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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Annual Public Electric Utility data - EIA-412 data file  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The EIA-412 "Annual Electric Industry Financial Report" collected information such as income statements, balance sheets, sales and purchases, and ...

2

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Sector ; Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector; Annual Totals: ...

3

Annual Electric Utility Data - Form EIA-906 Database  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed data files > Historic Form EIA-906 Historic Form EIA-906 Detailed Data with previous form data (EIA-759) Historic electric utility data files include information on net...

4

Annual Electric Utility Data - EIA-906/920/923 Data File  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

923 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-906/920) 923 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-906/920) The survey Form EIA-923 collects detailed electric power data -- monthly and annually -- on electricity generation, fuel consumption, fossil fuel stocks, and receipts at the power plant and prime mover level. Specific survey information provided: Schedule 2 - fuel receipts and costs Schedules 3A & 5A - generator data including generation, fuel consumption and stocks Schedule 4 - fossil fuel stocks Schedules 6 & 7 - non-utility source and disposition of electricity Schedules 8A-F - environmental data Monthly data (M) - over 1,900 plants from the monthly survey Annual final data - approximately 1,900 monthly plants + 4,100 plants from the annual survey

5

Annual Power Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Power Annual Revision Final Data for 2011 Released: January 30, 2013 Revison Date: May 16, 2013 May 16, 2013 Data revision. 2011 Total (all sectors) and electric utility...

6

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual  

SciTech Connect

In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

7

Electric power annual 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

Not Available

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

8

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities...

9

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report;" and predecessor forms. Imports and Exports: Mexico data - DOE, Fossil Fuels, Office of Fuels Programs, Form OE-781R, "Annual Report of International Electrical Export...

10

Electric Power Annual 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Annual 2004 iii Contacts Questions regarding this report may be directed to: Energy Information Administration, EI-53

11

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7. Net Generation from Wind by State, by Sector, 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent...

12

Annual Electric Utility Data EIA-906/920/923 Data File  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Net metering; Advanced metering; Final Data for 2011 Released: October 2, 2012. Contact: Electricity data experts ...

13

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5.70 SUN PV 2011 10 10393 PUD No 1 of Klickitat County Electric Utility Roosevelt Biogas 1 WA 7832 7 10.00 LFG CT 2011 10 10393 PUD No 1 of Klickitat County Electric Utility...

14

Annual Electric Utility Data EIA-906/920/923 Data File  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power plant data prior to 2001 are separate files for utility and nonutility plants. For 2001 data and subsequent years, the data are Excel spreadsheet files that ...

15

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2011 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu)...

16

Electric Utility Industry Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Industry Update Electric Utility Industry Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets Edison Electric Institute FUPWG Spring 2012 April 12, 2012 Edison Electric Institute  Investor-Owned Electric Companies  Membership includes  200 US companies,  More than 65 international affiliates and  170 associates  US members  Serve more than 95% of the ultimate customers in the investor-owned segment of the industry and  Nearly 70% of all electric utility ultimate customers, and  Our mission focuses on advocating public policy; expanding market opportunities; and providing strategic business information Agenda Significant Industry Trends Utility Infrastructure Investments Generation and Fuel Landscape

17

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Palos Verdes Gas to Energy CA 10473 GEN1 2.50 LFG ST 2011 10 56505 National Grid Generation LLC Electric Utility E F Barrett NY 2511 7 0.00 NG GT 2011 10 14354...

18

Annual Electricity Generation (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in billion kilowatthours ). Compiled by Energy Information Administration...

19

Annual Electricity Consumption (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA).
...

20

Electric power annual 1997. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual 1997, Volume 2 contains annual summary statistics at national, regional, and state levels for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; power transactions; and demand-side management. Also included are data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity; gross generation; emissions; and supply and disposition of energy. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. 15 figs., 62 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Electric power annual 1994. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels.

NONE

1995-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

22

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program Category, 2002 through 2011 Energy Efficiency Load Management Total Year Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) Actual Peak Load...

23

Electric Power Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Electric Power Industry - U.S. Electricity Imports from and Electricity Exports to Canada and Mexico, 2001-2011 (Megawatthours) Canada Mexico U.S. Total Year Imports from...

24

Electric Power Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 3.19. Net Generation from Geothermal by State, by Sector, 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric...

25

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors)...

26

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency...

27

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2011 Actual, 2012-2016 Projected Net Energy (Thousands of Megawatthours) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT...

28

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Total (All Sectors) by State, 2011 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts...

29

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4. Weighted Average Cost of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2011 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Fossil Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite All Coal Ranks...

30

Electric Power Annual 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region" "1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected"...

31

Electric Power Annual - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Industry - Electricity Purchases, 2002 through 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers

32

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Electric industry retail statistics by state State Retail sales (million kWh) Retail revenue (thousand dollars) Customers Alabama 89,995 8,100,051 2,505,190 Alaska 6,320 1,015,977...

33

Electrical utilities model for determining electrical distribution capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its simplest form, this model was to obtain meaningful data on the current state of the Site`s electrical transmission and distribution assets, and turn this vast collection of data into useful information. The resulting product is an Electrical Utilities Model for Determining Electrical Distribution Capacity which provides: current state of the electrical transmission and distribution systems; critical Hanford Site needs based on outyear planning documents; decision factor model. This model will enable Electrical Utilities management to improve forecasting requirements for service levels, budget, schedule, scope, and staffing, and recommend the best path forward to satisfy customer demands at the minimum risk and least cost to the government. A dynamic document, the model will be updated annually to reflect changes in Hanford Site activities.

Fritz, R.L., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

34

California load management research 1977: a first year report to the Federal Energy Administration on the FEA/California Electric Utilities Demonstration Project. Annual report for 1977  

SciTech Connect

The California Electric Utilities Demonstration Project (EUDP) seeks to identify cost effective ways to implement load management. The three-year, six-million-dollar project will involve 24 field experiments, four electric utilities, and 7000 residential, commercial and industrial utility customers. Each experiment tries to measure how the tested management measure reduces system peak demand and shifts kilowatt-hour use in both customer and system load curves. Results of three experiments are given. The four participating utilities (Southern California Edison, Pacific Gas and Electric, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, and San Diego Gas and Electric) are described. A load curve data catalog is discussed. An appendix to the report shows how to select load management equipment. Another discusses both United States and European load management experiences.

Hairston, R.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Understanding Electric Utility Customers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How customers use and value electricity has been a subject of study and debate for many decades. A better understanding of how customers use electricity could help the industry find ways to improve energy efficiency, thereby helping to reduce green house gas emissions, increase energy sustainability, and improve overall growth in the economy. In addition, our ability to encourage more efficient consumption through real-time feedback, control technology, and pricing is better and less costly than it has e...

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

36

Trends in electric utility load duration curves  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development and analysis of annual and quarterly load duration curves for each of the 10 Federal regions. The report describes analyses performed to test for changes in load duration curve shapes over time. These analyses are intended to aid the electric utility analyses and modeling activities of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) by expanding the understanding of current and expected load duration curve shapes. 7 figs., 13 tabs.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Deregulating the electric utility industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many functions must be performed in any large electric power system. A specific proposal for a deregulated power system, based on a real-time spot energy marketplace, is presented and analyzed. A central T&D utility acts ...

Bohn, Roger E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 1. Net Energy for load, actual and projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, Table 1. Net Energy for load, actual and projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 1990-2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected thousands of megawatthours Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2014E 2015E 2016E FRCC 142,502 146,903 147,464 153,468 159,861 169,021 173,377 175,557 188,384 188,598 196,561 200,134 211,116 219,021 220,335 226,544 230,115 232,405 226,874 225,966 233,034 224,064 224,337 227,095 230,481 235,490 239,191

39

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2001-2011 Actual, 2012-2016 Projected megawatts and percent Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 2001/ 2002 2002/ 2003 2003/ 2004 2004/ 2005 2005/ 2006 2006/ 2007 2007/ 2008 2008/ 2009 2009/ 2010 2010/ 2011 2011/ 2012 2012/ 2013E 2013/ 2014E 2014/ 2015E 2015/ 2016E 2016/ 2017E FRCC 39,699 42,001 36,229 41,449 42,493 45,993 46,093 45,042 51,703 45,954 39,924 43,558 43,049 44,228 44,790 45,297 NPCC 42,551 45,980 47,850 47,859 46,328 48,394 46,185 47,151 44,864 44,172 43,806 46,224 46,312 46,284 46,246 46,246 Balance of Eastern Region 341,158 360,748 357,026 371,011 375,365 385,887 383,779 384,495 399,204 389,351 385,428 384,172 386,823 394,645 398,806 403,949 ECAR 82,831 84,844 86,332

40

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Noncoincident peak load, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2. Noncoincident peak load, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 1990-2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected megawatts Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2014E 2015E 2016E FRCC 27,266 28,818 30,601 32,823 32,904 34,524 35,444 35,375 38,730 37,493 37,194 39,062 40,696 40,475 42,383 46,396 45,751 46,676 44,836 46,550 45,722 44,968 45,613 46,270 46,857 47,758 48,594 NPCC 44,116 46,594 43,658 46,706 47,581 47,705 45,094 49,269 49,566 52,855 50,057 55,949 56,012 55,018 52,549 58,960 63,241

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Capacity Capacity Conductor Characteristics Data Year Country NERC Region NERC Sub- region Type Operating (kV) Design (kV) Rating (MVa) Month Year From Terminal To Terminal Length (Miles) Type Pole Type Pole Material Size (MCM) Material Bundling Arrange- ment Present Ultimate Company Code Company Name Organizational Type Ownership (Percent) Project Name Level of Certainty Primary Driver 1 Primary Driver 2 2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 300-399 5 2018 DeCordova Benbrook 27 OH 44372 Delivery 100 00TPIT0004 Conceptual Reliability 2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 300-399 5 2018 Loma Alta Substation Rio Hondo Substation 35 OH 2409 BPUB 100 00TPITno07 Conceptual Reliability 2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 121-150 6 2014 Highway 32 Wimberley 4 OH 14626 PEC 100 05TPIT0065 Planned Reliability 2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 121-150 5 2018 Ennis Switch Ennis 6.32 OH 44372 Oncor Electric Delivery 100

42

Electric power annual 1994. Volume 2, Operational and financial data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This year, the annual is published in two volumes. Volume I focused on US electric utilities and contained final 1994 data on net generation, fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost. This Volume II presents annual 1994 summary statistics for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are preliminary data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on form EIA-861) and for electric utility financial statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, and demand- side management. Final 1994 data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity and gross generation, as well as supply and disposition information, are also provided in Volume II. Technical notes and a glossary are included.

NONE

1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

43

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region 1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected megawatts and percent Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2014E 2015E 2016E FRCC 27,162 27,773 28,898 29,435 30,537 31,649 31,868 32,874 34,562 34,832 35,666 38,932 37,951 40,387 42,243 45,950 45,345 46,434 44,660 46,263 45,522 44,798 42,430 43,041 43,618 44,459 45,242 NPCC 46,016 45,952 46,007 46,380 47,465 48,290 48,950 50,240 51,760 53,450 54,270 55,888 55,164 53,936 51,580 57,402 60,879 58,221 59,896 55,730 56,232 62,313 59,757 60,325 60,791 61,344 61,865 Balance of Eastern Region 332,679 337,297 341,869 349,984 357,284 365,319

44

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. Purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate, timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

Not Available

1993-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

46

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory...

47

Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policies- Public Meeting Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities...

48

Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1993  

SciTech Connect

The 1993 edition of the Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents five years (1989 to 1993) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, the Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities, filed on a fiscal basis.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Performance improvement of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak electric auxiliary. Semi-annual progress report, June 18, 1979-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect

During the period 18 June 1979 through December 1979, a solar assisted heat pump system was designed, installed and operated in the University of Toledo Experimental Solar House. The heat pump system is capable of operating in a wide range of temperatures which is needed in a solar house utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility. The complete system consists of 584.1 square feet of Libbey-Owens-Ford's flat plate solar collectors, a 5 horsepower compressor (Victaulic Corp.), an evaporator (Dunham-Bush), a condensor (Dunham-Bush), thermal storage units, and associated equipment. During the installation and initial operation of the system, numerous aspects of the feasibility of this system design have been evaluated. Many of these aspects point to the potentially improved operating performance of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility.

Eltimsahy, A.H.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Electric utility system master plan  

SciTech Connect

This publication contains the electric utility system plan and guidelines for providing adequate electric power to the various facilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in support of the mission of the Laboratory. The topics of the publication include general information on the current systems and their operation, a planning analysis for current and future growth in energy demand, proposed improvements and expansions required to meet long range site development and the site`s five-year plan.

Erickson, O.M.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Columbia Utilities Electricity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Electricity Place New York Utility Id 55814 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861...

52

title Survey of Western U S Electric Utility Resource Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survey of Western U S Electric Utility Resource Plans Survey of Western U S Electric Utility Resource Plans journal Energy Policy year month abstract p We review long term electric utility plans representing nbsp textquoteright of generation within the Western U S and Canadian provinces nbsp We nbsp address what utility planners assume about future growth of electricity demand and supply what types of risk they consider in their long term resource planning and the consistency in which they report resource planning related data The region is anticipated to grow by annually by before Demand Side Management nbsp About nbsp two thirds of nbsp the utilities that provided an annual energy forecast also nbsp reported energy efficiency savings projections in aggregate they anticipate an average reduction in energy and nbsp reduction in

53

Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation authorizes the Public Service Commission to promulgate regulations related to investor owned utilities in South Carolina, and addresses service areas, rates and charges, and operating procedures for

54

Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board Cities may establish utilities to acquire existing electric generating facilities or distribution systems. Acquisition, in this statute, is defined as city involvement, and includes purchase, lease, construction, reconstruction, extension, remodeling, improvement, repair, and equipping of the facility. This chapter does not limit the powers or authority of

55

Electric Power Annual - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Note: Data for 2010 have been revised. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report"

56

Electric power annual 1995. Volume II  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

None

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Electricity - Annual Disturbance Events Archive  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Disturbance Events Annual Disturbance Events Archive Last Updated - May 2010 Major Disturbances and Unusual Occurrences 2009 pdf excel 2008 pdf excel 2007 pdf excel 2006 pdf...

60

Electric Power Annual 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Generation and thermal output; Electric power plants generating capacity; ... Average power plant operating expenses for major U.S. investor-owned electric utilities XLS:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Energy efficiency and electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

Twenty years have now elapsed since the energy crisis irrevocably changed world energy priorities. The energy crisis banished all apparitions of cheap and almost limitless energy and made the public keenly aware of its scarcity. The sharp rise in energy prices that followed the Arab oil embargo created strong market incentives to conserve energy. Most users have substantially improved the efficiency with which they use energy, although one might lament that the gains have not been larger. In contrast to the increased efficiency with which electricity and other forms of energy are used, electric utilities themselves have singularly failed to improve their heat efficiency in generating electricity. This failure can be attributed to regulation preventing market forces from creating incentive to improve efficiency.

Studness, C.M.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Electric power annual 1998. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report, Electric Power Annual 1998 Volume 1 (EPAVI), is to provide a comprehensive overview of the electric power industry during the most recent year for which data have been collected, with an emphasis on the major changes that occurred. In response to the changes of 1998, this report has been expanded in scope. It begins with a general review of the year and incorporates new data on nonutility capacity and generation, transmission information, futures prices from the Commodity futures Trading commission, and wholesale spot market prices from the pennsylvania-new Jersey-Maryland Independent System Operator and the California Power Exchange. Electric utility statistics at the Census division and State levels on generation, fuel consumption, stocks, delivered cost of fossil fuels, sales to ultimate customers, average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold, and revenues from those retail sales can be found in Appendix A. The EPAVI is intended for a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric power industry, and the general public.

NONE

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies...

64

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978...

65

California Energy Commission - Electricity Consumption by Utility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility (1990-2009) Electricity consumption by Utility company for Commercial, Residential, Ag & Water Pump, Streetlight, Industry, Mining & Construction and Total...

66

Best Management Practices for Vegetation Management at Electric Utility Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlling vegetation inside key electric utility facilities is a necessary maintenance activity for a utilitys safe and reliable operation. Substations, switchyards, and other facilities require perpetual maintenance to maintain a vegetation-free environment. At a minimum, vegetation-maintenance treatment needs to be conducted annually; in some climatic regions, multiple treatments may be required. The objective of this research paper was to define current industry practices by means of a ...

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

67

Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Incentives Program Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives Program Eligibility Commercial Industrial InstallerContractor Savings...

69

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Electricity Delivery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Carlsbad...

70

Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential systems 30 kW or less: $14,000 or 50% of cost, whichever is less Small commercial systems 30 kW or less: $50,000 or 50% of cost, whichever is less Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Systems 30 kW or less: $2.00 per W-AC Systems larger than 30 kW: $0.06 per kWh for 5 years Provider Moreno Valley Electric Utility Moreno Valley Electric Utility provides rebates to its electric customers for the purchase of photovoltaic (PV) systems. System must be on the same premises as the customer to qualify. Systems 30 kilowatts (kW) or less can

71

Expected annual electricity bill savings for various PPA price options |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Expected annual electricity bill savings for various PPA price options Expected annual electricity bill savings for various PPA price options Jump to: navigation, search Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics Bill savings tables (main section): When evaluating PV systems under a PPA, it is important to look at the net effect on the building's annual electricity expense. If the solar value is greater than the PPA price, then the building will realize a net savings on annual energy expenses. If the solar value is less than the PPA price, then the building will realize a net loss. It is useful to understand how annual electricity expenses will be impacted at various PPA price levels. Bill Savings at PPA price of $0.04/kWhr Bill Savings at PPA price of $0.08/kWhr Bill Savings at PPA price of $0.12/kWhr Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Expected_annual_electricity_bill_savings_for_various_PPA_price_options&oldid=515464"

72

Electric Utility Measurement & Verification Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BC Hydro is an electric utility with a service area covering over 95% of the province of British Columbia in Canada. Power Smart is BC Hydros demand-side-management (DSM) division. Power Smart develops, operates and manages various DSM programs for residential, commercial and industrial customers. The Measurement and Verification (M&V) of applicable Power Smart Industrial projects is the process of verifying the results of the implementation of energy conservation measures (ECMs) at industrial customer facilities. Power Smart M&V activities are based on the International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP); a consensus document produced with the international support of industry and government. This paper discusses BC Hydros M&V program and the M&V results from industrial projects. Several case history studies will also be reviewed. The case studies reviewed involve aeration motor speed controls upgrade, steam turbine controls upgrade and natural gas liquid pump speed controls upgrade.

Lau, K.; Henderson, G.; Hebert, D.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Definition: Electric utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

utility utility Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electric utility A corporation, agency, or other legal entity that owns and/or operates facilities for the generation, transmission, distribution or sale of electricity primarily for use by the public. Also known as a power provider.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition An electric utility is an electric power company that engages in the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity for sale generally in a regulated market. The electrical utility industry is a major provider of energy in most countries. It is indispensable to factories, commercial establishments, homes, and even most recreational facilities. Lack of electricity causes not only inconvenience, but also economic loss due to reduced industrial production. Utility in the terms of power system,

74

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

75

Hudson Municipal Electric Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Electric Utility Municipal Electric Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hudson Municipal Electric Utility Place Iowa Utility Id 8966 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Residential Residential Residential All-Electric Residential School Rate Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0993/kWh Commercial: $0.0905/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hudson_Municipal_Electric_Utility&oldid=410846

76

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

77

PPL Electric Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program PPL Electric Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Home...

78

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0589(97) Distribution Category UC-950 U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 December 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal ...

79

Trends in Utility Scale Renewable Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov Trends in Utility Scale Renewable Electricity for ReTech 2012

80

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Tables 7 Tables May 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997 Tables ii Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Tipton Municipal Electric Util | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tipton Municipal Electric Util Tipton Municipal Electric Util Jump to: navigation, search Name Tipton Municipal Electric Util Place Indiana Utility Id 18942 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Rate A- Residential Electric Service Residential Rate B- Commercial Electric Service Commercial Rate C- General and Industrial Power Service, Single Phase Industrial Rate C- General and Industrial Power Service, Three Phase Industrial Rate CG- Cogeneration Commercial Rate D- Primary Power and Lighting Service

82

Electric Utility Sales and Revenue - EIA-826 detailed data file  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Form EIA-826 detailed data Form EIA-826 detailed data The Form EIA-826 "Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions" collects retail sales of electricity and associated revenue, each month, from a statistically chosen sample of electric utilities in the United States. The respondents to the Form EIA-826 are chosen from the Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Utility Report." Methodology is based on the "Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation." In 2003, EIA revised the survey to separate the transportation sales and reassign the other activities to the commercial and industrial sectors as appropriate. The "other" sector activities included public street and highway lighting, sales to public authorities, sales to railroads and railways, interdepartmental sales, and agricultural irrigations.

83

PPL Electric Utilities - Custom Energy Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PPL Electric Utilities - Custom Energy Efficiency Program PPL Electric Utilities - Custom Energy Efficiency Program PPL Electric Utilities - Custom Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Other Maximum Rebate Custom Efficiency Rebates: 50% of incremental cost, $500,000 per customer site per year, or 2 million per parent company Technical Study: $100,000 annually Program Info Expiration Date 5/31/2013 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Incentive: $0.10 per projected first year kWh savings Technical study: 50% of cost '''The available budget for Large C&I (Commercial and Industrial) customers has been fully committed. New funding for energy efficiency projects will be available when Phase 2 begins on June 1, 2013. However, Phase 2 funding

84

Lodi Electric Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lodi Electric Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lodi Electric Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lodi Electric Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate G-1 Rebates: $250 G-1 AC/Lighting Improvement: $1,000 G-2 Rebates: $7,500 G-3 to I-1 Rebates: $25,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount G-1 Rebates: up to $250 G-1 AC/Lighting Improvement: 25% of cost G-2 Rebates: $0.13/kWh annual projected savings

85

Tatitlek Electric Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tatitlek Electric Utility Tatitlek Electric Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tatitlek Electric Utility Place Alaska Utility Id 18480 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.5470/kWh Commercial: $0.4590/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Tatitlek_Electric_Utility&oldid=411647

86

Survey of Western U.S. Electric Utility Resource Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survey of Western U.S. Electric Utility Resource Plans Survey of Western U.S. Electric Utility Resource Plans Title Survey of Western U.S. Electric Utility Resource Plans Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2014 Authors Wilkerson, Jordan, Peter H. Larsen, and Galen L. Barbose Journal Energy Policy Date Published 2014 Abstract We review long-term electric utility plans representing "' 90% of generation within the Western U.S. and Canadian provinces. We address what utility planners assume about future growth of electricity demand and supply; what types of risk they consider in their long-term resource planning; and the consistency in which they report resource planning-related data. The region is anticipated to grow by 2% annually by 2020 before Demand Side Management. About two-thirds of the utilities that provided an annual energy forecast also reported energy efficiency savings projections; in aggregate, they anticipate an average 6.4% reduction in energy and 8.6% reduction in peak demand by 2020. New natural gas-fired and renewable generation will replace retiring coal plants. Although some utilities anticipate new coal-fired plants, most are planning for steady growth in renewable generation over the next two decades. Most planned solar capacity will come online before 2020, with most wind expansion after 2020. Fuel mix is expected to remain "' 55% of total generation. Planners consider a wide range of risks but focus on future demand, fuel prices, and the possibility of GHG regulations. Data collection and reporting inconsistencies within and across electric utility resource plans lead to recommendations on policies to address this issue.

87

Annual Outlook for US Electric Power, 1985  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a history and projections of US electric utility markets. It includes summary information on the production of electricity, its distribution to end-use sectors, and on electricity, its distribution to end-use sectors, and on electricity costs and prices. Further, this publication describes the ownership structure of the industry and the operations of utility systems and outlines basic electricity generating technologies. The historical information covers the period from 1882 through 1984, while projections extend from 1985 through 1995. 9 figs., 8 tabs.

1985-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

88

Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1992  

SciTech Connect

The 1992 edition of the Financial Statistics of Major US Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents 4 years (1989 through 1992) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. Four years of summary financial data are provided. Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, {open_quotes}Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities.{close_quotes} Public electric utilities file this survey on a fiscal year, rather than a calendar year basis, in conformance with their recordkeeping practices. In previous editions of this publication, data were aggregated by the two most commonly reported fiscal years, June 30 and December 31. This omitted approximately 20 percent of the respondents who operate on fiscal years ending in other months. Accordingly, the EIA undertook a review of the Form EIA-412 submissions to determine if alternative classifications of publicly owned electric utilities would permit the inclusion of all respondents.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Home Performance with ENERGY STAR®: $4000 Program Info Funding Source NH Saves State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Performance with ENERGY STAR®: up to $4,000 for improvements ENERGY STAR® Homes Qualification: custom incentives and technical support

90

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Custom Incentives: amount that buys down the cost of the project to a 1 year simple payback Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Retrofits and Engineering Studies: 50% of project cost Fluorescent Lighting: $10-$50 High Bay: $70 or $100 (retrofit) Metal Halide: $50 or $70 LED Exit Signs: $12 LED Traffic Signals: $50

91

PPL Electric Utilities Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PPL Electric Utilities Corp PPL Electric Utilities Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name PPL Electric Utilities Corp Place Allentown, Pennsylvania Service Territory Pennsylvania Website www.pplelectric.com Green Button Reference Page pplweb.mediaroom.com/inde Green Button Committed Yes Utility Id 14715 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. PPL Electric Utilities Corp. Smart Grid Project was awarded $19,054,516 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $38,109,032.

92

UGI Utilities Electric Division | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Electric Division Utilities Electric Division Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UGI Utilities Electric Division Name UGI Utilities Electric Division Address 2525 North 12th Street, Suite 360 Place Reading, Pennsylvania Zip 19605 Sector Services Product Green Power Marketer Website http://www.ugi.com/electric/in Coordinates 40.3746587°, -75.9149578° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3746587,"lon":-75.9149578,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

93

Decreasing Utility Contract Interest through Annual Payments | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decreasing Utility Contract Interest through Annual Payments Decreasing Utility Contract Interest through Annual Payments Decreasing Utility Contract Interest through Annual Payments October 7, 2013 - 2:23pm Addthis Federal agencies can leverage annual payments to get the best value from utility energy service contracts by decreasing total interest paid. Annual payments allow Federal agencies to pay for an entire fiscal year (12 months) of payments in advance. This method is attractive to finance companies and may also fit Federal budget and funding constraints, saving a substantial amount of interest expense. Savings are generated because financing is amortized faster and less interest accrues over the term of the project funding. It is important to note that the interest rate used for a monthly amortization is lower than that used for an annual amortization

94

Wisconsin Dells Electric Util | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dells Electric Util Dells Electric Util Jump to: navigation, search Name Wisconsin Dells Electric Util Place Wisconsin Utility Id 20844 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service- Single Phase Commercial General Service- Three Phase Commercial Large General Service Commercial Large Power Service Industrial Large Power Service(Primary Metering & Transformer Ownership) Industrial Large Power Service(Primary Metering) Industrial Large Power Service(Transformer Ownership) Industrial

95

Whitehall Electric Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Whitehall Electric Utility Whitehall Electric Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Whitehall Electric Utility Place Wisconsin Utility Id 20583 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Athletic Field Lighting- City of Whitehall Lighting Athletic Field Lighting- Whitehall Schools Lighting General Service- Single-Phase Commercial General Service- Three-Phase Commercial General Service- Time-of-Day- Single-Phase- Peak: 7am-7pm Commercial

96

Dublin Municipal Electric Util | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dublin Municipal Electric Util Dublin Municipal Electric Util Jump to: navigation, search Name Dublin Municipal Electric Util Place Indiana Utility Id 5392 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial General Power Rate OL: Outdoor Lighting (Security Lights) Lighting Rate SL: Street Lighting, All Public Street Lighting Lighting Rate SL: Street Lighting, State Highway Stoplight Lighting Residential Residential Residential: Space Heating and/or Air Conditioning Service Residential

97

Page Electric Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Electric Utility Page Electric Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Page Electric Utility Place Arizona Utility Id 14373 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Service with Demand Meter Commercial Commercial Service without Demand Meter Commercial Residential Service > 200 Amps Residential Residential Service < 200 Amps Residential

98

Solving the problems facing the electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

The dimensions of the current problems of attracting capital for utilities investment, of achieving more efficient utilization of capacity, of siting and construction of new power plants, and of utilities receiving a return on their investment large enough to enable them to continue their service to American consumers are examined. Federal actions that are being taken to help get the utilities out of their current state of malaise are described. The author concludes that positive electric power load management, through a system of cost-based pricing incentives and load controls, can achieve a balanced future both for total electricity usage and for peak demand. This would minimize the consumption of scarce fossil fuels in electricity generation, moderate the future need for construction of new capacity, improve utility revenues, and eventually reduce the need for rate increases to maintain utility viability. The FEA feels that is a reasonable, attainable objective for substantial electrification of the economy beyond 1985. (MCW)

Hill, J.A.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) for...

100

Annual Renewable Electricity Consumption by Country (2005 - 2009...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Electricity Consumption by Country (2005 - 2009) Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Electric utilities and residential solar systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-run incremental cost (LRIC) of providing electricity for solar heating and hot water systems is estimated for three utilities using a utility capacity expansion model and compared to the cost of providing electricity to electric-only systems. All investment, fuel and operating costs are accounted for. Hot water systems and combined heating and hot water systems are analyzed separately. It is found that the LRIC for solar backup is no more than the LRIC of electricity used for purely electric heating and hot water devices and also no more than the incremental cost of normal load growth. For the three utilities studied, there appears to be little basis for rate distinctions between solar devices using electric backup and electric-only heating and hot water devices. Off-peak storage heating and hot water devices have a much lower LRIC than the standard systems; again, there appears to be no basis for distinguishing between solar and electric off-peak devices. Compared to average cost pricing, incremental cost pricing offers considerable benefits to customers using solar and electric heat and hot water, especially if a separate lower rate is adopted for off-peak storage devices; these benefits can amount to several hundred dollars per year. Substantial savings in the use of oil and gas fuels can be achieved if residences using these fuels convert to solar systems, savings not necessarily achievable by a shift, instead, to electric systems.

Bright, R; Davitian, H

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Appendices Understanding Electric Utility Customers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI report 1023562 provides a synthesis of the body of evidence regarding the major factors that affect how customers value and use electricity; this companion report contains five appendices to support that document. Appendix A provides additional background on price elasticity of demand as a companion to the economics of demand discussion in Section 2 of 1023562. Appendix B provides tables detailing elements of the experimental designs for the 10 pricing pilots examined in Section 3 of 1023562; Append...

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission The Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act constitutes the main legislation in Virginia that pertains to the regulation of the state's electric utilities. The Act directs the State Corporation Commission to construct regulations for electric utilities, and contains information on

104

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info Funding Source American Municipal Power Start Date 01/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Fan with Lights: $15 Dehumidifier: $25 Select Clothes Washer: $50 ENERGY STAR Refrigerator: $50 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50 Furnace Fan with ECM: $100 Heat Pump Water Heaters: $250 CFLs: up to 85% of cost Efficiency Smart (tm) provides energy efficiency incentives to the American

105

PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. Annual report, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 & 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP`s proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name Approaches to Electric Utility Energy...

107

Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider South Dakota Public Utilities Commission This legislation contains provisions for gas and electric utilities. As part of these regulations, electric utilities are required to file with the

108

Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report." | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report." 1, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report." Dataset Summary Description This is an electric utility data file that includes such information as peak load, generation, electric purchases, sales, revenues, customer counts and demand-side management programs, green pricing and net metering programs, and distributed generation capacity. The data source is the survey Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report." Data for all years are final. The file F861yr09.exe is a file of data collected on the Form EIA-861, Annual Electric Power Industry Report, for the reporting period, calendar year 2009. The zipped .exe file contains 11 .xls files and one Word file, and a .pdf of the Form EIA-861. The data file structure detailed here also applies to data files for prior

109

MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT INSTRUCTIONS|Year: 2013 No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 0.3 Hours| |PURPOSE|Form EIA-860M collects data on the status of: Proposed new generators scheduled to begin commercial operation within the subsequent 12 months; Existing generators scheduled to retire from service within the subsequent 12 months; and Existing generators that have proposed modifications that are scheduled for completion within one month. The data collected on this form appear in the EIA publication Electric Power Monthly. They are also used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry.| |REQUIRED RESPONDENTS|Respondents to the Form EIA-860M who are required to complete this form are all Form EIA-860, ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT,

110

Electric power annual 1989. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents a summary of electric utility statistics at the national, regional and state levels. The Industry At A Glance'' section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance; a review of key statistics for the year; and projections for various aspects of the electric power industry through 2010. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; electricity sales, revenue and average revenue per kilowatthour sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; and electric power transactions. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. 24 figs., 57 tabs.

Not Available

1991-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

111

Electric power annual 1989. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents a summary of electric utility statistics at the national, regional and state levels. The Industry At A Glance'' section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance; a review of key statistics for the year; and projections for various aspects of the electric power industry through 2010. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; electricity sales, revenue and average revenue per kilowatthour sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; and electric power transactions. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. 24 figs., 57 tabs.

1991-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

112

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

10. U.S. Electric Utility Energy Savings by North American Electric Reliability Council Region and ... design, advanced electric motors and drive systems,

113

Annual Report 2008 DTU Electrical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: June 2008 Sofie Leweson Electrical main components in wind turbines - influences, compatibility. Through simulations, the project will analyze the interaction between the main wind turbine components compatibility. The research will be utilized to design wind turbines and farms by providing a basis for common

Mosegaard, Klaus

114

City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential: $9,050 Commercial: $192,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential: $1.81/W Commercial: $1.92/W Provider City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility '''''Note: This program is currently not accepting applications. Check the program web site for information regarding future solicitations. ''''' City of Shasta Lake Electric Utility is providing rebates to their customers for the purchase of photovoltaic (PV) systems. The rebate levels will decrease annually over the life of the program. For fiscal year

115

PRODCOST: an electric utility generation simulation code  

SciTech Connect

The PRODCOST computer code simulates the operation of an electric utility generation system. Through a probabilistic simulation the expected energy production, fuel consumption, and cost of operation for each plant are determined. Total system fuel consumption, energy generation by type, total generation costs, as well as system loss of load probability and expected unserved energy are also calculated.

Hudson, II, C. R.; Reynolds, T. M.; Smolen, G. R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

TY JOUR T1 Survey of Western U S Electric Utility Resource Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survey of Western U S Electric Utility Resource Plans Survey of Western U S Electric Utility Resource Plans JF Energy Policy A1 Jordan Wilkerson A1 Peter H Larsen A1 Galen L Barbose AB p We review long term electric utility plans representing nbsp of generation within the Western U S and Canadian provinces nbsp We nbsp address what utility planners assume about future growth of electricity demand and supply what types of risk they consider in their long term resource planning and the consistency in which they report resource planning related data The region is anticipated to grow by annually by before Demand Side Management nbsp About nbsp two thirds of nbsp the utilities that provided an annual energy forecast also nbsp reported energy ef ciency savings projections in aggregate they anticipate an average reduction in energy and nbsp reduction in peak demand by nbsp

117

Marketing Reordering of the Electric Utility Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELCON is a group of large industrial consumers of electricity with facilities in most of the 50 states and many foreign countries. Our members produce a wide range of products including steel, aluminum, chemicals, industrial gases, glass, motor vehicles, textiles and food. ELCON members consume approximately ten percent of all electricity sold to industrial customers and nearly five percent of all electricity consumed in the United States. We require an adequate and reliable supply of electricity at reasonable prices, so as you can imagine, we have a continuing interest in all aspects of the production, pricing, and delivery of electricity. ELCON member companies believe strongly that the electric utility industry is undergoing a market reordering that is being shaped by technological, institutional and legal forces. We see technical developments that now make small-scale generation economically attractive, if not downright desirable. Key regulatory and consumer institutions are taking fresh, new looks at issues such as wheeling and access to the grid that used to be considered sacred and untouchable. Some states are passing laws and implementing regulations that will require new thinking and new operating procedures on the part of utilities and consumers. I see these developments as logical reactions to changes in market forces. Change will take place. The relevant questions are: How will regulators and policy makers be influenced by market forces in the future? And: Will utilities, consumers and regulators attempt to benefit from market pressures or, alternatively, try to oppose what I believe is inevitable evolution to a more market-oriented electric industry?

Anderson, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

"Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Data Released: September 20, 2012 Data for: 2011 Next Release: September 2013 Re-Release Date: November 27, 2012 (CORRECTION) Survey form EIA-861 -- Annual Electric Power Industry...

119

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Annual outlook for US electric...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Annual outlook for US electric power, 1986 Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced...

120

Annual Renewable Electricity Net Generation by Country (1980...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Net Generation by Country (1980 - 2009) Total annual renewable electricity net generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu)....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Utility applications program. Annual report for 1981  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Utility Applications Program is to provide information and assistance to interested utilities on central station energy storage systems. Compressed air and underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage are the primary technical focus. Smaller utilities are the primary targets of this program, as they may not have resources to track and utilize new energy conservation developments. The program, initiated during this year-long period, consists of a series of tasks integrating and supporting energy storage implementation. Program management and technical coordination activities monitor the wide range of research ongoing both under government support and in industry and provide a locus for dissemination of results. Recently completed DOE demonstration studies provide the central data base and the DOE CAES and UPH Technology Program activities provide another major resource. In addition a UPH preliminary feasibility study in coorination with Central Vermont Public Servie (CVPS), a Northeast utility, was carried out. The major program activity this period was a comprehensive technology assessment and environmental siting study, performed in coordination with the Soyland Power Cooperative in Decatur, Illinois. The reports from this work established solid siting precedents for CAES application in the US and jointly assisted the utility in assembling the required baseline information for ongoing technical and financial development of the first US compressed air energy storage facility.

Doherty, T.J.; Loscutoff, W.V.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

High slot utilization systems for electric machines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two new High Slot Utilization (HSU) Systems for electric machines enable the use of form wound coils that have the highest fill factor and the best use of magnetic materials. The epoxy/resin/curing treatment ensures the mechanical strength of the assembly of teeth, core, and coils. In addition, the first HSU system allows the coil layers to be moved inside the slots for the assembly purpose. The second system uses the slided-in teeth instead of the plugged-in teeth. The power density of the electric machine that uses either system can reach its highest limit.

Hsu, John S (Oak Ridge, TN)

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

Ashland Electric Utility - Bright Way to Heat Water Rebate | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ashland Electric Utility - Bright Way to Heat Water Rebate Ashland Electric Utility - Bright Way to Heat Water Rebate Ashland Electric Utility - Bright Way to Heat Water Rebate < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $0.40/annual kWh saved (on average $800 to $1,000) Provider Ashland Electric Utilities Department The City of Ashland Conservation Division offers a solar water heating program to its residential electric customers who currently use an electric water heater. Under "The Bright Way to Heat Water Program," qualified home owners may choose either the cash rebate or a zero-interest loan. Cash rebates of up to $1,000 are available for approved systems. The rebate

124

Grid Reliability - An Electric Utility Company's Perspective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Electric Utility Company's Perspective Marc Butts Southern Company Services 11/19/08 Topics * Business Continuity at Southern Company * NERC Cyber Security at Southern Company * Homeland Security at Southern Company * Physical recovery following a major outage * 5 questions to ask your local utility * Facing Realities 3 Service territory across four states: 120,000 square miles * Southern Linc * Southern Power * Southern Telecom * Southern Nuclear Other Subsidiaries: Serves approximately 4 million customers Business Continuity at Southern Company Southern Company Business Assurance Model Business Unit Management (Asset Owners) Southern Company Business Assurance Council Infrastructure Protection Business Continuity Incident Response * Identify critical assets * Design and implement

125

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand and Supply Electricity Demand and Supply Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Electricity Demand and Supply Continued Growth in Electricity Use Is Expected in All Sectors Figure 66. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1970-2025 (billion kilowatthours). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Total electricity sales are projected to increase at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent in the AEO2005 reference case, from 3,481 billion kilowatthours in 2003 to 5,220 billion kilowatthours in 2025 (Figure 66). From 2003 to 2025, annual growth in electricity sales is projected to average 1.6 percent in the residential sector, 2.5 percent in the commercial sector, and 1.3 percent in the industrial sector.

126

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Preface. The U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec-

127

Electric Market and Utility Operation Terminology (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet is a list of electric market and utility operation terminology for a series of three electricity fact sheets.

Not Available

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Does EIA publish electric utility rate, tariff, and demand charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Does EIA publish electric utility rate, tariff, and demand charge data? No, EIA does not collect or publish data on electricity rates, or tariffs, for the sale or ...

129

Decoupling treatment of electric and gas utilities can differ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Many States institute decoupled rates for both electric and gas utilities ... Virginia and North Carolina have both decoupled gas rates but not electric rates.

130

PPL Electric Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilities PPL Electric Utilities offers rebates and incentives for commercial and industrial products installed in their service area. The program offers heating and...

131

The Influence of Residential Solar Water Heating on Electric Utility Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Similar sets of residences in Austin, Texas with electric water heaters and solar water heaters with electric back-up were monitored during 1982 to determine their instantaneous electric demands, the purpose being to determine the influence of residential solar water heating on electric utility demand. The electric demand of solar water hears was found to be approximately 0.39 kW lass than conventional electric water heaters during the late late afternoon, early evening period in the summer months when the Austin utility experiences its peak demand. The annual load factor would be only very slightly reduced if there were a major penetration of solar water heaters in the all electric housing sector. Thus solar water heating represents beneficial load management for utilities experiencing summer peaks.

Vliet, G. C.; Askey, J. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Provides detailed statistics on existing generating units operated by electric utilities as of December 31, 2000, and certain summary statistics about new generators planned for operation by electric utilities during the next 5 years.

Information Center

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

California Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) California Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

134

New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

135

Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances  

SciTech Connect

A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Taylor, E.R. Jr. (ABB Power Systems, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Tesche, F.M.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances  

SciTech Connect

A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems` responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Taylor, E.R. Jr. [ABB Power Systems, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tesche, F.M.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Electric Utility Industry Experience with Geomagnetic Disturbances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as a few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration.

Barnes, P.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Role of wind power in electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

Current estimates suggest that the cost of wind-generated power is likely to be competitive with conventionally generated power in the near future in regions of the United States with favorable winds and high costs for conventionally generated electricity. These preliminary estimates indicate costs of $500 to 700 per installed kW for mass-produced wind turbines. This assessment regarding competitiveness includes effects of reduced reliability of wind power compared to conventional sources. Utilities employing wind power are likely to purchase more peaking capacity and less baseload capacity than they would have otherwise to provide the lowest-cost reserve power. This reserve power is needed mainly when wind outages coincide with peak loads. The monetary savings associated with this shift contribute substantially to the value of wind energy to a utility.

Davitian, H

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) More Documents & Publications Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) -List of Covered Electric Utilities - 2006 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility

140

New Guide Will Allow Electric Utilities to Develop Green ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Guide Will Allow Electric Utilities to Develop Green Button Web Tools. From NIST Tech Beat: February 6, 2013. ...

2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fossil Fuel Prices to Electric Utilities - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil Fuel Prices to Electric Utilities. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, July 2000.

142

Building a winning electric utility organization  

SciTech Connect

The key factor that will differentiate the winners and losers is the speed with which they build their skills and enhance their performance focus. Setting the {open_quote}right{close_quote} aspirations, then effectively managing the change process, will be critical for winning power companies. Historically, only certain dimensions of organizational performance have been critical to an electric utility`s financial success. As a result, utilities understandably focused on achieving high levels of customer satisfaction and reliability, excellent regulatory relationships, and safe and environmentally acceptable operations. However, as the power industry undergoes fundamental change, obtaining superior organizational performance will become much more crucial and difficult. Given the importance of meeting these organizational challenges head on, the authors believe CEOs can only address them by taking an important step back from day-to-day activities to define what high performance really means in the future competitive world and what steps should be taken to achieve their aspirations. To facilitate this rethink - which senior managers should view as a multiyear process - utilities need to do three things in an iterative way: (1) energize the transformation with the right performance aspirations. (2) Tailor a coherent change program to the company`s unique starting position. (3) Manage the change process to build a skill-based and performance-focused organization.

Farha, G.; Silverman, L. [McKinsey & Co., Washington, DC (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., Washington, DC (United States); Keough, K. [McKinsey & Co., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Financial statistics of major publicly owned electric utilities, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Financial Statistics of Major Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes relating to publicly owned electric utility issues.

Not Available

1993-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Heat Rates for Baseload Steam-Electric Units TypicalAnnual Heat Rates for Baseload Steam- Electric Units. * Btuare calculated for both baseload operation (65% capacity

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Electricity Market Module figure 6. Electricity Market Model Supply Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2009, DOE/EIA-M068(2009). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules

146

Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Energy Sources Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Water Wind Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Net Metering Provider Farmington Electric Utility System Net metering rules developed by the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission (PRC) apply to the state's investor-owned utilities and electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities, which are not regulated by the commission, are exempt from the PRC rules but authorized to develop their own net metering programs. Farmington Electric, a municipal utility, offers net metering to residential customers with systems up to 10 kilowatts (kW) in capacity.

147

Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) for Electric Systems Program's specific mission is to work in partnership with industry to develop HTS wire and perform other research and development activities leading to the commercialization of HTS-based electric power applications by U.S. companies. This technology contributes to several key performance improvements of the grid. It enhances reliability by increasing capacity, which relieves congestion and helps prevent outages. Efficiency is improved as a result of the reduction of loss during operation which both conserves

148

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Revised 6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) More Documents & Publications "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the

149

"Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 DETAILED DATA Corrections for Annual Electric Generator Form EIA-860 detailed data files December 4, 2013 The re-release of the Survey form EIA-860 data. Data were corrected for...

150

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Index (click to jump links) Electricity Sales Electricity Generating Capacity Electricity Fuel Costs and Prices Nuclear Power Electricity from Renewable Sources Electricity Alternative Cases Electricity Sales Electricity Use Is Expected To Grow More Slowly Than GDP As generators and combined heat and power plants adjust to the evolving structure of the electricity market, they face slower growth in demand than in the past. Historically, demand for electricity has been related to economic growth; that positive relationship is expected to continue, but the ratio is uncertain. Figure 67. Population gross domestic product, and electricity sales, 1965-2025 (5-year moving average annual percent growth). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

151

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Electricity Generation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation Electricity Generation Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Electricity Generation U.S. electricity consumption—including both purchases from electric power producers and on-site generation—increases steadily in the AEO2008 reference case, at an average rate of 1.3 percent per year. In comparison, electricity consumption grew by annual rates of 4.2 percent, 2.6 percent, and 2.3 percent in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, respectively. The growth rate in the AEO2008 projection is lower than in the AEO2007 reference case (1.5 percent per year), and it leads to lower projections of electricity generation. Figure 4. Electricity generation by fuel, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

152

Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1994  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents 5 years (1990--94) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented. Composite tables present: Aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, financial indicators, electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data.

NONE

1995-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data Rate of Electricity Demand Growth Slows, Following the Historical Trend Electricity demand fluctuates in the short term in response to business cycles, weather conditions,...

154

Electric Power Annual 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation; Table 6.1. Stocks of coal, petroleum liquids, and petroleum coke: Electric power sector: XLS: Table 6.2.

155

User's guide to SERICPAC: A computer program for calculating electric-utility avoided costs rates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SERICPAC is a computer program developed to calculate average avoided cost rates for decentralized power producers and cogenerators that sell electricity to electric utilities. SERICPAC works in tandem with SERICOST, a program to calculate avoided costs, and determines the appropriate rates for buying and selling of electricity from electric utilities to qualifying facilities (QF) as stipulated under Section 210 of PURA. SERICPAC contains simulation models for eight technologies including wind, hydro, biogas, and cogeneration. The simulations are converted in a diversified utility production which can be either gross production or net production, which accounts for an internal electricity usage by the QF. The program allows for adjustments to the production to be made for scheduled and forced outages. The final output of the model is a technology-specific average annual rate. The report contains a description of the technologies and the simulations as well as complete user's guide to SERICPAC.

Wirtshafter, R.; Abrash, M.; Koved, M.; Feldman, S.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Financial statistics of major U.S. publicly owned electric utilities 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1997 edition of the ``Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities`` publication presents 5 years (1993 through 1997) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator (Tables 3 through 11) and nongenerator (Tables 12 through 20) summaries are presented in this publication. Five years of summary financial data are provided (Tables 5 through 11 and 14 through 20). Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided in Appendix C. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, operating revenue, and electric energy account data. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, ``Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities.`` Public electric utilities file this survey on a fiscal year basis, in conformance with their recordkeeping practices. The EIA undertook a review of the Form EIA-412 submissions to determine if alternative classifications of publicly owned electric utilities would permit the inclusion of all respondents. The review indicated that financial indicators differ most according to whether or not a publicly owned electric utility generates electricity. Therefore, the main body of the report provides summary information in generator/nongenerator classifications. 2 figs., 101 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Ashland Electric Utility - Bright Way to Heat Water Rebate |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 0.40annual kWh saved (on average 800 to 1,000) The City of Ashland Conservation Division offers a...

158

National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC): 2012 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Electric Transportation IWC is a group of individuals whose organizations have a vested interest in the emergence and growth of electric transportation, in particular, the plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) industries, as well as truck stop electrification (TSE) and port electrification. IWC includes representatives from electric utilities, vehicle manufacturing industries, component manufacturers, government agencies, related industry associations, and standards organizations. The ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Historical plant cost and annual production expenses for selected electric plants, 1982  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a composite of the two prior publications, Hydroelectric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses and Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses. Beginning in 1979, Thermal-Electric Plant Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses contained information on both steam-electric and gas-turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. The summarized historical plant cost described under Historical Plant Cost in this report is the net cumulative-to-date actual outlays or expenditures for land, structures, and equipment to the utility. Historical plant cost is the initial investment in plant (cumulative to the date of initial commercial operation) plus the costs of all additions to the plant, less the value of retirements. Thus, historical plant cost includes expenditures made over several years, as modifications are made to the plant. Power Production Expenses is the reporting year's plant operation and maintenance expenses, including fuel expenses. These expenses do not include annual fixed charges on plant cost (capital costs) such as interest on debt, depreciation or amortization expenses, and taxes. Consequently, total production expenses and the derived unit costs are not the total cost of producing electric power at the various plants. This publication contains data on installed generating capacity, net generation, net capability, historical plant cost, production expenses, fuel consumption, physical and operating plant characteristics, and other relevant statistical information for selected plants.

1984-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Electric Power Annual 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity Sales ; Table 2.1. Number of ultimate customers served by sector, by provider XLS: Table 2.2. Retail sales and direct use of electricity to ultimate ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1999 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

162

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Idaho) Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Idaho) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Incentives should not exceed 50% of the actual measure cost. Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Replacement of Electric Straight Resistance: $750 Air Source Heat Pump: $100 Variable Speed Motor: $100 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $30 Water Heater: $30 Floor and Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Attic and Ceiling Insulation: $0.25/sq. ft.

163

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Incentives will not exceed 50% of the actual measure cost Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Source Heat Pump: $100 Variable Speed Motor: $100 Water Heater: $30 Replacement of Electric Straight Resistance: $750 Floor and Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Attic and Ceiling Insulation: $0.25/sq. ft.

164

Avista Utilities (Gas and Electric)- Commercial Food Equipment Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities offers incentives to customers who improve efficiency through electric food service equipment retrofits. A variety of cooking and refrigeration equipment are eligible for rebates...

165

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Jump to:...

166

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

Information Center

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

PPL Electric Utilities- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

PPL Electric Utilities offers rebates and incentives for commercial and industrial products installed in their service area. The program offers heating and cooling equipment, motors, insulation,...

168

An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure in the United States. This report updates a previously published report on copper wire theft. The combined efforts of electric utilities, lawmakers, scrap metal...

169

Electric Power Annual 2009 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

electric power industry statistics at the national level. The publication provides industry decision-makers, government policymakers,

170

Electric Power Annual - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6.A. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2001 - 2011, Actual

171

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0) 0) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables August 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

172

Norwich Public Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Norwich Public Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Norwich Public Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Norwich Public Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Energy Star rebate: one rebate per appliance per residential utility customer Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/12 State Connecticut Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerators/Freezers: $60 Washing Machines: $60 Room AC: $60 Heat Pump Water Heater: $500 Central AC: $200 - $300/ton Dual Enthalpy Economizer Controls: $250 Air Source Heat Pump: $200 - $300/ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $150/ton

173

Pacific gas electric: 1993 EL P Utility of the Year. Incentive nuclear regulation spurs financial comeback  

SciTech Connect

Incentive agreements for Diablo Canyon nuclear plant helped spur Pacific Gas Electric Co.'s financial comeback. Consistent nuclear plant capacity factors above 80 percent contributed 38 percent of 1992 PG E earnings per share. This, plus aggressive cost cutting and reorganization, industry leading demand-side management, environmental measures and a rate refund and freeze are among the reasons Electric Light Power magazine names Pacific Gas Electric Co. the 1993 EL P Utility of the Year. San Francisco-based PG E is the 25th utility to receive the annual award for investor-owned electric utilities. PG E employees strive to create the kind of environment that can address increasing industry competitiveness. Rather than just doing their jobs, people consistently challenge each other to do their jobs better, trying to anticipate the changes of tomorrow and the next millennium.

Hoske, M.T.; Beaty, W.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Generation, distribution and utilization of electrical energy  

SciTech Connect

An up-to-date account of electric power generation and distribution (including coverage of the use of computers in various components of the power system). Describes conventional and unconventional methods of electricity generation and its economics, distribution methods, substation location, electric drives, high frequency power for induction and heating, illumination engineering, and electric traction. Each chapter contains illustrative worked problems, exercises (some with answers), and a bibliography.

Wadhwa, C.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority Place Arizona Utility Id 25866 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1010/kWh Commercial: $0.0815/kWh Industrial: $0.0550/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona).

176

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial New Construction Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Service Department Liberty Utilities Address PO Box 960 Place Northborough, Massachusetts ZipPostal Code 1532-0960 Phone (800) 375-7413 Website http:liberty-utilities.comeast...

177

Electric Utility Marketing Guide to Foodservice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Business groups apply rigorous evaluation standards to guide them toward increased efficiency. Utility foodservice programs are not immune to this same sort of scrutiny. Designed to address key issues facing utility foodservice programs, this marketing guide is essentially a set of crucial guidelines and advice. This information can assist utilities servicing the foodservice industry to become more profitable.

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

178

Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1989 and Preceding Years.  

SciTech Connect

This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1989 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. This report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1989, and also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1989 time period. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell to consumers annually. Data is provided on each retail customer sector: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. The data specifically supports forecasting activities, rate development, conservation and market assessments, and conservation and market program development and delivery. All of these activities require a detailed look at electricity use. 25 figs., 34 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Online Algorithm for Battery Utilization in Electric Computer Science Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Online Algorithm for Battery Utilization in Electric Vehicles Ron Adany Computer Science Department the problem of utilizing the pack of batteries serving current demands in Electric Vehicles. When serving a demand, the current allocation might be split among the batteries in the pack. Due to its internal

Tamir, Tami

180

"List of Covered Electric Utilities under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA)- 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2008, DOE/EIA-M068(2008). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

182

Gas turbine electric plant construction cost and annual production expenses. First annual publication, 1972  

SciTech Connect

By the end of 1972, gas turbine power plants owned and operated by U.S. utilities had a capacity of 27,918 MW. Data from the 1972 annual reports filed with the Federal Power Commission by utility systems are presented which show the plant cost, generating expenses, capacity and generation, and plant and equipment characteristics of 299 gas turbine plants. (LCL)

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Lodi Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lodi Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program Lodi Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program Lodi Electric Utility - PV Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential: $7,000 Non-residential: $40,000 Program Info Expiration Date January 1, 2018 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 2013 Program Year: $1.94/W AC Incentives will be adjusted based on expected performance Provider Customer Programs Lodi Electric Utility offers rebates to its residential, commercial, industrial and municipal customers who install photovoltaic (PV) systems. The rebate program is funded with approximately $6 million to support systems installed between January 1, 2008 and January 1, 2018. The total

184

Lodi Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lodi Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Lodi Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lodi Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Energy Efficient Home Improvement Rebate Program: Maximum total rebate in a 12-month period is $500 per customer service address, PLUS, an additional $250 allowance for air duct repair, or an additional $800 allowance for air duct replacement, if eligible. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $50 Clothes Washer: $50 Dishwasher: $25 Air Duct Testing: $125

185

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial New Construction Rebate Program  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities (Electric) - Commercial New Construction Rebate Program Utilities (Electric) - Commercial New Construction Rebate Program (New Hampshire) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Last modified on March 13, 2013. Financial Incentive Program Place New Hampshire Name Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial New Construction Rebate Program (New Hampshire) Incentive Type Utility Rebate Program Applicable Sector Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Schools Eligible Technologies Central Air conditioners, Chillers, Compressed air, Custom/Others pending approval, Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting Controls/Sensors, Motor VFDs, Motors, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Control Sensors, Economizers

186

Ashland Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ashland Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Ashland Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Ashland Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Washing Machines: $35 - $100 Dishwashers: $25 - $60 Refrigerators: $25 - $35 Refrigerator Recycling: $30 Water Heaters: $65 Ductwork: 80% of the cost up to $300 Insulation: Up to 70% of the cost Windows: $6.00 per square foot High-Efficiency Heat Pumps: $600

187

Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Section 1101 of the U.S. Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT)1 calls for a report on the current trends in the workforce of (A) skilled technical personnel that support energy technology industries, and (B) electric power and transmission engineers. It also requests that the Secretary make recommendations (as appropriate) to meet the future labor requirements. Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry More Documents & Publications Statement of Patricia A. Hoffman, Deputy Director of Research and Development and Acting Chief Operating Officer, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability, Department of Energy before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources United States

188

Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Program Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $5,000 Program Info Start Date 10/1/2010 State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Solar window of 80% or more: $1.00/watt Provider Gainesville Regional Utilities '''''NOTE: Application targets for fiscal year 2013 have been met for the GRU Solar PV Rebate Program. The next round of applications are scheduled to open on October 1, 2013 pending approval of the GRU budget by the Gainesville City Commission.''''' Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU) offers its customers a rebate to install photovoltaic (PV) systems. Systems with solar windows of 80% or

189

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand side management (DSM) activities in the electric power industry. The report presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a ...

190

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

residential customers to save energy in eligible homes. Offers apply to residential homeowners in Idaho who heat homes primarily with Avista electricity Incentives vary depending...

191

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2004, DOE/EIA- M068(2004). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

192

New Service Opportunities for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Faced with intensifying competitive pressures, many utilities are offering non-traditional services that provide new revenue sources. This report provides an overview of utility experience with diversification into non-traditional areas and identifies meaningful utility opportunities in several areas. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders may download this report at http://my.primen.com/Applications/DE/Community/index.asp .

1994-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

193

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applicable Sector Commercial Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy...

194

Ashland Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Insulation, CaulkingWeather-stripping, DuctAir sealing, Heat pumps, Windows, Solar Water Heat Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category...

195

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kWh saved in first year Avista Utilities offers numerous incentives to commercial and industrial customers to increase the energy efficiency of customer facilities or...

196

Galena Electric Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for...

197

Orange and Rockland Utilities (Electric) - Residential Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate...

198

National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC): 2011 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC) is a group of individuals whose organizations have a vested interest in the emergence and growth of electric transportation, in particular, the plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) industries as well as truck stop electrification (TSE) and port electrification. IWC includes representatives from electric utilities, vehicle manufacturing industries, component manufacturers, government agencies, related industry associations, and standards ...

2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

199

National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council: 2010 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC) is a group of individuals whose organizations have a vested interest in the emergence and growth of electric transportation, in particular, the plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) industries, as well as truck stop electrification (TSE) and port electrification. The IWC includes representatives from electric utilities, vehicle manufacturing industries, component manufacturers, government agencies, related industry associations, and stand...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ashland Electric Utility- Photovoltaic Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The City of Ashland Conservation Division offers electric customers installing photovoltaic systems a rebate of either $0.75 per watt (residential) or $1.00 per watt (commercial), up to a maximum...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning January 14, 2014 2:00PM to 3:00PM EST Online Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV "ownership" are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies, especially PV. In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their resource planning processes. Analysts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Solar Electric Power

202

Electric-utility DSM programs: 1990 data and forecasts to 2000  

SciTech Connect

In April 1992, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) released data on 1989 and 1990 electric-utility demand-site management (DMS) programs. These data represent a census of US utility DSM programs, with reports of utility expenditures, energy savings, and load reductions caused by these programs. In addition, EIA published utility estimates of the costs and effects of these programs from 1991 to 2000. These data provide the first comprehensive picture of what utilities are spending and accomplishing by utility, state, and region. This report presents, summarizes, and interprets the 1990 data and the utility forecasts of their DSM-program expenditures and impacts to the year 2000. Only utilities with annual sales greater than 120 GWh were required to report data on their DSM programs to EIA. Of the 1194 such utilities, 363 reported having a DSM program that year. These 363 electric utilities spent $1.2 billion on their DSM programs in 1990, up from $0.9 billion in 1989. Estimates of energy savings (17,100 GWh in 1990 and 14,800 GWh in 1989) and potential reductions in peak demand (24,400 MW in 1990 and about 19,400 MW in 1989) also showed substantial increases. Overall, utility DSM expenditures accounted for 0.7% of total US electric revenues, while the reductions in energy and demand accounted for 0.6% and 4.9% of their respective 1990 national totals. The investor-owned utilities accounted for 70 to 90% of the totals for DSM costs, energy savings, and demand reductions. The public utilities reported larger percentage reductions in peak demand and energy smaller percentage DSM expenditures. These averages hide tremendous variations across utilities. Utility forecasts of DSM expenditures and effects show substantial growth in both absolute and relative terms.

Hirst, E.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Understanding Electric Utility Customers -- Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How customers use and value electricity has been a subject of study and debate for many decades. A better understanding of how customers use electricity could help the industry find ways to improve energy efficiency. In addition, our ability to encourage more efficient consumption through feedback, control technology, and dynamic pricing is better and less costly than it has ever been due to technology advancements.Despite decades of research into how customers use and value ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1995  

SciTech Connect

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternative Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management``, presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Wonewoc Electric & Water Util | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wonewoc Electric & Water Util Wonewoc Electric & Water Util Jump to: navigation, search Name Wonewoc Electric & Water Util Place Wisconsin Utility Id 20924 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service- Single-Phase Commercial General Service- Three-Phase Commercial Large Power Commercial Off Peak Water Heating Residential Residential Single Phase Residential Residential Three Phase Residential Street Lighting- 100W HPS Lighting Street Lighting- 144W F Lighting Street Lighting- 150W HPS Lighting

206

Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent advancements in hydrogen technologies and renewable energy applications show promise for economical near- to mid-term conversion to a hydrogen-based economy. As the use of hydrogen for the electric utility and transportation sectors of the U.S. economy unfolds, electric power utilities need to understand the potential benefits and impacts. This report provides a historical perspective of hydrogen, discusses the process of electrolysis for hydrogen production (especially from solar and wind technologies), and describes the opportunities for electric power utilities.

Kroposki, B.; Levene, J.; Harrison, K.; Sen, P.K.; Novachek, F.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1990 and Preceding Years.  

SciTech Connect

This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1990 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. The report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1990 time period, and gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1990. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell annually to four sectors. Data is provided on each retail customer sector and also on the customers Bonneville serves directly: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. 21 figs., 40 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for electric utilities and fusion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Superconducting inductors provide a compact and efficient means of storing electrical energy without an intermediate conversion process. Energy storage inductors are under development for load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems and for driving magnetic confinement and plasma heating coils in fusion energy systems. Fluctuating electric power demands force the electric utility industry to have more installed generating capacity than the average load requires. Energy storage can increase the utilization of base-load fossil and nuclear power plants for electric utilities. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin are developing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, which will store and deliver electrical energy for load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks. In the fusion area, inductive energy transfer and storage is being developed. Both 1-ms fast-discharge theta-pinch systems and 1-to-2-s slow energy transfer tokamak systems have been demonstrated. The major components and the method of operation of a SMES unit are described, and potential applications of different size SMES systems in electric power grids are presented. Results are given of a reference design for a 10-GWh unit for load leveling, of a 30-MJ coil proposed for system stabilization, and of tests with a small-scale, 100-kJ magnetic energy storage system. The results of the fusion energy storage and transfer tests are presented. The common technology base for the various storage systems is discussed.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

761 761 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142263761 Varnish cache server Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report Dataset Summary Description The Form EIA-860 is a generator-level survey that collects specific information about existing and planned generators and associated environmental equipment at electric power plants with 1 megawatt or greater of combined nameplate capacity. The survey data is summarized in reports such as the Electric Power Annual. The survey data is also available for download here. The data are compressed into a self-extracting (.exe) zip folder containing .XLS data files and record layouts. The current file structure (starting with 2009 data) consists

210

Electricity privatization : should South Korea privatize its state-owned electric utility?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The state-owned electric utility, Korea Electricity Power Cooperation (KEPCO), privatization has been a key word in South Korea since 1997, when the government received $55 billion from the International Monetary Fund in ...

Lim, Sungmin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.ornl.gov/~webworks/cppr/y2001/misc/99601.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/approaches-electric-utility-energy-ef Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Feebates This report, written for members of the Weatherization Assistance Program

212

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels. Data is included for energy savings, peakload reductions, and costs.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Commercial Weatherization Water Heating Maximum Rebate Electric Measures: $100,000 per customer location, per technology, per year Custom Gas Measures: $75,000 per commercial location per year, $5,000 per industrial location per year Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting Equipment: See Program Website Air Source Heat Pumps: $20-$25/ton, plus bonus rebate of $4/ton for each

214

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. - 1996 - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

Information Center

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Sustainable Communities--Business Opportunities for the Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purposes of this study are to: develop and articulate a vision of sustainable communities of the future and identify and delineate resulting technology challenges and business opportunities facing the electric utility industry.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Savings for the 516 large electric utilities increased to 53.7 billion kilowatthours (kWh), 3.1 billion kWh more than in 1999. These energy savings

217

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Managment 1996  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Savings as a Percentage of Retail Sales by U.S. Electric Utilities with DSM Energy Savings Programs and Sales to Ultimate Consumers by Class of Ownership, 1996

218

Activity-Based Costing for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity-Based costing (ABC) is a cost-management approach that can help utility managers make better decisions through more-accurate process and product cost information and a better understanding of activities that either do or do not add value. This report is a primer on ABC.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability monitors changes, threats, and risks to the energy infrastructure in the United States. This report updates a previously published report on copper wire theft. The combined efforts of electric utilities, lawmakers, scrap metal dealers, and local law enforcement have succeeded in reducing the problem. Updated Assessment-Copper-Final October 2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Investigation Letter Report: I11IG002 Semiannual Report to Congress: for the first half of Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2010

220

Electric-utility DSM-program costs and effects, 1991 to 2001  

SciTech Connect

For the past three years (1989, 1990, and 1991), all US electric utilities that sell more than 120 GWh/year have been required to report to the Energy Information Administration data on their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These data provide a rich and uniquely comprehensive picture of electric-utility DSM programs in the United States. Altogether, 890 utilities (of about 3250 in the United States) ran DSM programs in 1991; of these, 439 sold more than 120 GWh and reported details on their DSM programs. These 439 utilities represent more than 80% of total US electricity sales and revenues. Altogether, these utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on DSM programs in 1991, equal to 1.0% of total utility revenues that year. In return for these (and prior-year) expenditures, utility DSM programs cut potential peak demand by 26,700 MW (4.8% of the national total) and cut annual electricity use by 23,300 GWh (0.9% of the national total). These 1991 numbers represent substantial increases over the 1989 and 1990 numbers on utility DSM programs. Specifically, utility DSM expenditures doubled, energy savings increased by almost 50%, and demand reductions increased by one-third between 1989 and 1991. Utilities differed enormously in their DSM-program expenditures and effects. Almost 12% of the reporting utilities spent more than 2% of total revenues on DSM programs in 1991, while almost 60% spent less than 0.5% of revenues on DSM. Utility estimates of future DSM-program expenditures and benefits show continuing growth. By the year 2001, US utilities expect to spend 1.2% of revenues on DSM and to cut demand by 8.8% and annual sales by 2.7%. Here, too, expectations vary by region. Utilities in the West and Northwest plan to spend more than 2% of revenues on DSM that year, while utilities in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Southwest, Central, and North Central regions plan to spend less than 1% of revenues on DSM.

Hirst, E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

City of Burlington-Electric, Vermont (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burlington-Electric, Vermont (Utility Company) Burlington-Electric, Vermont (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Burlington-Electric Place Vermont Utility Id 2548 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large General (LG) Rate Demand is less than 25KW- Net Metered Renewable

222

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heating Water Heating Maximum Rebate 50% of cost See individual programs on Avista web site for incentive details Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $200 Food Service Equipment: Varies Lighting: Varies Motors: Varies Power management for PC Networks: $10/controlled unit Retro-Commissioning Study: $0.10/conditioned sq. ft. (agents receive $0.02/kWh) VFD Fans: $80/HP VFD Cooling Pump: $85/HP VFD Heating Pump: $100/HP Insulation: $0.28--$0.35/sq. ft. New Windows: $1/sq. ft. Retrofit Windows: $3.50/sq. ft. Standby Generator Block Heater: $400 Custom: $0.08 - $0.20/kWh saved in first year Avista Utilities offers numerous incentives to commercial and industrial customers to increase the energy efficiency of customer facilities or

223

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Lighting Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate 50% of cost See individual programs on Avista web site for incentive details Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $200 Food Service Equipment: Varies Lighting: Varies Motors: Varies Power management for PC Networks: $10/controlled unit Retro-Commissioning Study: $0.10/conditioned sq. ft. (agents receive $0.02/kWh) VFD Fans: $80/HP VFD Cooling Pump: $85/HP VFD Heating Pump: $100/HP Insulation: $0.28--$0.35/sq. ft. New Windows: $1/sq. ft. Retrofit Windows: $3.50/sq. ft. Standby Generator Block Heater: $400 Custom: $0.08 - $0.20/kWh saved in first year Avista Utilities offers numerous incentives to commercial and industrial customers to increase the energy efficiency of customer facilities or

224

Perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry  

SciTech Connect

This report offers perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry. These perspectives will be used in further research to assess the prospects for Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The perspectives are developed first by examining economic, political and regulatory, societal, technological, and environmental trends that are (1) national and global in scope and (2) directly related to the electric utility industry. Major national and global trends include increasing global economic competition, increasing political and ethnic strife, rapidly changing technologies, and increasing worldwide concern about the environment. Major trends in the utility industry include increasing competition in generation; changing patterns of electricity demand; increasing use of information technology to control power systems; and increasing implementation of environmental controls. Ways in which the national and global trends may directly affect the utility industry are also explored. The trends are used to construct three global and national scenarios- ``business as usual,`` ``technotopia future,`` and ``fortress state`` -and three electric utility scenarios- ``frozen in headlights,`` ``megaelectric,`` and ``discomania.`` The scenarios are designed to be thought provoking descriptions of potential futures, not predictions of the future, although three key variables are identified that will have significant impacts on which future evolves-global climate change, utility technologies, and competition. While emphasis needs to be placed on understanding the electric utility scenarios, the interactions between the two sets of scenarios is also of interest.

Tonn, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaffhauser, A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Wind Power Generation Dynamic Impacts on Electric Utility Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical planning study is an initial assessment of potential dynamic impacts on electric utility systems of wind power generation via large wind turbines. Three classes of dynamic problems-short-term transient stability, system frequency excursions, and minute-to-minute unit ramping limitations - were examined in case studies based on the Hawaiian Electric Co. System.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Structural Change and Futures for the Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technological change and evolving customer needs have already combined to precipitate fundamental structural change in several capital-intensive industries, notably the telecommunications, natural gas, and transportation sectors. These forces are now being unleashed in the electric utility sector. This report outlines some common patterns of change across several industries and presents scenarios of structural change for the electric power industry.

1995-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

227

An Examination of Temporal Trends in Electricity Reliability Based on Reports from U.S. Electric Utilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from within the electricity distribution system. The mainfrom up to 155 electricity distribution utilities. The dataelectricity consumers are caused by events affecting primarily the electric distribution

Eto, Joseph H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Innovative and Progressive Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation of electric energy has been a concern of energy users in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors for several decades, and has increased in significance since the 1973 energy shortages. During this time, it has also become increasing difficult for electric utilities to install new generating capacity due to public concerns about nuclear energy and environmental issues. In many areas of the country, utilities now find themselves capacity short during their peak periods, and have concerns about providing a reliable supply of electricity. These utilities have initiated programs which encourage their customers to conserve electric energy, and shift or lower use during the utility's peak periods. In other areas of the country there are utilities which have more than adequate electric supplies. These utilities have developed programs which ensure that costs of electricity are such that existing customers are maintained. Programs which address demand issues of an energy utility are referred to as Demand-Side Management (DSM) and are extremely rigorous in scope. Electric utilities have pursued many different DSM policies and strategies during the past decade. These programs have addressed various technologies and have included rebates for efficient lighting, electric motors and packaged air conditioning systems. More recently, however, many utilities have implemented very innovative programs, which indicates an increased commitment towards demand planning, and requires a substantial financial investment in new equipment and engineering services. Some programs have addressed such areas as thermal storage and industrial processes, and others have included comprehensive facility energy studies where greater than fifty percent of the cost of energy retrofits may be covered by the utility. Progressive pricing strategies have included real-time pricing and aggressive curtailable rates for commercial and industrial buildings. Further, new standards are being established by electric utilities which promote energy efficient new construct ion. All of these programs can have considerable impacts on both the customer's and utility's energy use patterns and load shapes. This paper will discuss a number of more significant and innovative DSM programs, and will explain the potential load and energy impacts.

Epstein, G. J.; Fuller, W. H.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A new method for electric utility resource planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an interval-based multi-attribute decision making (MADM) approach in support of the decision process with imprecise information. The proposed decision methodology is based on the model of linear additive utility function but extends ... Keywords: decision making, electric utilities, power generation, resource planning

M. Sedighizadeh

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Potential Effects of Climate Change on Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, increasing attention has been focused on the potential for greenhouse gas emissions to modify the global climate system. Significant climate change could affect utility operations and costs through impacts on electricity demand and on generation and delivery systems. Utilities, moreover, may be called upon to take actions to reduce their emissions of CO2, an important greenhouse gas. This report summarizes an assessment of the long-term risks to individual utilities posed by the potentia...

1995-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

US electric utility demand-side management, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in US at the national, regional, and utility levels. Objective is provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions, and costs attributable to DSM.

NONE

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

232

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1996  

SciTech Connect

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it related to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Financial statistics major US publicly owned electric utilities 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1996 edition of The Financial Statistics of Major US Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents 5 years (1992 through 1996) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. Five years of summary financial data are provided. Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data. 2 figs., 32 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Orange and Rockland Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Orange and Rockland Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Orange and Rockland Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Programs Orange and Rockland Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Prescriptive Rebates: 50% of cost Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge Start Date 4/1/2010 State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Small Business Lighten Up Energy Savings Evaluation and CFLs: Free A/C A/C > 65 kBTU/h: $35/ton (11.5 EER); $55 (12 EER) Heat Pumps 14 SEER or 11.5 EER: $50-$65/ton

235

Form EIA-861S ANNUAL ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY REPORT (SHORT FORM)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

INDUSTRY REPORT (SHORT FORM) INSTRUCTIONS OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2016 Burden: 2.01 Hours Page 1 Draft for Discussion only PURPOSE Form EIA-861S collects information on the status of selected electric power industry participants involved in the sale, and distribution of electric energy in the United States. The data collected on this form are used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry. REQUIRED RESPONDENTS The Form EIA-861S is to be completed by all electric utilities with annual retail sales in the prior year of 100,000 megawatt-hours or less, with the following exceptions: 1. A respondent has retail sales of unbundled service; 2. A full set of data is required from the respondent to ensure that statistical estimates

236

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Preface Background The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 is prepared by the Electric Power Divi- sion; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S.

237

Connecting Your Solar Electric System to the Utility Grid: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, the number of solar-powered homes connected to the local utility grid has increased dramatically. These''grid-connected'' buildings have solar electric panels or''modules'' that provide some or even most of their power, while still being connected to the local utility. This fact sheet provides information on connecting your solar electric system to the utility grid, including information on net metering.

Not Available

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Economic impact of non-utility generation on electric power systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-Utility Generation is a major force in the way electrical energy is now being produced and marketed, and electric utilities are reacting to the growth (more)

Gupta, Rajnish

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Electric Utility Terrain Vehicle Demonstration in a Military Base Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility terrain vehicles (UTVs), also called all terrain vehicles (ATVs), are used for a variety of purposes ranging from transporting people and materials to recreation. Examples of uses include transportation at military bases, for beach patrols, at ports, agricultural locations, industrial sites, and local/municipal applications such as at parks and schools. As of August 30, 2012 the Federal Highway Administration estimated that annual fuel usage of All-terrain vehicles to be approximately 173 ...

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

240

New London Electric&Water Util | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Util Util Jump to: navigation, search Name New London Electric&Water Util Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13467 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Designing a Thermal Energy Storage Program for Electric Utilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric utilities are looking at thermal energy storage technology as a viable demand side management (DSM) option. In order for this DSM measure to be effective, it must be incorporated into a workable, well-structured utility program. This paper describes a methodology to design a successful thermal energy storage program for electric utilities. The design process is addressed beginning with the market research phase. The research includes information obtained from utilities having successful thermal storage programs. In addition, information is gathered from interviews with local architects and engineers, air conditioning contractors and potential thermal energy storage customers. From this information a marketing plan is developed that addresses the target market, market penetration, promotional methods, incentive types and levels, internal and external training requirements and optimal organizational structure. The marketing plan also includes various rate structures, program procedures and evaluation techniques. In addition to the marketing plan, several case histories are addressed.

Niehus, T. L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Integrated Job Exposure Matrix for Electric Utility Workers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies and includes all exposure factors in a prototype job-exposure matrix (JEM) to inform utility professionals, exposure assessment experts, and epidemiologists about exposures other than electric and magnetic fields that should be considered when assessing health and safety issues related to work near electric facilities. The nature of exposures to these factors, the ordinal exposure ranking for most of the factors, and the methodology for establishing such determining ordinal exposur...

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

Table 8.13 Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Savings: Electric Utility Costs 4: ... motor drive) with less electricity. Examples include high-efficiency appliances, ... advanced electric motor drives, and

244

Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

Akhil, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K. [R.K. Sen & Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Positioning the electric utility to build information infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

In two particular respects (briefly investigated in this study from a lawyer`s perspective), electric utilities appear uniquely well-positioned to contribute to the National Information Infrastructure (NII). First of all, utilities have legal powers derived from their charters and operating authorities, confirmed in their rights-of-way, to carry out activities and functions necessary for delivering electric service. These activities and functions include building telecommunications facilities and undertaking information services that have become essential to managing electricity demand and supply. The economic value of the efficiencies made possible by telecommunications and information could be substantial. How great remains to be established, but by many estimates electric utility applications could fund a significant share of the capital costs of building the NII. Though utilities` legal powers to pursue such efficiencies through telecommunications and information appear beyond dispute, it is likely that the effort to do so will produce substantial excess capacity. Who will benefit from this excess capacity is a potentially contentious political question that demands early resolution. Will this windfall go to the utility, the customer, or no one (because of political paralysis), or will there be some equitable and practical split? A second aspect of inquiry here points to another contemporary issue of very great societal importance that could very well become the platform on which the first question can be resolved fortuitously-how to achieve universal telecommunications service. In the effort to fashion the NII that will now continue, ways and means to maximize the unique potential contribution of electric utilities to meeting important social and economic needs--in particular, universal service--merit priority attention.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Price impacts of electric-utility DSM programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As competition in the electricity industry increases, utilities (and others) worry more about the upward pressure on electricity prices that demand-side management (DSM) programs often impose. Because of these concerns, several utilities have recently reduced the scope of their DSM programs or focused these programs more on customer service and peak-demand reductions and less on improving energy efficiency. This study uses the Oak Ridge Financial Model (ORFIN) to calculate the rate impacts of DSM. The authors use ORFIN to examine the two factors that contribute to DSM`s upward pressure on prices: the cost of the programs themselves and the loss of revenue associated with fixed-cost recovery. This second factor reflects the reduction in revenues caused by the DSM-induced energy and demand savings that exceed the reduction in utility costs. This analysis examines DSM price impacts as functions of the following factors: the DSM program itself (cost, conservation load factor, geographic focus on deferral of transmission and distribution investments, and mix across customer classes); the utility`s cost and pricing structures (factors at least partly under the utility`s control, such as retail tariffs, fixed vs variable operating costs, and capital costs not related to kW or kWh growth); and external economic and regulatory factors (the level and temporal pattern of avoided energy and capacity costs; ratebasing vs expensing of DSM-program costs; shareholder incentives for DSM programs; load growth; and the rates for income, property, and revenue taxes).

Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

CAPTURE OR CONTRACT?: THE EARLY YEARS OF ELECTRIC UTILITY REGULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(forthcoming) study the historical origins of governance institutions for natural gas and water, respectivelyCAPTURE OR CONTRACT?: THE EARLY YEARS OF ELECTRIC UTILITY REGULATION Thomas P. Lyon Nathan Wilson prices rose in states that adopted state regulation before 1917, suggesting that regulators were

Lyon, Thomas P.

248

CASE STUDY -ELECTRIC UTILITY RESTRUCTURING -MASSACHUSETTS RENEWABLE ENERGY TRUST FUND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CASE STUDY - ELECTRIC UTILITY RESTRUCTURING - MASSACHUSETTS RENEWABLE ENERGY TRUST FUND John A or not WTE will be considered a "renewable energy" source with respect to mandated fractions of state. This discussion will provide a brief history of the Massachusetts, Renewable Energy Trust Fund (RETF), delineate

Columbia University

249

Economic impact of integrating photovoltaics with conventional electric utility operation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the parameters which impact the value of photovoltaics (PV) to the electric utility. We have, therefore, chosen the high, medium and low load days in winter (January) and summer (July). The daily peak load has varied from 5838 MW to 9712 MW. These six days are studied for reference (no PV), high, medium, low and intermittent PV output cases. Results from these 30 case studies are summarized in this paper. In order to study the impact of operating photovoltaic (PV) systems on the electric utility production cost (fuel and variable O and M) we have chosen the load profile of a southeastern utility and the PV output data from solar test facilities in Virginia and North Carolina. In order to incorporate the short-term variations we have used 10-minute resolution data for both load and PV output.

Rahman, S. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Annual Electric Generator data - EIA-860 data file  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

60 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-860A/860B) 60 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-860A/860B) Release Date: October 10, 2013 for Final 2012 data Next Release Date: September 2014 Re-Release 2012 data: December 4, 2013 (CORRECTION) The survey Form EIA-860 collects generator-level specific information about existing and planned generators and associated environmental equipment at electric power plants with 1 megawatt or greater of combined nameplate capacity. Summary level data can be found in the Electric Power Annual. Detailed data are compressed (zip) and contain the following files: LayoutYyy – Provides a directory of all (published) data elements collected on the Form EIA-860 together with the related description, specific file location(s), and, where appropriate, an explanation of codes.

251

Consumer's Guide to the economics of electric-utility ratemaking  

SciTech Connect

This guide deals primarily with the economics of electric utilities, although certain legal and organizational aspects of utilities are discussed. Each of the seven chapters addresses a particular facet of public-utility ratemaking. Chapter One contains a discussion of the evolution of the public-utility concept, as well as the legal and economic justification for public utilities. The second chapter sets forth an analytical economic model which provides the basis for the next four chapters. These chapters contain a detailed examination of total operating costs, the rate base, the rate of return, and the rate structure. The final chapter discusses a number of current issues regarding electric utilities, mainly factors related to fuel-adjustment costs, advertising, taxes, construction work in progress, and lifeline rates. Some of the examples used in the Guide are from particular states, such as Illinois and California. These examples are used to illustrate specific points. Consumers in other states can generalize them to their states and not change the meaning or significance of the points. 27 references, 8 tables.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Incorporating uncertainty into electric utility projections and decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on how electric utility companies can respond in their decision making to uncertain variables. Here we take a mean- variance type of approach. The ``mean`` value is an expected cost, on a discounted value basis. We assume that management has risk preferences incorporating a tradeoff between the mean and variance in the utility`s net income. Decisions that utilities are faced with can be classified into two types: ex ante and ex post. The ex ante decisions need to be made prior to the uncertainty being revealed and the ex post decision can be postponed until after the uncertainty is revealed. Intuitively, we can say that the ex ante decisions provide a hedge against the uncertainties and the ex post decisions allow the negative outcomes of uncertain variables to be partially mitigated, dampening the losses. An example of an ex post decision is how the system is operated i.e., unit dispatch, and in some cases switching among types of fuels, say with different sulfur contents. For example, if gas prices go up, natural gas combined cycle units are likely to be dispatched at lower capacity factors. If SO{sub 2} emission allowance prices go up, a utility may seek to switch into a lower sulfur coal. Here we assume that regulated electric utilities do have some incentive to lower revenue requirements and hence an incentive to lower the electric rates needed for the utility to break even, thereby earning a fair return on invested capital. This paper presents the general approach first, including applications to capacity expansion and system dispatch. Then a case study is presented focusing on the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments including SO{sub 2} emissions abatement and banking of allowances under uncertainty. It is concluded that the emission banking decisions should not be made in isolation but rather all the uncertainties in demand, fuel prices, technology performance etc., should be included in the uncertainty analysis affecting emission banking.

Hanson, D.A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Electric utility restructuring and the California biomass energy industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shock jolted the electric power industry in April 1994, when the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) announced its intention to restructure the industry. The proposal, commonly referred to as retail wheeling, is based on the principle that market deregulation and competition will bring down the cost of electricity for all classes of customers. It would effectively break up the monopoly status of the regulated utilities and allow customers to purchase electricity directly from competing suppliers. According to the original CPUC proposal, cost alone would be the basis for determining which generating resources would be used. The proposal was modified in response to public inputs, and issued as a decision at the end of 1995. The final proposal recognized the importance of renewables, and included provisions for a minimum renewables purchase requirement (MRPR). A Renewables Working Group convened to develop detailed proposals for implementing the CPUC`s renewables program. Numerous proposals, which represented the range of possible programs that can be used to support renewables within the context of a restructured electric utility industry, were received.

Morris, G. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Electric utility applications of hydrogen energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the capital cost associated with various energy storage systems that have been installed for electric utility application. The storage systems considered in this study are Battery Energy Storage (BES), Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and Flywheel Energy Storage (FES). The report also projects the cost reductions that may be anticipated as these technologies come down the learning curve. This data will serve as a base-line for comparing the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen energy storage (HES) systems in the electric utility sector. Since pumped hydro or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is not particularly suitable for distributed storage, they are not considered in this report. There are no comparable HES systems in existence in the electric utility sector. However, there are numerous studies that have assessed the current and projected cost of hydrogen energy storage system. This report uses such data to compare the cost of HES systems with that of other storage systems in order to draw some conclusions as to the applications and the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen as a electricity storage alternative.

Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

What Does Industry Expect From An Electrical Utility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry is an important supplier to Union Carbide and as such must become a proactive participant in our quality programs which are aimed at continuous improvement in everything we do. The essential ingredients in the supplier quality programs we are developing include: 1. Performance and Delivery, 2. Conformance, 3. Responsiveness, 4. Communications, 5. Supplier Quality Efforts. The electric utility supplying each of our locations is our partner at that location. We do not have the same degree of flexibility to change electricity suppliers that we might have with other suppliers of goods and services. In order for our partnerships to work we must get to know each other better. We need to understand the other guys problems and then find ways to do business that are mutually beneficial to both of us. At Union Carbide our total quality process has started at the top of the corporation and is working its way throughout the organization. Our supplier quality programs are now beginning to take shape and we are relying upon our electric utility suppliers to become active in the final design and implementation of these programs.

Jensen, C. V.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Incorporating uncertainty into electric utility projections and decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on how electric utility companies can respond in their decision making to uncertain variables. Here we take a mean- variance type of approach. The mean'' value is an expected cost, on a discounted value basis. We assume that management has risk preferences incorporating a tradeoff between the mean and variance in the utility's net income. Decisions that utilities are faced with can be classified into two types: ex ante and ex post. The ex ante decisions need to be made prior to the uncertainty being revealed and the ex post decision can be postponed until after the uncertainty is revealed. Intuitively, we can say that the ex ante decisions provide a hedge against the uncertainties and the ex post decisions allow the negative outcomes of uncertain variables to be partially mitigated, dampening the losses. An example of an ex post decision is how the system is operated i.e., unit dispatch, and in some cases switching among types of fuels, say with different sulfur contents. For example, if gas prices go up, natural gas combined cycle units are likely to be dispatched at lower capacity factors. If SO{sub 2} emission allowance prices go up, a utility may seek to switch into a lower sulfur coal. Here we assume that regulated electric utilities do have some incentive to lower revenue requirements and hence an incentive to lower the electric rates needed for the utility to break even, thereby earning a fair return on invested capital. This paper presents the general approach first, including applications to capacity expansion and system dispatch. Then a case study is presented focusing on the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments including SO{sub 2} emissions abatement and banking of allowances under uncertainty. It is concluded that the emission banking decisions should not be made in isolation but rather all the uncertainties in demand, fuel prices, technology performance etc., should be included in the uncertainty analysis affecting emission banking.

Hanson, D.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Electric-utility DSM programs: Terminology and reporting formats  

SciTech Connect

The number, scope, effects, and costs of electric-utility demand-site management programs are growing rapidly in the United States. Utilities, their regulators, and energy policy makers need reliable information on the costs of, participation in, and energy and load effects of these programs to make informed decisions. In particular, information is needed on the ability of these programs to cost-effectively provide energy and capacity resources that are alternatives to power plants. This handbook addresses the need for additional and better information in two ways. First, it discusses the key concepts associated with DSM-program types, participation, energy and load effects, and costs. Second, the handbook offers definitions and a sample reporting form for utility DSM programs. The primary purpose in developing these definitions and this form is to encourage consistency in the collection and reporting of data on DSM programs. To ensure that the discussions, reporting formats, and definitions will be useful and used, development of this handbook was managed by a committee, with membership from electric utilities, state regulatory commissions, and the US Department of Energy. Also, this data-collection form was pretested by seven people from six utilities, who completed the form for nine DSM programs.

Hirst, E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Sabo, C. (Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Washington, DC (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Electric utility repowering assessment. Final report, July 1993-February 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report evaluates the potential for repowering of existing electric generation stations in the United States over the period 1994 to 2003. The report includes these topics: (1) Recommendations to GRI for technical development of repowering; (2) An evaluation of the major technological factors concerning major repowering options; (3) A generic economic assessment of the cost of repowering compared to alternatives; (4) An investigation of the factors that are important in the utility decision-making process concerning repowering. The topic was based on several in-depth interviews with utilities. (5) An evaluation of the potential market subdivided into two groups: gas- and oil-fired plants and coal-fired plants.

Lennox, F.; Siegel, J.; Preble, B.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Estimation of Annual Reductions of NOx Emissions in ERCOT for the HB3693 Electricity Savings Goals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing the level of energy efficiency in Texas, as proposed by House Bill 3693, an Act related to energy demand, energy load, energy efficiency incentives, energy programs and energy performance measures, would reduce the amount of electricity demanded from Texas utilities. Since approximately eighty-eight percent of electricity generated in Texas is from plants powered by fossil fuels, such as coal and natural gas, this decrease would also reduce the air pollution that would otherwise be associated with burning these fuels. This report presents the potential emission reductions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) that would occur in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) region if new energy efficiency targets for investor owned utilities are established for 2010 and 2015. These energy efficiency targets are the subject of a feasibility study as prescribed by Texas House Bill 3693. This report describes the details of the methodology, data and assumptions used, and presents the results of the analysis. The total energy savings targets for utilities within ERCOT are 745,710 megawatt-hours (MWh) by 2010 under the 30 percent reduction of growth scenario and 1,788,953 MWh by 2015 under the 50 percent reduction of growth scenario. The total projected annual NOx emissions reductions from these electricity savings are 191 tons in 2010 and 453 tons in 2015, or converting the annual totals into average daily avoided emissions totals, 0.5 tons per day by 2010 and 1.25 tons per day by 2015. The average avoided emission rate is approximately 0.51 pounds (lb) of NOx reduced per MWh of electricity savings. While House Bill 3693 is an Act related to energy and does not target emissions levels, the energy efficiency improvements would achieve air pollution benefits that could positively affect air quality and human health. The emissions reductions projected to result in 2010 and 2015 are comparable to the Texas Emission Reduction Program (TERP) Energy-Efficiency Grants Program, which does target emission reductions and estimated 2005 annual NOx emissions reductions of about 89 tons. While the projected emissions reductions are small compared to the total emission reductions needed to bring the states non-attainment areas into attainment of the national ambient air quality standards for ozone, they can be a part of an overall strategy to reduce emissions and improve human health in Texas.

Diem, Art; Mulholland, Denise; Yarbrough, James; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Im, Piljae; Haberl, Jeff

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis: Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities B. Kroposki, J. Levene, and K. Harrison National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P.K. Sen Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado F. Novachek Xcel Energy Denver, Colorado Technical Report NREL/TP-581-40605 September 2006 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities B. Kroposki, J. Levene, and K. Harrison National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P.K. Sen Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado F. Novachek Xcel Energy Denver, Colorado Prepared under Task No. HY61.3620 Technical Report NREL/TP-581-40605 September 2006

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NETL: Publications - 2002 Conference Proceedings: Electric Utilities and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL Publications NETL Publications 2002 Conference Proceedings Electric Utilities and Water: Emerging Issues and R&D Needs Table of Contents Disclaimer Front Matter and Workshop Summary [PDF-49KB] Appendix A - Workshop Brochure [PDF-274KB] Appendix B - Summary of Breakout Session A [PDF-19KB] Appendix C - Summary of Breakout Session B [PDF-27KB] Appendix D - Presentations Appendix E - List of Workshop Attendees [PDF-8KB] Electric Utilities and Water Brochure Cover Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or

262

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

263

PPL Electric Utilities Corp. Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corp. Smart Grid Project Corp. Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead PPL Electric Utilities Corp. Country United States Headquarters Location Allentown, Pennsylvania Recovery Act Funding $19,054,516.00 Total Project Value $38,109,032.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: PPL Electric Utilities Corp. Smart Grid Project Coordinates 40.6084305°, -75.4901833° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

264

Modifications To Incorporate Competitive Electricity Prices In The Annual Energy Outlook 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The purpose of this report is to describe modifications to the Electricity Market Module (EMM) for the Annual Energy Outlook 1998. It describes revisions necessary to derive competitive electricity prices and the corresponding reserve margins.

Information Center

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A primer on incentive regulation for electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

In contemplating a regulatory approach, the challenge for regulators is to develop a model that provides incentives for utilities to engage in socially desirable behavior. In this primer, we provide guidance on this process by discussing (1) various models of economic regulation, (2) problems implementing these models, and (3) the types of incentives that various models of regulation provide electric utilities. We address five regulatory models in depth. They include cost-of-service regulation in which prudently incurred costs are reflected dollar-for-dollar in rates and four performance-based models: (1) price-cap regulation, in which ceilings are placed on the average price that a utility can charge its customers; (2) revenue-cap regulation, in which a ceiling is placed on revenues; (3) rate-of-return bandwidth regulation, in which a utility`s rates are adjusted if earnings fall outside a {open_quotes}band{close_quotes} around equity returns; and (4) targeted incentives, in which a utility is given incentives to improve specific components of its operations. The primary difference between cost-of-service and performance-based approaches is the latter sever the tie between costs and prices. A sixth, {open_quotes}mixed approach{close_quotes} combines two or more of the five basic ones. In the recent past, a common mixed approach has been to combine targeted incentives with cost-of-service regulation. A common example is utilities that are subject to cost-of-service regulation are given added incentives to increase the efficiency of troubled electric-generating units.

Hill, L.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report: Volumes 1-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of human health risks from trace substances in electric utility stack plumes was carried out for each of 600 U.S. power plants. Emissions estimates were based on measurements at 43 units. Under realistic assumptions of exposure and plant configuration, inhalation risks were well below one in one million for increased cancer likelihood to all individuals exposed to emissions from power plants. Mercury case studies at four power plants showed health risks lower than federal guide...

1995-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

267

Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report: Volumes 1-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of human health risks from trace substances in electric utility stack plumes was carried out for each of 600 U.S. power plants. Emissions estimates were based on measurements at 43 units. Under realistic assumptions of exposure and plant configuration, inhalation risks were well below one in one million for increased cancer likelihood to all individuals exposed to emissions from power plants. Mercury case studies at four power plants showed health risks lower than federal guide...

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

268

Load management strategies for electric utilities: a production cost simulation  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with the development and application of a simulation model for analyzing strategies for managing the residential loads of electric utilities. The basic components of the model are (1) a production-cost model, which simulates daily operation of an electric power system; (2) a load model, which disaggregates system loads into appliance loads and other loads; and (3) a comparison model, which compares the production costs and energy consumption needed to meet a particular load profile to the corresponding costs and energy consumption required for another load profile. The profiles in each pair define alternative ways of meeting the same demand. A method for disaggregating load profiles into appliance components is discussed and several alternative strategies for residential load management for a typical northeastern electric utility are formulated. The method is based on an analysis of the composition of electric loads for a number of classes of residential customers in the model utility system. The effect of alternative load management strategies on the entire residential loadcurve is determined by predicting the effects of these strategies on the specific appliance components of the loadcurve. The results of using the model to analyze alternative strategies for residential load management suggest that load management strategies in the residential sector, if adopted by utilities whose operating and load characteristics are similar to those of the system modeled here, must take into account a wide variety of appliances to achieve significant changes in the total load profile. Moreover, the results also suggest that it is not easy to reduce costs significantly through new strategies for managing residential loads only and that, to be worthwhile, cost-reducing strategies will have to encompass many kinds of appliances.

Blair, P.D.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A knowledge based model of electric utility operations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of an appendix to provide a documentation and help capability for an analyst using the developed expert system of electric utility operations running in CLIPS. This capability is provided through a separate package running under the WINDOWS Operating System and keyed to provide displays of text, graphics and mixed text and graphics that explain and elaborate on the specific decisions being made within the knowledge based expert system.

NONE

1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

270

Evaluating the role of uncertainty in electric utility capacity planning  

SciTech Connect

This final report on Evaluating the Role of Uncertainty in Electric Utility Capacity Planning is divided into separate sections addressing demand, supply and the simultaneous consideration of both and describes several mathematical characterizations of the effects of uncertainty on the capacity expansion decision. The basic objective is to develop more robust models which can appropriately include the fundamental uncertainties associated with capacity expansion planning in the electric utility industry. Much of what has been developed in this project has been incorporated into a long-term, computer model for capacity expansion planning. A review is provided of certain deterministic capacity expansion methodologies. The effect of load curve uncertainty on capacity planning is considered and the use of a certain expected load curve to account for uncertainty in demand is proposed. How uncertainty influences the allocation of capital costs among the various load curve realizations is also discussed. The supply side uncertainties of fuel prices and random availability of generating units are considered. In certain cases it is shown that the use of the expected fuel costs will furnish a solution which minimizes the total expected costs. The effect of derating units to account for their random availability is also characterized. A stochastic linear program formulated to examine the simultaneous consideration of fuel cost and demand uncertainties is analyzed. This volume includes the report text one appendix with information on linear programming-based analysis of marginal cost pricing in the electric utility industry.

Soyster, A.L.

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets FUPWG Spring 2010 Meeting April 14, 2010 What's On the Minds of Your Utilities?  Transformation of the Electricity Industry  Emerging smart technology  Financial reform  Reliability  Major initiatives to address climate change  Gaps / Lack of Clarity in Federal / State Decisions on Infrastructure and Market Issues  Operating in a carbon constrained world EEI  Our members serve 95% of the ultimate customers in the shareholder-owned segment of the industry,  and represent approximately 70% of the U.S. electric power industry.  We also have more than 80 international electric companies as Affiliate Members  Organized in 1933, EEI works closely with all of its members, representing their interests and

272

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Treatment of Solar Generation Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning John Sterling Solar Electric Power Association Joyce McLaren National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mike Taylor Solar Electric Power Association Karlynn Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-60047 October 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

273

Proceedings: 1991 Fuel Oil Utilization Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist utilities in improving fossil steam plant operations, EPRI continues to conduct annual fuel oil utilization workshops. At the 1991 conference, personnel from 16 electric utilities exchanged ideas on improving residual fuel oil utilization in their generating plants.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Survey of Western U.S. electric utility resource plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survey Survey of Western U.S. electric utility resource plans Jordan Wilkerson a,n , Peter Larsen a,b , Galen Barbose b a Management Science and Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States b Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90-4000, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States H I G H L I G H T S  Anticipated power plant retirements are split between coal and natural gas.  By 2030, natural gas-fired generation represents 60% of new capacity followed by wind (15%), solar (7%) and hydropower (7%).  Utilities anticipate most new solar capacity to come online before 2020 with significant growth in wind capacity after 2020.  Utilities focus their uncertainty analyses on future demand, fuel prices,

275

Dependence of delivered energy on power conditioner electrical characteristics for utility-interactive PV systems  

SciTech Connect

In a utility-interactive photovoltaic system, the electrical characteristics of the dc-to-ac power-conditioning unit (inverter) influence the quantity of electrical energy delivered by the system, and therefore, affect the user worth of the system. An analysis of the effect of relevant inverter electrical characteristics on the quantity of system-delivered energy is undertaken using computer simulations of system behavior. Significant conclusions are that: (1) the annual system performance advantage of maximum-power-point voltage tracking is small compared with fixed-dc-input voltage operation; (2) low levels of inverter ac-power consumption during times of zero insolation can significantly degrade system performance; (3) the effect of small changes in the array-to-inverter size ratio on the user worth of the system is small; and (4) most of the system energy is delivered at power levels greater than one-half of the nominal array rating, and consequently, the inverter low-power efficiency is less important than is its full-power efficiency. A formula that approximates the inverter annual throughput efficiency with only four laboratory measurements on the inverter is presented.

Rasmussen, N.E.; Branz, H.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Economic assessment of the utilization of lead-acid batteries in electric utility systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Specific applications in which lead--acid batteries might be economically competitive on an electric utility system are identified. Particular attention is given to searching the Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSE and G) system for installations of batteries which could defer or cancel costly transmission and/or distribution projects. Although the transmission and distribution data are based on specific applications on the PSE and G system, the generation data are based on a national reference system. The report analyzes and summarizes all costs and savings attributable to lead--acid batteries. 40 figures, 78 tables. (RWR)

Johnson, A.C.; Hynds, J.A.; Nevius, D.R.; Nunan, G.A.; Sweetman, N.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0095(2000) Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000 March 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric

278

U.S. Electric Utility Companies and Rates: Look-up by Zipcode...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities....

279

Tool Helps Utilities Assess Readiness for Electric Vehicle Charging (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL research helps answer a fundamental question regarding electric vehicles: Is the grid ready to handle them? Environmental, economic and security concerns regarding oil consumption make electrifying the transportation sector a high national priority. NREL's Center for Transportation Technologies & Systems (CTTS) has developed a framework for utilities to evaluate the plug-in vehicle (PEV) readiness of distribution transformers. Combining a wealth of vehicle performance statistics with load data from partner utilities including the Hawaiian Electric Company and Xcel Energy, NREL analyzed the thermal loading characteristics of distribution transformers due to vehicle charging. After running millions of simulations replicating varying climates and conditions, NREL is now able to predict aging rates for transformers when PEVs are added to existing building loads. With the NREL tool, users define simulation parameters by inputting vehicle trip and weather data; transformer load profiles and ratings; PEV penetration, charging rates and battery sizes; utility rates; the number of houses on each transformer; and public charging availability. Transformer load profiles, drive cycles, and ambient temperature data are then run through the thermal model to produce a one-year timeseries of the hotspot temperature. Annual temperature durations are calculated to help determine the annual aging rate. Annual aging rate results are grouped by independent variables. The most useful measure is transformer mileage, a measure of how many electrically-driven miles must be supplied by the transformer. Once the spectrum analysis has been conducted for an area or utility, the outputs can be used to help determine if more detailed evaluation is necessary, or if transformer replacement is required. In the majority of scenarios, transformers have enough excess capacity to charge PEVs. Only in extreme cases does vehicle charging have negative long-term impact on transformers. In those cases, upgrades to larger transformers would be recommended. NREL analysis also showed opportunity for newly-installed smart grids to offset distribution demands by time-shifting the charging loads. Most importantly, the model demonstrated synergies between PEVs and distributed renewables, not only providing clean renewable energy for vehicles, but also reducing demand on the entire distribution infrastructure by supplying loads at the point of consumption.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Sixth annual coal preparation, utilization, and environmental control contractors conference  

SciTech Connect

A conference was held on coal preparation, utilization and environmental control. Topics included: combustion of fuel slurries; combustor performance; desulfurization chemically and by biodegradation; coal cleaning; pollution control of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides; particulate control; and flue gas desulfurization. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases. (CBS).

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A Statistical Forecast Model of Weather-Related Damage to a Major Electric Utility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generalized linear model (GLM) has been developed to relate meteorological conditions to damages incurred by the outdoor electrical equipment of Public Service Electric and Gas, the largest public utility in New Jersey. Utilizing a perfect-...

Brian J. Cerruti; Steven G. Decker

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Energy Conservation and Management for Electric Utility Industrial Customers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comprehensive energy management assistance within the industrial section is currently being offered by a growing number of electric utilities as part of their efforts to - provide additonal demand side services to their industrial customers. One of the keys to these enhanced services is the availability of a unique Industrial Energy Conservation and Management (EC&M) computer model that can be used to evaluate the technical and economic benefits of installing proposed process related energy management systems within an industrial plant. Details of an EPRI sponsored pilot program are summarized and results presented on the use of the computer model to provide comprehensive EC&M system evaluations of potential energy management opportunities in HL&P's and other utility service areas. This capability is currently being offered to HL&P's industrial customers and is primarily concerned with identifying and evaluating possible process heat recovery and other energy management opportunities to show how a plant's energy related operating costs can be reduced.

McChesney, H. R.; Obee, T. N.; Mangum, G. F.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Reexamination of electric-utility profitability in Ohio  

SciTech Connect

This article looks back to an earlier FORTNIGHTLY article by Coyne (Sept. 16, 1982), one which argued that investor-owned electric-utility companies in the state of Ohio could be demonstrated to be earning returns that were greater than those of major oil companies when the relative risks of the companies were taken into account. The author here points to considerations overlooked in the earlier article, leading to a conclusion that there is not statistical or practical difference between the risk-adjusted rates of return of the two industries. 6 references, 2 tables.

Davidson, W.N. III

1983-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

284

Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

1996 - Final issue. Presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the investor-owned electric utilities.

Information Center

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Cyber Security Challenges in Using Cloud Computing in the Electric Utility Industry  

SciTech Connect

This document contains introductory material that discusses cyber security challenges in using cloud computing in the electric utility industry.

Akyol, Bora A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Central Wind Power Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America.

Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Financial statistics of selected publicly owned electric utilities 1989. [Contains glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Financial Statistics of Selected Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide the Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes relating to publicly owned electric utility issues. 21 tabs.

Not Available

1991-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

288

A summary of the California Public Utilities Commission`s two competing electric utility restructuring proposals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 1995, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) released two proposals for restructuring the state`s electric power industry. The two proposals follow more than a year of testimony and public comment after the CPUC issued the ``Blue Book`` (CPUC 1994a) on April 20, 1994, which called for retail wheeling to be phased in to all customers over 5 years. The majority proposal, supported by three of the four CPUC commissioners (one seat was vacant when the proposals were released), calls for creating a central pool, or ``poolco``; setting electric prices to reflect true costs of service, or ``real-time pricing``; and allowing parties to negotiate ``contracts for differences`` between the pool price and the contract price. The minority proposal, sponsored by Commissioner Jesse Knight, calls for retail wheeling, or ``direct access,`` and for utilities to divest or spin off their generating assets. This paper presents a summary of the major provisions of the two CPUC proposals and the possible implications and issues associated with each. It is aimed at researchers who may be aware that various efforts to restructure the electric power industry are under way and want to known more about California`s proposals, as well as those who want to known the implications of certain restructuring proposals for renewable energy technologies. Presented at the end of the paper is a summary of alternative proposals promoted by various stakeholder in response to the two CPUC proposals.

Porter, K.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Table N13.3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" 3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " "," ",,,," " " "," ","Total of",,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

290

Electric Utility Transmission and Distribution Line Engineering Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic development in the United States depends on a reliable and affordable power supply. The nation will need well educated engineers to design a modern, safe, secure, and reliable power grid for our future needs. An anticipated shortage of qualified engineers has caused considerable concern in many professional circles, and various steps are being taken nationwide to alleviate the potential shortage and ensure the North American power system's reliability, and our world-wide economic competitiveness. To help provide a well-educated and trained workforce which can sustain and modernize the nation's power grid, Gonzaga University's School of Engineering and Applied Science has established a five-course (15-credit hour) Certificate Program in Transmission and Distribution (T&D) Engineering. The program has been specifically designed to provide working utility engineering professionals with on-line access to advanced engineering courses which cover modern design practice with an industry-focused theoretical foundation. A total of twelve courses have been developed to-date and students may select any five in their area of interest for the T&D Certificate. As each course is developed and taught by a team of experienced engineers (from public and private utilities, consultants, and industry suppliers), students are provided a unique opportunity to interact directly with different industry experts over the eight weeks of each course. Course material incorporates advanced aspects of civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering disciplines that apply to power system design and are appropriate for graduate engineers. As such, target students for the certificate program include: (1) recent graduates with a Bachelor of Science Degree in an engineering field (civil, mechanical, electrical, etc.); (2) senior engineers moving from other fields to the utility industry (i.e. paper industry to utility engineering or project management positions); and (3) regular working professionals wishing to update their skills or increase their knowledge of utility engineering design practices and procedures. By providing graduate educational opportunities for the above groups, the T&D Program will help serve a strong industry need for training the next generation of engineers in the cost-effective design, construction, operation, and maintenance of modern electrical transmission and distribution systems. In addition to developing the on-line engineering courses described above, the T&D Program also focused significant efforts towards enhancing the training opportunities available to power system operators in the northwest. These efforts have included working with outside vendors to provide NERC-approved training courses in Gonzaga University's (GU) system operator training facility, support for an accurate system model which can be used in regional blackstart exercises, and the identification of a retired system operator who could provide actual regional training courses. The GU system operator training facility is also being used to recruit young workers, veterans, and various under-represented groups to the utility industry. Over the past three years students from Columbia Gorge Community College, Spokane Falls Community College, Walla Walla Community College, Central Washington University, Eastern Washington University, Gonzaga University, and various local high schools have attended short (one-day) system operator training courses free of charge. These collaboration efforts has been extremely well received by both students and industry, and meet T&D Program objectives of strengthening the power industry workforce while bridging the knowledge base across power worker categories, and recruiting new workers to replace a predominantly retirement age workforce. In the past three years the T&D Program has provided over 170 utility engineers with access to advanced engineering courses, been involved in training more than 300 power system operators, and provided well over 500 college and high school students with an experienc

Peter McKenny

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

"Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ELECTRICITY DETAILED SURVEY DATA FILES: Electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency Form EIA-861 detailed data files ...

292

Deregulation and Resource Reconfiguration In The Electric Utility Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Scale Economies in Electric Power Production: Some Newand Delivery of Electric Power. Land Economics 62(4): 378-1998 Challenges of Electric Power Industry Restructuring for

Delmas, Magali; Russo, Michael V.; Montes-Sancho, Maria J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Low-cost load research for electric utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA) developed two pragmatic approaches to meet most load-research objectives at a substantially lower cost than would be incurred with traditional techniques. GVEA serves three customer classes, with most of its load in the Fairbanks area. GVEA's new approaches simulate load curves for individual customer classes to the degree necessary to meet most load-research objectives for the utility, including applications to cost-of-service analysis, rate design, demand-side management, and load forecasting. These approaches make class load-shape information available to utilities that cannot otherwise afford to develop such data. Although the two approaches were developed for a small utility, they are likely to work at least as well for medium and large utilities. The first approach simulates class curves by combining load data from system feeders with information on customer mix and energy usage. GVEA's supervisory control and data acquisition system gives hourly data on feeder loads, and its billing database provides the number of customers and kilowatt-hour usage by customer class on each feeder. The second approach enhances load-research results by redefining target parameters. Data from several like-hours are used to calculate substitutes for the parameters traditionally defined from single-hour data points. The precision of peak responsibility estimates, for example, can be improved if several of the highest hourly demands in a given time period are used rather than the single highest hourly demand. Arguably, use of several highest hourly demands can also improve the reliability of the allocation of responsibility.

Gray, D.A.; Butcher, M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

FY2008 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AnnuAl Progress rePort for AnnuAl Progress rePort for the AdvAnced Power electronics And electric MAchinery technology AreA annual progress report 2008 V e h i c l e T e c h n o l o g i e s P r o g r a m U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies, EE-2G 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W.

295

Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Lignite Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury control technologies for Mercury control technologies for electric utilities Burning lignite coal Background In partnership with a number of key stakeholders, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE), through its National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has been carrying out a comprehensive research program since the mid-1990s focused on the development of advanced, cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for coal-fired power plants. Mercury is a poisonous metal found in coal, which can be harmful and even toxic when absorbed from the environment and concentrated in animal tissues. Mercury is present as an unwanted by-product of combustion in power plant flue gases, and is found in varying percentages in three basic chemical forms(known as speciation): particulate-bound mercury, oxidized

296

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

8.13 Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs, 1989 ... (Find the latest annual data by residential sector in MER Table 12.2)

297

Ancillary-service costs for 12 US electric utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ancillary services are those functions performed by electrical generating, transmission, system-control, and distribution-system equipment and people to support the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission defined ancillary services as ``those services necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system.`` FERC divided these services into three categories: ``actions taken to effect the transaction (such as scheduling and dispatching services) , services that are necessary to maintain the integrity of the transmission system [and] services needed to correct for the effects associated with undertaking a transaction.`` In March 1995, FERC published a proposed rule to ensure open and comparable access to transmission networks throughout the country. The rule defined six ancillary services and developed pro forma tariffs for these services: scheduling and dispatch, load following, system protection, energy imbalance, loss compensation, and reactive power/voltage control.

Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A new FERC policy for electric utility mergers  

SciTech Connect

Section 203 of the FPA provides the FERC with significant authority to shape the future structure of the electric utility industry. The FERC should exercise this authority prudently, with due regard to the reality that competition works better than regulation. For the FERC, this means carefully selecting the type of regulation it pursues. Second guessing whether a particular merger makes good business sense or will create a more efficient firm are matters particularly ill-suited to the regulatory process. These decisions can generally be left to utility executives and shareholders. Competition will be more than adequate to discipline any mergers that do not live up to expectations. The goal should be to ensure that competition will remain a disciplining force following a merger. This means carefully considering the potential competitive impacts of a merger. In doing so, however, the FERC must remain cognizant of the interplay between its merger review standards and its other policies. FERC decisions regarding transmission pricing and future market institutions (such as Poolcos) will have a significant impact on the size and nature of markets. This, in turn, will affect the degree to which particular mergers may, or may not, harm competition. The FERC`s merger policies must not only be rational and clearly articulated, but coordinated with its other policies to achieve the common goal of more efficient bulk power markets.

Moot, J.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2002, DOE/EIA- M068(2002) January 2002. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are

300

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2001, DOE/EIA- M068(2001) January 2001. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Table 8.9 Electricity End Use, 1949-2011 (Billion Kilowatthours)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Energy Outlook ... Company Monthly Statement." - 1984-1996-EIA, Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Utility Report." - 1997

302

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Electricity Market Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. The major assumptions are summarized below.

303

Ashland Electric Utility - Bright Way to Heat Water Loan | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ashland Electric Utility - Bright Way to Heat Water Loan Ashland Electric Utility - Bright Way to Heat Water Loan Ashland Electric Utility - Bright Way to Heat Water Loan < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate not specified Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount not specified Provider Ashland Electric Utilities Department The City of Ashland Conservation Division offers a solar water heating program to residential electric customers who currently use an electric water heater. Under "The Bright Way to Heat Water Program," qualified home owners may take advantage of the City's zero-interest loan program or a cash rebate. Customers choosing a loan repay it as part of their monthly utility bill. Interested customers are provided site evaluations, consumer

304

Do You Buy Clean Electricity From Your Utility? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Do You Buy Clean Electricity From Your Utility? Do You Buy Clean Electricity From Your Utility? Do You Buy Clean Electricity From Your Utility? November 19, 2009 - 7:00am Addthis This week, John discussed buying clean electricity from your utility. If you can't set up a small renewable energy system of your own, buying clean electricity is a great way to support the use of renewable energy. Do you buy clean electricity from your utility? Tell us about your experience. Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. Addthis Related Articles You Can't Manage Energy Use That You Don't Measure Six Places to Find Help with Your Energy Costs Do You Drive a Hybrid Electric Vehicle?

305

Liberty Utilities (Electric) Commercial New Construction Rebate Program (New Hampshire)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

'''Liberty Utilities has assumed National Grid's customers base in the state of New Hampshire. Customers should contact Liberty Utilities for questions regarding incentive availability.'''

306

Financial statistics of major US investor-owned electric utilities 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the investor-owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State Governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for making policy and decisions relating to investor-owned electric utility issues.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Financial statistics of major U.S. investor-owned electric utilities 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Financial Statistics of Major US Investor-Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the investor-owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to investor-owned electric utility issues.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Central Wind Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities: Revised Edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report and accompanying table addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America. The first part of the table focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that have central wind power forecasting in place; the second part focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that plan to adopt central wind power forecasting in 2010. This is an update of the December 2009 report, NREL/SR-550-46763.

Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The ICF, Inc. coal and electric utilities model : an analysis and evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

v.1. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is sponsoring a series of evaluations of important energy policy and electric utility industry models by the MIT Energy Model Analysis Program (EMAP). The subject of this ...

Wood, David O.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

System average rates of U.S. investor-owned electric utilities : a statistical benchmark study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using multiple regression methods, we have undertaken a statistical "benchmark" study comparing system average electricity rates charged by three California utilities with 96 other US utilities over the 1984-93 time period. ...

Berndt, Ernst R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

2000 - Final issue. Presents summary financial data for 1994 through 2000 and detailed financial data for 2000 on major publicly owned electric utilities.

Tom Leckey

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

DOE-NETL Electric Utility-Water R&D Program EPRI Water Advisory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Utility-Water R&D Program EPRI Water Advisory Council September 25, 2002 Milwaukee, WI Thomas J. Feeley, III, Product Manager Innovations for Existing Plants TJFEPRI...

313

Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric)- Residential Conserve and Save Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Austin Utilities offers incentives to its residential customers for the installation of energy-efficient equipment in homes. Rebates are available for both electric and natural gas equipment....

314

"Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Sales, Revenue, and Average Price CorrectionUpdate December 9, 2013 The re-release of the "Electric Sales, Revenue, and Average Price" data. Retail Sales was revised for...

315

Cloud computing and electricity: beyond the utility model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the strengths, weaknesses, and general applicability of the computing-as-utility business model.

Erik Brynjolfsson; Paul Hofmann; John Jordan

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC): 2009 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the meeting minutes and other documents of the National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC) for 2009.

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

317

National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC): 2007 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides meeting minutes and other documents of the National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC) for 2007.

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

318

National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council: 2006 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the meeting minutes and other documents of the National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC) for 2006.

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC): 2008 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the meeting minutes and other documents of the National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC) for 2008.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

320

2012 Annual Planning Summary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Table 11.6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002;" Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." ,"Total of",,,"RSE" "Economic","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1.3,0.9 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)"

322

Table E13.3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" 3. Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." ,"Total of",,,"RSE" "Economic","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1,1.1 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

323

Deregulation and environmental differentiation in the electric utility industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy. 1998-2000. FERC 1 Survey. Washington, DC: FederalCommission Form Number 1 (FERC Form 1; United StatesProtection Agency, 2002). The FERC Form 1, the Annual Report

Delmas, M; Russo, M V; Montes-Sancho, M J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Deregulation and Resource Reconfiguration In The Electric Utility Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy. 1998-2000. FERC 1 Survey. Washington, DC: Federal2002), from 1998 to 2000. The FERC Form 1, the Annual ReportRegulatory Commission (FERC). EGRID aggregates the data from

Delmas, Magali; Russo, Michael V.; Montes-Sancho, Maria J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

DEREGULATION AND RESOURCE RECONFIGURATION IN THE ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy. 1998-2000. FERC 1 Survey. Washington, DC: Federal2002), from 1998 to 2000. The FERC Form 1, the Annual ReportRegulatory Commission (FERC). EGRID aggregates the data from

Delmas, Magali A; Russo, Michael V.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Methodology and results of the impacts of modeling electric utilities ; a comparative evaluation of MEMM and REM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study compares two models of the U.S. electric utility industry including the EIA's electric utility submodel in the Midterm Energy Market Model (MEMM), and the Baughman-Joskow Regionalized Electricity Model (REM). ...

Baughman, Martin L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Electric Utility Industrial DSM and M&V Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BC Hydro is an electric utility with a service area covering over 95% of the province of British Columbia in Canada. Power Smart is BC Hydros demand-side-management (DSM) division. Power Smart develops, operates and manages various DSM programs for residential, commercial and industrial customers. The Power Smart Partners Program (PSP) is the premier demand-side management program for BC Hydros large commercial and industrial non-transmission class customers. It is a direct energy acquisition program that is based on a partnering approach with BC Hydros business customers. A customer that commits to being a Power Smart Partner gains access to financial support and assistance with the identification and implementation of electricity savings projects. A direct financial incentive is provided to lower customers funding requirements and to improve the payback and/or investment criteria for energy efficiency projects. Projects are evaluated against established criteria set forth by BC Hydro. Projects which prove to be the most cost-effective on a $/kWh basis receive funds. For transmission-voltage customers, BC Hydro has recently implemented a new tariff designed to encourage energy reduction. The new tariff is an inclining block tariff and is known as the Stepped Rate. The customers consumption is compared against their Customer Baseline Load (CBL). The first 90% of the customers consumption is billed at a Tier 1 rate. The remaining consumption is billed at a Tier 2 rate, approximately two times the Tier 1 rate. There are mechanisms in place to adjust the customers CBL to account for activities such as customer-funded demand-side-management projects and customer plant expansion projects. This paper will discuss BC Hydros M&V program in terms of the process, operations and M&V results to date for the PSP. In addition, the paper will discuss the new Stepped Rate tariff intricacies in terms of CBL setting, CBL adjustments and transmission customer Impact Study guideline requirements.

Lau, K. P. K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Form EIA-861S ANNUAL ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

fee to purchase electricity generated from renewable sources. In addition, Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs), also known as green certificates, green tags, or tradable...

329

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Electricity Market...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

economical to continue running them. Each year, the model determines whether the market price of electricity is sufficient to support the continued operating of existing plants....

330

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Electricity generation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Electricity generation by fuel, 1970-2025 (billion kilowatthours). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy...

331

Annual Steam-Electric Plant Operation and Design Data (EIA-767 data file)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity data files > Form EIA-767 Electricity data files > Form EIA-767 Form EIA-767 historical data files Data Released: November 02, 2006 Next Release: None(discontinued) Annual steam-electric plant operation and design data Historical data files contain annual data from organic-fueled or combustible renewable steam-electric plants with a generator nameplate rating of 10 or more megawatts. The data are derived from the Form EIA-767 "Steam-Electric Plant Operation and Design Report." The files contains data on plant operations and equipment design (including boilers, generators, cooling systems, flue gas desulfurizations, flue gas particulate collectors, and stacks). Beginning in the data year 2001, nuclear plant data were no longer collected by the survey.

332

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Systems: Functional Definition for Communication and Control Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. A functional definition of DR for defining communication and control requirements in electric utility distribution systems is provided. The report is a tool that readers can use in developing communication and control strategies for DR in specific distribution systems.

1998-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

333

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. Through interviews and a questionnaire, the authors gathered information on utility supply planning and how solar is represented. Utilities were asked to provide their resource planning process details, key assumptions (e.g. whether DG is represented as supply or negative load), modeling methodology (e.g. type of risk analytics and candidate portfolio development), capacity expansion and production simulation model software, and solar project representation (project size, capacity value and integration cost adder). This presentation aims to begin the exchange of information between utilities, regulators and other stakeholders by capturing utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

Cory, K.; Sterling, J.; Taylor, M.; McLaren, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2007, DOE/EIA- M068(2007). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described.

335

Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

26 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 26 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Dataset Summary Description EIA previously collected sales and revenue data in a category called "Other." This category was defined as including activities such as public street highway lighting, other sales to public authorities, sales to railroads and railways, and interdepartmental sales. EIA has revised its survey to separate the transportation sales and reassign the other activities to the commercial and industrial sectors as appropriate. This is an electric utility data file that includes utility level retail sales of electricity and associated revenue by end-use sector, State, and reporting month. The data source is the survey: Form EIA-826, "Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report

336

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Industry Change Industry Change David K. Owens Executive Vice President Edison Electric Institute 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis April 7, 2008 EIA Key to Policy Development and EIA Key to Policy Development and Advocacy Activities Advocacy Activities EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving Energy Industry Energy Industry n EIA clearly provides more with less budgetary support l 1979: $347 million l 2007: $91 million (both in Real $2007) n EIA staff resource distribution has tracked changing energy markets and information needs Resource Management Oil & Gas Coal, Nuclear, Electric, Alt Fuels Energy Markets & End Use Integrated Analysis / Forecasting Information Technology

337

Does EIA publish electric utility rate, tariff, and demand charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA ... tariff, and demand charge data? No, EIA does not collect or publish data on electricity rates, or tariffs, ...

338

Specific systems studies of battery energy storage for electric utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. As a part of this program, four utility-specific systems studies were conducted to identify potential battery energy storage applications within each utility network and estimate the related benefits. This report contains the results of these systems studies.

Akhil, A.A.; Lachenmeyer, L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jabbour, S.J. [Decision Focus, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States); Clark, H.K. [Power Technologies, Inc., Roseville, CA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Electric Utility Terrain Vehicle Demonstration at a Military Base in Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-road electric vehicles such as lift trucks, airport ground support equipment and underground mining vehicles have proven themselves in the marketplace. However, heavy-duty utility-terrain vehicles (UTVs) powered exclusively by electricity have been introduced only recently. To test the capabilities of electric UTVs, two demonstration vehicles were instrumented for data acquisition and placed in ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Table A30. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1.1,1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",1829," W "," W ",28

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Orange and Rockland Utilities (Electric)- Residential Efficiency Program (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Orange and Rockland Utilities provides rebates for residential customers for recycling older, inefficient refrigerators and freezers. All appliances must meet the program requirements listed on the...

342

Avista Utilities (Gas & Electric)- Commercial Food Equipment Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities offers incentives to customers who improve efficiency through food service equipment retrofits. A variety of cooking and refrigeration equipment are eligible for rebates through...

343

Orange and Rockland Utilities (Electric)- Residential Appliance Recycling Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Orange and Rockland Utilities provides rebates for residential customers for recycling older, inefficient refrigerators and freezers. All appliances must meet the program requirements listed on the...

344

Avista Utilities (Electric)- Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities' Commercial Lighting Program provides incentives for lighting upgrades. New construction projects and proved energy saving lighting measures not listed on rebate form are...

345

Avista Utilities (Electric)- Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities' Commercial Lighting Program provides incentives for lighting upgrades. New construction projects and proved energy saving lighting measures not listed on rebate form are evaluated...

346

New Ulm Public Utilities - Solar Electric Rebate Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Rebate Amount 1watt (nameplate capacity) New Ulm Public Utilities provides solar photovoltaic (PV) rebates for residential, commercial, and industrial customers....

347

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies, especially PV. In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their...

348

Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar's Technology & Solutions Division conceived, designed, built and tested an electric turbocompound system for an on-highway heavy-duty truck engine. The heart of the system is a unique turbochargerr with an electric motor/generator mounted on the shaft between turbine and compressor wheels. When the power produced by the turbocharger turbine exceeds the power of the compressor, the excess power is converted to electrical power by the generator on the turbo shaft; that power is then used to help turn the crankshaft via an electric motor mounted in the engine flywheel housing. The net result is an improvement in engine fuel economy. The electric turbocompound system provides added control flexibility because it is capable of varying the amount of power extracted from the exhaust gases, thus allowing for control of engine boost. The system configuration and design, turbocharger features, control system development, and test results are presented.

Hopman, Ulrich,; Kruiswyk, Richard W.

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

349

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest New Crop (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest a New Crop is a trifold brochure that strives to educate rural landowners and rural co-op utilities about the benefits of wind power development. It provides examples of rural utilities that have successful wind energy projects and supportive statements from industry members.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Integrated resource planning Electric and gas utilities in the USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acquisitions will be the important criteria. Resource planning at gas utilities IRP is just beginning to be applied to the natural gas industry. At gas utilities, called local distribution companies (LDCs and regulated differently. Natural gas is produced, transported, and distributed by three different sets

351

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning  

SciTech Connect

Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV 'ownership' are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies (especially PV); however, solar introduces myriad new variables into the utility resource planning decision. Most, but not all, utility planners have less experience analyzing solar than conventional generation as part of capacity planning, portfolio evaluation, and resource procurement decisions. To begin to build this knowledge, utility staff expressed interest in one effort: utility exchanges regarding data, methods, challenges, and solutions for incorporating solar in the planning process. Through interviews and a questionnaire, this report aims to begin this exchange of information and capture utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

Sterling, J.; McLaren, J.; Taylor, M.; Cory, K.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Utility to Purchase Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In a non-carbon-capture plant, the syngas is cleaned to remove impurities and sent to a gas turbine where it undergoes combustion to produce electricity. The hot flue gas from...

353

Utility to Purchase Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported Clean Coal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility to Purchase Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported Clean Utility to Purchase Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported Clean Coal Project Utility to Purchase Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported Clean Coal Project January 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative clean coal technology project in Texas will supply electricity to the largest municipally owned utility in the United States under a recently signed Power Purchase Agreement, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today. Under the agreement - the first U.S. purchase by a utility of low-carbon power from a commercial-scale, coal-based power plant with carbon capture - CPS Energy of San Antonio will purchase approximately 200 megawatts (MW) of power from the Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP), located just west of Midland-Odessa.

354

Integration of photovoltaic units into electric utility grids: experiment information requirements and selected issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of investigations, including those conducted by The Aerospace Corporation and other contractors, have led to the recognition of technical, economic, and institutional issues relating to the interface between solar electric technologies and electric utility systems. These issues derive from three attributes of solar electric power concepts, including (1) the variability and unpredictability of the solar resources, (2) the dispersed nature of those resources which suggests the feasible deployment of small dispersed power units, and (3) a high initial capital cost coupled with relatively low operating costs. It is imperative that these integration issues be pursued in parallel with the development of each technology if the nation's electric utility systems are to effectively utilize these technologies in the near to intermediate term. Analyses of three of these issues are presented: utility information requirements, generation mix and production cost impacts, and rate structures in the context of photovoltaic units integrated into the utility system. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Handbook for Utility Participation in Biogas-Fueled Electric Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas is a methane-rich gas produced from the controlled biological degradation of organic wastes. Biogas is produced as part of the treatment of four general classes of wet waste streams: Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge Animal Manure Industrial Wastes Municipal Solid Waste in Sealed Landfills. The high methane content of biogas makes it suitable for fueling electric power generation. As energy prices increase, generation of electric power form biogas becomes increasingly attractive and the number of ...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

356

U.S. Electric Utility Companies and Rates: Look-up by Zipcode (Feb 2011) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Companies and Rates: Look-up by Zipcode (Feb 2011) Utility Companies and Rates: Look-up by Zipcode (Feb 2011) Dataset Summary Description This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011. Source NREL and Ventyx Date Released February 24th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords electric rates rates US utilities Data text/csv icon IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 1.7 MiB)

357

Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PVrate uses 15-minute or hourly data on building load and system production, as well as energy and demand charge information from a utility tariff sheet (usually available either...

358

DSM strikes again. [Demand-side management of gas and electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses and explains demand-side management (DSM) of the gas and electric utility companies. It contrasts the advantages that electric utilities offering economic incentives (with any cost passed on to rate payers) to increase demand while such offerings are rarely available from the gas utilities. It then discusses the cause and cost of pollution from conventional electrical facilities compared to gas-operated equipment and facilities. The paper goes on to discuss fuel switching and other incentives to get individuals and facilities to switch to natural gas.

Katz, M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

An Examination of Temporal Trends in Electricity Reliability Based on Reports from U.S. Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

Since the 1960s, the U.S. electric power system has experienced a major blackout about once every 10 years. Each has been a vivid reminder of the importance society places on the continuous availability of electricity and has led to calls for changes to enhance reliability. At the root of these calls are judgments about what reliability is worth and how much should be paid to ensure it. In principle, comprehensive information on the actual reliability of the electric power system and on how proposed changes would affect reliability ought to help inform these judgments. Yet, comprehensive, national-scale information on the reliability of the U.S. electric power system is lacking. This report helps to address this information gap by assessing trends in U.S. electricity reliability based on information reported by electric utilities on power interruptions experienced by their customers. Our research augments prior investigations, which focused only on power interruptions originating in the bulk power system, by considering interruptions originating both from the bulk power system and from within local distribution systems. Our research also accounts for differences among utility reliability reporting practices by employing statistical techniques that remove the influence of these differences on the trends that we identify. The research analyzes up to 10 years of electricity reliability information collected from 155 U.S. electric utilities, which together account for roughly 50% of total U.S. electricity sales. The questions analyzed include: 1. Are there trends in reported electricity reliability over time? 2. How are trends in reported electricity reliability affected by the installation or upgrade of an automated outage management system? 3. How are trends in reported electricity reliability affected by the use of IEEE Standard 1366-2003?

Eto, Joseph H.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Larsen, Peter; Todd, Annika; Fisher, Emily

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

360

Electric sales and revenue 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1996. 16 figs., 20 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Natural Gas Oil and Natural Gas Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Increases in Natural Gas Use Are Moderated by High Prices In the AEO2006 reference case, total natural gas consumption increases from 22.4 trillion cubic feet in 2004 to 26.9 trillion cubic feet in 2030. Most of the increase is seen before 2017, when total U.S. natural gas consumption reaches just under 26.5 trillion cubic feet. After 2017, high natural gas prices limit consumption to about 27 trillion cubic feet through 2030. Consequently, the natural gas share of total energy consumption drops from 23 percent in 2004 to 21 percent in 2030. Figure 71. Natural gas consumption by sector, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

362

An economic and legal perspective on electric utility transition costs  

SciTech Connect

The issue of possibly unrecoverable cost incurred by a utility, or `stranded costs,` has emerged as a major obstacle to developing a competitive generation market. Stranded or transition costs are defined as costs incurred by a utility to serve its customers that were being recovered in rates but are no longer due to availability of lower-priced alternative suppliers. The idea of `stranded cost,` and more importantly arguments for its recovery, is a concept with little basis in economic theory, legal precedence, or precedence in other deregulated industries. The main argument recovery is that the ``regulatory compact`` requires it. This is based on the misconception that the regulator compact is simply: the utility incurs costs on behalf of its customers because of the ``obligation to serve`` so, therefore, customers are obligated to pay. This is a mischaracterization of what the compact was and how it developed. Another argument is that recovery is required for economic efficiency. This presumes, however, a very narrow definition of efficiency based on preventing ``uneconomic`` bypass of the utility and that utilities minimize costs. A broader definition of efficiency and the likelihood of cost inefficiencies in the industry suggest that the cost imposed on customers from inhibiting competition could exceed the gains from preventing uneconomic bypass. Both these issues are examined in this paper.

Rose, K.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Demand-side management programs change along with the electric utility industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

They heyday of demand-side management may be over as far as utilities are concerned. The future path of utility demand-side management programs is obscured in a haze of important questions, especially questions regarding potential legislation and retail wheeling. Until recently, utility after utility was announcing new DSM programs, seemingly almost daily. But, as pointed out in our November issue by Robert Smock, Electric Light & Power`s editorial director, {open_quotes}Survivors of ruthless competition will not be doing much to reduce electricity sales. They`ll be doing their best to sell more of their product.

Stein, H. [ed.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Impact of 1980 scheduled capacity additions on electric-utility oil consumption  

SciTech Connect

The electric-utility sector currently consumes approximately 8% of the total oil used in the Nation. This oil represented about 15% of total fuel consumed by electric utilities in 1979. Two important factors that affect the level of utility oil consumption in 1980 are the substantial increase in coal-fired generating capacity and the uncertainty surrounding nuclear-plant licensing. With particular emphasis on these considerations, this report analyzes the potential for changes in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980 relative to the 1979 level. Plant conversions, oil to coal, for example, that may occur in 1980 are not considered in this analysis. Only the potential reduction in oil consumption resulting from new generating-capacity additions is analyzed. Changes in electric-utility oil consumption depend on, among other factors, regional-electricity-demand growth and generating-plant mix. Five cases are presented using various electricity-demand-growth rate assumptions, fuel-displacement strategies, and nuclear-plant-licensing assumptions. In general, it is likely that there will be a reduction in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980. Using the two reference cases of the report, this reduction is projected to amount to a 2 to 5% decrease from the 1979 oil-consumption level; 7% reduction is the largest reduction projected.

Gielecki, M.; Clark, G.; Roberts, B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity? This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a ``base`` that is typical of US utilities; a ``surplus`` utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a ``deficit`` utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a base'' that is typical of US utilities; a surplus'' utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit'' utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Electric Utility Company Assigned to a Zip Code? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Utility Company Assigned to a Zip Code? Electric Utility Company Assigned to a Zip Code? Home I have found an error in the utility company assigned to a zip code. I am not sure if the "assigned" utility company covers part of the zip code in question or not. How do I report an error like this for correction? Thanks. Submitted by Conroyt on 23 May, 2013 - 09:01 1 answer Points: 0 Thanks for submitting this. The Utilities Gateway (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities) uses the developer.nrel.gov service for zip-code lookups (http://developer.nrel.gov/doc/api/utility_rates/v3). This in turn uses Google for geocoding, and finds the centroid of the geographic region in question. This means that the result is based on the center of a zip code region, which may have no data. This question is timed well as we are

368

Reliability of Electric Utility Distribution Systems: EPRI White Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses what is known about electric power distribution system reliability and investigates whether there are generally available methods for performing reliability analysis for distribution systems. The theory of the reliability of general systems is well understood. A fundamental issue is whether an appropriate implementation of the theory exists in a form readily usable by distribution system planners and designers.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

369

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): o ozkocak Published: Geothermics, 1985 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Modeling-Computer Simulations (Ozkocak, 1985) Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) Reflection Survey (Ozkocak, 1985) Unspecified Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Un_Seminar_On_The_Utilization_Of_Geothermal_Energy_For_Electric_Power_Production_And_Space_Heating,_Florence_1984,_Section_2-_Geothermal_Resources&oldid=386949"

370

Black Hills/Colorado Electric Utility Co. Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hills/Colorado Electric Utility Co. Smart Grid Project Hills/Colorado Electric Utility Co. Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Black Hills/Colorado Electric Utility Co. Country United States Headquarters Location Pueblo, Colorado Recovery Act Funding $6,142,854.00 Total Project Value $12,285,708.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Black Hills/Colorado Electric Utility Co. Smart Grid Project Coordinates 38.2544472°, -104.6091409° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

371

International Benchmarking and Yardstick Regulation: An Application to European Electricity Utilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Also, due to electricity market liberalisation and privatisation policies, power markets and ownership of the utilities are becoming increasingly international, and mergers and acquisitions tend to reduce the domestic information base. Regulators can...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

372

CO? abatement by multi-fueled electric utilities: an analysis based on Japanese data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-fueled electric utilities are commonly seen as offering relatively greater opportunities for reasonably priced carbon abatement through changes in the dispatch of generating units from capacity using high emission ...

Ellerman, A. Denny.; Tsukada, Natsuki.

373

City of Statesville Electric Utility Department- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The City of Statesville Electric Utility Department offers rebates to its residential customers for installing new, energy efficient water heaters and heat pumps. To qualify for the heat pump...

374

Climate change adaptation in the U.S. electric utility sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility sector has been a focus of policy efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but even if these efforts are successful, the sector will need to adapt to the impacts of climate change. These are likely ...

Higbee, Melissa (Melissa Aura)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A Review of Coal Mine Methane Recovery for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery of methane from coal mines might be a cost-effective offset method for some utilities looking for ways to reduce or offset their greenhouse gas emissions. This report provides an evaluation of potential recovery amounts and costs for U.S. mines along with a discussion of technical and legal issues.

1997-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

" Electric Utilities",602076,"Florida","Rhode Island"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highest","Lowest" Highest","Lowest" "United States" "Primary Energy Source","Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",1039062,"Texas","District of Columbia" " Electric Utilities",602076,"Florida","Rhode Island" " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",436986,"Texas","Alaska" "Net Generation (megawatthours)",4125059899,"Texas","District of Columbia" " Electric Utilities",2471632103,"Florida","New Jersey" " Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power",1653427796,"Texas","District of Columbia" "Emissions (thousand metric tons)"

377

EPRI EMF Exposure Database: University of North Carolina (UNC) Electrical Utility Worker Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of North Carolina (UNC) Electrical Utility Worker Data Set contains measurement data collected during an epidemiologic study of leukemia and brain cancer mortality among nearly 139,000 men employed at five U.S. electric utilities. The data set contains eight data products related to measurements of magnetic field personal exposure. This document describes the UNC data products and provides a common set of statistical parameters, facilitating this study's comparison with other data sets in ...

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

378

Adapting state and national electricity consumption forecasting methods to utility service areas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the experiences of six utilities (Florida Power and Light Co., Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia, Philadelphia Electric Co., Public Service Co. of Colorado, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, and TVA) in adapting to their service territories models that were developed for forecasting loads on a national or regional basis. The models examined were of both end-use and econometric design and included the three major customer classes: residential, commercial, and industrial.

Swift, M.A.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Railroad Consolidation and Market Power: Challenges to a Deregulating Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The railroad industry is shrinking into a handful of mega-carriers, a development of great importance to the electric utility industry, which depends on railroads for most shipments of coal. As the electric utilities face deregulation, the impact of railroad market power on the delivered price of coal is a critical competitive issue. This report examines the motivations for railroad consolidation and assesses the likely business strategies of the five major coal hauling railroads.

1997-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

380

Electric Utility Phase I Acid Rain Compliance Strategies for the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Acid Rain Program is divided into two time periods; Phase I, from 1995 through 1999, and Phase II, starting in 2000. Phase I mostly affects power plants that are the largest sources of SO2 and NOx . Phase II affects virtually all electric power producers, including utilities and nonutilities. This report is a study of the effects of compliance with Phase I regulations on the costs and operations of electric utilities, but does not address any Phase II impacts.

Information Center

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Guided Horizontal Drilling: A Primer for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is intended to be an introduction to guided horizontal drilling, also termed horizontal directional drilling (HDD), as an alternative construction method to open trenching for the installation of underground power cables, pipes, ducts, or conduits. It is written for an audience that includes electric power engineers, designers, operations and procurement personnel. The document introduces guided horizontal drilling technology, the equipment, and several critical aspects of operating the equ...

1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

382

Statistical recoupling: A new way to break the link between electric-utility sales and revenues  

SciTech Connect

In 1991, US electric utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on demand-side management (DSM) programs. These programs cut peak demands 5% and reduced electricity sales 1% that year. Utility projections suggest that these reductions will increase to 9% and 3%, respectively, by the year 2001. However, utility DSM efforts vary enormously across the country, concentrated in a few states along the east and west coasts and the upper midwest. To some extent, this concentration is a function of regulatory reforms that remove disincentives to utility shareholders for investments in DSM programs. A key component of these reforms is recovery of the net lost revenues caused by utility DSM programs. These lost revenues occur between rate cases when a utility encourages its customers to improve energy efficiency and cut demand. The reduction in sales means that the utility has less revenue to cover its fixed costs. This report describes a new method, statistical recoupling (SR), that addresses this net-lost-revenue problem. Like other decoupling approaches, SR breaks the link between electric-utility revenues and sales. Unlike other approaches, SR minimizes changes from traditional regulation. In particular, the risks of revenue swings associated with year-to-year changes in weather and the economy remain with the utility under SR. Statistical recoupling uses statistical models, based on historical data, that explain retail electricity sales as functions of the number of utility customers, winter and summer weather, the condition of the local economy, electricity price, and perhaps a few other key variables. These models, along with the actual values of the explanatory variables, are then used to estimate ``allowed`` electricity sales and revenues in future years.

Hirst, E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Are price caps the answer for electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

There is no widely acceptable alternative to traditional rate-base/rate-of-return regulation. The industry is keenly interested in the experiment currently unfolding in the telephone industry: the price cap approach being followed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in regulating AT and T, and by many states in regulating local telephone companies. This approach offers an interesting and possibly useful alternative to traditional utility regulation.

Silverman, L.P. (McKinsey and Co., Washington, DC (United States)); Wenner, D.L.; Peters, R.S. (McKinsey and Company, Atlanta, GA (United States))

1991-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

UTILITY RESTRUCTURING Electric Utility Restructuring: What Does It Mean for Residential and Small Retail Consumers in Maine?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

poses both advantages and disadvantages to residential and small retail consumers in Maine. While electric restructuring in Maine has been thoughtfully developed, the basic question of whether electricity rates will be lower for the average consumer will remain uncertain for some time. This uncertainty is linked not only to Maines electricity rate bidding process but also to potentially oligopolistic national trends. In addition, whether individual consumers achieve savings in their electricity costs will be determined, in part, by their choice of electricity supplier. While some consumers may prefer a higher-cost supplier because of the value-added services that accompany that option, others may make no choice and, by default, receive the standard optionwhere rates are determined by the Maine Public Utilities Commission (MPUC). ? In this article, the authors describe the factors that initiated the push toward restructuring, the history of the enabling legislation, and relevant portions of the MPUCs Consumer Education Program. To consumers, the authors emphasize the importance of aggregationclusters of buying groupsand detail how the nature of open competition may affect them. In particular, they call attention to the additional services that may be provided by electricity suppliers. Finally, in discussing the implications of deregulation, they lay out the uncertainties that lie ahead for consumers, policymakers, and regulators as Maine opens itself up to competition in the electric power market.

Lewis Tagliaferre; Susan Greenwood

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

2014 Electricity Form Proposals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity and Renewable (Photovoltaic) Survey Form Changes Proposed for Electricity and Renewable (Photovoltaic) Survey Form Changes Proposed for 2014 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is proposing changes to its electricity data collection in 2014. These changes involve the following surveys: Form EIA-63B, "Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report," Form EIA-411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," Form EIA-826, "Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions," Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," Form EIA-860M, "Monthly Update to the Annual Electric Generator Report," Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report," Form EIA-861S, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (Short Form)," and

386

Battery Utilization in Electric Vehicles: Theoretical Analysis and an Almost Optimal Online Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Battery Utilization in Electric Vehicles: Theoretical Analysis and an Almost Optimal Online Algorithm Ron Adany Tami Tamir Abstract We consider the problem of utilizing a pack of m batteries serving among the batteries in the pack. A battery's life depends on the discharge current used for supplying

Tamir, Tami

387

Early, Cost-Effective Applications of Photovoltaics in the Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV)-powered systems can compete economically with conventional utility approaches such as distribution line extensions and step-down transformer installation for powering small electric loads. This study identified more than 60 cost-effective applications of PV-powered systems for utilities and their customers.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Energy and environmental advantages of cogeneration with nuclear and coal electrical utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of electrical-utility cogeneration from nuclear energy and coal is examined for improving regional energy-resource utilization efficiency and environmental performance. A case study is presented for a large and diverse hypothetical region which ... Keywords: coal, cogeneration, combined heat and power, efficiency, emissions, nuclear energy

Marc A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Impact of Industrial Electric Rate Structure on Energy Conservation - A Utility Viewpiont  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the price of energy rises, changes in industrial electric rates will have an impact on energy usage and conservation. Utilities interested in reducing system peak demands may reflect this need in the rate structure as an incentive for the industrial customer to alter their present operation. Utilities recognize that industry offers the greatest potential for peak load reduction.

Williams, M. M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Fuel Inventory Management for Electric Companies: Current Uses of the EPRI Utility Fuel Inventory Model (UFIM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes current applications of the Utility Fuel Inventory Model (UFIM) developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). This model is designed to help electric companies to better manage policy and operational decisions related to managing power plant fuel inventories. This report specifically address: (i) problems currently faced by electric power companies where fuel inventories can be used to address the problems; and, (ii) how the UFIM analysis tool can be used to ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

391

Adapting Utility Solar Strategies for a Changing Electricity Landscape: Innovative Business Approaches for Consideration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers the need for outside-the-box electric utility strategies that manage future deployment of distributed solar. Business models are discussed that offer potential to technically and financially align with utility interests and inform future planning and program development. For example, benefits and challenges of utility approaches that foster collaboration with third-party solar operators (TPO) are examined. In addition, the merits and technical feasibility of ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

Superconducting energy storage development for electric utility systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Model SMES experiments performed at LASL show that magnetic energy storage in a superconducting magnet is a viable alternate to energy storage methods which are being built today. It is a fast responding device, i.e., milliseconds, and efficient method which does not require electric energy be converted to mechanical form for storage. Component tests on a model SMES system include 12 pulse converter, automatic and manual converter power control system, and high current superconductors have been performed to evaluate and develop systems which could be used on the 100 MJ SMES system that has been designed. Test circuits have been designed and used for economical and nondestructive testing of magnets for superconductor performance and evaluation. A closed-loop model SMES system has been developed and built to study the electrical characteristics of the system. Initial test results were obtained for a symmetrically and asymmetrically triggered twelve-pulse converter. The asymmetrically triggered bridge shows the lower reactive power requirement, but a more distorted line current. Future converter tests and studies will be required to clearly identify the better circuit. A converter optimization study will include an evaluation of costs for harmonic filtering and power factor correction. Tests with the automatic control system show that a SMES system has switching times between the charging and discharging mode of about a cycle and a half. This makes the system very attractive for power system stabilization.

Turner, R.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Modeling renewable portfolio standards for the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module  

SciTech Connect

The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM) Submodule. For the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98), the EMM has been modified to represent Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), which are included in many of the Federal and state proposals for deregulating the electric power industry. A RPS specifies that electricity suppliers must produce a minimum level of generation using renewable technologies. Producers with insufficient renewable generating capacity can either build new plants or purchase {open_quotes}credits{close_quotes} from other suppliers with excess renewable generation. The representation of a RPS involves revisions to the ECP, EFD, and the EFP. The ECP projects capacity additions required to meet the minimum renewable generation levels in future years. The EFD determines the sales and purchases of renewable credits for the current year. The EFP incorporates the cost of building capacity and trading credits into the price of electricity.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Table A21. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" 1. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" " by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,"RSE" " "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States",,, "RSE Column Factors:",1,1.1,1 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",188,122,66,35.6 " 20-49",2311,1901,410,39.5 " 50-99",2951,2721,230,9.6 " 100-249",6674,5699,974,7.1

395

Table A31. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers by Census Region," Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers by Census Region," " Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,"RSE" " "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,"Total United States",,, "RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1.1,1 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",222,164," Q ",23.3 " 20-49",1131,937,194,17.2

396

Table A18. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" 8. Quantity of Electricity Sold to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers" " by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Utility ","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total Sold","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.9,1,1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",988,940,48,16.2 2011," Meat Packing Plants",0,0,0,"NF"

397

To: Rebecca Peterson, ERS2014@eia.gov Re: Public Comments on Form EIA-861, ''Annual Electric Power Industry Report''  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To: Rebecca Peterson, ERS2014@eia.gov To: Rebecca Peterson, ERS2014@eia.gov Re: Public Comments on Form EIA-861, ''Annual Electric Power Industry Report'' From: Volunteer members of the Large Public Power Council Energy Efficiency Working Group (LPPC EEWG) Benchmarking Subcommittee, led by:  Subcommittee Chair Norman Muraya (Austin Energy) norman.muraya@austinenergy.com,  Member Tom Gross (Orlando Utilities Commission) tgross@ouc.com, and  Facilitated by Annika Brink (Alliance to Save Energy/Clean and Efficient Energy Program for Public Power) abrink@ase.org. Over the course of the past year, the LPPC EEWG's Benchmarking Subcommittee has leveraged data from Form EIA-861, Schedule 6 to benchmark the energy efficiency activities and performance of LPPC

398

Financial statistics of major U.S. publicly owned electric utilities 1995  

SciTech Connect

The 1995 Edition of the Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents 5 years (1991 through 1995) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator (Tables 3 through 11) and nongenerator (Tables 12 through 20) summaries are presented in this publication. Five years of summary financial data are provided (Tables 5 through 11 and 14 through 20). Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided in Appendix C. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data. 9 figs., 87 tabs.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Evaluating Utility Owned Electric ESS - Dhruv Bhatnagar, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluating Utility Owned Evaluating Utility Owned Electric Energy Storage Systems: A Perspective for State Electric Utility Regulators DOE Energy Storage Program Peer Review 2012 September 28, 2012 Dhruv Bhatnagar & Verne Loose Sandia National Laboratories Motivation for this Work  Many state utility regulatory bodies are unfamiliar with electric energy storage systems  The technology  The functional uses  The value of these uses to the grid  This leads to a handicap in their proper evaluation for rate base  May prevent the best (economic) technologies from system integration 2 Source: GE What we are doing  Developing a guidebook:  Inform regulators about the system benefits of energy storage  Identify regulatory challenges to increased

400

Estimating potential stranded commitments for U.S. investor-owned electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

New technologies, low natural gas prices, and federal and state utility regions are restructuring the electricity industry. Yesterday`s vertically integrated utility with a retail monopoly franchise may be a very different organization in a few years. Conferences, regulatory-commission hearings, and other industry fora are dominated by debates over the extent and form of utility deintegration, wholesale competition, and retail wheeling. A key obstacle to restructuring the electricity industry is stranded commitments. Past investments, power-purchase contracts, and public-policy-driven programs that made sense in an era of cost-of-service regulation may not be cost-effective in a competitive power market. Regulators, utilities, and other parties face tough decisions concerning the mitigation and allocation of these stranded commitments. The authors developed and applied a simple method to calculate the amount of stranded commitments facing US investor-owned electric utilities. The results obtained with this method depend strongly on a few key assumptions: (1) the fraction of utility sales that is at risk with respect to competition, (2) the market price of electric generation, and (3) the number of years during which the utility would lose money because of differences between its embedded cost of production and the market price.

Baxter, L.; Hirst, E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Operational, cost, and technical study of large windpower systems integrated with an existing electric utility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed wind energy assessment from the available wind records, and evaluation of the application of wind energy systems to an existing electric utility were performed in an area known as the Texas Panhandle, on the Great Plains. The study area includes parts of Texas, eastern New Mexico, the Oklahoma Panhandle and southern Kansas. The region is shown to have uniformly distributed winds of relatively high velocity, with average wind power density of 0.53 kW/m/sup 2/ at 30 m height at Amarillo, Texas, a representative location. The annual period of calm is extremely low. Three separate compressed air storage systems with good potential were analyzed in detail, and two potential pumped-hydro facilities were identified and given preliminary consideration. Aquifer storage of compressed air is a promising possibility in the region.

Ligon, C.; Kirby, G.; Jordan, D.; Lawrence, J.H.; Wiesner, W.; Kosovec, A.; Swanson, R.K.; Smith, R.T.; Johnson, C.C.; Hodson, H.O.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

2005 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies, EE-2G Technologies, EE-2G 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2005 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Vehicle Systems Team Susan A. Rogers, Technology Development Manager November 2005 ii Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations ................................................................................................................. iv Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................ 1 1. Technical Support............................................................................................................................. 3

403

Occupational Health & Safety Annual Report 2000: Injury & Illness in the Electric Energy Workforce, 1995-1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established an ongoing health and safety database that is designed to provide more precise and detailed information about workplace injury and illness occurrence. Electric energy company health and safety professionals can use this information for establishing and evaluating injury prevention programs. The database provides the capability for epidemiological monitoring, annual injury/illness reporting, program evaluation, and occupational health and injury research. This report presents the firs...

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

404

Can I generate and sell electricity to an electric utility? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How many alternative fuel and hybrid vehicles are there in the U.S.? How much U.S. energy consumption and electricity generation comes from renewable sources?

405

Vehicle Yaw Control Utilizing Hybrid Electric Drivetrains with Multiple Electric Motors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vehicles with multiple electric motors coupled to individual wheels have excitingopportunities for safety control systems. An investigation is conducted to determine whatdynamic benefits can be (more)

D'Iorio, James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Notices DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Inc.:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

670 Federal Register 670 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 212 / Wednesday, November 2, 2011 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Inc.: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Hold Public Scoping Meetings AGENCY: Rural Utilities Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Rural Utilities Service (RUS), an agency within the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), intends to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) for Basin Electric Power Cooperative's (Basin Electric) proposed Antelope Valley Station (AVS) to Neset Transmission Project (Project) in North Dakota. RUS is issuing this Notice of Intent (NOI) to inform the public and interested parties about the proposed Project, conduct a public

407

Electric utility capacity expansion and energy production models for energy policy analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes electric utility capacity expansion and energy production models developed for energy policy analysis. The models use the same principles (life cycle cost minimization, least operating cost dispatching, and incorporation of outages and reserve margin) as comprehensive utility capacity planning tools, but are faster and simpler. The models were not designed for detailed utility capacity planning, but they can be used to accurately project trends on a regional level. Because they use the same principles as comprehensive utility capacity expansion planning tools, the models are more realistic than utility modules used in present policy analysis tools. They can be used to help forecast the effects energy policy options will have on future utility power generation capacity expansion trends and to help formulate a sound national energy strategy. The models make renewable energy source competition realistic by giving proper value to intermittent renewable and energy storage technologies, and by competing renewables against each other as well as against conventional technologies.

Aronson, E.; Edenburn, M.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

DOE Report to Congress„Energy Efficient Electric and Natural Gas Utilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AND REGIONAL POLICIES THAT AND REGIONAL POLICIES THAT PROMOTE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS CARRIED OUT BY ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITIES A REPORT TO THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS PURSUANT TO SECTION 139 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 MARCH 2007 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Sec. 139. Energy Efficient Electric and Natural Gas Utilities Study. a) IN GENERAL.-Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary, in consultation with the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commis- sioners and the National Association of State Energy Offi- cials, shall conduct a study of State and regional policies that promote cost-effective programs to reduce energy con- sumption (including energy efficiency programs) that are carried out by- (1) utilities that are subject to State regulation; and

409

Table 11.5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; 5 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of NAICS Sales and Utility Nonutility Code(a) Subsector and Industry Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States 311 Food 347 168 179 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 142 6 136 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 4 10 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 109 88 21 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 66 66 0 3115 Dairy Products 22 0 22 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1 1 * 3121 Beverages 1 1 * 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills

410

PRE-STUDY COMMENTS OF IOWA UTILITIES BOARD ON DOE 2012 ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION CONGESTION STUDY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRE-STUDY COMMENTS OF IOWA UTILITIES BOARD ON PRE-STUDY COMMENTS OF IOWA UTILITIES BOARD ON DOE 2012 ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION CONGESTION STUDY JANUARY 2012 The Iowa Utilities Board (Board) is pleased to provide these comments as the Department of Energy (DOE) commences its next transmission congestion study (2012). These comments are organized to give DOE a perspective on electric transmission issues in Iowa - transmission planning, congestion, and siting. Iowa has been a leader in wind generation installation as well as manufacturing of wind turbines. Iowa has the second most installed wind capacity of any state. Since the DOE 2009 congestion study, Iowa added 884 MW of wind generation in 2009 -2010. MidAmerican Energy Company (MidAmerican), an Iowa investor owned utility added 593.5 MW in 2011 and plans to

411

Impact of state regulatory practices on electric utility: an empirical analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of state regulatory practices on investor-owned electric utilities in the context of interactions among 5 variables: allowed rate of return; cost of capital; cost of electric service; price of electricity; and realized rate of return. A recursive system of 5 equations was constructed and the ordinary least-squares estimation was adopted. Data sets comprise 77 utilities in the US for 1976 and 1980. Results are: (1) allowed rate of return is principally determined by firm specific variables rather than by commission-specific variables, and the behavior of the public utility commission is adaptive; (2) high common equity ratio and a high market to book value ratio lower the cost of external capital, as proxies for financial strength and regulatory risk; (3) long-run average cost of electric service is nearly horizontal and any inter-firm difference in the cost is predominantly explained by the difference in the price of fuel that a utility plant uses; inclusion of Construction Work in Progress adversely affects the realized rate of return, not the cost or price; (4) electricity price is mostly determined by the average cost, and inter-firm differences in the allowed rate of return have little effect on the price; and (5) regulation is effective mainly in the sense that the realized rate of return is severely affected by the allowed rate of return.

Lee, J.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Energy Storage in a Restructured Electric Utility Industry: Report on EPRI Think Tanks I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy storage will play an increasingly crucial role in the deregulated electric power industry, with future generation probably decreasing in size and becoming more distributed. EPRI sponsored two think tanks to explore the need for energy storage in a deregulated environment and to assess the state of development of energy storage technologies. The think tanks described the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) view of deregulation and how electric utility deregulation compares to the dereg...

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

Program on Technology Innovation: Biotechnological Approaches to Removing Boron from Electric Utility Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-based electric power generation faces compliance difficulties with respect to boron (B) contamination. Concentrations of B in coal-combustion byproduct electric utility effluents commonly range from 30 to 120 ppm; there is a critical need for cost-effective technologies to treat and remove B from these effluents to levels around 1.7ppm. Wetland treatment systems offer significant operational and maintenance cost savings over chemical treatment alternatives for wastewater discharges from ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

414

FORM EIA-860M MONTHLY UPDATE TO ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PURPOSE Form EIA-860M collects data on the status of: a) Proposed new generators scheduled to begin commercial operation within the subsequent 12 months; b) Existing generators scheduled to retire from service within the subsequent 12 months; and c) Existing generators that have proposed modifications that are scheduled for completion within one month. The data collected on this form appear in the EIA publication Electric Power Monthly. They are also used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry. REQUIRED RESPONDENTS Respondents to the Form EIA-860M who are required to complete this form are all Form EIA-860, ANNUAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR REPORT, respondents who have indicated in a previous filing to

415

FY2007 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power electronics And Power electronics And electric MAchinery ProgrAM v ehicle t echnologies Progr AM Less dependence on foreign oil today, and transition to a petroleum-free, emissions-free vehicle tomorrow. 2 0 0 7 a n n u a l p r o g r e s s r e p o r t U.S. Department of Energy Office of Vehicle Technologies, EE-2G 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program Submitted to: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Vehicle Technologies Vehicle Systems Team Susan A. Rogers, Technology Development Manager December 2007 Power Electronics and Electric Machines FY 2007 Progress Report Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations ................................................................................................................ v

416

Key Climate Variables Relevant to the Energy Sector and Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in climate affect the energy sector and electric utilities through changes in demand, altered production and transmission capabilities, and effects on the operation of utility infrastructure. Unfortunately, few studies have been conducted on the impacts of climate change on the energy sector. This report outlines some key climate variables that may affect the energy sector, including long-term trends such as increases in air temperature, water temperatures, and sea-level rise; changes in precipit...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Electric and hybrid vehicles program. 5th annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fifth annual report on the implementation of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-413, as amended by Public Law 95-238, referred to as the Act) complies with the reporting requirements established in Section 14 of the Act. In addition to informing the Congress of the progress and plans of the Department of Energy Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program, this report is intended to serve as a communication link between the Department and all of the public and private interests involved in making the program a success. The Annual Report represents the major summary of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program activities; since July 1981, DOE has ceased publication of the EHV Quarterly Reports with Congressional approval. The fourth quarter activities for FY 1981 are included in this report. During FY 1981, significant progress was made toward implementing the policies established by Congress in the Act. There has been a noticeable increase in interest shown by both the automobile manufacturing and the supply sectors of our economy in electric and hybrid vehicles. This year, the emphasis in the Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program shifted from vehicle demonstration and preparation for production readiness to research, development, test, and evaluation of advanced technologies to achieve the attributes necessary to make electric and hybrid vehicles a practical transportation alternative. Research and development efforts in batteries and propulsion components, as well as total vehicle systems, continue to reveal significant progress toward providing industry with technology options that will result in vehicles with greater public acceptance.

None

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity markets in the United States are undergoing unprecedented structural changes as a result of the confluence of regulatory, competitive, and technological forces. This paper will introduce the role of distributed generation technologies in evolving electric markets and will review both current and emerging distributed generation technologies aimed at retail industrial, commercial and residential markets. This paper will draw upon several Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRI) and member utility case studies involving the assessment of distributed generation in premium power service, standby power and industrial cogeneration applications. In addition, EPRI products and services which can help evaluate energy service options involving distributed generation will also be briefly reviewed.

Rastler, D. M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

All electric homes in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information on the average annual costs for representative amounts of electricity to consumers in homes utilizing electricity exclusively for all purposes. Average annual electric bills, average charges per kilowatt-hour and average kilowatt-hour consumption for these homes are shown on a nationwide basis and for each State and individual communities throughout the United States.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Strategic planning in electric utilities: Using wind technologies as risk management tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights research investigating the ownership of renewable energy technologies to mitigate risks faced by the electric utility industry. Renewable energy technology attributes of fuel costs, environmental costs, lead time, modularity, and investment reversibility are discussed. Incorporating some of these attributes into an economic evaluation is illustrated using a municipal utility`s decision to invest in either wind generation or natural gas based generation. The research concludes that wind and other modular renewable energy technologies, such as photovoltaics, have the potential to provide decision makers with physical risk-management investments.

Hoff, T E [Pacific Energy Group, Stanford, CA (United States); Parsons, B [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Electric utility application of wind energy conversion systems on the island of Oahu  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This wind energy application study was performed by The Aerospace Corporation for the Wind Systems Branch of the Department of Energy. The objective was to identify integration problems for a Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS) placed into an existing conventional utility system. The integration problems included environmental, institutional and technical aspects as well as economic matters, but the emphasis was on the economics of wind energy. The Hawaiian Electric Company utility system on the island of Oahu was selected for the study because of the very real potential for wind energy on that island, and because of the simplicity afforded in analyzing that isolated utility.

Lindley, C.A.; Melton, W.C.

1979-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

422

A Primer on Electric Utilities, Deregulation, and Restructuring of U.S. Electricity Markets  

SciTech Connect

This primer is offered as an introduction to utility restructuring to better prepare readers for ongoing changes in public utilities and associated energy markets. It is written for use by individuals with responsibility for the management of facilities that use energy, including energy managers, procurement staff, and managers with responsibility for facility operations and budgets. The primer was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory under sponsorship from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Federal Energy Management Program. The impetus for this primer originally came from the Government Services Administration who supported its initial development.

Warwick, William M.

2002-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

423

Vegetation Management by Electric Utilities: Use of Herbicides and Other Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the essential elements and principles comprising electric utility vegetation management programs, defines management problems, and discusses possible research on vegetation management issues. The report particularly focuses on the use of herbicides and their effects on wildlife and human health. Legal and regulatory aspects and cost control issues are also covered.

1995-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

Assessment of Advanced Batteries for Energy Storage Applications in Deregulated Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy storage technologies, including advanced batteries, are likely to find new roles in a restructured electric utility environment. This study evaluated the near-term potential of fourteen advanced battery technologies to outperform conventional lead-acid batteries in four key energy storage applications.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

425

Integrating Distributed Resources into Electric Utility Distribution Systems: EPRI White Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI white paper is about understanding electric power engineering issues related to integrating distributed resources (DR) into utility distribution systems. It is an overview designed for all stakeholders rather than a rigorous technical engineering guide. A major goal of the paper is to move discussion of integration issues toward solutions.

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

426

Evaluation of Pen-Based and Hands-Free Computers for the Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies the critical feature and design specifications of pen-based and hands-free computers for electric utility applications. The report concludes with results of a benchmark and field test designed to ensure vendor compliance with these product specifications.

1997-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

427

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Systems: Current Interconnection Practice and Unified Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for interconnecting them with electric utility distribution systems. An assessment of current practice is provided, and a unified approach is recommended to achieve greater consistency. This report is a tool that readers can use to simplify their efforts in resolving DR interconnection problems.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

428

CPI anticipates price benefits in an open electricity market - but utilities `will erect roadblocks`  

SciTech Connect

Chemical manufacturers and industrial gas firms welcome the coming deregulation of electricity because the change offers them competitive choice in power supplies. They anticipate price benefits like those that have flowed from natural gas deregulation, which feed from manufacturers to bypass local utilities and shop for their own fuel supplies.

Pospisil, R.

1994-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

429

Rate impacts and key design elements of gas and electric utility decoupling: a comprehensive review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Opponents of decoupling worry that customers will experience frequent and significant rate increases as a result of its adoption, but a review of 28 natural gas and 17 electric utilities suggests that decoupling adjustments are both refunds to customers as well as charges and tend to be small. (author)

Lesh, Pamela G.

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Human Health Risk Assessment of Chemicals Encountered in Vegetation Management on Electric Utility Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the human health risk assessment of chemicals encountered in vegetation management on electric utility rights-of-way (ROWs).

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

431

The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Integration of photovoltaic units into electric utility grids: experiment information requirements and selected issues  

SciTech Connect

A number of investigations have led to the recognition of technical, economic, and institutional issues relating to the interface between solar electric technologies and electric utility systems. These issues derive from three attributes of solar electric power concepts, including (1) the variability and unpredictability of the solar resources, (2) the dispersed nature of those resources which suggest the deployment of small dispersed power units, and (3) a high initial capital cost coupled with relatively low operating costs. An important part of the DOE programs to develop new source technologies, in particular photovoltaic systems, is the experimental testing of complete or nearby complete power units. These experiments provide an opportunity to examine operational and integration issues which must be understood before widespread commercial deployment of these technologies can be achieved. Experiments may also be required to explicitly examine integration, operational, and control aspects of single and multiple new source technology power units within a utility system. An identification of utility information requirements, a review of planned experiments, and a preliminary determination of additional experimental needs and opportunities are presented. Other issues discussed include: (1) the impacts of on-site photovoltaic units on load duration curves and optimal generation mixes are considered; (2) the impacts of on-site photovoltaic units on utility production costs, with and without dedicated storage and with and without sellback, are analyzed; and (3) current utility rate structure experiments, rationales, policies, practices, and plans are reviewed.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program. Sixteenth annual report to Congress for fiscal year 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the progress achieved in developing electric and hybrid vehicle technologies, beginning with highlights of recent accomplishments in FY 1992. Detailed descriptions are provided of program activities during FY 1992 in the areas of battery, fuel cell, and propulsion system development, and testing and evaluation of new technology in fleet site operations and in laboratories. This Annual Report also contains a status report on incentives and use of foreign components, as well as a list of publications resulting from the DOE program.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program. Seventeenth annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program, in cooperation with industry, is conducting research, development, testing, and evaluation activities to develop the technologies that would lead to production and introduction of low-and zero-emission electric and hybrid vehicles into the Nation`s transportation fleet. This annual report describes program activities in the areas of advanced battery, fuel cell, and propulsion systems development. Testing and evaluation of new technology in fleet site operations and laboratories are also provided. Also presented is status on incentives (CAFE, 1992 Energy Policy Act) and use of foreign components, and a listing of publications by DOE, national laboratories, and contractors.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY NEPA Annual Planning Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENERGY RELIABILITY NEPA Annual Planning Summary 2012 Environmental Impact Statements Energia Sierra Juarez (DOE/EIS-0414)- Energia Sierra Juarez (ESJ) (formerly Baja Wind) applied to OE for a Presidential permit to construct a 1250 MW electric transmission line across the U.S.-Mexico border. The proposed transmission line would originate inside Mexico at the proposed La Rumorosa Wind Generation Facility. The line would continue north approximately two miles to the U. S.-Mexico border, and one additional mile inside the U.S. to a new substation to be constructed on the existing Southwest Powerlink. The proposed transmission line would be used to transmit renewable energy into the California electricity market. The County of San Diego is a cooperating agency. DEIS NOA (75 FR 57018) issued in September 2010, public

436

The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems, Vol. II Utility Case Assessments  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: the local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics, renewable energy source penetration level, whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied, and local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kW-scale applications may be connected to three+phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and y-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms, or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. In any case, the installation of small, distributed renewable energy sources is expected to have a significant impact on local utility distribution primary and secondary system economics. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications. The following utility- and site-specific conditions that may affect the economic viability of distributed renewable energy sources were considered: distribution system characteristics, and design standards, and voltage levels; load density, reliability, and power quality; solar insolation and wind resource levels; utility generation characteristics and load profiles; and investor-owned and publicly owned utilities, size, and financial assumptions.

Zaininger, H.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Electricity Industry Leaders U.S. Utilities, Grid Operators, Others Come Together  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is Focus of New Effort by is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders U.S. Utilities, Grid Operators, Others Come Together in National Effort to Tackle Important New Electricity Area (Washington, DC, July 1, 2004) A new group formed to work on the important new electricity area known as demand response was announced today in Washington, DC. The United States Demand Response Coordinating Committee (DRCC) will bring together a number of parties to focus on developing information and tools needed to allow demand response to be another option employed to address national, regional and state electricity issues and challenges. The DRCC's efforts are the U.S. part of a larger, global demand response effort announced recently by the International Energy Agency's

438

Region-specific study of the electric utility industry. Phase I, final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the financial background of the electric utility industry in VACAR, reports on the present condition of the industry and then assesses the future of this industry. The Virginia-Carolinas subregion (VACAR) of the Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) was selected for this regional study because of its cooperativeness and its representative mix of powerplants, for example coal, hydro, nuclear, oil. It was found that the supply of future economic electricity is in jeopardy because of the regulatory process, the increasing risk associated with large scale generating stations and the weakening of the nuclear option. A number of options for the future were considered, including deregulation, government ownership and retaining the present system with modifications. The option selected to improve the present condition of the electricity industry was to make the present system work. The present system is sound, and with modifications, problems could be solved within the existing framework. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Wacaster, A.J. (ed.)

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

EEI's Ellis: A voice from the Northwest (What changes are in store for the next decade for electric utilities ). [Edison Electric Institute  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses the next decade from the perspective of electric utilities with John B. Ellis chairman of the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) for 1989-1990. Discussed are the top priorities for the next 12 months and the next decade, changing regulatory structures, independent power producers, power-supply versus power demand, energy storage, clean coal technology, acid rain, the greenhouse effect, dependency on natural gas, marketing of energy, and managing electric utilities.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Different approaches to estimating transition costs in the electric- utility industry  

SciTech Connect

The term ``transition costs`` describes the potential revenue shortfall (or welfare loss) a utility (or other actor) may experience through government-initiated deregulation of electricity generation. The potential for transition costs arises whenever a regulated industry is subject to competitive market forces as a result of explicit government action. Federal and state proposals to deregulate electricity generation sparked a national debate on transition costs in the electric-utility industry. Industry-wide transition cost estimates range from about $20 billion to $500 billion. Such disparate estimates raise important questions on estimation methods for decision makers. This report examines different approaches to estimating transition costs. The study has three objectives. First, we discuss the concept of transition cost. Second, we identify the major cost categories included in transition cost estimates and summarize the current debate on which specific costs are appropriately included in these estimates. Finally, we identify general and specific estimation approaches and assess their strengths and weaknesses. We relied primarily on the evidentiary records established at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission to identify major cost categories and specific estimation approaches. We also contacted regulatory commission staffs in ten states to ascertain estimation activities in each of these states. We refined a classification framework to describe and assess general estimation options. We subsequently developed and applied criteria to describe and assess specific estimation approaches proposed by federal regulators, state regulators, utilities, independent power companies, and consultants.

Baxter, L.W.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Electric utility resource planning using Continuous-Discrete Modular Simulation and Optimization (CoDiMoSO)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility resource planning traditionally focuses on conventional energy supplies such as coal, natural gas, and oil. Nowadays, planning of renewable energy generation as well as its side necessity of storage capacities have become equally important ... Keywords: Continuous-discrete simulation modeling, Distributed energy generation and storage, Electric utility capacity planning, Integrated decision making

Juan Pablo SEnz; Nurcin Celik; Shihab Asfour; Young-Jun Son

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

An approach to assess the performance of utility-interactive wind electric conversion systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a probabilistic approach based on the convolution technique to assess the performance of utility-interactive wind electric conversion systems supplying loads. Expressions are developed to obtain the duration curve for the power injected into the utility grid. The energy injected into the grid and drawn from it to supply the load during the study period can be calculated from this duration curve. The load model employed enables the study period to range from one year to one particular hour-of-day, thus allowing the inclusion of the time-value of energy as appropriate in economic assessments.

Abouzahr, I.; Ramakumar, R. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (US))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Electric utility application of wind energy conversion systems on the island of Oahu  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to assess the potential for the application of Wind Energy Conversion Systems (a field of interconnected WTGs denoted in this report by the acronym WECS) in a specific utility contest to gain advance information concerning their economic feasibility; their optional problems; the criteria and procedures for site selection; environmental impacts; legal, social, and other problems; and the balance of cost and benefits from the point of view of the consumer and the utility. This study addresses the circumstances of the Hawaiian Electric Company operations onthe Island of Oahu.

Lindley, C.A.; Melton, W.C.

1979-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

444

Electric Utilities' Role in Industrial Competitiveness: Going Beyond the Energy Audit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes EPRI's Partnership for Industrial Competitiveness. The Partnership, comprised of over 15 EPRI member utllities, was established to help electric utilities identify, develop; and implement competitiveness improvement opportunities for their industrial customers. To be meaningful, strategies for increasing industrial competitiveness must consider not only energy use, but also all other production inputs. To this end, the program focusses on three major areas: productivity, environmental protection, and efficiency. The effectiveness of the program will be gauged by its ability to keep utility customers "alive and well."

Jeffress, R. D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

WATER AND BY-PRODUCT ISSUES IN THE ELECTRIC-UTILITY INDUSTRY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Power Conference in conjunction with 2 and Power Conference in conjunction with 2 nd Joint U.S.-People's Republic of China Conference on Clean Energy, November 17-19, 2003, Washington, DC A DOE R&D RESPONSE TO EMERGING COAL BY-PRODUCT AND WATER ISSUES IN THE ELECTRIC-UTILITY INDUSTRY Thomas J. Feeley, III Technology Manager U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT While the regulation and control of air emissions will continue to be of primary concern to the electric-utility industry over the next several decades, other environmental-related issues may also impact the operation of existing and new coal-based power systems. Coal by-products are one such issue. Coal-fired power plants generate nearly 118 million tons of fly ash, flue gas

446

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on electric utility systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical memorandum estimates the effects of alternative contractual commitments that may be initiated by the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. It also studies hydropower operational restrictions at the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects in combination with these alternatives. Power marketing and hydropower operational effects are estimated in support of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Electricity production and capacity expansion for utility systems that will be directly affected by alternatives specified in the EIS are simulated. Cost estimates are presented by utility type and for various activities such as capacity expansion, generation, long-term firm purchases and sales, fixed operation and maintenance expenses, and spot market activities. Operational changes at hydropower facilities are also investigated.

Veselka, T.D.; Portante, E.C.; Koritarov, V. [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Electric utility engineer`s FGD manual -- Volume 1: FGD process design. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Part 1 of the Electric Utility Engineer`s Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Manual emphasizes the chemical and physical processes that form the basis for design and operation of lime- and limestone-based FGD systems applied to coal- or oil-fired steam electric generating stations. The objectives of Part 1 are: to provide a description of the chemical and physical design basis for lime- and limestone-based wet FGD systems; to identify and discuss the various process design parameters and process options that must be considered in developing a specification for a new FGD system; and to provide utility engineers with process knowledge useful for operating and optimizing a lime- or limestone-based wet FGD system.

NONE

1996-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

448

Regional Impacts of Electric Utility Restructuring on Fuel Markets: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Will open transmission under electric utility restructuring cause low-cost generation to displace high-cost generation? Will this lead to dramatic shifts in patterns of fuel use? This report, the second in a multivolume series by EPRI and GRI addressing deregulation, shows what to expect for each of 10 major regions in the nation. It also dispels many myths about the ongoing effects of restructuring.

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

449

GIS/GPS Workshop '99: Applications and Developments for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a 1999 EPRI workshop on recent geographic information system (GIS) and global positioning system (GPS) applications and developments relevant to electric utilities. The workshop content centered around the current state of the art in GIS and GPS technology suited to the planning, design, and management of power delivery assets. Contained in the report are the workshop agenda, lists of presenters and attendees, copies of the workshop presentations, and a summary of the group discussi...

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 35. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities by State, 1967-2000 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

451

Electric utilities broaden their vision, again, and move beyond energy services...to communications services  

SciTech Connect

Energy production and delivery will be tightly coupled with telecommunications and information services for the foreseeable future. In order to control access to the customer and prevent erosion of their customer bases, utilities will be driven to become more aggressive in deploying both supply-side information technologies for improved operation of their generation, transmission, and distribution facilities; and demand side Energy Information Service (EIS). Those information services will enable utilities to provide higher quality services at lower cost with lower environmental impact, and to give their ratepayers better control over their power usage. Utilities have important assets that will be valuable in deploying telecommunications networks that support EIS and other value-added information services. Electric power utilities have the potential to become significant players in the National Information Infrastructure, providing commercial EIS, non-energy value-added services, and telecommunications services. Utility entry into telecommunications markets would bring more competition to those markets and contribute toward universal service goals. Regulatory restrictions on utility entry into telecommunications markets are inconsistent with more recent government policies promoting competition. Joint ventures and other forms of partnering will be necessary to build utility networks, and partnering with telecommunications companies will be especially important to utilities. Pivotal business alliances and regulatory policies that will shape the business environment for both industries are likely to be decided int the next few years. Utilities face a brief window of necessity and opportunity: the necessity to assess the EIS and telecommunications capabilities they will need to support their core business in the future; and the opportunity to consider what new sources of revenue could be opened up by those capabilities.

Mann, M. [Electric Power Research Institutes, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Renewable Electricity Benefits Quantification Methodology: A Request for Technical Assistance from the California Public Utilities Commission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) requested assistance in identifying methodological alternatives for quantifying the benefits of renewable electricity. The context is the CPUC's analysis of a 33% renewable portfolio standard (RPS) in California--one element of California's Climate Change Scoping Plan. The information would be used to support development of an analytic plan to augment the cost analysis of this RPS (which recently was completed). NREL has responded to this request by developing a high-level survey of renewable electricity effects, quantification alternatives, and considerations for selection of analytic methods. This report addresses economic effects and health and environmental effects, and provides an overview of related analytic tools. Economic effects include jobs, earnings, gross state product, and electricity rate and fuel price hedging. Health and environmental effects include air quality and related public-health effects, solid and hazardous wastes, and effects on water resources.

Mosey, G.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Region-specific study of the electric utility industry. Phases I and II. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the problems either confronting or likely to confront the electric utility industry in the event of a return of high rates of inflation. It attempts to assess the future of this industry and makes recommendations to resolve fundamental problems. The Virginia-Carolinas subregion (VACAR) of the Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) was selected for this regional study because of the willingness of a wide range of parties to participate and its representative mix of powerplants, for example coal, hydro, nuclear and oil. It was found that the future supply of reliable, economic electricity is in jeopardy because of the regulatory process, the increasing risk associated with large scale generating stations and the weakening of the nuclear option. A number of options for the future were considered, including deregulation, government ownership and retaining the present system with modifications. The option selected to improve the condition of the electricity industry was to make the present system work. The present system is sound and, with modifications, problems could be solved within the existing framework. A series of recommendations, developed through a consensus building effort involving state government officials, state regulators and investor-owned utility representatives, are presented. A discussion of the need for innovative solutions and one state's approach to the problem concludes the report.

Not Available

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Table 11.6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; 6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of Economic Sales and Utility Nonutility Characteristic(a) Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 194 100 93 20-49 282 280 3 50-99 1,115 922 194 100-249 5,225 4,288 936 250-499 5,595 2,696 2,899 500 and Over 20,770 12,507 8,263 Total 33,181 20,793 12,388 Employment Size Under 50 395 177 218 50-99 3,412 3,408 5 100-249 6,687 3,088 3,599 250-499 5,389 4,175 1,214 500-999 7,082 3,635 3,447

455

Financial impacts of nonutility power purchases on investor-owned electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

To assist in its these responsibilities in the area of electric power, EIA has prepared this report, Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities. The primary purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities. The existing concern in this area is manifest in the provisions of Section 712 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which required State regulatory commissions to evaluate various aspects of long-term power purchase contracts, including their impact on investor-owned utilities` cost of capital and rates charged to customers. The EIA does not take positions on policy questions. The EIA`s responsibility is to provide timely, high quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of the deliberations by both public and private decision-makers. Accordingly, this report does not purport to represent the policy positions of the US Department of Energy or the Administration.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Survey and analysis of selected jointly owned large-scale electric utility storage projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to examine and document the issues surrounding the curtailment in commercialization of large-scale electric storage projects. It was sensed that if these issues could be uncovered, then efforts might be directed toward clearing away these barriers and allowing these technologies to penetrate the market to their maximum potential. Joint-ownership of these projects was seen as a possible solution to overcoming the major barriers, particularly economic barriers, of commercializaton. Therefore, discussions with partners involved in four pumped storage projects took place to identify the difficulties and advantages of joint-ownership agreements. The four plants surveyed included Yards Creek (Public Service Electric and Gas and Jersey Central Power and Light); Seneca (Pennsylvania Electric and Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company); Ludington (Consumers Power and Detroit Edison, and Bath County (Virginia Electric Power Company and Allegheny Power System, Inc.). Also investigated were several pumped storage projects which were never completed. These included Blue Ridge (American Electric Power); Cornwall (Consolidated Edison); Davis (Allegheny Power System, Inc.) and Kttatiny Mountain (General Public Utilities). Institutional, regulatory, technical, environmental, economic, and special issues at each project were investgated, and the conclusions relative to each issue are presented. The major barriers preventing the growth of energy storage are the high cost of these systems in times of extremely high cost of capital, diminishing load growth and regulatory influences which will not allow the building of large-scale storage systems due to environmental objections or other reasons. However, the future for energy storage looks viable despite difficult economic times for the utility industry. Joint-ownership can ease some of the economic hardships for utilites which demonstrate a need for energy storage.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Impact of residential photovoltaics on electric utilities: some evidence from field test and simulation  

SciTech Connect

The adoption of residential photovoltaics will affect the load profile of electric utilities, the adequacy and reliability of their capacity, and their consumption of fuels. Impacts are examined by a comparison of the actual load profile facing a Texas utility with solar outputs from both TRNSYS simulations and a test array in Fort Worth. Array output is scaled up parametrically to represent different levels of solar penetration. The reductions in peak load and loss-of-load probability indicate that the adoption of 5 kW arrays by 50% of the residences reduces capacity requirements by only 4%. The value of utility savings will exceed the cost of the PV systems before 1990. The field test results are more favorable than the simulation.

Katzman, M.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Research, development and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first annual report describing progress in the 33-month cooperative program between Argonne National Laboratory and Gould Inc.'s Nickel-Zinc/Electric Vehicle Project. The purpose of the program is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the nickel-zinc battery for electric vehicle propulsion. The successful completion of the program will qualify the nickel-zinc battery for use in the Department of Energy's demonstration program under the auspices of Public Law 94-413.

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

"Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

FILES FILES Electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency Form EIA-861 detailed data files Release Date for 2012: October 29, 2013 Next Release date: October 29, 2014 Re-Release 2012 data: December 9, 2013 (CORRECTION) Data files include information such as peak load, generation, electric purchases, sales, revenues, customer counts and demand-side management programs, green pricing and net metering programs, and distributed generation capacity. The EIA-861S (Short Form) was created in 2012. Approximately 1,100 utilities completed this form in lieu of the EIA-861. The short form has fewer questions and collects retail sales data as an aggregate and not by customer sector. EIA has estimated the customer sector breakdown for this data and has included under the file called "Retail Sales." Advanced metering data and time-of-use data are collected on both Form EIA-861 and Form EIA-861S.

460

ANNUAL REPORT FY2012 S A N D I A N A T I O N A L L A B O R A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Utilization EPRI n Sandia researcher Josh Stein studies how clouds impact large-scale solar PV power plants. Electric Power Research Institute 13 Partnerships Annual Report *...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "annual electric utility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

2007 Annual Peer Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2007 Annual Peer Review 2007 Annual Peer Review September 27, 2007 San Francisco, California Welcoming Remarks Imre Gyuk US Dept. of Energy DOE / ESS Program Overview (View .pdf) John Boyes Sandia National Laboratories PRESENTATIONS\ ECONOMICS - BENEFIT STUDIES Evaluating Value Propositions for Four Modular Electricity Storage Demonstrations in California (View .pdf) Jim Eyer (Distributed Utility Assoc.) Update on Benefit and Cost Comparison of Modular Energy Storage Technologies for Four Viable Value Propositions (View .pdf) Susan Schoenung (Longitude 122 West, Inc.) ECONOMICS - ENVIRONMENT BENEFITS STUDIES Emissions from Traditional & Flywheel Plants for Regulation Services (View .pdf) Rick Fioravanti (KEMA, Inc.) UTILITY & COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS OF ADVANCED ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS

462

IEA Agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 1996 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The annual report includes an overview of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement, including a brief summary of hydrogen in general. The Chairman's report provides highlights for the year. Sections are included on hydrogen energy activities in the IEA Hydrogen Agreement member countries, including Canada, European Commission, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the US. Lastly, Annex reports are given for the following tasks: Task 10, Photoproduction of Hydrogen, Task 11, Integrated Systems, and Task 12, Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage.

Elam, Carolyn C. (National Renewable Energy Lab, Golden, CO (US)) (ed.)

1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Superconducting magnetic energy storage applications and benefits for electric utility power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large SMES units are being studied for electric utility applications as diurnal, load-curve leveling and as transient stabilizer units. Such SMES units show promise of providing greater operating flexibility than pumped-hydro or other types of energy storage. This operating flexibility, together with its fast response capability to provide transient and dynamic stabilization benefits to a power system, are discussed. Small SMES units are being designed for dynamic stability applications on electric power systems for use when negatively damped system operating conditions are encountered. The 30-MJ, 10-MW SMES dynamic-stabilizer design is presented; and the status of the component development and fabrication contracts which have been placed with commercial manufacturers is discussed.

Turner, R.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Performance evaluation of high-temperature superconducting current leads for electric utility SMES systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Technology Program, Argonne National Laboratory and Babcock & Wilcox are developing high-temperature super-conductor (HTS) current leads for application to electric utility superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. A 16,000-A HTS lead has been designed and is being constructed. An evaluation program for component performance was conducted to confirm performance predictions and/or to qualify the design features for construction. Performance of the current lead assemblies will be evaluated in a test program that includes assembly procedures, tooling, and quality assurance; thermal and electrical performance; and flow and mechanical characteristics. Results of the evaluations to date are presented.

Niemann, R.C.; Cha, Y.S.; Hull, J.R. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Determining the value of conservation to Thailand's electric utility  

SciTech Connect

Incorporating demand-side resources into the planning regime of fast-growing electric utilities in developing countries is a particular challenge. In this paper, a method is developed for valuing the contribution of conservation under these circumstances and illustrated through scenarios of electricity savings in Thailand's large commercials sector. The primary value of these scenarios is in the creation of opportunities to defer or cancel plants planned for future inclusion in the system. The benefits of such deferments are twofold: a direct reduction in capacity needs commensurate with the load impacts of the scenario, plus a reduction in the reserve margin required to maintain system reliability. Comparison of the capital requirements of the conservation scenarios versus the deferrable plant capacity showed that conservation is substantially less capital intensive.

Busch, J.F. Jr. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Estimated Value of Service Reliability for Electric Utility Customers in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Information on the value of reliable electricity service can be used to assess the economic efficiency of investments in generation, transmission and distribution systems, to strategically target investments to customer segments that receive the most benefit from system improvements, and to numerically quantify the risk associated with different operating, planning and investment strategies. This paper summarizes research designed to provide estimates of the value of service reliability for electricity customers in the US. These estimates were obtained by analyzing the results from 28 customer value of service reliability studies conducted by 10 major US electric utilities over the 16 year period from 1989 to 2005. Because these studies used nearly identical interruption cost estimation or willingness-to-pay/accept methods it was possible to integrate their results into a single meta-database describing the value of electric service reliability observed in all of them. Once the datasets from the various studies were combined, a two-part regression model was used to estimate customer damage functions that can be generally applied to calculate customer interruption costs per event by season, time of day, day of week, and geographical regions within the US for industrial, commercial, and residential customers. Estimated interruption costs for different types of customers and of different duration are provided. Finally, additional research and development designed to expand the usefulness of this powerful database and analysis are suggested.

Sullivan, M.J.; Mercurio, Matthew; Schellenberg, Josh

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Impacts of time-of-day on average electricity prices and utility load factors  

SciTech Connect

A degree of rationalism is brought to the rate debate between marginalist time of day advocates and embedded cost traditionalists by an empirical analysis. Studies show that neither side can claim victory. The results show that blanket statements cannot be made concerning the impacts of TOD in demand and load factor, and that rates reduce only slightly. This paper summarizes the impacts of marginal cost TOD rates on peak demand, generation, load factor, and the average price of electricity. The methodology includes calculation of marginal cost, prediction of effect of TOD on load shapes by means of a Load Curve Forecasting model, and a production costing model. A matrix shows that impacts of TOD rates on individual utilities will depend on the specific utility customer mix, load shape, and generation mix.

Chamberlin, J.H.; Dickson, C.T.; Spann, R.M.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station Unit Number 1. Annual report, January--December, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report satisfies the requirements of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-91MC27363, novated as of March 5, 1992, to provide an annual update report on the year`s activities associated with Tampa Electric Company`s 250 MW IGCC demonstration project for the year 1993. Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Approximately 50% of the raw, hot syngas is cooled to 900 F and passed through a moving bed of zinc-based sorbent which removes sulfur containing compounds from the syngas. The remaining portion of the raw, hot syngas is cooled to 400 F for conventional acid gas removal. Sulfur-bearing compounds from both cleanup systems are sent to a conventional sulfuric acid plant to produce a marketable, high-purity sulfuric acid by-product. The cleaned medium-BTU syngas from these processes is routed to the combined cycle power generation system where it is mixed with air and burned in the combustion section of the combustion turbine. Heat is extracted from the expanded exhaust gases in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) to produce steam at three pressure levels for use throughout the integrated process. A highly modular, microprocessor-based distributed control system (DCS) is being developed to provide continuous and sequential control for most of the equipment on PPS-1.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Incentive regulation in the electric utility industry. Volume II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

On October 15, 1982, Resource Consulting Group, Inc. (RCG), submitted a draft report to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) titled, Incentive Regulation in the Electric Utility Industry. The FERC distributed the draft report to more than 60 individuals and organizations who were requested to review and comment on the various proposals and recommendations outlined in the report. In response to the FERC's request, 18 organizations submitted formal review comments. This report contains reviewers comments on each of the three programs recommended. The three major incentive programs are: (1) Rate Control Incentive program (RCIP); (2) Construction Cost Control Incentive Program (CCIP); and (3) Automatic Rate Adjustment Mechanism (ARAM).

Goins, D.; Fisher, M.; Smiley, R.; Hass, J.; Ehrenberg, R.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

IMPACTS ASSESSMENT OF PLUG-IN HYBRID VEHICLES ON ELECTRIC UTILITIES AND REGIONAL U.S. POWER GRIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and daily generation flexibility in the installed hydro capacity, the total annual energy produced, 2003] 6 #12;· Renewable (non-conventional hydro) energy generation. This includes wind, solar, conventional hydro power, and renewable energy capacities because these are already fully utilized. Nuclear

471

The death spiral: An assessment of its likelihood in electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

First, we present the death spiral hypothesis (high rate increases leading to bankruptcy), providing a historical background on its inception and discussing the observations provided in other industries of its occurrence through the years. Then we provide a discussion of the conditions necessary for the spiral effect. In doing this we provide insight into the assumptions implied by those who forecast such doom. Based on this discussion, we then provide the reader with a discussion of the implications such a concept has for regulatory policy. In addition, we conclude that given the structure of the regulatory process, the chances of a spiral effect for the electric utility industry have probably been overstated. It is shown that the occurrence of a death spiral is based on unrealistic conditions about the response of a utility's customers to higher rates, the incentives of and constraints facing regulators regarding pricing and permitting a utility to experience permanent financial distress, and the intense actions of a utility's management to avoid financial disaster.

Hemphill, R.C.; Costello, K.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Performance improvement of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak electric auxiliary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and construction of a heat pump system suitable for incorporating in a space solar heating system utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility are described. The performance of the system is evaluated. The refrigerating capacity, heating capacity and compressor horsepower for a heat pump system using a piston type compressor are first determined. The heat pump design is also matched with the existing University of Toledo solar house heating system. The refrigerant is Freon-12 working between a condensing temperature of up to 172/sup 0/F and evaporator temperature between 0/sup 0/F and 75/sup 0/F. The heat pump is then installed. Performance indices for the heat pump and the heating system in general are defined and generated by the on-line computer monitoring system for the 1979/80 heating season operation. Monthly and seasonal indices such as heat pump coefficient of performance, collector efficiency, percent of heating load supplied by solar energy and individual components efficiencies in general are recorded. The data collected is then analyzed and compared with previously collected data. The improvement in the performance resulting from the addition of a piston type compressor with an external motor belt drive is then evaluated. Data collected points to the potentially improved operating performance of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility. Data shows that the seasonal percent of space heating load supplied by solar is 60% and the seasonal percent cost of space heating load supplied by solar is 82% with a solar collection coefficient of performance of 4.6. Data also indicates that such a system would pay for itself in 14 years when used in Northwest Ohio.

Eltimsahy, A.H.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Evaluation of Utility System Impacts and Benefits of Optimally Dispatched Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

Hybrid electric vehicles with the capability of being recharged from the grid may provide a significant decrease in oil consumption. These ''plug-in'' hybrids (PHEVs) will affect utility operations, adding additional electricity demand. Because many individual vehicles may be charged in the extended overnight period, and because the cost of wireless communication has decreased, there is a unique opportunity for utilities to directly control the charging of these vehicles at the precise times when normal electricity demand is at a minimum. This report evaluates the effects of optimal PHEV charging, under the assumption that utilities will indirectly or directly control when charging takes place, providing consumers with the absolute lowest cost of driving energy. By using low-cost off-peak electricity, PHEVs owners could purchase the drive energy equivalent to a gallon of gasoline for under 75 cents, assuming current national average residential electricity prices.

Denholm, P.; Short, W.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474