment demand. Operating costs tumbled also because fuel costs were reduced and well servicing rates fell in most areas. The exceptions were in California where electric rates continued to increase, causing a one (1) percent increase in annual operating costs for leases producing from 12,000 feet. Operating cost for coal bed methane wells in the Appalachian and Powder River areas increased because electric rates continued to climb. Due to the timing of the data collection, the cost reported here could be higher than the actual annual average for 2008. However, some production costs (labor and equipment) are not as volatile as drilling, pipe, and other well completion costs, so the effect of the oil and gas prices on collected data may be lessened. Annual average electric rates and natural gas prices are used, which also helps to dampen cost variances.

10

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Operating Costs for Trucks David Levinson*, Michael Corbett, Maryam Hashami  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author Abstract This study estimates the operating costs for commercial vehicle operators in Minnesota, but variable costs change with the level of output. Daniels (1974) divided vehicle operating cost into two different categories, running costs (includes fuel consumption, engine oil consumption, tire costs

Levinson, David M.

12

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller...

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

2010 Annual Planning Summary for Savannah River Operations Office...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Savannah River Operations Office (SRS) Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, any EAs expected to be prepared in the next 12...

14

Predicting the energy use and operation cost of HVAC air filters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model has been developed to predict the energy efficiency and annual operation cost for filters installed in an HVAC air handling system using filter data from standard ASHRAE 52.2-2007 filter tests. Thirty filters from six manufacturers were investigated to determine the most energy efficient and cost effective filtration solutions for an airport installation in Vancouver, Canada. A comparison of the output of the proposed model with the kep and Wattage methods was performed to highlight the possible differences in filter choice that would be made using alternative approaches. The outcomes have been shown to differ due to data not incorporated in the older models such as filtration efficiency and particulate concentration. The sensitivity of filter cost to model parameters was also studied. It was found that the concentration of particles in the air stream and the cost of electricity had the largest effect on annual cost of operation. Increasing the concentration of particles in the air stream increases the cost of operating the filter and causes the installation of a prefilter upstream of the primary filter to be more economically attractive. Increasing electricity cost also increases the operation cost but has the reverse effect on attractiveness of prefilter installations.

James F. Montgomery; Sheldon I. Green; Steven N. Rogak; Karen Bartlett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations, 1992--1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sum (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measured do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

17

Factors Influencing Productivity and Operating Cost of Demand Responsive Transit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors Influencing Productivity and Operating Cost of Demand Responsive Transit Kurt Palmer Maged of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1991 operating expenses for Demand Responsive Transit have more than and practices upon productivity and operating cost. ii #12;1 Introduction Demand Responsive Transit (DRT

Dessouky, Maged

18

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

EnergySmart Schools fact sheet on how school operations and maintenance (O&M) personnel can play a greater role in managing ever-increasing energy costs.

19

Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

Lacey, Ph.D, P.E., Ronald E. [Texas A& M University

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

20

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Annual Operating Budget and Credit Plan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-buildings, tile, fence 14. Livestock Expenses (breeding, veterinary, medical) 15. Fertilizer and lime 16. Gasoline, fuel, oil 17. Taxes (real estate, machinery, etc.) 18. Insurance (fire, wind- storm, liability, etc.) 19. Auto (farm share) 20... Cost Needed Needed Needed 11 ~ $ $ ~ 12 13 14 , 15 t 16 . , 17 18 Total $ Total $ Total $ Total $ COMMENTS: SECTION II-CROP USAGE AND FEED REQUIREMENTS Beginning Purchases Farm Use Sales Ending Crop Production Total Inventory Quantity Mo...

Anonymous

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Center for Operational Excellence Annual Report 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by five, the largest jump in membership in five years. While the mix of companies in COE is ever-changing to encompass a wide variety of companies with a commanding presence in industries ranging from health care' journey to operational excellence. As the stakes grow greater in a changing economy, COE takes the reins

23

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

Not Available

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

24

Annual Federal Government Energy Use and Costs by Agency, 1975...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy use, and is further broken down by energy type, electricity, natural gas, petroleum types, coal, steam, and others. Data and Resources Annual Federal Government Energy...

25

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 27% inAre Significant. . . . . . . 9 Wind Power Prices Are Up in

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Fact #594: October 26, 2009 Fuel Economy and Annual Fuel Cost Ranges for Vehicle Classes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The graph below shows the range of the lowest and highest fuel economy for each vehicle class, along with the lowest and highest annual fuel cost (in parentheses). For example, the two-seater model...

27

Evaluating capital and operating cost efficiency of offshore wind farms: A DEA approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An actual growth rate greater than 30% indicates that offshore wind is a reasonable alternative to other energy sources. The industry today is faced with the challenge of becoming competitive and thus significantly reduce the cost of electricity from offshore wind. This situation implies that the evaluation of costs incurred during development, installation and operation is one of the most pressing issues in this industry at the moment. Unfortunately, actual cost analyses suffer from less resilient input data and the application of simple methodologies. Therefore, the objective of this study was to elevate the discussion, providing stakeholders with a sophisticated methodology and representative benchmark figures. The use of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) allowed for plants to be modelled as entities and costs to be related to the main specifics, such as distance to shore and water depth, ensuring the necessary comparability. Moreover, a particularly reliable database was established using cost data from annual reports. Offshore wind capacity of 3.6GW was benchmarked regarding capital and operating cost efficiency, best-practice cost frontiers were determined, and the effects of learning-by-doing and economies of scale were investigated, ensuring that this article is of significant interest for the offshore wind industry.

Nikolaus Ederer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Selected Operating Costs for Storage of Sorghum Grain.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selected Operating Costs for Storage Of Sorghum Grain TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY This is the third of three bulletins reporting the results of a study of sorghum grain storage and handling practices in Texas. The first dealt with marketing and on...-farm storage; the second with com- mercial storage and handling practices. This bulletin reports the results of a study of the costs of com- mercial grain handling practices. Three areas representing a cross section of physical and economic conditions...

Bonnen, C. A. (Clarence Alfred); Cunningham, William C.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION Final Report April 2003 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under: Contract No. DE-AM26-99FT40465 between the NETL and Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Subcontract No. 990700362 between CTC and Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group Inc. Task 50611 DOE Task Managers: James R. Longanbach Gary J. Stiegel Parsons Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Thomas L. Buchanan Michael G. Klett Ronald L. Schoff PARSONS Capital and Operating Cost of Hydrogen Production from Coal Gasification Page i April 2003 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page List of Tables iii List of Figures iii

30

Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To help estimate costs of implementing greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies for vehicles, the table below provides the initial investment, operating costs, and operating savings for each strategy.

31

Institute of Nuclear Power Operations 1994 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report highlights the activities of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations. The topics of the report include the president and chairmen`s joint message, overview of programs serving as the foundation for most of its activities, performance indicators for the US nuclear utility industry, and INPO`s 1994 financial reports and rosters. INPO has four technical cornerstone programs that serve as the foundation for most of its activities. (1) Evaluations of nuclear power plants operated by member utilities are conducted on a regularly scheduled basis. (2) INPO supports its member utilities in their work to achieve and maintain accreditation of training programs. (3) Events analysis programs identify and communicate lessons learned from plant events so utilities can take action to prevent similar events at their plants. (4) INPO helps members improve in nuclear operations areas through assistance programs and other activities that continually evolve to meet the changing needs of the nuclear industry

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

  Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 006 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 7% in 006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9

33

Minimum Cost Operation Mode and Minimum Loss Operation Mode of Power System Operation Mode Selection Based on Voltage Stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two formulae an optimal P-Q generation formula for minimum system cost and an optimal MW allocation formula for minimum system loss are described in this paper. The author defines two kinds of power system operation

Sang-Joong Lee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Annual Report of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Programme 2009/10 3 JET Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of experimental programme operations, on 24 October. The EP2 shutdown activity managed and conducted by CCFE Operations 3.2 OPERATIONS OVERVIEW JET commissioning and operation is conducted in a shift pattern, with twoAnnual Report of the EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Programme 2009/10 3.1 3 JET Operations 3 JET Operations 3

35

Survey Results and Analysis of the Cost and Efficiency of Various Operating Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing Hydrogen Fueling Stations were surveyed to determine capital and operational costs. Recommendations for cost reduction in future stations and for research were developed.

Cornish, John

2011-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

36

Optimal Bus Stop Spacing for Minimizing Transit Operation Cost and Robert L. Bertini2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Two cost functions are considered in the model including passenger access cost and in-vehicle1 Optimal Bus Stop Spacing for Minimizing Transit Operation Cost Huan Li1 and Robert L. Bertini2 model is generated with the aim at minimizing the operation cost without impact on transit accessibility

Bertini, Robert L.

37

2010 Annual Planning Summary for Idaho Operations Office (ID)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, any EAs expected to be prepared in the next 12 months, any EISs expected to be prepared in the next 24...

38

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Idaho Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 19~ 2012 Subject: Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report for Calendar Year 2011 (OS-DM-12-004) To: Karen L. Boardman, Chairperson Federal Technical Capability Panel National Nuclear Security Administration Reference: Memorandum, Karen Boardman to Distribution, "Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report for Calendar Year 2011," dated October 13,2011 In accordance with direction in the reference, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) performed a workforce analysis and developed an Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Report. The Report is hereby submitted for the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) review and incorporation into the FTCP Annual Report to the Secretary.

39

2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Savannah River Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

40

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Richland Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Idaho Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

42

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Savannah River Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

43

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Richland Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

44

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Idaho Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

45

2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Idaho Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

46

2014 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Idaho Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

47

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Savannah River Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

48

2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Richland Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

49

2014 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Richland Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

50

2014 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Savannah River Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

51

2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- Savannah River Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

52

Impacts of motor vehicle operation on water quality in the US Cleanup costs and policies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the costs of controlling some of the environmental impacts of motor vehicle transportation on groundwater and on surface waters. We estimate that annualized costs of cleaning-up leaking underground storage tanks range from $0.8 billion to $2.1 billion per year over 10years. Annualized costs of controlling highway runoff from principal arterials in the US are much larger: they range from $2.9 billion to $15.6 billion per year over 20years (1.68.3% of annualized highway transportation expenditures). Some causes of non-point source pollution were unintentionally created by regulations or could be addressed by simple design changes of motor vehicles. A review of applicable measures suggests that effective policies should combine economic incentives, information campaigns, and enforcement, coupled with preventive environmental measures. In general, preventing water pollution from motor vehicles would be much cheaper than cleaning it up.

Hilary Nixon; Jean-Daniel Saphores

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Marc W. Melaina (Primary Contact), Michael Penev and Darlene Steward National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3836 Email: Marc.Melaina@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Subcontractor: IDC Energy Insights, Framingham, MA Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: September 28, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Identify the capacity (kg/day) and capital costs * associated with "Early Commercial" hydrogen stations (defined below) Identify cost metrics for larger numbers of stations and * larger capacities Technical Barriers This project addresses the following technical barriers

54

An analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs: A 1995 update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the years real (inflation-adjusted) O&M cost have begun to level off. The objective of this report is to determine whether the industry and NRC initiatives to control costs have resulted in this moderation in the growth of O&M costs. Because the industry agrees that the control of O&M costs is crucial to the viability of the technology, an examination of the factors causing the moderation in costs is important. A related issue deals with projecting nuclear operating costs into the future. Because of the escalation in nuclear operating costs (and the fall in fossil fuel prices) many State and Federal regulatory commissions are examining the economics of the continued operation of nuclear power plants under their jurisdiction. The economics of the continued operation of a nuclear power plant is typically examined by comparing the cost of the plants continued operation with the cost of obtaining the power from other sources. This assessment requires plant-specific projections of nuclear operating costs. Analysts preparing these projections look at past industry-wide cost trends and consider whether these trends are likely to continue. To determine whether these changes in trends will continue into the future, information about the causal factors influencing costs and the future trends in these factors are needed. An analysis of the factors explaining the moderation in cost growth will also yield important insights into the question of whether these trends will continue.

NONE

1995-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

55

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 producing wells, 11 injection wells and 1 water supply well. Costs for water storage tanks, injection plant, filtering systems, injection lines and drilling water supply wells...

56

California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Buidling Operating for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fact sheet from the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) describes rate-responsive building operations for cost and energy savings in California federal facilities.

57

Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Project Annual Operating Report CY 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 5.77 x 10 7 gallons (gal) of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Complex (PWTC) - Building 3544 ion exchange system during calendar year (CY) 1999. This averaged to 110 gpm throughout the year. An additional 3.94 x 10 6 gal of liquid waste (average of 8 gpm throughout the year) was decontaminated using the zeolite treatment system due to periods of high Cesium levels in the influent wastewater. A total of 6.17 x 10 7 gal of liquid waste (average of 118 gpm throughout the year) was decontaminated at Building 3544 during the year. During the year, the regeneration of the ion exchange resins resulted in the generation of 8.00 x 10 3 gal of Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) concentrate and 9.00 x 10 2 gal of LLLW supernate. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at Building 3544. Figure 1 shows a diagram of the Process Waste Collection and Transfer System and Figure 2 shows a diagram of the Building 3544 treatment process. Figures 3, 4 5, and 6 s how a comparison of operations at Building 3544 in 1997 with previous years. Figure 7 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1995.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Idaho Operations Office (ID)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Idaho Operations Office (ID) (See Environmental Management).

59

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Chicago Operations Office (CH)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Chicago Operations Office (CH) (See Science APS).

60

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Savannah River Operations Office (SRS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Savannah River Operations Office (SRS) (See also Environmental Management).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Minimizing the Operational Cost of Data Centers via Geographical Electricity Price Diversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimizing the Operational Cost of Data Centers via Geographical Electricity Price Diversity amounts of electric power, which lead to high operational costs of cloud service providers. Reducing cloud environment by incorporating the diversity of time-varying electricity prices in different regions

Liang, Weifa

62

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Genevieve Saur (Primary Contact), Chris Ainscough. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3783 Email: genevieve.saur@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Corroborate recent wind electrolysis cost studies using a * more detailed hour-by-hour analysis. Examine consequences of different system configuration * and operation for four scenarios, at 42 sites in five

63

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Idaho Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4, 2013 4, 2013 Subject: Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report for Calendar Year 2012 (EM-NSPD-13-003) To: Karen L. Boardman, Chairman Federal Technical Capability Panel National Nuclear Security Administration Reference: Memorandum, Karen Boardman to Distribution, "Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report for Calendar Year 2012," dated October 24, 2012 In accordance with direction in the reference, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) performed a workforce analysis and developed an Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Report. The Report is herby submitted for the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) review and incorporation into the FTCP Annual Report to the Secretary. Questions may be addressed to the DOE-ID FTCP Agent, Mark C. Brown at (208) 526-

64

Lowering Drilling Cost, Improving Operational Safety, and Reducing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

via stress cycling. This can occur due to post cementing operations such as drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or thermal stresses. The testing method used a 3" PVC pipe to...

65

Complex Technical Systems Operation, Reliability, Availability, Safety and Cost Optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methods based on the results of the joint model linking a semi-Markov modeling of the system operation processes with a multistate approach to system reliability and safety and the linear programming are prop...

Krzysztof Ko?owrocki; Joanna Soszy?ska-Budny

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Work Cost of Thermal Operations in Quantum and Nano Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adopting a resource theory framework of thermodynamics for quantum and nano systems pioneered by Janzing et al. [Int. J. Th. Phys. 39, 2717 (2000)], we formulate the cost in useful work of transforming one resource state into another as a linear program of convex optimization. This approach is based on the characterization of thermal quasiorder given by Janzing et al. and later by Horodecki and Oppenheim [Nat. Comm. 4, 2059 (2013)]. Both characterizations are related to an extended version of majorization studied by Ruch, Schranner, and Seligman under the name mixing distance [J. Chem. Phys. 69, 386 (1978)].

Joseph M. Renes

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

67

14 - Cost modelling of coal power plant start-up in cyclical operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: It has long been recognized that large coal plants that are exposed to cyclic operation incur more damage and have higher maintenance costs than units which operate in a base load regimen. This chapter reviews historical studies that have attempted to model the costs of cycling for these units from both bottom-up and top-down perspectives. It describes recent research at the component, unit and system level which attempts to forecast maintenance costs in the high-cycling scenarios likely to result from changes in the relative cost of fuel and the expansion of renewable energy sources.

P. Keatley

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see Table 5). Purchases are itemized in Appendix D and E. FishPro, Inc. assisted tribal staff with equipment purchases. The unspent contract balances will be carried forward to the ensuing year to complete equipment purchases essential to hatchery operations. The NPTH activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 decision that authorized hatchery construction. Construction began in July 2000. It is anticipated to continue through October 2002. At the end of 2001, the hatchery facilities were approximately 70% completed and the budget approximately 90% expended. The following facilities are either completed or in final stages of construction: (1) NPTH Central Hatchery facility at Site 1705, and (2) North Lapwai Valley satellite, and (3) Sweetwater Springs satellite, and (4) Yoosa-Camp satellite, and (5) Newsome Creek satellite, and (6) Lukes Gulch satellite, and (7) Cedar Flats satellite.

Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Liquid and gaseous waste operations section. Annual operating report CY 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents information on the liquid and gaseous wastes operations section for calendar year 1997. Operating activities, upgrade activities, and maintenance activities are described.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Table 1. Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs" Updated estimates of power plant capital and operating costs" ,"Plant Characteristics",,,"Plant Costs (2012$)" ,"Nominal Capacity (MW)","Heat Rate (Btu/kWh)",,"Overnight Capital Cost ($/kW)","Fixed O&M Cost ($/kW-yr)","Variable O&M Cost ($/MWh)" ,,,,,,,"NEMS Input" " Coal" "Single Unit Advanced PC",650,8800,,3246,37.8,4.47,"N" "Dual Unit Advanced PC",1300,8800,,2934,31.18,4.47,"Y" "Single Unit Advanced PC with CCS",650,12000,,5227,80.53,9.51,"Y" "Dual Unit Advanced PC with CCS",1300,12000,,4724,66.43,9.51,"N" "Single Unit IGCC ",600,8700,,4400,62.25,7.22,"N"

71

Disclosure of Energy Operating Cost Information: A Silver Bullet for Overcoming the Energy-Efficiency Gap?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Consumers frequently act contrary to rational economic theory by overvaluing an initially higher purchase price while heavily discounting future energy operating costs. One opportunity to help limit the scale ......

Stefanie Lena Heinzle

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

SP-100 operational life model. Fiscal Year 1990 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the initial year`s effort in the development of an Operational Life Model (OLM) for the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System. The initial step undertaken in developing the OLM was to review all available documentation from GE on their plans for the OLM and on the degradation and failure mechanisms envisioned for the SP-100. In addition, the DEGRA code developed at JPL, which modelled the degradation of the General Purpose Heat Source based Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG), was reviewed. Based on the review of the degradation and failure mechanisms, a list of the most pertinent degradation effects along with their key degradation mechanisms was compiled. This was done as a way of separating the mechanisms from the effects and allowing all of the effects to be incorporated into the OLM. The emphasis was on parameters which will tend to change performance as a function of time and not on those that are simply failures without any prior degradation.

Ewell, R.; Awaya, H.

1990-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

73

Annual Steam-Electric Plant Operation and Design Data (EIA-767 data file)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity data files > Form EIA-767 Electricity data files > Form EIA-767 Form EIA-767 historical data files Data Released: November 02, 2006 Next Release: None(discontinued) Annual steam-electric plant operation and design data Historical data files contain annual data from organic-fueled or combustible renewable steam-electric plants with a generator nameplate rating of 10 or more megawatts. The data are derived from the Form EIA-767 "Steam-Electric Plant Operation and Design Report." The files contains data on plant operations and equipment design (including boilers, generators, cooling systems, flue gas desulfurizations, flue gas particulate collectors, and stacks). Beginning in the data year 2001, nuclear plant data were no longer collected by the survey.

74

Geothermal Well Costs and their Sensitivities to Changes in Drilling and Completion Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a detailed analysis of the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. The basis for much of the analysis is a computer-simulation-based model which calculates and accrues operational costs involved in drilling and completing a well. Geothermal well costs are discussed in general, with special emphasis on variations among different geothermal areas in the United States, effects of escalation and inflation over the past few years, and comparisons of geothermal drilling costs with those for oil and gas wells. Cost differences between wells for direct use of geothermal energy and those for electric generation, are also indicated. In addition, a breakdown of total well cost into its components is presented. This provides an understanding of the relative contributions of different operations in drilling and completions. A major portion of the cost in many geothermal wells is from encountered troubles, such as lost circulation, cementing difficulties, and fishing. These trouble costs are considered through both specific examples and statistical treatment of drilling and completions problems. The sensitivities of well costs to variations in several drilling and completion parameters are presented. The mode1 makes it possible to easily vary parameters such as rates of penetration; bit lifetimes; bit rental, or rig costs; delay times; number of cement plugs; etc. are compared.

Carson, C. C.; Lin, Y.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities; Operations and Maintenance, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem, Thornhollow and Pendleton satellite facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead and Three Mile Dam and South Fork Walla Walla facilities are used for holding and spawning chinook salmon. In some years, Three Mile Dam may also be used for holding and spawning coho salmon. In the spring of 2002, summer steelhead were acclimated and released at Bonifer Pond (54,917), Minthorn Springs (47,521), and Pendleton (54,366). Yearling coho (1,621,857) were also acclimated and released at Pendleton. Yearling spring chinook salmon (876,121) were acclimated and released at Imeques C-mem-ini-kem. At Thornhollow, 520,564 yearling fall chinook and 307,194 subyearling fall chinook were acclimated. In addition, 104,908 spring chinook were transported to Imeques C-mem-ini-kem in November for release in the spring of 2003. CTUIR and ODFW personnel monitored the progress of outmigration for juvenile releases at the Westland Canal juvenile facility. Nearly all juveniles released in the spring migrated downstream prior to the trap being opened in early July. A total of 100 unmarked and 10 marked summer steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from September 21, 2001, through April 2, 2002. An estimated 180,955 green eggs were taken from 36 females and were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation and rearing. A total of 560 adult and 26 jack spring chinook salmon were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from April 22 through June 12, 2002, and were transported to South Fork Walla Walla. An estimated 1,017,113 green eggs were taken from 266 females and were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery. Excess unmarked broodstock (seven adult males, five jacks, and 34 females) were released into the South Fork Walla Walla River at the end of spawning. A total of 168 adult and eight jack spring chinook salmon were transferred from Three Mile Dam to South Fork Walla Walla between June 6 and June 23 for temporary holding. On August 8, 154 adults and eight jacks were released into the South Fork Walla Walla River to spawn naturally. A total of 214 adult spring chinook salmon were transferred from Ringold Hatchery to South Fork Walla Walla between June 7 and June 20 for temporary holding. On August 8, 171 were released into natural production areas in the Walla Walla River basin to spawn naturally. A total of 525 adult and 34 jack fall chinook salmon were collected and held for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from September 16 to November 17, 2002. An estimated 678,122 green eggs were taken from 183 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery. Coho salmon broodstock were not collected in 2002. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and spring and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was detected in five of 68 spawned summer steelhead. Summer steelhead were not examined for bacterial kidney disease (Renibacterium salmoninarum; BKD) in 2002. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus was detected in 27 of 78 spawned spring chinook females. Two hundred sixty-six spawned spring chinook females were sampled for BKD and two had low to moderate levels of Rs antigen (ELISA OD{sub 405} readings of 0.260 and 0.365). All others had low to negative levels of Rs antigen (ELISA OD{sub 405} readings of 0.00 to 0.099). Twenty-one spring chinook mortalities were examined for culturable bacteria and enteric redmouth disease

Rowan, Gerald

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. Migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage and trapping facility design, operation, and criteria. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. Beginning in March of 2007, two work elements from the Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations Project were transferred to other projects. The work element Enumeration of Adult Migration at Nursery Bridge Dam is now conducted under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project and the work element Provide Transportation Assistance is conducted under the Umatilla Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance Project. Details of these activities can be found in those project's respective annual reports.

Bronson, James P.; Duke, Bill; Loffink, Ken

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Stationery and Emerging Market Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Kathya Mahadevan (Primary Contact), VinceContini, Matt Goshe, and Fritz Eubanks Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 Phone: (614) 424-3197 Email: mahadevank@battelle.org DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Reg Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005250/001 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives To assist the DOE in developing fuel cell systems for stationary and emerging markets by developing independent cost models and costs estimates for manufacture and

78

Effects of different operating conditions of Gonen geothermal district heating system on its annual performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, the effects of different operating conditions of the Gonen geothermal district heating system (GDHS) on its annual energy and exergy performance are investigated. The system parameters such as temperature, pressure and flow rate are monitored by using fixed and portable measuring instruments over a one-year period. Thus the main differences in the annual system operation are detected. The measurements show that the Gonen GDHS has six different operating cases depending on the outside temperature throughout the year. The energy and exergy analysis of the system is carried out for each case using the actual system parameters at the corresponding reference temperatures, which are 3.86, 7.1, 8.88, 11.83, 15.26 and 20.4C. The highest and lowest energy (57.32%, 35.64%) and exergy (55.76%, 41.42%) efficiencies of the overall system are calculated at the reference temperatures of 15.26C and 3.86C, respectively. Besides, taking the six case-based energy and exergy analyses into account, the annual average energy and exergy efficiencies are determined to be 45.24% and 47.33%, respectively.

Asiye Aslan; Bedri Yksel; Tu?rul Akyol

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data. Annual report, 1994-FY 95  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) has published reports of its activities since 1984. The first report covered January through June of 1984, and the second report covered July through December 1984. Since those first two semiannual reports, AEOD has published annual reports of its activities from 1985 through 1993. Beginning with the report for 1986, AEOD Annual Reports have been published as NUREG-1272. Beginning with the report for 1987, NUREG-1272 has been published in two parts, No. 1 covering power reactors and No. 2 covering nonreactors (changed to {open_quotes}nuclear materials{close_quotes} with the 1993 report). The 1993 AEOD Annual Report was NUREG-1272, Volume 8. AEOD has changed its annual report from a calendar year to a fiscal year report to be consistent with the NRC Annual Report and to conserve staff resources. NUREG-1272, Volume 9, No. 1 and No. 2, therefore, are combined calendar year 1994 (1994) and fiscal year 1995 (FY 95) reports which describe activities conducted between January 1, 1994, and September 30, 1995. Certain data which have historically been reported on a calendar year basis, however, are complete through calendar year 1995. Throughout this report, whenever information is presented for fiscal year 1995, it is designated as FY 95 data. Calendar year information is always designated by the four digits of the calendar year. This report, NUREG-1272, Volume 9, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns associated with the use of licensed material in non-power reactor applications. A new part has been added, NUREG-1272, Volume 9, No. 3, which covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in FY 95 in support of the NRC`s mission.

none,

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The importance of annual personal saving to the capital finance and real wealth position of farm operator families  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE IMPORTANCE OF ANNUAL PERSONAL SAVING TO THE CAPITAL FINANCE AND REAL WEALTH POSITION OF FARM OPERATOR FAMILIES A Thesis by Deroe Elizabeth Asenath Davis Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the reqirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1977 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics THE IMPORTANCE OF ANNUAL PERSONAL SAVING TO THE CAPITAL FINANCE AND REAL WEALTH POSITION OF FARM OPERATOR FAMILIES A Thesis by Deroe Elizabeth Asenath...

Davis, Deroe Elizabeth Asenath

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost ($/MWh) Regulation Load Following Unit Commitment Gas31 Regulation and load-following impacts are generally found

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Office of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1989 annual report, Power reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1989. The report is published in two separate parts. This document, NUREG-1272, Vol. 4, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC's Operations Center. This report also compiles the status of staff actions resulting from previous Incident Investigation Team (IIT) reports. 16 figs., 9 tabs.

None

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations Odd Erik Gundersen In this paper we present DrillEdge - a commercial and award winning software system that monitors oil that provides real-time deci- sion support when drilling oil wells. Decisions are supported through analyzing

Aamodt, Agnar

84

SPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID 7.6 Kevin F the price of electricity in the PJM power grid. In this paper we examine one of the mechanisms by which space weather impacts the electricity market in the PJM power grid. The starting point of this paper

Schrijver, Karel

85

Operational costs induced by fluctuating wind power production in Germany and Scandinavia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operational costs induced by fluctuating wind power production in Germany and Scandinavia Peter Christoph Weber, Chair of Energy Management, University Duisburg-Essen, Germany Rüdiger Barth & Heike Brand, Institute of Energy Economics and the Rational Use of Energy, University of Stuttgart, Germany Abstract

86

Development of surface mine cost estimating equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cost estimating equations were developed to determine capital and operating costs for five surface coal mine models in Central Appalachia, Northern Appalachia, Mid-West, Far-West, and Campbell County, Wyoming. Engineering equations were used to estimate equipment costs for the stripping function and for the coal loading and hauling function for the base case mine and for several mines with different annual production levels and/or different overburden removal requirements. Deferred costs were then determined through application of the base case depreciation schedules, and direct labor costs were easily established once the equipment quantities (and, hence, manpower requirements) were determined. The data points were then fit with appropriate functional forms, and these were then multiplied by appropriate adjustment factors so that the resulting equations yielded the model mine costs for initial and deferred capital and annual operating cost. (The validity of this scaling process is based on the assumption that total initial and deferred capital costs are proportional to the initial and deferred costs for the primary equipment types that were considered and that annual operating cost is proportional to the direct labor costs that were determined based on primary equipment quantities.) Initial capital costs ranged from $3,910,470 in Central Appalachia to $49,296,785; deferred capital costs ranged from $3,220,000 in Central Appalachia to $30,735,000 in Campbell County, Wyoming; and annual operating costs ranged from $2,924,148 in Central Appalachia to $32,708,591 in Campbell County, Wyoming. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

87

Annual Summary Report Calendar Year 2000 for the 100-HR-3, 100-KR-4, and 100-NR-2 Operable Units and Pump-and-Treat Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual progress and performance evaluation report discusses the groundwater remedial actions in the 100 Area, including the interim actions at the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 Operable Units, and also discusses the expedited response action in the 100-NR-2 operable unit.

G. B. Mitchem

2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

88

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Surged by 46% in 2007, with 5,329 MW Added and $9 Billion Invested . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Wind Power Contributed 35% of All New U.S. Electric Generating Capacity in 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Continued to Lead the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Texas Easily Exceeded Other States in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . .6 Data from Interconnection Queues Demonstrate that an Enormous Amount of Wind Capacity Is Under Development . . . . . . . . . .9 GE Wind Remained the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, but a Growing Number of Other Manufacturers Are Capturing Market Share .

89

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 U.S. Wind Power Capacity Increased by 27% in 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The United States Leads the World in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . .4 Texas, Washington, and California Lead the U.S. in Annual Capacity Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 GE Wind Is the Dominant Turbine Manufacturer, with Siemens Gaining Market Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Average Turbine Size Continues to Increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Developer Consolidation Accelerates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Innovation and Competition in Non-Utility Wind Financing Persists . . . .9 Utility Interest in Wind Asset Ownership Strengthens; Community Wind Grows Modestly . . . . . . . . . . . .

90

Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis, Preliminary Results - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington, VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 E-mail: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Grace Ordaz Phone: (202) 586-8350 Email: Grace.Ordaz@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005253 Project Start Date: September 30, 2012 Project End Date: September 29, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop cost models of carbon fiber hydrogen storage * pressure vessels. Explore the sensitivity of pressure vessel cost to design * parameters including hydrogen storage quantity, storage

91

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results from Major Wind Integration Studies Completed 2003-a mini- mum) show that wind integration costs are generallyA number of additional wind integration analyses are planned

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Impacts of increased outdoor air flow rates on annual HVAC energy costs in office environment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The use of different ventilation systems has an important impact on the energy cost of office buildings. This paper examines the relationship between heating and (more)

Destrez, Adrien

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Cost-efficient staffing under annualized hours Egbert van der Veen1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Our model is able to address various business questions regard- ing tactical workforce planning. In this paper we integrate two (tactical) workforce planning problems. The `annualized hours' problem workforce planning problems, as discussed in the previous para- graph. Second, with our model, several

Boucherie, Richard J.

94

Will 10 MW Wind Turbines Bring Down the Operation and Maintenance Cost of Offshore Wind Farms?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Larger wind turbines are believed to be advantageous from an investment and installation perspective, since costs for installation and inner cabling are dependent mainly on the number of wind turbines and not their size. Analogously, scaling up the turbines may also be argued to be advantageous from an operation and maintenance (O&M) perspective. For a given total power production of the wind farm, larger wind turbines give a smaller number of individual machines that needs to be maintained and could therefore give smaller O&M costs. However, the O&M costs are directly dependent on how failure rates, spare part costs, and time needed by technicians to perform each maintenance task and will develop for larger wind turbines. A simulation study is carried out with a discrete-event simulation model for the operational phase of an offshore wind farm, comparing the O&M costs of a wind farm consisting of 5 MW turbines with a wind farm consisting of 10 MW turbines. Simulation results confirm that O&M costs decrease when replacing two 5 MW turbines by one 10 MW turbine, if the total production capacity and all other parameters are kept equal. However, whether larger wind turbines can contribute to a reduction of cost of energy from an O&M perspective is first and foremost dependent on how the failure rates and maintenance durations for such wind turbines will develop compared to 5 MW wind turbines. Based on the results of this analysis, it is concluded that higher failure rates and maintenance durations rapidly are counterbalancing the benefits of larger wind turbines.

Matthias Hofmann; Iver Bakken Sperstad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Capturing the impact of fuel price on jet aircraft operating costs with Leontief technology and econometric models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of the airline response to a fuel price increase is in effect an investigation of the role of variable interactions in aircraft cost models. We examine the impact of fuel price on aircraft costs and airline operational strategies by developing two classes of operating cost models for jet aircraft and comparing the results. The translog operating cost model is a flexible functional form that provides a detailed representation of the empirical relationship between fuel cost and operating cost, allowing for substitution, scale, aircraft age, and variable interactions to be captured. The simpler Leontief model assumes that inputs of a cost model must be used in fixed proportions regardless of their prices. While it does not capture variable interactions, the Leontief model is more transparent, requires fewer inputs, and allows the contribution of a single factor, such as fuel price, to operating cost to be more easily isolated. An analysis of the translog operating cost model reveals that as fuel price increases, airlines will take steps to use fuel more efficiently by leveraging other inputs; a comparison of the translog and the Leontief technology models, however, show that the potential for this supplier input substitution for fuel is rather modest. By building the two operating cost models and comparing their predictions, we illustrate a method to determine the prediction potential of a Leontief technology model and assess the importance of input substitution at the vehicle level.

Megan Smirti Ryerson; Mark Hansen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Wind turbine reliability : understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. Cost of energy (COE) is a key project evaluation metric, both in commercial applications and in the U.S. federal wind energy program. To reflect this commercial reality, the wind energy research community has adopted COE as a decision-making and technology evaluation metric. The COE metric accounts for the effects of reliability through levelized replacement cost and unscheduled maintenance cost parameters. However, unlike the other cost contributors, such as initial capital investment and scheduled maintenance and operating expenses, costs associated with component failures are necessarily speculative. They are based on assumptions about the reliability of components that in many cases have not been operated for a complete life cycle. Due to the logistical and practical difficulty of replacing major components in a wind turbine, unanticipated failures (especially serial failures) can have a large impact on the economics of a project. The uncertainty associated with long-term component reliability has direct bearing on the confidence level associated with COE projections. In addition, wind turbine technology is evolving. New materials and designs are being incorporated in contemporary wind turbines with the ultimate goal of reducing weight, controlling loads, and improving energy capture. While the goal of these innovations is reduction in the COE, there is a potential impact on reliability whenever new technologies are introduced. While some of these innovations may ultimately improve reliability, in the short term, the technology risks and the perception of risk will increase. The COE metric used by researchers to evaluate technologies does not address this issue. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce COE.

Not Available

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Reducing Building Energy Costs Using Optimized Operation Strategies for Constant Volume Air Handling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SDCVP 67.380 $153.200 $41.800 $195.000 $2.89 measured energy consumption for each building. The horizontal axis is the ambient temperature. The venical axis is the average daily energy consumption in MMBtulhr. Figure 5 compares the predicted...REDUCING BUILDING ENERGY COSTS USING OPTIMIZED OPERATION STRATEGIES FOR CONSTANT VOLUME AIR HANDLING SYSTEMS Mingsheng Liu, her Atha, Agarni Reddy Ed White David Claridge and Jeff Haberl Department of Physical Plant Texas A&M University...

Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; White, E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

cost savings  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

reduced the amount of time involved in the annual chemical inventory for a cost savings of 18,282. Other presentations covered SRNS' award-winning employee suggestion...

99

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

100

Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1996 annual report. Volume 10, Number 1: Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during 1996. The report is published in three parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1996 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from CY 1980 through 1996. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 3, covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in support of the NRC`s mission in 1996.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1990 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1990. The report is published in two separate parts. This document NUREG-1272, Vol. 5, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC's Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol.5, No. 2, covers nonreactors and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1990 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. The reports contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports for that group of licensees. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued for 1980 through 1990. 9 figs., 8 tabs.

None

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Stationary Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington, VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Technical Advisor Bryan Pivovar Phone: (303) 275-3809 Email: bryan.pivovar@nrel.gov Sub-Contract Number No: AGB-0-40628-01 under Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08G028308 Project Start Date: July 8, 2010 Project End Date: September 7, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Perform Design for Manufacturing and Assembly * (DFMA ® ) cost analysis for low-temperature (LT)

103

Annual  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

19 19 th Annual Triple "E" Seminar Presented by U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory and Spectroscopy Society of Pittsburgh Thursday, January 20, 2011 8:00 a.m. Registration & Breakfast 8:30 a.m. Opening Remarks/Welcome Michael Nowak, Senior Management & Technical Advisor National Energy Technology Laboratory 8:35 a.m. Overview of Energy Issues Michael Nowak, Senior Management & Technical Advisor National Energy Technology Laboratory 8:45 a.m. Introduction of Presenters McMahan Gray National Energy Technology Laboratory 8:50 a.m. Jane Konrad, Pgh Regional Center for Science Teachers "Green - What Does it Mean" 9:45 a.m. Break 10:00 a.m. John Varine, Spectroscopy Society of Pittsburgh

104

Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evaluation of a Low-Cost Salmon Production Facility; 1988 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fiscal year 1988 study sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration evaluates an existing, small-scale salmon production facility operated and maintained by the Clatsop County Economic Development Committee's Fisheries Project.

Hill, James M.; Olson, Todd

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE Operations annual site environmental report 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power of Boeing North American, Inc. These are identified as Area 4 of the SSFL and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for research and development (R and D), engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields primarily in energy research and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site had research and development laboratories involved with nuclear research. This work was terminated in 1995 and only D and D activities will have potential for impact on the environment. Since 1956, Area 4 has been used for work with nuclear materials, including fabricating nuclear reactor fuels, testing nuclear reactors, and dissembling used fuel elements. This work ended in 1988 and subsequent efforts have been directed toward decommissioning and decontamination of the former nuclear facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring of DOE-sponsored activities to the regulatory agencies responsible for oversight. Information presented here concentrates on Area 4 at SSFL, which is the only area at SSFL where DOE operations were performed.

Robinson, K.S. [ed.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

107

ORCED: A model to simulate the operations and costs of bulk-power markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dramatic changes in the structure and operation of US bulk-power markets require new analytical tools. The authors developed the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model to analyze a variety of public-policy issues related to the many changes underway in the US electricity industry. Such issues include: policy and technology options to reduce carbon emissions from electricity production; the effects of electricity trading between high- and low-cost regions on consumers and producers in both regions; the ability of the owners of certain generating units to exercise market power as functions of the transmission link between two regions and the characteristics of the generating units and loads in each region; and the market penetration of new energy-production and energy-use technologies and the effects of their adoption on fuel use, electricity use and costs, and carbon emissions. ORCED treats two electrical systems connected by a single transmission link ORCED uses two load-duration curves to represent the time-varying electricity consumption in each region. The two curves represent peak and offpeak seasons. User specification of demand elasticities permits ORCED to estimate the effects of changes in electricity price, both overall and hour by hour, on overall electricity use and load shapes. ORCED represents the electricity supply in each region with 26 generating units. The two regions are connected by a single transmission link. This link is characterized by its capacity (MW), cost ({cents}/kWh), and losses (%). This report explains the inputs to, outputs from, and operation of ORCED. It also presents four examples showing applications of the model to various public-policy issues related to restructuring of the US electricity industry.

Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

1997 annual ground control operating plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan presents background information and a working guide to assist Mine Operations and Engineering in developing strategies for addressing ground control issues at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). With the anticipated receipt of waste in late 1997, this document provides additional detail to Panel 1 activities and options. The plan also serves as a foundation document for development and revision of the annual long-term ground control plan. Section 2.0 documents the current status of all underground excavations with respect to location, geology, geometry, age, ground support, operational use, projected life, and physical conditions. Section 3.0 presents the methods used to evaluate ground conditions, including visual observations of the roof, ribs, and floor, inspection of observation holes, and review of instrumentation data. Section 4.0 lists several ground support options and specific applications of each. Section 5.0 discusses remedial ground control measures that have been implemented to date. Section 6.0 presents projections and recommendations for ground control actions based on the information in Sections 2.0 through 5.0 of this plan and on a rating of the critical nature of each specific area. Section 7.0 presents a summary statement, and Section 8.0 includes references. Appendix A provides an overview and critique of ground control systems that have been, or may be, used at the site. Because of the dynamic nature of the underground openings and associated geotechnical activities, this plan will be revised as additional data are incorporated.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A discounted-cost continuous-time flexible manufacturing and operator scheduling model solved by deconvexification over time  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A discounted-cost, continuous-time, infinite-horizon version of a flexible manufacturing and operator scheduling model is solved. The solution procedure is to convexify the discrete operator-assignment constraints to obtain a linear program, and then to regain the discreteness and obtain an approximate manufacturing schedule by deconvexification of the solution of the linear program over time. The strong features of the model are the accommodation of linear inequality relations among the manufacturing activities and the discrete manufacturing scheduling, whereas the weak features are intra-period relaxation of inventory availability constraints, and the absence of inventory costs, setup times, and setup charges.

Eaves, B.C.; Rothblum, U.G.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Toward mitigating wind-uncertainty costs in power system operation: A demand response exchange market framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The intermittent nature of the wind generation poses an obstacle to high penetration of wind energy in electric power systems. Demand response (DR) increases the flexibility of the power system by allowing very fast upward/downward changes in the demand. This potential can be interpreted as the ability to provide fast upward/downward reserves, facilitating the utilization of the wind power in the power system. Demand response exchange (DRX) market is a separate market in which DR is treated as a virtual resource to be exchanged between DR buyers and sellers. The major advantage of the DRX market in comparison to other DR proposals is that it allocates benefits and payments across all participants, fairly. However, there are still obstacles to its integration into the existing power markets. This paper proposes a short-term framework for DRX market that considers the interactions between the DRX market and energy/reserve markets. The proposed framework is aimed at reducing the operational costs incurred by the uncertainty of the wind power and providing a fair mechanism for valuation of the DR as a virtual resource. A stochastic programming model is used to clear the DRX market considering the wind power production scenarios. To illustrate the efficiency of the proposed DRX market framework, it is implemented on a simple and a realistic case study.

Javad Saebi; Mohammad Hossein Javidi; Majid Oloomi Buygi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

Michael D. Durham

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Project Project Funding Operational & Maintenance Costs Univ. Project Title GSF Brief Description of Project Location Amount Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Project Funding Operational & Maintenance Costs Univ. Project Title GSF Brief Description of Project Location Amount Source UF Minor Projects for UF 50,000 Minor projects for facilities located and education. Typical projects consist of Gainesville/ Typical projects other funding greenhouses, general

Slatton, Clint

114

Preliminary design and estimate of capital and operating costs for a production scale application of laser decontamination technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of laser ablation technology to the decontamination of radioactive metals, particularly the surfaces of equipment, is discussed. Included is information related to the design, capital and operating costs, and effectiveness of laser ablation technology, based on commercial excimer and Nd:YAG lasers, for the decontamination of production scale equipment.

Pang, Ho-ming; Edelson, M.C.

1994-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - airline operating costs Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air Traffic Management Research and Development Seminar (ATM2011) Evaluating Delay Cost Functions with Summary: RFSFS Median of FSFS ratios Rmin Median of minimum ratios...

116

Minimization of Transportation, Installation and Maintenance Operations Costs for Offshore Wind Turbines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Although it is a sustainable source and there is abundant potential for energy, cost of energy generated from offshore wind is still high compared to (more)

Faiz, Tasnim Ibn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Modernising underground compressed air DSM projects to reduce operating costs / Christiaan Johannes Roux Kriel.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Growing demand for electricity forces suppliers to expand their generation capacity. Financing these expansion programmes results in electricity cost increases above inflation rates. By reducing (more)

Kriel, Christiaan Johannes Roux

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Chapter 5 Airline Operating Costs and Measures of Productivity Learning Objectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

personnel) Materials Purchased (fuel & oil, parts, passenger food, other materials) Services Purchased airframe and engine maintenance cost, plus "burden" or overhead (hangars and spare parts inventory

119

Operating and life-cycle costs for uranium-contaminated soil treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a nuclear industry in the US required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To avoid disposal of these soils in low-level radioactive waste burial sites, increasing emphasis has been placed on the remediating soils contaminated with uranium and other radionuclides. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) evaluates and compares the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium-contaminated soils. Each technology must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives.

Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.; Stewart, R.N. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Investigation of H2 Diaphragm Compressors to Enable Low-Cost Long-Life Operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a short annual report to DOE Fuel Cell Technology Office describing the research on modeling and materials analysis of diaphragms in a diaphragm-type hydrogen compressor. The compressor design details and diaphragm materials were provided by PDC Machines, Inc., a commercial manufacturer of diaphragm-type hydrogen compressors that PNNL is partnering with in this project

Rohatgi, Aashish; Johnson, Kenneth I.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

HVAC filtration for controlling infectious airborne disease transmission in indoor environments: Predicting risk reductions and operational costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work describes and applies a methodology for estimating the impact of recirculating heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) particle filters on the control of size-resolved infectious aerosols in indoor environments using a modified version of the Wells-Riley model for predicting risks of infectious disease transmission. Estimates of risk reductions and associated operational costs of both HVAC filtration and equivalent outdoor air ventilation are modeled and compared using a case study of airborne transmission of influenza in a hypothetical office space. Overall, recirculating HVAC filtration was predicted to achieve risk reductions at lower costs of operation than equivalent levels of outdoor air ventilation, particularly for MERV 1316 filters. Medium efficiency filtration products (MERV 711) are also inexpensive to operate but appear less effective in reducing infectious disease risks.

Parham Azimi; Brent Stephens

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Energy-efficient evaporators can cut operating costs for wastewater treatment, reuse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-efficiency evaporators can substantially lower the costs of recycling water, separating and reducing waste, and reclaiming industrial byproducts. Although capital costs run higher than conventional, stream-driven systems, energy efficient designs can allow users to recoup those costs over time and provide significant, ongoing utility savings. This is especially true in applications in which evaporation requirements are more than 75,000 pounds per hour, and steam costs exceed $3 per 1,000 pounds. In conventional, multistage evaporators, vapor resulting from wastewater evaporation is reused as a heating agent to effect further evaporation, but fresh steam must be added continuously to the system to maintain adequate temperature and pressure--two factors critical to evaporation. In contrast, three energy-efficient designs maintain temperature and pressure by recycling otherwise wasted resources, thereby greatly reducing or eliminating steam costs and other utility expenses.

Kersey, D. [Dedert Corp., Olympia Fields, IL (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production from Biomass and Coal - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Darlene Steward (Primary Contact), Billy Roberts, Karen Webster National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3837 Email: Darlene.Steward@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE FY 2012 Objectives Elucidate the location-dependent variability of * infrastructure costs for biomass- and coal-based central hydrogen production and delivery and the tradeoffs inherent in plant-location choices Provide modeling output and correlations for use in other * integrated analyses and tools

124

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

125

Case Studies of Energy Information Systems and Related Technology: Operational Practices, Costs, and Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Information Systems (EIS), which can monitor and analyze building energy consumption and related data throughout the Internet, have been increasing in use over the last decade. Though EIS developers describe the capabilities, costs...

Motegi, N.; Piette, M. A.; Kinney, S.; Dewey, J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Impact of DOE Program Goals on Hydrogen Vehicles: Market Prospect, Costs, and Benefits - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Zhenhong Lin (Primary Contact), David Greene, Jing Dong Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 Phone: (865) 946-1308 Email: linz@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 2011 Project End Date: September 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Project market penetrations of hydrogen vehicles under * varied assumptions on processes of achieving the DOE program goals for fuel cells, hydrogen storage, batteries, motors, and hydrogen supply. Estimate social benefits and public costs under different *

127

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its ability to capture vapor phase Hg, however activated carbon performed relatively well. At the normal operating temperatures of 298-306 F, mercury emissions from the ESP were so low that both particulate and elemental mercury were ''not detected'' at the detection limits of the Ontario Hydro method for both baseline and injection tests. The oxidized mercury however, was 95% lower at a sorbent injection concentration of 10 lbs/MMacf compared with baseline emissions. When the flue gas temperatures were increased to a range of 343-347 F, mercury removal efficiencies were limited to <25%, even at the same sorbent injection concentration. Other tests examined the impacts of fly ash LOI, operation of the SNCR system, and flue gas temperature on the native mercury capture without sorbent injection. Listed below are the main conclusions from this program: (1) SNCR on/off test showed no beneficial effect on mercury removal caused by the SNCR system. (2) At standard operating temperatures ({approx} 300 F), reducing LOI from 30-35% to 15-20% had minimal impact on Hg removal. (3) Increasing flue gas temperatures reduced Hg removal regardless of LOI concentrations at Salem Harbor (minimum LOI was 15%). Native mercury removal started to fall off at temperatures above 320 F. ACI effectiveness for mercury removal fell off at temperatures above 340 F. (4) Test method detection limits play an important role at Salem Harbor due to the low residual emissions. Examining the proposed MA rule, both the removal efficiency and the emission concentrations will be difficult to demonstrate on an ongoing basis. (5) Under tested conditions the baseline emissions met the proposed removal efficiency for 2006, but not the proposed emission concentration. ACI can meet the more-stringent 2012 emission limits, as long as measurement detection limits are lower than the Ontario Hydro method. SCEM testing was able to verify the low emissions. For ACI to perform at this level, process conditions need to match those obtained during testing.

Michael D. Durham

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Mass-Production Cost Estimation for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Kevin Baum, Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski, Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005236 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Update 2011 automotive fuel cell cost model to include * latest performance data and system design information. Examine costs of fuel cell systems (FCSs) for light-duty * vehicle and bus applications.

129

Development of a Low-Cost 3-10 kW Tubular SOFC Power System - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Norman Bessette Acumentrics Corporation 20 Southwest Park Westwood, MA 02090 Phone: (781) 461-8251; Email: nbessette@acumentrics.com DOE Managers HQ: Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Phone: (202) 586-5463 Email: Dimitrios.Papageorgopoulos@ee.doe.gov GO: Reginald Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-03NT41838 Project Start Date: April 1, 2008 Project End Date: March 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives The goal of the project is to develop a low-cost 3-10 kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generator capable of meeting multiple market applications. This is accomplished by: Improving cell power and stability * Cost reduction of cell manufacturing

130

2014 Annual Planning Summary for the NNSA Savannah River Operations Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2014 and 2015 within the NNSA Savannah River Operations Office.

131

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Policies and Procedures for Columbia Basin Anadromous Salmonid Hatcheries, 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document outlines regional policies and procedures for hatchery operations in the Columbia River Basin. The purpose of these policies is to provide regional guidelines by which all anadromous fish hatcheries will be operated. These policies will be adopted by the fisheries co-managers, and will provide guidance to operate hatcheries in an efficient and biologically sound manner. The hatchery policies presented in this manual are not intended to establish production priorities. Rather, the intent is to guide hatchery operations once production numbers are established. Hatchery operations discussed in this report include broodstock collection, spawning, incubation of eggs, fish rearing and feeding, fish release, equipment maintenance and operations, and personnel training. Decisions regarding production priorities must be provided by fishery managers through a comprehensive plan that addresses both natural and hatchery fish production. The Integrated Hatchery Operations Team is a multi-agency group called for by the Northwest Power Planning Council. This team was directed to develop new basinwide policies for managing and operating all existing and future anadromous fish hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. The parties pledge to confer with each other and to use their authorities and resources to accomplish these mutually acceptable hatchery practices.

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (Northwest Power Planning Council, Portland, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 January 2013 Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 2018 1 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Early Release Reference case. 2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents the per-kilowatthour cost (in real dollars) of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle. Key

133

Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

DIII-D research operations. Annual report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the research on the following topics: DIII-D program overview; divertor and boundary research program; advanced tokamak studies; tokamak physics; operations; program development; support services; contribution to ITER physics R&D; and collaborative efforts.

Baker, D. [ed.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

H-coal pilot plant. Phase II. Construction. Phase III. Operation. Annual report No. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of DOE Oak Ridge, ASFI agreed to assume responsibility for completion of Plant construction in December, 1979, at which time Badger Plants' on-site work was ended. This construction effort consisted of electric heat tracing and insulation of piping and instrumentation. At the close of the reporting period the work was completed, or was projected to be completed, within the ASFI budgeted amounts and by dates that will not impact Plant operations. Engineering design solutions were completed for problems encountered with such equipment as the High Pressure Letdown Valves; Slurry Block Valves; Slurry Pumps; the Bowl Mill System; the Dowtherm System; and the Ebullating Pump. A Corrosion Monitoring Program was established. With the exception of Area 500, the Antisolvent Deashing Unit, all operating units were commissioned and operated during the reporting period. Coal was first introduced into the Plant on May 29, 1980, with coal operations continuing periodically through September 30, 1980. The longest continuous coal run was 119 hours. A total of 677 tons of Kentucky No. 11 Coal were processed during the reporting period. The problems encountered were mechanical, not process, in nature. Various Environmental and Health programs were implemented to assure worker safety and protection and to obtain data from Plant operations for scientific analysis. These comprehensive programs will contribute greatly in determining the acceptability of long term H-Coal Plant operations.

Not Available

1981-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

136

Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1996 annual report. Volume 10, Number 3: Technical training  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during 1996. The report is published in three parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1996 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from CY 1980 through 1996. NUREG-1272, Vol. 10, No. 3, covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in support of the NRC`s mission in 1996.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1992 annual report: Power reactors. Volume 7, No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1992. The report is published in two separate parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 7, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance, measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year, and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event report% diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. The reports contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports for that group of licensees. NUREG-1272, Vol. 7, No. 2, covers nonreactors and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1992 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued for 1984--1992.

none,

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Dealing With Load and Generation Cost Uncertainties in Power System Operation Studies: A Fuzzy Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power systems are currently facing a change of the paradigm that determined their operation and planning while being surrounded by multiple uncertainties sources. As a consequence, dealing with uncertainty is ...

Bruno Andr Gomes; Joo Tom Saraiva

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Capturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft Operating Costs with Engineering and Econometric Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft OperatingCapturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft Operatingare in part due to fuel price uncertainty. To address this

Smirti Ryerson, Megan; Hansen, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brayton Point Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of the impacts of future mercury regulations to Brayton Point Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has variable (29-75%) native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables and activated carbon on mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included: (1) Plant and PG&E National Energy Group corporate personnel; (2) Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); (3) United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL); (4) ADA-ES, Inc.; (5) NORIT Americas, Inc.; (6) Apogee Scientific, Inc.; (7) TRC Environmental Corporation; (8) URS Corporation; (9) Quinapoxet Solutions; (10) Energy and Environmental Strategies (EES); and (11) Reaction Engineering International (REI). The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall, the objectives of this field test program were to determine the impact of activated carbon injection on mercury control and balance-of-plant processes on Brayton Point Unit 1. Brayton Point Unit 1 is a 250-MW unit that fires a low-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. Particulate control is achieved by two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in series. The full-scale tests were conducted on one-half of the flue gas stream (nominally 125 MW). Mercury control sorbents were injected in between the two ESPs. The residence time from the injection grid to the second ESP was approximately 0.5 seconds. In preparation for the full-scale tests, 12 different sorbents were evaluated in a slipstream of flue gas via a packed-bed field test apparatus for mercury adsorption. Results from these tests were used to determine the five carbon-based sorbents that were tested at full-scale. Conditions of interest that were varied included SO{sub 3} conditioning on/off, injection concentrations, and distribution spray patterns. The original test plan called for parametric testing of NORIT FGD carbon at 1, 3, and 10 lbs/MMacf. These injection concentrations were estimated based on results from the Pleasant Prairie tests that showed no additional mercury removal when injection concentrations were increased above 10 lbs/MMacf. The Brayton Point parametric test data indicated that higher injection concentrations would achieve higher removal efficiencies and should be tested. The test plan was altered to include testing at 20 lbs/MMacf. The first test at this higher rate showed very high removal across the second ESP (>80%). Unlike the ''ceiling'' phenomenon witnessed at Pleasant Prairie, increasing sorbent injection concentration resulted in further capture of vapor-phase mercury. The final phase of field-testing was a 10-day period of continuous injection of NORIT FGD carbon. During the first five days, the injection concentration was held at 10 lbs/MMacf, followed by nominally five days of testing at an injection concentration of 20 lbs/MMacf. The mercury removal, as measured by the semi-continuous emission monitors (S-CEM), varied between 78% and 95% during the 10 lbs/MMacf period and increased to >97% when the injection concentration was increased to 20 lbs/MMacf. During the long-term testing period, mercury measurements following EPA's draft Ontario Hydro method were conducted by TRC Environmental Corporation at both 10 and 20 lbs/MMacf test conditions. The Ontario Hydro data showed that the particulate mercury removal was similar between the two conditions of 10 or 20 lbs/MMacf and removal efficiencies were greater than 99%. Elemental mercury was not detected in any samples, so no conclusions as to its removal can be drawn. Removal of oxidized mercury, on the other hand, increased from 68% to 93% with the higher injection concentration. These removal rates agreed well with the S-CEM results.

Michael D. Durham

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Annual Conference of the Prognostics and Health Management Society, 2009 Towards Verification of Operational Procedures using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Operational Procedures using Auto-Generated Diagnostic Trees Tolga Kurtoglu1 , Robyn Lutz2 , and Ann Patterson the development of general procedures that describe a detailed set of instructions capturing how mission tasks of the scientific mission objectives are highly dependent on the correctness of procedures. In this paper, we

Lutz, Robyn R.

142

16.2 - Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plans for Cost-Reimbursement, Non-Management and Operating Contracts  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chapter 16.2 (July 2012) Chapter 16.2 (July 2012) 1 Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plans for Cost-Reimbursement, Non- Management and Operating Contracts [Reference: FAR 6, FAR 16, FAR 22, FAR 32, FAR 46, DEAR 915.404-4-72, DEAR 916.405-2, DEAR 970.1504-1, and Acquisition Guide Chapter 16.1] Overview The policy of the DOE is to maximize contractor performance and to align costs with performance through the use of performance-based management as a strategic contract management tool to plan for, manage, and evaluate contractor performance. An important function of contract administration is the ability, or the opportunity, to manage the environment within which the contracted effort is proceeding and, most importantly, to facilitate adjustments to that effort to meet the demand and changes as

143

High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Dr. Katherine Ayers (Primary Contact), Andy Roemer Proton Energy Systems d/b/a Proton OnSite 10 Technology Drive Wallingford, CT 06492 Phone: (203) 678-2190 Email: kayers@protononsite.com DOE Managers HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov GO: Dave Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE000276 Subcontractors: * Entegris, Inc., Chaska, MN * The Electrochemical Engine Center at Penn State, University Park, PA * Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Project Start Date: September 1, 2009

144

PEM Electrolyzer Incorporating an Advanced Low-Cost Membrane - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Monjid Hamdan (Primary Contact), Tim Norman Giner, Inc. (Formerly Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC.) 89 Rumford Ave. Newton, MA 02466 Phone: (781) 529-0526 Email: mhamdan@ginerinc.com DOE Managers HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO18065 Subcontractors: * Virginia Polytechnic Institute and University, Blacksburg, VA * Parker Hannifin Ltd domnick hunter Division, Hemel Hempstead, United Kingdom Project Start Date: May 1, 2008

145

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During fiscal year 1993, the reserves generated $440 million in revenues, a $33 million decrease from the fiscal year 1992 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $207 million, resulting in net cash flow of $233 million, compared with $273 million in fiscal year 1992. From 1976 through fiscal year 1993, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated $15.7 billion in revenues for the US Treasury, with expenses of $2.9 billion. The net revenues of $12.8 billion represent a return on costs of 441 percent. See figures 2, 3, and 4. In fiscal year 1993, production at the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 25 million barrels of crude oil, 123 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 158 million gallons of natural gas liquids. The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves has embarked on an effort to identify additional hydrocarbon resources on the reserves for future production. In 1993, in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, the Department initiated a project to assess the oil and gas potential of the program`s oil shale reserves, which remain largely unexplored. These reserves, which total a land area of more than 145,000 acres and are located in Colorado and Utah, are favorably situated in oil and gas producing regions and are likely to contain significant hydrocarbon deposits. Alternatively the producing assets may be sold or leased if that will produce the most value. This task will continue through the first quarter of fiscal year 1994.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

147

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - I: DUPIC Fuel Fabrication Cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary conceptual design of a Direct Use of spent Pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel In Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel fabrication plant was studied, which annually converts spent PWR fuel of 400 tonnes heavy element (HE) into CANDU fuel. The capital and operating costs were estimated from the viewpoint of conceptual design. Assuming that the annual discount rate is 5% during the construction (5 yr) and operation period (40 yr) and contingency is 25% of the capital cost, the levelized unit cost (LUC) of DUPIC fuel fabrication was estimated to be 616 $/kg HE, which is mostly governed by annual operation and maintenance costs that correspond to 63% of LUC. Among the operation and maintenance cost components being considered, the waste disposal cost has the dominant effect on LUC ({approx}49%). From sensitivity analyses of production capacity, discount rate, and contingency, it was found that the production capacity of the plant is the major parameter that affects the LUC.

Choi, Hangbok; Ko, Won Il; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

High Speed, Low Cost Fabrication of Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Membrane Electrode Assemblies - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Emory S. De Castro BASF Fuel Cell, Inc. 39 Veronica Avenue Somerset, NJ 08873 Phone: (732) 545-5100 ext 4114 Email: Emory.DeCastro@BASF.com DOE Managers HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000384 Subcontractor: Dr. Vladimir Gurau Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio Project Start Date: July 1, 2009 Project End Date: June 30, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Reduce cost in fabricating gas diffusion electrodes * through the introduction of high speed coating technology, with a focus on materials used for the high- temperature membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs)

149

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

150

Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8: Annual HVAC Source Energy, Cost, and Savings ProjectionsStatewide HVAC Source Energy, Cost, and Savings Projections23 Table 8: Annual HVAC Source Energy, Cost, and Savings

Rainer, Leo I.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Apte, Michael G.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, William J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program : Facility Operation and Maintenance Facilities, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anadromous salmonid stocks have declined in both the Grande Ronde River Basin (Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Status Review Symposium 1998) and in the entire Snake River Basin (Nehlsen et al. 1991), many to the point of extinction. The Grande Ronde River Basin historically supported large populations of fall and spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), and coho (O. kisutch) salmon and steelhead trout (O. mykiss) (Nehlsen et al. 1991). The decline of chinook salmon and steelhead populations and extirpation of coho and sockeye salmon in the Grande Ronde River Basin was, in part, a result of construction and operation of hydroelectric facilities, over fishing, and loss and degradation of critical spawning and rearing habitat in the Columbia and Snake River basins (Nehlsen et al. 1991). Hatcheries were built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) to compensate for losses of anadromous salmonids due to the construction and operation of the lower four Snake River dams. Lookingglass Hatchery (LGH) on Lookingglass Creek, a tributary of the Grande Ronde River, was completed under LSRCP in 1982 and has served as the main incubation and rearing site for chinook salmon programs for Grande Ronde and Imnaha rivers in Oregon. Despite these hatchery programs, natural spring chinook populations continued to decline resulting in the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listing Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon as ''threatened'' under the federal Endangered Species Act (1973) on 22 April 1992. Continuing poor escapement levels and declining population trends indicated that Grande Ronde River basin spring chinook salmon were in imminent danger of extinction. These continuing trends led fisheries co-managers in the basin to initiate the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program (GRESCSSP) in order to prevent extinction and preserve options for use of endemic fish stocks in future artificial propagation programs. The GRESCSSP was implemented in three Grande Ronde River basin tributaries; the Lostine and upper Grande Ronde rivers and Catherine Creek. The GRESCSSP employs two broodstock strategies utilizing captive and conventional brood sources. The captive brood program began in 1995, with the collection of parr from the three tributary areas. The conventional broodstock component of the program began in 1997 with the collection of natural adults returning to these tributary areas. Although LGH was available as the primary production facility for spring chinook programs in the Grande Ronde Basin, there were never any adult or juvenile satellite facilities developed in the tributary areas that were to be supplemented. An essential part of the GRESCSSP was the construction of adult traps and juvenile acclimation facilities in these tributary areas. Weirs were installed in 1997 for the collection of adult broodstock for the conventional component of the program. Juvenile facilities were built in 2000 for acclimation of the smolts produced by the captive and conventional broodstock programs and as release sites within the natural production areas of their natal streams. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) operate both the juvenile acclimation and adult trapping facilities located on Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River under this project. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) operate the facilities on the Lostine River under a sister project. Hatcheries were also built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the LSRCP to compensate for losses of summer steelhead due to the construction and operation of the lowest four Snake River dams. Despite these harvest-driven hatchery programs, natural summer steelhead populations continued to decline as evidenced by declining counts at Lower Granite Dam since 1995 (Columbia River Data Access in Real Time, DART) and low steelhead redd counts on index streams in the Grande Ronde Basin. Because of low escapement the Snake River summer steelhead were listed as threat

McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Effects of Technology Cost Parameters on Hydrogen Pathway Succession - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Mark F. Ruth* (Primary Contact), Victor Diakov*, Brian James † , Julie Perez ‡ , Andrew Spisak † *National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Pkwy. Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 817-6160 Email: Mark.Ruth@nrel.gov and Victor.Diakov@nrel.gov † Strategic Analysis, Inc. ‡ New West Technologies DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: Strategic Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA Project Start Date: February 1, 2009 Project End Date: October 31, 2011 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop a macro-system model (MSM): * Aimed at performing rapid cross-cutting analysis - Utilizing and linking other models - Improving consistency between models -

153

Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1994 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities are still seen on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

Schmidt, J.; Fassett, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; Johnson, V.G.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.; Moss, K.J.; Perkins, C.J.; Richterich, L.R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report, 1992. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site for 1992. Monitoring and surveillance on and around the NTS by DOE contractors and Site user organizations during 1992 indicated that underground nuclear testing operations were conducted in compliance with regulations, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.15 percent of the guideline for air exposure. All 1992 nuclear events took place during the first three quarters of the calendar year prior to the Congressional testing moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from test operations was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated maximum effective dose equivalent offsite would have been 0.012 mrem. Any person receiving this dose was also exposed to 78 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped to EPA-approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Non-NTS support facilities complied with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

Black, S.C.; Latham, A.R.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

BCP Annual Rate Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2013 BCP Annual Rate Process 2013 BCP Annual Rate Process Informal Process Rate Activity Schedule (doc) Informal Customer Meeting Thursday March 6, 2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms 3&4 Informal Customer Meeting Presentation (Pdf) PRS Executive Summary (Mar 07, 2013) (Pdf) FY2014 Final Ten Year Operating Plan PRS Executive Summary (PDF) FORM for Foreign Visits (doc) Formal Process Initial Federal Register Notice (pdf) Public Information Forum March 27,2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms3&4 Customer Meeting Presentation PIF Presentation (PPT) Presentation Details (pdf) Reclamation Fund Status Report PIF PRS Executive Summary (pdf) PIF Transcripts (PDF) Visitor Center Cost Analysis Questions - Responses Public Comment Forum April 10, 2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms3&4 PCF Transcripts Customer Letters

156

US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by DOE contractors and NTS user organizations during 1993 indicated that operations on the NTS were conducted in compliance with applicable federal and DOE guidelines, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.04 percent of the 10 mrem per year guide for air exposure. No nuclear tests were conducted due to the moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from diffusion, evaporation of effluents, or resuspension was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual offsite would have been 0.004 mrem. Any person receiving this dose would also have received 97 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped offsite to approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Support facilities at off-NTS locations compiled with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program; Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance, 2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There were 2 acclimation periods at the Catherine Creek Acclimation Facility (CCAF) in 2005. During the early acclimation period, 130,748 smolts were delivered from Lookingglass Hatchery (LGH) on 7 March. This group contained progeny of both the captive (53%) and conventional broodstock programs. The size of the fish at delivery was 23.9 fish/lb. Volitional releases began 14 March 2005 and ended 27 March with an estimated total (based on PIT tag detections of 3,187) of 29,402 fish leaving the raceways. This was 22.5% of the total fish delivered. Fish remaining in the raceways after volitional release were forced out. Hourly detections of PIT-tagged fish showed that most of the fish left around 1900 hours. The size of the fish just before the volitional release was 23.9 and the size of the fish remaining just before the forced release was 23.2 fish/lb. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 204 (0.16%). The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility during the early period was 130,544. During the second acclimation period 59,100 smolts were delivered from LGH on 28 March. This group was comprised entirely of progeny from the conventional broodstock program. The size of the fish at delivery was 21.8 fish/lb. Volitional releases began 3 April 2005 and ended with a force out emergency release on 7 April. The size of the fish just before the volitional release was 21.8. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 64 (0.11 %). The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility during the late period was 59,036. There was only 1 planned acclimation period at the Upper Grande Ronde Acclimation Facility (UGRAF) in 2005. During the early acclimation period 105,418 smolts were delivered from LGH on 8 March. This group was comprised entirely of progeny from the conventional broodstock program. The size of the fish at delivery was 21.0 fish/lb. There was no volitional release in 2005 due to freezing air and water conditions prompting an early release. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 49 (0.05 %). The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility during the late period was 105,369. Maintenance and repair activities were conducted at the acclimation facilities in 2005. Facility maintenance work consisted of snow removal, installation of drainage lines, removal of gravel from intake area, installation of new gate at the CCAF, and complete overhaul of 2 travel trailers. The Catherine Creek Adult Capture Facility (CCACF) was put into operation on 11 February 2005. The first adult summer steelhead was captured on 4 March. A total of 190 adult summer steelhead were trapped and released from 4 March to 16 May 2005. Peak arrival at the trap was the week of 8 April. The first adult spring Chinook salmon was captured at CCACF on 6 May 2005. A total of 226 spring Chinook salmon were trapped from 6 May to 8 July 2005. There were 56 adults and 4 jacks unmarked and 136 adult and 30 jack marked spring Chinook salmon trapped. Peak arrival at the trap was the week of 10 June for the unmarked and marked fish. None of the captive broodstock returns were collected for broodstock. Broodstock was collected systematically over the entire return from 31 May to 6 July 2005. Ten of the 34 broodstock collected and transported from CCACF to LGH were unmarked fish trapped. About 18% of the naturally produced adult males and females trapped were taken to LGH for broodstock. One jack was collected for every 5 adult males that were taken to LGH. A total of 30 age 4 and 5 and 4 age 3 fish were transported to LGH for broodstock. The hatchery component of the broodstock was 66.7%. Five weekly spawning surveys were conducted below the weir on Catherine Creek beginning 30 June 2005. During these surveys no live or dead fish were observed. The trap was removed from Catherine Creek on 3 August 2005. Temperatures at the CCACF ranged from -0.1 C on 14 February to 23.7 C on 21 July. The hourly temperatures at the adult trap during the period of operation showed that the lowest water temperatures

McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Annual Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Annual Reports Annual Reports Annual Reports OHA Annual Reports Available for Download January 1, 2013 OHA 2012 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2011 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA). Here are highlights for the past year: September 30, 2011 OHA 2011 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2011 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 30, 2010 OHA 2010 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2010 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 8, 2009 OHA 2009 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2009 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 30, 2008 OHA 2008 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2008 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 30, 2007 OHA 2007 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2007 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals

159

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation CTS 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference costs #12;Potential Applications · Roadway Project Feasibility Studies ­ Identified potential roadway infrastructure improvement ­ Documentation of estimated project costs ­ Determine property assessments

Minnesota, University of

160

Assigning research and development costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Development Cost Components RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COSTS IN FINANCIAL STATEMENTS . 10 Capitalization Basis for Reporting Research and Development Costs Revenue Basis for Reporting Research and Development Costs Reasons Why Most Companies Expense... PRACTICE WITH ACCOUNTING THEORY Unknown Results at the End of an Accounting Period Uncertain Useful Life of Results. . . . . . . . . . . . . Recurrence of Annual Costs Permissive Feature of the Internal Revenue Code Uniform Amounts of Annual Costs...

Edwards, Wendell Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 38. Average Consumption and Annual Cost of Natural Gas per Consumer by State, 1967-1989 Table State Residential Commercial...

162

OHA 2011 ANNUAL REPORT | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 ANNUAL REPORT 1 ANNUAL REPORT OHA 2011 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2011 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA). Here are highlights for the past year: Alternative DisputeResolution. In FY 2011, we were happy to welcome aboard the DOE's Office of Conflict Resolution and Prevention (OCPR), which joined OHA in February 2011. OCPR, formerly a part of the Office of General Counsel, serves as a resource to all DOE components and contractors to explore efficient and cost effective means of preventing conflicts and resolving disputes, without the formalities or costs of litigation. Personnel security hearings. Under DOE's personnel security program, OHA conducts administrative hearings concerning individuals' eligibility for access to classified information or special nuclear material. In FY

163

Annual Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Annual Reports Services » Annual Reports Annual Reports Annual Reports December 28, 2012 Southeastern Power Administration 2012 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs,accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2011, and ending September 30, 2012. December 31, 2011 Southeastern Power Administration 2011 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2010, and ending September 31, 2011. December 27, 2010 Southeastern Power Administration 2010 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2009,

164

Monthly/Annual Energy Review - nuclear section  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Monthly and latest annual statistics on nuclear electricity capacity, generation, and number of operable nuclear reactors.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment PHEV Battery Cost Assessment 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

166

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment PHEV Battery Cost Assessment 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

167

DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the Department of Energy, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by General Atomics for the U.S. Department of Energy. The DIII-D is the most flexible and best diagnosed tokamak in the world and the second largest tokamak in the U.S. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data needed by ITER and to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The DIII-D long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY92 the DIII-D research program concentrated in three major areas: Tokamak Physics, Divertor and Boundary Physics, and Advanced Tokamak Studies.

Simonen, T.C.; Baker, D. [eds.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the Department of Energy, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by, General Atomics (GA) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DIII-D is the most flexible tokamak in the world. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data needed by International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The DIII-D long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of an advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY92 the DIII-D research program concentrated on three major areas: Divertor and Boundary Physics, Advanced Tokamak Studies, and Tokamak Physics.

Baker, D. [ed.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Annual Report 2008.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cold War FY08 Annual Summary Report Cold War FY08 Annual Summary Report Page 1 of 14 Savannah River Site (SRS) Cold War Built Environment Historic Preservation Annual Summary Report Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 October 2008 Prepared by: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Operations Office (SR) SRS Cold War FY08 Annual Summary Report Page 2 of 14 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page BASIS.............................................................................................3

170

Steam driven centrifugal pump for low cost boiler feed service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes a steam driven centrifugal pump for boiler feed-water and other high pressure water applications, which was awarded Top Honors in the special pumps category of the 1982 Chemical processing Vaaler competition, because the simple design with turbine, pump and controls combined in an integral unit provides high operating efficiency and reliable performance with minimal maintenance. Single source responsibility for all components when the pump may have to be serviced is another advantage. These features meet the requirements for boiler feed pumps that are critical to maintaining a consistent steam supply in a process plant where downtime can be extremely expensive. The annual cost to operate the pump for 8000 hours is about $100,000, if electricity costs 5 cents/kwh. These pumps can be run for about $30,000 on steam, if natural gas costs $4.00/mcf. Cost savings are $70,000 annually.

Not Available

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) a market for district heating and process heat. Time series for the wind power production rely on timeA Stochastic Unit-Commitment Model to Estimate the Costs of Changing Power Plant Operation under High Amounts of Intermittent Wind Power Integration Meibom, P.1 , Brand, H.2 , Barth, R.2 and Weber, C

172

Silica Scale Management: Lowering Operating Costs through Improved Scale Control, and Adding Value by Extracting Marketable By-Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are using laboratory and field experiments to design modeling tools and technology that will improve silica scale management practices in geothermal plants. Our work will help to lower operating costs through improved scale prediction and add new revenue streams from sale of mineral byproducts extracted from geothermal fluids. Improving the economics and effectiveness of scale control programs and/or extraction systems in geothermal operations requires a coupled kinetic-thermodynamic model of silica behavior. Silica scale precipitation is a multi-step process, involving a nucleation-related induction period, aqueous polymerization, condensation of polymers to form colloids, and deposition onto a solid surface. Many chemical and physical variables influence the rates of these steps and their impacts must be quantified and predictable in order to optimally control silica behavior. To date, in laboratory studies, we have quantified the effects on silica polymerization of the following set of chemical variables: Na at 500 and 2000 ppm, pH values from 5 to 9, temperatures of 25 and 50 C, and silica saturation values from 1.2 to 6 at initial dissolved silica concentrations of 600 ppm. Lowering pH both increases the induction time prior to polymerization and decreases the polymerization rate. We have successfully used a multiple regression model to predict polymerization rates from these variables. Geothermal fluids contain significant dissolved concentrations of potentially valuable mineral resources such as zinc, lithium, cesium and rubidium, but silica fouling interferes with traditional extraction methods. We are developing customized and new technologies to extract the silica as a commercial-grade commodity as well as the valuable metals. We are conducting field testing of some of these techniques at a Mammoth, CA geothermal plant using a reverse osmosis unit to concentrate the fluid, adding a commercial agglomerating agent to promote silica precipitation, and then removing the silica using a tangential flow ultrafilter. The particle size, surface area and trace impurities of the silica are characterized for comparison with commercial-grade silica products. We are also testing ion exchange resins and other functionalized materials to extract potentially economic concentrations of lithium, cesium, and rubidium that are enriched in the reverse osmosis concentrate.

Burton, E A; Bourcier, W L; Wallce, A; Bruton, C J; Leif, R

2003-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

173

Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology Comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cost of ownership analysis identifies the factors impacting the value proposition for fuel cell backup power and presents the estimated annualized cost of ownership for fuel cell backup power systems compared with the incumbent technologies of battery and diesel generator systems. The analysis compares three different backup power technologies (diesel, battery, and fuel cell) operating in similar circumstances in four run time scenarios (8, 52, 72, and 176 hours).

Kurtz, J.; Saur, G.; Sprik, S.; Ainscough, C.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Dynamic Analysis of Hybrid Energy Systems under Flexible Operation and Variable Renewable Generation -- Part I: Dynamic Performance Analysis and Part II: Dynamic Cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic analysis of hybrid energy systems (HES) under flexible operation and variable renewable generation is considered in order to better understand various challenges and opportunities associated with the high system variability arising from the integration of renewable energy into the power grid. Unique consequences are addressed by devising advanced HES solutions in which multiple forms of energy commodities, such as electricity and chemical products, may be exchanged. Dynamic models of various unit operations are developed and integrated within two different HES options. One HES option, termed traditional, produces electricity only and consists of a primary heat generator (PHG) (e.g., a small modular reactor), a steam turbine generator, a wind farm, and a battery storage. The other HES option, termed advanced, includes not only the components present in the traditional option but also a chemical plant complex to repurpose excess energy for non-electricity services, such as for the production of chemical goods (e.g., transportation fuel). In either case, a given HES is connected to the power grid at a point of common coupling and requested to deliver a certain electricity generation profile as dictated by a regional power grid operator based on a predicted demand curve. Dynamic analysis of these highly-coupled HES are performed to identify their key dynamical properties and limitations and to prescribe solutions for best managing and mitigating the high variability introduced from incorporating renewable energy into the energy mix. A comparative dynamic cost analysis is also conducted to determine best HES options. The cost function includes a set of metrics for computing fixed costs, such as fixed operations and maintenance (O&M) and overnight capital costs, and also variable operational costs, such as cost of variability, variable O&M cost, and cost of environmental impact, together with revenues. Assuming different options for implementing PHG (e.g., natural gas, coal, nuclear), preliminary results identify the level of renewable penetration at which a given advanced HES option (e.g., a nuclear hybrid) becomes increasingly more economical than a traditional electricity-only generation solution. Conditions are also revealed under which carbon resources may be better utilized as carbon sources for chemical production rather than as combustion material for electricity generation.

Humberto E. Garcia; Amit Mohanty; Wen-Chiao Lin; Robert S. Cherry

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Development of a low-cost black-liquid solar collector, Phase II. Second semi-annual report, March 1, 1980-August 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Battelle's Columbus Laboratories (BCL) is continuing its research effort to develop an efficient, low-temperature, low-cost, flat-plate black-liquid solar collector. The research efforts during this second 6-month period of Phase II have been directed toward (1) evaluating the long-term durability of various plastic materials and solar collector designs, (2) obtaining sufficient outdoor performance data to design a full-scale demonstration of a black-liquid solar collector for a commercial application, (3) working closely with a company willing to commercialize black liquid plastic collectors, and (4) incorporating improved black liquids with the identified plastic collector designs. Besides conducting indoor weathering tests of various plastic materials, two outdoor automated test facilities have been operated. One unit has been in use since February 1980 at Battelle in Columbus, Ohio, and the other unit began operation in May 1980 at Ramada Energy Systems, Inc., a collector manufacturing company near Phoenix, Arizona. Since Ramada Energy Systems has been working with extruded polycarbonate panels, Battelle has been working to date with extruded acrylic panel designs. Other potential plastics for solar collectors are being evaluated by exposure testing.

Landstrom, D.K.; Talbert, S.G.; McGinniss, V.D.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Annual GHG Emissions (lbs of CO2) Vehicle Cost Calculator See Assumptions and Methodology Back Next U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Get Widget Code...

177

Cost Study Manual  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

178

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

R&D Annual Progress Report 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Production using the Twin Roll Casting Process and Asymmetric Rolling...

179

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates...

180

Annual Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Occupational Radiation Exposure Occupational Radiation Exposure Home Welcome What's New Register Dose History Request Data File Submittal REMS Data Selection HSS Logo Annual Reports User Survey on the Annual Report Please take the time to complete a survey on the Annual Report. Your input is important to us! The 2012 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2011 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2010 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2009 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2008 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2007 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2006 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2005 Annual Report

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Annual Report Curtin University of Technology Annual Report 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report 2006 #12;#12;Curtin University of Technology Annual Report 2006 Chancellor's Foreword ........................................................................................................................ 2 Vice-Chancellor's Report ................................................................................................... 25 Report on Operations 28 Governance of the University

182

Annual Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annual Reports science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Annual Reports x Strategic Plan Annual Report - 2011 (pdf) Advancing Science for National Security See more Los...

183

Life Cycle Cost Estimate  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

184

Productivity and cost of harvesting a stemwood biomass product from integrated cut-to-length harvest operations in Australian Pinus radiata plantations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Significant quantities of woody biomass from the tops of trees and larger woody waste pieces that fall outside existing sawlog and pulpwood specifications are left on site post final harvest in Australian radiata Pinus radiata (D. Don) (radiata pine) plantations. Woody biomass is a potential product for pulp making or energy generation. Commercial use of woody biomass from radiata pine plantations would add extra value to the Australian plantation estate through improved resource utilisation, and potentially reduced post-harvesting silvicultural costs. This study investigated the productivity and cost impact of the harvest and extraction to roadside of woody biomass in an integrated harvest operation in a typical Australian two machine (harvester/processor and forwarder), cut-to-length, clearfall operation in a mature, thinned radiata pine plantation. The harvest operation yielded 23GMt/ha (5% of the total yield) of woody biomass (known as fibreplus), 443GMt/ha of sawlogs and 28GMt/ha of pulpwood. The mean quantity of biomass left on site was 128GMt/ha, mainly consisting of branches and needles, sufficient to minimise nutrient loss and protect the soil from erosion. Woodchips derived from the fibreplus product were suitable for kraft pulp making, (when blended in small amounts with clean de-barked roundwood woodchips), and for energy generation. The method trialed with the fibreplus product being produced did not impact harvesting and processing productivity and costs, but extraction was 14% less productive. Through analysis of the productivities of each phase and development of a cost model the harvest and extraction of the fibreplus product was estimated to increase total unit costs by ?4.9%.

D. Walsh; M. Strandgard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Performance and Costs of CO2 Capture at Gas Fired Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarises the results from a study that assesses the performance and costs of natural gas fired combined cycle power plants with CCS. Information is provided on the designs of each of the plants, their power output, efficiency, greenhouse gas intensity, capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, levelised costs of electricity and costs of CO2 avoidance. Discussion and commentary on the key findings and recommendations is also included. The paper includes information on base load plant performance and costs, but part load performance and costs of operation at low annual capacity factors are also presented because operation at lower load factors may be necessary, particularly in future electricity systems that include high amounts of other low-CO2 generation plants.

Neil Smith; Geoff Miller; Indran Aandi; Richard Gadsden; John Davison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Operational Safety, Health and Environment Division: Quality assessment program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 27th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXVII) that were received on or before December 3, 1987. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the Quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed, at first Quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML's results and are reported back to the participation contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

Sanderson, C.G.; Feiner, M.S.

1988-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

187

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Operational Safety, Health and Environment Division, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 32nd set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXXII) that were received on or before June 5, 1990. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML's results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer. This is the 39th report of this program.

Sanderson, C.G.; Scarpitta, S.C.

1990-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

188

Energy-Smart Building Choices: How School Facilities Managers and Business Officials Are Reducing Operating Costs and Saving Money  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most K-12 schools could save 25% of their energy costs by being smart about energy. Nationwide, the savings potential is $6 billion. While improving energy use in buildings and busses, schools are likely to create better places for teaching and learning, with better lighting, temperature control, acoustics, and air quality. This brochure, targeted to school facilities managers and business officials, describes how schools can become more energy efficient.

Energy Smart Schools Team

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

189

Energy-Smart Building Choices: How School Facilities Managers and Business Officials Are Reducing Operating Costs and Saving Money (Revision)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operating a typical school today is no easy task for facilities managers and business officials. You're expected to deliver increased services with constrained operating budgets. Many schools stay open for longer hours to accommodate community use of the facilities. Dilapidated buildings and systems gobble up energy, yet in many districts, maintenance needs are overshadowed by the need for expansion or new construction to serve growing student populations and changing educational needs.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Operations Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Volume IV of IV; Washington: Rocky Reach Hatchery Addendum, 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rocky Reach Hatchery is located along the Columbia Paver, just downstream from Rocky Reach Dam. Site elevation is 800 feet above sea level. The Turtle Rock Island facility, located 2 miles upstream, is operated as a satellite facility (shared with the Washington Department of Wildlife). The facility is staffed with 2.75 FTE`S. The hatchery was originally designed as a mile-long spawning channel at Turtle Rock Island. Rearing units consist of eight vinyl raceways at Rocky Reach and four rearing ponds at Turtle Rock. Water rights are held by Chelan County PUD and total 3,613 gpm from the Columbia River. Water available for use in the Turtle Rock rearing ponds averages 12,000 gpm from the Columbia River. Rocky Reach Hatchery and the Turtle Rock satellite facility are owned by Chelan County PUD. They are operated as mitigation facilities for the fishery impacts caused by the construction and operation of Rocky Reach Dam. Rocky Reach Hatchery is used for incubation and early rearing of upriver bright (URB) fall chinook. Fingerlings are later transferred to the Turtle Rock facility for final rearing and release.

Peck, Larry

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

2005 TEPP Annual Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transportation Emergency Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2005 Annual Report Special thanks to participants in the Haralson County, Georgia and Leigh Valley International Airport, Pennsylvania exercises who are featured on the front cover of this report. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2005 Annual Report Table of Contents Executive Summary ..................................................................................................1 I. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Purpose ......................3 II. Training ............................................................................................................3 III. TEPP Central Operations .................................................................................5

192

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options in ISEEM Global Energy Model: 2010-2050 Scenario Analysis for Least-Cost Carbon Reduction in Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quantify production, energy and cost characteristics of ironCost Total O&M Cost Energy Cost Raw Material Cost AnnualCost Total O&M Cost Energy Cost (other than Coking Coal and

Karali, Nihan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Lower Cost Carbon Fiber Precursors | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lower Cost Carbon Fiber Precursors Lower Cost Carbon Fiber Precursors 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June...

194

AVTA Vehicle Component Cost Model | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vehicle Component Cost Model AVTA Vehicle Component Cost Model 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010...

195

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

196

PHEV and LEESS Battery Cost Assessment | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

PHEV and LEESS Battery Cost Assessment PHEV and LEESS Battery Cost Assessment 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

197

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Management Group Annual Report 1997 #12;Data Management Group Annual Report 1997 A co-operative project that is jointly funded by members of the Toronto Area Transportation Planning Data Collection: (416) 978-3941 #12;Data Management Group 1997 Annual Report Table of Contents 1 INTRODUCTION

Toronto, University of

198

Sensitivity Analysis of H2-Vehicles' Market Prospects, Costs and Benefits - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program David L. Greene (Primary Contact), Zhenhong Lin, Jing Dong Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 Phone: (865) 946-1310 Email: dlgreene@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Subcontractor: Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN Project Start Date: October, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Project market shares of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles * (FCVs) under varying market conditions using the Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) model.

199

Cost-benefits of a mobile, trailer-contained, vibratory finishing decontamination facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine the cost-benefits of a vibratory finishing process, developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which has been used successfully to remove a variety of transuranic (TRU) contaminants from surfaces of metallic and nonmetallic wastes. Once TRU contaminants are removed, the metallic and nonmetallic materials can be disposed of as low-level waste (LLW). Otherwise, these materials would be disposed of in geologic repositories. This study provides an economic evaluation of the vibratory finishing process as a possible method for use in decontaminating and decommissioning retired facilities at Hanford and oher sites. Specifically, the economic evaluation focuses on a scoping design for a mobile, trailer-contained facility, which could be used in the field in conjunction with decontamination and decommissioning operations. The capital cost of the mobile facility is estimated to be about $1.09 million including contingency and working capital. Annual operating costs, including disposal costs, are estimated to be $440,000 for processing about 6340 ft/sup 3//yr of pre-sectioned, TRU-contaminated material. Combining the operating cost and the capital cost, annualized at a discount rate of 10%, the total annual cost estimate is $602,000. The unit cost for vibratory finishing is estimated to be about $11/ft/sup 3/ of original reference glove box volume (Abrams et at. 1980). All costs are in first quarter 1981 dollars. Although not directly comparable, the unit cost for the vibratory finishing process is very favorable when considered beside typical, substantially higher, unit costs for processing and geologically disposing of TUR-contaminated materials. The probable accuracy of this study cost estimate is about +- 30%. It is therefore recommended that a detailed cost estimate be prepared if a mobile facility is designed.

Hazelton, R.F.; McCoy, M.W.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Optimal design of a hybrid solarwind-battery system using the minimization of the annualized cost system and the minimization of the loss of power supply probability (LPSP)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potou is an isolated site, located in the northern coast of Senegal. The populations living in this area have no easy access to electricity supply. The use of renewable energies can contribute to the improvement of the living conditions of these populations. The methodology used in this paper consists in Sizing a hybrid solarwind-battery system optimized through multi-objective genetic algorithm for this site and the influence of the load profiles on the optimal configuration. The two principal aims are: the minimization of the annualized cost system and the minimization of the loss of power supply probability (LPSP). To study the load profile influence, three load profiles with the same energy (94kWh/day) have been used. The achieved results show that the cost of the optimal configuration strongly depends on the load profile. For example, the cost of the optimal configuration decreases by 7% and 5% going from profile 1 to 2 and for those ones going from 1 to 3.

B. Ould Bilal; V. Sambou; P.A. Ndiaye; C.M.F. Kb; M. Ndongo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Low Cost Titanium ? Propulsion Applications | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Applications Low Cost Titanium Propulsion Applications 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

202

Inverter Cost Analysis and Marketing Intelligence | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Marketing Intelligence Inverter Cost Analysis and Marketing Intelligence 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

203

Synergistically Enhanced Materials and Design Parameters for Reducing the Cost of Hydrogen Storage Tanks - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Kevin L. Simmons (Primary Contact), Kenneth Johnson, and Kyle Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 Phone: (509) 375-3651 Email: Kevin.Simmons@pnnl.gov Norman Newhouse (Lincoln Composites, Inc.), Mike Veenstra (Ford Motor Company), Anand V. Rau (TORAY Carbon Fibers America) and Thomas Steinhausler (AOC, L.L.C.) DOE Managers HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams

204

Development of Low-Cost, High Strength Commercial Textile Precursor (PAN-MA) - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report C.D. Warren and Felix L. Paulauskas Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1 Bethel Valley Road Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Phone: (865) 574-9693 Email: warrencd@ornl.gov Email: paulauskasfl@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov Contributors: * Hippolyte Grappe (ORNL) * Fue Xiong (ORNL) * Ana Paula Vidigal (FISIPE) * Jose Contrerias (FISIPE) Project Start Date: April 21, 2011 Project End Date: July 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Down-select from 11 polymer candidate polymer *

205

New MEA Materials for Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) Performance, Durability, and Cost - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report James Fletcher (Primary Contact), Philip Cox University of North Florida (UNF) 1 UNF Drive Jacksonville, FL 32224 Phone: (904) 620-1844 Email: jfletche@UNF.edu DOE Managers HQ: Donna Ho Phone: (202) 586-8000 Email: Donna.Ho@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000475 Subcontractors: * University of Florida, Gainesville, FL * Northeastern University, Boston, MA * Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells, Swindon, UK

206

QGESS: Capital Cost Scaling Methodology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(costs and values of inputs, outputs, and processes, including capital and operating costs) and performance (mass conversion, energy efficiency, and, generally speaking,...

207

Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Title Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBL-19734 Year of Publication 1985 Authors Arasteh, Dariush K., Russell Johnson, Stephen E. Selkowitz, and Deborah J. Connell Conference Name 2nd Annual Symposium on Improving Building Energy Efficiency in Hot and Humid Climates Date Published 09/1985 Conference Location Texas A&M University Call Number LBL-19734 Abstract Fenestration performance in nonresidentialsbuildings in hot climates is often a large coolingsload liability. Proper fenestration design andsthe use of daylight-responsive dimming controls onselectric lights can, in addition to drasticallysreducing lighting energy, lower cooling loads,speak electrical demand, operating costs, chillerssizes, and first costs. Using the building energyssimulation programs DOE-2.1B and DOE-2.1C , wesfirst discuss lighting energy savings from daylighting.sThe effects of fenestration parametersson cooling loads, total energy use, peak demand,schiller sizes, and initial and operating costs aresalso discussed. The impact of daylighting, asscompared to electric lighting, on cooling requirementssis discussed as a function of glazingscharacteristics, location, and shading systems.

208

Clean Cities 2012 Annual Metrics Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Energy Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Clean Cities 2012 Annual Metrics Report Caley Johnson National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5400-60274 December 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory

209

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR REVIEW Cap. exp. = capital expenditure; O & M exp. =not the straight capital expenditures -- are added to annualsimple sum of annual capital expenditures and annual O & M

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR REVIEW Cap. exp. = capital expenditure; O & M exp. =not the straight capital expenditures -- are added to annualsimple sum of annual capital expenditures and annual O & M

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Annual Monitoring Status Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the status of Fiscal Year 2009 groundwater monitoring performed in Waste Area Group 10 at the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory Site, as identified in the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan for Operable Unit 10-08. Twelve of the fourteen required wells were sampled, and all ten required intervals from the Westbay wells were sampled. Two wells were not sampled because they were in the process of being converted into multiple-sample-interval Westbay wells by the U.S. Geological Survey. Groundwater samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds identified on the Contract Laboratory Program target analyte list as well as metals (filtered), anions, and radionuclides (i.e., I-129, tritium, Tc-99, gross alpha, gross beta, and Sr-90). No contaminant exceeded maximum contaminant levels in wells along the southern boundary of the Idaho National Laboratory Site or in guard wells. Iron was above its secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 ug/L in one well. The cause of the elevated iron concentration is uncertain. Lead was detected just below its action level. However, the zinc concentration was also elevated in these wells, and the source of the lead is probably galvanized riser pipe in the wells. Once the galvanized pipe is replaced, both lead and zinc concentrations should decline, as has been observed at other Waste Area Group 10 wells.

Howard Forsythe

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

212

Annual Planning Summaries: 2013 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 Annual Planning Summaries: 2013 March 25, 2013 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Argonne Site Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Argonne Site Office March 25, 2013 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Argonne Site Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Argonne Site Office January 30, 2013 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Carlsbad Field Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Carlsbad Field Office January 30, 2013 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Oak Ridge Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Oak Ridge Office January 30, 2013 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Western Area Power Administration 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Western Area Power Administration January 29, 2013 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Idaho Operations Office

213

New High Performance Water Vapor Membranes to Improve Fuel Cell Balance of Plant Efficiency and Lower Costs (SBIR Phase I) - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Earl H. Wagener (Primary Contact), Brad P. Morgan, Jeffrey R. DiMaio Tetramer Technologies L.L.C. 657 S. Mechanic St. Pendleton, SC 29670 Phone: (864) 646-6282 Email: earl.wagener@tetramertechnologies.com DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0006172 Project Start Date: June 17, 2011 Project End Date: March 16, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Demonstrate water vapor transport membrane with * >18,000 gas permeation units (GPU) Water vapor membrane with less than 20% loss in * performance after stress tests Crossover leak rate: <150 GPU * Temperature Durability of 90°C with excursions to * 100°C Cost of <$10/m

214

Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Tri-Generation Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Mark F. Ruth* (Primary Contact), Michael E. Goldsby † , Timothy J. Sa † , Victor Diakov* *National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Pkwy. Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 817-6160 Email: Mark.Ruth@nrel.gov † Sandia National Laboratories DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: December 1, 2010 Project End Date: October 31, 2011 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop a macro-system model (MSM): * Aimed at performing rapid cross-cutting analysis - Utilizing and linking other models - Improving consistency between models - Incorporate tri-generation systems into the MSM and * develop a methodology for MSM users to analyze

215

Critical Research for Cost-Effective Photoelectrochemical Production of Hydrogen - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Liwei Xu (Primary Contact) 1 , Anke E. Abken 2 , William B. Ingler 3 , John Turner 4 1 Midwest Optoelectronics LLC (MWOE) 2801 W. Bancroft Street Mail Stop 230 Toledo, OH 43606 Phone: (419) 215-8583 Email: xu@mwoe.com 2 Xunlight Corporation (Xunlight) 3 University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (UT) 4 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (NREL) DOE Managers HQ: Eric Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-05GO15028 Subcontractors: * Xunlight Corporation, Toledo, OH * University of Toledo, Toledo, OH * National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO

216

Manufacturing of Low-Cost, Durable Membrane Electrode Assemblies Engineered for Rapid Conditioning - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program F. Colin Busby W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc (Gore) Gore Electrochemical Technologies Team 201 Airport Road Elkton, MD 21921 Phone: (410) 392-3200 Email: CBusby@WLGore.com DOE Managers HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FСЗ6-08G018052 Subcontractors: * UTC Power, South Windsor, CT * University of Delaware, Newark, DE (UD) * University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (UTK) Project Start Date: October 1, 2008 Project End Date: June 30, 2014

217

Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Mark Leavitt Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide, Inc. 25242 Arctic Ocean Drive Lake Forest, CA 92630 Phone: (949) 399-4584 Email: mleavitt@qtww.com DOE Managers HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO18055 Subcontractors: * Boeing Research and Technology, Seattle, WA * Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA Project Start Date: September 1, 2008 Project End Date: March 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop new methods for manufacturing Type IV

218

Low-Cost Large-Scale PEM Electrolysis for Renewable Energy Storage - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Dr. Katherine Ayers (Primary Contact), Chris Capuano Proton Energy Systems d/b/a Proton OnSite 10 Technology Drive Wallingford, CT 06492 Phone: (203) 678-2190 Email: kayers@protononsite.com DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0001338 Subcontractors: * 3M, Minneapolis, MN * University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY Project Start Date: June 19, 2010 (Phase 1) Project End Date: August 18, 2013 (with Phase 2 continuation) Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Project Objectives Demonstrate optimal membrane electrode assembly * (MEA) efficiency through: Refinement of catalyst compositions based on -

219

Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on High-Stability Low-Cost Supports - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Radoslav Adzic (Primary Contact), Miomir Vukmirovic, Kotaro Sasaki, Jia Wang, Yang Shao-Horn 1 , Rachel O'Malley 2 Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Bldg. 555 Upton, NY 11973-5000 Phone: (631) 344-4522 Email: adzic@bnl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: 1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge MA 2 Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells (JMFC), London, England Project Start Date: July 1, 2009 Project End Date: September 30, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Developing high-performance fuel cell electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) comprising contiguous Pt monolayer (ML) on stable, inexpensive metal

220

C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition;" and Federal Energy Regula- tion Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-year plan, 1990-1999 : 1989 Utility OM&R Comparison : A Comparison of BPA (Bonneville Power Administration) and Selected Utility Transmission, Operations and Maintenance Costs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past several years, competing resource demands within BPA have forced the Agency to stretch Operations, Maintenance and Replacement (OM R) resources. There is a large accumulation of tasks that were not accomplished when scheduled. Maintenance and replacements and outages, due to material and equipment failure, appear to be increasing. BPA has made a strategic choice to increase its emphasis on OM R programs by implementing a multi-year, levelized OM R plan which is keyed to high system reliability. This strategy will require a long-term commitment of a moderate increase in staff and dollars allocated to these programs. In an attempt to assess the direction BPA has taken in its OM R programs, a utility comparison team was assembled in early January 1989. The team included representatives from BPA's Management Analysis, Internal Audit and Financial Management organizations, and operation and maintenance program areas. BPA selected four utilities from a field of more than 250 electric utilities in the US and Canada. The selection criteria generally pertained to size, with key factors including transformation capacity, load, gross revenue, and interstate transmission and/or marketing agreements, and their OM R programs. Information was gathered during meetings with managers and technical experts representing the four utilities. Subsequent exchanges of information also took place to verify findings. The comparison focused on: Transmission operations and maintenance program direction and emphasis; Organization, management and implementation techniques; Reliability; and Program costs. 2 figs., 21 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Startup Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

223

Cost-Effective Industrial Boiler Plant Efficiency Advancements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural gas and electricity are expensive to the extent that annual fuel and power costs can approach the initial cost of an industrial boiler plant. Within this context, this paper examines several cost-effective efficiency advancements that were...

Fiorino, D. P.

224

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Key Issues Prices Consumption Energy Intensity Electricity Generation Production and Imports Carbon Emissions Key Issues Important energy issues addressed in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) include, among others, the ongoing restructuring of U.S. electricity markets, near-term prospects for world oil markets, and the impacts of energy use on carbon emissions. AEO2000 reflects the restructuring of U.S. electricity markets and the shift to increased competition by assuming changes in the financial structure of the industry. Ongoing efficiency and operating improvements are also assumed to continue. The projections assume a transition to full competitive pricing in States with specific deregulation plans—California, New York, New England, the Mid-Atlantic States, Illinois, Texas, Michigan, Ohio, Arizona, and New Mexico. Other States are assumed to continue cost-of-service electricity pricing. The provisions of the California legislation regarding stranded cost recovery and price caps are included. In other regions, stranded cost recovery is assumed to be phased out by 2008.

225

Annual Operating Plan: FY 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an internal DOE Geothermal Program planning and control document. Many of these reports were issued only in draft form.

None

1991-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cost Containment and Productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Containment and Productivity Faculty Assembly Presentation January 22, 2013 Arthur G. Ramicone, CFO David N. DeJong, Vice Provost, Academic Planning and Resources Management #12;Cost Containment Resources to Enhance the Student Experience · Reduce the Cost and Complexity of Administrative Operations

Jiang, Huiqiang

227

Annual Planning Summaries: 2011 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Annual Planning Summaries: 2011 Annual Planning Summaries: 2011 Annual Planning Summaries: 2011 January 20, 2011 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Chicago Operations Office (CH) The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Chicago Operations Office (CH) (See Science APS). January 20, 2011 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Nevada Site Office (NSO) The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Nevada Site Office (NSO). January 19, 2011 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Southeastern Power Administration (SEPA) The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Southeastern Power Administration (SEPA).

228

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

229

Cost effective lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-life replacement lamps for the incandescent lamp have been evaluated with regard to their cost effectiveness. The replacements include the use of energy buttons that extend lamp life as well as an adaptive fluorescent circline lamp that will fit into existing incandescent lamp sockets. The initial, operating, and replacement costs for one million lumen-hours are determined for each lamp system. We find the most important lighting cost component is the operating cost. Using lamps that are less efficient or devices that cause lamps to operate less efficiently are not cost-effective. The adaptive fluorescent circline lamp, even at an initial cost of $15.00, is the most cost effective source of illumination compared to the incandescent lamp and lamp systems examined. 3 refs., 6 tabs.

Morse, O.; Verderber, R.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Ice Machines | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ice Machines Ice Machines Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Ice Machines October 8, 2013 - 2:25pm Addthis Vary capacity size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Type of Ice Cube Machine Ice Making Head Self-Contained Remote Condensing Unit Ice Making Head Type of Condenser Air Cooled Water Cooled Air Cooled Ice Harvest Rate (lbs. ice per 24 hrs.) lbs. per 24 hrs. 500 lbs. per 24 hrs. Energy Consumption (per 100 lbs. of ice) kWh 5.5 kWh Quantity of ice machines to be purchased 1 Energy Cost $/kWh 0.06 $/kWh Annual Hours of Operation hrs. 3000 hrs. Calculate Reset OUTPUT SECTION Performance per Ice Cube Machine Your

231

Reclamation cost inputs for the resource allocation and mine costing model. Final working paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to improve estimates of surface mining reclamation cost components used as inputs to the Energy Information Administration's Resource Allocation and Mine Costing (RAMC) model. Costs ignored by the RAMC equations and input separately into the model on a regional basis were the focus of this study. Estimates of costs associated with the following reclamation activities were developed: valley fill construction, topsoil handling, runoff and diversion ditch construction and backfilling, sediment pond construction and backfilling, final pit backfilling and highwall reduction, revegetation, and permitting. For each activity, separate estimates were developed by cost component (initial capital, deferred capital, and annual operating), region (central Appalachia, northern Appalachia, the Midwest, and the West), and overburden ratio. For the first five activities, a ''composite mine'' approach was used. Basic engineering data on the quantity of material moved, and the distance over which it is moved, were obtained on a task-by-task basis for regional samples of actual mining operations. Mine permit applications filed with state and federal regulatory agencies were used as the source of these data. On the basis of the collected data, average material quantities and transportation distances were calculated for each region and reclamation task; these averages were used as the composite mine specifications assumed to be representative of the typical earthmoving requirements associated with each task in each region. Revegetation costs were estimated on the basis of published or publicly available data representing either the actual or estimated costs to state governments of revegetating abandoned mine sites. Permitting costs were developed on the basis of estimates of typical regional permitting costs solicited from engineering contractors providing permitting services to the coal industry. 11 tabs.

Not Available

1984-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

2007 Annual Peer Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2007 Annual Peer Review 2007 Annual Peer Review September 27, 2007 San Francisco, California Welcoming Remarks Imre Gyuk US Dept. of Energy DOE / ESS Program Overview (View .pdf) John Boyes Sandia National Laboratories PRESENTATIONS\ ECONOMICS - BENEFIT STUDIES Evaluating Value Propositions for Four Modular Electricity Storage Demonstrations in California (View .pdf) Jim Eyer (Distributed Utility Assoc.) Update on Benefit and Cost Comparison of Modular Energy Storage Technologies for Four Viable Value Propositions (View .pdf) Susan Schoenung (Longitude 122 West, Inc.) ECONOMICS - ENVIRONMENT BENEFITS STUDIES Emissions from Traditional & Flywheel Plants for Regulation Services (View .pdf) Rick Fioravanti (KEMA, Inc.) UTILITY & COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS OF ADVANCED ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS

233

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

234

Technology advances keeping LNG cost-competitive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LNG plants, often very expensive in the past, will in the future need to cost less to build and operate and yet maintain high safety and reliability standards, both during construction and operation. Technical advancements, both in the process and in equipment scaling, manufacturing, and metallurgy, will provide much of the impetus for the improved economics. Although world energy demand is predicted to grow on average of about 2% annually over the next decade, LNG is expected to contribute an increasing portion of this growth with annual growth rates averaging about 7%. This steep growth increase will be propelled mainly by the environmentally friendlier burning characteristics of natural gas and the strong industrial growth in Asian and pacific Rim countries. While LNG is emerging as the fuel of choice for developing economies, its delivered cost to consumers will need to stay competitive with alternate energy supplies if it is to remain in front. The paper discusses LNG process development, treating process, equipment developments (man heat exchanger, compressors, drivers, and pressure vessels), and economy of scale.

Bellow, E.J. Jr.; Ghazal, F.P.; Silverman, A.J. [Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States); Myers, S.D. [Mobil Oil Corp., Fairfax, VA (United States)

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

235

Fuel performance annual report for 1991. Volume 9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the fourteenth in a series that provides a compilation of information regarding commercial nuclear fuel performance. The series of annual reports were developed as a result of interest expressed by the public, advising bodies, and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for public availability of information pertaining to commercial nuclear fuel performance. During 1991, the nuclear industry`s focus regarding fuel continued to be on extending burnup while maintaining fuel rod reliability. Utilities realize that high-burnup fuel reduces the amount of generated spent fuel, reduces fuel costs, reduces operational and maintenance costs, and improves plant capacity factors by extending operating cycles. Brief summaries of fuel operating experience, fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, high-burnup experience, problem areas, and items of general significance are provided.

Painter, C.L.; Alvis, J.M.; Beyer, C.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Marion, A.L. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Payne, G.A. [Northwest Coll. and Univ. Association for Science, Richland, WA (United States); Kendrick, E.D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2009 Petroleum Marketing Annual 2009 Released: August 6, 2010 Monthly price and volume statistics on crude oil and petroleum products at a national, regional and state level. Notice: Changes to EIA Petroleum Data Program Petroleum Marketing Annual --- Full report in PDF (1.2 MB) Previous Issues --- Previous reports are available on the historical page. Summary Statistics Summary Statistics Tables PDF 1 Crude Oil Prices PDF TXT 1A Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil by PAD Districts HTML PDF TXT 2 U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products to End Users HTML PDF TXT 3 U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products to End Users PDF TXT Motor Gasoline to End Users HTML Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel to End Users HTML Other Petroleum Products to End Users HTML

237

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5005: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2002 versus 2005  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Date: March 20, 2005 5 Date: March 20, 2005 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2002 vs 2005 Originator: Patrick Davis Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: May 22, 2006 Item: "Reduced the high-volume cost of automotive fuel cells from $275/kW (50kW system) in 2002 to $110/kW (80kW system) in 2005." Supporting Information: In 2002, TIAX reported a cost of $324/kW for a 50-kW automotive PEM fuel cell system operating on gasoline reformate, based on their modeling of projected cost for 500,000 units per year. See Eric Carlson et al., "Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stack/System." U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Progress Report. (2002) at http://www.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/pdfs/33098_sec4-1.pdf. Also see "Cost Modeling of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automobiles," Eric Carlson et al., SAE

238

Estimating the Cost and Energy Efficiency of a Solar Water Heater |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Estimating the Cost and Energy Efficiency of a Solar Water Heater Estimating the Cost and Energy Efficiency of a Solar Water Heater Estimating the Cost and Energy Efficiency of a Solar Water Heater May 30, 2012 - 3:09pm Addthis Solar water heaters are more efficient the gas or electric heaters. | Chart credit ENERGY STAR Solar water heaters are more efficient the gas or electric heaters. | Chart credit ENERGY STAR What does this mean for me? Solar water heaters cost more to purchase and install but may save you money in the long run. Estimate the annual operating costs and compare several solar water heaters to determine whether it is worth investing in a more efficient system. Solar water heating systems usually cost more to purchase and install than conventional water heating systems. However, a solar water heater can

239

Estimating the Cost and Energy Efficiency of a Solar Water Heater |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Estimating the Cost and Energy Efficiency of a Solar Water Heater Estimating the Cost and Energy Efficiency of a Solar Water Heater Estimating the Cost and Energy Efficiency of a Solar Water Heater May 30, 2012 - 3:09pm Addthis Solar water heaters are more efficient the gas or electric heaters. | Chart credit ENERGY STAR Solar water heaters are more efficient the gas or electric heaters. | Chart credit ENERGY STAR What does this mean for me? Solar water heaters cost more to purchase and install but may save you money in the long run. Estimate the annual operating costs and compare several solar water heaters to determine whether it is worth investing in a more efficient system. Solar water heating systems usually cost more to purchase and install than conventional water heating systems. However, a solar water heater can

240

Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake; Effects of Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on Reproductive Success, 1983 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Koktneesalmon (Oncorhvnchusnerka), the land-locked form of sockeye salmon, were originally introduced to Flathead Lake in 1916. My 1933, kokanee had become established in the lake and provided a popular summer trolling fishery as well as a fall snagging fishery in shoreline areas. Presently, Flathead Lake supports the second highest fishing pressure of any lake or reservoir in Montana (Montana Department of Fish and Game 1976). During 1981-82, the lake provided 168,792 man-days of fishing pressure. Ninety-two percent of the estimated 536,870 fish caught in Flathead Lake in 1981-82 were kokanee salmon. Kokanee also provided forage for bull trout seasonally and year round for lake trout. Kokanee rear to maturity in Flathead Lake, then return to various total grounds to spawn. Spawning occurred in lake outlet streams, springs, larger rivers and lake shoreline areas in suitable but often limited habitat. Shoreline spawning in Flathead Lake was first documented in the mid-1930's. Spawning kokanee were seized from shoreline areas in 1933 and 21,000 cans were processed and packed for distribution to the needy. Stefanich (1953 and 1954) later documented extensive but an unquantified amount of spawning along the shoreline as well as runs in Whitefish River and McDonald Creek in the 1950's. A creel census conducted in 1962-63 determined 11 to 13 percent of the kokanee caught annually were taken during the spawning period (Robbins 1966). During a 1981-82 creel census, less than one percent of the fishermen on Flathead Lake were snagging kokanee (Graham and Fredenberg 1982). The operation of Kerr Dam, located below Flathead Lake on the Flathead River, has altered seasonal fluctuations of Flathead Lake. Lake levels presently remain high during kokanee spawning in November and decline during the incubation and emergence periods. Groundwater plays an important role in embryo and fry survival in redds of shoreline areas exposed by lake drawdown. Stefanich (1954) and Domrose (1968) found live eggs and fry only in shoreline spawning areas wetted by groundwater seeps. Impacts of the operation of Kerr Dam on lakeshore spawning have not been quantified. Recent studies have revealed that operation of Hungry Horse Dam severely impacted successful kokanee spawning and incubation in the Flathead River above Flathead Lake (Graham et al. 1980, McMullin and Graham 1981, Fraley and Graham 1982 and Fraley and McMullin 1983). Flows from Hungry Horse Dam to enhance kokanee reproduction in the river system have been voluntarily met by the Bureau of Reclamation since 1981. In lakeshore spawning areas in other Pacific Northwest systems, spawning habitat for kokanee and sockeye salmon was characterized by seepage or groundwater flow where suitable substrate composition existed (Foerster 1968). Spawning primarily occurred in shallower depths (<6 m) where gravels were cleaned by wave action (Hassemer and Rieman 1979 and 1980, Stober et al. 1979a). Seasonal drawdown of reservoirs can adversely affect survival of incubating kokanee eggs and fry spawned in shallow shoreline areas. Jeppon (1955 and 1960) and Whitt (1957) estimated 10-75 percent kokanee egg loss in shoreline areas of Pend Oreille Lake, Idaho after regulation of the upper three meters occurred in 1952. After 20 years of operation, Bowler (1979) found Pend Oreille shoreline spawning to occur in fewer areas with generally lower numbers of adults. In studies on Priest Lake, Idaho, Bjornn (1957) attributed frozen eggs and stranded fry to winter fluctuations of the upper three meters of the lake. Eggs and fry frozen during winter drawdown accounted for a 90 percent loss to shoreline spawning kokanee in Donner Lake, California (Kimsey 1951). Stober et al. (1979a) determined irrigation drawdown of Banks Lake, Washington reduced shoreline survival during five of the seven years the system was studied. The goal of this phase of the study was to evaluate and document effects of the operation of Kerr Dam on kokanee shoreline reproduction in Flathead Lake. Specific objectives to meet this goal are: (1) Del

Decker-Hess, Janet; McMullin, Steve L.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Program Potential: Estimates of Federal Energy Cost Savings from Energy Efficient Procurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 Energy and Costsavings in Table 7: Annual energy and cost savings of waterwere used to derive energy and cost savings estimates:

Taylor, Margaret

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

FTCP Annual Report- Calendar Year 2008  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FTCP Annual Report summarizes the yearly actions taken to ensure organizations maintain their critical technical capabilities needed for the safe operations of defense nuclear facilities.

243

2008 Annual Site Environmental Report Summary Pamphlet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annual Site Environmental Report Summary Pamphlet 1 2008 ASER Summary Pamphlet Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia...

244

Office Inspector General DOE Annual Performance Report FY 2008, Annual  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inspector General DOE Annual Performance Report FY 2008, Inspector General DOE Annual Performance Report FY 2008, Annual Performance Plan FY 2009 Office Inspector General DOE Annual Performance Report FY 2008, Annual Performance Plan FY 2009 During Fiscal Year (FY) 2008, we reviewed a variety of critical areas relevant to the Department's mission priorities. One of our goals, for example, was to examine possible programmatic improvements in Department operations relating to cyber security and contract management. Overall, our efforts resulted in the issuance of over 70 audit and inspection reports containing recommendations for enhancing Departmental operations, with likely savings of over $7 million. Further as a result of our investigative efforts, we obtained 20 criminal convictions, recovered $22.8 million in

245

Operations and Maintenance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lower operations and maintenance (O&M) costs are critical to reducing a solar system's lifecycle cost of ownership. O&M costs are influenced by up-front investments in design, engineering,...

246

ROC curves in cost space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ROC curves and cost curves are two popular ways of visualising classifier performance, finding appropriate thresholds according to the operating condition, and deriving useful aggregated measures such as the area under the ROC curve (AUC) or ... Keywords: Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC), Cost curves, Cost-sensitive evaluation, Kendall tau distance, Operating condition, ROC curves, Ranking performance

Jos Hernndez-Orallo; Peter Flach; Csar Ferri

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

EEO Annual Training | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Annual Training | National Nuclear Security Administration Annual Training | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog EEO Annual Training Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > EEO Annual Training EEO Annual Training OCR's mission: Promote and advocate Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action

248

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

249

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

250

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

251

Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Sarah Cowan...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Meeting Posters Development of a Low Cost Ultra Specular Advanced Polymer Film Solar Reflector Nano-structures Thermoelectric Materals - Part 2...

252

cost | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cost cost Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

253

Low Cost Carbon Fiber from Renewable Resources | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

from Renewable Resources Low Cost Carbon Fiber from Renewable Resources 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting,...

254

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2002 2003...

255

Reduction in Fabrication Costs of Gas Diffusion Layers | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Layers Reduction in Fabrication Costs of Gas Diffusion Layers 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

256

Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

(DBA) Substrates Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

257

Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Aluminum (DBA) Substrates Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

258

Fuel Displacement & Cost Potential of CNG, LNG, and LPG Vehicles...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

LPG Vehicles Fuel Displacement & Cost Potential of CNG, LNG, and LPG Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

259

Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

260

Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

262

Development and Commercialization of a Novel Low-Cost Carbon...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Development and Commercialization of a Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fiber 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

263

High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

264

Advanced Materials for Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (RSOFC), Dual-Mode Operation with Low Degradation - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Eric Tang, Tony Wood, Sofiane Benhaddad, Casey Brown, Hongpeng He, Jeff Nelson, Oliver Grande, Ben Nuttall, Mark Richard, Randy Petri (Primary Contact) Versa Power Systems 10720 Bradford Road #110 Littleton, CO 80127 Phone: (303) 226-0762 Email: randy.petri@versa-power.com DOE Managers HQ: Kathi Epping Martin Phone: (202) 586-7425 Email: Kathi.Epping@ee.doe.gov

265

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawai?¢????i and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the predicted economies of scale as technology and efficiency improvements are realized and larger more economical plants deployed. Utilizing global high resolution OTEC resource assessment from the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project (an independent DOE project), Global Energy Supply Curves were generated for Grid Connected and Energy Carrier OTEC plants deployed in 2045 when the predicted technology and efficiencies improvements are fully realized. The Global Energy Supply Curves present the LCOE versus capacity in ascending order with the richest, lowest cost resource locations being harvested first. These curves demonstrate the vast ocean thermal resource and potential OTEC capacity that can be harvested with little change in LCOE.

Martel, Laura; Smith, Paul; Rizea, Steven; Van Ryzin, Joe; Morgan, Charles; Noland, Gary; Pavlosky, Rick; Thomas, Michael

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Estimating environmental costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Added demands on natural resources and proposed environmental regulations could potentially have a significant impact on the production and operational costs of information technology (IT). In this paper, we utilize an Economic Input-Output Life-Cycle ...

Kiara Corrigan; Amip Shah; Chandrakant Patel

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Cost Containment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cost containment in health care involves awide ... , the growth rate of expenditure or certain costs of health care services. These measures include ... patient education, etc. The reasons for increased cost ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Annual Planning Summaries: 2010 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Annual Planning Summaries: 2010 February 24, 2010 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, any EAs expected to be prepared in the next 12 months, any EISs expected to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. February 2, 2010 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Chief Financial Officer (CFO) Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, any EAs expected to be prepared in the next 12 months, any EISs expected to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. February 1, 2010 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Oak Ridge (OR)

269

US Department of Energy, Annual report on energy management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report on DOE's In-house Energy Management Program for reducing energy consumption and increasing energy efficiency in all of its facilities and operations is presented. Programs in energy conservation surveys and studies, retrofit projects, fuel conversion projects, operation and maintenance improvements, driver training, and employee awareness have enabled the department to reduce its energy consumption in FY 1979 by 12.7% in BTU per gross sq. ft. as compared to 1973. Total cost of energy conservation projects in 1979 was $11.455 million. Cost avoidance as a result of implementing these programs is expected to be $3.75 million annually. To date, DOE has invested $51.4 million in retrofit projects.

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Positron emission tomography with selected mediastinoscopy compared to routine mediastinoscopy offers cost and clinical outcome benefits for pre-operative staging of non-small cell lung cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The true cost of a whole-body FDG-PET scan in this environment is difficult to ascertain. Keith et al. [6...], in the setting of solitary pulmonary nodules, used the Australian Medicare rebate of AUD$950 plus cap...

Kelvin K. Yap; Kenneth S. K. Yap

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

ALTERNATE POWER AND ENERGY STORAGE/REUSE FOR DRILLING RIGS: REDUCED COST AND LOWER EMISSIONS PROVIDE LOWER FOOTPRINT FOR DRILLING OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on alternate drilling energy sources which can make entire drilling process economic and environmentally friendly. One of the major ways to reduce the footprint of drilling operations is to provide more efficient power sources for drilling operations...

Verma, Ankit

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for Baseload Operation Development of an Advanced, Low-Cost parabolic Trough Collector for Baseload Operation This...

273

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010...

274

Process Intensification of Hydrogen Unit Operations Using an Electrochemical Device - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Glenn Eisman (Primary Contact), Dylan Share, Chuck Carlstrom H2Pump LLC 11 Northway Lane North Latham, NY 12110 Phone: (518) 783-2241 Email: glenn.eisman@h2pumpllc.com DOE Manager HQ: Richard Farmer Phone: (202) 586-1623 Email: Richard.Farmer@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0002185 Subcontractor: PBI Performance Products, Inc., Rock Hill, SC Project Start Date: Phase II: August 15, 2010 Project End Date: August 15, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop and demonstrate a multi-functional hydrogen production technology based on a polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane which exhibits: High efficiency (70%) * Up to 100 scfh pumping capability * CO * 2 and CO tolerance

275

Cost analysis guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

276

Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Annual Status Report for Fiscal Year 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a status of the progress made in Fiscal Year 2006 on tasks identified in the Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan. Major accomplishments include: (1) groundwater sampling and review of the groundwater monitoring data, (2) installation of a Sitewide groundwater-level monitoring network, (3) update of the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan of Operable Unit 10-08, (4) re-evaluation of the risk at Site TSF-08, (5) progress on the Operable Unit 10-08 Sitewide Groundwater Model.

R. P. Wells

2007-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

277

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact 1 Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact 1 August 30, 2012 Form EIA-923 Frame Reduction Impact Schedule 2 of the Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," collects the cost and quality of fossil fuel purchases made by electric power plants with at least 50 megawatts (MW) of nameplate capacity primarily fueled by fossil fuels. The proposal is to raise the threshold to 200 megawatts of nameplate capacity primarily fueled by natural gas, petroleum coke, distillate fuel oil, and residual fuel oil. This would result in reducing the Form EIA-923 overall annual burden by 2.2 percent. The threshold for coal plants will remain at 50 megawatts. Natural gas data collection on Schedule 2 will be reduced from approximately 970 to 603 plants

278

Cost Estimator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a senior cost and schedule estimator who is responsible for preparing life-cycle cost and schedule estimates and analyses associated with the...

279

Cost Utility of Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention with Dutasteride in Men with an Elevated Prostate Specific Antigen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Articles Impact of Screening Test Performance and Cost on Mortality Reduction and Cost-effectiveness of Multimodal Ovarian Cancer Screening...mortality reduction, years of life saved, and cost-effectiveness achievable by annual multimodal...

Robert S. Svatek and Yair Lotan

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

EM Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual Caucus |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual EM Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual Caucus EM Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual Caucus March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM and its cleanup contractors present briefings each year to the U.S. House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus on remediation operations at its major sites across the DOE complex. The briefings are organized by Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.), who chairs the bipartisan caucus. For nearly two decades, the briefings have offered members of Congress and their staff, news media and other interested individuals insight into the progress of cleanup of the environmental legacy of the Cold War. EM site managers and their contractor counterparts provide updates on cleanup accomplishments, safety performance, budget scopes, cost savings and plans

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hay Harvesting Costs $$$$$ in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............. .. ................. 6 LOOSE HAY STACKING ................................... 7 Tractor-Mounted (Front-End Loader) Hay Stacking Equipment .......... .... ............. 8 Fixed Costs ............................................................ 8 Operating Costs..., there is no economic advantage to At least two tractors are usually needed for baling. Most livestock producers who use custom balers will probably have to buy another tractor. This machine may be used for other operations, but the equivalent of one full...

Long, James T.; Taylor, Wayne D.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Annual Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

09 09 THROUGH 09/30/2010 The following Annual Freedom of Information Act report covers the Period 10/01/2009, through 09/30/2010, as required by 5 U.S.C. 552. I. BASIC INFORMATION REGARDING REPORT 1. Kevin T. Hagerty, Director Office of Information Resources, MA-90 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 Alexander Morris, FOIA Officer Sheila Jeter, FOIA/Privacy Act Specialist FOIA Office, MA-90 Office of Information Resources U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 2. An electronic copy of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) report can be obtained at http://management.energy.gov/documents/annual_reports.htm. The report can then be accessed by clicking FOIA Annual Reports.

283

Cost Shifting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cost shifting exists when a provider raises prices for one set of buyers because it has lowered prices for some other buyer. In theory, cost shifting can take place only if providers have unexploited market power. The empirical evidence on the extent of cost shifting is mixed. Taken as a whole, the evidence does not support the claims that cost shifting is a large and pervasive feature of the US health-care markets. At most, one can argue that perhaps one-fifth of Medicare payment reductions have been passed on to private payers. The majority of the rigorous studies, however, have found no evidence of cost shifting.

M.A. Morrisey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operating Costs Purifier Electricity costs (energy + demand)Cost ($/MMBTU, HHV) Electricity Cost (cents/kWh) ProductionNatural Gas Cost ($/kg) Electricity Cost ($/kg) O&M ($/kg)

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Annual Training Plan Template  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Annual Training Plan Template is used by an organization's training POC to draft their organization's annual training plan.

286

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Phase II Fish Screen Operation and Maintenance; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to assure that the benefits of BPA's capital investment in Yakima Basin Phase II fish screen facilities are realized by performing operations that assure optimal fish protection and long facility life through a rigorous preventative maintenance program, while helping to restore ESA listed fish stocks in the Yakima River Basin.

Schille, Patrick C. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Habitat Program, Yakima, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record 12020: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Record Record Record #: 12020 Date: August 21, 2012 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2012 Update to: Record 11012 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: September 14, 2012 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2012 technology 1 and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $47/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: The DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program supports analysis projects that perform detailed analysis to estimate cost status of fuel cell systems, updated on an annual basis [1]. In fiscal year 2012, Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) updated their 2011 cost analysis of an 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell system, based on 2012 technology and projected to a

289

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Office Record Office Record Record #: 13012 Date: September 18, 2013 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 Update to: Record 12020 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: October 16, 2013 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2013 technology 1 and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $67/kW when manufactured at a volume of 100,000 units/year, and $55/kW at 500,000 units/year. Rationale: The DOE Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Office supports projects that perform detailed analysis to estimate cost status of fuel cell systems, updated on an annual basis [1]. In fiscal year 2013, Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) updated their 2012 cost analysis of an 80-kW

290

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters June 14, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy factor (EF), which is based on the amount of hot water produced per unit of fuel consumed over a typical day. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater. A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy factor (EF), which is based on the amount of hot water produced per unit of fuel consumed over a typical day. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater. What does this mean for me? Estimate the annual operating costs and compare several water heaters to determine whether it is worth investing in a more efficient

291

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

292

BPA's Costs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BPAsCosts Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates...

293

DOE FOIA 2012 Annual Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FOIA ANNUAL REPORT FOIA ANNUAL REPORT FOR Department of Energy 10/01/2011 THROUGH 09/30/2012 The following Annual Freedom of Information Act report covers the Period 10/01/2011, through 09/30/2012, as required by 5 U.S.C. 552. I. BASIC INFORMATION REGARDING REPORT 1. Kevin T. Hagerty, Director Office of Information Resources, MA-90 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 Alexander Morris, FOIA Officer FOIA Office, MA-90 Office of Information Resources U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 2. An electronic copy of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) report can be obtained at http://energy.gov/management/office-management/operational- management/freedom-information-act/documents/annual-reports.

294

Calculating Cost Savings from FY08 Pollution Prevention Projects Purpose: To ensure a standard and credible method is used to compare the cost savings of all pollution prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculating Cost Savings from FY08 Pollution Prevention Projects Purpose: To ensure a standard and credible method is used to compare the cost savings of all pollution prevention proposals, allowing `apples = UTotal Project Cost Annual Project Savings Total Project Cost = all costs for implementation, including

295

CALiPER Report 21.3: Cost-Effectiveness of Linear (T8) LED Lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Meeting performance expectations is important for driving adoption of linear LED lamps, but cost-effectiveness may be an overriding factor in many cases. Linear LED lamps cost more initially than fluorescent lamps, but energy and maintenance savings may mean that the life-cycle cost is lower. This report details a series of life-cycle cost simulations that compared a two-lamp troffer using LED lamps (38 W total power draw) or fluorescent lamps (51 W total power draw) over a 10-year study period. Variables included LED system cost ($40, $80, or $120), annual operating hours (2,000 hours or 4,000 hours), LED installation time (15 minutes or 30 minutes), and melded electricity rate ($0.06/kWh, $0.12/kWh, $0.18/kWh, or $0.24/kWh). A full factorial of simulations allows users to interpolate between these values to aid in making rough estimates of economic feasibility for their own projects. In general, while their initial cost premium remains high, linear LED lamps are more likely to be cost-effective when electric utility rates are higher than average and hours of operation are long, and if their installation time is shorter.

Miller, Naomi J.; Perrin, Tess E.; Royer, Michael P.

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

296

ANNUAL SCIENCE EXPOSITION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...shop and equipment, bring you...economical cost but also...impossible of production by any other...leaders in the field of precision...savings in all operations requiring...de-velopment is the production of flat-type...specialized equipment for radio-activity...Foreign and Domestic Commerce...efficient production and marketing...publications in the fields of chemistry...

1950-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

297

ANNUAL ENERGY  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(93) (93) ANNUAL ENERGY OUTLOOK 1993 With Projections to 2010 EIk Energy Information Administration January 1993 For Further Information ... The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222). General questions concerning energy demand or energy markets may be addressed to Mark E. Rodekohr (202/586-1130), Director of the Energy Demand and Integration Division. General questions regarding energy supply and conversion activities may be addressed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Acting Director of the Energy Supply and Conversion Division. Detailed questions may be addressed to the following EIA analysts: Framing the 1993 Energy Outlook ............. Susan H. Shaw (202/586-4838)

298

Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 2011 Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Community Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Community DOE/ORO/2399 Progress Cleanup P Progress Cleanup P 2 This report was produced by URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, DOE's Environmental Management contractor for the Oak Ridge Reservation. About the Cover After recontouring and revegetation, the P1 Pond at East Tennessee Technology Park is flourishing. The contaminated pond was drained, recontoured, and restocked with fish that would not disturb the pond sediment. 1 Message from the Acting Manager Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office To the Oak Ridge Community: Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 marked many accomplishments in Oak Ridge. Our Environmental Management (EM) program completed a majority of its American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded projects,

299

Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11) | April 2011 11) | April 2011 with Projections to 2035 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 For further information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2011 was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.gov, 202-586-2222), Assistant Administrator of Energy Analysis; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.gov, 202/586-1284), Co-Acting Director, Office of Integrated and International Energy Analysis, and Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team; Joseph A. Beamon (joseph.beamon@eia.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis; A. Michael Schaal (michael.schaal@eia.gov, 202/586-5590), Director, Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuel Analysis;

300

Operations Directorate Integrated Safety and Environmental Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operations Directorate Integrated Safety and Environmental Management Systems (ISEMS) Plan Directorate Integrated Safety and Environmental Management System (ISEMS) Plan The Operations Directorate, Operations Date #12;The Operations Directorate ISEMS Plan 032108 bf 2 Annual Review and Update Operations

Wechsler, Risa H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

AnnualReport2012 Department of Petroleum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AnnualReport2012 Department of Petroleum Engineering and Applied Geophysics #12;Department of Petroleum Engineering and Applied Geophysics Department of Petroleum Engineering and Applied Geophysics S. P . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Center for integrated operations in the petroleum industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 EDUCATION

Malinnikova, Eugenia

302

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Protect the Use of Persian-Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles (related to the use of Persian-Gulf oil by MVs Annualizedas the cost of defending Persian-Gulf oil, that also can be

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Protect the Use of Persian-Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles (related to the use of Persian-Gulf oil by MVs Annualizedas the cost of defending Persian-Gulf oil, that also can be

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Motor-Vehicle Infrastructure and Services Provided by the Public Sector: Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7.8.3 The motor-vehicle fraction of air, water, and solid-7.8.3 The motor-vehicle fraction of air, water, and solid-travel. The motor-vehicle related costs of water treatment

Delucchi, Mark; Murphy, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR Report #7 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7.8.3 The motor-vehicle fraction of air, water, and solid-7.8.3 The motor-vehicle fraction of air, water, and solid-travel. The motor-vehicle related costs of water treatment

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

LNG Annual Report - 2005 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 LNG Annual Report - 2005 LNG Annual Report - 2005 LNG Annual Report - 2005 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2004 LNG Annual Report - 2006 LNG Annual Report -...

307

LNG Annual Report - 2006 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 LNG Annual Report - 2006 LNG Annual Report - 2006 LNG Annual Report - 2006 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2007 LNG Annual Report - 2005 LNG Annual Report -...

308

LNG Annual Report - 2004 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 LNG Annual Report - 2004 LNG Annual Report - 2004 LNG Annual Report - 2004 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2005 LNG Annual Report - 2007 LNG Annual Report -...

309

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings June 4, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov (509) 376-4171 Dee Millikin, CHPRC Dee_Millikin@rl.gov (509) 376-1297 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company is using a treatment material that has delivered more than $6 million in cost savings to date and is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiencies in treatment

310

2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT

Jawitz, James W.

311

1982 laser program annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report covers the following eight sections: (1) laser program review, (2) laser systems and operation, (3) target design, (4) target fabrication, (5) fusion experiments program, (6) Zeus laser project, (7) laser research and development, and (8) energy applications. (MOW)

Hendricks, C.D.; Grow, G.R. (eds.)

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Annual Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Documents Documents » Annual Reports Annual Reports Note: Some of the following documents are in PDF and will require Adobe Reader for viewing. Freedom of Information Act Annual Reports Annual Report for 2012 Annual Report for 2011 Annual Report for 2010 Annual Report for 2009 Annual Report for 2008 (pdf) Annual Report for 2007 (pdf) Annual Report for 2006 (pdf) Annual Report for 2005 (pdf) Annual Report for 2004 (pdf) Annual Report for 2003 (pdf) Annual Report for 2002 (pdf) (Revised 11/03/03) Annual Report for 2001 (pdf) Annual Report for 2000 (pdf) Annual Report for 1999 (pdf) Annual Report for 1998 (pdf) Annual Report for 1997 (pdf) Annual Report for 1996 (pdf) Annual Report for 1995 (pdf) Annual Report for 1994 (pdf) Chief FOIA Officers Reports Aviation Management Green Leases

313

Annual Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Annual Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Annual Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Annual Reports Home > Our Mission > Powering the Nuclear Navy > Annual Reports Annual Reports NNSA's Naval Reactors is committed to providing information about its operations. Environmental Monitoring Report NT-12-1 - May 2012 - ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND DISPOSAL OF

314

C:\ANNUAL\Vol2chps.v8\ANNUAL2.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Energy Information Administration / Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 Energy Information Administration / Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 38. Average Consumption and Annual Cost of Natural Gas per Consumer by State, 1967-1989 Table State Residential Commercial Industrial Consumption (thousand cubic feet) Cost (dollars) Consumption (thousand cubic feet) Cost (dollars) Consumption (thousand cubic feet) Cost (dollars) 1967 Alabama ...................... 91 103 844 475 NA NA Alaska.......................... 218 329 1,361 1,348 NA NA Arizona ........................ 69 67 667 338 NA NA Arkansas ..................... 152 108 751 374 NA NA California ..................... 98 91 548 372 NA NA Colorado...................... 159 106 701 389 NA NA Connecticut ................. 73 134 312 476 NA NA DC............................... a a a

315

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual coal preparation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal pro- vided about half of all annual electricity production for the US throughout its history... Historical Costs of Coal-Fired Electricity and Implications for the Future...

316

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual technology review Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

42 Low Cost, High Efficiency Reversible Fuel Cell Systems Summary: Wh Annual Heat Recovery 18000 MJ Natural Gas LHV 925 BTUscf 12;May 19 , 2003 Technology Management,...

317

Energy Use and Costs in Texas Schools and Hospitals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand charges, monthly natural gas consumed, monthly total natural gas costs, and total facility conditioned area. From this data, the monthly and annual energy use and cost performance of the facility is presented with the calculation of 10 use and cost...

Dunn, J. R.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Analysis-2013 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis-2013 Handbook describes the annual supplements to the NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special...

319

Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Crude Oil Acquisition Report," July 1984 to present. 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997...

320

Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Oil Acquisition Report," July 1984 to present. 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The costs of breaching the four lower Snake River dams - BPA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ratepayers 373 million and generate 106 million annually in benefi ts and avoided costs (1998 dollars) over a 100-year period. With the exception of power prices, which...

322

Scalable, Low-Cost, High Performance IPM Motor for Hybrid Vehicles...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Scalable, Low-Cost, High Performance IPM Motor for Hybrid Vehicles 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

323

Innovative Manufacturing and Materials for Low-Cost Lithium-Ion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Manufacturing and Materials for Low-Cost Lithium-Ion Batteries 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

324

Hanford Solar Power: Cost Effective and Mobile | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Hanford Solar Power: Cost Effective and Mobile Hanford Solar Power: Cost Effective and Mobile February 26, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis EMs Richland Operations Office and its...

325

Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and or efficiency level. INPUT...

326

,"California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2013,"6301967"...

327

Market Transformation Activities - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program IntroductIon The Market Transformation sub-program is conducting activities to help promote and implement commercial and pre-commercial hydrogen and fuel cell systems in real-world operating environments and to provide feedback to research programs, U.S. industry manufacturers, and potential technology users. One of the sub-program's goals is to achieve sufficient manufacturing volumes in emerging commercial applications that will enable cost reductions through economies of scale, which will help address the current high cost of fuel cells (currently the capital and installation costs of fuel cells are from five to six times higher than

328

ARM - Annual Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annual Reports Program Fact Sheets Campaign Backgrounders Education and Outreach Posters Brochures Research Highlights Summaries Annual Reports For proper viewing, the ARM...

329

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: August 6, 2010 Released: August 6, 2010 Notice: Price data for petroleum products will be changed from cents per gallon to dollars per gallon later this year for the 2010 data. Petroleum Marketing Annual --- Full report in PDF (1.2 MB) Summary Statistics Summary Statistics Tables PDF 1 Crude Oil Prices PDF TXT 1A Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil by PAD Districts PDF TXT 2 U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products to End Users PDF TXT 3 U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products to End Users PDF TXT 4 U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products for Resale PDF TXT 5 U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products for Resale PDF TXT 6 U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT 7 U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT

330

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: August 29, 2008 Petroleum Marketing Annual --- Full report in PDF (1.2 MB) Summary Statistics Summary Statistics Tables PDF 1 Crude Oil Prices PDF TXT 1A Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil by PAD Districts PDF TXT 2 U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products to End Users PDF TXT 3 U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products to End Users PDF TXT 4 U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products for Resale PDF TXT 5 U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products for Resale PDF TXT 6 U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT 7 U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT 8 U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT 9 U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT

331

Petroleum Marketing Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: August 27, 2009 Petroleum Marketing Annual --- Full report in PDF (1.2 MB) Summary Statistics Summary Statistics Tables PDF 1 Crude Oil Prices PDF TXT 1A Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil by PAD Districts PDF TXT 2 U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products to End Users PDF TXT 3 U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products to End Users PDF TXT 4 U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products for Resale PDF TXT 5 U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products for Resale PDF TXT 6 U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT 7 U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT 8 U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT 9 U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type PDF TXT

332

Waste minimization and pollution prevention initiatives within Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) boiler house operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of ANL-E Plant Facility and Services-Utilities and Systems (PFS-US) is to operate and maintain utility services in a cost-effective manner, while utilizing new and innovative methods whenever possible. PFS-US operates an on-site coal burning boiler plant that generates steam for use throughout the Laboratory as a source to heat buildings, as well as for use in research experiments. In the recent past, PFS-US has embarked upon a series of initiatives to improve operating efficiency of boiler house operations. The results of these projects have had the following impacts on boiler house performance and operations: (1) boiler house efficiency and operations have improved, (2) boiler house operating costs have been reduced, (3) specific operating and maintenance costs have been avoided or eliminated, and (4) the amount of waste and pollution generated has been reduced. Through the implementation of these initiatives, over $250,000 of revenue and cost savings have been incurred by ANL-E. In addition, the Laboratory and DOE will benefit annually from revenues, cost savings, and the reduction of environmental liability resulting from these initiatives.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

LNG Annual Report - 2009 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 LNG Annual Report - 2009 LNG Annual Report - 2009 LNG Annual Report - 2009 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2008...

334

Assessing the impact of changes in the electricity price structure on dairy farm energy costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study aims to provide information on the changes in electricity consumption and costs on dairy farms, through the simulation of various electricity tariffs that may exist in the future and how these tariffs interact with changes in farm management (i.e. shifting the milking operation to an earlier or later time of the day). A previously developed model capable of simulating electricity consumption and costs on dairy farms (MECD) was used to simulate five different electricity tariffs (Flat, Day&Night, Time of Use Tariff 1 (TOU1), TOU2 and Real Time Pricing (RTP)) on three representative Irish dairy farms: a small farm (SF), a medium farm (MF) and a large farm (LF). The Flat tariff consisted of one electricity price for all time periods, the Day&Night tariff consisted of two electricity prices, a high rate from 09:00 to 00:00h and a low rate thereafter. The TOU tariff structure was similar to that of the Day&Night tariff except that a peak price band was introduced between 17:00 and 19:00h. The RTP tariff varied dynamically according to the electricity demand on the national grid. The model used in these simulations was a mechanistic mathematical representation of the electricity consumption that simulated farm equipment under the following headings; milk cooling system, water heating system, milking machine system, lighting systems, water pump systems and the winter housing facilities. The effect of milking start time was simulated to determine the effect on electricity consumption and costs at farm level. The earliest AM milking start time and the latest PM milking start time resulted in the lowest energy consumption. The difference between the lowest and highest electricity consumption within a farm was 7% for SF, 5% for MF and 5% for LF. This difference was accounted for by the variation in the milk cooling system coefficient of performance. The greatest scope to reduce total annual electricity costs by adjusting milking start times was on TOU2 (39%, 34% and 33% of total annual electricity costs on the SF, MF and LF) and the least scope for reductions using this method was on the Flat tariff (7%, 5% and 7% of total annual electricity costs). The potential for reduction of annual electricity consumption and related costs per litre of milk produced by adjusting milking times was higher for the LF than the SF or MF across all electricity tariffs. It is anticipated that these results and the use of the MECD will help support the decision-making process at farm level around increasing energy efficiency and electricity cost forecasts in future electricity pricing tariff structures.

J. Upton; M. Murphy; L. Shalloo; P.W.G. Groot Koerkamp; I.J.M. De Boer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

EARTH SCIENCES DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the price of geothermal energy, a cost differential forcosts for and availability of energy. Several process plans of pulp and paper operations using geothermal

Authors, Various

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Electricity costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... index is used to correct for inflation. The short answer is given by the Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The ... Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The cost per kWh of fuel. . . rose by 18.6 per cent (between 1979 ...

J.W. JEFFERY

1982-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

337

Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Crude Oil Acquisition Report," July 1984 to present. 26. F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity 48 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996...

338

Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Crude Oil Acquisition Report," July 1984 to present. 26. F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity 48 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997...

339

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation lm001das2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Technical Cost...

340

Low Cost SiOx-Graphite and Olivine Materials | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cost SiOx-Graphite and Olivine Materials Low Cost SiOx-Graphite and Olivine Materials 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Annual Meeting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...operate daily between the airports and the meeting hotels...Washington Natonal Airport, 4-5 miles from city...approx. $6.00. Dulles InternaionalAiport...Baltimore-Washington International Airport, about 40 miles from...

ARTHUR HERSCHMAN

1981-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

342

A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Design and Manufacturing Optimization of Fuel Cells in Stationary and Emerging Market Applications - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Max Wei (Primary Contact), Tom McKone, Tim Lipman 1 , David Dornfeld 2 , Josh Chien 2 , Chris Marnay, Adam Weber, Paul Beattie 3 , Patricia Chong 3 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R-4000 Berkeley, CA 94706 Phone: (510) 486-5220 Email: mwei@lbl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: 1 University of California, Berkeley, Transportation Sustainability Research Center and DOE Pacific Region Clean Energy Application Center, Berkeley, CA 2 University of California, Berkeley, Laboratory for Manufacturing and Sustainability, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Berkeley, CA

343

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

COST REVIEW (ICR) COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) Revision 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (OAPM) September 2013 SUMMARY OF UPDATES: This revision includes the following significant changes since the December 2011 SOP release: 1. The original SOP discussed how an EIR and an ICE could be executed in tandem, but since we are no longer advocating this approach the ICE process has been completely separated from the EIR process and references to EIRs have been removed. 2. Section 1 adds a reference to Public Law 2055 reflecting that we must now, as a matter of law, perform an ICE at CD-3 for projects with a TPC over $100 million. 3. Section 2 notes that DOE Programs must now pay for ICRs and ICEs and reflects that PARS II must be

344

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

COST REVIEW (ICR) COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) Revision 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (OAPM) September 2013 SUMMARY OF UPDATES: This revision includes the following significant changes since the December 2011 SOP release: 1. The original SOP discussed how an EIR and an ICE could be executed in tandem, but since we are no longer advocating this approach the ICE process has been completely separated from the EIR process and references to EIRs have been removed. 2. Section 1 adds a reference to Public Law 2055 reflecting that we must now, as a matter of law, perform an ICE at CD-3 for projects with a TPC over $100 million. 3. Section 2 notes that DOE Programs must now pay for ICRs and ICEs and reflects that PARS II must be

345

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

346

RTO heat recovery system decreases production costs and provides payback  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of a heat recovery system to an existing regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) was considered, tested, and selected for decreasing production costs at a pressure sensitive tape manufacturing facility. Heat recovery systems on RTO's are less common than those on other thermal oxidizers (e.g., recuperative) because RTO's, by the nature of the technology, usually provide high thermal efficiencies (without the application of external heat recovery systems). In this case, the production processes were integrated with the emission controls by applying an external heat recovery system and by optimizing the design and operation of the existing drying and cure ovens, RTO system, and ductwork collection system. Integration of these systems provides an estimated annual production cost savings of over $400,000 and a simplified capital investment payback of less than 2 years, excluding possible savings from improved dryer operations. These additional process benefits include more consistent and simplified control of seasonal dryer performance and possibly production throughput increases. The production costs savings are realized by substituting excess RTO heat for a portion of the infrared (IR) electrical heat input to the dryers/ovens. This will be accomplished by preheating the supply air to the oven zones with the excess RTO heat (i.e., heat at the RTO exceeding auto-thermal conditions). Several technologies, including direct air-to-air, indirect air-to-air, hot oil-to-air, waste heat boiler (steam-to-air) were evaluated for transferring the excess RTO heat (hot gas) to the ovens. A waste heat boiler was selected to transfer the excess RTO heat to the ovens because this technology provided the most economical, reliable, and feasible operation. Full-scale production test trials on the coating lines were performed and confirmed the IR electrical costs could be reduced up to 70%.

Lundquist, P.R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

PRI Annual Report 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Annual Report highlights the activities and people that make PRI a multidisciplinary research center.

Maynard-Moody, Steven

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Project Listings by Organization; DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2009 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2009 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen Program 3M Company V.D.11 Novel Approaches to Immobilized Heteropoly Acid (HPA) Systems for High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Polymer-Type Membranes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1034 V.D.13 Membranes and MEAs for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1042 V.E.1 Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1065 A Mountaintop LLC VII.1 HyDRA: Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1267 Acumentrics Corporation V.I.5 Development of a Low Cost 3-10 kW Tubular SOFC Power System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1141 Addison Bain IX.7 Hydrogen Safety Panel

349

Denver: 128th Annual Meeting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...expert in his field and the entire...scientific fields to this co-operative...seconds, low-cost, safe operation, com-plete...new Basic Index-a current...biochemical field. The Book...Analysis of Gases in Metals...Continental Oil Company Booth...featured. The equipment aids in the...

1961-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

350

Oxygenation cost estimates for Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capital and annual costs associated with reoxygenation of the turbine releases at Cherokee, Douglas and Norris Reservoirs using the small bubble injection technique developed for Ft. Patrick Henry Dam were computed. The weekly average dissolved oxygen (DO) deficits were computed for each reservoir for an average year (based on 16 years of records). The total annual cost of an oxygen supply and injection system for each reservoir is presented. 5 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Fain, T.G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Supplement to the Annual Radiological Environmental Operating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The attachment to this letter contains a supplemental corrective update to the referenced report for calendar year 2004. There are no new regulatory commitments contained in this submittal We trust that the information provided is adequate; however, should you have questions or require additional information, please contact me at (802) 258-4236. Sincerely,

Vermont Yankee; Aames M. Devincentis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Cost of presumptive source term Remedial Actions Laboratory for energy-related health research, University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) is in progress at the Laboratory for Energy Related Health Research (LEHR) at the University of California, Davis. The purpose of the RI/FS is to gather sufficient information to support an informed risk management decision regarding the most appropriate remedial actions for impacted areas of the facility. In an effort to expedite remediation of the LEHR facility, the remedial project managers requested a more detailed evaluation of a selected set of remedial actions. In particular, they requested information on both characterization and remedial action costs. The US Department of Energy -- Oakland Office requested the assistance of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to prepare order-of-magnitude cost estimates for presumptive remedial actions being considered for the five source term operable units. The cost estimates presented in this report include characterization costs, capital costs, and annual operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. These cost estimates are intended to aid planning and direction of future environmental remediation efforts.

Last, G.V.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Josephson, G.B.; Lanigan, D.C.; Liikala, T.L.; Newcomer, D.R.; Pearson, A.W.; Teel, S.S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Pipeline Annual Data - 1996 Gas Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov » Communities » Energy » Data Pipeline Annual Data - 1996 Gas Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) Dataset Summary Description Pipeline operators (for gas distribution, gas transmission, and hazardous liquid pipelines) are required to submit an annual report to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration's Office of Pipeline Safety. The report includes information about the operator, a description of their system (main, services), leaks eliminated/repaired during the year, excavation damage, excess flow valves, and other information. Beginning in 2010, the form also includes information regarding integrity management programs.

354

Pipeline Annual Data - 1997 Gas Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Gas Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) 7 Gas Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov » Communities » Energy » Data Pipeline Annual Data - 1997 Gas Distribution Annuals Data (Zip) Dataset Summary Description Pipeline operators (for gas distribution, gas transmission, and hazardous liquid pipelines) are required to submit an annual report to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration's Office of Pipeline Safety. The report includes information about the operator, a description of their system (main, services), leaks eliminated/repaired during the year, excavation damage, excess flow valves, and other information. Beginning in 2010, the form also includes information regarding integrity management programs.

355

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets ­ Three main· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining-site management or corporate level expenditure · Direct vs. Indirect Costs ­ Direct (or variable) costs apply

Boisvert, Jeff

356

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408 ­ off-site management or corporate level expenditure · Direct vs. Indirect Costs ­ Direct (or variable

Boisvert, Jeff

357

Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable energy isnt just a catchphrase at Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern). It describes the hydroelectric energy we market, and the energy that Southwesterns employees bring to work every day, constantly challenging themselves to become more eff ective and effi cient in providing aff ordable, environmentally clean power to the American people. As Southwesterns new Administrator, I have had the opportunity to view our operations from a fresh perspective, and Im proud to share with you how a focus on continual improvement has been evident in accomplishments throughout the agency during fi scal year (FY) 2007. When the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) implemented new reliability standards, we met applicable implementation dates and exceeded NERCs control performance standards throughout the year. When tasked with reducing the agencys carbon footprint, we found ways to achieve an 8.7% reduction in energy intensity from last year without impacting our operational capabilities. And when faced with record-breaking infl ows into the reservoir projects from which we market power, we capitalized on the opportunity to provide customers with signifi cant quantities of supplemental energy. Our supplemental sales this year not only saved customers over $122 million, but increased Southwesterns revenues -- a huge win-win for Southwesterns ratepayers and the Nations taxpayers alike. Southwestern is proud of its role in protecting National and economic security by contributing to the diverse supply of domestically produced energy, operating and maintaining a safe and reliable transmission system, and ensuring good stewardship of our Nations water resources and environment. In FY 2007, Southwestern continued to repay all power costs to the American taxpayers by marketing and delivering approximately 5.6 billion kilowatthours of hydropower at cost-based rates to customers in our six-state region. This energy was generated from the 24 Federal hydroelectric projects in our marketing region, producing annual revenues of $161 million. In this time of rising energy costs, the Nations need for renewable energy has never been greater. Hydropower and the people of Southwestern stand ready to help meet that need.

none,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Revised July 2013 ANNUAL LIVING EXPENSES*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTIMATED UNDERGRADUATE COST** TOTAL: (includes Fall & Spring semesters only) $38,668.00 GLOBAL PATHWAYS Insurance: $ 1,740.00 Other Expenses: $ 5,166.00 Annual Living Expenses Total: $18,508.00 NON) $19,885.00 Matriculation Fee: (one time charge only) $125.00 Tuition & Fees Total: $20,160.00 TOTAL

Tipple, Brett

359

LNG Annual Report - 2011 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 LNG Annual Report - 2011 LNG Annual Report - 2011 (Revised 3152012) LNG Annual Report 2011 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2012 LNG Annual Report - 2013 LNG...

360

LNG Annual Report - 2007 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 LNG Annual Report - 2007 LNG Annual Report - 2007 (Revised 10102008) LNG Annual Report - 2007 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2008 LNG Annual Report - 2006...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

LNG Annual Report - 2010 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 LNG Annual Report - 2010 LNG Annual Report - 2010 LNG Annual Report - 2010 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2009 LNG Annual Report - 2008...

362

LNG Annual Report - 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 LNG Annual Report - 2012 LNG Annual Report - 2012 (Revised 3212013) LNG Annual Report - 2012 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2013 LNG Annual Report - 2011 LNG...

363

Draft 2014 Annual Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Draft 2014 Annual Plan Draft 2014 Annual Plan Section 999: Draft 2014 Annual Plan Section 999 - Draft 2014 Annual Plan More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Plan 2013...

364

DOE/EIA-0487(98) Petroleum Marketing Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pur- Pur- chase Report"; Form EIA-856, "Monthly For-eign Crude Oil Acquisition Report"; and Form EIA-14, "Re- finers' Monthly Cost Report." The statistics on petroleum product sales prices and volumes are derived from Form EIA-782A, "Refin-ers'/Gas Plant Operators' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report" and Form EIA-782B, "Re- sellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report." The data presented in Tables 48 to 50 are derived from aggregations of data from Form EIA-782C, "Monthly Report of Prime Supplier Sales of Petroleum Products Sold for Local Consumption." Sections Monthly statistics on purchases of crude oil and sales of petroleum products are presented in the Petroleum Marketing Annual in five sections: * Summary Statistics * Crude Oil Prices * Prices of Petroleum Products * Volumes of Petroleum

365

Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Dataset Summary Description The calculator provides information on the assumptions behind foodborne illness cost estimates and gives you a chance to make your own assumptions and calculate your own cost estimates. This interactive web-based tool allows users to estimate the cost of illness due to specific foodborne pathogens. The updated ERS cost estimate for Shiga-toxin producing E. coli O157 (STEC O157) was added to the Calculator in spring, 2008. Calculator users can now review and change the assumptions behind the ERS cost estimates for either STEC O157 or Salmonella. The assumptions that can be modified include the annual number of cases, the distribution of cases by severity, the use or costs of medical care, the amount or value of time lost from work, the costs of premature death, and the disutility costs for nonfatal cases. Users can also update the cost estimate for inflation for any year from 1997 to 2007.

366

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Richland  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Richland Richland Operations Office 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Richland Operations Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards. Individual site summaries developed at the end of each year are a basis for DOE Federal Technical Capability Panel reporting to the Secretary of Energy summarizing DOE's federal technical capabilities for defense nuclear facility safety assurance. 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - RL

367

Carbon Dioxide Transport and Storage Costs in NETL Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Operations of Plant, Transport and Storage ... 10 Exhibit 2 Pipeline Cost Breakdown (2011 Dollars) 1, 2, 3 ......

368

Estimating Specialty Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

369

Direct costing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oau 5e reduced. Under the same oonOitions, even ~Me on a bread scale entails not mere1y the conduct of the direct oyeraticns cf yrccessing the materials into finished products, but also the performance of auxiliary functions. these may 'ba power y... purposes have been advanced as folkway le Most of a o03RyaxO' 8 products Grc usual13r sold at prices which oovex' full product costs y plus 861ling a%el administrative expenses, plus normal profit. The inventoi~ valuate. on should be consistent...

Browning, Donald Bullock

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

370

COST AND QUALITY TABLES 95  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 Tables 5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) will no longer be pub- lished by the EIA. The tables presented in this docu- ment are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions regarding the availability of these data should be directed to: Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division

371

FY 2007 Annual Uncosted Balances Report | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Annual Uncosted Balances Reports » FY 2007 Annual Annual Uncosted Balances Reports » FY 2007 Annual Uncosted Balances Report FY 2007 Annual Uncosted Balances Report The Department faced significant challenges due to the unusually long Continuing Resolution (CR), which extended until April 2007. Under the CR the Department must act conservatively to ensure that obligations and costs are restrained in order to mitigate any negative impacts should actual appropriations differ significantly from planned and budgeted amounts. In addition, the Department is prohibited from engaging in any "new starts" for contracts or projects, which means that these activities are deferred until later in the year, thereby increasing the amount of uncosted balances at year-end since the costing cycle is, in essence, no longer on a fiscal

372

Cost Analysis Rate Settin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Analysis and Rate Settin for Animal Research Facilities #12;#12;Cost Analysis and Rate ... .. . ...................... . . . ................................. . .... 7 Chapter 2 Preparation for Cost Analysis ......................................................... 9 Chapter 3 Assignment of Costs to Animal Research Facility Cost Centers

Baker, Chris I.

373

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of such efforts based substantially on empirical data collected from operating facilities. The combined cycle, alternative technologies, combined cycle, simple cycle, integrated gasification combined cycle, coal cost and simple cycle costs are the result of a comprehensive survey of actual costs from the power plant

374

Operations and maintenance philosophy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Philosophy document is intended to establish a future O&M vision, with an increased focus on minimizing worker exposure, ensuring uninterrupted retrieval operations, and minimizing operation life-cycle cost. It is intended that this document would incorporate O&M lessons learned into on-going and future project upgrades.

DUNCAN, G.P.

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

375

Cost Sharing What is Cost Sharing?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cost Sharing What is Cost Sharing? x Cost sharing is a commitment to use university resources and Expenses o Equipment x Committing to cost share is highly discouraged unless required by the sponsoring agency x Tracking of committed cost share is required to meet federal regulations (OMB A-110) x UCSD has

Tsien, Roger Y.

376

Cost Study for Large Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost study for large wind turbine blades reviewed three blades of 30 meters, 50 meters, and 70 meters in length. Blade extreme wind design loads were estimated in accordance with IEC Class I recommendations. Structural analyses of three blade sizes were performed at representative spanwise stations assuming a stressed shell design approach and E-glass/vinylester laminate. A bill of materials was prepared for each of the three blade sizes using the laminate requirements prepared during the structural analysis effort. The labor requirements were prepared for twelve major manufacturing tasks. TPI Composites developed a conceptual design of the manufacturing facility for each of the three blade sizes, which was used for determining the cost of labor and overhead (capital equipment and facilities). Each of the three potential manufacturing facilities was sized to provide a constant annual rated power production (MW per year) of the blades it produced. The cost of the production tooling and overland transportation was also estimated. The results indicate that as blades get larger, materials become a greater proportion of total cost, while the percentage of labor cost is decreased. Transportation costs decreased as a percentage of total cost. The study also suggests that blade cost reduction efforts should focus on reducing material cost and lowering manufacturing labor, because cost reductions in those areas will have the strongest impact on overall blade cost.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Utility Systems Management and Operational Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The provision of an adequate and reliable supply of utilities (fuel, steam and power) represents a significant operating cost for many industrial companies. For many industries, the energy/utilities cost is the largest operating expense after...

Dhole, V.; Seillier, D.; Garza, K.

378

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0.88 million, the annual maintenance and surveillance cost is estimated to be about $0.095 million, and deferred decontamination is estimated to cost about $6.50 million. Therefore, passive SAFSTOR for 10 years is estimated to cost $8.33 million in nondiscounted 1981 dollars. DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to cost about $4.59 million, with an annual cost of $0.011 million for long-term care. All of these estimates include a 25% contingency. Waste management costs for DECON, including the net cost of disposal of the solvent extraction lagoon wastes by shipping those wastes to a uranium mill for recovery of residual uranium, comprise about 38% of the total decommissioning cost. Disposal of lagoon waste at a commercial low-level waste burial ground is estimated to add $10.01 million to decommissioning costs. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year committed dose equivalent to members of the public from airborne releases during normal decommissioning activities is estimated to 'Je about 4.0 man-rem. Radiation doses to the public from accidents are found to be very low for all phases of decommissioning. Occupational radiation doses from normal decommissioning operations (excluding transport operations) are estimated to be about 79 man-rem for DECON and about 80 man-rem for passive SAFSTOR with 10 years of safe storage. Doses from DECON with lagoon waste stabilization are about the same as for DECON except there is less dose resulting from transportation of radioactive waste. The number of fatalities and serious lost-time injuries not related to radiation is found to be very small for all decommissioning alternatives. Comparison of the cost estimates shows that DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is the least expensive method. However, this alternative does not allow unrestricted release of the site. The cumulative cost of maintenance and surveillance and the higher cost of deferred decontamination makes passive SAFSTOR more expensive than DECON. Seve

Elder, H. K.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Solar gas turbine systems: Design, cost and perspectives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combination of high solar shares with high conversion efficiencies is one of the major advantages of solar gas turbine systems compared to other solar-fossil hybrid power plants. Pressurized air receivers are used in solar tower plants to heat the compressed air in the gas turbine to temperatures up to 1000C. Therefore solar shares in the design case of 40% up to 90% can be realized and annual solar shares up to 30% can be achieved in base load. Using modern gas turbine systems in recuperation or combined cycle mode leads to conversion efficiencies of the solar heat from around 40% up to more than 50%. This is an important step towards cost reduction of solar thermal power. Together with the advantages of hybrid power plantsvariable solar share, fully dispatchable power, 24h operation without storagesolar gas turbine systems are expected to have a high potential for market introduction in the mid term view. In this paper the design and performance assessment of several prototype plants in the power levels of 1MW, 5MW and 15MW are presented. Advanced software tools are used for design optimization and performance prediction of the solar tower gas turbine power plants. Detailed cost assumptions for the solarized gas turbine, the solar tower plant and further equipment as well as for operation and maintenance are presented. Intensive performance and economic analysis of the prototype plants for different locations and capacity factors are shown. The cost reduction potential through automation and remote operation is revealed.

Peter Schwarzbzl; Reiner Buck; Chemi Sugarmen; Arik Ring; Ma Jess Marcos Crespo; Peter Altwegg; Juan Enrile

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

2006 TEPP Annual Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Emergency Preparedness Program 2006 Annual Report US Department of Energy - Offi ce of Environmental Management Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2006 Annual Report 2 2 Table of Contents Executive Summary.......................................................................................................................4 I. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Purpose.......................................6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Contractor Issues 2011 Annual Review | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contractor Issues 2011 Annual Review Contractor Issues 2011 Annual Review Contractor Issues 2011 Annual Review March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis SRR has released its 2011 Annual Review. SRR has released its 2011 Annual Review. AIKEN, S.C. - Savannah River Remediation (SRR), the liquid waste contractor at the Savannah River Site (SRS), has released its 2011 Annual Review available here. The document summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the safe and efficient liquid waste operations at SRS for the 2011 calendar year, which SRR President and Project Manager Dave Olson calls a year of excellence. "Our employees continue the legacy of safe leadership in processing high-level waste with an eye toward operationally closing waste tanks," Olson said. "We have made great strides in many areas."

382

Contractor Issues 2011 Annual Review | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contractor Issues 2011 Annual Review Contractor Issues 2011 Annual Review Contractor Issues 2011 Annual Review March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis SRR has released its 2011 Annual Review. SRR has released its 2011 Annual Review. AIKEN, S.C. - Savannah River Remediation (SRR), the liquid waste contractor at the Savannah River Site (SRS), has released its 2011 Annual Review available here. The document summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the safe and efficient liquid waste operations at SRS for the 2011 calendar year, which SRR President and Project Manager Dave Olson calls a year of excellence. "Our employees continue the legacy of safe leadership in processing high-level waste with an eye toward operationally closing waste tanks," Olson said. "We have made great strides in many areas."

383

Library Annual Report Library Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Library Annual Report 2007 Library Annual Report 2007 #12;www.library.uwa.edu.au Our mission: By delivering excellent information resources and services the Library is integral to the University's mission of advancing, transmitting and sustaining knowledge. Our vision: The Library will continue to be at the heart

Tobar, Michael

384

Cost Minimization in an Energy-Intensive Plant Using Mathematical Programming Approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cost Minimization in an Energy-Intensive Plant Using Mathematical Programming Approaches ... This creates a potential opportunity to reduce average operating costs by changing the operating mode and production rates depending on the power costs. ...

M. G. Ierapetritou; D. Wu; J. Vin; P. Sweeney; M. Chigirinskiy

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

385

Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology Comparison  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This cost of ownership analysis identifies the factors impacting the value proposition for fuel cell backup power and presents the estimated annualized cost of ownership for fuel cell backup power systems compared with the incumbent technologies of battery and diesel generator systems.

386

Costin2010US$(billions) A COSTLY ENTERPRISE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that roughly 3% of the country's annual GDP had been Financial model failed in real world David Lindley cites­2010, we originally projected an average cost per flight of about $800 million. The actual cost was about, with projected uncertainties. Thus, our 1992 projection indicates that the performance of large- scale

Colorado at Boulder, University of

387

An algorithm for minimization of quantum cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new algorithm for minimization of quantum cost of quantum circuits has been designed. The quantum cost of different quantum circuits of particular interest (eg. circuits for EPR, quantum teleportation, shor code and different quantum arithmetic operations) are computed by using the proposed algorithm. The quantum costs obtained using the proposed algorithm is compared with the existing results and it is found that the algorithm has produced minimum quantum cost in all cases.

Anindita Banerjee; Anirban Pathak

2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

ANNUAL REVIEW FACTSHEET WORKFLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the PhD has updated his T&SP (15. Second annual review). The PhD and the Promotor have to plan a date for the second annual review and the PhD has to enter that date in ProDoc (20 Date second annual review plannedANNUAL REVIEW FACTSHEET WORKFLOW PhD Candidate / Promotor / Dean / TGS / Doctorate Board / Pro

Twente, Universiteit

389

Annual Energy Review 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2002 125 a Unfinished oils, motor gasoline blending components, aviation gasoline blending components, and other...

390

Cost Sharing Basics Definitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Sharing Basics Definitions Some funding agencies require the grantee institution the project costs. Cost sharing is defined as project costs not borne by the sponsor. Cost sharing funds may resources or facilities. If the award is federal, only acceptable non-federal costs qualify as cost sharing

Finley Jr., Russell L.

391

Annual Report and Accounts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report and Accounts 2013�2014 The Research Agency of the Forestry CommissionHC 2 #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2013�2014 Presented to the House of Commons pursuant to Section 7 Annual Report and Accounts 2013�2014 Forest Research 1 #12;� Crown Copyright 2014 You may re

392

Operations Research Analyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as an Operations Research Analyst assigned to CEPE, in Washington, DC and is responsible for conducting independent cost and schedule estimates of...

393

Essays on Retail Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-fraction and all-or-none inspection. We further perform a case study to identify deficiencies of store operating practices given different risk preferences. Our findings provide practical guidelines for managers to design cost-efficient inspection policy...

Chuang, Hao-Chun

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

394

FULL-COST ACCOUNTING  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

FULL-COST ACCOUNTING ... Environmental costs would be built into a product's cost, and consumers would be able to make informed purchases. ...

1993-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

The energy consumption and economic costs of different vehicles used in transporting woodchips  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the weak points in the energy-wood chain is the transport of woodchips from the forestry yard to the power station. This operation is critical because the vehicles used must be very versatile to operate under different conditions while maintaining low operating costs. The goal of this study is to implement the information on this topic by examining the different categories of vehicles that are considered to be appropriate for this purpose. For each category of vehicle, the working time, working rate, fuel consumption, energy costs and economic costs were processed. Tests were conducted using both agricultural convoys (tractor+trailer) and industrial vehicles (lorries). All vehicles were tested on short itineraries of approximately 5, 15 and 25km and on long itineraries of 50, 100 and 200km. The study showed that on routes longer than 25km, lorries had the highest average transfer speed (42kmh?1) whereas agricultural vehicles had the lowest (24kmh?1). The transport costs depending on the distance, the type of vehicle used and the unit cost (km?1) were high, especially for distances less than 20km (up to 5km?1). The application of these values to a biomass-fed thermal power unit of 1MW with an annual use of 2000h and a supply of biofuels in the radius of 75km shows that 1500hyear?1 are needed for the bestowal of chips to power the unit (3700tss). The total cost for a lorry is approximately 148,000year?1 and approximately four times higher for agricultural convoys. The energy required to transport the woodchips is approximately 90MJm?3 loose chips for agricultural vehicles and 35MJm?3 loose chips for lorries. In both cases, these values represent a small claim (2%) of the energy value of the biomass transported.

Marco Manzone; Paolo Balsari

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

397

Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and posted 2/10/2011 and posted 2/10/2011 *Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain $50,000 FONSI: uncertain Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost $70,000 Attachment: Memo, Moody to Marcinowski, III, SUBJECT: NEPA 2011 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: Annual NEPA Planning Summary Environmental Assessments (EAs) Expected to be Initiated in the Next 12 Months Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Jan-11 Estimated Schedule (**NEPA Milestones) South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Industrial Stormwater General Permit (IGP) # SCR000000 November 12, with an effective date of January

398

Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Report summarizes the waste generation and pollution prevention activities of the major operational sites in the Department of Energy (DOE). We are witnessing progress in waste reduction from routine operations that are the focus of Department-wide reduction goals set by the Secretary on May 3,1996. The goals require that by the end of 1999, we reduce, recycle, reuse, and otherwise avoid waste generation to achieve a 50 percent reduction over 1993 levels. This Report provides the first measure of our progress in waste reduction and recycling against our 1993 waste generation baseline. While we see progress in reducing waste from our normal operations, we must begin to focus attention on waste generated by cleanup and facilities stabilization activities that are the major functions of the Office of Environmental Management. Reducing the generation of waste is one of the seven principles that I have established for the Office of Environmental Management Ten Year Plan. As part of our vision to complete a major portion of the environmental cleanup at DOE sites over the next ten years, we must utilize the potential of the pollution prevention program to reduce the cost of our cleanup program. We have included the Secretarial goals as part of the performance measures for the Ten Year Plan, and we are committed to implementing pollution prevention ideas. Through the efforts of both Federal and contractor employees, our pollution prevention program has reduced waste and the cost of our operations. I applaud their efforts and look forward to reporting further waste reduction progress in the next annual update of this Report.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

400

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

402

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2007, 2010, and 2015, and is the first annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

403

Cost-Effectiveness Ratio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cost?effectiveness ratio (CER) is acalculation that summarizes the intervention's net cost and effectiveness. The three types of CER are: the average cost?effectiveness ratio (ACER), the marginal cost?...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Cost Share-Cost Reimbursement Invoice Format Example | The Ames...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Share-Cost Reimbursement Invoice Format Example Effective Date: 102014 File (public): Cost Share-Cost...

405

OPT Annual Report, FY 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OPT Annual Report, FY 2012 OPT Annual Report, FY 2012 i Executive Summary The Office of Environmental Management (EM) was established to mitigate the risks and hazards posed by the legacy of nuclear weapons production and research. The most ambitious and far ranging of these missions is dealing with the environmental legacy of the Cold War. Many problems posed by its operations are unique, and include the transportation of unprecedented amounts of contaminated waste, water, and soil, and a vast number of contaminated structures during remediation of the contaminated sites. Since Fiscal Year (FY) 2004, EM has completed over 150,000 shipments of radioactive material and waste. The mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Packaging and Transportation (OPT) positioned

406

The impacts of duct design on life cycle costs of central residential heating and air-conditioning systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many central residential HVAC systems in the U.S. operate at high external static pressures due to a combination of system restrictions. Undersized and constricted ductwork are thought to be key culprits that lead to excess external static pressures in many systems, although the magnitude of energy impacts associated with restrictive ductwork and the costs or benefits associated with addressing the problem are not well known. Therefore, this work uses annual energy simulations of two typical new single-family homes in two separate climates in the United States (Austin, TX and Chicago, IL) to predict the impacts of various external static pressure ductwork designs from independent HVAC contractors (using both flexible and rigid sheet metal ductwork materials) on annual space conditioning energy use. Results from the simulations are combined with estimates of the initial installation costs of each duct design made by each contractor to evaluate the total life cycle costs or savings of using lower pressure duct designs in the two homes over a 15-year life cycle. Lower pressure ductwork systems generally yielded life cycle cost savings, particularly in homes with PSC blowers and particularly when making comparisons with constant ductwork materials (i.e., comparing flex only or rigid only).

Brent Stephens

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Costs, Savings and Financing Bulk Tanks on Texas Dairy Farms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

\\ BULLETIN 904 MAY 1958 .t(. :a ,s - / cwdh\\@ Costs, Savi~gs;.itd Financing Bulk Tanks on Texas Dairy Farms . ?. I I 1 i I I ! ,:ravings in hauling - 10 cents I \\ \\ 1 \\ savings in hauling - 15 cents -----------____--- 'savings... in hauling - 20 cents Annual production, 1,000 pounds Estimated number of years required for savings from a bulk tank to equal additional costs at different levels of production and savings in hauling costs. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMEN'T STATION R. D...

Moore, Donald S.; Stelly, Randall; Parker, Cecil A.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

NREL is a na*onal laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. A Survey of State-Level Cost and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy, LLC. A Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Es7mates-funded by EERE's Solar Energy Technologies Office, and the Na*onal Electricity Delivery. Download report: hSp://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy14os*/61042.pdf or hSp://emp.lbl.gov/publica*ons/survey-state-level-cost-and-benefit

409

Residential photovoltaic systems costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of costs associated with the installation and operation of a residential photovoltaic system has been conducted to determine present and projected (1986) status. As a basis for the study, a residential photovoltaic system design projected for 1986 was assumed, consisting of two principal components: a roof-mounted array and a utility-interactive inverter. The scope of the study encompassed both silicon and cadmium sulfide photovoltaic modules. Cost estimates were obtained by a survey and study of reports generated by companies and agencies presently active in each of the subsystem area. Where necessary, supplemental estimates were established as part of this study. The range of estimates for silicon-based systems strongly suggest that such systems will be competitive for new installations and reasonably competitive for retrofit applications. The cadmium-sulfide-based system cost estimates, which are less certain than those for silicon, indicate that these systems will be marginally competitive with silicon-based systems for new construction, but not competitive for retrofit applications. Significant variations from the DOE system price sub-goals were found, however, particularly in the areas of array mounting, wiring and cleaning. Additional development work appears needed in these areas.

Cox, C.H. III

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Analytical model for solar PV and CSP electricity costs: Present LCOE values and their future evolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we first make a review of the past annual production of electricity and the cumulative installed capacity for photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. This together with the annual costs of PV modules and CSP systems allows us the determination of the experience curves and the corresponding learning rates. Then, we go over a rigorous exposition of the methodology employed for the calculation of the value of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for PV and CSP. Based on this knowledge, we proceed to establish a mathematical model which yields closed-form analytical expressions for the present value of the LCOE, as well as its future evolution (20102050) based on the International Energy Agency roadmaps for the cumulative installed capacity. Next, we explain in detail how specific values are assigned to the twelve independent variables which enter the LCOE formula: solar resource, discount and learning rates, initial cost and lifetime of the system, operational and maintenance costs, etc. With all this background, and making use of a simple computer simulation program, we can generate the following: sensitivity analysis curves, graphs on the evolution of the LCOE in the period 20102050, and calculations of the years at which grid parities will be reached. These representations prove to be very useful in energy planning policies, like tariff-in schemes, tax exemptions, etc., and in making investment decisions, since they allow, for a given location, to directly compare the costs of PV vs CSP power generation technologies for the period 20102050. Among solar technologies, PV seems always more appropriate for areas located in middle to high latitudes of the Earth, while CSP systems, preferably with thermal storage incorporated, yield their best performance in arid areas located at relatively low latitudes.

J. Hernndez-Moro; J.M. Martnez-Duart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

23rd steam-station cost survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of the 23rd Steam Station Cost Survey covering the year 1982 are summarized. The major categories of the survey are as follows: general data; output data, 1982; fuel consumption, 1982; operation 1982 (mills/net kWh); investment ($/net kWh); energy cost, 1982 (mills/net kWh); and station performance, 1982. Thirty-one fossil-fuel steam plants and four nuclear stations were included in the survey. Fuel and operating cost increases are felt to be responsible for the moderate rise in total busbar-enery costs. 11 figures, 1 table.

Friedlander, G.D.; Going, M.C.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

2008 Annual Site Environmental Report Summary Pamphlet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annual Site Environmental Report Summary Pamphlet Annual Site Environmental Report Summary Pamphlet 1 2008 ASER Summary Pamphlet Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. SAND 2009-4984P annual site environmental report 2 Sandia National Laboratories Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, make any

414

Uranium Marketing Annual Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Uranium Marketing Annual Report Uranium Marketing Annual Report With Data for 2012 | Release Date: May 16, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 | full report Previous uranium marketing annual reports Year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 Go Uranium purchases and prices Owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors ("civilian owner/operators" or "COOs") purchased a total of 58 million pounds U3O8e (equivalent1) of deliveries from U.S. suppliers and foreign suppliers during 2012, at a weighted-average price of $54.99 per pound U3O8e. The 2012 total of 58 million pounds U3O8e increased 5 percent compared with the 2011 total of 55 million pounds U3O8e. The 2012 weighted-average price of

415

FTCP Annual Report - Fiscal Year 2004 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 FTCP Annual Report - Fiscal Year 2004 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to ensuring employees are trained and technically capable of performing their duties. In pursuit of this objective, the Secretary of Energy issued DOE Policy 426.1, Federal Technical Capability Policy for Defense Nuclear Facilities, to institutionalize the Federal Technical Capability Program. Report summarizes the yearly actions taken to ensure organizations maintain their critical technical capabilities needed for the safe operations of defense nuclear facilities. FTCP 2004 Annual Report More Documents & Publications FTCP Annual Plan - Fiscal Year 2005 Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Sandia Site Office FTCP Annual Report - Calendar Year 2007

416

NNSA hosts annual Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Symposium |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

annual Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Symposium | annual Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Symposium | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA hosts annual Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Symposium NNSA hosts annual Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Symposium Posted By Office of Public Affairs

417

LNG Annual Report - 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Annual Report - 2013 LNG Annual Report - 2013 LNG Annual Report - 2013 LNG 2013.pdf More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2012 LNG Monthly Report - August 2014...

418

LNG Annual Report - 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 LNG Annual Report - 2008 LNG Annual Report - 2008 (Revised 10142009) LNG Annual Report - 2008 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2009...

419

LM Annual Post Competition Accountability Reports | Department...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LM Annual Post Competition Accountability Reports LM Annual Post Competition Accountability Reports Third Annual Post Competition Accountability Report Second Annual Post...

420

Cost effectiveness of converting to alternative motor vehicle fuels. A technical assistance study for the City of Longview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The City of Longview can obtain significant fuel savings benefits by converting a portion of their vehicle fleet to operate on either compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquid petroleum gas (LPG) fuels. The conversion of 41 vehicles including police units, sedans, pickups, and light duty trucks to CNG use would offset approximately 47% of the city's 1982 gasoline consumption. The CNG conversion capital outlay of $115,000 would be recovered through fuel cost reductions. The Cascade Natural Gas Corporation sells natural gas under an interruptible tariff for $0.505 per therm, equivalent to slightly less than one gallon of gasoline. The city currently purchases unleaded gasoline at $1.115 per gallon. A payback analysis indicates that 39.6 months are required for the CNG fuel savings benefits to offset the initial or first costs of the conversion. The conversion of fleet vehicles to liquid petroleum gas (LPG) or propane produces comparable savings in vehicle operating costs. The conversion of 59 vehicles including police units, pickup and one ton trucks, street sweepers, and five cubic yard dump trucks would cost approximately $59,900. The annual purchase of 107,000 gallons of propane would offset the consumption of 96,300 gallons of gasoline, or approximately 67% of the city's 1982 usage. Propane is currently retailing for $0.68 to $0.74 per gallon. A payback analysis indicates that 27.7 months are required for the fuel savings benefits to offset the initial LPG conversion costs.

McCoy, G.A.

1983-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

,"New York Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release...

422

Expanding Robust HCCI Operation (Delphi CRADA) | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

(Delphi CRADA) Expanding Robust HCCI Operation (Delphi CRADA) 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

423

2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Richland  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Richland 2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Richland Operations Office 2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Richland Operations Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards. Individual site summaries developed at the end of each year are a basis for DOE Federal Technical Capability Panel reporting to the Secretary of Energy summarizing DOE's federal technical capabilities for defense nuclear facility safety assurance.

424

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Richland  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Richland 2 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Richland Operations Office 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Richland Operations Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards. Individual site summaries developed at the end of each year are a basis for DOE Federal Technical Capability Panel reporting to the Secretary of Energy summarizing DOE's federal technical capabilities for defense nuclear facility safety assurance.

425

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- NNSA HQ  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

426

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- NNSA HQ  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

427

2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- NNSA HQ  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

428

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2005 Annual Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2005 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

Paul M. Bertsch

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

429

2014 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report- NNSA HQ  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.

430

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory FY2006 Annual Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FY2006 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of the University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, County, SC.

Paul M. Bertsch

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

431

Cost Modeling and Design Techniques for Integrated Package Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Modeling and Design Techniques for Integrated Package Distribution Systems Karen R. Smilowitz idealizations of network geometries, operating costs, demand and customer distributions, and routing patterns that approximate the total cost of operation. The design problem is then reduced to a series of optimization

Daganzo, Carlos F.

432

Industrial heat pumps - types and costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Confusion about energy savings and economics is preventing many potentially beneficial applications for industrial heat pumps. The variety of heat pumps available and the lack of a standard rating system cause some of this confusion. The authors illustrate how a simple categorization based on coefficient of performance (COP) can compare the cost of recovering waste energy with heat pumps. After evaluating examples in which the cost of energy delivered was calculated based on estimates of capital cost, operating costs, and maintenance costs, they compare heat pumps from the various categories on the basis of economics. 6 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

Chappell, R.N.; Bliem, C.J. Jr.; Mills, J.I.; Demuth, O.J.; Plaster, D.S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Fuel Performance Annual Report for 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report, the third in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance in conmercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel surveillance programs and operating experience, fuel performance problems, and fuel design changes are provided. References to additional, more detailed, information and related NRC evaluation are included.

Bailey, W. J.; Rising, K. H.; Tokar, M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Sustainability Annual Report | 2013 President's Message  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability Annual Report | 2013 #12;#12;President's Message To continue our commitment to ensuring a sustainable campus and campus community, advancements have been made in all areas of sustainability at McMaster, including physical and operational upgrades to campus grounds and infrastructure

Thompson, Michael

435

Trade-off between collector area, storage volume, and building conservation in annual-storage solar-heating systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual storage is used with active solar heating systems to permit storage of summertime solar heat for winter use. The results of a comprehensive computer simulation study of the performance of active solar heating systems with long-term hot water storage are presented. A unique feature of this study is the investigation of systems used to supply backup heat to passive solar and energy-conserving buildings, as well as to meet standard heating and hot water loads. Findings show that system output increases linearly as storage volume increases, up to the point where the storage tank is large enough to store all heat collected in summer. This point, the point of unconstrained operation, is the likely economic optimum. Unlike diurnal storage systems, annual storage systems show only slightly diminished efficiency as system size increases. Annual storage systems providing nearly 100% solar space heat may cost the same or less per unit heat delivered as a 50% diurnal solar system. Also in contrast to diurnal systems, annual storage systems perform efficiently in meeting the load of a passive or energy-efficient building.

Sillman, S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Water and Associated Costs in the Production of Cotton and Grain Sorghum, Texas High Plains, 1955.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a very low price for his labor. Water constitutes one of the largest items of expense in preharvest costs, but substantial re- ductions in water cost seem unlikely. One pro- spect is to reduce fuel costs by a shift to natural gas. Natural gas... lines cost about $1,000 per well; consequently, the shift is advisable only if the annual fuel requirements are large. For large wells, a shift to natural gas would reduce annual costs of fuel substantially, and the savings would be sufficient...

Magee, A. C.; Hughes, William F.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Chapter 6 - Subsea Cost Estimation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter provides guidelines for cost estimation during a project feasibility study, where the accuracy range is between 30% for subsea field development projects. Subsea cost refers to the cost of the whole project, which generally includes the capital expenditures (CAPEX) and operation expenditures (OPEX) of the subsea field development. The feasibility studies are performed before execution of the project, which may include three phases as shown in the figure: prefield development; conceptual/feasibility study; and front-end engineering design (FEED). Cost estimations are made for several purposes, and the methods used for the estimations as well as the desired amount of accuracy will be different. The cost estimation classifications according to Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering (AACE): level of project definition: expressed as percentage of complete definition; end usage: typical purpose of estimation; methodology: typical estimating method; expected accuracy range: typical range relative to best index of 1; and preparation effort: typical degree of effort relative to least cost index of 1.

Yong Bai; Qiang Bai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

SSAP annual now available | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SSAP annual now available | National Nuclear Security Administration SSAP annual now available | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > SSAP annual now available SSAP annual now available Posted By Office of Public Affairs The 2013 Stewardship Science Academic Programs annual (SSAP) is now available online. The annual focuses on various programs within the SSAP

439

SSAP annual now available | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

SSAP annual now available | National Nuclear Security Administration SSAP annual now available | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > SSAP annual now available SSAP annual now available Posted By Office of Public Affairs The 2013 Stewardship Science Academic Programs annual (SSAP) is now available online. The annual focuses on various programs within the SSAP

440

Cost Implications of Reduced Work Hours and Workloads for Resident Physicians  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...substantial costs were not included. Shifting residents' work to substitute providers or an expanded population of residents would generate the labor costs. Secondary objectives included estimating potential net costs to major teaching hospitals and cost-effectiveness to society specifically, costs per averted... The Institute of Medicine recently made new recommendations to reduce the work hours and workload of residents. This economic analysis suggests that implementation of these recommendations would be costly (annual labor costs, $1.6 billion), but if they are highly effective in reducing patient harm, they may be cost-effective.

Nuckols T.K.Bhattacharya J.Wolman D.M.Ulmer C.Escarce J.J.

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

United States Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (Early Release) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (Early Release) Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (Early Release) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: United States Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (Early Release) Focus Area: Other Renewable Electricity Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/er/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/united-states-annual-energy-outlook-2 Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: Utility/Electricity Service Costs The Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO2012) reference case overview evaluates a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for

442

Costs of Generating Electrical Energy 1.0 Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

period for coal, petroleum, and natural gas are by factors of 1.72, 7.27, and 1 "Conversion" here does1 Costs of Generating Electrical Energy 1.0 Overview The costs of electrical energy generation can of electric energy out of the power plant. 2.0 Fuels Fuel costs dominate the operating costs necessary

McCalley, James D.

443

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual . 1996 Published October 1997 1997 Published October 1998 1998 Published October 1999 1999 Published October 2000 2000 Published December 2001...

444

Annual Report Generator.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This report analyzes the needs to build an annual report generator which has the properties of Modularity, Simplicity in use and Maintainability based on (more)

Lin, Yingwei

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

446

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

447

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

448

BPA 2002 Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STATEMENTS 2002 Annual Report of the Bonneville Power Administration Cover photo BPA fish biologist Andy Thoms (upper right) works with students from H.B. Lee Middle School...

449

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

and may differ slightly from official EIA data reports. Sources: 2010 data based on: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 28 and Annual (Oak...

450

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Federal Highway Administration, Highway Statistics 2009 (Washington, DC, April 2011); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 30 and Annual (Oak...

451

2007 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report includes: a brief overview of Western; FY 2007 highlights; FY 2007 Integrated Resource Planning, or IRP, survey; and financial data.

none,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Annual Performance Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico October 2014 Doc. No. S12021 Page i Contents Abbreviations ......

453

NLC Annual Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National League of Cities (NLC) is hosting its annual Congressional City Conference in Washington, D.C., from March 7-11, 2015.

454

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Regional maps Figure F3. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts 216 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Figure F3. Petroleum...

455

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

36 Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 6 Table A3. Energy prices by sector and source (2010 dollars per million Btu, unless otherwise...

456

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Table G1. Heat rates Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

457

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-- -- -- -- not reported. See notes at end of table. (continued on next page) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 116 Comparison with other...

458

SFU LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SFU LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT 2006/07 #12;22 TABLE OF CONTENTS Message from the University Librarian................................................... ....................................... 7 WAC Bennett Library.................................................................. ....................................... 8 Samuel and Frances Belzberg Library

459

Annual Coal Distribution Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distribution Report Release Date: December 19, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 12, 2014 | full report | RevisionCorrection Revision to the Annual Coal Distribution Report...

460

EMSL 2009 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EMSL 2009 Annual Report describes the science conducted at EMSL during 2009 as well as outreach activities and awards and honors received by users and staff.

Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.; Wiley, Julie G.; Reed, Jennifer R.

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

SPEER Third Annual Summit  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The South-Central Partnership for Energy Efficiency as a Resource (SPEER) is hosting their 3rd Annual Summit in Dallas, Texas.

462

OPSI Annual Meeting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Organization of PJM States, Inc. (OPSI) is hosting its annual meeting in Chicago, IL, on October 13-14, 2014.

463

DOE Selects ASE to Manage and Operate its National Renewable Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ASE to Manage and Operate its National Renewable Energy ASE to Manage and Operate its National Renewable Energy Laboratory DOE Selects ASE to Manage and Operate its National Renewable Energy Laboratory July 29, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the Alliance for Sustainable Energy (ASE) LLC has been selected as the management and operating contractor for DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. The cost-plus award-fee contract is valued at approximately $1.1 billion, subject to annual appropriations, over a five-year contract period. The contract includes an option to extend it for up to five additional years. "While there is certainly no 'silver bullet' that will solve the world's energy problems, we know that renewable energy and efficiency technologies

464

Annual Planning Summaries: Oak Ridge Office (OR) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge Office (OR) Oak Ridge Office (OR) Annual Planning Summaries: Oak Ridge Office (OR) Document(s) Available For Download February 23, 2012 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Oak Ridge Office The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within the Oak Ridge Office. January 28, 2011 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Oak Ridge Operations Office (OR) The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Oak Ridge Operations Office (OR) (See Environmental Management and Science). February 1, 2010 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Oak Ridge (OR) Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, any EAs expected to be prepared in the next 12

465

Annual Performance Plan: IG-APP-005 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plan: IG-APP-005 Plan: IG-APP-005 Annual Performance Plan: IG-APP-005 February 1, 2003 Planning for and Measuring Office of Inspector General Results FY 2002 Annual Performance Report and FY 2003 Annual Performance Plan We are pleased to present the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) consolidated Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Performance Report and Fiscal Year 2003 Annual Performance Plan. This document evaluates our actual Fiscal Year (FY) 2002 performance and establishes the performance goals and strategies we will pursue in FY 2003 to fulfill our mission. As mandated by the Inspector General Act, the OIG promotes the effective, efficient, and economical operation of the Department of Energy's programs and operations, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

466

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA HQ |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA HQ 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA HQ 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA HQ Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards. Individual site summaries developed at the end of each year are a basis for DOE Federal Technical Capability Panel reporting to the Secretary of Energy summarizing DOE's federal technical capabilities for defense nuclear facility safety assurance. 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NA-SH

467

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA HQ |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA HQ Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA HQ 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA HQ Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards. Individual site summaries developed at the end of each year are a basis for DOE Federal Technical Capability Panel reporting to the Secretary of Energy summarizing DOE's federal technical capabilities for defense nuclear facility safety assurance. 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NA-SH

468

Unit Cost Natural Gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281532 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Natural Gas Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

469

Unit Cost Electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281518 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Electricity Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

470

A Low-Cost Natural Gas/Freshwater Aerial Pipeline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Offered is a new type of low-cost aerial pipeline for delivery of natural gas, an important industrial and residential fuel, and freshwater as well as other payloads over long distances. The offered pipeline dramatically decreases the construction and operation costs and the time necessary for pipeline construction. A dual-use type of freight pipeline can improve an arid rural environment landscape and provide a reliable energy supply for cities. Our aerial pipeline is a large, self-lofting flexible tube disposed at high altitude. Presently, the term "natural gas" lacks a precise technical definition, but the main components of natural gas are methane, which has a specific weight less than air. A lift force of one cubic meter of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg. The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in the Earth-atmosphere at high altitude and poses no threat to airplanes or the local environment. The authors also suggest using lift force of this pipeline in tandem with wing devices for cheap shipment of a various payloads (oil, coal and water) over long distances. The article contains a computed macroproject in northwest China for delivery of 24 billion cubic meter of gas and 23 millions tonnes of water annually.

Alexander Bolonkin; Richard Cathcart

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

471

Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

472

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence · Approach · Implementation · Results · Discussion Process · Summary #12;3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal $) EIA Annual Energy Outlook, 2005 Ratio of FCV fuel economy to evolved gasoline ICE 2.40 NRC H2 Economy Liquid Distribution $0.28 $1.06 $2.54 $3.88 Central Wind Electrolysis Pipeline Distribution $0.01 $6

473

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - EM Consolidated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM EM Consolidated Business Center 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - EM Consolidated Business Center Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards. Individual site summaries developed at the end of each year are a basis for DOE Federal Technical Capability Panel reporting to the Secretary of Energy summarizing DOE's federal technical capabilities for defense nuclear facility safety assurance. 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - EMCBC

474

2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - EM Consolidated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM EM Consolidated Business Center 2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - EM Consolidated Business Center Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards. Individual site summaries developed at the end of each year are a basis for DOE Federal Technical Capability Panel reporting to the Secretary of Energy summarizing DOE's federal technical capabilities for defense nuclear facility safety assurance. 2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - EMCBC

475

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - EM Consolidated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM EM Consolidated Business Center 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - EM Consolidated Business Center Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards. Individual site summaries developed at the end of each year are a basis for DOE Federal Technical Capability Panel reporting to the Secretary of Energy summarizing DOE's federal technical capabilities for defense nuclear facility safety assurance. 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - EMCBC

476

Navy Lowering Upfront Costs to Save Energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Navy Lowering Upfront Costs to Save Energy Navy Lowering Upfront Costs to Save Energy Navy Lowering Upfront Costs to Save Energy June 21, 2010 - 11:23am Addthis This hangar at Naval Air Station Meridian in Mississippi received an energy-efficiency makeover that included major lighting retrofits and water conservation measures. | Photo Courtesy U.S. Navy This hangar at Naval Air Station Meridian in Mississippi received an energy-efficiency makeover that included major lighting retrofits and water conservation measures. | Photo Courtesy U.S. Navy Joshua DeLung What does this mean for me? 2 mechanical project upgrades, 16 lighting project upgrades and 19 water conservation measures $267,565 in taxpayer money saved annually 3.1 million gallons of water saved annuallym 1,889 MWh of electricity saved annually and 56,118 therms natural gas saved annually

477

Annual Report School of Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report 1999-2000 School of Engineering University of Connecticut #12;#12;University of Connecticut School of Engineering Annual Report 1999-2000 Table of Contents School of Engineering Annual Report Summary................................................................................... 3

Alpay, S. Pamir

478

University of Lethbridge Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Lethbridge Annual Report 2011/12 #12; i University of Lethbridge 2011/12 Annual Report ACCOUNTABILITY STATEMENT The University of Lethbridge Annual Report for the year ended March 31, 2012 was prepared

Seldin, Jonathan P.

479

Uranium industry annual 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual operating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Demonstrating Economic and Operational Viability of 72-Hour Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems to Support Emergency Communications on the Sprint Nextel Network - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Kevin Kenny Sprint Nextel 12000 Sunrise Valley Drive MS: VARESQ0401-E4064 Reston, VA 20191 Phone: (703) 592-8272 Email: kevin.p.kenny@sprint.com DOE Managers HQ: Sara Dillich Phone: (202) 586-7925 Email: Sara.Dillich@ee.doe.gov GO: James Alkire Phone: (720) 356-1426 Email: James.Alkire@go.doe.gov Contract Number: EE-0000486 Project Partners: * Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (Fuel Project Partner) * Altergy Systems, Folsum, CA (PEM Fuel Cell Project Partner) * Black & Veatch Corporation, Overland Park, KS (A&E

482

Incorporating uncertainty in the Life Cycle Cost Analysis of pavements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) is an important tool to evaluate the economic performance of alternative investments for a given project. It considers the total cost to construct, maintain, and operate a pavement over its ...

Swei, Omar Abdullah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Activity Based Costing  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

484

Levelized Electricity Costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of levelized energy costs responds to the necessity of disclosing the ... in order to recover the total life cycle cost of energy production. This chapter charts the effectiveness of levelized cost fo...

Nuno Luis Madureira

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

2004 TEPP Annual Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transportation Transportation Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2004 Annual Report United States Department of Energy Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) 2004 Annual Report Table of Contents Executive Summary..................................................................................... 1 I. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Purpose ...... 3 II. Training.............................................................................................. 3 III. Outreach and Conferences ............................................................... 5 IV. Go-Kits ............................................................................................... 5 V. TEPP Exercise and Tabletop Activities ..........................................

486

Annual Fire Safety Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 Annual Fire Safety Report University of California, Irvine HIGHER EDUCATION OPPORTUNITY to the Fire Safety in Student Housing Buildings of current or perspective students and employees be reported publish an annual fire safety report, keep a fire log, and report fire statistics to the Secretary

Loudon, Catherine

487

Information Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Technology Services 2012­13 Annual Report #12;#12;Contents Administrative Information ______117 Telecommunications and Networking Services __151 #12;#12;5 ITS 2012-13 Administrative Information Services INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES Administrative Information Services 2012­13 Annual Report

Maroncelli, Mark

488

Annual Energy Review, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions.

None

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

ANNUAL SECURITY FIRE SAFETY REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY REPORT OCTOBER 1, 2013 DARTMOUTH COLLEGE http................................................................................................................................................................... 7 ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT........................................................................................................................9 PREPARATION OF THE REPORT AND DISCLOSURE OF CRIME STATISTICS

490

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 10, 11 and 16. 2003-2013-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". million pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent 1 Includes purchases between...

491

Entanglement cost in practical scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We quantify the one-shot entanglement cost of an arbitrary bipartite state, that is the minimum number of singlets needed by two distant parties to create a single copy of the state up to a finite accuracy, using local operations and classical communication only. This analysis, in contrast to the traditional one, pertains to scenarios of practical relevance, in which resources are finite and transformations can only be achieved approximately. Moreover, it unveils a fundamental relation between two well-known entanglement measures, namely, the Schmidt number and the entanglement of formation. Using this relation, we are able to recover the usual expression of the entanglement cost as a special case.

Francesco Buscemi; Nilanjana Datta

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

492

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

493

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

494

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

495

Facilities and Administrative Cost Recovery Annual Report FY 2009 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; 43,441; 1% Private; 245,344; 3% Sources of F&A Revenue FY 2010 Federal State Local Private #12,795 250,513 183,413 222,549 Energy (DOE) 8,555 21,391 25,5

Dodla, Ramana

496

Reducing power production costs by utilizing petroleum coke. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

Galbreath, K.C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

information NREL has developed the following cost of energy tools: System Advisor Model (SAM): https:sam.nrel.gov SAM makes performance predictions and cost of...

498

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2006, DOE/EIA- M068(2006). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

499

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is com