National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for annual electricity consumption

  1. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  2. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  3. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  4. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  5. Derived Annual Estimates of Manufacturing Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    > Derived Annual Estimates - Executive Summary Derived Annual Estimates of Manufacturing Energy Consumption, 1974-1988 Figure showing Derived Estimates Executive Summary This...

  6. Annual Power Electric

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Annual Update / Revision Data for 2014 updated: February 16, 2016 February 16, 2016 Table update: The following tables are being withheld pending the availability of additional data: Table 8.5. Revenue and Expense Statistics for U.S. Cooperative Borrower-Owned Electric Utilities Table 8.6.A. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, Actual Table 8.6.B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation

  7. Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity...

  8. Electric power annual 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

  9. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

  10. Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

  11. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2006-03-07

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  12. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2008-09-02

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  13. Electric power annual 1996. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1--with a focus on US electric utilities--contains final 1996 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1996 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA. Data published in the Electric Power Annual Volume 1 are compiled from three statistical forms filed monthly and two forms filed annually by electric utilities. These forms are described in detail in the Technical Notes. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  14. Electric Power Annual 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Energy Source and Cooling System Type U.S. Energy ... 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year 2014 Year 2013 Year ... dependent upon customer class and consumption occurring ...

  15. Electric power annual 1994. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-21

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels.

  16. Table C10. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,,,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per Square Foot (kWh)","per...

  17. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    40: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing Fact 840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing Electricity generated ...

  18. Annual Energy Consumption Analysis Report for Richland Middle School

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Bing

    2003-12-18

    Richland Middle School is a single story, 90,000 square feet new school located in Richland, WA. The design team proposed four HVAC system options to serve the building. The proposed HVAC systems are listed as following: (1) 4-pipe fan coil units served by electrical chiller and gas-fired boilers, (2) Ground-source closed water loop heat pumps with water loop heat pumps with boiler and cooling tower, and (3) VAV system served by electrical chiller and gas-fired boiler. This analysis estimates the annual energy consumptions and costs of each system option, in order to provide the design team with a reasonable basis for determining which system is most life-cycle cost effective. eQuest (version 3.37), a computer-based energy simulation program that uses the DOE-2 simulation engine, was used to estimate the annual energy costs.

  19. Electric power annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-08

    This report presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and state levels: generating capability and additions, net generation, fossil-fuel statistics, retail sales and revenue, finanical statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, demand side management, nonutility power producers. Purpose is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets.

  20. Electric Power Annual 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 1999 through 2010" ,"(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Interconnection","NERC Regional Assesment Area","Net Internal Demand (MW)[1] -- Summer" ,,,"Actual",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Projected"

  1. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square...

  2. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity...

  3. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region" "1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected" "megawatts and percent" "Interconnection","NERC Regional Assesment Area","Net Internal Demand (MW)[1] -- Summer" ,,"Actual",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Projected"

  4. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Below is...

  5. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 1. Net Energy for load, actual and projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 1990-2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected thousands of megawatthours Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2014E 2015E 2016E FRCC 142,502 146,903 147,464 153,468 159,861 169,021 173,377 175,557 188,384 188,598 196,561 200,134 211,116 219,021 220,335

  6. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2001-2011 Actual, 2012-2016 Projected megawatts and percent Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 2001/ 2002 2002/ 2003 2003/ 2004 2004/ 2005 2005/ 2006 2006/ 2007 2007/ 2008 2008/ 2009 2009/ 2010 2010/ 2011 2011/ 2012 2012/ 2013E 2013/ 2014E 2014/ 2015E 2015/ 2016E 2016/ 2017E FRCC 39,699 42,001 36,229 41,449 42,493 45,993 46,093 45,042 51,703 45,954 39,924

  7. Electric Power Annual 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 | Release Date: February 16, 2016 | Next Release Date: February 2017 | full report Previous issues Year: 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 prior to 2001 Go Electric industry sales to ultimate customers statistics by state State Sales to ultimate customers (million kWh) Revenue (thousand dollars) Customers Alabama 90,494 8,386,390 2,537,927 Alaska 6,165 1,076,133 333,742 Arizona 76,298 7,764,422 2,981,625 Arkansas 47,080 3,720,556 1,566,538 California 262,585

  8. Derived annual estimates of manufacturing energy consumption, 1974--1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-05

    This report presents a complete series of annual estimates of purchased energy used by the manufacturing sector of the US economy, for the years 1974 to 1988. These estimates interpolate over gaps in the actual data collections, by deriving estimates for the missing years 1982--1984 and 1986--1987. For the purposes of this report, ``purchased`` energy is energy brought from offsite for use at manufacturing establishments, whether the energy is purchased from an energy vendor or procured from some other source. The actual data on purchased energy comes from two sources, the US Department of Commerce Bureau of the Census`s Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) and EIA`s Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). The ASM provides annual estimates for the years 1974 to 1981. However, in 1982 (and subsequent years) the scope of the ASM energy data was reduced to collect only electricity consumption and expenditures and total expenditures for other purchased energy. In 1985, EIA initiated the triennial MECS collecting complete energy data. The series equivalent to the ASM is referred to in the MECS as ``offsite-produced fuels.``

  9. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Noncoincident peak load, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 1990-2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected megawatts Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2014E 2015E 2016E FRCC 27,266 28,818 30,601 32,823 32,904 34,524 35,444 35,375 38,730 37,493 37,194 39,062 40,696 40,475 42,383 46,396 45,751 46,676 44,836 46,550 45,722 44,968 45,613

  10. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region 1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected megawatts and percent Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2014E 2015E 2016E FRCC 27,162 27,773 28,898 29,435 30,537 31,649 31,868 32,874 34,562 34,832 35,666 38,932 37,951 40,387 42,243 45,950

  11. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - electricity section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on electricity generation, capacity, end-use, fuel use and stocks, and retail price.

  12. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - electricity section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2016-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on electricity generation, capacity, end-use, fuel use and stocks, and retail price.

  13. Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2012-09-04

    Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods are described. According to one aspect, an electrical energy consumption control apparatus includes processing circuitry configured to receive a signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by a plurality of loads at a site, to compare the signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by the plurality of loads at the site with a desired substantially sinusoidal waveform of current of electrical energy which is received at the site from an electrical power system, and to use the comparison to control an amount of the electrical energy which is consumed by at least one of the loads of the site.

  14. Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and...

  15. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  16. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  17. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  18. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  19. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  20. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  1. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  2. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  3. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  4. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  5. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  6. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using...

  7. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  8. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  9. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  10. Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity - Energy...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity With data for 2010 | Release Date: December 11, ... renewable energy consumption, and solar and geothermal combined ...

  11. Electric power annual 1998. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this report, Electric Power Annual 1998 Volume 1 (EPAVI), is to provide a comprehensive overview of the electric power industry during the most recent year for which data have been collected, with an emphasis on the major changes that occurred. In response to the changes of 1998, this report has been expanded in scope. It begins with a general review of the year and incorporates new data on nonutility capacity and generation, transmission information, futures prices from the Commodity futures Trading commission, and wholesale spot market prices from the pennsylvania-new Jersey-Maryland Independent System Operator and the California Power Exchange. Electric utility statistics at the Census division and State levels on generation, fuel consumption, stocks, delivered cost of fossil fuels, sales to ultimate customers, average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold, and revenues from those retail sales can be found in Appendix A. The EPAVI is intended for a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric power industry, and the general public.

  12. Electric power annual 1994. Volume 2, Operational and financial data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-28

    This year, the annual is published in two volumes. Volume I focused on US electric utilities and contained final 1994 data on net generation, fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost. This Volume II presents annual 1994 summary statistics for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are preliminary data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on form EIA-861) and for electric utility financial statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, and demand- side management. Final 1994 data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity and gross generation, as well as supply and disposition information, are also provided in Volume II. Technical notes and a glossary are included.

  13. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Electric Power Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual

  14. Table 6b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total...

  15. Electricity - Annual Disturbance Events Archive

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Annual Disturbance Events Annual Disturbance Events Archive Last Updated - April 2014 Major Disturbances and Unusual Occurrences 2013 NA excel 2012 NA excel 2011 NA excel 2010 NA ...

  16. Electric power annual 1995. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding U.S. electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S. Department of Energy. In the private sector, the majority of the users of the Electric Power Annual are researchers and analysts and, ultimately, individuals with policy- and decisionmaking responsibilities in electric utility companies. Financial and investment institutions, economic development organizations interested in new power plant construction, special interest groups, lobbyists, electric power associations, and the news media will find data in the Electric Power Annual useful. In the public sector, users include analysts, researchers, statisticians, and other professionals with regulatory, policy, and program responsibilities for Federal, State, and local governments. The Congress and other legislative bodies may also be interested in general trends related to electricity at State and national levels. Much of the data in these reports can be used in analytic studies to evaluate new legislation. Public service commissions and other special government groups share an interest in State-level statistics. These groups can also compare the statistics for their States with those of other jurisdictions.

  17. Annual outlook for US electric power, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-04-24

    This document includes summary information on the ownership structure of the US electric utility industry, a description of electric utility regulation, and identification of selected factors likely to affect US electricity markets from 1985 through 1995. This Outlook expands upon projections first presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1985, offering additional discussion of projected US electricity markets and regional detail. It should be recognized that work on the Annual Energy Outlook 1985 had been completed prior to the sharp reductions in world oil prices experienced early in 1986.

  18. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grades: All Topics: Biomass, Wind Energy, Hydropower, Solar, Geothermal Owner: The NEED Project Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and...

  19. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Power Annual 1997, Volume 2 contains annual summary statistics at national, regional, and state levels for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; power transactions; and demand-side management. Also included are data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity; gross generation; emissions; and supply and disposition of energy. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. 15 figs., 62 tabs.

  20. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    This is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's second study to help provide a better understanding of the factors impacting residential energy consumption and intensity in ...

  1. Annual Electric Utility Data - EIA-906/920/923 Data File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    923 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-906/920) The survey Form EIA-923 collects detailed electric power data -- monthly and annually -- on electricity generation, fuel consumption, fossil fuel stocks, and receipts at the power plant and prime mover level. Specific survey information provided: Schedule 2 - fuel receipts and costs Schedules 3A & 5A - generator data including generation, fuel consumption and stocks Schedule 4 - fossil fuel stocks Schedules 6 & 7 - non-utility

  2. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Electricity Delivery and Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and ...

  3. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Electricity Delivery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability The ongoing and projected Environmental ...

  4. Electricity in US energy consumption. [Percentages for 1973 to 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studness, C.M.

    1984-09-13

    The share of US energy consumption devoted to electric generation rose sharply again in 1983. Of 70.573 quadrillion Btu consumed nationally last year, 35.4% or 24.975 quadrillion Btu were used for electric generation. This represented an increase from 34.3% in 1982. Significantly, the share of the nation's energy consumption accounted for by electric generation has risen just as rapidly during the ten years since the Arab oil embargo in 1973 as it did during the decade leading up to the embargo. Electricity's share of energy consumption rose 7.3 percentage points from only 19.5% in 1963 to 26.8% in 1973 and another 8.6 percentage points during the last ten years to 35.4% in 1983. Moreover, electricity's share of energy consumption has grown in each of the ten years since the embargo. The nation's energy consumption actually fell 0.4% in 1983, and it declined 4.9% or roughly 0.4% per year during 1973 to 1983. By contrast, energy consumed in electric generation rose 2.9% last year and grew 2.3% per year during the last decade.

  5. Electric Power Annual 2014 - U.S. Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for...

  6. Derived annual estimates of manufacturing energy consumption, 1974--1988. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-05

    This report presents a complete series of annual estimates of purchased energy used by the manufacturing sector of the US economy, for the years 1974 to 1988. These estimates interpolate over gaps in the actual data collections, by deriving estimates for the missing years 1982--1984 and 1986--1987. For the purposes of this report, purchased'' energy is energy brought from offsite for use at manufacturing establishments, whether the energy is purchased from an energy vendor or procured from some other source. The actual data on purchased energy comes from two sources, the US Department of Commerce Bureau of the Census's Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) and EIA's Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). The ASM provides annual estimates for the years 1974 to 1981. However, in 1982 (and subsequent years) the scope of the ASM energy data was reduced to collect only electricity consumption and expenditures and total expenditures for other purchased energy. In 1985, EIA initiated the triennial MECS collecting complete energy data. The series equivalent to the ASM is referred to in the MECS as offsite-produced fuels.''

  7. Capacity utilization and fuel consumption in the electric power industry, 1970-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, E.W.

    1982-07-01

    This report updates the 1980 Energy Information Administration (EIA) publication entitled Trends in the Capacity Utilization and Fuel Consumption of Electric Utility Powerplants, 1970-1978, DOE/EIA-184/32. The analysis covers the period from 1970 through 1981, and examines trends during the period prior to the 1973 Arab oil embargo (1970-1973), after the embargo (1974-1977), and during the immediate past (1978-1981). The report also addresses other factors affecting the electric utility industry since the oil embargo: the reduction in foreign oil supplies as a result of the 1979 Iranian crisis, the 1977 drought in the western United States, the 1978 coal strike by the United Mine Workers Union, and the shutdown of nuclear plants in response to the accident at Three Mile Island. Annual data on electric utility generating capacity, net generation, and fuel consumption are provided to identify changes in patterns of power plant capacity utilization and dispatching.

  8. Environmental effects of interstate power trading on electricity consumption mixes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Marriott; H. Scott Matthews

    2005-11-15

    Although many studies of electricity generation use national or state average generation mix assumptions, in reality a great deal of electricity is transferred between states with very different mixes of fossil and renewable fuels, and using the average numbers could result in incorrect conclusions in these studies. The authors create electricity consumption profiles for each state and for key industry sectors in the U.S. based on existing state generation profiles, net state power imports, industry presence by state, and an optimization model to estimate interstate electricity trading. Using these 'consumption mixes' can provide a more accurate assessment of electricity use in life-cycle analyses. It is concluded that the published generation mixes for states that import power are misleading, since the power consumed in-state has a different makeup than the power that was generated. And, while most industry sectors have consumption mixes similar to the U.S. average, some of the most critical sectors of the economy - such as resource extraction and material processing sectors - are very different. This result does validate the average mix assumption made in many environmental assessments, but it is important to accurately quantify the generation methods for electricity used when doing life-cycle analyses. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Lifestyle Factors in U.S. Residential Electricity Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanquist, Thomas F.; Orr, Heather M.; Shui, Bin; Bittner, Alvah C.

    2012-03-30

    A multivariate statistical approach to lifestyle analysis of residential electricity consumption is described and illustrated. Factor analysis of selected variables from the 2005 U.S. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) identified five lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices associated with air conditioning, laundry usage, personal computer usage, climate zone of residence, and TV use. These factors were also estimated for 2001 RECS data. Multiple regression analysis using the lifestyle factors yields solutions accounting for approximately 40% of the variance in electricity consumption for both years. By adding the associated household and market characteristics of income, local electricity price and access to natural gas, variance accounted for is increased to approximately 54%. Income contributed only {approx}1% unique variance to the 2005 and 2001 models, indicating that lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices better account for consumption differences than income. This was not surprising given the 4-fold range of energy use at differing income levels. Geographic segmentation of factor scores is illustrated, and shows distinct clusters of consumption and lifestyle factors, particularly in suburban locations. The implications for tailored policy and planning interventions are discussed in relation to lifestyle issues.

  10. Sandia Energy - Second Annual Electric Power Research Institute...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Second Annual Electric Power Research InstituteSandia Photovoltaic Systems Symposium Home Renewable Energy Energy Facilities Grid Integration News Distribution Grid Integration...

  11. Expected annual electricity bill savings for various PPA price...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Expected annual electricity bill savings for various PPA price options Jump to: navigation, search Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics Bill savings tables (main section): When...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress Report | Department of Energy Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report The Electric Drive Technologies research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research is focused on developing power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system

  13. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Electricity Delivery and Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reliability | Department of Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. PDF icon APS-2012-OE.pdf More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) EIS-0447: Amended Notice of Intent to

  14. Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Electricity Working Group Meeting-72413

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Analysis Team Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis Office of Energy Analysis Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Electricity Working Group Meeting July 24, 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Reference Case: Key Changes 2 Electricity Analysis Team, July 24th, 2013 * Environmental Rules - Updates to NEMS modeling of MATS - RGGI cap tightened to reflect February 2013 MOU * Enhancements - Reserve margins and capacity payments - Spinning and operating reserves - Operations

  15. Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) for Electric Systems Program's specific mission is to work in partnership with industry to develop HTS wire and perform other research and development activities leading to the commercialization of HTS-based

  16. Annual Public Electric Utility data - EIA-412 data file

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    412 Archive Data (The EIA-412 survey has been terminated.) The EIA-412 "Annual Electric Industry Financial Report" collected information such as income statements, balance sheets, sales and purchases, and transmission line data. Form EIA-412 data Schedules Year 2 Electric Balance Sheet 3 Electric Income Statement 4 Electric Plant 5 Taxes, Tax Equivalents, Contributions, and Services During Year 6 Sales of Electricity for Resale (Account 447) 7 Electric Operation and Maintenance

  17. Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.

  18. Modifications to incorporate competitive electricity prices in the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe modifications to the Electricity Market Module (EMM) for the Annual Energy Outlook 1998. It describes revisions necessary to derive competitive electricity prices and the corresponding reserve margins.

  19. Electric power annual 1995. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

  20. Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Renewable Electricity Working Group

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Renewable Electricity Working Group Summary, Aug. 2, 2012 On Thursday, August 2 EIA held the first of two Renewable Electricity Working Groups to discuss issues related to the development of the Annual Energy Outlook 2013. The meeting was well attended by stakeholders from EIA, other DOE staff, industry associations, and interested consultants. Attendance included those there in person and through conference call/web interface. The meeting agenda can be found on Page 2

  1. Electric Power Annual 2013 - Energy Information Administration

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    electricity imports from and electricity exports to Canada and Mexico XLS Table 2.14. Green pricing customers by end use sector XLS Net Generation Table 3.1.A. Net generation...

  2. Consumption of the electric power inside silent discharge reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yehia, Ashraf

    2015-01-15

    An experimental study was made in this paper to investigate the relation between the places of the dielectric barriers, which cover the surfaces of the electrodes in the coaxial cylindrical reactors, and the rate of change of the electric power that is consumed in forming silent discharges. Therefore, silent discharges have been formed inside three coaxial cylindrical reactors. The dielectric barriers in these reactors were pasted on both the internal surface of the outer electrode in the first reactor and the external surface of the inner electrode in the second reactor as well as the surfaces of the two electrodes in the third reactor. The reactor under study has been fed by atmospheric air that flowed inside it with a constant rate at normal temperature and pressure, in parallel with the application of a sinusoidal ac voltage between the electrodes of the reactor. The electric power consumed in forming the silent discharges inside the three reactors was measured as a function of the ac peak voltage. The validity of the experimental results was investigated by applying Manley's equation on the same discharge conditions. The results have shown that the rate of consumption of the electric power relative to the ac peak voltage per unit width of the discharge gap improves by a ratio of either 26.8% or 80% or 128% depending on the places of the dielectric barriers that cover the surfaces of the electrodes inside the three reactors.

  3. Annual Outlook for US Electric Power, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-12

    This report provides a history and projections of US electric utility markets. It includes summary information on the production of electricity, its distribution to end-use sectors, and on electricity, its distribution to end-use sectors, and on electricity costs and prices. Further, this publication describes the ownership structure of the industry and the operations of utility systems and outlines basic electricity generating technologies. The historical information covers the period from 1882 through 1984, while projections extend from 1985 through 1995. 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Electric power annual 1989. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-17

    This publication presents a summary of electric utility statistics at the national, regional and state levels. The Industry At A Glance'' section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance; a review of key statistics for the year; and projections for various aspects of the electric power industry through 2010. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; electricity sales, revenue and average revenue per kilowatthour sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; and electric power transactions. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. 24 figs., 57 tabs.

  5. Annual Electric Generator data - EIA-860 data file

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    60 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-860A/860B) Release Date: October 21, 2015 Final 2014 data Next Release Date: October 15, 2016 Re-Release 2014 data: February 8, 2016 (CORRECTION) The survey Form EIA-860 collects generator-level specific information about existing and planned generators and associated environmental equipment at electric power plants with 1 megawatt or greater of combined nameplate capacity. Summary level data can be found in the Electric Power Annual. Detailed data

  6. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  7. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil...

  8. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  9. Annual Electric Utility Data - EIA-906/920/923 Data File

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    923 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-906920) The survey Form EIA-923 collects detailed electric power data -- monthly and annually -- on electricity generation, fuel...

  10. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  11. Effects of Feedback on Residential Electricity Consumption: A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    none of which were elec- trically heated; each had an electric stove, dryer, dishwasher, and water heater. The researchers installed 24-h chart recorders in each residence...

  12. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Electricity Generation and Fuel Consumption Models

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Model Documentation: Electricity Generation and Fuel Consumption Models January 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Model Documentation: Electricity Generation and Fuel Consumption Models i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts

  13. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in Indias Housing Sector

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector November 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of

  14. Estimating Monthly 1989-2000 Data for Generation, Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly Energy Review, Section 7: Estimating Monthly 1989-2000 Data for Generation, Consumption, and Stocks For 1989-2000, monthly and annual data were collected for electric ...

  15. Fuel consumption of freight trains hauled by diesel electric locomotives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radford, R.W.

    1983-05-01

    The cost of railway diesel fuel has become an increasingly high proportion of railway operating expenses. The paper analyzes the generation and utilization of rail horsepower in freight train operations. The effects on fuel consumption of variations in several parameters including train consist, car weight, gradient, average speed, meet strategy, throttle control, locomotive axle arrangement, and train marshalling are examined. Estimates are made of the value, in terms of fuel cost, of weight reduction of freight cars and of selective train marshalling.

  16. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Electricity Delivery and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Reliability | Department of Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2013 and 2014 within the Carlsbad Field Office. PDF icon OE-NEPA-APS-2013 More Documents & Publications 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 2011 Annual Planning Summary for

  17. Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, Aaron; New, Joshua Ryan; Chandler, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    Building energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Calibrating models is costly because it is currently an art which requires significant manual effort by an experienced and skilled professional. An automated methodology could significantly decrease this cost and facilitate greater adoption of energy simulation capabilities into the marketplace. The Autotune project is a novel methodology which leverages supercomputing, large databases of simulation data, and machine learning to allow automatic calibration of simulations to match measured experimental data on commodity hardware. This paper shares initial results from the automated methodology applied to the calibration of building energy models (BEM) for EnergyPlus (E+) to reproduce measured monthly electrical data.

  18. A simple tool for estimating city-wide annual electrical energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A simple tool for estimating city-wide annual electrical energy savings from cooler surfaces Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on ...

  19. Energy consumption and expenditure projections by population group on the basis of the annual energy outlook 1999 forecast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poyer, D.A.; Balsley, J.H.

    2000-01-07

    This report presents an analysis of the relative impact of the base-case scenario used in Annual Energy Outlook 1999 on different population groups. Projections of energy consumption and expenditures, as well as energy expenditure as a share of income, from 1996 to 2020 are given. The projected consumption of electricty, natural gas, distillate fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas during this period is also reported for each population group. In addition, this report compares the findings of the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 report with the 1998 report. Changes in certain indicators and information affect energy use forecasts, and these effects are analyzed and discussed.

  20. Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Peng, J.

    2011-02-24

    Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2015 Electric Drive Technologies Annual R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress Report | Department of Energy 5 Electric Drive Technologies Annual R&D Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2015 Electric Drive Technologies Annual R&D Progress Report The Electric Drive Technologies research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research is focused on developing power electronics (PE), electric motor, and

  2. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    The NEED Project and the U.S. Department of Energy have collaborated to bring you this educational four-page guide to energy, electricity, consumption and efficiency. It includes, on the last page, a home energy survey to help you analyze your home energy use.

  3. A Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, Jordan; Newmark, Robin; Heath, Garvin; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    This report provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The presented water factors may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available.

  4. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption and Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE / EERE / NEED Project

    2011-06-07

    The NEED Project and the U.S. Department of Energy have collaborated to bring you this educational four-page guide to energy, electricity, consumption and efficiency. It includes, on the last page, a home energy survey to help you analyze your home energy use.

  5. International Energy Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-14

    This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules.

  6. Annual Energy Review, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions.

  7. International energy annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar, and wind electric power, biofuels energy for the US, and biofuels electric power for Brazil. New in the 1996 edition are estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum and coal, and the consumption and flaring of natural gas. 72 tabs.

  8. Annual Steam-Electric Plant Operation and Design Data (EIA-767 data file)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity data files > Form EIA-767 Form EIA-767 historical data files Data Released: November 02, 2006 Next Release: None(discontinued) Annual steam-electric plant operation and design data Historical data files contain annual data from organic-fueled or combustible renewable steam-electric plants with a generator nameplate rating of 10 or more megawatts. The data are derived from the Form EIA-767 "Steam-Electric Plant Operation and Design Report." The files contains data on

  9. Delivered Energy Consumption Projections by Industry in the Annual Energy Outlook 2002

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents delivered energy consumption and intensity projections for the industries included in the industrial sector of the National Energy Modeling System.

  10. Annual Energy Outlook 2016: Electricity Sector Preliminary Results

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Sector Preliminary Results For Electricity AEO2016 Working Group February 10, 2016| Washington, DC By EIA, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear & Renewables Analysis WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Summary 2 Electricity Analysis Team February 10, 2016 * Address issues raised by stakeholders * Discuss recent developments- updates to generator status and capital costs * Present preliminary AEO2016 forecast

  11. Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End Use, 2003 (Trillion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End Use, 2003 (Trillion Btu) End Use Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other 1 Total All Buildings 167 481 436 88 1,340 24 381 69 156 418 3,559 Principal Building Activity Education 15 74 83 11 113 2 16 4 32 21 371 Food Sales 6 12 7 Q 46 2 119 2 2 10 208 Food Service 10 28 24 10 42 13 70 2 2 15 217 Health Care 6 34 42 2 105 1 8 4 10 36 248 Inpatient 3 25 38 2 76 1 4 2 7 21

  12. Determinants of residential electricity consumption: Using smart meter data to examine the effect of climate, building characteristics, appliance stock, and occupants' behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavousian, A; Rajagopal, R; Fischer, M

    2013-06-15

    We propose a method to examine structural and behavioral determinants of residential electricity consumption, by developing separate models for daily maximum (peak) and minimum (idle) consumption. We apply our method on a data set of 1628 households' electricity consumption. The results show that weather, location and floor area are among the most important determinants of residential electricity consumption. In addition to these variables, number of refrigerators and entertainment devices (e.g., VCRs) are among the most important determinants of daily minimum consumption, while number of occupants and high-consumption appliances such as electric water heaters are the most significant determinants of daily maximum consumption. Installing double-pane windows and energy-efficient lights helped to reduce consumption, as did the energy-conscious use of electric heater. Acknowledging climate change as a motivation to save energy showed correlation with lower electricity consumption. Households with individuals over 55 or between 19 and 35 years old recorded lower electricity consumption, while pet owners showed higher consumption. Contrary to some previous studies, we observed no significant correlation between electricity consumption and income level, home ownership, or building age. Some otherwise energy-efficient features such as energy-efficient appliances, programmable thermostats, and insulation were correlated with slight increase in electricity consumption. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Sales, Revenue, and Average Price Correction/Update Annual data revisions: January 13, 2016 The re-release of the form EIA-861 survey data: January 13, 2016 Revenue data values were revised due to enhancements to the SEDAPs imputation system. Contact: Electricity data experts

  14. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption and Expenditures Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Consumption Wood and Solar Energy Consumption Fuel Oil and District Heat Consumption Energy Consumption in...

  15. Renewable Electricity in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    For Renewable Electricity Working Group July 24, 2014 Christopher Namovicz and Gwen Bredehoeft Renewable Electricity Analysis Team AEO2014 results and status updates for the AEO2015 Agenda Renewable Electricity Analysis Team July 24, 2014 2 * Review of AEO2014 - Changes made for AEO2014 - Review of Results * Status of AEO2015 * Updates planned for AEO2015 WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Updates included in the AEO2014

  16. Renewable Electricity in the Annual Energy Outlook 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2014 For Renewable Electricity Working Group AEO2014 Second Meeting September 26, 2013 Christopher Namovicz and Gwen Bredehoeft, Renewable Electricity Analysis Team Agenda Renewable Electricity Analysis Team, September 26, 2013 2 * Status of AEO2014 and future development plans * Data and model updates - PTC expiration update - Capital costs - Transmission - 860 (planned capacity) data - Polysys integration - Spinning reserves - RPS updates * Preliminary Results for the AEO2014 Reference case

  17. FY2015 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research is focused on developing power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive ...

  18. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Electricity Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    will be passed through to prices. - Impact: results in slightly more CC builds and ... CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Environmental Rules 3 Electricity Analysis Team ...

  19. Annual Electric Utility Data - Form EIA-906 Database

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Detailed data files > Historic Form EIA-906 Historic Form EIA-906 Detailed Data with previous form data (EIA-759) Historic electric utility data files include information on net ...

  20. Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Report -- 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.; DeVoto, D.; Moreno, G.; Rugh, J.; Waye, S.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the research into advanced liquid cooling, integrated power module cooling, high temperature air cooled power electronics, two-phase cooling for power electronics, and electric motor thermal management by NREL's Power Electronics group in FY13.

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Buildings Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption/Sales (Percent) Buildings Delivered Total | Total Industry Transportation Total (10^15 Btu) 1980 | 60.9% 38.9% 0.2% 100% | 7.15 1981 | 61.4% 38.5% 0.1% 100% | 7.33 1982 | 64.1% 35.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.12 1983 | 63.8% 36.1% 0.2% 100% | 7.34 1984 | 63.2% 36.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.80 1985 | 63.8% 36.0% 0.2% 100% | 7.93 1986 | 64.8% 35.1% 0.2% 100% | 8.08 1987 | 64.9% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 8.38 1988 | 65.0% 34.8% 0.2% 100% | 8.80 1989 | 64.8% 35.0% 0.2% 100% |

  2. FY2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-12-01

    The Electric Drive Technologies research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research is focused on developing power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will reduce system cost and improve their efficiency in transforming battery energy to useful work. The R&D is also aimed at better understanding and improving how various components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  3. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    FILES Electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency Form EIA-861 detailed data files Release Date: October 21, 2015 Final 2014 data Next Release date: October 15, 2016 Annual data for 2014 re-released: January 13, 2016 (Revision\Correction) The Form EIA-861 and Form EIA-861S (Short Form) data files include information such as peak load, generation, electric purchases, sales, revenues, customer counts and demand-side management programs, green pricing and net metering programs, and

  4. Profiling Real-Time Electricity Consumption Data for Process Monitoring and Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A

    2013-01-01

    Today, smart meters serve as key assets to utilities and their customers because they are capable of recording and communicating real-time energy usage data; thus, enabling better understanding of energy usage patterns. Other potential benefits of smart meters data include the ability to improve customer experience, grid reliability, outage management, and operational efficiency. Despite these tangible benefits, many utilities are inundated by data and remain uncertain about how to extract additional value from these deployed assets outside of billing operations. One way to overcome this challenge is the development of new metrics for classifying utility customers. Traditionally, utilities classified their customers based on their business nature (residential, commercial, and industrial) and/or their total annual consumption. While this classification is useful for some operational functions, it is too limited for designing effective monitoring and control strategies. In this paper, a data mining methodology is proposed for clustering and profiling smart meters data in order to form unique classes of customers exhibiting similar usage patterns. The developed clusters could help utilities in identifying opportunities for achieving some of the benefits of smart meters data.

  5. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 DETAILED DATA Revisions \ Corrections for electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency Form EIA-861 detailed data files Annual data revisions: January 13, 2016 The re-release of the form EIA-861 survey data: January 13, 2016 Revenue data values were revised due to enhancements to the SEDAPs imputation system.

  6. Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Short Tons Barrels Short Tons Barrels Thousand Cubic Feet Billion Btu Billion Btu Billion Btu Electricity-Only Plants 11<//td> 1989 767,378,330 25,574,094 241,960,194 3,460 517,385 270,124,673

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Renewables Growth Rate Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 2010-Year 1980 2.87 0.06 2.92 2.74 (1) 24.32 1981 2.72 0.06 2.79 3.01 (1) 24.49 1982 3.23 0.05 3.29 3.13 (1) 23.95 1983 3.49 0.07 3.56 3.20 (1) 24.60 1984 3.35 0.09 3.44 3.55 (1) 25.59 1985 2.94 0.11 3.05 4.08 (1) 26.09 1986 3.04 0.12 3.16 4.38 (1) 26.22 1987 2.60 0.13 2.73 4.75 (1) 26.94 1988 2.30 0.12 2.43 5.59 (1) 28.27 1989 2.81 0.41 3.22 5.60 (1) 29.88

  8. Modeling renewable portfolio standards for the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM) Submodule. For the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98), the EMM has been modified to represent Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), which are included in many of the Federal and state proposals for deregulating the electric power industry. A RPS specifies that electricity suppliers must produce a minimum level of generation using renewable technologies. Producers with insufficient renewable generating capacity can either build new plants or purchase {open_quotes}credits{close_quotes} from other suppliers with excess renewable generation. The representation of a RPS involves revisions to the ECP, EFD, and the EFP. The ECP projects capacity additions required to meet the minimum renewable generation levels in future years. The EFD determines the sales and purchases of renewable credits for the current year. The EFP incorporates the cost of building capacity and trading credits into the price of electricity.

  9. Annual Environmental Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ‹ Analysis & Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Release Date: April 14, 2015 | Next Release Date: June 2016 | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer By Section Executive summary Economic growth Prices Delivered energy consumption by sector Energy consumption by primary fuel Energy intensity Energy production, imports, and exports Electricity generation Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Appendices Correction/Update 4/21/2015 The

  10. 2015 Standard Scenarios Annual Report: U.S. Electric Sector Scenario Exploration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Standard Scenarios Annual Report: U.S. Electric Sector Scenario Exploration Patrick Sullivan, Wesley Cole, Nate Blair, Eric Lantz, Venkat Krishnan, Trieu Mai, David Mulcahy, and Gian Porro National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-64072 July 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National

  11. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings...

  12. Emissions and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  13. Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Billion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal 5 Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 1,995,055 414,632 569,375 NA 2,979,062 0 1,349,185 5,803 NA NA NA NA 1,354,988 NA 5,420 4,339,470 1950 2,199,111

  14. Table 2.3 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by End Use, 2006

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by End Use, 2006 End-Use Category Net Electricity 1 Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 2 and NGL 3 Natural Gas Coal 4 Total 5 Million Kilowatthours Million Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Million Short Tons Indirect End Use (Boiler Fuel) 12,109 21 4 2 2,059 25 – – Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 2 1,245 6 – – CHP 6 and/or Cogeneration Process – – 10 1 (s) 814 19 – – Direct End Use All Process Uses 657,810

  15. DOE FreedomCAR and vehicle technologies program advanced power electronic and electrical machines annual review report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, Mitch

    2006-10-11

    This report is a summary of the Review Panel at the FY06 DOE FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) Annual Review of Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machine (APEEM) research activities held on August 15-17, 2006.

  16. Electric and hybrid vehicles program. 5th annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-03-01

    This fifth annual report on the implementation of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-413, as amended by Public Law 95-238, referred to as the Act) complies with the reporting requirements established in Section 14 of the Act. In addition to informing the Congress of the progress and plans of the Department of Energy Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program, this report is intended to serve as a communication link between the Department and all of the public and private interests involved in making the program a success. The Annual Report represents the major summary of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program activities; since July 1981, DOE has ceased publication of the EHV Quarterly Reports with Congressional approval. The fourth quarter activities for FY 1981 are included in this report. During FY 1981, significant progress was made toward implementing the policies established by Congress in the Act. There has been a noticeable increase in interest shown by both the automobile manufacturing and the supply sectors of our economy in electric and hybrid vehicles. This year, the emphasis in the Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program shifted from vehicle demonstration and preparation for production readiness to research, development, test, and evaluation of advanced technologies to achieve the attributes necessary to make electric and hybrid vehicles a practical transportation alternative. Research and development efforts in batteries and propulsion components, as well as total vehicle systems, continue to reveal significant progress toward providing industry with technology options that will result in vehicles with greater public acceptance.

  17. Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

  18. State energy data report 1994: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This document provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), operated by EIA. SEDS provides State energy consumption estimates to members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and provides the historical series needed for EIA`s energy models. Division is made for each energy type and end use sector. Nuclear electric power is included.

  19. US SoAtl FL Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    FL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl FL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl FL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US SoAtl FL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Electricity accounts for 90% of the energy consumed by Florida households, and annual electricity expenditures are 40% more than the U.S. average. Florida is second only

  20. International energy annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The International Energy Annual presents information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu). Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Data are provided on crude oil refining capacity and electricity installed capacity by type. Prices are included for selected crude oils and for refined petroleum products in selected countries. Population and Gross Domestic Product data are also provided.

  1. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program. Seventeenth annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This program, in cooperation with industry, is conducting research, development, testing, and evaluation activities to develop the technologies that would lead to production and introduction of low-and zero-emission electric and hybrid vehicles into the Nation`s transportation fleet. This annual report describes program activities in the areas of advanced battery, fuel cell, and propulsion systems development. Testing and evaluation of new technology in fleet site operations and laboratories are also provided. Also presented is status on incentives (CAFE, 1992 Energy Policy Act) and use of foreign components, and a listing of publications by DOE, national laboratories, and contractors.

  2. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program. Sixteenth annual report to Congress for fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the progress achieved in developing electric and hybrid vehicle technologies, beginning with highlights of recent accomplishments in FY 1992. Detailed descriptions are provided of program activities during FY 1992 in the areas of battery, fuel cell, and propulsion system development, and testing and evaluation of new technology in fleet site operations and in laboratories. This Annual Report also contains a status report on incentives and use of foreign components, as well as a list of publications resulting from the DOE program.

  3. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh)...

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 U.S. Electric Power Sector Cumulative Power Plant Additions Needed to Meet Future Electricity Demand (1) Typical New Number of New Power Plants to Meet Demand Electric Generator Plant Capacity (MW) 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Coal Steam 1,300 7 8 8 8 8 Combined Cycle 540 28 29 43 79 130 Combustion Turbine/Diesel 148 62 105 174 250 284 Nuclear Power 2,236 1 3 3 3 4 Pumped Storage 147 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 Fuel Cells 10 0 0 0 0 0 Conventional Hydropower 20 (2) 20 47 81 125 185 Geothermal 50 9 26 41 62 81

  5. State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-02-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

  6. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electricity generated from sources that are renewable – hydroelectric power, bio-fuels, geothermal, solar, wind, wood, waste – have grown 150% from 1980 to 2011 (latest year available). Of the...

  7. Hydro and geothermal electricity as an alternative for industrial petroleum consumption in Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendis, M.; Park, W.; Sabadell, A.; Talib, A.

    1982-04-01

    This report assesses the potential for substitution of electricity for petroleum in the industrial/agro-industrial sector of Costa Rica. The study includes a preliminary estimate of the process energy needs in this sector, a survey of the principal petroleum consuming industries in Costa Rica, an assessment of the electrical technologies appropriate for substitution, and an analysis of the cost trade offs of alternative fuels and technologies. The report summarizes the total substitution potential both by technical feasibility and by cost effectiveness under varying fuel price scenarios and identifies major institutional constraints to the introduction of electric based technologies. Recommendations to the Government of Costa Rica are presented. The key to the success of a Costa Rican program for substitution of electricity for petroleum in industry rests in energy pricing policy. The report shows that if Costa Rica Bunker C prices are increased to compare equitably with Caribbean Bunker C prices, and increase at 3 percent per annum relative to a special industrial electricity rate structure, the entire substitution program, including both industrial and national electric investment, would be cost effective. The definition of these pricing structures and their potential impacts need to be assessed in depth.

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 U.S. Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Coal Steam Other Fossil Combine Cycle Combustion Turbine Nuclear Pumped Total 1980 0.0 1981 0.0 1982 0.0 1983 0.0 1984 0.0 1985 0.0 1986 0.0 1987 0.0 1988 0.0 1989 18.1 1990 19.5 1991 18.4 1992 21.2 1993 21.1 1994 21.2 1995 21.4 1996 21.1 1997 19.3 1998 19.5 1999 19.6 2000 19.5 2001 19.7 2002 20.4 2003 20.5 2004 20.8 2005 21.3 2006 21.5 2007 21.9 2008 21.9 2009 22.2 2010 22.2 2011 22.2 2012 22.2 2013 22.2 2014

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 U.S. Renewable Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Conv. Hydropower Geothermal Municipal Solid Waste Biomass Solar Thermal Solar PV Wind 1980 81.7 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. N.A. 1981 82.4 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1982 83.0 1.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1983 83.9 1.2 0.0 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1984 85.3 1.2 0.0 0.3 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1985 88.9 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1986 89.3 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1987 89.7 1.5 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1988 90.3 1.7 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0

  10. Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station Unit Number 1. Annual report, January--December, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report satisfies the requirements of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-91MC27363, novated as of March 5, 1992, to provide an annual update report on the year`s activities associated with Tampa Electric Company`s 250 MW IGCC demonstration project for the year 1993. Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Approximately 50% of the raw, hot syngas is cooled to 900 F and passed through a moving bed of zinc-based sorbent which removes sulfur containing compounds from the syngas. The remaining portion of the raw, hot syngas is cooled to 400 F for conventional acid gas removal. Sulfur-bearing compounds from both cleanup systems are sent to a conventional sulfuric acid plant to produce a marketable, high-purity sulfuric acid by-product. The cleaned medium-BTU syngas from these processes is routed to the combined cycle power generation system where it is mixed with air and burned in the combustion section of the combustion turbine. Heat is extracted from the expanded exhaust gases in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) to produce steam at three pressure levels for use throughout the integrated process. A highly modular, microprocessor-based distributed control system (DCS) is being developed to provide continuous and sequential control for most of the equipment on PPS-1.

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 U.S. Electricity Net Generation, by Plant Type (Billion kWh) Renewables Growth Rate Hydr(1) Oth(2) Total CHP (3) Tot.(4) 2010-year 1980 276 6 282 N.A. 1981 261 6 267 N.A. 1982 309 5 314 N.A. 1983 332 6 339 N.A. 1984 321 9 330 N.A. 1985 281 11 292 N.A. 1986 291 12 302 N.A. 1987 250 12 262 N.A. 1988 223 12 235 N.A. 1989 269 28 297 42 1990 290 35 324 61 1991 286 38 324 72 1992 250 40 290 91 1993 278 42 320 108 1994 254 42 296 123 1995 305 39 345 141 1996 341 41 382 147 1997 351 41 392 148 1998

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Shares (Percent) Renewables Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 1980 15.7% 10.8% 50.2% 11.8% 0.2% 12.1% 11.3% (1) 100% 1981 15.4% 9.0% 51.8% 11.2% 0.3% 11.4% 12.3% (1) 100% 1982 13.9% 6.6% 52.6% 13.6% 0.2% 13.8% 13.1% (1) 100% 1983 12.2% 6.3% 53.9% 14.3% 0.3% 14.6% 13.1% (1) 100% 1984 12.6% 5.1% 54.9% 13.2% 0.4% 13.5% 14.0% (1) 100% 1985 12.1% 4.2% 56.2% 11.3% 0.4% 11.8% 15.7% (1) 100% 1986 10.2% 5.6% 55.3% 11.7% 0.5%

  13. International energy annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power and geothermal, solar, and wind electric power. Also included are biomass electric power for Brazil and the US, and biomass, geothermal, and solar energy produced in the US and not used for electricity generation. This report is published to keep the public and other interested parties fully informed of primary energy supplies on a global basis. The data presented have been largely derived from published sources. The data have been converted to units of measurement and thermal values (Appendices E and F) familiar to the American public. 93 tabs.

  14. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  15. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  16. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  17. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  18. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  19. Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Billion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10<//td> 1989 9,135 6,901 18,424 1,143 35,603 [–] 685 1,781 9,112 [–] – – 11,578 – –

  20. DOE FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Annual Review Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Annual Review Report Pollard Technology Center Oak Ridge, Tennessee May 3-5, 2005 Prepared by Oak Ridge National Laboratory June 16, 2005 For DOE Internal Use Only Table of Contents Page Attendee List 3 Webcast Attendance Report 5 Evaluation Form Results 6 Summary of Reviewers' Ratings (grouped by research area) 9 Reviewers Rating Descriptions 12 Reviewers' Comments (grouped by title) 13 Appendix A

  1. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Analysis & Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Release Date: April 14, 2015 | Next Release Date: June 2016 | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer By Section Executive summary Economic growth Prices Delivered energy consumption by sector Energy consumption by primary fuel Energy intensity Energy production, imports, and exports Electricity generation Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Appendices Table Title Formats Summary Reference

  2. Office Buildings - Energy Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity,...

  3. Tampa Electric Company, Polk Power Station Unit No. 1. Annual report, January--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-10-01

    As part of the Tampa Electric Polk Power Unit No. 1, a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown entrained-flow coal gasifier will convert approximately 2300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) into a medium-BTU fuel gas with a heat content of about 250 BTU/scf (LHV). Syngas produced in the gasifier flows through a high-temperature heat recovery unit which cools the gases prior to entering two parallel clean-up areas. A portion (up to 50%) of the hot syngas is cooled to 1000{degrees}F and passed through a moving bed of zinc titanate sorbent which removed sulfur containing components of the fuel gas. The project will be the first in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology at a commercial scale. The remaining portion of the syngas is cooled to 400{degrees}F for conventional acid gas removal. This portion of the plant is capable of processing between 50% and 100% of the dirty syngas. The cleaned low-BTU syngas is then routed to the combined cycle power generation system where it is mixed with air and burned in the gas turbine combustor. Heat is extracted from the expanded exhaust gases by a heat recovery steam generator to produce high pressure steam. This steam, along with the steam generated in the gasification process, drives a steam turbine to generate an additional 132MW of power. Internal process power consumption is approximately 62MW, and includes power for coal grinding, air separation, and feed pumps. Net output from the IGCC demonstration plant will be 260MW.

  4. International energy annual 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-01-23

    The International Energy Annual presents current data and trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in more than 190 countries, dependencies, and area of special sovereignty. Also included are prices on crude oil, petroleum products, natural gas, electricity, and coal in selected countries. (VC)

  5. Annual energy review 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This 13th edition presents the Energy Information Administration`s historical energy statistics. For most series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1994; thus, this report is well-suited to long-term trend analyses. It covers all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels and electricity. Statistics on renewable energy sources are also included: this year, for the first time, usage of renewables by other consumers as well as by electric utilities is included. Also new is a two-part, comprehensive presentation of data on petroleum products supplied by sector for 1949 through 1994. Data from electric utilities and nonutilities are integrated as ``electric power industry`` data; nonutility power gross generation are presented for the first time. One section presents international statistics (for more detail see EIA`s International Energy Annual).

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes the progress made on the research and development projects funded by the Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors subprogram in the Vehicle Technologies Office.

  7. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE).

  8. 2014 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Electricity and Energy Reliability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2014 and 2015 within the Office of Electricity and Energy Reliability.

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machinery R&D Annual Progress Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machinery subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and electric machinery technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies.

  10. Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,520,229,870 169,653,294 133,545,718 363,247 4,365,768 1,828,157,897 13,815,263 832 809,873 6,874

  11. A simple tool for estimating city-wide annual electrical energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We restrict this to the "indirect effect", the cooling of outside air that lessens the demand for air conditioning (AC). Given the power demand of the electric utilities and data ...

  12. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

  13. FY2010 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and electric motor technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  14. Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-25

    In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

  15. FY2012 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), thermal management, and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), thermal management, and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrows automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  17. FY2011 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2012-01-31

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), thermal management, and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  18. Annual Energy Review 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    2008-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....”

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The APEEM subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and electric motor technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies.

  20. Annual Energy Review 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-14

    This twelfth edition of the Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the Energy Information Administration`s historical energy statistics. For most series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1993. Because coverage spans four and a half decades, the statistics in this report are well-suited to long-term trend analyses. The AER is comprehensive. It covers all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices, for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels and electricity. The AER also presents Energy Information Administration (EIA) statistics on some renewable energy sources. EIA estimates that its consumption series include about half of the renewable energy used in the United States. For a more complete discussion of EIA`s renewables data, see p. xix, ``Introducing Expanded Coverage of Renewable Energy Data Into the Historical Consumption Series.`` Copies of the 1993 edition of the Annual Energy Review may be obtained by using the order form in the back of this publication. Most of the data in the 1993 edition also are available on personal computer diskette. For more information about the diskettes, see the back of this publication. In addition, the data are available as part of the National Economic, Social, and Environmental Data Bank on a CD-ROM. For more information about the data bank, contact the US Department of Commerce Economics and Statistics Administration, on 202-482-1986.

  1. FY2009 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, Mitchell

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs (PHEVs), all electric vehicles, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the Vehicle Technologies Program. A key element in making these advanced vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency, with the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments while achieving high reliability; (3) converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) new onboard battery charging concepts that result in decreased cost and size; (5) more effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (6) integrated motor/inverter concepts. ORNL's Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program, APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following report discusses those projects carried out in FY 2009 and conveys highlights of their accomplishments. Numerous project reviews, technical reports, and papers have been published for these efforts, if the reader is interested in pursuing details of the work.

  2. FY2013 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2014-02-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) technology area within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies, leading to lower cost and better efficiency in transforming battery energy to useful work. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency through research in more efficient TDSs.

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, M.

    2008-10-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve advanced vehicle efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the Vehicle Technologies Program. A key element in making HEVs practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) more effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program, APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies.

  4. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Electric Drive Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2015-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) announced in May 2011 a new cooperative research effort comprising DOE, the US Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford Motor Company, General Motors Company, and Chrysler Group), Tesla Motors, and representatives of the electric utility and petroleum industries. Known as U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability), it represents DOE’s commitment to developing public–private partnerships to fund high-risk–high-reward research into advanced automotive technologies. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the partnership known as FreedomCAR (derived from “Freedom” and “Cooperative Automotive Research”) that ran from 2002 through 2010 and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Electric Drive Technologies (EDT) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies, leading to lower cost and better efficiency in transforming battery energy to useful work. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency through research in more efficient TDSs. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the EDT subprogram fosters the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy

  5. [Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. 1996 DOE annual technical report, January--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project uses a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal to syngas. The gasification plant is coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 BTUs/cf (HHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product. Approximately 10% of the raw, hot syngas at 900 F is designed to pass through an intermittently moving bed of metal-oxide sorbent which removes sulfur-bearing compounds from the syngas. PPS-1 will be the first unit in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology on a commercial unit. The emphasis during 1996 centered around start-up activities.

  6. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, M.

    2006-10-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and DaimlerChrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Vehicle Systems subprogram within the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive and heavy truck technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles and heavy trucks will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. This work also supports the development of advanced automotive accessories and the reduction of parasitic losses (e.g., aerodynamic drag, thermal management, friction and wear, and rolling resistance). In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the Vehicle Systems subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve fuel economy, comply with projected emissions and safety regulations, and use fuels produced domestically. The Vehicle Systems subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership and the 21st Century Truck Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) Identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) Develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, emission control devices, battery systems, power electronics, accessories, and devices to reduce parasitic losses; and (3) Determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under the Vehicle Systems subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) Novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) Inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) Converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) More effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) Integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following report discusses those projects carried out in FY 2006 and conveys highlights of their accomplishments. Numerous project reviews, technical reports, and papers have been published for these efforts, if the reader is interested in pursuing details of the work. Summaries of major accomplishments for each technical project are give.

  7. 2015 Standard Scenarios Annual Report: U.S. Electric Sector Scenario Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Patrick; Cole, Wesley; Blair, Nate; Lantz, Eric; Krishnan, Venkat; Mai, Trieu; Mulcahy, David; Porro, Gian

    2015-07-16

    This report is one of several products resulting from an initial effort to provide a consistent set of technology cost and performance data and to define a conceptual and consistent scenario framework that can be used in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL’s) future analyses. The long-term objective of this effort is to identify a range of possible futures of the U.S. electricity sector in which to consider specific energy system issues through (1) defining a set of prospective scenarios that bound ranges of key technology, market, and policy assumptions and (2) assessing these scenarios in NREL’s market models to understand the range of resulting outcomes, including energy technology deployment and production, energy prices, and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.

  8. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Modeling Updates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Analysis; Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis July 23, 2013 | Washington, DC Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Modeling Updates in the Transportation Sector Overview 2 AEO2014 Transportation Model Updates Washington, D.C., July 2013 Discussion purposes only - Do not cite or circulate * Light-duty vehicle - Vehicle miles traveled by age cohort, update modeling parameters, employment and VMT - E85 demand - Battery electric vehicle cost, efficiency, and availability * Heavy-duty vehicle, rail,

  9. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in this report were based on monthly billing records submitted by the buildings' energy suppliers. The section, "Annual Consumption and Expenditures" provide a detailed...

  10. ,"Maine Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  11. ,"Washington Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  12. ,"Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  13. ,"Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  14. ,"Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  15. ,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  16. Survey Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents composing a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and...

  17. Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Total 1949 187 30 2 NA 30 33 NA NA 250 1 NA 1 1950 206 35 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 278 1 NA 1 1951 235 42 2 NA 29 31 NA NA 308 1 NA 1 1952 240 50 2 NA 31 33 NA NA 323 1 NA 1 1953 260 57 3 NA 38 40 NA NA 358 (s) NA (s)

  18. Electric and Magnetic Fields Research and Public Information Dissemination Program annual report for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) Research and Public Information Dissemination (RAPID) Program was authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 as a near-term effort to expand and accelerate the research needed to address the EMF issue. As required by this legislation, the EMF Interagency Committee, the National EMF Advisory Committee (NEMFAC), and the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) are providing valued input and advice for the direction of this program. With this input and advice, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) have developed and are implementing five-year program plans. Multi-year health effects research projects and related EMF measurement and exposure assessment projects are underway using funds appropriated in fiscal years 1994, 1995, and 1996 together with voluntary non-Federal contributions. The results of these research projects, along with the results of other EMF research, will be used as input to the hazard evaluation effort, which is the focus of the EMF RAPID Program. A coordinated interagency program is underway to communicate needed information on the EMF issue in a clear manner to the public and other decision makers.

  19. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program 18th annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The Department remains focused on the technologies that are critical to making electric and hybrid vehicles commercially viable and competitive with current production gasoline-fueled vehicles in performance, reliability, and affordability. During Fiscal Year 1994, significant progress was made toward fulfilling the intent of Congress. The Department and the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (a partnership of the three major domestic automobile manufacturers) continued to work together and to focus the efforts of battery developers on the battery technologies that are most likely to be commercialized in the near term. Progress was made in industry cost-shared contracts toward demonstrating the technical feasibility of fuel cells for passenger bus and light duty vehicle applications. Two industry teams which will develop hybrid vehicle propulsion technologies have been selected through competitive procurement and have initiated work, in Fiscal Year 1994. In addition, technical studies and program planning continue, as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992, to achieve the goals of reducing the transportation sector dependence on imported oil, reducing the level of environmentally harmful emissions, and enhancing industrial productivity and competitiveness.

  20. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - renewable section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on renewable energy production and consumption and overviews of fuel ethanol and biodiesel.

  1. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - renewable section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2016-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on renewable energy production and consumption and overviews of fuel ethanol and biodiesel.

  2. Research, development and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979. [70 W/lb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This second annual report under Contract No. 31-109-39-4200 covers the period July 1, 1978 through August 31, 1979. The program demonstrates the feasibility of the nickel-zinc battery for electric vehicle propulsion. The program is divided into seven distinct but highly interactive tasks collectively aimed at the development and commercialization of nickel-zinc technology. These basic technical tasks are separator development, electrode development, product design and analysis, cell/module battery testing, process development, pilot manufacturing, and thermal management. A Quality Assurance Program has also been established. Significant progress has been made in the understanding of separator failure mechanisms, and a generic category of materials has been specified for the 300+ deep discharge (100% DOD) applications. Shape change has been reduced significantly. A methodology has been generated with the resulting hierarchy: cycle life cost, volumetric energy density, peak power at 80% DOD, gravimetric energy density, and sustained power. Generation I design full-sized 400-Ah cells have yielded in excess of 70 W/lb at 80% DOD. Extensive testing of cells, modules, and batteries is done in a minicomputer-based testing facility. The best life attained with electric vehicle-size cell components is 315 cycles at 100% DOD (1.0V cutoff voltage), while four-cell (approx. 6V) module performance has been limited to about 145 deep discharge cycles. The scale-up of processes for production of components and cells has progressed to facilitate component production rates of thousands per month. Progress in the area of thermal management has been significant, with the development of a model that accurately represents heat generation and rejection rates during battery operation. For the balance of the program, cycle life of > 500 has to be demonstrated in modules and full-sized batteries. 40 figures, 19 tables. (RWR)

  3. Electric Power detailed State data

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Detailed State Data Final annual data for 2014 Release Date: October 21, 2015 Next Release Date: October 15, 2016 January 13, 2016 Revision/Corrections Annual data format 1990 - 2014 Net Generation by State by Type of Producer by Energy Source (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)1 XLS 1990 - 2014 Fossil Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation by Year, Industry Type and State (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)2 XLS 1990 - 2013 Existing Nameplate and Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source, Producer Type

  4. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - nuclear section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on nuclear electricity capacity, generation, and number of operable nuclear reactors.

  5. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 121-150 3 2018 Hamilton Road Picacho 8.67 OH 3278 AEPTCC 100 ... 2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 121-150 4 2018 Hamilton Road Del Rio 3 OH 3278 AEPTCC 100 ...

  6. Electric Power Annual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) Projects published on Beta are not final and may contain programming errors. They are for public testing and comment only. We welcome your feedback. For final products, please visit www.eia.gov. Read our feedback policy. Project Feedback Rea Give Us Your Feedback We welcome your feedback and insights on this project. Your Country: United States Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Angola Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia

  7. NRECA Annual Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) is hosting its annual conference in Orlando, FL, on Feb. 19-27, 2015.

  8. OPSI Annual Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Organization of PJM States, Inc. (OPSI) is hosting its annual meeting with sessions covering clean power, gas and electric coordination, and more.

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 2010 Impacts of Saving an Electric Quad (1) Utility Average-Sized Aggregate Number of Units Fuel Input Utility Unit (MW) to Provide the Fuel's Share Plant Fuel Type Shares (%) in 2010 of the Electric Quad (2) Coal 49% 36 Petroleum 1% 96 Natural Gas 19% 141 Nuclear 22% 3 Renewable (3) 10% 184 Total 100% 460 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, Electric Power Annual 2010, Feb. 2012, Table 1.2; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A2 for consumption and Table A8 for electricity

  10. Electric sales and revenue, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  11. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center ... presents statistics on end-use: retail ratesprices and consumption of electricity. ...

  12. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and ... and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. ...

  13. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY

  14. Annual Energy Review 2004 - August 2005

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    which is accounted for in both fossil fuels and renewable energy but counted only once in total consumption; and 0.04 electricity net imports. l Primary consumption,...

  15. Annual energy review 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiferlein, Katherin E.

    2004-09-30

    The Annual Energy Review 2003 is a statistical history of energy activities in the United States in modern times. Data are presented for all major forms of energy by production (extraction of energy from the earth, water, and other parts of the environment), consumption by end-user sector, trade with other nations, storage changes, and pricing. Much of the data provided covers the fossil fuels—coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels are nature’s batteries; they have stored the sun’s energy over millennia past. It is primarily that captured energy that we are drawing on today to fuel the activities of the modern economy. Data in this report measure the extraordinary expansion of our use of fossil fuels from 29 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1949 to 84 quadrillion Btu in 2003. In recent years, fossil fuels accounted for 86 percent of all energy consumed in the United States. This report also records the development of an entirely new energy industry—the nuclear electric power industry. The industry got its start in this country in 1957 when the Shippingport, Pennsylvania, nuclear electric power plant came on line. Since that time, the industry has grown to account for 20 percent of our electrical output and 8 percent of all energy used in the country. Renewable energy is a third major category of energy reported in this volume. Unlike fossil fuels, which are finite in supply, renewable energy is essentially inexhaustible because it can be replenished. Types of energy covered in the renewable category include conventional hydroelectric power, which is power derived from falling water; wood; waste; alcohol fuels; geothermal; solar; and wind. Together, these forms of energy accounted for about 6 percent of all U.S. energy consumption in recent years.

  16. Presidential Permit Holders - Annual Reports | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Permit Holders - Annual Reports Presidential Permit Holders - Annual Reports Presidential permit holders are responsible for reporting the gross amount electric energy which flows ...

  17. Annual Site Environmental Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Annual Reports to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management Annual Reports to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management Annual reports on federal energy management respond to section 548 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619), as amended, and provide information on energy consumption in federal buildings, operations, and vehicles. Compiled by the Federal Energy Management Program, these reports document activities

  18. Annual Energy Review 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    2006-07-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications.

  19. Annual Energy Review 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    2007-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications.

  20. Annual Energy Review 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    2005-08-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications.

  1. Annual Energy Review 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fichman, Barbara T.

    2010-08-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding the content of the AER and other EIA publications.

  2. Annual Energy Review 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fichman, Barbara T.

    2012-09-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, and renewable energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding the content of the AER and other EIA publications.

  3. US ESC TN Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ESC TN Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US ESC TN Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Tennessee households consume an average of 79 million Btu per year, about 12% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33%

  4. US WSC TX Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than

  5. Electric Submersible Pump | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detailed State Data Final annual data for 2014 Release Date: October 21, 2015 Next Release Date: October 15, 2016 January 13, 2016 Revision/Corrections Annual data format 1990 - 2014 Net Generation by State by Type of Producer by Energy Source (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)1 XLS 1990 - 2014 Fossil Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation by Year, Industry Type and State (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)2 XLS 1990 - 2013 Existing Nameplate and Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source, Producer Type

  6. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  7. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  8. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1998 ,"Release...

  9. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  10. Table 8.4a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.4b and 8.4c; Billion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.4b and 8.4c; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal 5 Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 1,995,055 414,632 569,375 NA 2,979,062 0 1,424,722 5,803 NA NA NA NA 1,430,525 NA 5,420 4,415,007 1950

  11. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A

  12. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators

  13. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Table A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators

  14. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A-3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane

  15. Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey data Energy intensity Consumption summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All consumption & efficiency data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular All sectors Commercial buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections

  16. Annual Reports - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reports Annual Reports Annual Report 2015 Annual Report 2014 Annual Report 2013 Annual Report 2012 Annual Report 2011 Annual Report 2010 Annual Report 2009 Annual Report 2008...

  17. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Reference case Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2015 ...

  18. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Table A6. Industrial sector key indicators and consumption Energy Information Administration ...

  19. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A17. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year) Sector and ...

  20. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Release Date: April 14, 2015 | Next Release Date: June 2016 | ... Executive summary Economic growth Prices Delivered energy consumption by sector Energy ...

  1. FY2010 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, Mitchell

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from ''Freedom'' and ''Cooperative Automotive Research''), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public-private partnerships to fund high risk, high payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and electric motor technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the APEEM subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and PE; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs (PHEVs), battery electric vehicles, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the VTP. A key element in making these advanced vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the PE and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency, with the ability to accommodate higher temperature environments while achieving high reliability; (3) converter concepts that use methods of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) new onboard battery charging concepts that result in decreased cost and size; (5) more effective thermal control through innovative packaging technologies; and (6) integrated motor/inverter concepts. ORNL's Power Electronics and Electric Machines Research Program conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the VTP APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following report discusses those projects carried out in FY 2010 and conveys highlights of their accomplishment

  2. Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and 11.5c; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and 11.5c; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,573,566,415 218,383,703 145,398,976 363,247 5,590,014 1,943,302,355 14,468,564 1,059 984,406

  3. Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Commercial Sector 8<//td> 1989 2,319,630 1,542,083 637,423 [ –] 803,754 5,302,890 37,398 4

  4. Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Short Tons Barrels Short Tons Barrels Thousand Cubic Feet Billion Btu Billion Btu Billion Btu 1989 638,798 119,640 1,471,031 762 – 1,591,433 81,669,945 2,804 24,182 5,687

  5. FY2011 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, Mitchell

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced in May 2011 a new cooperative research effort comprising DOE, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford Motor Company, General Motors Company, and Chrysler Group), Tesla Motors, and representatives of the electric utility and petroleum industries. Known as U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public-private partnerships to fund high risk-high reward research into advanced automotive technologies. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the partnership known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research') that ran from 2002 through 2010 and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machines (PEEM) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the PEEM subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The PEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the U.S. DRIVE partnership through a three phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component R&D activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including EMs and PE; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs (PHEVs), battery electric vehicles, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the VTP. A key element in making these advanced vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, efficiency, and cost targets for the PE and EM subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency with the ability to accommodate higher temperature environments while achieving high reliability; (3) converter concepts that use methods of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) new onboard battery charging concepts that result in decreased cost and size; (5) more effective thermal control through innovative packaging technologies; and (6) integrated motor-inverter traction drive system concepts. ORNL's PEEM research program conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the VTP Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program. In this role, ORNL serves on the U.S. DRIVE Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. DOE's continuing R&D into advanced vehicle technologies for transportation offers the possibility of reducing the nation's dependence on foreign oil and the negative economic impacts of crude oil price fluctuations. It also supports the Administration's goal of deploying 1 million PHEVs by 2015.

  6. Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Use Compare Activities by ... Electricity Use Total Electricity Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 908 billion...

  7. Annual energy review 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    This report presents historical energy statistics on all major energy activities. The statistics cover consumption, production, trade, stock, and prices, for all major energy commodities including fossil fuels, electricity, and renewable energy sources.

  8. Derived Annual Estimates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    74-1988 For Methodology Concerning the Derived Estimates Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat and Power by Industry Group, 1974-1988 Total Energy *** Electricity...

  9. Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-17

    The Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993 is a companion document to the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 1993 (AEO). Supplement tables provide the regional projections underlying the national data and projections in the AEO. The domestic coal, electric power, commercial nuclear power, end-use consumption, and end-use price tables present AEO forecasts at the 10 Federal Region level. World coal tables provide data and projections on international flows of steam coal and metallurgical coal, and the oil and gas tables provide the AEO oil and gas supply forecasts by Oil and Gas Supply Regions and by source of supply. All tables refer to cases presented in the AEO, which provides a range of projections for energy markets through 2010.

  10. Microsoft Word - S08846_2012_Annual_IC report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Cleanups (EPA 2005). U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of ... 2. Prohibit the extraction or consumption of, exposure to, or the use in any way ...

  11. FY 2005 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, M

    2005-11-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and DaimlerChrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from ''Freedom'' and ''Cooperative Automotive Research''), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Vehicle Systems subprogram within the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive and heavy truck technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles and heavy trucks will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. This work also supports the development of advanced automotive accessories and the reduction of parasitic losses (e.g., aerodynamic drag, thermal management, friction and wear, and rolling resistance). In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the Vehicle Systems subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve fuel economy, comply with projected emissions and safety regulations, and use fuels produced domestically. The Vehicle Systems subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel and the 21st Century Truck Partnerships through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) Identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements, then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) Develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, emission control devices, battery systems, power electronics, accessories, and devices to reduce parasitic losses; and (3) Determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under the Vehicle Systems subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include: (1) Novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) Inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) Converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) More effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) Integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following report discusses those projects carried out in FY 2004 and conveys highlights of their accomplishments. Numerous project reviews, technical reports, and papers have been published for these efforts, if the reader is interested in pursuing details of the work.

  12. FY2007 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, Mitchell

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as 'FreedomCAR' (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieving the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve advanced vehicle efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) more effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following report discusses those projects carried out in FY 2007 and conveys highlights of their accomplishments. Numerous project reviews, technical reports, and papers have been published for these efforts, if the reader is interested in pursuing details of the work.

  13. Electric sales and revenue, 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  14. Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants - Energy Information...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of ...

  15. Tennessee Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date: 5312016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

  16. Utah Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date: 5312016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

  17. Texas Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date: 5312016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

  18. FY2014 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) announced in May 2011 a new cooperative research effort comprising DOE, the US Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford Motor Company, General Motors Company, and Chrysler Group), Tesla Motors, and representatives of the electric utility and petroleum industries. Known as U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability), it represents DOE’s commitment to developing public–private partnerships to fund high-risk–high-reward research into advanced automotive technologies. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the partnership known as FreedomCAR (derived from “Freedom” and “Cooperative Automotive Research”) that ran from 2002 through 2010 and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies, leading to lower cost and better efficiency in transforming battery energy to useful work. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency through research in more efficient TDSs.

  19. Natural Gas Consumption (Annual Supply & Disposition)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,919,302 2,003,295 2,257,703 2,597,874 3,134,086 2,703,223 2001

  20. Natural Gas Consumption (Annual Supply & Disposition)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    103,976 108,490 101,217 93,985 95,207 93,855 1999-2014 Alabama 454,456 534,779 598,514 666,712 615,407 634,678 1997-2014 Alaska 342,261 333,312 335,458 343,110 332,298 327,428...

  1. C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... Generation of electricity, other than by electric utilities, ... Industrial Consumption: Natural gas used for heat, power, or ... Salt Dome Storage Field: A sub-surface storage facility that ...

  2. Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and appliances, stock, usage, and consumption data can be difficult to obtain. ... Energy Modeling System (NEMS) project annual energy consumption of MELs by combining unit ...

  3. US ENC IL Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels

  4. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels

  5. US NE MA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption

  6. C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    89 Energy Information Administration Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 State Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Consumption (thousand cubic feet) Cost ...

  7. C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Energy Information Administration Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 15. Consumption of Natural Gas by State, 1993-2000 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Delivered ...

  8. US ENC WI Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to

  9. Research, development, and demonstration of lead-acid batteries for electric-vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The first development effort in improving lead-acid batteries fore electric vehicles was the improvement of electric vehicle batteries using flat pasted positive plates and the second was for a tubular long life positive plate. The investigation of 32 component variables based on a flat pasted positive plate configuration is described. The experiment tested 96 - six volt batteries for characterization at 0, 25, and 40/sup 0/C and for cycle life capability at the 3 hour discharge rate with a one cycle, to 80% DOD, per day regime. Four positive paste formulations were selected. Two commercially available microporous separators were used in conjunction with a layer of 0.076 mm thick glass mat. Two concentrations of battery grade sulfuric acid were included in the test to determine if an increase in concentration would improve the battery capacity sufficient to offset the added weight of the more concentrated solution. Two construction variations, 23 plate elements with outside negative plates and 23 plate elements with outside positive plates, were included. The second development effort was an experiment designed to study the relationship of 32 component variables based on a tubular positive plate configuration. 96-six volt batteries were tested at various discharge rates at 0, 25, and 40/sup 0/C along with cycle life testing at 80% DOD of the 3 hour rate. 75 batteries remain on cycle life testing with 17 batteries having in excess of 365 life cycles. Preliminary conclusions indicate: the tubular positive plate is far more capable of withstanding deep cycles than is the flat pasted plate; as presently designed 40 Whr/kg can not be achieved, since 37.7 Whr/kg was the best tubular data obtained; electrolyte circulation is impaired due to the tight element fit in the container; and a redesign is required to reduce the battery weight which will improve the Whr/kg value. This redesign is complete and new molds have been ordered.

  10. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991--Combined Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Consumption of...

  11. Annual Energy Review 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    2003-10-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the Energy Information Administration’s historical energy statistics. For many series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 2002. The statistics, expressed in either physical units or British thermal units, cover all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices, for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels, electricity, and renewable energy sources. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications. Related Publication: Readers of the AER may also be interested in EIA’s Monthly Energy Review, which presents monthly updates of many of the data in the AER. Contact our National Energy Information Center for more information.

  12. Annual Energy Review 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    1998-07-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the Energy Information Administration’s historical energy statistics. For many series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1997. The statistics, expressed in either physical units or British thermal units, cover all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices, for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels, electricity, and renewable energy sources. Publication of this report is in keeping with responsibilities given to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2) that: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications.

  13. Annual Energy Review 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    2001-08-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the Energy Information Administration’s historical energy statistics. For many series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 2000. The statistics, expressed in either physical units or British thermal units, cover all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices, for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels, electricity, and renewable energy sources. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the Energy Information Administration under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications.

  14. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and fuel consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which...

  15. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wholesale Markets: February 2014 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

  16. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Wholesale Markets: May 2015 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

  17. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wholesale Markets: August 2015 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

  18. 2013 Electricity Form Proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report" The EIA-861 survey has historically collected retail sales, revenue, and a variety of information related to demand response ...

  19. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End Use: August 2015 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based...

  20. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by state Percent Change Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent...

  1. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-05

    This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

  2. EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010 XLS XLS XLS 2009 XLS XLS XLS 2008 XLS XLS XLS 2007 XLS XLS XLS 2006 XLS XLS XLS 2005 XLS XLS XLS 2004 XLS XLS XLS 2003 XLS XLS XLS Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." Related links Electric Power Monthly Electric Power Annual Form EIA-860 Source Data

  3. Annual Energy Review, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    This document presents statistics on energy useage for 1995. A reviving domestic economy, generally low energy prices, a heat wave in July and August, and unusually cold weather in November and December all contributed to the fourth consecutive year of growth in U.S. total energy consumption, which rose to an all-time high of almost 91 quadrillion Btu in 1995 (1.3). The increase came as a result of increases in the consumption of natural gas, coal, nuclear electric power, and renewable energy. Petroleum was the primary exception, and its use declined by only 0.3 percent. (Integrating the amount of renewable energy consumed outside the electric utility sector into U.S. total energy consumption boosted the total by about 3.4 quadrillion Btu, but even without that integration, U.S. total energy consumption would have reached a record level in 1995.)

  4. Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S.

    1996-08-01

    Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

  5. US WNC MO Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    WNC MO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US WNC MO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per year, 12% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Missouri are slightly less

  6. US SoAtl VA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are

  7. State Energy Data Report, 1991: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to the Government, policy makers, and the public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  8. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

  9. State energy data report 1993: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  10. Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption Estimates by Source, 1949...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Primary Energy Consumption Estimates by Source, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy 1 Electricity Net Imports 3 Total Coal Coal ...

  11. 2013 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies 2013 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle ...

  12. 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle ...

  13. 2012 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies 2012 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle ...

  14. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  15. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  16. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    F-3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, ...

  17. Coal industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  18. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey 1994 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Manufacturing Energy Consumption...

  19. Annual Energy Review - July 2006

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Btu, 0.34 ethanol blended into motor gasoline, which is accounted for in both fossil fuels and renewable energy but counted only once in total consumption; and 0.08 electricity...

  20. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1989 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-06-01

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1989 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. This report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1989, and also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1989 time period. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell to consumers annually. Data is provided on each retail customer sector: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. The data specifically supports forecasting activities, rate development, conservation and market assessments, and conservation and market program development and delivery. All of these activities require a detailed look at electricity use. 25 figs., 34 tabs.

  1. Interim Data Changes in the Short-term Energy Outlook Data Systems Related to Electric Power Sector and Natural Gas Demand Data Revisions (Released in the STEO December 2002)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    Beginning with the December 2002 issue of the Energy Information Administration's Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), electricity generation and related fuel consumption totals will be presented on a basis that is consistent with the definitions and aggregates used in the 2001 edition of EIA's Annual Energy Review (AER). Particularly affected by these changes are the demand and balancing item totals for natural

  2. Annual Energy Review 2007 - June 2008

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Btu) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2007 3 Consumption 101.60 k Supply 106.96 Exports 5.36 Petroleum 2.93 Other Exports 2.43 g Coa l 23.48 Natural Gas...

  3. AnnualCIPSEAReport2009.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electric Power Annual Update / Revision Data for 2014 updated: February 16, 2016 February 16, 2016 Table update: The following tables are being withheld pending the availability of additional data: Table 8.5. Revenue and Expense Statistics for U.S. Cooperative Borrower-Owned Electric Utilities Table 8.6.A. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, Actual Table 8.6.B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation

  4. Annual Energy Review 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    2000-07-01

    A generation ago the Ford Foundation convened a group of experts to explore and assess the Nation’s energy future, and published their conclusions in A Time To Choose: America’s Energy Future (Cambridge, MA: Ballinger, 1974). The Energy Policy Project developed scenarios of U.S. potential energy use in 1985 and 2000. Now, with 1985 well behind us and 2000 nearly on the record books, it may be of interest to take a look back to see what actually happened and consider what it means for our future. The study group sketched three primary scenarios with differing assumptions about the growth of energy use. The Historical Growth scenario assumed that U.S. energy consumption would continue to expand by 3.4 percent per year, the average rate from 1950 to 1970. This scenario assumed no intentional efforts to change the pattern of consumption, only efforts to encourage development of our energy supply. The Technical Fix scenario anticipated a “conscious national effort to use energy more efficiently through engineering know-how." The Zero Energy Growth scenario, while not clamping down on the economy or calling for austerity, incorporated the Technical Fix efficiencies plus additional efficiencies. This third path anticipated that economic growth would depend less on energy-intensive industries and more on those that require less energy, i.e., the service sector. In 2000, total energy consumption was projected to be 187 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in the Historical Growth case, 124 quadrillion Btu in the Technical Fix case, and 100 quadrillion Btu in the Zero Energy Growth case. The Annual Energy Review 1999 reports a preliminary total consumption for 1999 of 97 quadrillion Btu (see Table 1.1), and the Energy Information Administration’s Short-Term Energy Outlook (April 2000) forecasts total energy consumption of 98 quadrillion Btu in 2000. What energy consumption path did the United States actually travel to get from 1974, when the scenarios were drawn, to the end of the century? What happened to the relationship between growth and energy consumption? How did the fuel mix change over this period? What are the effects of energy usage on our environment? What level of consumption will the United States—and the world—record in the Annual Energy Review 2025? We present this edition of the Annual Energy Review to help investigate these important questions and to stimulate and inform our thinking about what the future holds.

  5. Coal industry annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-06

    Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

  6. Renewable energy annual 1998, with data for 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    This is the fourth annual report published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) which presents information on renewable energy consumption, capacity, and electricity generation data; US solar thermal and photovoltaic collector manufacturing activities; and US geothermal heat pump manufacturing activities. It updates and provides more detail on renewable energy information than what`s published in the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Annual Energy Review 1997. The renewable energy resources included in the report are: biomass (wood, wood waste, municipal solid waste, ethanol, and biodiesel); geothermal; wind; solar (solar thermal and photovoltaic); and hydropower. However, hydropower is also regarded as a conventional energy source because it has furnished a significant amount of electricity for more than a century. Therefore, the contribution of hydropower to total renewable energy consumption is discussed, although hydropower as an individual energy source is not addressed. Since EIA collects data only on terrestrial (land-based) systems, satellite and military applications are not included in this report. 13 figs., 44 tabs.

  7. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Reference case Table A10. Electricity trade (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A10. Electricity trade (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Electricity trade Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Interregional electricity trade Gross domestic sales Firm power .......................................................... 156 157 122 63 28 28 28 -6.2% Economy

  8. Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,387,184 7,573,863 9,110,793 8,190,756 8,149,111 9,671,095 1997-2015 Alabama 281,722 342,841 401,306 333,897 345,102 397,961 1997-2015 Alaska 39,732 41,738 39,758 33,944 30,444 27,722 1997-2015 Arizona 224,430 180,966 228,818 222,985 207,085 249,477 1997-2015 Arkansas 96,553 107,014 129,059 93,552 71,921 108,755 1997-2015 California 736,092 616,564 855,342 825,713 824,868 816,787 1997-2015 Colorado 92,657 85,015 86,309 89,508 98,269 92,757 1997-2015 Connecticut 85,144 107,897 114,054 106,863

  9. Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    901,839 797,631 737,310 771,355 776,525 692,006 2001-2016 Alabama 33,356 31,534 31,034 33,249 34,029 29,307 2001-2016 Alaska 1,863 2,096 2,164 2,336 2,283 1,992 2001-2016 Arizona 31,091 24,561 17,672 17,515 15,294 12,584 2001-2016 Arkansas 8,552 4,130 5,434 6,754 8,589 5,839 2001-2016 California 89,295 84,917 59,484 63,111 60,889 47,924 2001-2016 Colorado 9,582 8,172 9,658 8,346 7,962 6,288 2001-2016 Connecticut 10,504 10,291 9,814 11,119 10,473 9,671 2001-2016 Delaware 4,903 3,068 2,330 2,190

  10. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 14 10 Many studies remove wood when drawing comparisons because of the distorting ... Implementing End-use Efficiency Improvements in India: Drawing from Experience in the US ...

  11. Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for...

  12. C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    357 Energy Information Administration Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 36. Prices of Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Utilities by State, 1993-1998 (Dollars per ...

  13. Power consumption monitoring using additional monitoring device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truşcă, M. R. C. Albert, Ş. Tudoran, C. Soran, M. L. Fărcaş, F.; Abrudean, M.

    2013-11-13

    Today, emphasis is placed on reducing power consumption. Computers are large consumers; therefore it is important to know the total consumption of computing systems. Since their optimal functioning requires quite strict environmental conditions, without much variation in temperature and humidity, reducing energy consumption cannot be made without monitoring environmental parameters. Thus, the present work uses a multifunctional electric meter UPT 210 for power consumption monitoring. Two applications were developed: software which carries meter readings provided by electronic and programming facilitates remote device and a device for temperature monitoring and control. Following temperature variations that occur both in the cooling system, as well as the ambient, can reduce energy consumption. For this purpose, some air conditioning units or some computers are stopped in different time slots. These intervals were set so that the economy is high, but the work's Datacenter is not disturbed.

  14. An International Survey of Electric Storage Tank Water Heater Efficiency and Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Alissa; Lutz, James; McNeil, Michael A.; Covary, Theo

    2013-11-13

    Water heating is a main consumer of energy in households, especially in temperate and cold climates. In South Africa, where hot water is typically provided by electric resistance storage tank water heaters (geysers), water heating energy consumption exceeds cooking, refrigeration, and lighting to be the most consumptive single electric appliance in the home. A recent analysis for the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) performed by the authors estimated that standing losses from electric geysers contributed over 1,000 kWh to the annual electricity bill for South African households that used them. In order to reduce this burden, the South African government is currently pursuing a programme of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labelling (EES&L) for electric appliances, including geysers. In addition, Eskom has a history of promoting heat pump water heaters (HPWH) through incentive programs, which can further reduce energy consumption. This paper provides a survey of international electric storage water heater test procedures and efficiency metrics which can serve as a reference for comparison with proposed geyser standards and ratings in South Africa. Additionally it provides a sample of efficiency technologies employed to improve the efficiency of electric storage water heaters, and outlines programs to promote adoption of improved efficiency. Finally, it surveys current programs used to promote HPWH and considers the potential for this technology to address peak demand more effectively than reduction of standby losses alone

  15. National Lighting Energy Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting Energy National Lighting Energy Consumption Consumption 390 Billion kWh used for lighting in all 390 Billion kWh used for lighting in all commercial buildings in commercial buildings in 2001 2001 LED (<.1% ) Incandescent 40% HID 22% Fluorescent 38% Lighting Energy Consumption by Lighting Energy Consumption by Breakdown of Lighting Energy Breakdown of Lighting Energy Major Sector and Light Source Type Major Sector and Light Source Type Source: Navigant Consulting, Inc., U.S. Lighting

  16. Residential Energy Consumption Survey:

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... ...*...,,.<,<,...,,.,,.,,. 97 Table 6. Residential Fuel Oil and Kerosene Consumption and Expenditures April 1979 Through March 1980 Northeast...

  17. US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MidAtl NJ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $700 $1,400 $2,100 $2,800 $3,500 US MidAtl NJ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US MidAtl NJ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Average energy consumption (127 million Btu per year) in New Jersey homes and average household energy expenditures ($3,065 per year) are among the

  18. US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Arizona households use 66 million Btu of energy per home, 26% less than the U.S. average. * The combination of lower than average site consumption of all

  19. US SoAtl GA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    GA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl GA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Site energy consumption (89.5 million Btu) and energy expenditures per household ($2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per

  20. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  1. Annual Coal Report - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual Coal Report Release Date: March 23, 2016 | Next Release Date: December 18, 2016 | full report Previous Reports (pdf) Data year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 see all Go The Annual Coal Report (ACR) provides annual data on U.S. coal production, number of mines, productive capacity, recoverable reserves, employment, productivity, consumption, stocks, and prices. All data for 2014 and prior years are final. Highlights for 2014: In 2014, U.S. coal production

  2. Computer usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Fuchs, Heidi; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Pratt, Stacy; Willem, Henry; Claybaugh, Erin; Beraki, Bereket; Nagaraju, Mythri; Price, Sarah; Young, Scott

    2014-12-01

    The electricity consumption of miscellaneous electronic loads (MELs) in the home has grown in recent years, and is expected to continue rising. Consumer electronics, in particular, are characterized by swift technological innovation, with varying impacts on energy use. Desktop and laptop computers make up a significant share of MELs electricity consumption, but their national energy use is difficult to estimate, given uncertainties around shifting user behavior. This report analyzes usage data from 64 computers (45 desktop, 11 laptop, and 8 unknown) collected in 2012 as part of a larger field monitoring effort of 880 households in the San Francisco Bay Area, and compares our results to recent values from the literature. We find that desktop computers are used for an average of 7.3 hours per day (median = 4.2 h/d), while laptops are used for a mean 4.8 hours per day (median = 2.1 h/d). The results for laptops are likely underestimated since they can be charged in other, unmetered outlets. Average unit annual energy consumption (AEC) for desktops is estimated to be 194 kWh/yr (median = 125 kWh/yr), and for laptops 75 kWh/yr (median = 31 kWh/yr). We estimate national annual energy consumption for desktop computers to be 20 TWh. National annual energy use for laptops is estimated to be 11 TWh, markedly higher than previous estimates, likely reflective of laptops drawing more power in On mode in addition to greater market penetration. This result for laptops, however, carries relatively higher uncertainty compared to desktops. Different study methodologies and definitions, changing usage patterns, and uncertainty about how consumers use computers must be considered when interpreting our results with respect to existing analyses. Finally, as energy consumption in On mode is predominant, we outline several energy savings opportunities: improved power management (defaulting to low-power modes after periods of inactivity as well as power scaling), matching the rated power of power supplies to computing needs, and improving the efficiency of individual components.

  3. Annual Technology Baseline

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is conducting a study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy DOE, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), that aims to document and implement an annual process designed to identify a realistic and timely set of input assumptions (e.g., technology cost and performance, fuel costs), and a diverse set of potential futures (standard scenarios), initially for electric sector analysis. This primary product of the Annual Technology Baseline (ATB) project component includes detailed cost and performance data (both current and projected) for both renewable and conventional technologies. This data is presented in MS Excel.

  4. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the U.S. economy based on data from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey. The sample used in this report represented about 250,000 of the largest manufacturing establishments which account for approximately 98 percent of U.S. economic output from manufacturing, and an expected similar proportion of manufacturing energy use. The amount of energy use was collected for all operations of each establishment surveyed. Highlights of the report include profiles for the four major energy-consuming industries (petroleum refining, chemical, paper, and primary metal industries), and an analysis of the effects of changes in the natural gas and electricity markets on the manufacturing sector. Seven appendices are included to provide detailed background information. 10 figs., 51 tabs.

  5. Renewable Energy Annual - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ‹ See All Petrolem Reports Renewable Energy Annual With Data for 2009 | Release Date: January 30, 2012 | Next Release Date: Discontinued | full report Previous Renewable Energy Annual Reports Year (PDF): 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Data Tables Renewable Energy Trends Consumption 1.1 U.S. energy consumption by energy source, 2005 - 2009 1.2 Renewable energy consumption by energy-use sector and energy source, 2005 - 2009 1.3 Renewable energy

  6. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Reference case Table A7. Transportation sector key indicators and delivered energy consumption Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A7. Transportation sector key indicators and delivered energy consumption Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Travel indicators (billion vehicle miles traveled) Light-duty vehicles less than 8,501 pounds .... 2,578 2,644 2,917 3,090 3,287

  7. State energy data report 1995 - consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  8. Activity: Conserving Electric Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Students participate in two experiments in which they (1) gain an appreciation for their dependency on electricity and (2) learn how regulating the rate of energy consumption makes the energy...

  9. Open cycle liquid desiccant dehumidifier and hybrid solar/electric absorption refrigeration system. Annual report, January 1993--December 1993. Calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimmo, B.G.; Thornbloom, M.D.

    1995-04-01

    This annual report presents work performed during calendar year 1993 by the Florida Solar Energy Center under contract to the US Department of Energy. Two distinctively different solar powered indoor climate control systems were analyzed: the open cycle liquid desiccant dehumidifier, and an improved efficiency absorption system which may be fired by flat plate solar collectors. Both tasks represent new directions relative to prior FSEC research in Solar Cooling and Dehumidification.

  10. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1990 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-06-01

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1990 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. The report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1990 time period, and gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1990. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell annually to four sectors. Data is provided on each retail customer sector and also on the customers Bonneville serves directly: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. 21 figs., 40 tabs.

  11. All Consumption Tables.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4) June 2007 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2004 2004 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2004...

  12. Annual Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Status & Schedules » Annual Planning Summaries Annual Planning Summaries Background DOE Order 451.1B, National Environmental Compliance Program, Section 4.d, requires that an annual NEPA planning summary will describe briefly: (1) the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, (2) any environmental assessments expected to be prepared in the next 12 months, (3) any environmental impact statements expected to be prepared in the next 24 months, and (4) the planned cost and schedule for

  13. Electric sales and revenue 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1996. 16 figs., 20 tabs.

  14. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Sandra R.; Johnson, Melvin; McClevey, Kenneth; Calopedis, Stephen; Bolden, Deborah

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  15. Annual Energy Review 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    1999-07-01

    Fifty Years of History. That’s what you will find in this report—energy data from 1949 through 1998. Remarkable change occurred in half a century. The U.S. population grew by 82 percent while consumption of energy increased by 194 percent. At the end of the period, the average amount of energy used per person in one year was 62 percent greater than at the beginning. At mid-century, America was nearly self-sufficient in petroleum; we were a net exporter of natural gas; most of our coal came from underground mines and was produced at the rate of seven-tenths of a short ton per miner hour; nuclear electric power had not been developed; and almost twice as much electricity was used at industrial sites as in homes. Near the end of the century, half of the petroleum we use comes from other countries; 15 percent of our natural gas consumption is imported; more of our coal comes from surface mines than underground mines and U.S. miners produce coal at a rate of over 6 short tons per miner hour; about a fifth of U.S. electricity is supplied by nuclear electric power; and residences use more electricity than industrial sites.

  16. Annual Energy Review 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-10-01

    This twenty-ninth edition of the Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) most comprehensive look at integrated energy statistics. The summary statistics on the Nation’s energy production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices cover all major energy commodities and all energy-consuming sectors of the U.S. economy from 1949 through 2010. The AER is EIA’s historical record of energy statistics and, because the coverage spans six decades, the statistics in this report are well-suited to long-term trend analysis.

  17. Annual Energy Review 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    2002-11-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is a statistical history of energy activities in the United States. It documents trends and milestones in U.S. energy production, trade, storage, pricing, and consumption. Each new year of data that is added to the time series—which now reach into 7 decades—extends the story of how Americans have acquired and used energy. It is a story of continual change as the Nation's economy grew, energy requirements expanded, resource availability shifted, and interdependencies developed among nations.

  18. Renewable energy annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    This report presents summary data on renewable energy consumption, the status of each of the primary renewable technologies, a profile of each of the associated industries, an analysis of topical issues related to renewable energy, and information on renewable energy projects worldwide. It is the second in a series of annual reports on renewable energy. The renewable energy resources included in the report are biomass (wood and ethanol); municipal solid waste, including waste-to-energy and landfill gas; geothermal; wind; and solar energy, including solar thermal and photovoltaic. The report also includes various appendices and a glossary.

  19. Standard Scenarios Annual Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is conducting a study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy DOE, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), that aims to document and implement an annual process designed to identify a realistic and timely set of input assumptions (e.g., technology cost and performance, fuel costs), and a diverse set of potential futures (standard scenarios), initially for electric sector analysis.

  20. CSV File Documentation: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Consumption Estimates The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files ... SG still gas SN special naphthas SO solar thermal and photovoltaic energy TE total ...

  1. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  2. US MidAtl NY Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MidAtl NY Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NY Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * New York households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Electricity consumption in

  3. Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Hydropower Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel Wind Geothermal Solar Energy in Brief How much U.S. electricity is generated from renewable energy?...

  4. Microsoft Word - 1 Million Electric Vehicle Report Final | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Microsoft Word - 1 Million Electric Vehicle Report Final More Documents & Publications FY 2012 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D Hybrid Electric Systems ...

  5. Power Electronics and Electric Machines Merit Review, May 2005...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Machines Merit Review, May 2005 Power Electronics and Electric Machines Merit ... PDF icon Annual Review Report More Documents & Publications Power Electronics and ...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Smith Electric...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Smith Electric Vehicles at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Smith Electric Vehicles:...

  7. Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of

  8. International Energy Outlook 2016-Transportation sector energy consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    - Energy Information Administration 8. Transportation sector energy consumption Overview In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, transportation sector delivered energy consumption increases at an annual average rate of 1.4%, from 104 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2012 to 155 quadrillion Btu in 2040. Transportation energy demand growth occurs almost entirely in regions outside of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD), with

  9. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Energy Sources; Column: Consumption Potential;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Energy Sources; Column: Consumption Potential; Unit: Physical Units. Actual Minimum Maximum Energy Sources Consumption Consumption(a) Consumption(b) Total United States Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthour 745,247 727,194 770,790 Natural Gas (billion cubic feet) 5,064 4,331 5,298 Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels) 22 20 82 Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels) 13 9 46 Coal (thousand short

  10. Electric Metering | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Metering Electric Metering Saving Money by Saving Energy The Department of Energy has installed meters in the James Forrestal Building that will enable DOE to measure electricity use and costs in its headquarters facility. You may explore this data further by visiting our Forrestal Metering Dashboard at the following website: http://forrestal.nrel.gov The Forrestal electric meters provide daily read-outs and comparison of data on electricity consumption for overhead lighting and power

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...... 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal ... Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants ...

  12. Electric power monthly, April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-07

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  13. Electric power monthly, May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-25

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  14. Conserving Electric Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    two experiments in which they gain an appreciation for their dependency on electricity, and learn how regulating the rate of energy consumption makes the energy source last longer. ...

  15. Waukesha Electric Systems Smart Grid Demonstration Project |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    transformer, lower power consumption through reduction of losses, and increase the reliability of the electrical grid. References ARRA Smart Grid Demonstration Projects...

  16. US MidAtl PA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MidAtl PA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl PA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Pennsylvania households consume an average of 96 million Btu per year, 8% more than the U.S. average. Pennsylvania residents also

  17. US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Colorado households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in

  18. US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Colorado households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in

  19. Electricity - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for...

  20. Electric Sales, Revenue, and Average Price 2011 - Energy Information

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and

  1. Major Fuels","Site Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel, 1999" ,"All Buildings",,"Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Primary Electricity (trillion Btu)" ,"Number of Buildings...

  2. Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low Cost Electricity FY-01 Annual Report, October 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Herring, James Stephen; Loewen, Eric Paul; Smolik, Galen Richard; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Todreas, N.

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, plant engineering, material compatibility studies, and coolant activation. The publications derived from work on this project (since project inception) are listed in Appendix A.

  3. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2003, 2nd Annual/8th Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation-IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% vs. about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors, LWRs) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus the need for recirculation and jet pumps, a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies, LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which is also in use around the world.

  4. DOE/EIA-0321/HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents composing a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and...

  5. Annual Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Coal Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting and mapping) Summary Prices Reserves Consumption Production Stocks Imports, exports & distribution Coal-fired electric power plants Transportation costs to electric power sector International All coal data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Consumption Environment Imports & exports Industry characteristics Prices Production Projections Recurring Reserves Stocks All

  6. Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review - Energy Information

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Release Date: March 25, 2015 | Next Release Date: April 2017 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0640(2014) Evaluation of 2014 and Prior Reference Case Projections The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy production, consumption and prices each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). Each year, EIA also produces an AEO Retrospective Review document, which presents a comparison between realized energy

  7. Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Reference Case

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Outlook for U.S. Coal and Nuclear Electricity Generation for 2013 EIA Energy Conference June 18, 2013 | Washington, DC by Jim Diefenderfer, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear & Renewables Analysis U. S. Energy Information Administration Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation 2 U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 25% 19% 42% 13% 1% Nuclear Oil and

  8. Annual Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 2011 Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Community Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Community DOE/ORO/2399 Progress Cleanup P Progress Cleanup P 2 This report was produced by URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, DOE's Environmental Management contractor for the Oak Ridge Reservation. About the Cover After recontouring and revegetation, the P1 Pond at East Tennessee Technology Park is flourishing. The contaminated pond was drained, recontoured, and restocked with fish that would not disturb the pond sediment. 1

  9. DOE/IG Annual Performance Report FY 2008, Annual Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOEIG Annual Performance Report FY 2008, Annual Performance Plan FY 2009 DOEIG Annual Performance Report FY 2008, Annual Performance Plan FY 2009 DOEIG Annual Performance Report ...

  10. Residential energy consumption survey: consumption and expenditures, April 1982-March 1983. Part 1, national data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, W.

    1984-11-01

    This report presents data on the US consumption and expenditures for residential use of natural gas, electricity, fuel oil or kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) from April 1982 through March 1983. Data on the consumption of wood for this period are also presented. The consumption and expenditures data are based on actual household bills, obtained, with the permission of the household. from the companies supplying energy to the household. Data on wood consumption are based on respondent recall of the amount of wood burned during the winter and are subject to memory errors and other reporting errors described in the report. These data come from the 1982 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the fifth in a series of comparable surveys beginning in 1978. The 1982 survey is the first survey to include, as part of its sample, a portion of the same households interviewed in the 1980 survey. A separate report is planned to report these longitudinal data. This summary gives the highlights of a comparison of the findings for the 5 years of RECS data. The data cover all types of housing units in the 50 states and the District of Columbia including single-family units, apartments, and mobile homes. For households with indirect energy costs, such as costs that are included in the rent or paid by third parties, the sonsumption and expenditures data are estimated and included in the figures reported here. The average household consumption of natural gas, electricity, fuel oil or kerosene, and LPG dropped in 1982 from the previous year, hitting a 5-year low since the first Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) was conducted in 1978. The average consumption was 103 (+-3) million Btu per household in 1982, down from 114 (+-) million Btu in 1981. The weather was the main contributing factor. 8 figures, 46 tables.

  11. Petroleum Marketing Annual Archives

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petrolem Reports Petroleum Marketing Annual Archives The Petroleum Marketing Annual was discontinued in 2010. Choose the year from the archive Petroleum Marketing Annual you wish...

  12. International energy annual, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-08

    This document presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 200 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy includes hydroelectric, geothermal, solar and wind electric power and alcohol for fuel. The data were largely derived from published sources and reports from US Embassy personnel in foreign posts. EIA also used data from reputable secondary sources, industry reports, etc.

  13. Current Annualized Request

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appropriation FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 Current Annualized Request CR $ % Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Energy Programs Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 1,780,548 1,820,713 2,775,700 +995,152 +55.9% Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 136,178 139,954 169,015 +32,837 +24.1% Nuclear Energy 760,466 770,075 735,460 -25,006 -3.3% Race to the Top for Energy Efficiency and Grid Modernization 0 0 200,000 +200,000 N/A Fossil Energy Programs Fossil Energy Research and

  14. Household Energy Consumption Segmentation Using Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwac, J; Flora, J; Rajagopal, R

    2014-01-01

    The increasing US deployment of residential advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) has made hourly energy consumption data widely available. Using CA smart meter data, we investigate a household electricity segmentation methodology that uses an encoding system with a pre-processed load shape dictionary. Structured approaches using features derived from the encoded data drive five sample program and policy relevant energy lifestyle segmentation strategies. We also ensure that the methodologies developed scale to large data sets.

  15. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption &

  16. Electric sales and revenue 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the United States. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1994.

  17. Electric sales and revenue 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1997. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

  18. Alaska Power Association Annual Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alaska Power Association Annual Meeting Alaska Power Association Annual Meeting September 21, 2016 8:00AM AKDT to September 23, 2016 5:00PM AKDT Cordova, Alaska Hosted by Cordova Electric Association, the Alaska Power Association Annual Meeting will cover various sessions and topics as well as feature exhibitors

  19. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-22

    This report is the third in the series of reports presenting data from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The 1987 RECS, seventh in a series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers, provides baseline information on household energy use in the United States. Data from the seven RECS and its companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are made available to the public in published reports such as this one, and on public use data files. This report presents data for the four Census regions and nine Census divisions on the consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and kerosene (as a single category), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on consumption of wood at the Census region level. The emphasis in this report is on graphic depiction of the data. Data from previous RECS surveys are provided in the graphics, which indicate the regional trends in consumption, expenditures, and uses of energy. These graphs present data for the United States and each Census division. 12 figs., 71 tabs.

  20. Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and Customer Charging...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the U.S. Department of Energy and the electricity ... in annual sales of plug-in electric vehicles by 2023, 1 which may substantially increase electricity usage and peak ...

  1. Now Available: Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The electric power industry expects a 400% growth in annual sales of plug-in electric vehicles by 2023, which may substantially increase electricity usage and peak demand in high ...

  2. Energy Consumption: Costs and the Annual Efficiency Index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-01-01

    This document explains to municipal workers how they can measure and reduce the energy usage of their buildings.

  3. C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Utilities 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1980 1985 1990 1995 1975 2000 Note: Beginning in 1996, consumption of natural gas for agricultural use was...

  4. Annual Training Plan Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Annual Training Plan Template is used by an organization's training POC to draft their organization's annual training plan.

  5. Annual Energy Review 2006 - June 2007

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Btu) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2006 3 Consumption 99.87 k Supply 104.80 Exports 4.93 Petroleum 2.79 Other 2.14 g Coa l 23.7 9 Natur al Gas 19.02 C...

  6. C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    53 Energy Information Administration Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 35. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities by State, 1967-2000 ...

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 FY 2007 Federal Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Buildings and Facilities 0.88 Vehicles/Equipment 0.69 (mostly jet fuel and diesel) Total Federal Government Consumption 1.57 Source(s): DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table A-1, p. 90 for total consumption and Table A-7, p. 95 for vehicle and equipment operations

  8. Electric Blanket Delivers K.O. to Space Heater During #EnergyFaceoff...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Space Heater Space Heater (low end of energy use): (750 W x 8 hours) 1000 6 kWhday (daily consumption) 6 kWhday x 50 days 300 kWh (annual energy consumption) 300 kWh x ...

  9. Electric power monthly, September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-17

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  10. Electric power monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-13

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  11. Electric sales and revenue 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenue, and average revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  12. Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous EquipmentElectricity Use in New Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan,Gregory

    2007-02-28

    The "Other" end-uses (appliances, lighting, electronics, andmiscellaneous equipment) continue to grow. This is particularly true innew homes, where increasing floor area and amenities are leading tohigher saturation of these types of devices. This paper combines thefindings of several field studies to assess the current state ofknowledge about the "Other" end-uses in new homes. The field studiesinclude sub-metered measurements of occupied houses in Arizona, Florida,and Colorado, as well as device-level surveys and power measurements inunoccupied new homes. We find that appliances, lighting, electronics, andmiscellaneous equipment can consume from 46 percent to 88 percent ofwhole-house electricity use in current low-energy homes. Moreover, theannual consumption for the "Other" end-uses is not significantly lower innew homes (even those designed for low energy use) compared to existinghomes. The device-level surveys show that builder-installed equipment isa significant contributor to annual electricity consumption, and certaindevices that are becoming more common in new homes, such as structuredwiring systems, contribute significantly to this power consumption. Thesefindings suggest that energy consumption by these "Other" end uses isstill too large to allow cost-effective zero-energy homes.

  13. Miscellaneous electricity use in U.S. homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Marla C.; Koomey, Jonathan G.; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Meier, Alan; Huber, Wolfgang

    1999-09-30

    Historically, residential energy and carbon saving efforts have targeted conventional end uses such as water heating, lighting and refrigeration. The emergence of new household appliances has transformed energy use from a few large and easily identifiable end uses into a broad array of ''miscellaneous'' energy services. This group of so called miscellaneous appliances has been a major contributor to growth in electricity demand in the past two decades. We use industry shipment data, lifetimes, and wattage and usage estimates of over 90 individual products to construct a bottom-up end use model (1976-2010). The model is then used to analyze historical and forecasted growth trends, and to identify the largest individual products within the miscellaneous end use. We also use the end use model to identify and analyze policy priorities. Our forecast projects that over the period 1996 to 2010, miscellaneous consumption will increase 115 TWh, accounting for over 90 percent of future residential electricity growth. A large portion of this growth will be due to halogen torchiere lamps and consumer electronics, making these two components of miscellaneous electricity a particularly fertile area for efficiency programs. Approximately 20 percent (40 TWh) of residential miscellaneous electricity is ''leaking electricity'' or energy consumed by appliances when they are not performing their principal function. If the standby power of all appliances with a standby mode is reduced to one watt, the potential energy savings equal 21 TWh/yr, saving roughly $1-2 billion annually.

  14. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption CBECS 2012 - Release date: March 18, 2016 2012 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for the 2012 CBECS provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, computing (including servers), office equipment, and other uses. Although details vary by energy source, there are

  15. International Energy Outlook 2016-Buildings sector energy consumption -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration 6. Buildings sector energy consumption Overview Energy consumed in the buildings sector consists of residential and commercial end users and accounts for 20.1% of the total delivered energy consumed worldwide. Consumption of delivered, or site, energy contrasts with the use of the primary energy that also includes the energy used to generate and deliver electricity to individual sites such as homes, offices, or industrial plants. In the International Energy

  16. Annual Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    09 THROUGH 09/30/2010 The following Annual Freedom of Information Act report covers the Period 10/01/2009, through 09/30/2010, as required by 5 U.S.C. 552. I. BASIC INFORMATION REGARDING REPORT 1. Kevin T. Hagerty, Director Office of Information Resources, MA-90 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 Alexander Morris, FOIA Officer Sheila Jeter, FOIA/Privacy Act Specialist FOIA Office, MA-90 Office of Information Resources U.S. Department of Energy

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Smith Electric Vehicles at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Smith Electric...

  18. Full Consumption Report.indd

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    214(2013) July 2015 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2013 2013 Consumption Summary Tables S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy ...

  19. Health Care Buildings: Consumption Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption Tables Sum of Major Fuel Consumption by Size and Type of Health Care Building Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) Dollars per...

  20. US ESC TN Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Survey www.eia.govconsumptionresidential Space heating Water heating Air conditioning Appliances, electronics, lighting Household Energy Use in ...

  1. US ENC WI Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Survey www.eia.govconsumptionresidential Space heating Water heating Air conditioning Appliances, electronics, lighting Household Energy Use in ...

  2. US NE MA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Survey www.eia.govconsumptionresidential Space heating Water heating Air conditioning Appliances, electronics, lighting Household Energy Use in ...

  3. Monitoring and Characterization of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in a Large Retail Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile-Polese, L.; Frank, S.; Sheppy, M.; Lobato, C.; Rader, E.; Smith, J.; Long, N.

    2014-02-01

    Buildings account for 40% of primary energy consumption in the United States (residential 22%; commercial 18%). Most (70% residential and 79% commercial) is used as electricity. Thus, almost 30% of U.S. primary energy is used to provide electricity to buildings. Plug loads play an increasingly critical role in reducing energy use in new buildings (because of their increased efficiency requirements), and in existing buildings (as a significant energy savings opportunity). If all installed commercial building miscellaneous electrical loads (CMELs) were replaced with energy-efficient equipment, a potential annual energy saving of 175 TWh, or 35% of the 504 TWh annual energy use devoted to MELs, could be achieved. This energy saving is equivalent to the annual energy production of 14 average-sized nuclear power plants. To meet DOE's long-term goals of reducing commercial building energy use and carbon emissions, the energy efficiency community must better understand the components and drivers of CMEL energy use, and develop effective reduction strategies. These goals can be facilitated through improved data collection and monitoring methodologies, and evaluation of CMELs energy-saving techniques.

  4. Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

    1982-02-01

    The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

  5. Minimize oil field power consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, B.; Ennis, P.

    1999-08-01

    Though electric power is a major operating cost of oil production, few producers have systematically evaluated their power consumption for ways to be more efficient. There is significant money to be saved by doing so, and now is a good time to make an evaluation because new power options are at hand. They range from small turbo generators that can run on casing head gas and power one or two lift pumps, to rebuilt major turbines and ram-jet powered generators that can be set in a multi-well field and deliver power at bargain prices. Power industry deregulation is also underway. Opportunities for more advantageous power contracts from competitive sources are not far off. This two-part series covers power efficiency and power options. This article reviews steps you can take to evaluate the efficiency of your power use and go about improving it. Part 2 will discuss opportunities for use of distributed power and changes you can expect from decentralized power.

  6. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-02

    DOE2.1E-121SUNOS is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating,more » cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS).« less

  7. Advanced Integrated Electric Traction System | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ape014_smith_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Integrated Electric Traction System Advanced Integrated Electric Traction System Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report

  8. Energy consumption series: Lighting in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-11

    Lighting represents a substantial fraction of commercial electricity consumption. A wide range of initiatives in the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Energy Strategy have focused on commercial lighting as a potential source of energy conservation. This report provides a statistical profile of commercial lighting, to examine the potential for lighting energy conservation in commercial buildings. The principal conclusion from this analysis is that energy use for lighting could be reduced by as much as a factor of four using currently available technology. The analysis is based primarily on the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) 1986 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The more recent 1989 survey had less detail on lighting, for budget reasons. While changes have occurred in the commercial building stock since 1986, the relationships identified by this analysis are expected to remain generally valid. In addition, the analytic approach developed here can be applied to the data that will be collected in the 1992 CBECS.

  9. Annual Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual Reports Annual Reports Note: Some of the following documents are in PDF and will require Adobe Reader for viewing. Freedom of Information Act Annual Reports Annual Report for 2015 Annual Report for 2014 Annual Report for 2013 Annual Report for 2012 Annual Report for 2011 Annual Report for 2010 Annual Report for 2009 Annual Report for 2008 (pdf) Annual Report for 2007 (pdf) Annual Report for 2006 (pdf) Annual Report for 2005 (pdf) Annual Report for 2004 (pdf) Annual Report for 2003 (pdf)

  10. Electric power monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  11. Electric power monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the U.S., Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. This April 1994 issue contains 1993 year-end data and data through January 1994.

  12. Community Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-21

    The TDIST3 program performs an analysis of large integrated community total energy systems (TES) supplying thermal and electrical energy from one or more power stations. The program models the time-dependent energy demands of a group of representative building types, distributes the thermal demands within a thermal utility system (TUS), simulates the dynamic response of a group of power stations in meeting the TUS demands, and designs an optimal base-loaded (electrically) power plant and thermal energymore » storage reservoir combination. The capital cost of the TES is evaluated. The program was developed primarily to analyze thermal utility systems supplied with high temperature water (HTW) from more than one power plant. The TUS consists of a transmission loop and secondary loops with a heat exchanger linking each secondary loop to the transmission loop. The power stations electrical output supplies all community buildings and the HTW supplies the thermal demand of the buildings connected through the TUS, a piping network. Basic components of the TES model are one or more power stations connected to the transmission loop. These may be dual-purpose, producing electricity and HTW, or just heating plants producing HTW. A thermal storage reservoir is located at one power station. The secondary loops may have heating plants connected to them. The transmission loop delivers HTW to local districts; the secondary loops deliver the energy to the individual buildings in a district.« less

  13. "Annual Coal Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual Coal Report Data Released: January 20, 2015 Data for: 2013 Re-Release Date: April 23, 2015 (CORRECTION) Annual Coal Report 2013 CorrectionUpdate April 23, 2015 The Annual ...

  14. RECENT TRENDS IN EMERGING TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunting, Bruce G

    2012-01-01

    Abundance of energy can be improved both by developing new sources of fuel and by improving efficiency of energy utilization, although we really need to pursue both paths to improve energy accessibility in the future. Currently, 2.7 billion people or 38% of the world s population do not have access to modern cooking fuel and depend on wood or dung and 1.4 billion people or 20% do not have access to electricity. It is estimated that correcting these deficiencies will require an investment of $36 billion dollars annually through 2030. In growing economies, energy use and economic growth are strongly linked, but energy use generally grows at a lower rate due to increased access to modern fuels and adaptation of modern, more efficient technology. Reducing environmental impacts of increased energy consumption such as global warming or regional emissions will require improved technology, renewable fuels, and CO2 reuse or sequestration. The increase in energy utilization will probably result in increased transportation fuel diversity as fuels are shaped by availability of local resources, world trade, and governmental, environmental, and economic policies. The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the recently emerging trends, but not to suggest winners. This paper will focus on liquid transportation fuels, which provide the highest energy density and best match with existing vehicles and infrastructure. Data is taken from a variety of US, European, and other sources without an attempt to normalize or combine the various data sources. Liquid transportation fuels can be derived from conventional hydrocarbon resources (crude oil), unconventional hydrocarbon resources (oil sands or oil shale), and biological feedstocks through a variety of biochemical or thermo chemical processes, or by converting natural gas or coal to liquids.

  15. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  16. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  17. Petroleum Marketing Annual 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 2009 Released: August 6, 2010 Next Release Date: Discontinued find annual data in Petroleum Marketing Monthly Monthly price and volume statistics on...

  18. Petroleum Marketing Annual

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    PDF 1.2MB . Front Matter . Petroleum Marketing Annual Cover Page, Preface, and Table of Contents PDF . Highlights . Petroleum Marketing Annual Highlights PDF . . Summary Statistics ...

  19. Petroleum Marketing Annual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    PDF 2.9MB . . Front Matter . Petroleum Marketing Annual Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents PDF . . Highlights . Petroleum Marketing Annual Highlights PDF . . ...

  20. Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    PDF 1.2MB . . Front Matter . Petroleum Marketing Annual Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents PDF . . Highlights . Petroleum Marketing Annual Highlights PDF . . ...

  1. Annual Coal Distribution Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: April 16, 2015 | Next Release Date: March 2016 | full report | RevisionCorrection Revision to the Annual Coal Distribution Report ...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Motors R&D Annual Progress Report | Department of Energy Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing

  3. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-01-24

    DOE2.1E-121 is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating,more » cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS). DOE2.1E-121 contains modifications to DOE2.1E which allows 1000 zones to be modeled.« less

  4. Renewable energy annual 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    This report presents information on renewable energy consumption, capacity, and electricity generation data, as well as data on US solar thermal and photovoltaic collector manufacturing activities. The renewable energy resources included in the report are: biomass (wood, ethanol, and biodiesel); municipal solid waste; geothermal; wind; and solar (solar thermal and photovoltaic). The first chapter of the report provides an overview of renewable energy use and capability from 1992 through 1996. It contains renewable energy consumption, capacity, and electricity generation data, as well as descriptive text. Chapter 2 presents current (through 1996) information on the US solar energy industry. A glossary of renewable energy terms is also included. 15 figs., 42 tabs.

  5. DOETEIAO32l/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents comprising a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. * Wood used for heating. Although wood consumption data...

  6. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A16. Renewable energy generating capacity and generation (gigawatts, unless otherwise noted) Net summer capacity and generation Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Electric power sector 1 Net summer capacity Conventional hydroelectric power ...................... 78.1 78.3 79.2 79.6 79.7 79.8 80.1

  7. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Energy Sources; Column: Consumption Potential;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 10.1 Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Energy Sources; Column: Consumption Potential; Unit: Physical Units. Actual Minimum Maximum Energy Sources Consumption Consumption(a) Consumption(b) Total United States Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthour 854,102 826,077 889,281 Natural Gas (billion cubic feet) 5,357 4,442 5,649 Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels) 22,139 19,251 101,340 Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels) 39,925

  8. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... sulfur, tire-derived fuels, waste heat and miscellaneous technologies. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" ...

  9. ANSI Electric Vehicle Standards Roadmap | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmap ANSI Electric Vehicle Standards Roadmap 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ...

  10. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Wind...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... 35% of U.S. power requirements with high grid ... responsible deployment. 8 Market Application Land-based. ... Annual Energy Outlook natural gas-fueled electricity ...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electric Vehicle Grid Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about electric...

  12. Development of High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles FY 2011 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage ...

  13. Electric power monthly, October 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-11

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, statistics at the company and plant level are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 63 tabs.

  14. Electric Power Monthly, September 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-12

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and state levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, statistics at the company and plant level are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 63 tabs.

  15. Energy Intensity Indicators: Transportation Energy Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Energy Consumption Energy Intensity Indicators: Transportation Energy Consumption This section contains an overview of the aggregate transportation sector, combining ...

  16. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Detailed Tables 28 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 1. In previous MECS, the term "primary energy" was used to denote the "first use" of...

  17. US WSC TX Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Survey www.eia.govconsumptionresidential Space heating Water heating Air conditioning Appliances, electronics, lighting Household Energy Use in Texas A ...

  18. US WNC MO Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Survey www.eia.govconsumptionresidential Space heating Water heating Air conditioning Appliances, electronics, lighting Household Energy Use in Missouri ...

  19. US ENC IL Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Survey www.eia.govconsumptionresidential Space heating Water heating Air conditioning Appliances, electronics, lighting Household Energy Use in Illinois ...

  20. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Survey www.eia.govconsumptionresidential Space heating Water heating Air conditioning Appliances, electronics, lighting Household Energy Use in Michigan ...

  1. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    or commercial trucks (See Table 1). Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 5 The 1991 RTECS count includes vehicles that were owned or used...

  2. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the...

  3. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas to Residual Fuel Oil, by Industry Group and Selected Industries, 1994 369 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 SIC Residual...

  4. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Release Next Update: August 1997. Based on the 1991...

  5. Annual report to the legislature 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The report reflects the responsibilities and accomplishments of the governor's Energy Office during 1981, presents a brief statistical summary of the energy situation in the State, shows the organization structure of and funding for the Energy Office, and provides a general statement regarding recommendations for improvement of the State's energy programs and policies. Statistics are given on monthly (1980 and 1981) and yearly (1976-1981) per capita gasoline sales; monthly (1980 and 1981) and yearly (1976-1981) per capita electricity sales; percentage of total energy consumption by primary energy type (1980) and by sector (1980); residential and transportation end uses of energy; primary energy consumption per capita; and percentage of net electric generation by fuel type (1980); percentage of sales of electricity to ultimate customers by class of service (1980); and 1990 forecasts. A report from the Public Service Commission on electricity and natural gas activities during 1981 is included. (MCW)

  6. 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-01-01

    This annual report includes: a brief overview of Western; FY 2008 operational highlights; and financial data.

  7. AVTA: Hybrid Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Procedure PDF icon ETA-HTP03 Implementation of SAE, J1634 May 1993 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Energy Consumption and Range Test Procedure PDF icon ETA-HTP04 Electric Vehicle ...

  8. AVTA: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Procedure PDF icon ETA-HP003 Implementation of SAE J1634, May 1993 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Energy Consumption and Range Test Procedure PDF icon ETA-TP004 Electric Vehicle ...

  9. Electric power monthly, July 1995 - with data for April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This publication provides statistical data on net generation, fuel consumption, fossil fuel stocks, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on fossil fuel stocks and costs are also included.

  10. NERSC Annual Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Reports NERSC Annual Reports Sort by: Default | Name 2014cover.jpg NERSC Annual Report 2014 Download Image: 2014cover.jpg | jpg | 202 KB Download File: 2014NERSCAnnualReport.pdf | pdf | 6.1 MB 2013-Annual-Report-cover.png NERSC Annual Report 2013 Download Image: 2013-Annual-Report-cover.png | png | 645 KB Download File: annrep2013.pdf | pdf | 6.7 MB 2012-Cover.png NERSC Annual Report 2012 Download Image: 2012-Cover.png | png | 420 KB Download File: annrep12.pdf | pdf | 38 MB

  11. Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2006 - Supplemental Tables - All Tables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Tables describing regional energy consumption and prices by sector; residential, commercial, and industrial demand sector data; transportation demand sector; electricity and renewable fuel; and petroleum, natural gas, and coal data.

  12. Annual energy review 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is a historical data report that tells many stories. It describes, in numbers, the changes that have occurred in US energy markets since the midpoint of the 20th century. In many cases, those markets differ vastly from those of a half-century ago. By studying the graphs and data tables presented in this report, readers can learn about past energy supply and usage in the United States and gain an understanding of the issues in energy and the environment now before use. While most of this year`s report content is similar to last year`s, there are some noteworthy developments. Table 1.1 has been restructured into more summarized groupings -- fossil fuels, nuclear electric power, and renewable energy -- to aid analysts in their examination of the basic trends in those broad categories. Readers` attention is also directed to the electricity section, where considerable reformatting of the tables and graphs has been carried out to help clarify past and recent trends in the electric power industry as it enters a period of radical restructuring. Table 9.1, which summarizes US nuclear generating units, has been redeveloped to cover the entire history of the industry in this country and to provide categories relevant in assessing the future of the industry, such as the numbers of ordered generating units that have been canceled and those that were built and later shut down. In general, the AER emphasizes domestic energy statistics. Sections 1 through 10 and Section 12 are devoted mostly to US data; Section 11 reports on international statistics and world totals. 140 figs., 141 tabs.

  13. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Preliminary Results

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Working Group 2 September 25, 2013 | Washington, DC By Trisha Hutchins and Nicholas Chase Office of Transportation Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis Annual Energy Outlook 2014: transportation modeling updates and preliminary results Overview 2 AEO2014 Transportation Working Group 2: Modeling updates and preliminary results Washington, D.C., September 25, 2013 Discussion purposes only - Do not cite or circulate * Macroeconomic drivers - GDP, population, world oil price * Light-duty

  14. Air-conditioning electricity savings and demand reductions from exterior masonry wall insulation applied to Arizona residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ternes, M.P.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1993-06-01

    A field test involving eight single-family houses was performed during the summer of 1991 in Scottsdale, Arizona to evaluate the potential of reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption and demand by insulating their exterior masonry walls. Total per house costs to perform the installations ranged from $3610 to $4550. The average annual savings was estimated to be 491 kWh, or 9% of pre-retrofit consumption. Peak demands without and with insulation on the hottest day of an average weather year for Phoenix were estimated to be 4.26 and 3.61 kill, for a demand reduction of 0.65 kill (15%). We conclude that exterior masonry wall insulation reduces air-conditioning electricity consumption and peak demand in hot, dry climates similar to that of Phoenix. Peak demand reductions are a primary benefit, making the retrofit worthy of consideration in electric utility conservation programs. Economics can be attractive from a consumer viewpoint if considered within a renovation or home improvement program.

  15. Air-conditioning electricity savings and demand reductions from exterior masonry wall insulation applied to Arizona residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ternes, M.P.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1993-01-01

    A field test involving eight single-family houses was performed during the summer of 1991 in Scottsdale, Arizona to evaluate the potential of reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption and demand by insulating their exterior masonry walls. Total per house costs to perform the installations ranged from $3610 to $4550. The average annual savings was estimated to be 491 kWh, or 9% of pre-retrofit consumption. Peak demands without and with insulation on the hottest day of an average weather year for Phoenix were estimated to be 4.26 and 3.61 kill, for a demand reduction of 0.65 kill (15%). We conclude that exterior masonry wall insulation reduces air-conditioning electricity consumption and peak demand in hot, dry climates similar to that of Phoenix. Peak demand reductions are a primary benefit, making the retrofit worthy of consideration in electric utility conservation programs. Economics can be attractive from a consumer viewpoint if considered within a renovation or home improvement program.

  16. Madison Gas & Electric- Clean Power Partner Solar Buyback Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Annual green energy purchases must be at least as large as the AC output of the PV system. This arrangement requires that the customer have two electricity meters: one to measure electricity...

  17. 2014 Data Book Shows Increased Use of Renewable Electricity ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Book shows that U.S. renewable electricity grew to 15.5 percent of total installed capacity and 13.5 percent of total electricity generation. Published annually by the National...

  18. Electric power monthly, March 1998 with data for December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 63 tabs.

  19. Florida's electric industry and solar electric technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camejo, N.

    1983-12-01

    The Florida Electric Industry is in a process of diversifying its generation technology and its fuel mix. This is being done in an effort to reduce oil consumption, which in 1981 accounted for 46.5% of the electric generation by fuel type. This does not compare well with the rest of the nation where oil use is lower. New coal and nuclear units are coming on line, and probably more will be built in the near future. However, eventhough conservation efforts may delay their construction, new power plants will have to be built to accomodate the growing demand for electricity. Other alternatives being considered are renewable energy resources. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a research project in which 10 electric utilities in Florida and the Florida Electric Power Coordinating Group rated six Solar Electric options. The Solar Electric options considered are: 1) Wind, 2) P.V., 3) Solar thermal-electric, 4) OTEC, 5) Ocean current, and 6) Biomass. The questionaire involved rating the economic and technical feasibility, as well as, the potential environmental impact of these options in Florida. It also involved rating the difficulty in overcoming institutional barriers and assessing the status of each option. A copy of the questionaire is included after the references. The combined capacity of the participating utilities represent over 90% of the total generating capacity in Florida. A list of the participating utilities is also included. This research was done in partial fulfillment for the Mater's of Science Degree in Coastal Zone Management. This paper is complementary to another paper (in these condensed conference proceedings) titled COASTAL ZONE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: A multidisciplinary approach for the integration of Solar Electric Systems with Florida's power generation system, which present a summary of the Master's thesis.

  20. Annual Review | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ON-SITE RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS Annual Reviews FY13 Annual Review FY12 Annual Review FY11 Annual Review...

  1. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Modeling updates in the Transportation sector

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    For AEO2015 Working Group July 30, 2014 | Washington, DC By Nicholas Chase, Trisha Hutchins, John Maples Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis Modeling updates in the transportation sector Data updates 2 * Update historical fuel consumption data to latest state energy data (2011), annual national data from Monthly Energy Review (2012), and most recent Short-Term Energy Outlook * Update historical light-duty vehicle attribute data through 2013 (pending) * Update historical

  2. Natural Gas Annual 2014 (NGA) - Energy Information Administration - With

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for 2014 Natural Gas Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Prices Exploration & reserves Production Imports/exports Pipelines Storage Consumption All natural gas data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Consumption Exploration & reserves Imports/exports & pipelines Prices Production Projections Recurring Storage All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Natural Gas Annual With Data for 2014 |

  3. Annual Performance Report FY 2005 Annual Performance Plan FY 2006 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 5 Annual Performance Plan FY 2006 Annual Performance Report FY 2005 Annual Performance Plan FY 2006 Annual Performance Report FY 2005 Annual Performance Plan FY 2006 PDF icon Annual Performance Report FY 2005 Annual Performance Plan FY 2006 More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy 2006 Annual Report FTCP Annual Plan - Fiscal Year 2005 FY 2008 E-Government Act Report

  4. Secretary's annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-01-01

    This second annual report of the DOE covers activities of all elements of the department except the independent FERC, which issues its own annual report. Individual chapters concern a posture statement, conservation, solar and other renewable energy, fossil energy, electric energy, nuclear energy, the environment, defense programs, international programs, general science programs, energy information, economic regulation, energy production, and support operations. The following appendixes are also included: foreign direct investments in US energy sources and supplies, exports of energy resources by foreign companies, major recipients of DOE funding, actions taken regarding disclosure of energy assets by DOE employees, financial assistance programs for alternative fuel demonstration facilities, and 1978 budget summary. 16 figures, 56 tables. (RWR)

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMeo, E.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

  7. Challenges for the vehicle tester in characterizing hybrid electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duoba, M.

    1997-08-01

    Many problems are associated with applying test methods, like the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), for HEVs. Although there has been considerable progress recently in the area of HEV test procedure development, many challenges are still unsolved. A major hurdle to overcoming the challenges of developing HEV test procedures is the lack of HEV designs available for vehicle testing. Argonne National Laboratory has tested hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) built by about 50 colleges and universities from 1994 to 1997 in annual vehicle engineering competitions sponsored in part by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). From this experience, the Laboratory has gathered information about the basics of HEV testing and issues important to successful characterization of HEVs. A collaboration between ANL and the Society of Automotive Engineer`s (SAE) HEV Test Procedure Task Force has helped guide the development of test protocols for their proposed procedures (draft SAE J1711) and test methods suited for DOE vehicle competitions. HEVs use an electrical energy storage device, which requires that HEV testing include more time and effort to deal with the effects of transient energy storage as the vehicle is operating in HEV mode. HEV operation with electric-only capability can be characterized by correcting the HEV mode data using results from electric-only operation. HEVs without electric-only capability require multiple tests conducted to form data correlations that enable the tester to find the result that corresponds to a zero net change in SOC. HEVs that operate with a net depletion of charge cannot be corrected for battery SOC and are characterized with emissions and fuel consumption results coupled with the electrical energy usage rate. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Electric power monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels. Data on quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels lag data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the US, Census division, and State level tables. However, for purposes of comparison, plant-level data are presented for the earlier month.

  9. Electric power monthly, October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-20

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  10. Electric power monthly, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-26

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  11. Electric Power Monthly, July 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-12

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost in fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 12 refs., 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  12. Electric power monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-16

    The Electric Power Monthly (EMP) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  13. NERSC Annual Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Annual Reports NERSC Annual Reports Sort by: Default | Name anrep2000.png NERSC Annual Report 2000 Download Image: anrep2000.png | png | 203 KB Download File: NERSCAnnualReport2000.pdf | pdf | 4.9 MB anrep2001.png NERSC Annual Report 2001 Download Image: anrep2001.png | png | 175 KB Download File: annrep01.pdf | pdf | 7.1 MB anrep2002.png NERSC Annual Report 2002 Download Image: anrep2002.png | png | 55 KB Download File: annrep02.pdf | pdf | 3.4 MB anrep2003.png NERSC Annual Report 2003

  14. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration (EIA) ‹ Consumption & Efficiency Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data 2009 2005 2001 1997 1993 Previous Analysis & Projections RECS Terminology A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ A Account Classification: The method in which suppliers of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil classify and bill their customers. Commonly used account classifications are "Commercial," "Industrial,"

  15. LNG Annual Report - 2006 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6 LNG Annual Report - 2006 LNG Annual Report - 2006 PDF icon LNG Annual Report - 2006 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2007 LNG Annual Report - 2008

  16. LNG Annual Report - 2010 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    10 LNG Annual Report - 2010 LNG Annual Report - 2010 PDF icon LNG Annual Report - 2010 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2009 LNG Annual Report - 2008

  17. OHA 2008 ANNUAL REPORT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 ANNUAL REPORT OHA 2008 ANNUAL REPORT PDF icon OHA 2008 ANNUAL REPORT FINAL More Documents & Publications OHA 2007 ANNUAL REPORT OHA 2009 ANNUAL REPORT OHA 2015

  18. Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Review, August 2006 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Electrical Machines Review, August 2006 Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Review, August 2006 This report is a summary of the Review Panel at the FY06 DOE FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) Annual Review of Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machine (APEEM) research activities held on August 15-17, 2006. PDF icon Annual Review Report More Documents & Publications FY 2011 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D FY 2011 Annual Progress Report for

  19. Effects of Feedback on Residential Electricity Consumption: A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Barbara C. Farhar Colleen Fitzpatrick January 1989 Prepared under Task No. BE911041 Solar Energy Research Institute A Division of MidwestResearch Institute 1617 Cole...

  20. Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (San Francisco, CA: Aspen Environmental Group) Aspen Environmental Group 2011b Topaz Solar Farm Conditional Use Permit: Final Environmental Impact Report (DRC2008-00009) (San...

  1. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2(94) Distribution Category UC-950 Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of...

  2. 2014 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U S C E N S U S B U R E A U 2014 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Sponsored by the Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy Administered and Compiled by ...

  3. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    for 1994, will continue the 3-year cycle. The RTECS, a subsample of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), is an integral part of a series of surveys designed by...

  4. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    16.8 17.4 18.6 18.9 1.7 2.2 0.6 1.5 Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 15 Vehicle Miles Traveled per Vehicle (Thousand) . . . . . . . . ....

  5. Electric Vehicle Safety Training for Emergency Responders | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon arravt036_ti_klock_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Electric Vehicle Safety Training for Emergency Responders U.S. First Responder Safety Training for Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Presentation 2009 TEPP Annual Report

  6. Annual Performance Report FY 2012, Annual Performance Plan FY...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2, Annual Performance Plan FY 2013 & FY 2014 Annual Performance Report FY 2012, Annual Performance Plan FY 2013 & FY 2014 PDF icon Annual Performance Report and Plan FY12 FY13 FY14 ...

  7. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

  8. ARM - Annual Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MaterialsAnnual Reports Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library...

  9. Annual Reports - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Reports Soil & Groundwater Home Annual Reports Environmental Data Access Administrative Record Annual Reports Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size NEW The Groundwater Remediation Project issues an annual report describing its accomplishments and plans. The projects associated with the Groundwater Remediation Project also issue periodic status reports. Those reports can be found in this section. Title Issue Date Rev. Document Information 2014

  10. NASEO 2015 Annual Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) Annual Meeting will be held in San Diego, California.

  11. Annual Site Environmental Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 Annual Site Environmental Report Updated July 24, 2015 NETL's Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014 -ii- 2014 Annual Site Environmental Report September 9, 2015 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Albany, Oregon Anchorage, Alaska Morgantown, West Virginia Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Sugar Land, Texas NETL's Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014 -iii- Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government.

  12. 2012 Annual Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Annual Plan 2012 Annual Plan Section 999: 2012 Annual Plan PDF icon Section 999 - 2012 Annual Plan More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Plan Sec. 999 Annual Plan 2012 2013 Annual Plan

  13. Draft 2014 Annual Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft 2014 Annual Plan Draft 2014 Annual Plan Section 999: Draft 2014 Annual Plan PDF icon Section 999 - Draft 2014 Annual Plan More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Plan 2013 Annual Plan Sec. 999 Annual Plan 2012

  14. Electric Power Monthly, June 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-13

    The EPM is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 40 tabs.

  15. Electric sales and revenue 1991. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenue, and average revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  16. Impacts of Climate Change on Energy Consumption and Peak Demand in Buildings: A Detailed Regional Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, James A.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Hathaway, John E.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Scott, Michael J.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of numerous commercial and residential building simulations, with the purpose of examining the impact of climate change on peak and annual building energy consumption over the portion of the Eastern Interconnection (EIC) located in the United States. The climate change scenario considered (IPCC A2 scenario as downscaled from the CASCaDE data set) has changes in mean climate characteristics as well as changes in the frequency and duration of intense weather events. This investigation examines building energy demand for three annual periods representative of climate trends in the CASCaDE data set at the beginning, middle, and end of the century--2004, 2052, and 2089. Simulations were performed using the Building ENergy Demand (BEND) model which is a detailed simulation platform built around EnergyPlus. BEND was developed in collaboration with the Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA), a modeling framework designed to simulate the complex interactions among climate, energy, water, and land at decision-relevant spatial scales. Over 26,000 building configurations of different types, sizes, vintages, and, characteristics which represent the population of buildings within the EIC, are modeled across the 3 EIC time zones using the future climate from 100 locations within the target region, resulting in nearly 180,000 spatially relevant simulated demand profiles for each of the 3 years. In this study, the building stock characteristics are held constant based on the 2005 building stock in order to isolate and present results that highlight the impact of the climate signal on commercial and residential energy demand. Results of this analysis compare well with other analyses at their finest level of specificity. This approach, however, provides a heretofore unprecedented level of specificity across multiple spectrums including spatial, temporal, and building characteristics. This capability enables the ability to perform detailed hourly impact studies of building adaptation and mitigation strategies on energy use and electricity peak demand within the context of the entire grid and economy.

  17. Electric power monthly, February 1998 with data for November 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

  18. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household RECS 2009 - Release date: June 6, 2012 Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for ...

  19. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    When will energy consumption estimates be available? Energy consumption and expenditures data will be available beginning in spring 2015. CBECS data collection is currently in its ...

  20. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption ... 7:09:42 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption ...