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Sample records for annual electric industry

  1. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    FILES Electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency Form EIA-861 detailed data ... and demand-side management programs, green pricing and net metering programs, and ...

  2. Electric power annual 1994. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-21

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels.

  3. Uranium industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-05

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  4. Uranium industry annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  5. Electric power annual 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

  6. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  7. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Sales, Revenue, and Average Price Correction/Update Annual data revisions: January 13, 2016 The re-release of the form EIA-861 survey data: January 13, 2016 Revenue data values were revised due to enhancements to the SEDAPs imputation system. Contact: Electricity data experts

  8. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  9. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    FILES ‹ FORM EIA-861 DETAILED DATA Revisions \ Corrections for electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency Form EIA-861 detailed data files Annual 2013 data revisions: August 2, 2016 The re-release of the form EIA-861 survey data: August 2, 2016 Column headers corrected for the Potential and Actual Peak Demand Savings. Annual data revisions: January 13, 2016 The re-release of the form EIA-861 survey data: January 13, 2016 Revenue data values were revised due to enhancements to the

  10. Uranium industry annual 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-22

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  11. Uranium industry annual, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-29

    This report provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, federal and state agencies, the uranium and utility industries, and the public. It utilizes data from the mandatory ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey,'' Form EIA-858; historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and by the Grand Junction (Colorado) Project Office of the Idaho Operations Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE); and other data from federal agencies that preceded the DOE. The data provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's annual activities and include some information about industry plans and commitments over the next several years. Where these data are presented in aggregate form, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific data while still conveying an accurate and complete statistical representation of the industry data.

  12. Annual Power Electric

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Electric Power Annual Update Revision Data for 2014 updated: February 16, 2016 February ... Table 8.11.A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Outages by Type and NERC region Table 8.11.B. ...

  13. Electric Power Annual 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Annual 2014 February 2016 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Electric Power Annual This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. U.S.

  14. Coal industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  15. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  16. Electric Power Annual 2014

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Electric industry sales to ultimate customers statistics by state State Sales to ultimate customers (million kWh) Revenue (thousand dollars) Customers Alabama 90,494 8,386,390 ...

  17. Electric power annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-08

    This report presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and state levels: generating capability and additions, net generation, fossil-fuel statistics, retail sales and revenue, finanical statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, demand side management, nonutility power producers. Purpose is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets.

  18. Coal industry annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-06

    Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

  19. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

  20. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Power Annual 1997, Volume 2 contains annual summary statistics at national, regional, and state levels for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; power transactions; and demand-side management. Also included are data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity; gross generation; emissions; and supply and disposition of energy. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. 15 figs., 62 tabs.

  1. Electric power annual 1995. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding U.S. electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S. Department of Energy. In the private sector, the majority of the users of the Electric Power Annual are researchers and analysts and, ultimately, individuals with policy- and decisionmaking responsibilities in electric utility companies. Financial and investment institutions, economic development organizations interested in new power plant construction, special interest groups, lobbyists, electric power associations, and the news media will find data in the Electric Power Annual useful. In the public sector, users include analysts, researchers, statisticians, and other professionals with regulatory, policy, and program responsibilities for Federal, State, and local governments. The Congress and other legislative bodies may also be interested in general trends related to electricity at State and national levels. Much of the data in these reports can be used in analytic studies to evaluate new legislation. Public service commissions and other special government groups share an interest in State-level statistics. These groups can also compare the statistics for their States with those of other jurisdictions.

  2. Electric power annual 1996. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1--with a focus on US electric utilities--contains final 1996 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1996 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA. Data published in the Electric Power Annual Volume 1 are compiled from three statistical forms filed monthly and two forms filed annually by electric utilities. These forms are described in detail in the Technical Notes. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  3. Annual outlook for US electric power, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-04-24

    This document includes summary information on the ownership structure of the US electric utility industry, a description of electric utility regulation, and identification of selected factors likely to affect US electricity markets from 1985 through 1995. This Outlook expands upon projections first presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1985, offering additional discussion of projected US electricity markets and regional detail. It should be recognized that work on the Annual Energy Outlook 1985 had been completed prior to the sharp reductions in world oil prices experienced early in 1986.

  4. Uranium industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

  5. Electricity - Annual Disturbance Events Archive

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electric Power Annual 2014 February 2016 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Electric Power Annual This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. U.S.

  6. Coal Industry Annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

  7. Coal industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  8. Electric Power Annual

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Year: 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 prior to 2001 Go Average revenue per kilowatthour (centskWh) State Residential Commerical Industrial ...

  9. Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) for Electric Systems Program's specific mission is to work in partnership with industry to develop HTS wire and perform other research and development activities leading to the commercialization of HTS-based

  10. Electric Power Annual 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 1999 through 2010" ,"(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Interconnection","NERC Regional Assesment Area","Net Internal Demand (MW)[1] -- Summer" ,,,"Actual",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Projected"

  11. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region" "1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected" "megawatts and percent" "Interconnection","NERC Regional Assesment Area","Net Internal Demand (MW)[1] -- Summer" ,,"Actual",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Projected"

  12. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 1. Net Energy for load, actual and projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 1990-2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected thousands of megawatthours Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2014E 2015E 2016E FRCC 142,502 146,903 147,464 153,468 159,861 169,021 173,377 175,557 188,384 188,598 196,561 200,134 211,116 219,021 220,335

  13. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2001-2011 Actual, 2012-2016 Projected megawatts and percent Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 2001/ 2002 2002/ 2003 2003/ 2004 2004/ 2005 2005/ 2006 2006/ 2007 2007/ 2008 2008/ 2009 2009/ 2010 2010/ 2011 2011/ 2012 2012/ 2013E 2013/ 2014E 2014/ 2015E 2015/ 2016E 2016/ 2017E FRCC 39,699 42,001 36,229 41,449 42,493 45,993 46,093 45,042 51,703 45,954 39,924

  14. Annual Public Electric Utility data - EIA-412 data file

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    412 Archive Data (The EIA-412 survey has been terminated.) The EIA-412 "Annual Electric Industry Financial Report" collected information such as income statements, balance sheets, sales and purchases, and transmission line data. Form EIA-412 data Schedules Year 2 Electric Balance Sheet 3 Electric Income Statement 4 Electric Plant 5 Taxes, Tax Equivalents, Contributions, and Services During Year 6 Sales of Electricity for Resale (Account 447) 7 Electric Operation and Maintenance

  15. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Noncoincident peak load, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 1990-2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected megawatts Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2014E 2015E 2016E FRCC 27,266 28,818 30,601 32,823 32,904 34,524 35,444 35,375 38,730 37,493 37,194 39,062 40,696 40,475 42,383 46,396 45,751 46,676 44,836 46,550 45,722 44,968 45,613

  16. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region 1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected megawatts and percent Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2014E 2015E 2016E FRCC 27,162 27,773 28,898 29,435 30,537 31,649 31,868 32,874 34,562 34,832 35,666 38,932 37,951 40,387 42,243 45,950

  17. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - electricity section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on electricity generation, capacity, end-use, fuel use and stocks, and retail price.

  18. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - electricity section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2016-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on electricity generation, capacity, end-use, fuel use and stocks, and retail price.

  19. United States Electricity Industry Primer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United States Electricity Industry Primer provides a high-level overview of the U.S. electricity supply chain, including generation, transmission, and distribution; markets and ownership structures, including utilities and regulatory agencies; and system reliability and vulnerabilities.

  20. Electric power annual 1998. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this report, Electric Power Annual 1998 Volume 1 (EPAVI), is to provide a comprehensive overview of the electric power industry during the most recent year for which data have been collected, with an emphasis on the major changes that occurred. In response to the changes of 1998, this report has been expanded in scope. It begins with a general review of the year and incorporates new data on nonutility capacity and generation, transmission information, futures prices from the Commodity futures Trading commission, and wholesale spot market prices from the pennsylvania-new Jersey-Maryland Independent System Operator and the California Power Exchange. Electric utility statistics at the Census division and State levels on generation, fuel consumption, stocks, delivered cost of fossil fuels, sales to ultimate customers, average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold, and revenues from those retail sales can be found in Appendix A. The EPAVI is intended for a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric power industry, and the general public.

  1. Electric Power Annuals prior to 2001

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Annual PDFs XLS(zip) HTML 2014 XLS 2014 entire report 2013 XLS 2012 XLS 2011 XLS 2011 entire report 2010 XLS 2009 XLS 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 Electric Power Annual Volume 1 and 2 Archives These reports were discontinued; summary data starting in 2001 is now available in the consolidated Electric Power Annual; detailed data is also available in data files on the Internet. Electric Power Annual Volume 1 and 2 2000 Volume 1 2000 Volume 2 1999 Volume 1 1999 Volume 2

  2. Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report The Office of Electricity ...

  3. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Electric Power Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual

  4. Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation Place: Kuitun City, Xinjiang Autonomous Region,...

  5. Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial...

  6. Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.

  7. Electric power annual 1994. Volume 2, Operational and financial data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-28

    This year, the annual is published in two volumes. Volume I focused on US electric utilities and contained final 1994 data on net generation, fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost. This Volume II presents annual 1994 summary statistics for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are preliminary data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on form EIA-861) and for electric utility financial statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, and demand- side management. Final 1994 data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity and gross generation, as well as supply and disposition information, are also provided in Volume II. Technical notes and a glossary are included.

  8. Florida's electric industry and solar electric technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camejo, N.

    1983-12-01

    The Florida Electric Industry is in a process of diversifying its generation technology and its fuel mix. This is being done in an effort to reduce oil consumption, which in 1981 accounted for 46.5% of the electric generation by fuel type. This does not compare well with the rest of the nation where oil use is lower. New coal and nuclear units are coming on line, and probably more will be built in the near future. However, eventhough conservation efforts may delay their construction, new power plants will have to be built to accomodate the growing demand for electricity. Other alternatives being considered are renewable energy resources. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a research project in which 10 electric utilities in Florida and the Florida Electric Power Coordinating Group rated six Solar Electric options. The Solar Electric options considered are: 1) Wind, 2) P.V., 3) Solar thermal-electric, 4) OTEC, 5) Ocean current, and 6) Biomass. The questionaire involved rating the economic and technical feasibility, as well as, the potential environmental impact of these options in Florida. It also involved rating the difficulty in overcoming institutional barriers and assessing the status of each option. A copy of the questionaire is included after the references. The combined capacity of the participating utilities represent over 90% of the total generating capacity in Florida. A list of the participating utilities is also included. This research was done in partial fulfillment for the Mater's of Science Degree in Coastal Zone Management. This paper is complementary to another paper (in these condensed conference proceedings) titled COASTAL ZONE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: A multidisciplinary approach for the integration of Solar Electric Systems with Florida's power generation system, which present a summary of the Master's thesis.

  9. Electric power annual 1995. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

  10. Industry Leaders, Research Experts Gather for Fourth Annual DOE...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fourth Annual DOE Solid-State Lighting Workshop Industry Leaders, Research Experts Gather for Fourth Annual DOE Solid-State Lighting Workshop More than 250 attendees gathered in ...

  11. Electric industry restructuring in Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadsworth, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    A law restructuring the electric utility industry in Massachusetts became effective on November 25, 1997. The law will break up the existing utility monopolies into separate generation, distribution and transmission entities, and it will allow non-utility generators access to the retail end user market. The law contains many compromises aimed at protecting consumers, ensuring savings, protecting employees and protecting the environment. While it appears that the legislation recognizes the sanctity of independent power producer contracts with utilities, it attempts to provide both carrots and sticks to the utilities and the IPP generators to encourage renegotiations and buy-down of the contracts. Waste-to-energy contracts are technically exempted from some of the obligations to remediate. Waste-to-energy facilities are classified as renewable energy sources which may have positive effects on the value to waste-to-energy derived power. On November 25, 1997, the law restructuring the electric utility industry in Massachusetts became effective. The law will have two primary effects: (1) break up the existing utility monopolies into separate generation, distribution and transmission entities, and (2) allow non-utility generators access to the retail end-user market.

  12. Electric power annual 1989. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-17

    This publication presents a summary of electric utility statistics at the national, regional and state levels. The Industry At A Glance'' section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance; a review of key statistics for the year; and projections for various aspects of the electric power industry through 2010. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; electricity sales, revenue and average revenue per kilowatthour sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; and electric power transactions. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. 24 figs., 57 tabs.

  13. Annual Outlook for US Electric Power, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-12

    This report provides a history and projections of US electric utility markets. It includes summary information on the production of electricity, its distribution to end-use sectors, and on electricity, its distribution to end-use sectors, and on electricity costs and prices. Further, this publication describes the ownership structure of the industry and the operations of utility systems and outlines basic electricity generating technologies. The historical information covers the period from 1882 through 1984, while projections extend from 1985 through 1995. 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Some perspectives on the electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winer, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    Opinions regarding future directions of the U.S. electric utility industry are presented in the paper. Pertinent historical aspects and current industry rules are summarized. Major issues and trends in the electricity market are outlined, and recommendations are presented. It is concluded that new rules in the industry will be set directly by customers, and that customers want renewable energy resources.

  15. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Electricity Delivery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability The ongoing and projected Environmental ...

  16. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Electricity Delivery and Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and ...

  17. A Brief History of the Electricity Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    data and evaluating electricity restructuring James Bushnell University of California Energy Inst. www.ucei.berkeley.edu Outline * Shameless flattery - Why EIA data are so important * Why are people so unhappy? - With electricity restructuring * What EIA data have helped us learn - Production efficiencies - Market efficiency - Market competition - Environmental compliance Why EIA is so important * Important industries undergoing historic changes - Restructuring/deregulation - Environmental

  18. Expected annual electricity bill savings for various PPA price...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Expected annual electricity bill savings for various PPA price options Jump to: navigation, search Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics Bill savings tables (main section): When...

  19. Shenzhen Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shenzhen Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd Place: Xixiang Town,Shenzhen, Guangdong...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress Report | Department of Energy Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report The Electric Drive Technologies research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research is focused on developing power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system

  1. Technology opportunities in a restructured electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehl, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the Strategic Research & Development (SR&D) program of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The intent of the program is to anticipate and shape the scientific and technological future of the electricity enterprise. SR&D serves those industry R&D needs that are more exploratory, precompetitive, and longer-term. To this end, SR&D seeks to anticipate technological change and, where possible, shape that change to the advantage of the electric utility enterprise and its customers. SR&D`s response to this challenge is research and development program that addresses the most probable future of the industry, but at the same time is robust against alternative futures. The EPRI SR&D program is organized into several vectors, each with a mission that relates directly to one or more EPRI industry goals, which are summarized in the paper. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Carbon Constraints and the Electric Power Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-11-15

    The report is designed to provide a thorough understanding of the type of carbon constraints that are likely to be imposed, when they are likely to take effect, and how they will impact the electric power industry. The main objective of the report is to provide industry participants with the knowledge they need to plan for and react to a future in which carbon emissions are restricted. The main goal of the report is to ensure an understanding of the likely restrictions that will be placed on carbon emissions, the methods available for reducing their carbon emissions, and the impact that carbon reductions will have on the electric power industry. A secondary goal of the report is to provide information on key carbon programs and market participants to enable companies to begin participating in the international carbon marketplace. Topics covered in the report include: overview of what climate change and the Kyoto Protocol are; analysis of the impacts of climate change on the U.S. and domestic efforts to mandate carbon reductions; description of carbon reduction mechanisms and the types of carbon credits that can be created; evaluation of the benefits of carbon trading and the rules for participation under Kyoto; Description of the methods for reducing carbon emissions available to the U.S. electric power industry; analysis of the impact of carbon restrictions on the U.S. electric power industry in terms of both prices and revenues; evaluation of the impact of carbon restrictions on renewable energy; overview of the current state of the global carbon market including descriptions of the three major marketplaces; descriptions of the industry and government programs already underway to reduce carbon emissions in the U.S. electric power industry; and, profiles of the major international carbon exchanges and brokers.

  3. 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Machines Technologies | Department of Energy Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies research activities 2011_amr_03.pdf (5.61 MB) More Documents & Publications 2012 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Power Electronics and

  4. 2012 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Machines Technologies | Department of Energy Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies 2012 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies research activities 2012_amr_03.pdf (5.68 MB) More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Power Electronics and

  5. 2013 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Machines Technologies | Department of Energy Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies 2013 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies research activities 2013_amr_03.pdf (5.87 MB) More Documents & Publications 2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Unique Lanthide-Free Motor

  6. 2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Machines Technologies | Department of Energy Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies 2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies research activities 2014_amr_03.pdf (3.56 MB) More Documents & Publications 2013 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Development of Radically Enhanced

  7. Industry sector analysis, Mexico: Annual petroleum report. Export Trade Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The comprehensive appraisal of the Mexican Petroleum industry was completed in July 1991. Some of the topics concerning the Mexican petroleum industry covered in the Annual Petroleum Report include: exploration efforts, oil reserves, pipelines, refining, finances, transportation, alternative energy sources, and others. The report also contains lists of petrochemicals produced in Mexico and extensive statistics on oil production and export prices.

  8. Modifications to incorporate competitive electricity prices in the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe modifications to the Electricity Market Module (EMM) for the Annual Energy Outlook 1998. It describes revisions necessary to derive competitive electricity prices and the corresponding reserve margins.

  9. Electric Motor Thermal Management R&D: Annual Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... NREL Technical Report NRELTP- 5400-63887, June 2015. 5 K. Bennion. "Electric Motor Thermal Management R&D." 2015 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) Annual Merit Review, June ...

  10. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment The objectives of the Market Assessment were ...

  11. Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Utilities, Grid Operators, Others Come Together in National Effort to Tackle Important New Electricity Area Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry ...

  12. Electric and Gas Industries Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Industries Association Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electric and Gas Industries Association Place: Sacramento, CA Zip: 95821 Website: www.egia.org Coordinates:...

  13. NIPSCO Custom Commercial and Industrial Gas and Electric Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIPSCO’s Commercial and Industrial Custom Electric and Natural Gas Incentive Program offers financial incentives to qualifying large commercial, industrial, non-profit, governmental and...

  14. Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Stationary energy storage technologies will address the growing ...

  15. Challenges of Electric Power Industry Restructuring for Fuel Suppliers

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    Provides an assessment of the changes in other energy industries that could occur as the result of restructuring in the electric power industry.

  16. 2015 Energy Systems Integration Facility Annual Report Calls to Industry:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bring Us Your Challenges | Grid Modernization | NREL 2015 Energy Systems Integration Facility Annual Report Calls to Industry: Bring Us Your Challenges April 6, 2016 The 2015 Energy Systems Integration Facility Annual Report is now available for download. The Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is the nation's premier facility for research, development, and demonstration of the components and strategies needed to optimize our entire energy system. It was established in 2013 by the

  17. Electric Power Annual 2013 - Energy Information Administration

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    electricity imports from and electricity exports to Canada and Mexico XLS Table 2.14. Green pricing customers by end use sector XLS Net Generation Table 3.1.A. Net generation...

  18. Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Section 1101 of the U.S. Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT)1 calls for a report on the current trends in the workforce of (A) skilled technical personnel that support energy technology industries, and (B) electric power and transmission engineers. It also requests that the Secretary make recommendations (as appropriate) to meet the future labor requirements. Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry

  19. The industrial role in the changing electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, B.

    1994-12-31

    Armco is a large customer on the West Penn Power, Ohio Power, and Ohio Edison systems. Two of the three utilities are considered low cost providers, one as a high cost provider. Even though all three utilities provide the same product in the same region of the country, the established regulatory system for setting rates has resulted in a price disparity between these suppliers that is economically unjustified. Deregulation and retail wheeling would correct this efficiency problem to the benefit of the ratepayers. Armco, along with many other energy intensive industrials, has a long history of involvement in traditional utility matters. Typically, this role has had two phases: First, at the local level, a partnership with the utility on the efficient transmission and distribution of energy into our facilities and involvement with the utility on the customer side of the meter with projects that affect power consumption and quality in the plant. The second phase is in the regulatory world. Typically, Armco is one of many adversaries jockeying for adoption of a particular revenue requirement and method of cost allocation in PUC hearings. At the state level, Armco has successfully appealed several PUC decisions that could adversely affect business. Armco management continues to support industrial positions at the federal level through trade associations such as ELCON. Armco`s role in the changing electric power industry is discussed.

  20. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Annual progress report FY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This Annual Report for FY 1995 contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Areas covered here are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

  1. Challenges of electric power industry restructuring for fuel suppliers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an assessment of the changes in other energy industries that could occur as the result of restructuring in the electric power industry. This report is prepared for a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric power industry, and the general public. 28 figs., 25 tabs.

  2. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of site personnel or our field engineers to provide ... interval is the range around the sample estimate that ... In 1994, industrial electric motor systems used in ...

  3. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United ... Gases",2256,2313,1995,1932,2700 "Nuclear",100334,100266,100755,101004,10116...

  4. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, ...

  5. Midstate Electric Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midstate Electric Cooperative (MEC) encourages energy efficiency in the commercial and industrial sectors by giving customers a choice of several different financial incentive programs. First, ...

  6. Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial)- Sustainable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers a variety of energy efficiency incentives to their commercial and industrial customers through the Sustainable Energy Program (SEP). Some incentives are...

  7. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" ...onal",289246,247510,254831,273445,260203 "Solar",508,612,864,891,1212 ...

  8. ConEd (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate and Custom Efficiency Programs offer incentives to directly metered electric customers in good standing who contribute to the system benefits charge ...

  9. Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial)- 2015 Sustainable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers a variety of energy efficiency incentives for commercial and industrial customers through the Sustainable Energy Program (SEP). Some incentives are provided on...

  10. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Thousand Megawatthours)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 ...

  11. Green Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers Green Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers July 22, 2015 - 3:01pm Addthis Photo courtesy of San Diego Gas & Electric Photo courtesy of San Diego Gas & Electric Kristen Honey Science and Technology Policy Fellow, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy David Wollman Deputy Director of the Smart Grid and Cyber-Physical Systems Program at the National

  12. Service design in the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oren, S.S.; Smith, S.A.; Wilson, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    This essay reviews the basic concepts of product differentiation as they apply to service design in the electric power industry. Unbundling the quality attributes of service conditions benefits utilities as well as their customers. Each customer gains from new opportunities to match the quality and cost of service conditions to the characteristics of their end uses. A well designed product line of service conditions benefits every customer. The utility benefits from improved operating efficiency and from greater flexibility in meeting service obligations and competitive pressures. In addition, the utility obtains better information for planning investments in generation, transmission, and distribution. Together these features provide a foundation for a utility's business strategy. The basic principles of product design are described and a unified methodology for specifying and pricing service conditions is outlined. We also describe how the pricing of quality attributes enables the utility to price other service options systematically, such as long-term supply contracts, cogeneration, and standby service. 60 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  13. Annual Electric Utility Data - EIA-906/920/923 Data File

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    923 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-906920) The survey Form EIA-923 collects detailed electric power data -- monthly and annually -- on electricity generation, fuel...

  14. American Indian tribes and electric industry restructuring: Issues and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, D.; Busch, J.; Starrs, T.

    1997-07-01

    The US electric utility industry is undergoing a period of fundamental change that has significant implications for Native American tribes. Although many details remain to be determined, the future electric power industry will be very different from that of the present. It is anticipated that the new competitive electric industry will be more efficient, which some believe will benefit all participants by lowering electricity costs. Recent developments in the industry, however, indicate that the restructuring process will likely benefit some parties at the expense of others. Given the historical experience and current situation of Native American tribes in the US, there is good reason to pay attention to electric industry changes to ensure that the situation of tribes is improved and not worsened as a result of electric restructuring. This paper provides a review of electricity restructuring in the US and identifies ways in which tribes may be affected and how tribes may seek to protect and serve their interests. Chapter 2 describes the current status of energy production and service on reservations. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the evolution of the electric industry to its present form and introduces the regulatory and structural changes presently taking place. Chapter 4 provides a more detailed discussion of changes in the US electric industry with a specific focus on the implications of these changes for tribes. Chapter 5 presents a summary of the conclusions reached in this paper.

  15. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment | Department of Energy Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment The objectives of the Market Assessment were to: Develop a detailed profile of the stock of motor-driven equipment in U.S. industrial facilities; Characterize and estimate the magnitude of opportunities to improve the energy efficiency of industrial motor systems; Develop a profile of motor system purchase and maintenance

  16. Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Federal Government Multifamily Residential Savings Category Clothes Washers RefrigeratorsFreezers Equipment...

  17. Modeling renewable portfolio standards for the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM) Submodule. For the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98), the EMM has been modified to represent Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), which are included in many of the Federal and state proposals for deregulating the electric power industry. A RPS specifies that electricity suppliers must produce a minimum level of generation using renewable technologies. Producers with insufficient renewable generating capacity can either build new plants or purchase {open_quotes}credits{close_quotes} from other suppliers with excess renewable generation. The representation of a RPS involves revisions to the ECP, EFD, and the EFP. The ECP projects capacity additions required to meet the minimum renewable generation levels in future years. The EFD determines the sales and purchases of renewable credits for the current year. The EFP incorporates the cost of building capacity and trading credits into the price of electricity.

  18. Public-policy responsibilities in a restructured electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B.; Hirst, E.; Bauer, D.

    1995-06-01

    In this report, we identify and define the key public-policy values, objectives, and actions that the US electricity industry currently meets. We also discuss the opportunities for meeting these objectives in a restructured industry that relies primarily on market forces rather than on government mandates. And we discuss those functions that governments might undertake, presumably because they will not be fully met by a restructured industry on its own. These discussions are based on a variety of inputs. The most important inputs came from participants in an April 1995 workshop on Public-Policy Responsibilities and Electric Industry Restructuring: Shaping the Research Agenda. Other sources of information and insights include the reviews of a draft of this report by workshop participants and others and the rapidly growing literature on electric-industry restructuring and its implications. One of the major concerns about the future of the electricity industry is the fate of numerous social and environmental programs supported by today`s electric utilities. Many people worry that a market-driven industry may not meet the public-policy objectives that electric utilities have met in the past. Examples of potentially at-risk programs include demand-side management (DSM), renewable energy, low-income weatherization, and fuel diversity. Workshop participants represented electric utilities, public utility commissions (PUCs), state energy offices, public-interest groups, other energy providers, and the research community.

  19. (Electric) Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All Connecticut Utilities implement electric and gas efficiency rebate programs funded by Connecticut's public benefits charge through the Energy Efficiency Fund. The Connecticut Light and Power...

  20. Dakota Electric Association - Commercial and Industrial Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industrial Agricultural Savings Category Geothermal Heat Pumps Lighting Chillers Heat Pumps Air conditioners Compressed air Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls Motors Motor VFDs...

  1. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: An Update, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive overview of the structure of the U.S. electric power industry over the past 10 years, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects.

  2. Lodi Electric Utility- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lodi Electric Utility provides an on-bill financing program for the commercial and industrial customers. To participate, the customer must receive a rebate through the utility's rebate program, and...

  3. Empire District Electric- Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Empire District Electric Company offers a Commercial/Industrial Prescriptive Rebate Program to its non-residential customers in Arkansas who purchase certain high-efficiency equipment for...

  4. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: Selected Issues, 1998

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    Provides an analytical assessment of the changes taking place in the electric power industry, including market structure, consumer choice, and ratesetting and transition costs. Also presents federal and state initiatives in promoting competition.

  5. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 32,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,855 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3,272 10.1 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8 MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 152,151 100.0 Total

  6. The status of electric industry restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morey, M.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation discusses current electric utility regulatory reform with a focus on the impacts of competition in the Midwest marketplace. Information and data are presented through 14 figures and 30 tables. Regulatory issues at the state and Federal levels are very briefly outlined, including reciprocity, unbundling, stranded cost recovery, and independent system operation. Graphical data on energy capacity by source, capacity additions, wholesale markets, electricity prices, and market development are also presented.

  7. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 10,050 100.0 Total

  8. Annual Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    412 Archive Data (The EIA-412 survey has been terminated.) The EIA-412 "Annual Electric Industry Financial Report" collected information such as income statements, balance sheets, sales and purchases, and transmission line data. Form EIA-412 data Schedules Year 2 Electric Balance Sheet 3 Electric Income Statement 4 Electric Plant 5 Taxes, Tax Equivalents, Contributions, and Services During Year 6 Sales of Electricity for Resale (Account 447) 7 Electric Operation and Maintenance

  9. The changing structure of the electric power industry: An update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The U. S. electric power industry today is on the road to restructuring a road heretofore uncharted. While parallels can be drawn from similar journeys taken by the airline industry, the telecommunications industry, and, most recently, the natural gas industry, the electric power industry has its own unique set of critical issues that must be resolved along the way. The transition will be from a structure based on a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to one equipped to function successfully in a competitive market. The long-standing traditional structure of the electric power industry is the result of a complex web of events that have been unfolding for over 100 years. Some of these events had far-reaching and widely publicized effects. Other major events took the form of legislation. Still other events had effects that are less obvious in comparison (e.g., the appearance of technologies such as transformers and steam and gas turbines, the invention of home appliances, the man-made fission of uranium), and it is likely that their significance in the history of the industry has been obscured by the passage of time. Nevertheless, they, too, hold a place in the underpinnings of today`s electric industry structure. The purpose of this report, which is intended for both lay and technical readers, is twofold. First, it is a basic reference document that provides a comprehensive delineation of the electric power industry and its traditional structure, which has been based upon its monopoly status. Second, it describes the industry`s transition to a competitive environment by providing a descriptive analysis of the factors that have contributed to the interest in a competitive market, proposed legislative and regulatory actions, and the steps being taken by the various components of the industry to meet the challenges of adapting to and prevailing in a competitive environment.

  10. Managing an evolution: Deregulation of the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, S.K.

    1994-12-31

    The author discusses the emerging competitive situation in the electric power industry as deregulation of electric utilities looms on the horizon. The paper supports this change, and the competition it will bring, but urges caution as changes are instituted, and the regulatory bodies decide how and how much to free, and at what rates. The reason for his urge for caution comes from historical experience of other industries, which were smaller and had less direct impact on every American.

  11. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program. Seventeenth annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This program, in cooperation with industry, is conducting research, development, testing, and evaluation activities to develop the technologies that would lead to production and introduction of low-and zero-emission electric and hybrid vehicles into the Nation`s transportation fleet. This annual report describes program activities in the areas of advanced battery, fuel cell, and propulsion systems development. Testing and evaluation of new technology in fleet site operations and laboratories are also provided. Also presented is status on incentives (CAFE, 1992 Energy Policy Act) and use of foreign components, and a listing of publications by DOE, national laboratories, and contractors.

  12. North Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 6,188 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,941 31.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 508 8.2 Solar - - Wind 1,423 23.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 10 0.2 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 34,740 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation 6,150

  13. Ohio Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 33,071 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 231 0.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 101 0.3 Solar 13 * Wind 7 * Wood/Wood Waste 60 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 48 0.1 Other Biomass 2 * Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 143,598 100.0 Total Renewable

  14. Oklahoma Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,022 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,412 11.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 858 4.1 Solar - - Wind 1,480 7.0 Wood/Wood Waste 58 0.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 16 0.1 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 72,251 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation

  15. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,261 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,684 74.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 8,425 59.1 Solar - - Wind 2,004 14.1 Wood/Wood Waste 221 1.6 MSW/Landfill Gas 31 0.2 Other Biomass 3 * Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 55,127 100.0

  16. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 24 1.3 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net

  17. Electric Utility Industry Experience with Geomagnetic Disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as a few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration.

  18. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W.; Taylor, E.R. Jr.; Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems` responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  19. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. ); Taylor, E.R. Jr. ); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  20. World electricity and gas industries; Pressures for structural change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahane, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Electric and gas utilities are central middlemen in the energy business. Worldwide, more than 50% of all primary energy is transformed by utilities and delivered to final consumers through utility wires and pipes. The structure and behavior of the electricity and gas industries and the role and behavior of utilities are therefore important to all other energy industry players. The electricity and gas industries are special. Unlike oil, coal, or wood, electricity and gas are transported from producers to consumers mostly via fixed grids. This means that supplies are generally tied to specific markets and, unlike an oil tanker on the high seas, cannot be easily diverted elsewhere. These grids are natural monopolies inasmuch as having more than one wire or pipe along a given route is generally unnecessary duplicative. In addition, both supply and grid investments are generally large and lumpy. Industrial organization theory suggests that the coordination of industries can be achieved either through hierarchies or through markets. Hierarchies are generally preferred when the transaction costs of coordinating through markets is too high. These two elements of electricity and gas industry structure are the means of hierarchical coordination. This paper discusses the possibilities for changing the structure of utilities to one which has greater reliance on markets.

  1. Assistance to States on Electric Industry Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen Andersen

    2010-10-25

    This project seeks to educate state policymakers through a coordinated approach involving state legislatures, regulators, energy officials, and governors’ staffs. NCSL’s activities in this project focus on educating state legislators. Major components of this proposal include technical assistance to state legislatures, briefing papers, coordination with the National Council on Electricity Policy, information assistance, coordination and outreach, meetings, and a set of transmission-related activities.

  2. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",32417,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",3855,11.9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",3272,10.1 "

  3. New York Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",39357,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",6033,15.3 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",4314,11 "

  4. North Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",27674,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2499,9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1956,7.1 "

  5. North Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Dakota" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",6188,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1941,31.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",508,8.2 "

  6. Ohio Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",33071,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",231,0.7 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",101,0.3 "

  7. Oklahoma Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",21022,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2412,11.5 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",858,4.1 " Solar","-","-"

  8. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",14261,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",10684,74.9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",8425,59.1 "

  9. Pennsylvania Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",45575,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1984,4.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",747,1.6 "

  10. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",1782,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",28,1.6 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro

  11. South Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",23982,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1623,6.8 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1340,5.6 "

  12. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",3623,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2223,61.3 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1594,44 "

  13. A simple tool for estimating city-wide annual electrical energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A simple tool for estimating city-wide annual electrical energy savings from cooler surfaces Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on ...

  14. Electric power industry restructuring in Australia: Lessons from down-under. Occasional paper No. 20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, D.

    1997-01-01

    Australia`s electric power industry (EPI) is undergoing major restructuring. This restructuring includes commercialization of state-owned electric organization through privatization and through corporatization into separate governmental business units; structural unbundling of generation, transmission, retailing, and distribution; and creation of a National Electricity Market (NEM) organized as a centralized, market-based trading pool for buying and selling electricity. The principal rationales for change in the EPI were the related needs of enhancing international competitiveness, improving productivity, and lowering electric rates. Reducing public debt through privatization also played an important role. Reforms in the EPI are part of the overall economic reform package that is being implemented in Australia. Enhancing efficiency in the economy through competition is a key objective of the reforms. As the need for reform was being discussed in the early 1990s, Australia`s previous prime minister, Paul Keating, observed that {open_quotes}the engine which drives efficiency is free and open competition.{close_quotes} The optimism about the economic benefits of the full package of reforms across the different sectors of the economy, including the electricity industry, is reflected in estimated benefits of a 5.5 percent annual increase in real gross domestic product and the creation of 30,000 more jobs. The largest source of the benefits (estimated at 25 percent of total benefits) was projected to come from reform of the electricity and gas sectors.

  15. Electric and hybrid vehicles program. 5th annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-03-01

    This fifth annual report on the implementation of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-413, as amended by Public Law 95-238, referred to as the Act) complies with the reporting requirements established in Section 14 of the Act. In addition to informing the Congress of the progress and plans of the Department of Energy Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program, this report is intended to serve as a communication link between the Department and all of the public and private interests involved in making the program a success. The Annual Report represents the major summary of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program activities; since July 1981, DOE has ceased publication of the EHV Quarterly Reports with Congressional approval. The fourth quarter activities for FY 1981 are included in this report. During FY 1981, significant progress was made toward implementing the policies established by Congress in the Act. There has been a noticeable increase in interest shown by both the automobile manufacturing and the supply sectors of our economy in electric and hybrid vehicles. This year, the emphasis in the Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program shifted from vehicle demonstration and preparation for production readiness to research, development, test, and evaluation of advanced technologies to achieve the attributes necessary to make electric and hybrid vehicles a practical transportation alternative. Research and development efforts in batteries and propulsion components, as well as total vehicle systems, continue to reveal significant progress toward providing industry with technology options that will result in vehicles with greater public acceptance.

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2015 Electric Drive Technologies Annual R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress Report | Department of Energy Electric Drive Technologies Annual R&D Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2015 Electric Drive Technologies Annual R&D Progress Report The Electric Drive Technologies research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research is focused on developing power electronics (PE), electric motor, and

  17. Institutional contexts of market power in the electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foer, A.A.

    1999-05-01

    Market power is widely recognized as one of the principal issues that must be dealt with if the electricity industry is to make the transition from regulation to competition. In this article, the author provides a legal and economic introduction to what the antitrust community means by market power and offers a primer on why market power is so central an issue in the electricity industry. Finally and most importantly, he offers comments on the institutional contexts of market power, exploring a process which he calls Shermanization that helps explain the institutional aspect of moving from regulation to competition and holds implications for where oversight should reside during this complex transition.

  18. Perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B.; Schaffhauser, A.

    1994-04-01

    This report offers perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry. These perspectives will be used in further research to assess the prospects for Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The perspectives are developed first by examining economic, political and regulatory, societal, technological, and environmental trends that are (1) national and global in scope and (2) directly related to the electric utility industry. Major national and global trends include increasing global economic competition, increasing political and ethnic strife, rapidly changing technologies, and increasing worldwide concern about the environment. Major trends in the utility industry include increasing competition in generation; changing patterns of electricity demand; increasing use of information technology to control power systems; and increasing implementation of environmental controls. Ways in which the national and global trends may directly affect the utility industry are also explored. The trends are used to construct three global and national scenarios- ``business as usual,`` ``technotopia future,`` and ``fortress state`` -and three electric utility scenarios- ``frozen in headlights,`` ``megaelectric,`` and ``discomania.`` The scenarios are designed to be thought provoking descriptions of potential futures, not predictions of the future, although three key variables are identified that will have significant impacts on which future evolves-global climate change, utility technologies, and competition. While emphasis needs to be placed on understanding the electric utility scenarios, the interactions between the two sets of scenarios is also of interest.

  19. 2015,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","All Sources",18,8...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Industry","All Sources",1,1,12,12 2015,"AR","Total Electric Power Industry","Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic",1,1,12,12 2015,"AZ","Total Electric Power ...

  20. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Wind",2,2,2,2,2,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0.1,0.1 "Total electric industry",3086,3246,3357,3359,3389,3362,3351,3357,3374,3365,3428,3392,3390,2701,2414,2447,...

  1. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: 1970-1991

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive overview of the ownership of the U.S. electric power industry over the past two decades, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects.

  2. Reshaping the electric utility industry: Competitive implications for Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maschoff, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper briefly outlines some of the issues in the electric power industry restructuring. In addition, the impacts of these changes on the energy marketplace are discussed. Federal policy initiatives, state regulatory response, and utility management response are each described. Management skills are identified as the critical success factor for competition in the utility market.

  3. Capacity utilization and fuel consumption in the electric power industry, 1970-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, E.W.

    1982-07-01

    This report updates the 1980 Energy Information Administration (EIA) publication entitled Trends in the Capacity Utilization and Fuel Consumption of Electric Utility Powerplants, 1970-1978, DOE/EIA-184/32. The analysis covers the period from 1970 through 1981, and examines trends during the period prior to the 1973 Arab oil embargo (1970-1973), after the embargo (1974-1977), and during the immediate past (1978-1981). The report also addresses other factors affecting the electric utility industry since the oil embargo: the reduction in foreign oil supplies as a result of the 1979 Iranian crisis, the 1977 drought in the western United States, the 1978 coal strike by the United Mine Workers Union, and the shutdown of nuclear plants in response to the accident at Three Mile Island. Annual data on electric utility generating capacity, net generation, and fuel consumption are provided to identify changes in patterns of power plant capacity utilization and dispatching.

  4. Electric power industry in Korea: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hoesung

    1994-12-31

    Electrical power is an indispensable tool in the industrialization of a developing country. An efficient, reliable source of electricity is a key factor in the establishment of a wide range of industries, and the supply of energy must keep pace with the increasing demand which economic growth creates in order for that growth to be sustained. As one of the most successful of all developing countries, Korea has registered impressive economic growth over the last decade, and it could be said that the rapid growth of the Korean economy would not have been possible without corresponding growth in the supply of electric power. Power producers in Korea, and elsewhere in Asia, are to be commended for successfully meeting the challenge of providing the necessary power to spur what some call an economic miracle. The future continues to hold great potential for participants in the electrical power industry, but a number of important challenges must be met in order for that potential to be fully realized. Demand for electricity continues to grow at a staggering rate, while concerns over the environmental impact of power generating facilities must not be ignored. As it becomes increasingly difficult to finance the rapid, and increasingly larger-scale expansion of the power industry through internal sources, the government must find resources to meet the growing demand at least cost. This will lead to important opportunities for the private sector. It is important, therefore, for those interested in participating in the power production industry and taking advantage of the newly emerging opportunities that lie in the Korean market, and elsewhere in Asia, to discuss the relevant issues and become informed of the specific conditions of each market.

  5. Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rural electric customers are the most vulnerable to power outages Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Electric Power Industry Report (Form EIA-861) 2015 early ...

  6. 2013 Electricity Form Proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report" The EIA-861 survey has historically collected retail sales, revenue, and a variety of information related to demand response ...

  7. Industry Leaders, Research Experts Gather for Fourth Annual DOE Solid-State

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting Workshop | Department of Energy Fourth Annual DOE Solid-State Lighting Workshop Industry Leaders, Research Experts Gather for Fourth Annual DOE Solid-State Lighting Workshop More than 250 attendees gathered in Phoenix, Arizona, to participate in the 2007 DOE Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Program Planning Workshop on January 31-February 2, 2007. Lighting industry leaders, fixture manufacturers, researchers, academia, trade associations, lighting designers, energy efficiency

  8. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program annual progress report, FY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program is a part of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of AIM is to support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve energy efficiency, productivity, product quality, and reduced waste in the major process industries. OIT has embarked on a fundamentally new way of working with industries--the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy--concentrating on the major process industries that consume about 90% of the energy and generate about 90% of the waste in the industrial sector. These are the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metalcasting, and steel industries. OIT has encouraged and assisted these industries in developing visions of what they will be like 20 or 30 years into the future, defining the drivers, technology needs, and barriers to realization of their visions. These visions provide a framework for development of technology roadmaps and implementation plans, some of which have been completed. The AIM Program supports IOF by conducting research and development on materials to solve problems identified in the roadmaps. This is done by National Laboratory/industry/university teams with the facilities and expertise needed to develop new and improved materials. Each project in the AIM Program has active industrial participation and support.

  9. FORM EIA-861 ANNUAL ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY REPORT INSTRUCTIONS

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... in customer energy usage due to higher prices); ... processes that exceed current standards. An energy efficiency resource ... 1 megawatt (1000 kilowatts) installed at or near ...

  10. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    The re-release of the Survey form EIA-860 data for reporting year 2014. The 860 web file ... The re-release of the Survey form EIA-860 data for reporting year 2014. The 860 web files ...

  11. Informatics requirements for a restructured competitive electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickle, S.; Marnay, C.; Olken, F.

    1996-08-01

    The electric power industry in the United States is undergoing a slow but nonetheless dramatic transformation. It is a transformation driven by technology, economics, and politics; one that will move the industry from its traditional mode of centralized system operations and regulated rates guaranteeing long-run cost recovery, to decentralized investment and operational decisionmaking and to customer access to true spot market prices. This transformation will revolutionize the technical, procedural, and informational requirements of the industry. A major milestone in this process occurred on December 20, 1995, when the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) approved its long-awaited electric utility industry restructuring decision. The decision directed the three major California investor-owned utilities to reorganize themselves by the beginning of 1998 into a supply pool, at the same time selling up to a half of their thermal generating plants. Generation will be bid into this pool and will be dispatched by an independent system operator. The dispatch could potentially involve bidders not only from California but from throughout western North America and include every conceivable generating technology and scale of operation. At the same time, large customers and aggregated customer groups will be able to contract independently for their supply and the utilities will be required to offer a real-time pricing tariff based on the pool price to all their customers, including residential. In related proceedings concerning competitive wholesale power markets, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has recognized that real-time information flows between buyers and sellers are essential to efficient equitable market operation. The purpose of this meeting was to hold discussions on the information technologies that will be needed in the new, deregulated electric power industry.

  12. Local government: The sleeping giant in electric industry restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridley, S.

    1997-11-01

    Public power has long been a cornerstone of consumer leverage in the electric industry. But its foundation consists of a much broader and deeper consumer authority. Understanding that authority - and present threats to it - is critical to restructuring of the electric industry as well as to the future of public power. The country has largely forgotten the role that local governments have played and continue to play in the development of the electric industry. Moreover, we risk losing sight of the options local governments may offer to protect consumers, to advance competition in the marketplace, and to enhance opportunities for technology and economic development. The future role of local government is one of the most important issues in the restructuring discussion. The basic authority of consumers rests at the local level. The resulting options consumers have to act as more than just respondents to private brokers and telemarketing calls are at the local level. And the ability for consumers to shape the marketplace and standards for what it will offer exists at the local level as well.

  13. Chemical Industry Vision 2020. Annual Report 2004 (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Industry; ITP; AMO; Chemicals; Vision Word Cloud More ...

  14. Advanced Industrial Materials Program. Annual progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stooksbury, F.

    1994-06-01

    Mission of the AIM program is to commercialize new/improved materials and materials processing methods that will improve energy efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness. Program investigators in the DOE national laboratories are working with about 100 companies, including 15 partners in CRDAs. Work is being done on intermetallic alloys, ceramic composites, metal composites, polymers, engineered porous materials, and surface modification. The program supports other efforts in the Office of Industrial Technologies to assist the energy-consuming process industries. The aim of the AIM program is to bring materials from basic research to industrial application to strengthen the competitive position of US industry and save energy.

  15. Annual Steam-Electric Plant Operation and Design Data (EIA-767 data file)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity data files > Form EIA-767 Form EIA-767 historical data files Data Released: November 02, 2006 Next Release: None(discontinued) Annual steam-electric plant operation and design data Historical data files contain annual data from organic-fueled or combustible renewable steam-electric plants with a generator nameplate rating of 10 or more megawatts. The data are derived from the Form EIA-767 "Steam-Electric Plant Operation and Design Report." The files contains data on

  16. Cyber Security Challenges in Using Cloud Computing in the Electric Utility Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akyol, Bora A.

    2012-09-01

    This document contains introductory material that discusses cyber security challenges in using cloud computing in the electric utility industry.

  17. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Electricity Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    : Electricity Working Group Meeting September 25, 2013 Electricity Analysis Team Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis Office of Energy Analysis WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Key Modeling updates from AEO2013 * Revised Reserve Margin and Capacity Market Methodology - Explicit Reserve Margin, Explicit Capacity Payment - Results in 3-5 mill higher electric prices * Operating/Spinning reserve

  18. Annual Energy Outlook 2016: Electricity Sector Preliminary Results

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Sector Preliminary Results For Electricity AEO2016 Working Group February 10, 2016| Washington, DC By EIA, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear & Renewables Analysis WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Summary 2 Electricity Analysis Team February 10, 2016 * Address issues raised by stakeholders * Discuss recent developments- updates to generator status and capital costs * Present preliminary AEO2016 forecast

  19. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability.

  20. The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable 1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable was created just over a decade ago to provide a unique forum for dialogue among top government, university, and industry leaders in the national science and technology enterprise. The purpose is to facilitate personal working relationships and exchange of ideas about issues, problems, and promising opportunities facing those charged with developing and deploying science and technology resources. In 1996, Council meetings focused on the following: (1) the impact of information technology on the structure of research and educational organizations; (2) ways to improve communication between the science and engineering community and the public; and (3) new approaches both to measuring the results of research investments, and to communicating those metrics to non-technical decision-makers and to the public. Significant milestones were also achieved in four major projects, representing, impart, follow-up activity from previous Council Meeting discussions: (1) facilitating the Federal Demonstration Partnership, designed to maximize the efficiency of the federal research support system; (2) compiling results of a regional workshop on experiences in industry-university collaborative organization; (3) publishing the results of a study comparing the cost structures for research performed in the industrial, academic, and government laboratory sector; and (4) catalyzing, and participating in, a series of campus-based convocations on stresses being experienced in the research university environment.

  1. The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable was created just over a decade ago to provide a unique forum for dialogue among top government, university, and industry leaders of the national science and technology enterprise. The purpose is to facilitate personal working relationships and exchange of ideas about issues, problems, and promising opportunities that are facing those charged with developing and deploying science and technology resources. The open dialogue and informal exchange of ideas preclude a process of making formal recommendations or offering specific advice. Instead, the Roundtable seeks to stimulate new approaches by dissemination of its discussions, and pro-active contacts with organizations that may want to build on the idea base it establishes. After introductory material on the structure and operation of the Roundtable, accomplishments on current projects are described. Projects include: Stresses on research and education at colleges and universities; Formulating US research policies within an international context; The Federal Demonstration project, designed to improve the management of federally-funded research; Analysis of the costs of research in industrial, academic, and federal labs; Industry-university research collaborations; and Public stakeholding in America`s investment in science and technology.

  2. Renewable Electricity in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    For Renewable Electricity Working Group July 24, 2014 Christopher Namovicz and Gwen Bredehoeft Renewable Electricity Analysis Team AEO2014 results and status updates for the AEO2015 Agenda Renewable Electricity Analysis Team July 24, 2014 2 * Review of AEO2014 - Changes made for AEO2014 - Review of Results * Status of AEO2015 * Updates planned for AEO2015 WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Updates included in the AEO2014

  3. Renewable Electricity in the Annual Energy Outlook 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2014 For Renewable Electricity Working Group AEO2014 Second Meeting September 26, 2013 Christopher Namovicz and Gwen Bredehoeft, Renewable Electricity Analysis Team Agenda Renewable Electricity Analysis Team, September 26, 2013 2 * Status of AEO2014 and future development plans * Data and model updates - PTC expiration update - Capital costs - Transmission - 860 (planned capacity) data - Polysys integration - Spinning reserves - RPS updates * Preliminary Results for the AEO2014 Reference case

  4. Strategies for promoting renewables in a new electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driver, B.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes strategies for promoting renewable resources in an era characterized by competitive pressures in the electric industry. It begins with a background section to describe the perspective from which I am writing and the nature of the pressures confronting renewables in 1996. Then, the paper turns to a discussion of the regulatory and other options to promote renewables in this environment. The major conclusion of the paper is that there is no {open_quotes}magic bullet{close_quotes} to guide the development of renewables through the developing competitive era within the electric industry. Indeed, it appears that the job can get done only through a combination of different measures at all levels of government. The author believes that among the most effective measures are likely to be: a national renewable resources generation standard; conditions attached to restructuring events; regional interstate compacts; regional risk-sharing consortia supported by federal and state tax and fiscal policy; and state {open_quotes}systems benefits charges;{close_quotes}

  5. 2015 Energy Systems Integration Facility Annual Report Calls to Industry:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Distributed Wind Market Report Fact Sheet 2015 Distributed Wind Market Report Fact Sheet 2015-Distributed-Wind-Market-Report-Fact-Sheet_Page_1.jpg Wind turbines in distributed applications are found in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands to provide energy locally, either serving on-site electricity needs or a local grid. Distributed wind is defined by the wind project's location relative to end-use and powerdistribution infrastructure, rather than turbine or project size.

  6. Electric Power Annual 2014 - U.S. Energy Information Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), ... to ultimate customers by end-use sector XLS Table 2.5. ...

  7. FY2015 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Electric Drive Technologies research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge ...

  8. Industrial Hygiene Group annual research report, FY 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J.O.; Ettinger, H.J.

    1982-10-01

    Field studies have been performed at several oil shale facilities to identify unique industrial hygiene problems and provide input to inhalation toxicology studies aimed at evaluating the hazards of materials associated with this developing technology. Aerosol physics support has also been provided to develop aerosol generation and animal exposure techniques for evaluating the toxicity of oil shale materials and manmade mineral fibers. As part of the effort to assure a safe, orderly, and timely development of various synfuels, field evaluation of indicator-sampling procedures was perfomed, and industrial hygiene work practices for two synfuel technologies are being prepared. Respirator studies are used to evaluate the performances of special devices (some of which are not in the existing government approval schedules) and of a proposed test procedures for self-contained breathing apparatus. An approval procedure is being developed for air-purifying respirators required for protection against radioiodine, evaluating the adequacy of respirator programs at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensee facilities, and developing a program for respirator use under emergency situations. A new aerosol size-characterization stack sampler has been designed, and potential instrument changes to aerosol size monitoring for filter testing are being evaluated. Material permeability tests have identified the protection afforded by protective clothing materials, and improved analytical procedures have been developed for pentachlorophenol and plutonium.

  9. Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Report -- 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.; DeVoto, D.; Moreno, G.; Rugh, J.; Waye, S.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the research into advanced liquid cooling, integrated power module cooling, high temperature air cooled power electronics, two-phase cooling for power electronics, and electric motor thermal management by NREL's Power Electronics group in FY13.

  10. Distributed generation technology in a newly competitive electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeifenberger, J.P.; Ammann, P.R.; Taylor, G.A.

    1996-10-01

    The electric utility industry is in the midst of enormous changes in market structure. While the generation sector faces increasing competition, the utilities` transmission and distribution function is undergoing a transition to more unbundled services and prices. This article discusses the extent to which these changes will affect the relative advantage of distributed generation technology. Although the ultimate market potential for distributed generation may be significant, the authors find that the market will be very heterogeneous with many small and only a few medium-sized market segments narrowly defined by operating requirements. The largest market segment is likely to develop for distributed generation technology with operational and economical characteristics suitable for peak-shaving. Unbundling of utility costs and prices will make base- and intermediate-load equipment, such as fuel cells, significantly less attractive in main market segments unless capital costs fall significantly below $1,000/kW.

  11. FY2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-12-01

    The Electric Drive Technologies research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research is focused on developing power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will reduce system cost and improve their efficiency in transforming battery energy to useful work. The R&D is also aimed at better understanding and improving how various components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  12. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    Information is reported in sections entitled: radiation monitoring; Environmental Management Program; radiation and safety surveys; industrial safety and special projects; Office of Operational Safety; and training, lectures, publications, and professional activities. There were no external or internal exposures to personnel which exceeded the standards for radiation protection as defined in DOE Manual Chapter 0524. Only 35 employees received whole body dose equivalents of 10 mSv (1 rem) or greater. There were no releases of gaseous waste from the Laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. There were no releases of liquid radioactive waste from the Laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. The quantity of those radionuclides of primary concern in the Clinch River, based on the concentration measured at White Oak Dam and the dilution afforded by the Clinch River, averaged 0.16 percent of the concentration guide. The average background level at the Perimeter Air Monitoring (PAM) stations during 1980 was 9.0 ..mu..rad/h (0.090 ..mu..Gy/h). Soil samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for eleven radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Plutonium-239 content ranged from 0.37 Bq/kg (0.01 pCi/g) to 1.5 Bq/kg (0.04 pCi/g), and the uranium-235 content ranged from 0.7 Bq/kg (0.02 pCi/g) to 16 Bq/kg (0.43 pCi/g). Grass samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for twelve radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Plutonium-239 content ranged from 0.04 Bq/kg (0.001 pCi/g) to 0.07 Bq/kg (0.002 pCi/g), and the uranium-235 content ranged from 0.37 Bq/kg (0.01 pCi/g) to 12 Bq/kg (0.33 pCi/g).

  13. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",24048,17 " Electric Utilities",17045,17 " IPP & CHP",7003,16 "Net generation (megawatthours)",70155504,22 " Electric Utilities",48096026,19 " IPP & CHP",22059478,14 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",78556,18 " Nitrogen

  14. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Hydroelectric", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",3948,45 " Electric Utilities",3450,36 " IPP & CHP",499,48 "Net generation (megawatthours)",10995240,45 " Electric Utilities",9344872,38 " IPP & CHP",1650368,48 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",13852,35 " Nitrogen

  15. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Hydroelectric", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",30949,10 " Electric Utilities",27376,5 " IPP & CHP",3573,26 "Net generation (megawatthours)",116334363,11 " Electric Utilities",102294256,5 " IPP & CHP",14040107,24 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",13716,36 "

  16. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",17166,23 " Electric Utilities",14377,18 " IPP & CHP",2788,32 "Net generation (megawatthours)",61064796,25 " Electric Utilities",47301782,20 " IPP & CHP",13763014,26 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",81239,17 " Nitrogen

  17. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",28249,13 " Electric utilities",21311,11 " IPP & CHP",6938,17 "Net generation (megawatthours)",112257187,13 " Electric utilities",94847135,8 " IPP & CHP",17410053,19 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",22597,32 " Nitrogen

  18. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",74646,2 " Electric utilities",28201,4 " IPP & CHP",46446,2 "Net generation (megawatthours)",198807622,5 " Electric utilities",71037135,14 " IPP & CHP",127770487,4 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",3102,46 "

  19. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",14933,29 " Electric utilities",10204,28 " IPP & CHP",4729,18 "Net generation (megawatthours)",53847386,30 " Electric utilities",43239615,26 " IPP & CHP",10607771,30 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",28453,30 " Nitrogen

  20. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",8832,35 " Electric utilities",161,45 " IPP & CHP",8671,12 "Net generation (megawatthours)",33676980,38 " Electric utilities",54693,45 " IPP & CHP",33622288,11 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",1897,47 " Nitrogen

  1. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",3086,46 " Electric utilities",102,46 " IPP & CHP",2984,31 "Net generation (megawatthours)",7703584,47 " Electric utilities",49050,46 " IPP & CHP",7654534,35 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",824,48 " Nitrogen

  2. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",9,51 " Electric utilities",, " IPP & CHP",9,51 "Net generation (megawatthours)",67612,51 " Electric utilities",, " IPP & CHP",67612,51 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",0,51 " Nitrogen oxide (short

  3. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural Gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",59440,3 " Electric utilities",51775,1 " IPP & CHP",7665,15 "Net generation (megawatthours)",230015937,2 " Electric utilities",211970587,1 " IPP & CHP",18045350,15 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",126600,10 "

  4. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",38250,7 " Electric utilities",28873,3 " IPP & CHP",9377,10 "Net generation (megawatthours)",125837224,10 " Electric utilities",109523336,4 " IPP & CHP",16313888,20 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",105998,11 " Nitrogen

  5. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Petroleum", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",2672,47 " Electric utilities",1732,40 " IPP & CHP",939,45 "Net generation (megawatthours)",10204158,46 " Electric utilities",5517389,39 " IPP & CHP",4686769,40 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",21670,33 " Nitrogen

  6. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Hydroelectric", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",4944,42 " Electric utilities",3413,37 " IPP & CHP",1531,39 "Net generation (megawatthours)",15184417,43 " Electric utilities",9628016,37 " IPP & CHP",5556400,39 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",5777,42 " Nitrogen

  7. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",44727,4 " Electric utilities",5263,35 " IPP & CHP",39464,4 "Net generation (megawatthours)",202143878,4 " Electric utilities",10457398,36 " IPP & CHP",191686480,3 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",187536,6 " Nitrogen

  8. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",27499,14 " Electric utilities",23319,7 " IPP & CHP",4180,23 "Net generation (megawatthours)",115395392,12 " Electric utilities",100983285,6 " IPP & CHP",14412107,22 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",332396,3 " Nitrogen

  9. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",16507,24 " Electric utilities",12655,20 " IPP & CHP",3852,25 "Net generation (megawatthours)",56853282,28 " Electric utilities",43021954,27 " IPP & CHP",13831328,25 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",74422,19 " Nitrogen oxide

  10. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",14227,31 " Electric utilities",11468,24 " IPP & CHP",2759,33 "Net generation (megawatthours)",49728363,31 " Electric utilities",39669629,29 " IPP & CHP",10058734,31 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",31550,29 " Nitrogen

  11. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",20878,21 " Electric utilities",19473,15 " IPP & CHP",1405,40 "Net generation (megawatthours)",90896435,17 " Electric utilities",90133403,10 " IPP & CHP",763032,49 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",204873,5 " Nitrogen

  12. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",26657,15 " Electric utilities",18120,16 " IPP & CHP",8537,13 "Net generation (megawatthours)",104229402,15 " Electric utilities",58518271,17 " IPP & CHP",45711131,8 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",96240,14 "

  13. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",4470,43 " Electric utilities",10,49 " IPP & CHP",4460,20 "Net generation (megawatthours)",13248710,44 " Electric utilities",523,49 " IPP & CHP",13248187,27 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",10990,38 " Nitrogen oxide

  14. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",12264,33 " Electric utilities",85,47 " IPP & CHP",12179,8 "Net generation (megawatthours)",37833652,35 " Electric utilities",20260,47 " IPP & CHP",37813392,9 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",41370,26 " Nitrogen oxide

  15. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",13128,32 " Electric utilities",971,42 " IPP & CHP",12157,9 "Net generation (megawatthours)",31118591,40 " Electric utilities",679986,43 " IPP & CHP",30438606,12 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",6748,41 "

  16. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",30435,12 " Electric utilities",22260,9 " IPP & CHP",8175,14 "Net generation (megawatthours)",106816991,14 " Electric utilities",84075322,12 " IPP & CHP",22741669,13 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",173521,7 " Nitrogen

  17. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",15621,28 " Electric utilities",11557,22 " IPP & CHP",4064,24 "Net generation (megawatthours)",56998330,27 " Electric utilities",45963271,22 " IPP & CHP",11035059,29 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",39272,27 " Nitrogen

  18. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",16090,26 " Electric utilities",13494,19 " IPP & CHP",2597,34 "Net generation (megawatthours)",55127092,29 " Electric utilities",47084382,21 " IPP & CHP",8042710,34 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",101093,13 "

  19. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",21790,19 " Electric utilities",20538,13 " IPP & CHP",1252,42 "Net generation (megawatthours)",87834468,18 " Electric utilities",85271253,11 " IPP & CHP",2563215,46 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",149842,9 " Nitrogen

  20. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",6330,41 " Electric utilities",3209,38 " IPP & CHP",3121,30 "Net generation (megawatthours)",30257616,41 " Electric utilities",12329411,35 " IPP & CHP",17928205,16 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",14426,34 " Nitrogen

  1. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",8732,36 " Electric utilities",7913,30 " IPP & CHP",819,46 "Net generation (megawatthours)",39431291,34 " Electric utilities",36560960,30 " IPP & CHP",2870331,45 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",63994,22 " Nitrogen oxide

  2. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",10485,34 " Electric utilities",8480,29 " IPP & CHP",2006,35 "Net generation (megawatthours)",36000537,37 " Electric utilities",27758728,33 " IPP & CHP",8241809,33 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",10229,40 "

  3. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",4418,44 " Electric utilities",1121,41 " IPP & CHP",3297,28 "Net generation (megawatthours)",19538395,42 " Electric utilities",2085585,41 " IPP & CHP",17452810,18 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",3107,45 " Nitrogen

  4. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",19399,22 " Electric utilities",544,43 " IPP & CHP",18854,7 "Net generation (megawatthours)",68051086,23 " Electric utilities",-117003,50 " IPP & CHP",68168089,7 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",3369,44 " Nitrogen oxide

  5. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",8072,39 " Electric utilities",6094,33 " IPP & CHP",1978,37 "Net generation (megawatthours)",32306210,39 " Electric utilities",26422867,34 " IPP & CHP",5883343,38 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",12064,37 " Nitrogen oxide

  6. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",40404,6 " Electric utilities",10989,27 " IPP & CHP",29416,5 "Net generation (megawatthours)",137122202,7 " Electric utilities",34082856,31 " IPP & CHP",103039347,5 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",31878,28 " Nitrogen

  7. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",30498,11 " Electric utilities",26941,6 " IPP & CHP",3557,27 "Net generation (megawatthours)",128143588,9 " Electric utilities",119432144,2 " IPP & CHP",8711444,32 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",64168,21 " Nitrogen

  8. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",6790,40 " Electric utilities",5516,34 " IPP & CHP",1274,41 "Net generation (megawatthours)",36462508,36 " Electric utilities",32088446,32 " IPP & CHP",4374062,42 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",52716,23 " Nitrogen oxide

  9. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",31507,9 " Electric utilities",11134,26 " IPP & CHP",20372,6 "Net generation (megawatthours)",134476405,8 " Electric utilities",43290512,25 " IPP & CHP",91185893,6 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",355108,1 " Nitrogen oxide

  10. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Hydroelectric", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",15884,27 " Electric utilities",11175,25 " IPP & CHP",4709,19 "Net generation (megawatthours)",60119907,26 " Electric utilities",44565239,24 " IPP & CHP",15554668,21 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",10595,39 "

  11. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",42723,5 " Electric utilities",39,48 " IPP & CHP",42685,3 "Net generation (megawatthours)",221058365,3 " Electric utilities",90994,44 " IPP & CHP",220967371,2 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",297598,4 " Nitrogen

  12. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",1810,49 " Electric utilities",8,50 " IPP & CHP",1803,38 "Net generation (megawatthours)",6281748,49 " Electric utilities",10670,48 " IPP & CHP",6271078,36 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",100,49 " Nitrogen

  13. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",22824,18 " Electric utilities",20836,12 " IPP & CHP",1988,36 "Net generation (megawatthours)",97158465,16 " Electric utilities",93547004,9 " IPP & CHP",3611461,43 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",43659,25 "

  14. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",20998,20 " Electric utilities",20490,14 " IPP & CHP",508,47 "Net generation (megawatthours)",79506886,20 " Electric utilities",76986629,13 " IPP & CHP",2520257,47 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",89357,16 " Nitrogen

  15. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Natural gas", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",112914,1 " Electric utilities",29113,2 " IPP & CHP",83800,1 "Net generation (megawatthours)",437629668,1 " Electric utilities",94974953,7 " IPP & CHP",342654715,1 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",349245,2 " Nitrogen

  16. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",8325,38 " Electric utilities",7296,31 " IPP & CHP",1029,44 "Net generation (megawatthours)",43784526,33 " Electric utilities",40741425,28 " IPP & CHP",3043101,44 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",23646,31 " Nitrogen oxide

  17. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",650,50 " Electric utilities",337,44 " IPP & CHP",313,49 "Net generation (megawatthours)",7031394,48 " Electric utilities",868079,42 " IPP & CHP",6163315,37 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",70,50 " Nitrogen oxide

  18. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Nuclear", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",26292,16 " Electric utilities",22062,10 " IPP & CHP",4231,22 "Net generation (megawatthours)",77137438,21 " Electric utilities",62966914,16 " IPP & CHP",14170524,23 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",68550,20 "

  19. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",16276,25 " Electric utilities",11981,21 " IPP & CHP",4295,21 "Net generation (megawatthours)",81059577,19 " Electric utilities",63331833,15 " IPP & CHP",17727743,17 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",102406,12 "

  20. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary energy source","Coal", "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",8458,37 " Electric utilities",7233,32 " IPP & CHP",1225,43 "Net generation (megawatthours)",49696183,32 " Electric utilities",45068982,23 " IPP & CHP",4627201,41 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)",, " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",45704,24 " Nitrogen oxide

  1. "Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-861,""Annual Electric Power Industry Report."" U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, ""Power Plant Operations Report"" and predecessor forms."

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "Item","Value" "Primary energy source","Coal" "Net summer capacity (megawatts)",1068422 " Electric utilities",616632 " IPP & CHP",451791 "Net generation (megawatthours)",4093606005 " Electric utilities",2382473495 " IPP & CHP",1711132510 "Emissions (thousand metric tons)", " Sulfur dioxide (short tons)",3842005 " Nitrogen oxide (short

  2. Rural electric cooperatives and the cost structure of the electric power industry: A multiproduct analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1935, the federal government of the United States has administered a program designed to make electricity available to rural Americans. This dissertation traces the history of the rural electrification program, as well as its costs. While the Congress intended to simply provide help in building the capital structure of rural electric distribution systems, the program continues to flourish some 35 years after these systems first fully covered the countryside. Once the rural distribution systems were built, the government began to provide cooperatives with billions of dollars in subsidized loans for the generation of electric power. Although this program costs the taxpayers nearly $1 billion per year, no one has ever tested its efficacy. The coops' owner/members do not have the right to trade their individual ownership shares. The RECs do not fully exploit the scale and scope economies observed in the investor-owned sector of this industry. This dissertation compares the relative productive efficiencies of the RECs and the investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) in the United States. Using multiproduct translog cost functions, the estimated costs of cooperatives are compared to those of IOUs in providing identical output bundles. Three separate products are considered as outputs: (1) wholesale power; (2) power sold to large industrial customers; and (3) power sold to residential and commercial customers. It is estimated that, were the RECs forced to pay market prices for their inputs, their costs would exceed those incurred by the IOUs by about 24 percent. Several policy recommendations are made: (1) the RECs should be converted to stockholder-owned, tax-paying corporations; (2) the government should discontinue its subsidized loan program; (3) the government should sell its hydroelectric power at market prices, nullifying the current preference given to cooperatives and municipal distributors in the purchase of this currently underpriced power.

  3. Annual Electric Utility Data - EIA-906/920/923 Data File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    923 detailed data with previous form data (EIA-906/920) The survey Form EIA-923 collects detailed electric power data -- monthly and annually -- on electricity generation, fuel consumption, fossil fuel stocks, and receipts at the power plant and prime mover level. Specific survey information provided: Schedule 2 - fuel receipts and costs Schedules 3A & 5A - generator data including generation, fuel consumption and stocks Schedule 4 - fossil fuel stocks Schedules 6 & 7 - non-utility

  4. Annual Electric Utility Data - Form EIA-906 Database

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Detailed data files > Historic Form EIA-906 Historic Form EIA-906 Detailed Data with previous form data (EIA-759) Historic electric utility data files include information on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, prime mover and fuel type. Data sources are surveys -- Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report" and Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report." Beginning with 1996, two separate files are available for each year: Monthly (M) data submitted by those respondents

  5. Industrial Energy-Efficiency Improvement Program. Annual report to the Congress and the President 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The industrial energy efficiency improvement program to accelerate market penetration of new and emerging industrial technologies and practices which will improve energy efficiency; encourage substitution of more plentiful domestic fuels; and enhance recovery of energy and materials from industrial waste streams is described. The role of research, development, and demonstration; technology implementation; the reporting program; and progress are covered. Specific reports from the chemicals and allied products; primary metals; petroleum and coal products; stone, clay, and glass, paper and allied products; food and kindred products; fabricated metals; transportation equipment; machinery (except electrical); textile mill products; rubber and miscellaneous plastics; electrical and electronic equipment; lumber and wood; and tobacco products are discussed. Additional data from voluntary submissions, a summary on progress in the utilization of recovered materials, and an analysis of industrial fuel mix are briefly presented. (MCW)

  6. Industry Applications Society 42. annual petroleum and chemical industry conference: Record of conference papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    Thirty-six papers were presented relating to electrical equipment in petroleum, petrochemical, and chemical plants. They are arranged under the following topical sections: general technical program; refining subcommittee; chemical subcommittee; production subcommittee; transportation subcommittee; electrochemical subcommittee; and general session safety. All papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  7. Dakota Electric Association- Commercial and Industrial Custom Energy Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dakota Electric will conduct an inspection of the project site prior to approval, and grant applications must earn pre-approval from Dakota Electric before any work begins. To qualify for rebates...

  8. Salem Electric- Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Salem Electric provides incentives for members to increase the energy efficiency of eligible homes and facilities. Available rebates include:

  9. National Grid (Electric) Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National Grid offers various rebate programs for industrial and commercial customers to install energy efficiency measures. 

  10. Oncor Electric Delivery - Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Contact Oncor Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Oncor Electric Delivery Website http:www.takealoadofftexas.comindex.aspx?idcommercial-standard-offer...

  11. DTE Energy (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Efficiency Program for Business offers prescriptive incentives for both electric and natural gas energy efficient improvements in areas of lighting, HVAC, processes, compressed air,...

  12. Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric) - Commercial and Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    commercial location per year, 5,000 per industrial location per year Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Austin Utilities Website http:www.austinutilities.compages...

  13. Renewable Electricity Use by the U.S. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John; Bird, Lori; Heeter, Jenny; Gorham, Bethany

    2015-07-20

    The information and communication technology (ICT) sector continues to witness rapid growth and uptake of ICT equipment and services at both the national and global levels. The electricity consumption associated with this expansion is substantial, although recent adoptions of cloudcomputing services, co-location data centers, and other less energy-intensive equipment and operations have likely reduced the rate of growth in this sector. This paper is intended to aggregate existing ICT industry data and research to provide an initial look at electricity use, current and future renewable electricity acquisition, as well as serve as a benchmark for future growth and trends in ICT industry renewable electricity consumption.

  14. The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. Annual reports for 1997, 1998, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-12-31

    The Roundtable was created in 1984 to provide a unique forum for dialog among top government, university, and industry leaders of the national science and technology enterprise. The purpose is to facilitate personal working relationships and exchange of ideas regarding issues, problems, and promising opportunities that are facing those charged with developing and deploying science and technology resources. These annual reports begin by describing the purpose, structure, and mode of operation of the Roundtable. There follow sections devoted to the council activities, major projects, and follow-up planning, and the activities of the Roundtable working groups. Meeting agendas and publications lists are also included.

  15. DOE FreedomCAR and vehicle technologies program advanced power electronic and electrical machines annual review report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, Mitch

    2006-10-11

    This report is a summary of the Review Panel at the FY06 DOE FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) Annual Review of Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machine (APEEM) research activities held on August 15-17, 2006.

  16. Dakota Electric Association- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rebates are limited to 50% of the project cost up to a maximum of $100,000. Customers who wish to participate in this rebate program should call Dakota Electric Association before the new equipme...

  17. RG&E (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSEG and RG&E offer rebates to non-residential customers installing energy efficient equipment that have an electricity Systems Benefits Charge (SBC) included in their energy bills. Both...

  18. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry 1999: Mergers and Other Corporate Combinations, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    Presents data about corporate combinations involving investor-owned utilities in the United States, discusses corporate objectives for entering into such combinations, and assesses their cumulative effects on the structure of the electric power industry.

  19. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry 2000: An Update, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive overview of the structure of the U.S. electric power industry over the past 10 years, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects.

  20. Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power offers incentives to commercial and industrial electric customers who wish to install energy efficient equipment and measures in eligible facilities. Incentives are...

  1. Duke Energy (Electric)- Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Duke Energy’s Smart $aver Incentive program offers rebates to non-residential customers to install energy efficient equipment in commercial/industrial facilities. All Duke Energy Ohio...

  2. Hydro and geothermal electricity as an alternative for industrial petroleum consumption in Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendis, M.; Park, W.; Sabadell, A.; Talib, A.

    1982-04-01

    This report assesses the potential for substitution of electricity for petroleum in the industrial/agro-industrial sector of Costa Rica. The study includes a preliminary estimate of the process energy needs in this sector, a survey of the principal petroleum consuming industries in Costa Rica, an assessment of the electrical technologies appropriate for substitution, and an analysis of the cost trade offs of alternative fuels and technologies. The report summarizes the total substitution potential both by technical feasibility and by cost effectiveness under varying fuel price scenarios and identifies major institutional constraints to the introduction of electric based technologies. Recommendations to the Government of Costa Rica are presented. The key to the success of a Costa Rican program for substitution of electricity for petroleum in industry rests in energy pricing policy. The report shows that if Costa Rica Bunker C prices are increased to compare equitably with Caribbean Bunker C prices, and increase at 3 percent per annum relative to a special industrial electricity rate structure, the entire substitution program, including both industrial and national electric investment, would be cost effective. The definition of these pricing structures and their potential impacts need to be assessed in depth.

  3. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  4. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  5. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  6. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  7. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  8. Performance Issues for a Changing Electric Power Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    Provides an overview of some of the factors affecting reliability within the electric bulk power system. Historical and projected data related to reliability issues are discussed on a national and regional basis. Current research on economic considerations associated with reliability levels is also reviewed.

  9. Low-income energy policy in a restructuring electricity industry: an assessment of federal options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1997-07-01

    This report identifies both the low-income energy services historically provided in the electricity industry and those services that may be affected by industry restructuring. It identifies policies that are being proposed or could be developed to address low- income electricity services in a restructured industry. It discusses potential federal policy options and identifies key policy and implementation issues that arise when considering these potential federal initiatives. To understand recent policy development at the state level, we reviewed restructuring proposals from eight states and the accompanying testimony and comments filed in restructuring proceedings in these states.

  10. Economic analysis of solar industrial process heat systems: a methodology to determine annual required revenue and internal rate of return

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, W.C.; Brown, K.C.

    1981-08-11

    To permit an economic evaluation of solar industrial process heat systems, a methodology was developed to determine the annual required revenue and the internal rate of return. First, a format is provided to estimate the solar system's installed cost, annual operating and maintenance expenses, and net annual solar energy delivered to the industrial process. Then an expression is presented that gives the annual required revenue and the price of solar energy. The economic attractiveness of the potential solar investment can be determined by comparing the price of solar energy with the price of fossil fuel, both expressed in levelized terms. This requires calculation of the internal rate of return on the solar investment or, in certain cases, the growth rate of return.

  11. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program. Sixteenth annual report to Congress for fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the progress achieved in developing electric and hybrid vehicle technologies, beginning with highlights of recent accomplishments in FY 1992. Detailed descriptions are provided of program activities during FY 1992 in the areas of battery, fuel cell, and propulsion system development, and testing and evaluation of new technology in fleet site operations and in laboratories. This Annual Report also contains a status report on incentives and use of foreign components, as well as a list of publications resulting from the DOE program.

  12. The changing structure of the electric power industry: Selected issues, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    More than 3,000 electric utilities in the United States provide electricity to sustain the Nation`s economic growth and promote the well-being of its inhabitants. At the end of 1996, the net generating capability of the electric power industry stood at more than 776,000 megawatts. Sales to ultimate consumers in 1996 exceeded 3.1 trillion kilowatthours at a total cost of more than $210 billion. In addition, the industry added over 9 million new customers during the period from 1990 through 1996. The above statistics provide an indication of the size of the electric power industry. Propelled by events of the recent past, the industry is currently in the midst of changing from a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to a functionally unbundled industry with a competitive market for power generation. Advances in power generation technology, perceived inefficiencies in the industry, large variations in regional electricity prices, and the trend to competitive markets in other regulated industries have all contributed to the transition. Industry changes brought on by this movement are ongoing, and the industry will remain in a transitional state for the next few years or more. During the transition, many issues are being examined, evaluated, and debated. This report focuses on three of them: how wholesale and retail prices have changed since 1990; the power and ability of independent system operators (ISOs) to provide transmission services on a nondiscriminatory basis; and how issues that affect consumer choice, including stranded costs and the determination of retail prices, may be handled either by the US Congress or by State legislatures.

  13. Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Commercial and Industrial Equipment-- AHRI Annual Meeting CCE Overview and Update Presenation, dated April 13, 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document is the Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Commercial and Industrial Equipment-- AHRI Annual Meeting CCE Overview and Update Presenation, dated April 13, 2011

  14. Hydrothermal industrialization electric-power systems development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    The nature of hydrothermal resources, their associated temperatures, geographic locations, and developable capacity are described. The parties involved in development, required activities and phases of development, regulatory and permitting requirements, environmental considerations, and time required to complete development activities ae examined in detail. These activities are put in proper perspective by detailing development costs. A profile of the geothermal industry is presented by detailing the participants and their operating characteristics. The current development status of geothermal energy in the US is detailed. The work on market penetration is summarized briefly. Detailed development information is presented for 56 high temperature sites. (MHR)

  15. Efficiency, equity and the environment: Institutional challenges in the restructuring of the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haeri, M.H.

    1998-07-01

    In the electric power industry, fundamental changes are underway in Europe, America, Australia, New Zealand and, more recently, in Asia. Rooted in increased deregulation and competition, these changes are likely to radically alter the structure of the industry. Liberalization of electric power markets in the United Kingdom is, for the most part, complete. The generation market in the United States began opening to competition following the 1987 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 set the stage for a much more dramatic change in the industry. The most far-reaching provision of the Act was its electricity title, which opened access to the electric transmission grid. With legal barriers now removed, the traditionally sheltered US electric utility market is becoming increasingly open to entry and competition. A number of important legislative, regulatory and governmental policy initiatives are underway in the Philippines that will have a profound effect on the electric power industry. In Thailand, the National Energy Planning Organization (NEPO) has undertaken a thorough investigation of industry restructuring. This paper summarizes recent international developments in the deregulation and liberalization of electricity markets in the U.K., U.S., Australia, and New Zealand. It focuses on the relevance of these experiences to development underway in the Philippines and Thailand, and presents alternative possible structures likely to emerge in these countries, drawing heavily on the authors' recent experiences in Thailand and the Philippines. The impact of these changes on the business environment for power generation and marketing will be discussed in detail, as will the opportunities these changes create for investment among private power producers.

  16. Electric Industry Structure and Regulatory Responses in a High Distributed Energy Resources Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corneli, Steve; Kihm, Steve; Schwartz, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of distributed energy resources (DERs) that can generate, manage and store energy on the customer side of the electric meter is widely recognized as a transformative force in the power sector. This report focuses on two key aspects of that transformation: structural changes in the electric industry and related changes in business organization and regulation that are likely to result from them. Both industry structure and regulation are inextricably linked. History shows that the regulation of the power sector has responded primarily to innovation in technologies and business models that created significant structural changes in the sector’s cost and organizational structure.

  17. Assessing strategies to address transition costs in a restructuring electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

    1996-08-01

    Restructuring the US electricity industry has become the nation`s central energy issue for the 1990s. Restructuring proposals at the federal and state levels focus on more competitive market structures for generation and the integration of transmission within those structures. The proposed move to more competitive generation markets will expose utility costs that are above those experienced by alternative suppliers. Debate about these above-market, or transition, costs (e.g., their size,who will pay for them and how) has played a prominent role in restructuring proceedings. This paper presents results from a project to systematically assess strategies to address transition costs exposed by restructuring the electricity industry.

  18. " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size(b)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ",,,,,"1,000","Row"

  19. The Impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on Industrial End Users of Electric Motor-Driven Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Answers to frequently asked questions about the impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on industrial end users of electric motor-driven systems.

  20. " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," "," Employment Size(b)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",1000,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and

  1. Derivatives and Risk Management in the Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Electricity Industries

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    In February 2002 the Secretary of Energy directed the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to prepare a report on the nature and use of derivative contracts in the petroleum, natural gas, and electricity industries. Derivatives are contracts ('financial instruments') that are used to manage risk, especially price risk.

  2. Electricity industry development trends and the environmental programs in the Czech Republic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karas, P.

    1995-12-01

    The process of industrialization in the Czech Republic, which is more intensive than in other parts of central Europe, has been under way since the mid-nineteenth century. Over the last 40 years, large-scale industrial activity was based on extensive use of domestic primary energy sources, especially brown-coal/lignite. The escalation of this usage inflicted heavy devastation to large portions of industrial zones and, as a result, worsened living conditions through atmospheric pollution and other environmental impacts in large regions of central Europe. The Czech electricity industry and CEZ, a.s. (the nation`s principal electricity generator, responsible for meeting eighty percent of national electricity demand, and operator of the nationwide EHV transmission system) has been challenged to cope with all environmental issues by the end of 1997, in compliance with the strict limits set by the Clean Air Act of 1991, which are comparable to standard implemented in advanced industrial countries. A review of the critical environmental issues is presented and the role of the individual and of the State is analyzed. The approach of CEZ, a.s., towards a better natural environment and its response to legal environment provisions have been incorporated into the company`s development program. It comprises decommissioning the most obsolete fossil-fuel fired power stations; rehabilitation of thermal power plants; supplementing the coal/lignite-fired units selected for future operation with FGD systems and retrofitting them with DENOX equipment; a larger share of nuclear electricity generation after the completion of the Temelin NPP (2 units of 1000MW each) and, last but not least, initiating DSM (demand-side management) programs of energy-electricity savings in the Czech Republic.

  3. Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station Unit Number 1. Annual report, January--December, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report satisfies the requirements of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-91MC27363, novated as of March 5, 1992, to provide an annual update report on the year`s activities associated with Tampa Electric Company`s 250 MW IGCC demonstration project for the year 1993. Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Approximately 50% of the raw, hot syngas is cooled to 900 F and passed through a moving bed of zinc-based sorbent which removes sulfur containing compounds from the syngas. The remaining portion of the raw, hot syngas is cooled to 400 F for conventional acid gas removal. Sulfur-bearing compounds from both cleanup systems are sent to a conventional sulfuric acid plant to produce a marketable, high-purity sulfuric acid by-product. The cleaned medium-BTU syngas from these processes is routed to the combined cycle power generation system where it is mixed with air and burned in the combustion section of the combustion turbine. Heat is extracted from the expanded exhaust gases in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) to produce steam at three pressure levels for use throughout the integrated process. A highly modular, microprocessor-based distributed control system (DCS) is being developed to provide continuous and sequential control for most of the equipment on PPS-1.

  4. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program 18th annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The Department remains focused on the technologies that are critical to making electric and hybrid vehicles commercially viable and competitive with current production gasoline-fueled vehicles in performance, reliability, and affordability. During Fiscal Year 1994, significant progress was made toward fulfilling the intent of Congress. The Department and the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (a partnership of the three major domestic automobile manufacturers) continued to work together and to focus the efforts of battery developers on the battery technologies that are most likely to be commercialized in the near term. Progress was made in industry cost-shared contracts toward demonstrating the technical feasibility of fuel cells for passenger bus and light duty vehicle applications. Two industry teams which will develop hybrid vehicle propulsion technologies have been selected through competitive procurement and have initiated work, in Fiscal Year 1994. In addition, technical studies and program planning continue, as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992, to achieve the goals of reducing the transportation sector dependence on imported oil, reducing the level of environmentally harmful emissions, and enhancing industrial productivity and competitiveness.

  5. Industry and Government: Paving the way towards electric modes of transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, G.L.

    1995-06-01

    Government officials and the private sector have taken a renewed interest in supporting the development and commercialization of electric vehicles in the United States. The current electric vehicle renaissance is the result of three very important factors: the need to improve our environment, particularly our urban air quality; the need to enhance our energy security through increased use of domestically produced fuels; and the desire to increase our global economic competitiveness. In the past decade, research and development efforts related to electric vehicles (EVs) have increased dramatically in response to national imperatives to address the transportation sector`s contribution to air pollution and to our reliance on foreign oil. Also, it is recognized that development and expansion of a U.S. electric vehicle could contribute to an international competitive advantage and could assist in the conversion of traditionally defense-related industries to civilian applications.

  6. Synthesis of economic criteria in the design of electric utility industrial conservation programs in Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper lays out a set of economic criteria to guide the development of electricity conservation programs for industrial customers of the Costa Rican utilities. It puts the problem of utility and other public policy formulation in the industrial conservation field into the context of ongoing economic and trade liberalization in Costa Rica, as well as the financial and political pressures with which the country`s utilities must contend. The need to bolster utility financial performance and the perennial political difficulty of adjusting power rates for inflation and devaluation, not to mention maintaining efficient real levels, puts a premium on controlling the costs of utility conservation programs and increasing the degree of cost recovery over time. Industrial conservation programs in Costa Rica must adopt a certain degree of activation to help overcome serious market failures and imperfections while at the same time avoiding significant distortion of the price signals guiding the ongoing industrial rationalization process and the reactivation of growth.

  7. U.S. and Chinese experts perspectives on IGCC technology for Chinese electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, B.C.B.; Wang Yingshi

    1997-11-01

    Although China is a very large and populous nation, and has one of the longest known histories in the world, it has only lately begun to seek its place among modern industrial nations. This move, precipitated by the government`s relatively recently adopted strategic goals of economic development, societal reform and promotion of engagement with other industrial nations, has brought to the fore the serious situation in which the Chinese electric power industry finds itself. Owing to the advanced average age of generation facilities and the technology used in them, serious expansion and modernization of this industry needs to take place, and soon, if it is to support the rapid industrial development already taking place in China. While China does have some oil and gas, coal constitutes its largest indigenous energy supply, by far. Coal has been mined and utilized for years in China. It is used directly to provide heat for homes, businesses and in industrial applications, and used to raise steam for the generation of electricity. The presently dominant coal utilization methods are characterized by low or marginal efficiencies and an almost universal lack of pollution control equipment. Because there is so much of it, coal is destined to be China`s predominant source of thermal energy for decades to come. Realizing these things--the rapidly increasing demand for more electric power than China presently can produce, the need to raise coal utilization efficiencies, and the corresponding need to preserve the environment--the Chinese government moved to commission several official working organizations to tackle these problems.

  8. Delivered Energy Consumption Projections by Industry in the Annual Energy Outlook 2002

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents delivered energy consumption and intensity projections for the industries included in the industrial sector of the National Energy Modeling System.

  9. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  10. SO{sub 2} trading program as a metaphor for a competitive electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, P.R.

    1996-12-31

    This very brief presentation focuses on the competitive market impacts of sulfur dioxide SO{sub 2} emissions trading. Key points of the presentation are highlighted in four tables. The main principles and results of the emissions trading program are outlined, and the implications of SO{sub 2} trading for the electric industry are listed. Parallels between SO{sub 2} trading and electric utility restructing identified include no market distortion by avoiding serious disadvantages to competitors, and avoidance of stranded costs through compliance flexibility. 4 tabs.

  11. " and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Total Inputs of Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products for Heat, Power," " and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Billion Btu)" ,,,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,,,"Biomass" " "," ",," "," "," ","Wood Residues","Wood-Related"," " " ","

  12. " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," "," ","

  13. "Table A16. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total

  14. The revenue requirement approach to analysis of alternative technologies in the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohrasbi, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The advancement of coal-based power generation technology is of primary interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The interests are well-founded due to increasing costs for premium fuels and, more importantly, the establishment of energy independence to promote national security. One of DOE's current goals is to promote the development of coal-fired technology for the electric utility industry. This paper is concerned with the economic comparison of two alternative technologies: the coal gasification-combined cycle (GCC) and the coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-combined cycle. The revenue requirement analysis was used for the economic evaluation of engineering alternatives in the electric utility industry. The results were compared based on year-by-year revenue requirement analysis. A computer program was written in Fortran to perform the calculations.

  15. Antitrust Enforcement in the Electricity and Gas Industries: Problems and Solutions for the EU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leveque, Francois

    2006-06-15

    Antitrust enforcement in the electricity and gas industries raises specific problems that call for specific solutions. Among the issues: How can the anticompetitive effects of mergers be assessed in a changing regulatory environment? Should long-term agreements in energy purchasing be prohibited? What are the benefits of preventive action such as competition advocacy and market surveillance committees? Should Article 82 (a) of the EC Treaty be used to curb excessive pricing?. (author)

  16. Visioning the 21st Century Electricity Industry: Outcomes and Strategies for America

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lauren Azar Senior Advisor to the Secretary U. S. Department of Energy 8 February 2012 Visioning the 21 st Century Electricity Industry: Strategies and Outcomes for America http://teeic.anl.gov/er/transmission/restech/dist/index.cfm We all have "visions," in one form or another: * Corporations call them strategic plans * RTOs ... transmission expansion plans or Order 1000 plans * State PUCs ... integrated resource plans * Employees ... career goals Artist: Paolo Frattesi Artist: Paolo

  17. Biocide usage in cooling towers in the electric power and petroleum refining industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.; Rice, J.K.; Raivel, M.E.S.

    1997-11-01

    Cooling towers users frequently apply biocides to the circulating cooling water to control growth of microorganisms, algae, and macroorganisms. Because of the toxic properties of biocides, there is a potential for the regulatory controls on their use and discharge to become increasingly more stringent. This report examines the types of biocides used in cooling towers by companies in the electric power and petroleum refining industries, and the experiences those companies have had in dealing with agencies that regulate cooling tower blowdown discharges. Results from a sample of 67 electric power plants indicate that the use of oxidizing biocides (particularly chlorine) is favored. Quaternary ammonia salts (quats), a type of nonoxidizing biocide, are also used in many power plant cooling towers. The experience of dealing with regulators to obtain approval to discharge biocides differs significantly between the two industries. In the electric power industry, discharges of any new biocide typically must be approved in writing by the regulatory agency. The approval process for refineries is less formal. In most cases, the refinery must notify the regulatory agency that it is planning to use a new biocide, but the refinery does not need to get written approval before using it. The conclusion of the report is that few of the surveyed facilities are having any difficulty in using and discharging the biocides they want to use.

  18. Different approaches to estimating transition costs in the electric- utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1995-10-01

    The term ``transition costs`` describes the potential revenue shortfall (or welfare loss) a utility (or other actor) may experience through government-initiated deregulation of electricity generation. The potential for transition costs arises whenever a regulated industry is subject to competitive market forces as a result of explicit government action. Federal and state proposals to deregulate electricity generation sparked a national debate on transition costs in the electric-utility industry. Industry-wide transition cost estimates range from about $20 billion to $500 billion. Such disparate estimates raise important questions on estimation methods for decision makers. This report examines different approaches to estimating transition costs. The study has three objectives. First, we discuss the concept of transition cost. Second, we identify the major cost categories included in transition cost estimates and summarize the current debate on which specific costs are appropriately included in these estimates. Finally, we identify general and specific estimation approaches and assess their strengths and weaknesses. We relied primarily on the evidentiary records established at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission to identify major cost categories and specific estimation approaches. We also contacted regulatory commission staffs in ten states to ascertain estimation activities in each of these states. We refined a classification framework to describe and assess general estimation options. We subsequently developed and applied criteria to describe and assess specific estimation approaches proposed by federal regulators, state regulators, utilities, independent power companies, and consultants.

  19. FY2009 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, Mitchell

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion

  20. Evaluation of electric vehicle battery systems through in-vehicle testing: Third annual report, April 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blickwedel, T.W.; Thomas, W.A.; Whitehead, G.D.

    1989-04-01

    This third annual summary report documents the performance from October 1986 through September 1987 of the Tennessee Valley Authority's ongoing project to evaluate near-term electric vehicle traction battery packs. Detailed test procedures and test data are available from EPRI in an informal data report. The purpose of this field test activity is to provide an impartial life evaluation and comparison of the performance of various battery systems in a real-world operating environment. Testing includes initial acceptance testing of battery components and systems, daily in-vehicle operation of the batteries, monthly in-vehicle driving range tests, and periodic static (constant current) discharge tests under computer control. This year's report gives the final results on a NiZn, NiCd, Gel Cell, and two lead-acid battery packs. Specific energy and monthly driving ranges (SAE J227a ''C'' cycle and 35 mi/h constant speed cycles) are maintained throughout battery life. Vehicle range test data is analyzed statistically and variable conditions are normalized for comparative purposes. Battery modules in the pack are replaced when their measured ampere-hour capacity at a fixed discharge rate drops to 60 percent of the manufacturer's rated value. The life of a test battery pack is terminated when 25 percent of the modules in the pack have been replaced or require replacement. 26 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Electric Drive Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2015-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) announced in May 2011 a new cooperative research effort comprising DOE, the US Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford Motor Company, General Motors Company, and Chrysler Group), Tesla Motors, and representatives of the electric utility and petroleum industries. Known as U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability), it represents DOE’s commitment to developing public–private partnerships to fund high-risk–high-reward research into advanced automotive technologies. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the partnership known as FreedomCAR (derived from “Freedom” and “Cooperative Automotive Research”) that ran from 2002 through 2010 and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Electric Drive Technologies (EDT) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies, leading to lower cost and better efficiency in transforming battery energy to useful work. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency through research in more efficient TDSs. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the EDT subprogram fosters the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy

  2. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, M.

    2008-10-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve advanced vehicle efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and

  3. Residential Demand Sector Data, Commercial Demand Sector Data, Industrial Demand Sector Data - Annual Energy Outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Tables describing consumption and prices by sector and census division for 2006 - includes residential demand, commercial demand, and industrial demand

  4. DOE FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Annual Review Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Annual Review Report Pollard Technology Center Oak Ridge, Tennessee May 3-5, 2005 Prepared by Oak Ridge National Laboratory June 16, 2005 For DOE Internal Use Only Table of Contents Page Attendee List 3 Webcast Attendance Report 5 Evaluation Form Results 6 Summary of Reviewers' Ratings (grouped by research area) 9 Reviewers Rating Descriptions 12 Reviewers' Comments (grouped by title) 13 Appendix A

  5. Making evolution work for us: Structural adaptation in the electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, J.

    1994-09-01

    Adoption of a thoughtful model of reform with the unbundling of generation as its keystone could make the evolutionary process work for the industry and its stakeholders alike. Integration of transition cost recovery into this approach would defuse utilities` concerns that exposure to competition could lead to financial meltdown. Evolution, biologists now theorize, takes place not in glacial, steady progression but in volatile spasms. Surely this principle of dynamis and stasis is illustrated by the sudden wave of reform activity underway in electricity markets - a startling departure after decades in which the utility industry was the very symbol of stability in American business. The change agent has been the onset of effective competition in bulk power generation, beginning with the thin wedge of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act. As competition in the power supply area grew, spurred by low natural gas prices and advances in the cost effectiveness of smaller generating units, Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 1992, embracing competition in bulk power markets as the cornerstone of federal electricity policy. Passage of EPAct alone will not, in and of itself, restructure bulk power markets, of course. Rather, it will result in the opening of transmission systems over time and the establishment of truly competitive power markets, with private initiative and actions by federal and state regulators. Even more recently, before the industry could catch its breath and accommodate to the substantial changes set in motion by EPAct, the ripening of retail wheeling proposals in California and Michigan has spurred a further quantum leap in the nature of the debate over the industry`s future.

  6. Convergence of natural gas and electricity industries means change, opportunity for producers in the U. S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dar, V.K. Jefferson Gas Systems Inc., Arlington, VA )

    1995-03-13

    The accelerating deregulation of natural gas and electricity distribution is the third and most powerful wave of energy deregulation coursing through North America. The first wave (1978--92) provided the impetus for sculpting competitive markets in energy production. The second (1986--95) is now breaking to fashion competitive bulk logistical and wholesale consumption markets through open access on and unbundling of gas pipeline and storage capacity and high voltage transmission capacity. The third wave, the deregulation of gas and electric retail markets through open access and nondiscriminatory, unbundled local gas and electric distribution tariffs, began in the early 1990s. It will gather momentum for the next 5 years and crest at the turn of the century, affecting and molding almost $300 billion/year in retail energy sales. The transformation will have these strategic implications: (1) the convergent evolution of the gas and electric industries; (2) severe margin compression along the energy value chain from wellhead to busbar to the distribution pipes and wires; and (3) the rapid emergency of cyberspace retailing of energy products and services. The paper discusses merchant plants, convergence and producers, capital flows, producer federations, issues of scale, and demand, margins, and value.

  7. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal",2274,2214,2229,2382,2405 "Hydro Conventional",77821,77885,77930,78518,78825 "Solar",411,502,536,619,941 "Wind",11329,16515,24651,34296,39135 "Wood/Wood Waste",6372,6704,6864,6939,7037 "MSW/Landfill Gas",3166,3536,3644,3645,3690

  8. 2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 reporting year, an estimated 11.84 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  9. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Frederick

    2012-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000160-01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Facility and system description; (2) Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; (3) Groundwater monitoring data; (4) Status of special compliance conditions; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 reporting year, an estimated 6.99 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. Using the dissolved iron data, the concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  10. 2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Frederick

    2011-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from May 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 partial reporting year, an estimated 3.646 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

  11. 2014 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike

    2015-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2013 through October 31, 2014. The report contains the following information; Facility and system description; Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; Groundwater monitoring data; Status of special compliance conditions; Noncompliance issues; and Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2014 reporting year, an estimated 10.11 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the applicable Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s groundwater quality standard levels.

  12. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, M.

    2006-10-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and DaimlerChrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Vehicle Systems subprogram within the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive and heavy truck technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles and heavy trucks will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. This work also supports the development of advanced automotive accessories and the reduction of parasitic losses (e.g., aerodynamic drag, thermal management, friction and wear, and rolling resistance). In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the Vehicle Systems subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve fuel economy, comply with projected emissions and safety regulations, and use fuels produced domestically. The Vehicle Systems subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership and the 21st Century Truck Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) Identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems

  13. Form EIA-861S ANNUAL ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY REPORT (SHORT FORM...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... than 2,750 per day for each civil violation, or a fine of not more than 5,000 per day for each criminal violation. The government may bring a civil action to prohibit reporting ...

  14. 2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (WRU-I-0160-01, formerly LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2012 through October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2013 reporting year, an estimated 9.64 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 17 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the applicable Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s groundwater quality standard levels.

  15. Eck Industries, Inc. Realizes Savings Through Smarter Lighting Solutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study discusses how Eck Industries pursued a lighting retrofit project that reduced its Manitowoc, Wisconsin, facility’s plant-wide electricity use, achieved annual operating savings, and provided higher quality lighting.

  16. 2015 Standard Scenarios Annual Report: U.S. Electric Sector Scenario...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report: U.S. Electric Sector Scenario Exploration ... Porro National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical ... contingency, frequency regulation, and VRRE forecast error ...

  17. 2014 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Electricity and Energy Reliability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2014 and 2015 within the Office of Electricity and Energy Reliability.

  18. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE).

  19. DOE National Power Grid recommendations: unreliable guides for the future organization of the bulk electric-power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.T. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The bulk electric power supply industry needs leadership to meet its problems effectively, economically, and with the least injury to the environment during the rest of the century. The industry's pluralistic character, which is one of its strengths, and the range of the federal antitrust laws have blunted industry response to the challenge of supplying adequate bulk power. DOE failed to recognize the leadership vacuum and to use the opportunity provided by its Final Report on the National Power Grid Study to adopt a more effective role. DOE can still recover and urge Congress to pass the necessary enabling legislation to establish a regional bulk power supply corporation that would generate and transmit electric power for sale to federally chartered, privately owned electric utilities having no corporate links to their wholesale customers. 87 references.

  20. Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-08-16

    Changes in the electricity consumption of commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities) during Demand Response (DR) events are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models. Model error makes it difficult to precisely quantify these changes in consumption and understand if C&I facilities exhibit event-to-event variability in their response to DR signals. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and DR variability in C&I facilities facing dynamic electricity prices. Using a regression-based baseline model, we present a method to compute the error associated with estimates of several DR parameters. We also develop a metric to determine how much observed DR variability results from baseline model error rather than real variability in response. We analyze 38 C&I facilities participating in an automated DR program and find that DR parameter errors are large. Though some facilities exhibit real DR variability, most observed variability results from baseline model error. Therefore, facilities with variable DR parameters may actually respond consistently from event to event. Consequently, in DR programs in which repeatability is valued, individual buildings may be performing better than previously thought. In some cases, however, aggregations of C&I facilities exhibit real DR variability, which could create challenges for power system operation.

  1. Industrial advanced turbine systems: Development and demonstration. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    The US DOE has initiated a program for advanced turbine systems (ATS) that will serve industrial power generation markets. The ATS will provide ultra-high efficiency, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness. The ATS will foster (1) early market penetration that enhances the global competitiveness of US industry, (2) public health benefits resulting from reduced exhaust gas emissions of target pollutants, (3) reduced cost of power used in the energy-intensive industrial marketplace and (4) the retention and expansion of the skilled US technology base required for the design, development and maintenance of state-of-the-art advanced turbine products. The Industrial ATS Development and Demonstration program is a multi-phased effort. Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar) has participated in Phases 1 and 2 of the program. On September 14, 1995 Solar was awarded a Cooperative Agreement for Phases 3 and 4 of the program. Phase 3 of the work is separated into two subphases: Phase 3A entails Component Design and Development Phase 3B will involve Integrated Subsystem Testing. Phase 4 will cover Host Site Testing. Forecasts call for completion of the program within budget as originally estimated. Scheduled completion is forecasted to be approximately 3 years late to original plan. This delay has been intentionally planned in order to better match program tasks to the anticipated availability of DOE funds. To ensure the timely realization of DOE/Solar program goals, the development schedule for the smaller system (Mercury 50) and enabling technologies has been maintained, and commissioning of the field test unit is scheduled for May of 2000. As of the end of the reporting period work on the program is 22.80% complete based upon milestones completed. This measurement is considered quite conservative as numerous drawings on the Mercury 50 are near release. Variance information is provided in Section 4.0-Program Management.

  2. Industry Leaders, Research Experts Gather for Second Annual DOE Solid-State Lighting Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Technology leaders from industry, research institutions, universities, and national laboratories gathered in San Diego, California, on February 3 and 4, 2005 to attend a workshop focused on advancing solid-state lighting (SSL) technology from the laboratory to the marketplace. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Office, the workshop provided an interactive forum for shaping and prioritizing DOE's SSL research and development activities.

  3. Applications of Genome-based Science in Shaping Citrus Industries of the World (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting, 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gmitter Jr, Fred [University of Florida

    2013-01-15

    Fred Gmitter from the University of Florida on "Applications of Genome-based Science in Shaping the Future of the World's Citrus Industries" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  4. Applications of Genome-based Science in Shaping Citrus Industries of the World (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting, 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gmitter Jr, Fred [University of Florida

    2012-03-21

    Fred Gmitter from the University of Florida on "Applications of Genome-based Science in Shaping the Future of the World's Citrus Industries" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  5. FY2011 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2012-01-31

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), thermal management, and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  6. Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-25

    In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), thermal management, and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrows automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  8. FY2012 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), thermal management, and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  9. FY2010 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and electric motor technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency.

  10. Annual energy review 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This 13th edition presents the Energy Information Administration`s historical energy statistics. For most series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1994; thus, this report is well-suited to long-term trend analyses. It covers all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels and electricity. Statistics on renewable energy sources are also included: this year, for the first time, usage of renewables by other consumers as well as by electric utilities is included. Also new is a two-part, comprehensive presentation of data on petroleum products supplied by sector for 1949 through 1994. Data from electric utilities and nonutilities are integrated as ``electric power industry`` data; nonutility power gross generation are presented for the first time. One section presents international statistics (for more detail see EIA`s International Energy Annual).

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The APEEM subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and electric motor technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies.

  12. Annual Electric Utility Data - EIA-906/920/923 Data File

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    < back to detailed data Detailed State Data form data (EIA-906, 920, and 923) Revisions & Corrections The re-release of the form EIA-861 survey data: January 13, 2016 Revenue data values were revised due to enhancements to the SEDAPs imputation system. Contact: Electricity data experts

  13. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, June 1991--June 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; When, C.S.

    1992-06-01

    This report covers the activity during the period from 2 June 1991 to 1 June 1992. The major areas of work include: the combustor sub-scale and full size testing, cleanup, coal fuel specification and processing, the Hot End Simulation rig and design of the engine parts required for use with the coal-fueled combustor island. To date Solar has demonstrated: Stable and efficient combustion burning coal-water mixtures using the Two Stage Slagging Combustor; Molten slag removal of over 97% using the slagging primary and the particulate removal impact separator; and on-site preparation of CWM is feasible. During the past year the following tasks were completed: The feasibility of on-site CWM preparation was demonstrated on the subscale TSSC. A water-cooled impactor was evaluated on the subscale TSSC; three tests were completed on the full size TSSC, the last one incorporating the PRIS; a total of 27 hours of operation on CWM at design temperature were accumulated using candle filters supplied by Refraction through Industrial Pump & Filter; a target fuel specification was established and a fuel cost model developed which can identify sensitivities of specification parameters; analyses of the effects of slag on refractory materials were conducted; and modifications continued on the Hot End Simulation Rig to allow extended test times.

  14. Industrial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  15. Mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, and applications for market-based rates in a deregulating electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, A.J.

    1999-05-01

    In this article, the author reviews FERC's current procedures for undertaking competitive analysis. The current procedure for evaluating the competitive impact of transactions in the electric utility industry is described in Order 592, in particular Appendix A. These procedures effectively revised criteria that had been laid out in Commonwealth Edison and brought its merger policy in line with the EPAct and the provisions of Order 888. Order 592 was an attempt to provide more certainty and expedition in handling mergers. It established three criteria that had to be satisfied for a merger to be approved: Post-merger market power must be within acceptable thresholds or be satisfactorily mitigated, acceptable customer protections must be in place (to ensure that rates will not go up as a result of increased costs) and any adverse effect on regulation must be addressed. FERC states that its Order 592 Merger Policy Statement is based upon the Horizontal Merger Guidelines issued jointly by the Federal Trade Commission and the Antitrust Division Department of Justice (FTC/DOJ Merger Guidelines). While it borrows much of the language and basic concepts of the Merger Guidelines, FERC's procedures have been criticized as not following the methodology closely enough, leaving open the possibility of mistakes in market definition.

  16. FY2013 Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Susan A.

    2014-02-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) technology area within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies, leading to lower cost and better efficiency in transforming battery energy to useful work. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency through research in more efficient TDSs.

  17. A simple tool for estimating city-wide annual electrical energy savings from cooler surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomerantz, Melvin; Rosado, Pablo J.; Levinson, Ronnen M.

    2015-06-27

    We present a simple method to estimate the maximum possible electrical energy saving that might be achieved by increasing the albedo of surfaces in a large city. We restrict this to the “indirect effect”, the cooling of outside air that lessens the demand for air conditioning (AC). Given the power demand of the electric utilities and data about the city, we can use a single linear equation to estimate the maximum savings. For example, the result for an albedo change of 0.2 of pavements in a typical warm city in California, such as Sacramento, is that the saving is less than about 2 kWh per m2 per year. This may help decision makers choose which heat island mitigation techniques are economical from an energy-saving perspective.

  18. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2012-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  19. 2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  20. [Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. 1996 DOE annual technical report, January--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project uses a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal to syngas. The gasification plant is coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 BTUs/cf (HHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product. Approximately 10% of the raw, hot syngas at 900 F is designed to pass through an intermittently moving bed of metal-oxide sorbent which removes sulfur-bearing compounds from the syngas. PPS-1 will be the first unit in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology on a commercial unit. The emphasis during 1996 centered around start-up activities.

  1. "Table A25. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","

  2. Ultra-Efficient and Power Dense Electric Motors for U. S. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melfi, Michael J.; Schiferl, Richard F.; Umans, Stephen D.

    2013-03-12

    The primary purpose of this project was to combine the ease-of-installation and ease-of-use attributes of industrial induction motors with the low-loss and small size and weight advantages of PM motors to create an ultra-efficient, high power density industrial motor that can be started across-the-line or operated from a standard, Volts/Hertz drive without the need for a rotor position feedback device. PM motor products that are currently available are largely variable speed motors that require a special adjustable speed drive with rotor position feedback. The reduced size and weight helps to offset the magnet cost in order make these motors commercially viable. The scope of this project covers horsepower ratings from 20 ? 500. Prototypes were built and tested at ratings ranging from 30 to 250 HP. Since fans, pumps and compressors make up a large portion of industrial motor applications, the motor characteristics are tailored to those applications. Also, since there is extensive use of adjustable frequency inverters in these applications, there is the opportunity to design for an optimal pole number and operate at other than 60 Hz frequency when inverters are utilized. Designs with four and eight pole configurations were prototyped as part of this work. Four pole motors are the most commonly used configuration in induction motors today. The results of the prototype design, fabrication, and testing were quite successful. The 50 HP rating met all of the design goals including efficiency and power density. Tested values of motor losses at 50 HP were 30% lower than energy efficient induction motors and the motor weight is 35% lower than the energy efficient induction motor of the same rating. Further, when tested at the 30 HP rating that is normally built in this 286T frame size, the efficiency far exceeds the project design goals with 30 HP efficiency levels indicating a 55% reduction in loss compared to energy efficient motors with a motor weight that is a few

  3. FY2011 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, Mitchell

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced in May 2011 a new cooperative research effort comprising DOE, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford Motor Company, General Motors Company, and Chrysler Group), Tesla Motors, and representatives of the electric utility and petroleum industries. Known as U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public-private partnerships to fund high risk-high reward research into advanced automotive technologies. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the partnership known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research') that ran from 2002 through 2010 and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machines (PEEM) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the PEEM subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The PEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the U.S. DRIVE partnership through a three phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then

  4. 2015 Standard Scenarios Annual Report: U.S. Electric Sector Scenario Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Patrick; Cole, Wesley; Blair, Nate; Lantz, Eric; Krishnan, Venkat; Mai, Trieu; Mulcahy, David; Porro, Gian

    2015-07-16

    This report is one of several products resulting from an initial effort to provide a consistent set of technology cost and performance data and to define a conceptual and consistent scenario framework that can be used in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL’s) future analyses. The long-term objective of this effort is to identify a range of possible futures of the U.S. electricity sector in which to consider specific energy system issues through (1) defining a set of prospective scenarios that bound ranges of key technology, market, and policy assumptions and (2) assessing these scenarios in NREL’s market models to understand the range of resulting outcomes, including energy technology deployment and production, energy prices, and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.

  5. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce G

    2006-09-29

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University has been successfully managing the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by Penn State, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. Base funding for the selected projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. At the annual funding meeting held in October 2003, ten projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten 2004 projects were completed during the previous annual reporting period and their final reports were submitted with the previous annual report (i.e., 10/01/04-09/30/05). The final report for the remaining project, which was submitted during this reporting

  6. Coal industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, distribution, coal stocks, quality, prices, coal production information, and emissions for a wide audience.

  7. FY2010 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, Mitchell

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from ''Freedom'' and ''Cooperative Automotive Research''), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public-private partnerships to fund high risk, high payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and electric motor technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the APEEM subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2

  8. Electric and Magnetic Fields Research and Public Information Dissemination Program annual report for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) Research and Public Information Dissemination (RAPID) Program was authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 as a near-term effort to expand and accelerate the research needed to address the EMF issue. As required by this legislation, the EMF Interagency Committee, the National EMF Advisory Committee (NEMFAC), and the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) are providing valued input and advice for the direction of this program. With this input and advice, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) have developed and are implementing five-year program plans. Multi-year health effects research projects and related EMF measurement and exposure assessment projects are underway using funds appropriated in fiscal years 1994, 1995, and 1996 together with voluntary non-Federal contributions. The results of these research projects, along with the results of other EMF research, will be used as input to the hazard evaluation effort, which is the focus of the EMF RAPID Program. A coordinated interagency program is underway to communicate needed information on the EMF issue in a clear manner to the public and other decision makers.

  9. This document is to provide input for a probable future state of the electric system and electric industry in 2030

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruce Renz - Renz Consulting State of the Electric System in 2030 The Issue Last month's SGN article by Joe Miller discussed how the transition to a Smart Grid might take place. Joe's article was part of a series that has discussed the seven Principal Characteristics of a Smart Grid. While those seven characteristics promise a future in which the power grid supports and enables the needs of 21 st century society, such a grid does not exist today. And it will not exist tomorrow unless there is a

  10. Research, development and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979. [70 W/lb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This second annual report under Contract No. 31-109-39-4200 covers the period July 1, 1978 through August 31, 1979. The program demonstrates the feasibility of the nickel-zinc battery for electric vehicle propulsion. The program is divided into seven distinct but highly interactive tasks collectively aimed at the development and commercialization of nickel-zinc technology. These basic technical tasks are separator development, electrode development, product design and analysis, cell/module battery testing, process development, pilot manufacturing, and thermal management. A Quality Assurance Program has also been established. Significant progress has been made in the understanding of separator failure mechanisms, and a generic category of materials has been specified for the 300+ deep discharge (100% DOD) applications. Shape change has been reduced significantly. A methodology has been generated with the resulting hierarchy: cycle life cost, volumetric energy density, peak power at 80% DOD, gravimetric energy density, and sustained power. Generation I design full-sized 400-Ah cells have yielded in excess of 70 W/lb at 80% DOD. Extensive testing of cells, modules, and batteries is done in a minicomputer-based testing facility. The best life attained with electric vehicle-size cell components is 315 cycles at 100% DOD (1.0V cutoff voltage), while four-cell (approx. 6V) module performance has been limited to about 145 deep discharge cycles. The scale-up of processes for production of components and cells has progressed to facilitate component production rates of thousands per month. Progress in the area of thermal management has been significant, with the development of a model that accurately represents heat generation and rejection rates during battery operation. For the balance of the program, cycle life of > 500 has to be demonstrated in modules and full-sized batteries. 40 figures, 19 tables. (RWR)

  11. Solar-electric power: The U.S. photovoltaic industry roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2003-01-01

    To meet this challenge, we — the U.S.-based PV industry — have developed this roadmap as a guide for building our domestic industry, ensuring U.S. technology ownership, and implementing a sound commercialization strategy that will yield significant benefits at minimal cost. Putting the roadmap into action will call for reasonable and consistent co-investment by our industry and government in research and technology development.

  12. Tampa Electric Company, Polk Power Station Unit No. 1. Annual report, January--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-10-01

    As part of the Tampa Electric Polk Power Unit No. 1, a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown entrained-flow coal gasifier will convert approximately 2300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) into a medium-BTU fuel gas with a heat content of about 250 BTU/scf (LHV). Syngas produced in the gasifier flows through a high-temperature heat recovery unit which cools the gases prior to entering two parallel clean-up areas. A portion (up to 50%) of the hot syngas is cooled to 1000{degrees}F and passed through a moving bed of zinc titanate sorbent which removed sulfur containing components of the fuel gas. The project will be the first in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology at a commercial scale. The remaining portion of the syngas is cooled to 400{degrees}F for conventional acid gas removal. This portion of the plant is capable of processing between 50% and 100% of the dirty syngas. The cleaned low-BTU syngas is then routed to the combined cycle power generation system where it is mixed with air and burned in the gas turbine combustor. Heat is extracted from the expanded exhaust gases by a heat recovery steam generator to produce high pressure steam. This steam, along with the steam generated in the gasification process, drives a steam turbine to generate an additional 132MW of power. Internal process power consumption is approximately 62MW, and includes power for coal grinding, air separation, and feed pumps. Net output from the IGCC demonstration plant will be 260MW.

  13. FY2014 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) announced in May 2011 a new cooperative research effort comprising DOE, the US Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford Motor Company, General Motors Company, and Chrysler Group), Tesla Motors, and representatives of the electric utility and petroleum industries. Known as U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability), it represents DOE’s commitment to developing public–private partnerships to fund high-risk–high-reward research into advanced automotive technologies. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the partnership known as FreedomCAR (derived from “Freedom” and “Cooperative Automotive Research”) that ran from 2002 through 2010 and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies, leading to lower cost and better efficiency in transforming battery energy to useful work. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow’s automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency through research in more efficient TDSs.

  14. FY2007 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, Mitchell

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as 'FreedomCAR' (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieving the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve advanced vehicle efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether

  15. FY 2005 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszewski, M

    2005-11-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and DaimlerChrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from ''Freedom'' and ''Cooperative Automotive Research''), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Vehicle Systems subprogram within the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive and heavy truck technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles and heavy trucks will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. This work also supports the development of advanced automotive accessories and the reduction of parasitic losses (e.g., aerodynamic drag, thermal management, friction and wear, and rolling resistance). In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the Vehicle Systems subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve fuel economy, comply with projected emissions and safety regulations, and use fuels produced domestically. The Vehicle Systems subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel and the 21st Century Truck Partnerships through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) Identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements, then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and

  16. Electric industry restructuring and environmental issues: A comparative analysis of the experience in California, New York, and Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.M.; Galen, P.S.

    1996-08-01

    Since the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) issued its April 20, 1994, Blue Book proposal to restructure the regulation of electric utilities in California to allow more competition, over 40 states have initiated similar activities. The question of how major public policy objectives such as environmental protection, energy efficiency, renewable energy, and assistance to low-income customers can be sustained in the new competitive environment is also an important element being considered. Because many other states will undergo restructuring in the future, the experience of the {open_quotes}early adopter{close_quotes} states in addressing public policy objectives in their electric service industry restructuring processes can provide useful information to other states. The Competitive Resource Strategies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Utility Technologies, is interested in documenting and disseminating the experience of the pioneering states. The Center for Energy Analysis and Applications of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory assisted the Office of Utility Technologies in this effort with a project on the treatment of environmental issues in electric industry restructuring.

  17. Electricity and technical progress: The bituminous coal mining industry, mechanization to automation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devine, W.D. Jr.

    1987-07-01

    Development and use of electric mobile machinery facilitated the mechanization of underground bituminous coal mining and has played a lesser but important role in the growth of surface mining. Electricity has been central to the rise of mechanically integrated mining, both underground (after 1950) and on the surface (recently). Increasing labor productivity in coal mining and decreasing total energy use per ton of coal mined are associated with penetration of new electric technology through at least 1967. Productivity declined and energy intensity increased during the 1970s due in part to government regulations. Recent productivity gains stem partly from new technology that permits automation of certain mining operations. On most big electric excavating machines, a pair of large alternating current (ac) motors operate continuously at full speed. These drive direct current (dc) generators that energize dc motors, each matched to the desired power and speed range of a particular machine function. Direct-current motors provide high torque at low speeds, thus reducing the amount of gearing required; each crawler is independently propelled forward or backward by its own variable-speed dc motors. The principal advantages of electric power are that mechanical power-transmission systems - shafts, gears, etc. - are eliminated or greatly simplified. Reliability is higher, lifetime is longer, and maintenance is much simpler with electric power than with diesel power, and the spare parts inventory is considerably smaller. 100 refs., 11 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - nuclear section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on nuclear electricity capacity, generation, and number of operable nuclear reactors.

  19. Industrial innovations for tomorrow: Advances in industrial energy-efficiency technologies. Commercial power plant tests blend of refuse-derived fuel and coal to generate electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    MSW can be converted to energy in two ways. One involves the direct burning of MSW to produce steam and electricity. The second converts MSW into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) by reducing the size of the MSW and separating metals, glass, and other inorganic materials. RDF can be densified or mixed with binders to form fuel pellets. As part of a program sponsored by DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory participated in a cooperative research and development agreement to examine combustion of binder-enhanced, densified refuse-derived fuel (b-d RDF) pellets with coal. Pelletized b-d RDF has been burned in coal combustors, but only in quantities of less than 3% in large utility systems. The DOE project involved the use of b-d RDF in quantities up to 20%. A major goal was to quantify the pollutants released during combustion and measure combustion performance.

  20. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Capacity Conductor Characteristics Data Year Country NERC Region NERC Sub- region Type Operating (kV) Design (kV) Rating (MVa) Month Year From Terminal To Terminal Length (Miles) Type Pole Type Pole Material Size (MCM) Material Bundling Arrange- ment Present Ultimate Company Code Company Name Organizational Type Ownership (Percent) Project Name Level of Certainty Primary Driver 1 Primary Driver 2 2011 US TRE ERCOT AC 300-399 5 2018 DeCordova Benbrook 27 OH 44372 Delivery 100 00TPIT0004

  1. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  2. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  3. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  4. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  5. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  6. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  7. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  8. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  9. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  11. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  12. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  13. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  14. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  15. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  16. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  17. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  18. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  19. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  20. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  1. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  2. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  3. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  4. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  5. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  6. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  7. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  8. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  9. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  11. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  12. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  13. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  14. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  15. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  16. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  17. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  18. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  19. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  20. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  1. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  2. A premium price electricity market for the emerging biomass industry in the UK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettle, R.

    1995-11-01

    The Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation (NFFO) is the means by which the UK Government creates an initial market for renewable sources of electricity. For the first time the third round of the competition for NFFO contracts included a band for {open_quote}energy crops and agricultural and forestry wastes{close_quote}. The NFFO Order which obliges the Regional Electricity Companies (RECs) in England and Wales to contract for a specified electricity generating capacity from renewable resources was made in December 1994. It required 19.06 MW of wood gasification capacity and 103.81 MW from other energy crops and agricultural and forestry wastes. The purpose of these Orders is to create an initial market so that in the not too distant future the most promising renewables can compete without financial support. This paper describes how these projects are expected to contribute to this policy. It also considers how the policy objective of convergence under successive Orders between the price paid under the NFFO and the market price for electricity might be accomplished.

  3. Energy Department Announces $25 Million to Develop Next Generation of Electric Machines for Industrial Energy Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Obama Administration's Mission Innovation effort to double clean energy research and development (R&D) investments over the next five years, the Energy Department today announced up to $25 million in available funding aimed at advancing technologies for energy-efficient electric motors through applied R&D.

  4. NRECA Annual Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) is hosting its annual conference in Orlando, FL, on Feb. 19-27, 2015.

  5. OPSI Annual Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Organization of PJM States, Inc. (OPSI) is hosting its annual meeting with sessions covering clean power, gas and electric coordination, and more.

  6. Buying and Selling Electric Power in the West

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 21st Annual Conference on Buying & Selling Electric Power in the Southwest is a two-day conference to address the EPA greenhouse rules and how they will impact the industry. Attendees will learn about the challenges of integrating rooftop solar into the electric grid, the changing energy market in the west, and efforts to police that market.

  7. Prospects for the medium- and long-term development of China`s electric power industry and analysis of the potential market for superconductivity technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.

    1998-05-01

    First of all, overall economic growth objectives in China are concisely and succinctly specified in this report. Secondly, this report presents a forecast of energy supply and demand for China`s economic growth for 2000--2050. In comparison with the capability of energy construction in China in the future, a gap between supply and demand is one of the important factors hindering the sustainable development of Chain`s economy. The electric power industry is one of China`s most important industries. To adopt energy efficiency through high technology and utilizing energy adequately is an important technological policy for the development of China`s electric power industry in the future. After briefly describing the achievements of China`s electric power industry, this report defines the target areas and policies for the development of hydroelectricity and nuclear electricity in the 2000s in China, presents the strategic position of China`s electric power industry as well as objectives and relevant plans of development for 2000--2050. This report finds that with the discovery of superconducting electricity, the discovery of new high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, and progress in materials techniques, the 21st century will be an era of superconductivity. Applications of superconductivity in the energy field, such as superconducting storage, superconducting transmission, superconducting transformers, superconducting motors, its application in Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD), as well as in nuclear fusion, has unique advantages. Its market prospects are quite promising. 12 figs.

  8. An overview of market power issues in today`s electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guth, L.A.

    1998-07-01

    With the tendency for vertical disintegration of control and/or ownership of assets within the industry, however, properly defining the relevant product in horizontal competition at each stage of production, transmission, distribution, and marketing assumes increasing importance. There is every reason to expect that market power issues and antitrust concerns will arise in each of the five dimensions outlined above. In each case, the author believes the framework will continue to be properly measuring market shares and concentration for carefully defined product and geographic markets as a basis for making informed judgments about market power concerns. The modeling of industry demand, supply, and competitive interactions certainly helps to inform this process by testing the proper scopes of product and geographic markets and of the economic significance of productive assets in the market defined. Modeling should also help the screening process where the issue is possible market power in markets being restructured for retail competition.

  9. Identification, definition and evaluation of potential impacts facing the US electric utility industry over the next decade. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grainger, J.J.; Lee, S.S.H.

    1993-11-26

    There are numerous conditions of the generation system that may ultimately develop into system states affecting system reliability and security. Such generation system conditions should also be considered when evaluating the potential impacts on system operations. The following five issues have been identified to impact system reliability and security to the greatest extent: transmission access/retail wheeling; non-utility generators and independent power producers; integration of dispersed storage and generation into utility distribution systems; EMF and right-of-way limitations; Clean Air Act Amendments. Strictly speaking, some issues are interrelated and one issue cannot be completely dissociated from the others. However, this report addresses individual issues separately in order to determine all major aspects of bulk power system operations affected by each issue. The impacts of the five issues on power system reliability and security are summarized. This report examines the five critical issues that the US electric utility industry will be facing over the next decade. The investigation of their impacts on utility industry will be facing over the next decade. The investigation of their impacts on utility system reliability and security is limited to the system operation viewpoint. Those five issues will undoubtedly influence various planning aspects of the bulk transmission system. However, those subjects are beyond the scope of this report. While the issues will also influence the restructure and business of the utility industry politically, sociologically, environmentally, and economically, all discussion included in the report are focused only on technical ramifications.

  10. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",23050,23419,23615,23642,23642,23285,23144,23182,23218,23252,23346,22943,23429,22532,22366,21461,21292,20840,20692,20463,19878,19972,19972,19902,19354,95,72.9,72.1

  11. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11526,11559,13131,11464,11488,11456,11459,11467,10669,10434,9769,9774,9551,9615,9330,9279,9619,9688,9639,9639,9168,9033,9000,8996,8944,96,71.9,78.1

  12. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",2313,2205,1946,1891,1889,1868,1847,1820,1736,1769,1722,1752,1740,1770,1775,1725,1702,1763,1739,1737,1740,1715,1679,1551,1547,84,91.4,93.9

  13. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",21311,20668,20277,20168,20115,20127,19717,19551,19566,18860,16854,15542,15516,15284,15140,15091,15084,15164,15147,15222,15067,14990,14970,14911,14906,98.9,76.2,75.4

  14. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",28201,28165,30294,29011,28685,28021,26467,26334,26346,25248,23739,23171,24390,24347,24321,24324,30665,43711,43936,43303,42329,43140,42673,42780,42822,46.5,42.6,37.8

  15. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",10204,10238,10475,10580,9114,8454,8142,8008,8034,7955,7954,7883,7596,7479,7271,7255,6938,6851,6795,6648,6675,6637,6629,6610,6533,86.6,66.2,68.3

  16. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",161,152,152,154,160,111,111,111,37,25,174,210,78,185,2204,2454,5617,6295,6321,6723,6579,6600,6600,6764,7079,34.2,1.9,1.8

  17. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",51775,50967,51373,51298,50853,50781,47222,47224,45184,45196,42619,41996,40267,38238,37265,36537,36472,39460,36899,35857,34769,33663,33403,32204,32103,89.7,86,87.1

  18. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",28873,28875,29293,27146,26639,26558,26462,26432,26542,26538,25404,24804,25821,24099,24861,23331,23392,23148,22791,22299,21698,21163,21160,20752,20731,89.6,72.7,75.5

  19. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",1732,1821,1821,1821,1828,1859,1730,1730,1730,1705,1691,1624,1622,1622,1627,1609,1617,1597,1611,1603,1603,1603,1602,1522,1488,68.1,72.1,64.8

  20. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",3413,3394,3394,3035,3035,3029,2686,2547,2558,2558,2394,2439,2674,2521,2585,2571,2576,2576,2553,2559,2500,2300,2308,2282,2282,85.7,76.1,69

  1. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",5263,5269,5274,5280,4789,4819,4680,4630,4731,3976,4233,3007,4151,4420,17497,16817,30367,33550,33169,33143,32951,32770,33644,32644,32597,48.1,10.9,11.8

  2. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",23319,23309,23031,22763,23008,23631,23598,22012,22021,22017,21261,21016,20392,20616,20554,20358,20337,20201,20681,20712,20632,20901,20901,20702,20588,85.9,83.2,84.8

  3. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",12655,12092,12179,11863,11282,11479,11274,10669,9562,10090,9895,9039,8457,8402,8511,8438,8370,8217,8161,8237,8219,8069,8074,8093,7702,93.5,77.3,76.7

  4. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11468,11485,11593,11746,11732,11733,11246,10944,10829,10734,10705,10729,10244,10223,10089,10023,9918,9789,9697,9678,9525,9525,9518,9507,9475,99.5,93.5,80.6

  5. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",19473,19599,19681,19601,18945,18763,16759,16819,16878,16234,15860,15349,15419,15229,14781,14708,13995,15660,15686,15425,15397,15297,15297,15333,15511,88,92.6,93.3

  6. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",18120,17297,16661,15991,16471,15615,15755,14756,15176,15137,14249,12728,14233,14165,14317,16339,17014,17080,17150,17019,16433,16221,16221,15883,15839,67.8,61.6,68

  7. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",10,14,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,16,17,21,63,1457,1502,2388,2433,2253,2222,2222,2379,2369,0.5,0.4,0.2

  8. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",85,85,85,81,80,80,80,80,79,79,79,70,70,70,753,10955,10971,11105,10958,10958,10838,10709,10709,10723,9758,7.2,0.6,0.7

  9. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",971,969,991,956,936,930,829,827,837,983,981,981,945,993,997,2216,3386,11295,9366,9289,9219,9461,9452,9770,9909,8.1,6.8,7.4

  10. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",22260,22148,22517,22401,21639,21759,21885,21894,22734,23029,23310,23345,23575,22833,22757,22378,21948,21916,21990,21986,22396,22395,22347,22258,22298,88.3,72.6,73.1

  11. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11557,11901,11685,11650,11547,11639,11432,10719,10458,10543,10175,10129,10073,9885,9069,8988,9090,9217,9181,8925,8936,8853,8830,8854,8806,88.4,78.5,74

  12. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",20538,20562,20767,20831,20360,19600,19621,19570,19675,18970,18602,18587,18409,18221,17182,16757,16284,16215,15980,15727,15490,15429,15405,15311,15179,99.4,93.7,94.3

  13. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",3209,2568,2570,2483,2340,2232,2190,2179,2163,2186,2189,2274,2237,2235,2265,2257,4945,4943,4943,4943,4907,4871,4871,4829,4912,38.7,39.9,50.7

  14. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",7913,7911,7810,7834,7647,7675,7011,6959,7056,7007,6722,6667,6154,6112,6043,5963,5944,5894,5765,5663,5651,5645,5637,5584,5586,99.7,97.3,90.6

  15. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",8480,7915,7807,8939,8713,8741,8741,6998,6771,5611,5389,5323,5384,5388,5434,5434,5642,5642,5643,5556,5478,5235,5235,5125,4944,80.9,76.3,80.9

  16. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",1121,1121,1121,1134,1132,1118,1125,1121,1116,1121,1121,1121,1105,1128,2290,2294,2292,2715,2705,2698,2692,2692,2692,2793,2821,80.2,27.1,25.4

  17. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",6094,5912,6359,6321,6345,6344,6324,6324,6223,5692,5348,5398,5463,5250,5250,5299,5294,5183,5077,5078,4940,4967,4967,4950,4947,93.8,78,75.5

  18. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",10989,10736,10739,11022,11032,11871,11784,12056,12046,11927,11386,11902,11675,11572,15807,17679,29587,29987,30061,32149,31567,32323,30163,31177,31020,44.4,28,27.2

  19. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",26941,26706,27265,26158,25398,25376,25405,25345,24553,23822,23984,24036,23650,23478,22015,21182,21020,21054,20923,20597,19691,20041,20043,19990,20049,89.9,91.8,88.3

  20. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",5516,5292,5217,4908,4912,4852,4691,4668,4634,4622,4673,4561,4659,4677,4679,4676,4657,4733,4208,4485,4487,4476,4476,4497,4476,99.2,79.4,81.2

  1. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11134,20779,21072,20120,20179,20356,20340,20012,20147,19312,27713,27547,27304,27081,26301,27083,26768,26630,27279,27365,26347,26388,26388,26939,25365,92.3,61,35.3

  2. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",17045,16951,17148,16487,16015,16187,15913,14495,14648,13992,13460,13463,13387,12941,13438,12861,12622,12931,13092,12928,12546,12348,12348,12308,12284,94.6,76.2,70.9

  3. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11175,10973,10888,10892,10846,10683,10491,10502,9971,9839,9805,10298,10357,10354,10337,10293,10449,10537,10526,10445,10165,10132,10132,11235,11235,91.7,76.1,70.4

  4. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",39,455,455,455,455,455,455,455,455,455,4921,4921,4887,4887,13394,25251,33781,33825,34060,33699,32710,32509,32505,32423,32526,36.3,1,0.1

  5. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",20836,21039,21280,22227,22082,22100,22062,21730,21019,20787,20406,19402,19103,18246,17717,17682,17627,17431,17165,16693,16152,16131,16118,16162,14909,94.8,92.1,91.3

  6. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",3450,3480,3428,3130,2994,3042,2911,2826,2889,2759,2618,2650,2752,2712,2710,2763,2791,2795,2822,2818,2831,2543,2543,2519,2517,100,82.6,87.4

  7. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",20490,20635,20635,20474,20761,20211,20249,19770,19768,19120,19044,19011,19137,18600,17893,17253,17546,18212,17253,16144,16334,16076,16076,16121,16848,92,96.9,97.6

  8. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",29113,28705,28463,27389,26533,25140,25005,24569,24991,24033,23587,22629,38903,38940,65384,65293,65209,64858,64768,64425,63351,63214,63213,61420,61261,79.8,24.5,25.8

  9. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",337,329,329,265,260,257,259,258,259,258,261,260,261,262,778,783,775,904,901,899,902,911,911,908,882,78.9,23,51.8

  10. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",22062,20601,20626,19999,19430,19131,18824,18372,18162,18087,17547,17045,15817,15761,15608,15312,15316,15293,14764,14300,13764,14055,14020,13652,13661,79.5,80.6,83.9

  11. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",27376,27070,27037,26375,26498,26322,26243,24511,24303,24046,23828,24166,24132,24191,23841,25190,25236,25274,24277,24278,24254,24243,24242,24243,24173,91.5,86.9,88.5

  12. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11981,10625,10590,11740,11719,11698,11698,11711,11975,10890,10164,10164,10172,10188,14475,14505,14495,14491,14492,14495,14510,14448,14448,14435,14435,95.9,71,73.6

  13. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",14377,13358,13464,13408,13098,12998,12975,11767,12911,12877,12405,12523,12335,12246,12211,12086,11862,11866,11866,11536,11264,10909,10747,10504,10545,89.8,73.4,83.8

  14. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",7233,7279,7278,7333,6931,6713,6450,6142,6137,6241,6086,6088,6083,6050,6048,6012,6018,6045,5966,5971,5864,5842,5842,5817,5800,97.1,86.8,85.5

  15. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",523,597,168,754,1759,867,1080,1317,489,827,1121,1409,865,0,2781,1189273,3549008,3222785,7800149,2668381,9015544,8075919,8334852,9518506,9063595,0,0,0

  16. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andresen, John; Schobert, Harold; Miller, Bruce G

    2006-03-01

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected 10 projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the various subcontractors on March 1, 2004.

  17. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce G

    2006-03-01

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected ten projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten projects have been completed and the final reports for these 2004 projects are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2004 and the council selected

  18. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",8,8,8,7,7,7,7,8,8,6,7,9,9,7,6,7,7,441,441,442,148,148,148,162,263,0.5,0.4,0.4 "Hydroelectric",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,1,1,1,0.2,0,0

  19. HTR-100 industrial nuclear power plant for generation of heat and electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, S.; Kohl, W.

    1987-11-01

    Based on their proven high-temperature reactor (HTR) with pebble-bed core, Brown, Boveri and Cie/Hochtemperatur-Reaktorbau have developed an HTR-100 plant that combines favorable capital costs and high availability. Due to the high HTR-specific standards and passive safety features, this plant is especially well suited for siting near the end user. The safety concept permits further operation of the plant or decay heat removal via the operational heat sinks in the event of maloperation and design basis accidents having a higher probability of occurrence. In the event of hypothetical accidents, the decay heat is removed from the reactor pressure vessel by radiation, conduction, and convection to a concrete cooling system operating in natural convection. As an example of the new HTR-100 plant concept, a twin-block plant design for extraction of industrial steam is presented.

  20. A utility survey and market assessment on repowering in the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klara, J.M.; Weinstein, R.E.; Wherley, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    Section 1 of this report provides a background about the DOE High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) program. There are two kinds of HIPPS cycles under development. One team is led by the Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, the other team is led by the United Technologies Research Center. These cycles are described. Section 2 summarizes the feedback from the survey of the repowering needs of ten electric utility companies. The survey verified that the utility company planners favor a repowering for a first-of-a-kind demonstration of a new technology rather than an all-new-site application. These planners list the major factor in considering a unit as a repowering candidate as plant age: they identify plants built between 1955 and 1965 as the most likely candidates. Other important factors include the following: the need to reduce operating costs; the need to perform major maintenance/replacement of the boiler; and the need to reduce emissions. Section 3 reports the results of the market assessment. Using the size and age preferences identified in the survey, a market assessment was conducted (with the aid of a power plant data base) to estimate the number and characteristics of US generating units which constitute the current, primary potential market for coal-based repowering. Nearly 250 units in the US meet the criteria determined to be the potential repowering market.

  1. Methods to estimate stranded commitments for a restructuring US electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.; Baxter, L.

    1996-01-01

    Estimates of stranded commitments for US investor-owned electric utilities range widely, from as little as $20 billion to as much as $500 billion (more than double the shareholder equity in US utilities). These potential losses are a consequence of the above-market book values for some utility-owned power plants, long-term power-purchase contracts, deferred income taxes, regulatory assets, and public-policy programs. Because of the wide range of estimates and the potentially large dollar amounts involved, state and federal regulators need a clear understanding of the methods used to calculate these estimates. In addition, they may want simple methods that they can use to check the reasonableness of the estimates that utilities and other parties present in regulatory proceedings. This report explains various top-down and bottom-up methods to calculate stranded commitments. The purpose of this analysis is to help regulators and others understand the implications of different analytical approaches to estimating stranded-commitment amounts. Top-down methods, because they use the utility as the unit of analysis, are simple to apply and to understand. However, their aggregate nature makes it difficult to determine what specific assets and liabilities affect their estimates. Bottom-up methods use the individual asset (e.g., power plant) or liability (e.g., power-purchase contract, fuel-supply contract, and deferred income taxes) as the unit of analysis. These methods have substantial data and computational requirements.

  2. The roles of antitrust law and regulatory oversight in the restructured electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glazer, C.A.; Little, M.B.

    1999-05-01

    The introduction of retail wheeling is changing the roles of regulators and the courts. When states unbundle the vertically integrated investor-owned utility (IOU) into generation companies, transmission companies, and distribution companies, antitrust enforcement and policy setting by the state public utility/service commissions (PUCs) will be paramount. As was seen in the deregulation of the airline industry, vigorous enforcement of antitrust laws by the courts and proper policy setting by the regulators are the keys to a successful competitive market. Many of the problems raised in the airline deregulation movement came about due to laxity in correcting clear antitrust violations and anti-competitive conditions before they caused damage to the market. As retail wheeling rolls out, it is critical for state PUCs to become attuned to these issues and, most of all, to have staff trained in these disciplines. The advent of retail wheeling changes the application of the State Action Doctrine and, in turn, may dramatically alter the role of the state PUC--meaning antitrust law and regulatory oversight must step in to protect competitors and consumers from monopolistic abuse.

  3. Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Kilowatts)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 8 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 7 Wind Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 9<//td> 1989 258,193 191,487 578,797 – 1,028,477 [–] – 17,942 13,144 166,392 [–] – – 197,478 – 1,225,955 1990

  4. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A

  5. Annual energy review 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiferlein, Katherin E.

    2004-09-30

    The Annual Energy Review 2003 is a statistical history of energy activities in the United States in modern times. Data are presented for all major forms of energy by production (extraction of energy from the earth, water, and other parts of the environment), consumption by end-user sector, trade with other nations, storage changes, and pricing. Much of the data provided covers the fossil fuels—coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels are nature’s batteries; they have stored the sun’s energy over millennia past. It is primarily that captured energy that we are drawing on today to fuel the activities of the modern economy. Data in this report measure the extraordinary expansion of our use of fossil fuels from 29 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1949 to 84 quadrillion Btu in 2003. In recent years, fossil fuels accounted for 86 percent of all energy consumed in the United States. This report also records the development of an entirely new energy industry—the nuclear electric power industry. The industry got its start in this country in 1957 when the Shippingport, Pennsylvania, nuclear electric power plant came on line. Since that time, the industry has grown to account for 20 percent of our electrical output and 8 percent of all energy used in the country. Renewable energy is a third major category of energy reported in this volume. Unlike fossil fuels, which are finite in supply, renewable energy is essentially inexhaustible because it can be replenished. Types of energy covered in the renewable category include conventional hydroelectric power, which is power derived from falling water; wood; waste; alcohol fuels; geothermal; solar; and wind. Together, these forms of energy accounted for about 6 percent of all U.S. energy consumption in recent years.

  6. Annual energy review 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is a historical data report that tells many stories. It describes, in numbers, the changes that have occurred in US energy markets since the midpoint of the 20th century. In many cases, those markets differ vastly from those of a half-century ago. By studying the graphs and data tables presented in this report, readers can learn about past energy supply and usage in the United States and gain an understanding of the issues in energy and the environment now before use. While most of this year`s report content is similar to last year`s, there are some noteworthy developments. Table 1.1 has been restructured into more summarized groupings -- fossil fuels, nuclear electric power, and renewable energy -- to aid analysts in their examination of the basic trends in those broad categories. Readers` attention is also directed to the electricity section, where considerable reformatting of the tables and graphs has been carried out to help clarify past and recent trends in the electric power industry as it enters a period of radical restructuring. Table 9.1, which summarizes US nuclear generating units, has been redeveloped to cover the entire history of the industry in this country and to provide categories relevant in assessing the future of the industry, such as the numbers of ordered generating units that have been canceled and those that were built and later shut down. In general, the AER emphasizes domestic energy statistics. Sections 1 through 10 and Section 12 are devoted mostly to US data; Section 11 reports on international statistics and world totals. 140 figs., 141 tabs.

  7. Electric sales and revenue, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  8. Analysis of residential, industrial and commercial sector responses to potential electricity supply constraints in the 1990s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Z.J.; Fang, J.M.; Lyke, A.J.; Krudener, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    There is considerable debate over the ability of electric generation capacity to meet the growing needs of the US economy in the 1990s. This study provides new perspective on that debate and examines the possibility of power outages resulting from electricity supply constraints. Previous studies have focused on electricity supply growth, demand growth, and on the linkages between electricity and economic growth. This study assumes the occurrence of electricity supply shortfalls in the 1990s and examines the steps that homeowners, businesses, manufacturers, and other electricity users might take in response to electricity outages.

  9. Annual Reports - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reports Annual Reports Annual Report 2015 Annual Report 2014 Annual Report 2013 Annual Report 2012 Annual Report 2011 Annual Report 2010 Annual Report 2009 Annual Report 2008...

  10. Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Progress in developing nickel-zinc batteries for propelling electric vehicles is reported. Information is included on component design, battery fabrication, and module performance testing. Although full scale hardware performance has fallen short of the contract cycle life goals, significant progress has been made to warrant further development. (LCL)

  11. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlack, R.D.

    2005-12-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the

  12. Electric Power Research Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Technical Notes This appendix describes how the U.S. Energy Information Administration collects, estimates, and reports electric power data in the Electric Power Annual. Data Quality and Submission The Electric Power Annual (EPA) is prepared by the Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics (ERUS), U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ERUS performs routine reviews of the data collection respondent frames, survey forms, and reviews

  13. NARUC 127th Annual Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) is hosting its annual meeting to set policy, share best practices, and discuss crucial industry issues.

  14. Annual Energy Review 1997

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    for Industrial Processes Products and To Produce Steam To Generate Electricity Geothermal and Other 0.13 Sales to Electric Utilities 0.89 Conversion Losses 21.39 T & D Losses...

  15. Annual Energy Review 1998

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    for Industrial Processes Products and To Produce Steam To Generate Electricity Geothermal and Other 0.13 Sales to Electric Utilities 0.77 Conversion Losses 22.10 T & D Losses...

  16. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010

  17. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History U.S.

  18. 2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2012–October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Noncompliance issues • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, approximately 238 million gallons of wastewater was discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters are below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  19. 2014 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike

    2015-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2013–October 31, 2014. The report contains the following information; Facility and system description; Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; Permit required groundwater monitoring data; Status of compliance activities; Noncompliance issues; and Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2014 permit year, approximately 238 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters are below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the downgradient monitoring wells.

  20. Annual Report 2008.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Power Annual Update / Revision Data for 2014 updated: February 16, 2016 February 16, 2016 Table update: The following tables are being withheld pending the availability of additional data: Table 8.5. Revenue and Expense Statistics for U.S. Cooperative Borrower-Owned Electric Utilities Table 8.6.A. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, Actual Table 8.6.B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation

  1. Annual Energy Review, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions.

  2. Electric sales and revenue: 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1993. Operating revenue includes energy charges, demand charges, consumer service charges, environmental surcharges, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. Because electric rates vary based on energy usage, average revenue per kilowatthour are affected by changes in the volume of sales. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  3. Research, development, and demonstration of lead-acid batteries for electric-vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The first development effort in improving lead-acid batteries fore electric vehicles was the improvement of electric vehicle batteries using flat pasted positive plates and the second was for a tubular long life positive plate. The investigation of 32 component variables based on a flat pasted positive plate configuration is described. The experiment tested 96 - six volt batteries for characterization at 0, 25, and 40/sup 0/C and for cycle life capability at the 3 hour discharge rate with a one cycle, to 80% DOD, per day regime. Four positive paste formulations were selected. Two commercially available microporous separators were used in conjunction with a layer of 0.076 mm thick glass mat. Two concentrations of battery grade sulfuric acid were included in the test to determine if an increase in concentration would improve the battery capacity sufficient to offset the added weight of the more concentrated solution. Two construction variations, 23 plate elements with outside negative plates and 23 plate elements with outside positive plates, were included. The second development effort was an experiment designed to study the relationship of 32 component variables based on a tubular positive plate configuration. 96-six volt batteries were tested at various discharge rates at 0, 25, and 40/sup 0/C along with cycle life testing at 80% DOD of the 3 hour rate. 75 batteries remain on cycle life testing with 17 batteries having in excess of 365 life cycles. Preliminary conclusions indicate: the tubular positive plate is far more capable of withstanding deep cycles than is the flat pasted plate; as presently designed 40 Whr/kg can not be achieved, since 37.7 Whr/kg was the best tubular data obtained; electrolyte circulation is impaired due to the tight element fit in the container; and a redesign is required to reduce the battery weight which will improve the Whr/kg value. This redesign is complete and new molds have been ordered.

  4. NNSA lab recognized for innovation to power electric cars | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) lab recognized for innovation to power electric cars Wednesday, June 15, 2016 - 10:02am The expertise and capabilities of NNSA's labs are recognized for powering innovation in the nuclear industry - and now for powering hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles. The recent 2016 Annual Merit Review Awards recognized significant achievements in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. Researchers from NNSA's Sandia National

  5. Industrial energy-efficiency-improvement program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Progress made by industry toward attaining the voluntary 1980 energy efficiency improvement targets is reported. The mandatory reporting population has been expanded from ten original industries to include ten additional non-targeted industries and all corporations using over one trillion Btu's annually in any manufacturing industry. The ten most energy intensive industries have been involved in the reporting program since the signing of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act and as industrial energy efficiency improvement overview, based primarily on information from these industries (chemicals and allied products; primary metal industry; petroleum and coal products; stone, clay, and glass products; paper and allied products; food and kindred products; fabricated metal products; transportation equipment; machinery, except electrical; and textile mill products), is presented. Reports from industries, now required to report, are included for rubber and miscellaneous plastics; electrical and electronic equipment; lumber and wood; and tobacco products. Additional data from voluntary submissions are included for American Gas Association; American Hotel and Motel Association; General Telephone and Electronics Corporation; and American Telephone and Telegraph Company. (MCW)

  6. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Electric Power Sector comprises electricity-only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants within the North American Industrial Classification System 22 category whose...

  7. Electricity Restructuring by State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Restructuring Status Status of Electricity Restructuring by State Data as of: September 2010 Next Release Date: None The map below shows information on the electric industry ...

  8. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Wholesale Markets: May 2015 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

  9. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wholesale Markets: August 2015 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

  10. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wholesale Markets: February 2014 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

  11. Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The 1993 edition of the Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents five years (1989 to 1993) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, the Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities, filed on a fiscal basis.

  12. NREL: Energy Analysis - 2015 Standard Scenarios Annual Report...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Standard Scenarios Annual Report: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) The 2015 Standard Scenarios Annual Report explores U.S. electricity sector scenarios. It aims to identify a ...

  13. NREL: Energy Analysis - Annual Technology Baseline and Standard...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Technology Baseline and Standard Scenarios Discussion Draft of NREL 2016 Annual ... and a diverse set of potential futures (standard scenarios) to inform electric sector ...

  14. Electric Submersible Pump | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detailed State Data Final annual data for 2014 Release Date: October 21, 2015 Next Release Date: October 15, 2016 January 13, 2016 Revision/Corrections Annual data format 1990 - 2014 Net Generation by State by Type of Producer by Energy Source (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)1 XLS 1990 - 2014 Fossil Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation by Year, Industry Type and State (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)2 XLS 1990 - 2014 Existing Nameplate and Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source, Producer Type

  15. Electric sales and revenue, 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  16. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO{sub 2} take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry`s response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  17. EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010 XLS XLS XLS 2009 XLS XLS XLS 2008 XLS XLS XLS 2007 XLS XLS XLS 2006 XLS XLS XLS 2005 XLS XLS XLS 2004 XLS XLS XLS 2003 XLS XLS XLS Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." Related links Electric Power Monthly Electric Power Annual Form EIA-860 Source Data

  18. Electric sales and revenue 1992, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-20

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1992. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the applicable revenue from kilowatthours sold; revenue from income; unemployment and other State and local taxes; energy, demand, and consumer service charges; environmental surcharges; franchise fees; fuel adjustments; and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  19. Creating New Incentives for Risk Identification and Insurance Process for the Electric Utility Industry (initial award through Award Modification 2); Energy & Risk Transfer Assessment (Award Modifications 3 - 6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Ebert

    2008-02-28

    This is the final report for the DOE-NETL grant entitled 'Creating New Incentives for Risk Identification & Insurance Processes for the Electric Utility Industry' and later, 'Energy & Risk Transfer Assessment'. It reflects work done on projects from 15 August 2004 to 29 February 2008. Projects were on a variety of topics, including commercial insurance for electrical utilities, the Electrical Reliability Organization, cost recovery by Gulf State electrical utilities after major hurricanes, and review of state energy emergency plans. This Final Technical Report documents and summarizes all work performed during the award period, which in this case is from 15 August 2004 (date of notification of original award) through 29 February 2008. This report presents this information in a comprehensive, integrated fashion that clearly shows a logical and synergistic research trajectory, and is augmented with findings and conclusions drawn from the research as a whole. Four major research projects were undertaken and completed during the 42 month period of activities conducted and funded by the award; these are: (1) Creating New Incentives for Risk Identification and Insurance Process for the Electric Utility Industry (also referred to as the 'commercial insurance' research). Three major deliverables were produced: a pre-conference white paper, a two-day facilitated stakeholders workshop conducted at George Mason University, and a post-workshop report with findings and recommendations. All deliverables from this work are published on the CIP website at http://cipp.gmu.edu/projects/DoE-NETL-2005.php. (2) The New Electric Reliability Organization (ERO): an examination of critical issues associated with governance, standards development and implementation, and jurisdiction (also referred to as the 'ERO study'). Four major deliverables were produced: a series of preliminary memoranda for the staff of the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability ('OE'), an ERO interview

  20. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  1. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO[sub 2] take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry's response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  2. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  3. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-17

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  4. 2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies 2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle ...

  5. 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle ...

  6. 2012 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies 2012 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle ...

  7. 2013 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies 2013 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle ...

  8. Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    loads account for an increasingly large portion of commercial electricity consumption. ... This includes analysis of their unit energy consumption and annual electricity consumption ...

  9. International energy annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar, and wind electric power, biofuels energy for the US, and biofuels electric power for Brazil. New in the 1996 edition are estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum and coal, and the consumption and flaring of natural gas. 72 tabs.

  10. Renewable Energy Data Book Details Growing Industry in 2012 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Renewable Energy Data Book Details Growing Industry in 2012 Renewable Energy Data Book Details Growing Industry in 2012 December 4, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) on November 21 released the 2012 Renewable Energy Data Book on behalf of the Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The annual report is an important assessment of U.S. energy statistics for 2012, including renewable electricity, worldwide renewable

  11. Annual Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    & distribution Coal-fired electric power plants Transportation costs to electric power ... domestic distribution, while industrial plants excluding coke received 4.8%, coke plants ...

  12. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    F-3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, ...

  13. Derived Annual Estimates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    74-1988 For Methodology Concerning the Derived Estimates Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat and Power by Industry Group, 1974-1988 Total Energy *** Electricity...

  14. 2014 Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Annual Meeting attracts geothermal industry stakeholders worldwide and provides opportunity to participate in presentations on geothermal research, exploration, development, and utilization.

  15. Laboratory Directed Research Development (LDRD) Annual Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s national laboratories annual reports of long-term national missions and unique scientific and technical capabilities beyond the scope of academic and industrial institutions.

  16. Microsoft Word - S08846_2012_Annual_IC report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Institutional Controls U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of ... Evidence of land use other than "Industrial" (e.g., residential)? Yes ( ) No ( X ) No ...

  17. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1989 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-06-01

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1989 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. This report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1989, and also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1989 time period. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell to consumers annually. Data is provided on each retail customer sector: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. The data specifically supports forecasting activities, rate development, conservation and market assessments, and conservation and market program development and delivery. All of these activities require a detailed look at electricity use. 25 figs., 34 tabs.

  18. Impact on the steam electric power industry of deleting Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act: Energy and environmental impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Folga, S.; Gillette, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Many power plants discharge large volumes of cooling water. In some cases, the temperature of the discharge exceeds state thermal requirements. Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) allows a thermal discharger to demonstrate that less stringent thermal effluent limitations would still protect aquatic life. About 32% of the total steam electric generating capacity in the United States operates under Section 316(a) variances. In 1991, the US Senate proposed legislation that would delete Section 316(a) from the CWA. This study, presented in two companion reports, examines how this legislation would affect the steam electric power industry. This report quantitatively and qualitatively evaluates the energy and environmental impacts of deleting the variance. No evidence exists that Section 316(a) variances have caused any widespread environmental problems. Conversion from once-through cooling to cooling towers would result in a loss of plant output of 14.7-23.7 billion kilowatt-hours. The cost to make up the lost energy is estimated at $12.8-$23.7 billion (in 1992 dollars). Conversion to cooling towers would increase emission of pollutants to the atmosphere and water loss through evaporation. The second report describes alternatives available to plants that currently operate under the variance and estimates the national cost of implementing such alternatives. Little justification has been found for removing the 316(a) variance from the CWA.

  19. International Energy Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-14

    This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules.

  20. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Reference case Table A10. Electricity trade (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A10. Electricity trade (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Electricity trade Reference case Annual growth 2013-2040 (percent) 2012 2013 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Interregional electricity trade Gross domestic sales Firm power .......................................................... 156 157 122 63 28 28 28 -6.2% Economy