National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for annex vi sox

  1. Assessor Training Annex A: Referencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Annex A: Referencing NVLAP Accreditation #12;Assessor Training: Annex · NVLAP reserves the right to control its use #12;Assessor Training: Annex A (rev. 2012-07-31) 33 · NVLAP of technical competence #12;Assessor Training: Annex A (rev. 2012-07-31) 44 · It is NVLAP's responsibility

  2. SSMP Annex A

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    on AppropriationsArmed Services March 2010 Annex A May 2010 U.S. Department of Energy S S S t t t o o o c c c k k k p p p i i i l l l e e e S S S t t t e e e w w w a a a r...

  3. PUBLIC INFORMATION ANNEX I -PUBLIC INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNEX I PUBLIC INFORMATION #12;ANNEX I - PUBLIC INFORMATION 11/12/2013 v. 2.0 Page I-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex I: Public Information, and contents within, is a guide to how the University maintains public information during an incident. The Annex is written in support of the Texas A&M University (TAMU

  4. Cancer Cell Sox4 Is a Key Oncogenic Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    expression is inversely correlated with C/EBPa activity. Downregulation of Sox4 abro- gated increased self-renewal (LICs) from both Sox4 overexpression and murine C/EBPa mutant AML models clus- tered together

  5. Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility Construction Quality - January 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility Construction Quality - January 2015 January,...

  6. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and Environmental Effects Research Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and...

  7. Fraunhofer ISE IEA HPP Annex 43

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    .-Ing. Peter Schossig Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE www.ise.fraunhofer.de Nürnberg, 16 and technology Recent market developments Scope and goals of Annex 43 Annex structure and participants Outlook changes on existing system Conservative user behaviour regarding energy carrier Comparatively smaller size

  8. 311 DECEMBRE 2012 -N9 SoX Sound eXchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    concernant l'instal- lation de ce logiciel: Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install sox; RedHat/Fedora: yum install sox

  9. The IEA/ECBCS/Annex 40 Glossary on Commissioning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akashi, Y.; Castro, N.; Novakovic, V.; Viaud, B.; Jandon, M.

    2004-01-01

    International Energy Agency's (IEA) Energy Conservation in Building and Community Systems' (ECBCS) Annex 40 has developed a glossary of commissioning terms as one of the first commissioning tools produced within the annex. The glossary consists...

  10. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Review, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility - April 2014 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility - April 2014 April 2014 Review of the Hanford Site K-West...

  11. IEA HPP ANNEX 36: QUALITY INSTALLATION / QUALITY MAINTENANCE SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hourahan, Mr. Glenn [Air Conditioning Contractors of America, Arlington, VA; Domanski, Dr. Piotr [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The paper summarizes the goals and planned activities to be undertaken by the participants in Annex 36. Some background information and status of Annex work specific to each participant is provided as well.

  12. Bonneville Power Ampere Annex Z-995 Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Vancouver, WA The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a federal agency headquartered in Portland, Oregon, provides about half of the electricity used in the Pacific Northwest and operates more than three-fourths of the region's high-voltage transmission. Because BPA markets power at cost from 31 federal dams, its rates are among the least expensive electricity in the country. The Ampere Annex project is a renovation of an exisiting 60-year-old standard warehouse building located within the Ross Complex.

  13. Diesel Engine CO2 and SOx Emission Compliance Strategy for the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CO2 and SOx Emission Compliance Strategy for the Royal Navy (RN) and Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) Flotillas Diesel Engine CO2 and SOx Emission Compliance Strategy for the Royal Navy...

  14. `Heat pumps in Smart Grids' IEA Annex 42

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Annex 42 `Heat pumps in Smart Grids' #12;IEA Annex 42 `Heat Pumps in Smart Grids' by Peter P.M. Wagener Managing Consultant OPERATING AGENT: #12;GAS HEAT PUMPS COMMERCIAL SECTOR RESEARCH, STRATEGY AUTOMATION HEAT PUMPS DOMESTIC AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS WORKING GROUP THERMAL DRIVEN HEAT PUMPS TARGET

  15. NOx, SOx & CO{sub 2} mitigation using blended coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labbe, D.

    2009-11-15

    Estimates of potential CO{sub 2} reduction achievable through the use of a mixture of bituminous and subbituminous (PRB) coals, whilst attaining NOx and SOx compliance are presented. The optimization considerations to provide satisfactory furnace, boiler and unit performance with blended coal supplies to make such operation feasible are discussed. 6 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Controlling Emissions of SOx and NOx from power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Controlling Emissions of SOx and NOx from power plants By: Ben Bernardo #12;Main Control2 2 H2S + SO2 2 H2O + 3 S The elemental sulfur is then sold and the emissions of SO2 and H2S 2 CaSO3 + CO2 + H2O CaCO3 + SO2 CaSO3 + CO2 #12;Main Control Technologies for NOx Combustion

  17. Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This part should contain a general statement of the intent of this Annex. To provide for the planning, preparedness and coordination of emergency service efforts to respond to a transportation...

  18. Annexation of Crimea: Causes, Analysis and Global Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saluschev, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Annexation of Crimea: Causes, Analysis & Global Implicationss understanding of the causes of the territory’s decision tos understanding of the causes of the territory’s decision to

  19. Neuroimaging Data Landscapes: Annex to SCARP Case Study 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whyte, Angus

    2008-11-11

    This is the Annex to Case Study No. 1 of the Digital Curation Centre’s SCARP Project titled ‘Curating Brain Images in a Psychiatric Research Group: Infrastructure and Preservation Issues’ (SCARP Deliverable number ...

  20. Radioactive Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex The EMSL Radiochemistry Annex, located in the 3410 Material Science and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of radioactive material. In order to work within 3410 facility radiological limits, potential users must provide can evaluate whether it will meet our facility limits. Note that while the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex

  1. LABORATORY VI ROTATIONAL DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab VI - 1 LABORATORY VI ROTATIONAL DYNAMICS So far this semester, you have been asked to think kinematics. OBJECTIVES: Successfully completing this laboratory should enable you to: · Use linear kinematics in a laboratory on earth, before launching the satellite. EQUIPMENT You will use an apparatus that spins

  2. SOx/NOx sorbent and process of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziebarth, M.S.; Hager, M.J.; Beeckman, J.W.; Plecha, S.

    1993-01-19

    An alumina sorbent capable of adsorbing NOx and SOx from waste gases and being regenerated by heating above 600 C. is made by incorporating an alumina stabilizing agent into the sorbent. A preferred method is to add the stabilizer when the alumina is precipitated. The precipitated powder is formed subsequently into a slurry, milled and dripped to form the stabilizing spheroidal alumina particles. These particles are impregnated with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal to form the stabilized sorbent. Alumina stabilizers include one or more of silica, lanthana, other rare earths, titania, zirconia and alkaline earths.

  3. SOX/NOX sorbent and process of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziebarth, Michael S. (Columbia, MD); Hager, Michael J. (Baltimore, MD); Beeckman, Jean W. (Columbia, MD); Plecha, Stanislaw (Baltimore, MD)

    1995-01-01

    An alumina sorbent capable of adsorbing NOx and SOx from waste gases and being regenerated by heating above 600.degree. C. is made by incorporating an alumina stabilizing agent into the sorbent. A preferred method is to add the stabilizer when the alumina is precipitated. The precipitated powder is formed subsequently into a slurry, milled and dripped to form the stabilized spheroidal alumina particles. These particles are impregnated with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal to form the stabilized sorbent. Alumina stabilizers include one or more of silica, lanthana, other rare earths, titania, zirconia and alkaline earths.

  4. SOx/NOx sorbent and process of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziebarth, Michael S. (Columbia, MD); Hager, Michael J. (Baltimore, MD); Beeckman, Jean W. (Columbia, MD); Plecha, Stanislaw (Baltimore, MD)

    1993-01-19

    An alumina sorbent capable of adsorbing NOx and SOx from waste gases and being regenerated by heating above 600.degree. C. is made by incorporating an alumina stabilizing agent into the sorbent. A preferred method is to add the stabilizer when the alumina is precipitated. The precipitated powder is formed subsequently into a slurry, milled and dripped to form the stabilizing spheroidal alumina particles. These particles are impregnated with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal to form the stabilized sorbent. Alumina stabilizers include one or more of silica, lanthana, other rare earths, titania, zirconia and alkaline earths.

  5. SOX/NOX sorbent and process of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziebarth, M.S.; Hager, M.J.; Beeckman, J.W.; Plecha, S.

    1995-05-09

    An alumina sorbent capable of adsorbing NOx and SOx from waste gases and being regenerated by heating above 600 C is made by incorporating an alumina stabilizing agent into the sorbent. A preferred method is to add the stabilizer when the alumina is precipitated. The precipitated powder is formed subsequently into a slurry, milled and dripped to form the stabilized spheroidal alumina particles. These particles are impregnated with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal to form the stabilized sorbent. Alumina stabilizers include one or more of silica, lanthana, other rare earths, titania, zirconia and alkaline earths. 3 figs.

  6. Sox/Nox Sorbent And Process Of Use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziebarth, Michael S. (Columbia, MD); Hager, Michael J. (Coraopolis, PA); Beeckman, Jean W. (Columbia, MD); Plecha, Stanislaw (Baltimore, MD)

    1996-12-17

    An alumina sorbent capable of adsorbing NOx and SOx from waste gases and being regenerated by heating above 650.degree. C. is made by incorporating an alumina stabilizing agent into the sorbent. A preferred method is to add the stabilizer when the alumina is precipitated. The precipitated powder is formed subsequently into a slurry, milled and spray dried to form the stabilized spheroidal alumina particles having a particle size of less than 500 microns. These particles are impregnated with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal to form the stabilized sorbent. Alumina stabilizers include one or more of silica, lanthana, other rare earths, titania, zirconia and alkaline earths.

  7. Sox/Nox Sorbent And Process Of Use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziebarth, Michael S. (Columbia, MD); Hager, Michael J. (Caraopolis, PA); Beeckman, Jean W. (Columbia, MD); Plecha, Stanislaw (Baltimore, MD)

    1995-06-27

    An alumina sorbent capable of adsorbing NOx and SOx from waste gases and being regenerated by heating above 650.degree. C. is made by incorporating an alumina stabilizing agent into the sorbent. A preferred method is to add the stabilizer when the alumina is precipitated. The precipitated powder is formed subsequently into a slurry, milled and spray dried to form the stabilized spheroidal alumina particles having a particle size of less than 500 microns. These particles are impregnated with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal to form the stabilized sorbent. Alumina stabilizers include one or more of silica, lanthana, other rare earths, titania, zirconia and alkaline earths.

  8. Sox6 Up-Regulation by Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Promotes Survival and Maintenance of Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sox6 Up-Regulation by Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Promotes Survival and Maintenance migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has important roles in supporting the proliferation and/or survival) of the adult mouse forebrain. Retroviral overexpression of Sox6 in NSPCs increases the number of primary

  9. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Effects of Energy Removal on Physical Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please mark your calendars for the next Annex IV Environmental webinar titled: Effects of Energy Removal on Physical Systems. Held under the auspices of the Annex IV initiative to the IEA Ocean...

  10. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    develop advanced storage concepts for solar and low energyAnnex 32, Advanced Storage Concepts for Solar and Low EnergyAnnexes Advanced storage concepts for solar and low energy 

  11. Tethys and Annex IV Progress Report for FY 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-09-01

    The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System, dubbed “Tethys” after the mythical Greek titaness of the seas, is being developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). Functioning as a smart database, Tethys enables its users to identify key words or terms to help gather, organize and make available information and data pertaining to the environmental effects of MHK and offshore wind (OSW) energy development. By providing and categorizing relevant publications within a simple and searchable database, Tethys acts as a dissemination channel for information and data which can be utilized by regulators, project developers and researchers to minimize the environmental risks associated with offshore renewable energy developments and attempt to streamline the permitting process. Tethys also houses a separate content-related Annex IV data base with identical functionality to the Tethys knowledge base. Annex IV is a collaborative project among member nations of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ocean Energy Systems – Implementing Agreement (OES-IA) that examines the environmental effects of ocean energy devices and projects. The U.S. Department of Energy leads the Annex IV working with federal partners such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). While the Annex IV database contains technical reports and journal articles, it is primarily focused on the collection of project site and research study metadata forms (completed by MHK researchers and developers around the world, and collected by PNNL) which provide information on environmental studies and the current progress of the various international MHK developments in the Annex IV member nations. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the content, accessibility and functionality enhancements made to the Annex IV and Tethys knowledge bases in FY12.

  12. Annex 2 Risk Guidance Science Programme Office Project Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Annex 2 ­ Risk Guidance Science Programme Office Project Management Guidance on Risk Management and technical performance. However, with appropriate procedures, risks can be managed and in so doing, present as bad things happening. The objective of risk management is to identify, assess, reduce, accept

  13. Annex 2 Risk Management Guidance and Template SPO Project Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Annex 2 ­ Risk Management Guidance and Template SPO Project Management Guidance on Risk Management Introduction Risk is any action or event that affects a project's ability to achieve its on cost, schedule and technical performance. However, with appropriate procedures, risks can be managed

  14. International Collaboration on Offshore Wind Energy Under IEA Annex XXIII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.; Lemming, J.

    2005-11-01

    This paper defines the purpose of IEA Annex XXIII, the International Collaboration on Offshore Wind Energy. This international collaboration through the International Energy Agency (IEA) is an efficient forum from which to advance the technical and environmental experiences collected from existing offshore wind energy projects, as well as the research necessary to advance future technology for deep-water wind energy technology.

  15. Control of SOx emission in tail gas of the Claus Plant at Kwangyang Steel Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, H.S.; Park, J.W.; Hyun, H.D. [POSCO, Cheonnam (Korea, Republic of). Kwangyang Works; Lee, D.S. [RIST, Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Environmental Catalysis; Paik, S.C. [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Chung, J.S. [RIST, Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Environmental Catalysis; [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-12-01

    Pilot and/or laboratory studies were conducted in order to find methods for reducing the SOx emission in the Claus tail gas of the cokes unit. The TGT process which is based on the complete hydrogenation of the sulfur-containing compounds (SO{sub 2}, S) into H{sub 2}S and returning to the COG main line can reduce the SOx emission to zero. In case the return to the COG main is impossible, the SPOR process (Sulfur removal based on Partial Oxidation and Reduction) can be successfully applied to reduce the SOx emission.

  16. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    HP HP HP Current Annexes Transportation of Thermal Energy Utilizing Thermal Energy Storage Technology Optimised Power Generation with Thermal Energy Storage  Sustainable 

  17. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    focuses on on using the BEopt analysis optimizing buildingwhich has also developed BEopt); 4E Annex on Mapping andConditioning Engineers BEopt Building design optimization

  18. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    fuel cells and other cogeneration systems, while SHC IAFuel Cell and Other Cogeneration Systems; ECBCS Annex 44,Fuel Cell and Other Cogeneration Systems government and

  19. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Annex 5, Air Infiltration and distribution study VentilationAir Infiltration and Ventilation Centre, including studiesInfiltration and Ventilation Centre includes hundreds of studies

  20. LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM Lab VI - 1 In the previous problems you explored by electric currents. This lab will carry that investigation one step further, determining how changing magnetic fields can give rise to electric currents. This is the effect that allows the generation

  1. LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM Lab VI - 1 In the previous problems you explored the magnetic field and its effect on moving charges. You also saw how electric currents could create magnetic can give rise to electric currents. This is the effect that allows the generation of electricity

  2. Sox9 plays multiple roles in the lung epithelium during branching morphogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Maike

    Sox9 plays multiple roles in the lung epithelium during branching morphogenesis Briana E. Rockicha, Durham, NC, and approved October 2, 2013 (received for review June 21, 2013) Lung branching morphogenesis lung. Intricate regulation of signaling pathways, tran- scription factors, and epithelial

  3. Energy Sector-Specific Plan: An Annex to the National Infrastructure...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Plan: An Annex to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan In its role as the lead Sector-Specific Agency for the Energy Sector, the Department of Energy has worked...

  4. Evolutionary patterns of group B Sox binding and function in Drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl, Sarah Hamilton

    2015-04-07

    ChIP-seq reads and input reads from three biological replicates in D. pseudoobscura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 4.1 Reproducibility of biological replicate DamID samples . . . . . . . 97 4.2 Translated reads for Sox fusion proteins... ) is to bind DNA and regulate the expression of target genes; however, the complexity of combinatorial binding patterns and the sheer quantity of binding events, even in the model organism Drosophila, which has a smaller and more compact genome than hu- mans...

  5. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Babcock and Wilcox`s (B and W) SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} process effectively removes SOx, NOx and particulate (Rox) from flue gas generated from coal-fired boilers in a single unit operation, a high temperature baghouse. The SNRB technology utilizes dry sorbent injection upstream of the baghouse for removal of SOx and ammonia injection upstream of a zeolitic selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst incorporated in the baghouse to reduce NOx emissions. Because the SOx and NOx removal processes require operation at elevated gas temperatures (800--900 F) for high removal efficiency, high-temperature fabric filter bags are used in the baghouse. The SNRB technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B and W tested the SNRB pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R.E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B and W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB process. The SNRB facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993. About 2,300 hours of high-temperature operation were achieved. The main emissions control performance goals of: greater than 70% SO{sub 2} removal using a calcium-based sorbent; greater than 90% NOx removal with minimal ammonia slip; and particulate emissions in compliance with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) of 0.03 lb/million Btu were exceeded simultaneously in the demonstration program when the facility was operated at optimal conditions. Testing also showed significant reductions in emissions of some hazardous air pollutants.

  6. Vi rtuali zed Multi kernel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quest­V: A Vi rtuali zed Multi kernel for Hi gh­Confidence Systems Ye Li BostonU niversity ########## #### Matthew Danish BostonU niversity ######## #### Richard West BostonU niversity ############## #### Abstract operating together as a dis­ tributed system on a chip. Quest­V uses virtualization techniques to isolate

  7. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Lecture 11-VI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Nathanael J.

    NUCLEAR REACTIONS Lecture 11-VI #12;General setup 2 Radioactive decay ­ a nucleus spontaneously decays. The only particle present before the decay is the parent nucleus. Nuclear reaction ­ an incident shorthand for nuclear reactions Examples Write the following reactions using the shorthand notation. (Note

  8. Sox2 sustains recruitment of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells following CNS demyelination and primes them for differentiation during CNS remyelination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Chao; Ma, Dan; Zawadzka, Malgorzata; Fancy, Stephen P. J.; Elis-Williams, Lowri; Bouvier, Guy; Stockley, John H.; de Castro, Glaucia M.; Wang, Bowei; Jacobs, Sabrina; Casaccia, Patrizia; Franklin, Robin J. M.

    2015-01-01

    be therapeutically enhanced in chronic demyelinating disease such as multiple sclerosis. In this 22 study we describe the role of Sox2, a transcription factor widely implicated in stem cell biology, in CNS 23 myelination and remyelination. We show how Sox2... Sclerosis tissue 126 Post-mortem human brain tissue from 6 cases was obtained from UK Multiple Sclerosis Tissue Bank. 127 Inflammation was characterised by immunochemistry with LN3 (HLA-DR) antibody and myelin loss by luxol 128 fast blue histology. 129...

  9. Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. VI. Acetonitrile...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. VI. Acetonitrile-Lithium Salt Mixtures: Highly Associated Salts Revisited Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electrolyte...

  10. Environmental Effects of Marine Energy Development Around the World. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, L.; Whiting, J.; Geerlofs, S.; Grear, M.; Blake, K.; Coffey, A.; Massaua, M.; Brown-Saracino, J.; Battey, H.

    2013-01-01

    This Annex IV report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment addressing the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines, the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals, and the effects of energy removal on physical systems.

  11. Retri-Commissioning the Aria Building Using Cite-AHU: An Annex 40 Collaboration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, N.; Vaezi-Nejad, H.

    2004-01-01

    to develop a service tool called CITE-AHU, an automated commissioning tool for air-handling units. The work was carried out as part of an IEA Annex 40 research project and included the retro-commissioning of a real building in Paris as a field test...

  12. LE CONSEIL D'ADMINISTRATION -ANNEXES Conseil d'administration au 1er

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DSFDME DRV DSS DEV SAJ SAS #12;58 LES UNITÉS DE RECHERCHE ET LES UNITÉS DE SERVICE au 1er juillet 200556 LE CONSEIL D'ADMINISTRATION - ANNEXES Conseil d'administration au 1er juillet 2005 Président;ORGANIGRAMME DES SERVICES CENTRAUXAU 1ER JUILLET 2005 CENTRES RÉGIONAUX EN FRANCE REPRÉSENTATIONS À L

  13. LABORATORY VI ENERGY AND THERMAL PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY VI ENERGY AND THERMAL PROCESSES Lab VI - 1 The change of the internal energy of a system temperature. In this lab you will concentrate on quantifying the changes in internal energy within the framework of conservation of energy. In the problems of this lab, you will master the relation

  14. VI. Universal Arm Exponents Helen K. Lei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei, Guo-Ying "Helen"

    (VI) VI. Universal Arm Exponents Helen K. Lei Caltech, W'02 From the "fences and corridors cases (in particular 5­arm crossings in a full annulus and 3­arm crossings in a half annulus the characteristic length. 5­Arm Exponent in Full Space. Here we will establish that Lemma. Suppose p = pc. Let

  15. LABORATORY VI MAGNETIC FIELDS AND FORCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab VI - 1 LABORATORY VI MAGNETIC FIELDS AND FORCES Magnetism plays a large role in our world for the differences as you go through the problems in this lab. In this set of laboratory problems, you will map: After successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to: · Explain the differences

  16. The Radiolysis of AmVI Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce J. Mincher

    2013-06-01

    The reduction of bismuthate-produced AmVI by 60Co gamma-rays was measured using post-irradiation UV/Vis spectroscopy. The reduction of AmVI by radiolysis was rapid, producing AmV as the sole product. Relatively low absorbed doses in the ~0.3 kGy range quantitatively reduced a solution of 2.5 x 10-4 M AmVI. The addition of bismuthate to samples during irradiation did not appear to protect AmVI from radiolytic reduction during these experiments. It was also shown here that AmV is very stable toward radiation. The quantitative reduction of the AmVI concentration here corresponds to 1.4 hours of exposure to a process solution, however the actual americium concentrations will be higher and the expected contact times short when using centrifugal contactors. Thus, the reduction rate found in these initial experiments may not be excessive.

  17. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater...

  18. Environmental effects of marine energy development around the world. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, Luke; Whiting, Johnathan; Geerlofs, Simon; Grear, Molly; Blake, Kara ); Coffey, Anna; Massaua, Meghan; Brown-Saracino, Jocelyn; Battey, Hoyt )

    2013-01-15

    Annex IV is an international collaborative project to examine the environmental effects of marine energy devices among countries through the International Energy Agency’s Ocean Energy Systems Initiative (OES). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) serves as the Operating Agent for the Annex, in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM; formerly the Minerals Management Service), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Numerous ocean energy technologies and devices are being developed around the world, and the few data that exist about the environmental effects of these technologies are dispersed among countries and developers. The purpose of Annex IV is to facilitate efficient government oversight of the development of ocean energy systems by compiling and disseminating information about the potential environmental effects of marine energy technologies and to identify methods of monitoring for these effects. Beginning in 2010, this three-year effort produced a publicly available searchable online database of environmental effects information (Tethys). It houses scientific literature pertaining to the environmental effects of marine energy systems, as well as metadata on international ocean energy projects and research studies. Two experts’ workshops were held in Dublin, Ireland (September 2010 and October 2012) to engage with international researchers, developers, and regulators on the scope and outcomes of the Annex IV project. Metadata and information stored in the Tethys database and feedback obtained from the two experts’ workshops were used as resources in the development of this report. This Annex IV final report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment that survey, compile, and analyze the best available information in one coherent location. These case studies address 1) the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines; 2) the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals; and 3) the effects of energy removal on physical systems. Each case study contains a description of environmental monitoring efforts and research studies, lessons learned, and analysis of remaining information gaps. The information collected through the Annex IV effort and referenced in this report, can be accessed on the Tethys database at http://mhk.pnnl.gov/wiki/index.php/Tethys_ Home.

  19. Summary Article: IEA HPP Annex 36: Quality Installation / Quality Maintenance Sensitivity Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hourahan, Mr. Glenn [Air Conditioning Contractors of America, Arlington, VA; Domanski, Dr. Piotr [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The outcome from this Annex activity clearly identifies that poorly designed, installed, and/or maintained heat pumps operate inefficiently and waste considerable energy compared to their as-designed potential. Additionally, it is clear that small faults for a given field-observed practice are significant, that some attribute deviations (in various equipment applications and geographical locations) have a larger impact than others, and that multiple faults or deviations have a cumulative impact on heat pump performance.

  20. Flyer, Title VI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services » ProgramPolicySenateFlyer, Title VI Flyer, Title VI

  1. IEA Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Meier, Alan; Runci, Paul J.

    2008-08-05

    This guide presents insights and guidance from DOE’s gathered through longstanding and extensive participation in IEA implementing agreements (IAs) and annexes. Even though DOE has been a key participant in international research activities through the IEA since the 1970s, the experience, knowledge, and institutional memory associated with these activities can be lost or forgotten easily as key DOE managers retire or leave the department. The guide seeks to assemble in a single reference some of the learning that has occurred through participation in IEA IAs as a guide for BTP managers currently responsible for IAs and for those who might consider entering into new IEA activities in the future.

  2. Volume VI, Chapter 6 Application of the EDT model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................... 30 V. Supplemental Information............................................................................................ 31 #12;EDT METHODS VI, 6-1 May 2004 I. Introduction Ecosystem Diagnosis & Treatment (EDT

  3. Emergency Action Plan and Annexes 2014 Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey emergency.rutgers.edu 19 of 39

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    Emergency Action Plan and Annexes © 2014 Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey emergency windows and out from under the heavy suspended light fixtures. Identify what equipment you should shut down if time permits. Make sure latches on cabinets, process tanks, storage tanks and closets

  4. Radiological assessment report for the University of Rochester Annex, 400 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York, April-May 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-12-01

    In light of the results of the comprehensive radiological assessment of the annex and auxiliary facilities, the following conclusions can be made: There is no immediate hazard from the elevated levels of radioactivity detected; however, some of these levels are above criteria. The radon, thoron, actinon, long-lived particulates, and tritium in the air are all below criteria for unrestricted use. Some ductwork has been identified as being contaminated. All ductwork must, therefore, be considered potentially contaminated. Since several floor drains were found to exhibit elevated readings, and the samples had elevated concentrations of radionuclides, it must be concluded that the drain and sewer systems of the Annex are contaminated with radioactive material. Since the samples collected from the storm and sewer systems outside the building also had elevated concentrations of radionuclides, these systems are also considered contaminated with radioactive material. The grounds around the Annex have exhibited background concentrations of radionuclides. Two rooms, B-330 and B-332, were inaccessible for survey due to the presence of stored furniture and equipment. Therefore, no comment about their radiological status can be made. At the common baseboard for Room C-12 and C-16 and on the floor below the tile in Room C-40, contamination appeared to be masked by construction modifications. Other areas of the Annex must also be considered potentially contaminated where modifications may have masked the contamination.

  5. Annex to 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Annex to the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report updates the Conceptual Design Report of 1987 (CDR-87) to include the results of further optimization and changes of the design during the past year. The design changes can be summarized as affecting three areas: the accelerator system, conventional facilities, and experimental systems. Most of the changes in the accelerator system result from inclusion of a positron accumulator ring (PAR), which was added at the suggestion of the 1987 DOE Review Committee, to speed up the filling rate of the storage ring. The addition of the PAR necessitates many minor changes in the linac system, the injector synchrotron, and the low-energy beam transport lines. 63 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. Painleve VI, Rigid Tops and Reflection Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Levin; M. Olshanetsky; A. Zotov

    2006-06-01

    We show that the Painlev{\\'e} VI equation has an equivalent form of the non-autonomous Zhukovsky-Volterra gyrostat. This system is a generalization of the Euler top in $C^3$ and include the additional constant gyrostat momentum. The quantization of its autonomous version is achieved by the reflection equation. The corresponding quadratic algebra generalizes the Sklyanin algebra. As by product we define integrable XYZ spin chain on a finite lattice with new boundary conditions.

  7. Air quality VI details environmental progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-12-31

    A report is given of the International Conference on Air Quality VI where key topics discussed were control of mercury, trace elements, sulphur trioxide and particulates. This year a separate track was added on greenhouse gas reduction, with panels on greenhouse gas policy and markets, CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration, and monitoring, mitigation and verification. In keynote remarks, NETL Director Carl Bauer noted that emissions have gone down since 1990 even though coal consumption has increased. The conference provided an overview of the state-of-the-science regarding key pollutants and CO{sub 2}, the corresponding regulatory environment, and the technology readiness of mitigation techniques. 1 photo.

  8. Blue Canyon VI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin:Pontiac Biomass Facility JumpIICalifornia: EnergyC Ltd JumpVI

  9. Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 3: SOx/NOx/Hg Removal for Low Sulfur Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monica Zanfir; Rahul Solunke; Minish Shah

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxycombustion technology. The objective of Task 3 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning low sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was to conduct an experimental investigation and to develop a novel process for simultaneously removal of SOx and NOx from power plants that would operate on low sulfur coal without the need for wet-FGD & SCRs. A novel purification process operating at high pressures and ambient temperatures was developed. Activated carbonâ??s catalytic and adsorbent capabilities are used to oxidize the sulfur and nitrous oxides to SO{sub 3} and NO{sub 2} species, which are adsorbed on the activated carbon and removed from the gas phase. Activated carbon is regenerated by water wash followed by drying. The development effort commenced with the screening of commercially available activated carbon materials for their capability to remove SO{sub 2}. A bench-unit operating in batch mode was constructed to conduct an experimental investigation of simultaneous SOx and NOx removal from a simulated oxyfuel flue gas mixture. Optimal operating conditions and the capacity of the activated carbon to remove the contaminants were identified. The process was able to achieve simultaneous SOx and NOx removal in a single step. The removal efficiencies were >99.9% for SOx and >98% for NOx. In the longevity tests performed on a batch unit, the retention capacity could be maintained at high level over 20 cycles. This process was able to effectively remove up to 4000 ppm SOx from the simulated feeds corresponding to oxyfuel flue gas from high sulfur coal plants. A dual bed continuous unit with five times the capacity of the batch unit was constructed to test continuous operation and longevity. Full-automation was implemented to enable continuous operation (24/7) with minimum operator supervision. Continuous run was carried out for 40 days. Very high SOx (>99.9%) and NOx (98%) removal efficiencies were also achieved in a continuous unit. However, the retention capacity of carbon beds for SOx and NOx was decreased from ~20 hours to ~10 hours over a 40 day period of operation, which was in contrast to the results obtained in a batch unit. These contradictory results indicate the need for optimization of adsorption-regeneration cycle to maintain long term activity of activated carbon material at a higher level and thus minimize the capital cost of the system. In summary, the activated carbon process exceeded performance targets for SOx and NOx removal efficiencies and it was found to be suitable for power plants burning both low and high sulfur coals. More efforts are needed to optimize the system performance.

  10. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  11. Procedure for plutonium determination using Pu(VI) spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, L.F.; Temer, D.J.; Jackson, D.D.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes a simple spectrophotometric method for determining total plutonium in nitric acid solutions based on the spectrum of Pu(VI). Plutonium samples in nitric acid are oxidized to Pu(VI) with Ce(IV) and the net absorbance at the 830 nm peak is measured.

  12. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    E. , Thesis, Reactions of Plutonium(VI) with the Iron Oxideof Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium, Americium and Technetium;Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic

  13. Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    15 Figure 9. Electricity Consumption per Household per year,vi Annexes Annex 1. Model of Electricity Consumption by MPCEAnnex 1. Model of Electricity Consumption by MPCE Class

  14. EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bay Energy VI, LLC Order authorizing Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. EA-389 Great Bay Energy (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export...

  15. Remediation of chromium(VI) in the vadose zone: stoichiometry and kinetics of chromium(VI) reduction by sulfur dioxide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Min

    2004-11-15

    and kinetics of chromium reduction both in aqueous solutions at pH values near neutrality and in soil. First, batch experiments and elemental analyses were conducted to characterize the stoichiometry and kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction in water...

  16. MIKE Central African Pilot Project Report 2, draft 21 August 2001 27 ANNEX 1: Field data forms and field form instructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Len

    MIKE Central African Pilot Project Report 2, draft 21 August 2001 27 ANNEX 1: Field data forms: ELEPHANT POPULATION FORM #12;MIKE Central African Pilot Project Report 2, draft 21 August 2001 28 1. MIKE deplacement Recce Transect Other #12;MIKE Central African Pilot Project Report 2, draft 21 August 2001 29 16

  17. NIST HANDBOOK 150-17 ANNEX B CHECKLIST (REV. 2012-04-05) PAGE 1 OF 7 Enter Date: Enter NVLAP Lab Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Code: NIST HANDBOOK 150-17 Annex B CHECKLIST Cryptographic Algorithms and Cryptographic Modules Testing), Cryptographic Hardward Modules (17CMH) and Cryptographic Software Modules (17CMS) test methods. It is used. B.5.2.2 The laboratory's personnel shall have experience, training, knowledge, or familiarity

  18. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Clean Air Act notice of construction for spent nuclear fuel project - hot conditioning system annex, project W-484

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, S.K., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-10

    This notice of construction (NOC) provides information regarding the source and the estimated quantity of potential airborne radionuclide emissions resulting from the operation of the Hot Conditioning System (HCS) Annex. The construction of the HCS Annex is scheduled to conunence on or about December 1996, and will be completed when the process equipment begins operations. This document serves as a NOC pursuant to the requirements of 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61 for the HCS Annex. About 80 percent of the U.S. Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory is stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins. Spent nuclear fuel in the K West Basin is contained in closed canisters, while the SNF in the K East Basin is contained in open canisters, which allows release of corrosion products to the K East Basin water. Storage of the current inventory in the K Basins was originally intended to be on an as-needed basis to sustain operation of the N Reactor while the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant was refurbished and restarted. The decision in December 1992 to deactivate the PUREX Plant left approximately 2, 1 00 MT (2,300 tons) of uranium, as part of 1133 N Reactor SNF in the K Basins with no means for near-term removal and processing. The HCS Annex will be constructed as an annex to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) and will contain the hot conditioning equipment. The hot conditioning system (HCS) will release chemically-bound water and will condition (process of using a controlled amount of oxygen to destroy uranium hydride) the exposed uranium surfaces associated with the SNF through oxidation. The HCS Annex will house seven hot conditioning process stations, six operational and one auxiliary, which could be used as a welding area for final closure of the vessel containing the SNF. The auxiliary pit is being evaluated at this time for its usefulness to support other operations that may be needed to ensure proper conditioning of the SNF and proper storage of the vessel containing the SNF. Figures I and 2 contain map locations of the Hanford Site and the HCS Annex.

  19. Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: Sixth amendment and extension to Annex IV enhanced oil recovery thermal processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, T.B. (USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)); Rivas, O. (INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela))

    1991-10-01

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Sixth Amendment and Extension of Annex 4, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 44 through 49. Tasks are: DOE-SUPRI-laboratory research on steam foam, CAT-SCAN, and in-situ combustion; INTEVEP-laboratory research and field projects on steam foam; DOE-NIPER-laboratory research and field projects light oil steam flooding; INTEVEP-laboratory research and field studies on wellbore heat losses; DOE-LLNL-laboratory research and field projects on electromagnetic induction tomography; INTEVEP-laoboratory research on mechanistic studies.

  20. Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 2: SOx/Nox/Hg Removal for High Sulfur Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Degenstein; Minish Shah; Doughlas Louie

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxy-combustion technology. The objective of Task 2 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning high sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was not only to investigate a new method of flue gas purification but also to produce useful acid byproduct streams as an alternative to using a traditional FGD and SCR for flue gas processing. During the project two main constraints were identified that limit the ability of the process to achieve project goals. 1) Due to boiler island corrosion issues >60% of the sulfur must be removed in the boiler island with the use of an FGD. 2) A suitable method could not be found to remove NOx from the concentrated sulfuric acid product, which limits sale-ability of the acid, as well as the NOx removal efficiency of the process. Given the complexity and safety issues inherent in the cycle it is concluded that the acid product would not be directly saleable and, in this case, other flue gas purification schemes are better suited for SOx/NOx/Hg control when burning high sulfur coal, e.g. this project's Task 3 process or a traditional FGD and SCR.

  1. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ria A. Yngard; Virender K. Sharma; Jan Filip; Radek Zboril [Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States). Chemistry Department, Florida Institute of Technology

    2008-04-15

    Cyanide is commonly found in electroplating, mining, coal gasification, and petroleum refining effluents, which require treatment before being discharged. Cyanide in effluents exists either as free cyanide or as a metal complex. The kinetics of the oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides by an environmentally friendly oxidant, ferrate, were studied as a function of pH (9.1-10.5) and temperature (15-45{sup o}C) using a stopped-flow technique. The weak-acid dissociable cyanides were Cd(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-} and Ni(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}, and the rate-laws for the oxidation may be -d(Fe(VI))/dt = k (Fe(VI))(M(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}){sup n} where n = 0.5 and 1 for Cd(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-} and Ni(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}, respectively. The rates decreased with increasing pH and were mostly related to a decrease in concentration of the reactive protonated Fe(VI) species, HFeO{sub 4}{sup -}. The stoichiometries with Fe(VI) were determined to be: 4HFeO{sub 4}{sup -} + M(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-} + 6H{sub 2}O {yields} 4Fe(OH){sub 3} + M{sup 2+} + 4NCO{sup -} + O{sub 2} + 4OH{sup -}. Mechanisms are proposed that agree with the observed reaction rate-laws and stoichiometries of the oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides by Fe(VI). Results indicate that Fe(VI) is effective in removing cyanide in coke oven plant effluent, where organics are also present. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Energy and momentum of Bianchi Type VI_h Universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripathy, S K; Pandey, G K; Singh, A K; Kumar, T; Xulu, S S

    2015-01-01

    We obtain the energy and momentum of the Bianchi type VI_h universes using different prescriptions for the energy-momentum complexes in the framework of general relativity. The energy and momentum of the Bianchi VI_h universe are found to be zero for the parameter h = -1 of the metric. The vanishing of these results support the conjecture of Tryon that Universe must have a zero net value for all conserved quantities.This also supports the work of Nathan Rosen with the Robertson-Walker metric. Moreover, it raises an interesting question: "Why h=-1 case is so special?"

  3. Energy and momentum of Bianchi Type VI_h Universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K. Tripathy; B. Mishra; G. K. Pandey; A. K. Singh; T. Kumar; S. S. Xulu

    2015-01-19

    We obtain the energy and momentum of the Bianchi type VI_h universes using different prescriptions for the energy-momentum complexes in the framework of general relativity. The energy and momentum of the Bianchi VI_h universe are found to be zero for the parameter h = -1 of the metric. The vanishing of these results support the conjecture of Tryon that Universe must have a zero net value for all conserved quantities.This also supports the work of Nathan Rosen with the Robertson-Walker metric. Moreover, it raises an interesting question: "Why h=-1 case is so special?"

  4. OES-IA Annex IV: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices - Report from the Experts’ Workshop September 27th – 28th 2010 Clontarf Castle, Dublin Ireland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; O'Toole, Michael J.

    2010-12-02

    An experts' workshop was convened in Dublin Ireland September 27th – 28th 2010 in support of IEA Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement Annex IV. PNNL was responsible for organizing the content of the workshop, overseeing the contractors (Irish Marine Institute) hosting the event, presenting material on Annex IV and materials applicable to the workshop intent. PNNL is also overseeing a contractor (Wave Energy Center/University of Plymouth – WEC/UP) in the collection and analysis of the Annex IV data. Fifty-eight experts from 8 countries attended the workshop by invitation, spending two days discussing the needs of Annex IV. Presentations by DOE (background on Annex IV), PNNL (process for developing Annex IV; presentation of the draft database for PNNL project, plans for incorporating Annex IV data), WEC/UP on the environmental effect matrix, and four MHK developers (two from the UK, one from Ireland and one from Sweden; each discussing their own projects and lessons learned for measuring and mitigating environmental effects, as well as interactions with consenting [permitting] processes) helped provide background. The workshop participants worked part of the time in the large group and most of the time in four smaller breakout groups. Participants engaged in the process and provided a wealth of examples of MHK environmental work, particularly in the European nations. They provided practical and actionable advice on the following: • Developing the Annex IV database, with specific uses and audiences • Strong consensus that we should collect detailed metadata on available data sets, rather than attempting to draw in copious datasets. The participants felt there would then be an opportunity to then ask for specific set of data as needed, with specific uses and ownership of the data specified. This is particularly important as many data collected, particularly in Europe but also in Canada, are proprietary; developers were not comfortable with the idea of handing over all their environmental effects data, but all said they would entertain the request if they specifics were clear. • The recommendation was to collect metadata via an online interactive form, taking no more than one hour to complete. • Although the idea of cases representing the “best practices” was recognized as useful, the participants pointed out that there are currently so few MHK projects in the water, that any and all projects were appropriate to highlight as “cases”. There was also discomfort at the implication that “best practices” implied “lesser practices”; this being unhelpful to a new and emerging industry. • Workshop participants were asked if they were willing to continue to engage in the Annex IV process; all expressed willingness. The workshop was successful in adequately addressing its objectives and through participation and interaction in the breakout sessions around the various topics. As a result of the workshop, many delegates are now better informed and have a greater understanding of the potential environmental effects of MHK devices on the marine environment. There is now a greater sense of understanding of the issues involved and consensus by those regulators, developers and scientists who attended the workshop. A strong network has also been built over the two days between European and US/Canadian technical experts in wave and tidal energy.

  5. Important Tenders and Contracts to be Placed in the Near Future - Concrete and Masonry Construction Work for the Control Station and Part of the Annex Laboratory Wing and the Corridor which Connects them to the Main SC Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    European Organization for Nuclear Research

    1955-01-01

    Important Tenders and Contracts to be Placed in the Near Future - Concrete and Masonry Construction Work for the Control Station and Part of the Annex Laboratory Wing and the Corridor which Connects them to the Main SC Building

  6. Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Brian A.

    2008-01-01

    U(VI) and citric acid on goethite, gibbsite, and kaolinite.on uranium(VI) adsorption to goethite-coated sand. Env. Sci.of phosphonates onto goethite. Env. Sci. Tech. 33, 3627-

  7. Realities and perceptions : HOPE VI poverty deconcentration and implications for broader neighborhood revitalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderford, Carrie Ann

    2006-01-01

    HOPE VI was developed in 1992 as program to demolish and revitalize the nation's most severely distressed public housing. One element of the HOPE VI program is to move low-income households out of an environment of ...

  8. Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Brian A.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of phosphate on uranium(VI) adsorption to goethite-and ionic strength upon uranium(VI) sorption onto alumina asD. R. , Leslie, B. W. , Uranium sorption on a-alumina:

  9. AM(VI) PARTITIONING STUDIES: FY14 FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce J Mincher

    2014-10-01

    The use of higher oxidation states of americium in partitioning from the lanthanides is under continued investigation by the sigma team. This is based on the hypothesis that Am(VI) can be produced and remain stable in irradiated first cycle raffinate solution long enough to perform solvent extraction for separations. The stability of Am(VI) to autoreduction was measured using millimolar americium concentrations in a 1-cm cell with a Cary 6000 UV/Vis spectrophotometer for data acquisition. At millimolar americium concentrations, Am(VI) is stable enough against its own autoreduction for separations purposes. A second major accomplishment during FY14 was the hot test. Americium oxidation and extraction was performed using a centrifugal contactor-based test bed consisting of an extraction stage and two stripping stages. Sixty-three percent americium extraction was obtained in one extraction stage, in agreement with batch contacts. Promising electrochemical oxidation results have also been obtained, using terpyridine ligand derivatized electrodes for binding of Am(III). Approximately 50 % of the Am(III) was oxidized to Am(V) over the course of 1 hour. It is believed that this is the first demonstration of the electrolytic oxidation of americium in a non-complexing solution. Finally, an initial investigation of Am(VI) extraction using diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA) was performed.

  10. THE HYMENOPTEROUS POISON APPARATUS. VI. CAMPONOTU8 PENNSYLYANICUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villemant, Claire

    THE HYMENOPTEROUS POISON APPARATUS. VI. CAMPONOTU8 PENNSYLYANICUS (HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE:or illustrations are in millimeters. In preparation for chemical analysis, poison sacs were dissected rom workers compounds present in the poison gland secretion were re- solved by applying the .contents of fifty glands

  11. VI. EVALUATION OF FACULTY F. Merit Categories and Salary Increases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    VI. EVALUATION OF FACULTY F. Merit Categories and Salary Increases Eligibility for any salary member is eligible for any salary increase. Eligibility for any salary increase requires satisfying for these designations. In addition to merit ratings, market factors may contribute to a salary increase. Market factors

  12. -A Science Service Feature 7 ViHY THE WEATHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    No. 370 July 18 -A Science Service Feature 7 ViHY THE WEATHER Dr. Charles F. Brooks, of Cla , 1923. having a normal clear weather v i s i b i l i t y not exceeding 22 miles, were distinctly Bee

  13. DOE / DOE ANNEX LIBRARY T H E U N I V E R S I T Y L I B R A R Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    FLOOR 3 DOE / DOE ANNEX LIBRARY T H E U N I V E R S I T Y L I B R A R Y E S C M Access Book / ADA Emergency Exit FLOOR 2 DOE LIBRARY FLOOR 3 308J308G308E308D 308A 303 Conference Room 321 322 Staff Office 307 Art History/Classics Library 308B Seminar Room 308C Seminar Room 308F Staff E E E THE BANCROFT

  14. VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, inhibits migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Fanni; Li, Chenglin; Zhang, Haiwei; Lu, Zhijian [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Lu, Na [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Guo, Qinglong, E-mail: anticancer_drug@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2012-06-01

    It has been well characterized that flavonoids possess pronounced anticancer potentials including anti-angiogenesis, anti-metastasis, and pro-apoptosis. Herein, we report, for the first time, that VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, possesses anti-cancer properties. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-migration and anti-invasion activities of VI-14 in breast cancer cells. Our data indicate that VI-14 inhibits adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 cells treated with VI-14 display reduced activities and expressions of ECM degradation-associated proteins including matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and 9 (MMP-9) at both the protein and mRNA levels. Meanwhile, VI-14 treatment induces an up-regulated expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) and 2 (TIMP-2) in MDA-MB-231 cells. Western blotting results show that phosphorylation levels of critical components of the MAPK signaling pathway, including ERK, JNK and P38, are dramatically decreased in VI-14-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, treatment of VI-14 significantly decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Taken together, our data suggest that VI-14 treatment suppresses migration and motility of breast cancer cells, and VI-14 may be a potential compound for cancer therapy. Highlights: ? We report for the first time that VI-14 possesses anti-cancer properties. ? VI-14 weakens the adhesion, migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. ? VI-14 decreases the activities and expressions of MMP-2/9. ? VI-14 suppresses the phosphorylation levels of the MAPK signaling pathway. ? VI-14 decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of NF-?B and AP-1.

  15. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, P.F.

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on tapes.'' Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the tape'' number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  16. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, P.F.

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on ``tapes.`` Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the ``tape`` number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  17. The chemistry of plutonium(VI) in aqueous carbonate solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stout, B.E.; Choppin, G.R. . Dept. of Chemistry); Sullivan, J.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of carbonate ion as a ligand that interacts with the hexavalent actinyl ions of U, Np, and Pu has been examined by {sup 13}C NMR. The first order rate parameter that describes the exchange between bulk solution and bound carbonate decreases with increasing pH. At a pH of 10.0, 25{degree}C, the respective values of k for the U(VI), Np(VI) and Pu(VI) complexes are 27.1 {plus minus} 0.3, 64.7 {plus minus} 3.3 and 706 {plus minus} 29. The variation of k with temperature was used to calculate the values of {Delta}H{sup +} = 53 and 42 kJ/M; and {Delta}S{sup +} = {minus}40 and {minus}71 J/M-K for the uranyl and neptunyl systems, respectively. A plausible reaction scheme for the exchange reaction is considered. The influence of these slow carbonate exchange reactions on selected electron transfer reactions is noted. 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Effects of Phosphate on Uranium(VI) Adsorption to Goethite-Coated Sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    Effects of Phosphate on Uranium(VI) Adsorption to Goethite-Coated Sand T A O C H E N G , M A R K O natural and contaminated environments. We studied U(VI) adsorption on goethite-coated sand (to mimic of increase in U(VI) adsorption. Phosphate was strongly bound by the goethite surface in the low pH range

  19. Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Devaney, Walter E. (Seattle, WA)

    1987-08-04

    Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

  20. Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor films for solar cell application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Basol, Bulent M. (Redondo Beach, CA); Kapur, Vijay K. (Northridge, CA)

    1991-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved thin film solar cell with excellent electrical and mechanical integrity. The device comprises a substrate, a Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor absorber layer and a transparent window layer. The mechanical bond between the substrate and the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor layer is enhanced by an intermediate layer between the substrate and the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor film being grown. The intermediate layer contains tellurium or substitutes therefor, such as Se, Sn, or Pb. The intermediate layer improves the morphology and electrical characteristics of the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor layer.

  1. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    VI) with the Iron Oxide Goethite, University of California,Values for Synthetic Goethite and Pyrolusite" submitted tothe two Mn-substituted goethite minerals used in this study.

  2. Reaction of Plutonium(VI) with the Manganese-Substituted Iron Oxide Mineral Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin Hu

    2011-01-01

    Plutonium(VI) Sorption on Manganese-SubstitutedX-ray Beam-Induced Chemistry on Plutonium Sorbed on Variousof Plutonium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159 v E Anion

  3. Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Martin, Leigh

    2006-01-01

    Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminuman increase in the aqueous phase uranium concentration.The concentration of uranium continually increased over 59

  4. Method of manufacturing semiconductor having group II-group VI compounds doped with nitrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Price, Kent J.; Ma, Xianda; Makhratchev, Konstantin

    2005-02-08

    A method of making a semiconductor comprises depositing a group II-group VI compound onto a substrate in the presence of nitrogen using sputtering to produce a nitrogen-doped semiconductor. This method can be used for making a photovoltaic cell using sputtering to apply a back contact layer of group II-group VI compound to a substrate in the presence of nitrogen, the back coating layer being doped with nitrogen. A semiconductor comprising a group II-group VI compound doped with nitrogen, and a photovoltaic cell comprising a substrate on which is deposited a layer of a group II-group VI compound doped with nitrogen, are also included.

  5. Bistability of Cation Interstitials in II-VI Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, S. H.; Dalpian, G. M.

    2005-11-01

    The stability of cation interstitials in II-VI semiconductors is studied using ab initio methods. We find that interstitials in the neutral charge state are more stable in the tetrahedral interstitial site near the cation, whereas in the (2+) charge state, they are more stable near the anion. The diffusion energy barrier changes when the defect charge state changes. Therefore, if electrons/holes are taken from the defect level by light, changing its charge state, the interstitial atom will be able to diffuse almost spontaneously due to a reduced diffusion barrier.

  6. Nonlinear Spinor Fields in Bianchi type-$VI_0$ spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bijan Saha

    2015-04-15

    Within the scope of Bianchi type-$VI_0$ space time we study the role of spinor field on the evolution of the Universe. It is found that the presence of nontrivial non-diagonal components of energy-momentum tensor of the spinor field plays vital role on the evolution of the Universe. As a result of their mutual influence the invariants constructed from the bilinear forms of the spinor field become trivial, thus giving rise to a massless and linear spinor field Lagrangian. This result shows that the spinor field is highly sensitive to the gravitational one.

  7. Geothermal Program Review VI: proceedings. Beyond goals and objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Program Review VI was comprised of six sessions, including an opening session, four technical sessions that addressed each of the major DOE research areas, and a session on special issues. The technical sessions were on Hydrothermal, Hot Dry Rock, Geopressured and Magma resources. Presenters in the technical sessions discussed their R and D activities within the context of specific GTD Programmatic Objectives for that technology, their progress toward achieving those objectives, and the value of those achievements to industry. The ''Special Issues'' presentations addressed several topics such as the interactions between government and industry on geothermal energy R and D; the origin and basis for the programmatic objectives analytical computer model; and international marketing opportunities for US geothermal equipment and services. The unique aspect of Program Review VI was that it was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's Industry Round Table on Federal R and D. The Round Table provided a forum for open and lively discussions between industry and government researchers and gave industry an opportunity to convey their needs and perspectives on DOE's research programs. These discussions also provided valuable information to DOE regarding industry's priorities and directions.

  8. Data summary report for fission product release Test VI-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorentz, R.A.; Travis, J.R.; Collins, J.L.; Webster, C.S.

    1995-05-01

    Test VI-7 was the final test in the VI series conducted in the vertical furnace. The fuel specimen was a 15.2-cm-long section of a fuel rod from the Monticello boiling water reactor (BWR). The fuel had experienced a burnup of {approximately}-40 Mwd/kg U. It was heated in an induction furnace for successive 20-min periods at 2000 and 2300 K in a moist air-helium atmosphere. Integral releases were 69% for {sup 85}Kr, 52% for {sup 125}Sb, 71% for both {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, and 0.04% for {sup 154}Eu. For the non-gamma-emitting species, release values for 42% for I, 4.1% for Ba, 5.3% for Mo, and 1.2% for Sr were determined. The total mass released from the furnace to the collection system, including fission products, fuel, and structural materials, was 0.89 g, with 37% being collected on the thermal gradient tubes and 63% downstream on filters. Posttest examination of the fuel specimen indicated that most of the cladding was completely oxidized to ZrO{sub 2}, but that oxidation was not quite complete at the upper end. The release behaviors for the most volatile elements, Kr and Cs, were in good agreement with the ORNL-Booth Model.

  9. Uranium (VI) solubility in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucchini, Jean-francois; Khaing, Hnin; Reed, Donald T

    2010-01-01

    When present, uranium is usually an element of importance in a nuclear waste repository. In the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), uranium is the most prevalent actinide component by mass, with about 647 metric tons to be placed in the repository. Therefore, the chemistry of uranium, and especially its solubility in the WIPP conditions, needs to be well determined. Long-term experiments were performed to measure the solubility of uranium (VI) in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine, a simulated WIPP brine, at pC{sub H+} values between 8 and 12.5. These data, obtained from the over-saturation approach, were the first repository-relevant data for the VI actinide oxidation state. The solubility trends observed pointed towards low uranium solubility in WIPP brines and a lack of amphotericity. At the expected pC{sub H+} in the WIPP ({approx} 9.5), measured uranium solubility approached 10{sup -7} M. The objective of these experiments was to establish a baseline solubility to further investigate the effects of carbonate complexation on uranium solubility in WIPP brines.

  10. Tracking the Sun VI: An Historical Summary of the Installed Price of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2014-01-01

    National Laboratory. Tracking the Sun VI: The InstalledSize Range ?10 kW Tracking the Sun VI: The Installed PriceSize Range ?10 kW Tracking the Sun VI: The Installed Price

  11. Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: EOR thermal processes. Seventh Amendment and Extension to Annex 4, Enhanced oil recovery thermal processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, T B [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)] [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States); Colonomos, P [INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela)] [INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela)

    1993-02-01

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Seventh Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 50 through 55. The first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh reports on Annex IV, Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5 and IV-6 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, DOE/BC-86/2/SP, DOE/BC-87/2/SP, DOE/BC-89/l/SP, DOE/BC-90/l/SP, and DOE/BC-92/l/SP) contain the results for the first 49 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1987, November 1988, December 1989, and October 1991, respectively. Each task report has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010 The impact of fire #12;VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010 1. Introduction Cork-mail: elodie.marini@cemagref.fr Abstract Cork oak (Quercus suber) is known as one of the most fire

  13. VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010 Litter flammability, fire ignition hazard] #12;VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010-mail: aminata.ndiaye-boubacar@cemagref.fr Abstract Assessing the flammability of litters in fire

  14. Static Security Analysis based on Vulnerability Index (VI) and Network Contribution Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Static Security Analysis based on Vulnerability Index (VI) and Network Contribution Factor (NCF introduces a new approach of power system static security analysis based on the Vulnerability Index (VI with the full AC power flow method shows that this approach is promising for fast and accurate static security

  15. Visual Information Systems Pr. Robert Laurini Chapter VI: Visual Portals to Multimedia Information Systems 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurini, Robert

    Visual Information Systems Pr. Robert Laurini Chapter VI: Visual Portals to Multimedia Information Systems 1 Chapter VI Visual Portals to Multimedia Information Systems http://puebla.turista.com.mx/ What is a portal? · Portal = an entry mechanism for an information system · A good portal = a portail allowing

  16. Aerobic uranium (VI) bioprecipitation by metal-resistant bacteria isolated from radionuclide-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skolnick, Jeff

    Aerobic uranium (VI) bioprecipitation by metal-resistant bacteria isolated from radionuclide uranium [U(VI)] mediated by the intrinsic phosphatase acti- vities of naturally occurring bacteria such as uranium (U), technetium (Tc) and other toxic metals [e.g. cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), chromium (Cr

  17. Affinity of An(VI) for N4-Tetradentate Donor Ligands: Complexation of the Actinyl(VI) Ions with N4-Tetradentate Ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogden, Mark; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2012-05-01

    In this report the affinity of four N4-tetradentate ligands that incorporate the 2- methylpyridyl functionality with hexavalent actinides (AnO2+2 ) has been investigated in methanol solution. The ligands studied include N,N*-bis(2-methylpyridyl)diaminoethane (BPMDAE), N,N-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (BPMDAP), N,N*-bis(2-pyridylmethyl) piperazine (BPMPIP), and trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC). Conditional stability constants describing the strength of the interaction were determined by UV-visible spectrophotometry. The log10K101 values for both U(VI) and Pu(VI) are comparable and show the same trend of stability with ligand structure. Dinuclear complexes are also indicated as being important. The log10K201 values for Pu(VI) complexation with the N4-ligands are identical for the four ligands (within experimental error), indicating that the structure of the ligand backbone has little effect on the stability of the (PuO2)2L2+ complex. The exception to this trend is the behavior of N,N*- bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine (BPMPIP) with Pu(VI). This ligand displays a tendency to reduce Pu(VI) within the experimental time frame of 45 minutes. BPMPIP is the only ligand tested that contains tertiary amines in the ligand backbone. The decomposition of BPMPIP by Pu(VI) suggests a susceptibility of tertiary amines to oxidative degradation.

  18. Solvent impregnated resin for isolation of U(VI) from industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karve, M.; Rajgor, R.V.

    2008-07-01

    A solid-phase extraction method based upon impregnation of Cyanex 302 (bis(2,4,4- trimethylpentyl)mono-thio-phosphinic acid) on Amberlite XAD-2 resin is proposed for isolation of U(VI) from uranmicrolite ore tailing samples and industrial effluent samples. U(VI) was sorbed from nitric acid media on the solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) and was recovered completely with 1.0 M HCl. Based upon sorption behavior of U(VI) with Cyanex 302, it was quantitatively sorbed on the SIR in a dynamic method, while the other metal ions were not sorbed by the modified resin. The preparation of impregnated resin is simple, based upon physical interaction of the extractant and solid support, has good sorption capacity for U(VI), and is also reliable for detection of traces of U(VI). (authors)

  19. The River Campus Libraries comprised of the Annex Storage Library; the Carlson Science and Engineering Library; the Laboratory for Laser Energetics Library; the Physics-Optics-Astronomy Library; and the Rush Rhees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Collaborative Solutions, and Digital Capabilities. Through these priorities, the River Campus Libraries aimsThe River Campus Libraries ­ comprised of the Annex Storage Library; the Carlson Science and Engineering Library; the Laboratory for Laser Energetics Library; the Physics-Optics-Astronomy Library

  20. This annex lists the fields that are used to import and export user accounts. Mandatory fields for Import are in bold. An asterisk denotes a field which is mandatory for importing a new account.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    This annex lists the fields that are used to import and export user accounts. Mandatory fields names given below are those used with the Import/Export functions. In some cases the field names may if applicable) EMailAddress String Function String Delete, Import, Export, Options, Submission

  1. CFD Simulation of the NREL Phase VI Rotor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The simulation of the turbulent and potentially separating flow around a rotating, twisted, and tapered airfoil is a challenging task for CFD simulations. This paper describes CFD simulations of the NREL Phase VI turbine that was experimentally characterized in the 24.4m x 36.6m NREL/NASA Ames wind tunnel (Hand et al., 2001). All computations in this article are performed on the experimental base configuration of 0o yaw angle, 3o tip pitch angle, and a rotation rate of 72 rpm. The significance of specific mesh resolution regions to the accuracy of the CFD prediction is discussed. The ability of CFD to capture bulk quantities, such as the shaft torque, and the detailed flow characteristics, such as the surface pressure distributions, are explored for different inlet wind speeds. Finally, the significant three-dimensionality of the boundary layer flow is demonstrated.

  2. COMMUNICATIONS ANNEX B -COMMUNICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and interoperable communications systems are essential to obtain the most complete information during emergency System (NIMS). Communications Equipment · Telephones, cellular or landline, are the primary means of the Brazos Valley Wide Area Communications System (BVWACS), most departments on campus have access to a radio

  3. Annex IV Environmental Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department will present a live webcast on Instrumentation for Monitoring Around Marine Renewable Energy Devices, highlighting themes that arose during a related workshop.

  4. SSMP Annex D

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal Register /AdministrationSummaryMay 2010

  5. SSMP Annex A

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en NNSAReference to Mod/%2A19FY 2011

  6. Multi-crystalline II-VI based multijunction solar cells and modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardin, Brian E.; Connor, Stephen T.; Groves, James R.; Peters, Craig H.

    2015-06-30

    Multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells and methods for fabrication of same are disclosed herein. A multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cell includes a first photovoltaic sub-cell comprising silicon, a tunnel junction, and a multi-crystalline second photovoltaic sub-cell. A plurality of the multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells can be interconnected to form low cost, high throughput flat panel, low light concentration, and/or medium light concentration photovoltaic modules or devices.

  7. Complexation of Gluconate with Uranium(VI) in Acidic Solutions: Thermodynamic Study with Structural Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhicheng

    2009-01-01

    Nash, K. L. “The Nature of Uranyl Gluconate Complexes inon coordination properties of uranyl (VI) complexes. A firstgluconate complexation with uranyl. I = 1.0 M NaClO 4 and t

  8. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, J.

    2011-01-01

    base properties of a goethite surface model: A theoreticalcomplexation of U(VI) on goethite (alpha-FeOOH). Geochim.acid and humic-acid on goethite, gibbsite and imogolite. J.

  9. In Situ Long-Term Reductive Bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in Groundwater...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    injection into Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater stimulates an average increase in biomass by up to 50 times, from-5105 to 2.5107 cellsmL. The results also show a...

  10. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Derrick

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  11. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Derrick

    2015-01-28

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  12. Chromium Isotope Fractionation During Reduction of Cr(VI) Under Saturated Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H.; Gibson, Blair D.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Kim, Yeongkyoo; Ptacek, Carol J.; Blowes, David W.

    2012-10-25

    Chromium isotopes are potentially useful indicators of Cr(VI) reduction reactions in groundwater flow systems; however, the influence of transport on Cr isotope fractionation has not been fully examined. Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to evaluate isotopic fractionation of Cr during Cr(VI) reduction under both static and controlled flow conditions. Organic carbon was used to reduce Cr(VI) in simulated groundwater containing 20 mg L{sup -1} Cr(VI) in both batch and column experiments. Isotope measurements were performed on dissolved Cr on samples from the batch experiments, and on effluent and profile samples from the column experiment. Analysis of the residual solid-phase materials by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy confirmed association of Cr(III) with organic carbon in the column solids. Decreases in dissolved Cr(VI) concentrations were coupled with increases in {delta}{sup 53}Cr, indicating that Cr isotope enrichment occurred during reduction of Cr(VI). The {delta}{sup 53}Cr data from the column experiment was fit by linear regression yielding a fractionation factor ({alpha}) of 0.9979, whereas the batch experiments exhibited Rayleigh-type isotope fractionation ({alpha} = 0.9965). The linear characteristic of the column {delta}{sup 53}Cr data may reflect the contribution of transport on Cr isotope fractionation.

  13. VI-26.00(A) Page 1 VI-26.00(A) UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND POLICY ON THE COLLECTION, USE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    a unique Directory ID. For complete authentication, these identifiers (U ID Number and Directory ID authorized by law or business necessity. #12;VI-26.00(A) Page 2 5. Name and directory systems, purchased to the data custodian (Registrar's Office for students, UHR for employees) who shall seek approval from

  14. Thermodynamics of the Complexation of Uranium(VI) by oxalate in aqueous solution at 10-70oC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Bernardo, Plinio

    2009-01-01

    O. Tochiyama in Chemical Thermodynamics of Compounds andUpdate on the Chemical Thermodynamics of Uranium, Neptunium,Thermodynamics of the Complexation of Uranium(VI) with

  15. Improving Memory Subsystem Performance Using ViVA: Virtual Vector Architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gebis, Joseph; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Williams, Samuel; Yelick, Katherine

    2009-01-12

    The disparity between microprocessor clock frequencies and memory latency is a primary reason why many demanding applications run well below peak achievable performance. Software controlled scratchpad memories, such as the Cell local store, attempt to ameliorate this discrepancy by enabling precise control over memory movement; however, scratchpad technology confronts the programmer and compiler with an unfamiliar and difficult programming model. In this work, we present the Virtual Vector Architecture (ViVA), which combines the memory semantics of vector computers with a software-controlled scratchpad memory in order to provide a more effective and practical approach to latency hiding. ViVA requires minimal changes to the core design and could thus be easily integrated with conventional processor cores. To validate our approach, we implemented ViVA on the Mambo cycle-accurate full system simulator, which was carefully calibrated to match the performance on our underlying PowerPC Apple G5 architecture. Results show that ViVA is able to deliver significant performance benefits over scalar techniques for a variety of memory access patterns as well as two important memory-bound compact kernels, corner turn and sparse matrix-vector multiplication -- achieving 2x-13x improvement compared the scalar version. Overall, our preliminary ViVA exploration points to a promising approach for improving application performance on leading microprocessors with minimal design and complexity costs, in a power efficient manner.

  16. Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2012-04-14

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  17. Spectrophotometric determination of uranium(VI) with chlorophosphonazo-mN by flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Jun Ying; Chen, Xing Guo; Hu, Zhi De

    1994-07-01

    A sensitive and selective spectrophotometric flow injection analysis (FIA) method with chlorophosphonazo-mN has been developed for the determination of uranium(VI) in standard ore samples. Most interfereing ions are effectively eliminated by the masking reagent diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). In the U(VI)-chlorophosphonazo-mN system, the maximum absorption wavelength is at 680 nm and Beer`s law is obeyed in the range of 1 to 15 {mu}g {mu}l{sup -1}. The correlation coefficient of the calibration curve is. 0.9998, the sampling frequency is 60{sup -1}, and detection limit for uranium(VI) is 0.5 {mu}g mul{sup -1}.

  18. Effect of temperature on the complexation of Uranium(VI) with fluoride in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-05-18

    Complexation of U(VI) with fluoride at elevated temperatures in aqueous solutions was studied by spectrophotometry. Four successive complexes, UO{sub 2}F{sup +}, UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}(aq), UO{sub 2}F{sub 3}{sup -}, and UO{sub 2}F{sub 4}{sup 2-}, were identified, and the stability constants at 25, 40, 55, and 70 C were calculated. The stability of the complexes increased as the temperature was elevated. The enthalpies of complexation at 25 C were determined by microcalorimetry. Thermodynamic parameters indicate that the complexation of U(VI) with fluoride in aqueous solutions at 25 to 70 C is slightly endothermic and entropy-driven. The Specific Ion Interaction (SIT) approach was used to obtain the thermodynamic parameters of complexation at infinite dilution. Structural information on the U(VI)/fluoride complexes was obtained by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

  19. Leibniz Universitt Hannover Leibniz Universitt Hannover (LUH hay vi tn y Gottfried Wilhelm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nejdl, Wolfgang

    trng cho gii trí Hannover, ngoài ra cng là thc n tinh thn ca mi ngi dân. Cánh rng bo ph khp thành ph Hannover vi các trng H hàng u càng ngày c tng cng và các tho thun hp tác c c th hoá hn. Có hn 30 sinh viên

  20. USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-187. 2003. 249 VI. The Association of Bay Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of leaders in the high-tech industry, in writing a report designed to address the problem of housingUSDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-187. 2003. 249 VI. The Association of Bay Area in the region. #12;USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-187. 2003. SectionVI 250 THE ASSOCIATION OF BAY

  1. Design of I2-II-IV-VI4 Semiconductors through Element Substitution: The Thermodynamic Stability Limit and Chemical Trend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xingao

    Design of I2-II-IV-VI4 Semiconductors through Element Substitution: The Thermodynamic Stability that this element-substitution design is thermodynamically limited, that is, although I2-II-IV-VI4 with I = Cu, Ag for future design of new quaternary semiconductors. I. INTRODUCTION Because all component elements are earth

  2. UMBC Policy VI-10.00.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON POLICY FORMULATION AND MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suri, Manil

    UMBC Policy VI-10.00.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON POLICY FORMULATION AND MANAGEMENT UMBC Policy No. VI-10.00.01 I. POLICY STATEMENT The UMBC community should have access to well-articulated and understandable University Policies and related Operating Procedures. Those responsible for writing, updating

  3. FATE AND TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES [U(VI), Sr, Cs] IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    FATE AND TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES [U(VI), Sr, Cs] IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE AND TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES [U(VI), Sr, Cs] IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE Abstract by Kenton A unsaturated conditions. 2. To evaluate pore scale processes of uranium release from sediment to pore water. 3

  4. ViDE: A Vision-Based Approach for Deep Web Data Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Weiyi

    ViDE: A Vision-Based Approach for Deep Web Data Extraction Wei Liu, Xiaofeng Meng, Member, IEEE, and Weiyi Meng, Member, IEEE Abstract--Deep Web contents are accessed by queries submitted to Web databases and the returned data records are enwrapped in dynamically generated Web pages (they will be called deep Web pages

  5. Detailed Tuning of Structure and Intramolecular Communication Are Dispensable for Processive Motion of Myosin VI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spudich, James A.

    Detailed Tuning of Structure and Intramolecular Communication Are Dispensable for Processive Motion and intramolecular communication are dispensable for processive motion, and further show theoretically that one. The properties of the lever arm and tail structure of myosin VI, and of other molecular motors, have been

  6. De Bilt, 2014 | KNMI publication 196-VI Rainfall generator for the Meuse basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beersma, Jules

    De Bilt, 2014 | KNMI publication 196-VI Rainfall generator for the Meuse basin: Description, and T. Adri Buishand #12;#12;1 Rainfall generator for the Meuse basin: Description of simulations ......................................................................................................................21 #12;3 1. INTRODUCTION The rainfall generator has been developed to generate long synthetic

  7. Billiards Digest September, 2012 "VEPP Part VI: Line-of-Balls Drill" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alciatore, David G.

    Billiards Digest September, 2012 "VEPP ­ Part VI: Line-of-Balls Drill" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES David-dave-billiards.com/vepp. Last month, we looked at useful center-of-table drills from Disc II: "VEPP II ­ Position Control and English." This month, we'll look at another type of position control drill, also from the second DVD

  8. Chemical passivity of III-VI bilayer terminated Si,,111... Jonathan A. Adamsa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olmstead, Marjorie

    Chemical passivity of III-VI bilayer terminated Si,,111... Jonathan A. Adamsa and Aaron A online 17 October 2005 The chemical stability of Si 111 , terminated with bilayer AlSe and GaSe, upon electronic and atomic structure do not imply similar chemical passivity. While Si 111 :GaSe is largely

  9. Bioremediation and Biodegradation In Situ Reduction of Chromium(VI) in Heavily Contaminated Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    Bioremediation and Biodegradation In Situ Reduction of Chromium(VI) in Heavily Contaminated Soils reductants into soils and ground water is be- in the form of tryptic soy broth or lactate were diffused oxidation states having contaminated soils and ground water contain levels ofvery different behavior (Rai et

  10. The Vi Capsular Polysaccharide Enables Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi to Evade Microbe-Guided

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinrich, Volkmar

    The Vi Capsular Polysaccharide Enables Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi to Evade Microbe Serovar Typhi to Evade Microbe-Guided Neutrophil Chemotaxis. PLoS Pathog 10(8): e1004306. doi:10 genes that are absent from S. Typhi can contribute to differences in the outcome of host microbe

  11. VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010 Comparison International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010 1. Introduction In the Mediterranean Basin, fires are of major concern for forest and shrubland ecosystems. Wildland fire occurrence and area

  12. VI. EVALUATION OF FACULTY D. Procedures for Third-Year Evaluation, Tenure and Promotion of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    VI. EVALUATION OF FACULTY D. Procedures for Third-Year Evaluation, Tenure and Promotion of Instructional and Library Faculty 1. Introduction The third-year evaluation is a significant decision point in a faculty member's career at the College of Charleston. The result of the third-year evaluation

  13. VI. EVALUATION OF FACULTY C. Third-Year Review, Tenure and Promotion of the Library Faculty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    VI. EVALUATION OF FACULTY C. Third-Year Review, Tenure and Promotion of the Library Faculty (Rev. April 2011) The President retains the power of approval for third-year review determinations, conferrals simultaneously with the third-year review. A third-year review should substantiate whether satisfactory progress

  14. Chemical Reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) at the Solid-Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    ) oxides and highly Fe(III) oxide-enriched (18-35 wt % Fe) Atlantic coastal plain sediments. In contrast with relatively low Fe(III) oxide content (1-5 wt % Fe). Fe(II) sorption site density was severalfold lower Uranium(VI) is stable in oxic environments and typically exists as soluble carbonate complexes in aerobic

  15. VI. EVALUATION OF FACULTY B. Third-Year Review and Promotion of Instructors and Renewal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    VI. EVALUATION OF FACULTY B. Third-Year Review and Promotion of Instructors and Renewal of Senior. A promotion decision is made only once normally in the sixth year. A review for renewal as Senior Instructor normally takes place every fifth year. (Inst. April 2011) 1. Specific Criteria for Promotion to and Renewal

  16. VI International Conference on Computational Methods in Marine Engineering MARINE 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VI International Conference on Computational Methods in Marine Engineering MARINE 2015 F. Salvatore, R. Broglia and R. Muscari (Eds) SHIP VOYAGE ENERGY EFFICIENCY ASSESSMENT USING SHIP SIMULATORS Ameen.ac.uk, web page: http://www.soton.ac.uk Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Department Faculty

  17. VI. SENSOR CALIBRATIONS One of the most important aspects of high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    13 VI. SENSOR CALIBRATIONS One of the most important aspects of high quality solar radiation the solar radiation transmission values on clear days at solar noon. A comparison of these values over exactly duplicate the re- sponse to the incident solar radiation. The electrical power used in the heater

  18. AFS-2 FLOWSHEET MODIFICATIONS TO ADDRESS THE INGROWTH OF PU(VI) DURING METAL DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crapse, K.; Rudisill, T.; O'Rourke, P.; Kyser, E.

    2014-07-02

    In support of the Alternate Feed Stock Two (AFS-2) PuO{sub 2} production campaign, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted a series of experiments concluding that dissolving Pu metal at 95°C using a 6–10 M HNO{sub 3} solution containing 0.05–0.2 M KF and 0–2 g/L B could reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to dissolving Pu metal under the same conditions but at or near the boiling temperature. This flowsheet was demonstrated by conducting Pu metal dissolutions at 95°C to ensure that PuO{sub 2} solids were not formed during the dissolution. These dissolution parameters can be used for dissolving both Aqueous Polishing (AP) and MOX Process (MP) specification materials. Preceding the studies reported herein, two batches of Pu metal were dissolved in the H-Canyon 6.1D dissolver to prepare feed solution for the AFS-2 PuO{sub 2} production campaign. While in storage, UV-visible spectra obtained from an at-line spectrophotometer indicated the presence of Pu(VI). Analysis of the solutions also showed the presence of Fe, Ni, and Cr. Oxidation of Pu(IV) produced during metal dissolution to Pu(VI) is a concern for anion exchange purification. Anion exchange requires Pu in the +4 oxidation state for formation of the anionic plutonium(IV) hexanitrato complex which absorbs onto the resin. The presence of Pu(VI) in the anion feed solution would require a valence adjustment step to prevent losses. In addition, the presence of Cr(VI) would result in absorption of chromate ion onto the resin and could limit the purification of Pu from Cr which may challenge the purity specification of the final PuO{sub 2} product. Initial experiments were performed to quantify the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) (presumed to be facilitated by Cr(VI)) as functions of the HNO{sub 3} concentration and temperature in simulated dissolution solutions containing Cr, Fe, and Ni. In these simulated Pu dissolutions studies, lowering the temperature from near boiling to 95 °C reduced the oxidation rate of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). For 8.1 M HNO{sub 3} simulated dissolution solutions, at near boiling conditions >35% Pu(VI) was present in 50 h while at 95 °C <10% Pu(VI) was present at 50 h. At near boiling temperatures, eliminating the presence of Cr and varying the HNO{sub 3} concentration in the range of 7–8.5 M had little effect on the rate of conversion of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). HNO{sub 3} oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) in a pure solution has been reported previously. Based on simulated dissolution experiments, this study concluded that dissolving Pu metal at 95°C using a 6 to 10 M HNO{sub 3} solution 0.05–0.2 M KF and 0–2 g/L B could reduce the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. To demonstrate this flowsheet, two small-scale experiments were performed dissolving Pu metal up to 6.75 g/L. No Pu-containing residues were observed in the solutions after cooling. Using Pu metal dissolution rates measured during the experiments and a correlation developed by Holcomb, the time required to completely dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver using this flowsheet was estimated to require nearly 5 days (120 h). This value is reasonably consistent with an estimate based on the Batch 2 and 3 dissolution times in the 6.1D dissolver and Pu metal dissolution rates measured in this study and by Rudisill et al. Data from the present and previous studies show that the Pu metal dissolution rate decreases by a factor of approximately two when the temperature decreased from boiling (112 to 116°C) to 95°C. Therefore, the time required to dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver at 95°C would likely double (from 36 to 54 h) and require 72 to 108 h depending on the surface area of the Pu metal. Based on the experimental studies, a Pu metal dissolution flowsheet utilizing 6–10 M HNO{sub 3} containing 0.05–0.2 M KF (with 0–2 g/L B) at 95°C is recommended to reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. The time required to completely di

  19. Investigation on Microbial Dissolution of Uranium (VI) from Autunite Mineral - 13421

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepulveda, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel [Applied Research Center, Florida International University. 10555 West Flagler St. Suite 2100, Miami Fl 33175 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University. 10555 West Flagler St. Suite 2100, Miami Fl 33175 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Precipitating autunite minerals by polyphosphate injection was identified as a feasible remediation strategy for sequestering uranium in contaminated groundwater and soil in situ at the Hanford Site. Autunite stability under vadose and saturated zone environmental conditions can help to determine the long-term effectiveness of this remediation strategy. The Arthrobacter bacteria are one of the most common groups in soils and are found in large numbers in Hanford soil as well as other subsurface environments contaminated with radionuclides. Ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, these bacteria can play a significant role in the dissolution of minerals and the formation of secondary minerals. The main objective of this investigation was to study the bacterial interactions under oxidizing conditions with uranium (VI); study the potential role of bicarbonate, which is an integral complexing ligand for U(VI) and a major ion in groundwater compositions; and present data from autunite dissolution experiments using Arthrobacter strain G968, a less U(VI)-tolerant strain. Sterile 100 mL glass mixed reactors served as the major bioreactor for initial experimentation. These autunite-containing bioreactors were injected with bacterial cells after the autunite equilibrated with the media solution amended with 0 mM, 3 mM 5 mM and 10 mM concentrations of bicarbonate. G968 Arthrobacter cells in the amount of 10{sup 6} cells/mL were injected into the reactors after 27 days, giving time for the autunite to reach steady state. Abiotic non-carbonate controls were kept without bacterial inoculation to provide a control for the biotic samples. Samples of the solution were analyzed for dissolved U(VI) by means of kinetic phosphorescence analyzer KPA-11 (Chemcheck Instruments, Richland, WA). Analysis showed that as [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}] increases, a diminishing trend on the effect of bacteria on autunite leaching is observed. Viability of cells was conducted after 24 hours of cell incubation with the appropriate uranium and bicarbonate concentration treatment. As expected, the cells started to reduce after day 41 due to the nutritional exhaustion of the media. Moreover, viable bacteria accounted for more than 94% in the presence of 10 mM bicarbonate. Experiments showed that despite differences between the G975 and the G968 bacterial strains resistance to U(VI), in the presence of bicarbonate ions they are able to dissolute uranium from autunite mineral at the same capacity. The effect of both bacterial strains on autunite dissolution is reduced as the concentration of bicarbonate increases while the increase in soluble U(VI) concentration induced by G968 and G975 is dwarfed, for larger [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}]. (authors)

  20. Sputtered II-VI Alloys and Structures forTandem PV: Final Subcontract Report, 9 December 2003 - 30 July 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compaan, A. D.; Collins, R.; Karpov, V. G.; Giolando, D.

    2008-09-01

    This report elaborates on Phase 3 and provides summaries of the first two Phases. Phase 3 research work was divided into five task areas covering different aspects of the II-VI tandem cell.

  1. Dendritic Chelating Agents. 2. U(VI) Binding to Poly(amidoamine) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    ,(ii)dendrimergeneration,(iii)dendrimercoreandterminal group chemistry, and (iv) solution pH and competing ligands (NO3 -, PO4 3-, CO3 2-, and Cl. Introduction The mining and processing of uranium ores and the production, reprocessing and disposal of uranium streams is a key compo- nent of the uranium nuclear fuel cycle (1­4). Uranyl [U(VI)] is the most stable

  2. TREATMENT TESTS FOR EX SITU REMOVAL OF CHROMATE & NITRATE & URANIUM (VI) FROM HANFORD (100-HR-3) GROUNDWATER FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECK MA; DUNCAN JB

    1994-01-03

    This report describes batch and ion exchange column laboratory scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and uranium (present as uranium [VI]) from contaminated Hanford site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include: chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium; and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan. The method suggested for future study is anion exchange.

  3. Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Brian; Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth. L.

    2008-06-10

    The dissolution of synthetic boehmite (?-AlOOH) by 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) was examined in a series of batch adsorption/dissolution experiments. Additionally, the leaching behavior of {sup 233}U(VI) from boehmite was examined as a function of pH and HEDPA concentration. The results are discussed in terms of sludge washing procedures that may be utilized during underground tank waste remediation. In the pH range 4 to 10, complexation of Al(III) by HEDPA significantly enhanced dissolution of boehmite. This phenomenon was especially pronounced in the neutral pH region where the solubility of aluminum, in the absence of complexants, is limited by the formation of sparsely soluble aluminum hydroxides. At pH higher than 10, dissolution of synthetic boehmite was inhibited by HEDPA, likely due to sorption of Al(III):HEDPA complexes. Addition of HEDPA to equilibrated U(VI)-synthetic boehmite suspensions yielded an increase in the aqueous phase uranium concentration. Partitioning of uranium between the solid and aqueous phase is described in terms of U(VI):HEDPA speciation and dissolution of the boehmite solid phase.

  4. Electrode Induced Removal and Recovery of Uranium (VI) from Acidic Subsurfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, Kelvin

    2013-08-12

    The overarching objective of this research is to provide an improved understanding of how aqueous geochemical conditions impact the removal of U and Tc from groundwater and how engineering design may be utilized to optimize removal of these radionuclides. Experiments were designed to address the unique conditions in Area 3 of ORNL while also providing broader insight into the geochemical effectors of the removal rates and extent for U and Tc. The specific tasks of this work were to: 1) quantify the impact of common aqueous geochemical and operational conditions on the rate and extent of U removal and recovery from water, 2) investigate the removal of Tc with polarized graphite electrode, and determine the influence of geochemical and operational conditions on Tc removal and recovery, 3) determine whether U and Tc may be treated simultaneous from Area 3 groundwater, and examine the bench-scale performance of electrode-based treatment, and 4) determine the capacity of graphite electrodes for U(VI) removal and develop a mathematical, kinetic model for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution. Overall the body of work suggests that an electrode-based approach for the remediation of acidic subsurface environments, such as those observed in Area 3 of ORNL may be successful for the removal for both U(VI) and Tc. Carbonaceous (graphite) electrode materials are likely to be the least costly means to maximize removal rates and efficiency by maximizing the electrode surface area.

  5. Equations of state of ice VI and ice VII at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezacier, Lucile; Hanfland, Michael; Journaux, Baptiste; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Cardon, Hervé; Daniel, Isabelle

    2014-09-14

    High-pressure H{sub 2}O polymorphs among which ice VI and ice VII are abundant in the interiors of large icy satellites and exo-planets. Knowledge of the elastic properties of these pure H{sub 2}O ices at high-temperature and high-pressure is thus crucial to decipher the internal structure of icy bodies. In this study we assess for the first time the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) relations of both polycrystalline pure ice VI and ice VII at high pressures and temperatures from 1 to 9 GPa and 300 to 450 K, respectively, by using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PVT data are adjusted to a second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and give V{sub 0} = 14.17(2) cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}, K{sub 0} = 14.05(23) GPa, and ?{sub 0} = 14.6(14) × 10{sup ?5} K{sup ?1} for ice VI and V{sub 0} = 12.49(1) cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}, K{sub 0} = 20.15(16) GPa, and ?{sub 0} = 11.6(5) × 10{sup ?5} K{sup ?1} for ice VII.

  6. Spectroscopic studies of U(VI) sorption at the kaolinite-water interface. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, H.A.; Parks, G.A.; Brown, G.E. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Efficient use of U as a resource and safe handling, recycling and disposal of U-containing wastes require an understanding of the factors controlling the fate of U, where fate refers to the destination of U, typically expressed as an environmental medium or a process phase. The sorption process constitutes a change in elemental fate. Partitioning of an element from solution to a solid phase, or sorption, can be divided into three broad categories: adsorption, surface precipitation, and absorption. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), a type of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), offers the possibility for distinguishing among different modes of sorption by characterizing the atomic environment of the sorbing element. In this study, the authors use EXAFS to determine the structure of U(VI) sorption complexes at the kaolinite-water interface. In Chapter One, they present an overview of selected aspects of U structural chemistry as a basis for considering the structural environment of U at the solid-water interface. To evaluate the utility of XAS for characterization of the structural environment of U(VI) at the solid-water interface, they have carried out an in-depth analysis of XAS data from U(VI)-containing solid and solution model compounds, which they describe in Chapter Two. In Chapter three, they consider sorption of U by kaolinite as a means of effecting the removal of U from surface collection pond waters on the Rocky Flats Plant site in northern Colorado.

  7. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Reimus, Paul W.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M.; House, Brian M.; Hartmann, Matt; et al

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³?U/²³?U (?²³?U), ²³?U/²³?U activity ratio, and ³?S/³²S (?³?S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility atmore »an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The ?²³?U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower ?²³?U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and ?²³?U with an ? of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³?U/²³?U activity ratio and ?³?S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.« less

  8. Reactive oxygen species mediate Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through PI3K/AKT-dependent activation of GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Fan, Jia; Kim, Dong-Hern; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi, Xianglin

    2013-09-01

    Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens that primarily target the lungs. Cr(VI) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules involved in Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis have not been extensively studied. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to Cr(VI) at nanomolar concentrations (10–100 nM) for 3 months not only induced cell transformation, but also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of Cr(VI)-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) increased levels of intracellular ROS and antiapoptotic proteins. Transfection with catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevented Cr(VI)-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion, migration, and xenograft tumors. While chronic Cr(VI) exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K/AKT/GSK-3?/?-catenin and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, transfection with catalase or SOD markedly inhibited Cr(VI)-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or ?-catenin almost completely suppressed the Cr(VI)-mediated increase in total and active ?-catenin proteins and colony formation. In particular, Cr(VI) suppressed autophagy of epithelial cells under nutrition deprivation. Furthermore, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3?, ?-catenin, mTOR, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with Cr(VI)-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that ROS is a key mediator of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through the activation of PI3K/AKT-dependent GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling and the promotion of cell survival mechanisms via the inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy. - Highlights: • Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. • ROS play an important role in Cr(VI)-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. • PI3K/AKT/GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling involved in Cr(VI) carcinogenesis. • The inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy contributes to Cr(VI) carcinogenesis.

  9. Marshall Field Annex 1897 -1920

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    until 1919. The library finally moved into the new space in 1920 and reopened in May 1921 with seven group; although college students, and particularly IIT students, frequented the Randolph Street Library

  10. Standard test method for uranium in presence of plutonium by iron(II) reduction in phosphoric acid followed by chromium(VI) titration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    Standard test method for uranium in presence of plutonium by iron(II) reduction in phosphoric acid followed by chromium(VI) titration

  11. Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2009-09-09

    To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  12. The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackPropertiesfully coupledU(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments

  13. Tank Operations Contract No. DE-AC27-08R Vi4800

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:Take ActionPermitB ContractR Vi4800

  14. Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program: Phase VI update (1983) report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    This update of the Energy Economic Data Base is the latest in a series of technical and cost studies prepared by United Engineers and Constructors Inc., during the last 18 years. The data base was developed during 1978 and has been updated annually since then. The purpose of the updates has been to reflect the impact of changing regulations and technology on the costs of electric power generating stations. This Phase VI (Sixth) Update report documents the results of the 1983 EEDB Program update effort. The latest effort was a comprehensive update of the technical and capital cost information for the pressurized water reactor, boiling water reactor, and liquid metal fast breeder reactor nuclear power plant data models and for the 800 MWe and 500 MWe high sulfur coal-fired power plant data models. The update provided representative costs for these nuclear and coal-fired power plants for the 1980's. In addition, the updated nuclear power plant data models for the 1980's were modified to provide anticipated costs for nuclear power plants for the 1990's. Consequently, the Phase VI Update has continued to provide important benchmark information through which technical and capital cost trends may be identified that have occurred since January 1, 1978.

  15. Microbial Community Changes in Response to Ethanol or Methanol Amendments for U(VI) Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Madden, Andrew [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Drake, Meghan M [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University; Akob, Denise M. [Florida State University; Kusel, Kirsten [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Microbial community responses to ethanol, methanol and methanol + humics amendments in relationship to uranium bioremediation were studied in laboratory microcosm experiments using sediments and ground water from a uranium-contaminated site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Ethanol addition always resulted in uranium reduction at rate of 0.8-1.0 mol l-1 d-1 while methanol addition did so occasionally at rate 0.95 mol l-1 d-1. The type of carbon source added, the duration of incubation, and the sampling site influenced the bacterial community structure upon incubation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicated (1) bacterial communities found in ethanol- and methanol-amended samples with U(VI) reduction were similar due to presence of -Proteobacteria, and -Proteobacteria (members of the families Burkholderiaceae, Comamonadaceae, Oxalobacteraceae, and Rhodocyclaceae); (2) methanol-amended samples without U(VI) reduction exhibited the lowest diversity and the bacterial community contained 69.2-92.8% of the family Methylophilaceae; and (3) the addition of humics resulted in an increase of phylogenetic diversity of -Proteobacteria (Rodoferax, Polaromonas, Janthinobacterium, Methylophilales, unclassified) and Firmicutes (Desulfosporosinus, Clostridium).

  16. Uranium (VI)Bis(imido) chalcogenate complexes:synthesis and density functional theory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Liam P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boncella, James M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Bis(imido) uranium(VI) trans- and cis-dichalcogenate complexes with the general formula U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 (EAr = O-2-tBuC6H4, SPh, SePh, TePh) and U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(R2bpy) (EAr = SPh, SePh, TePh) (R2bpy = 4,4'-disubstituted-2,2'-bipyridyl, R = Me, tBu) have been prepared. This family of complexes includes the first reported monodentate selenolate and tellurolate complexes of uranium(VI). Density functional theory calculations show that covalent interactions in the U-E bond increase in the trans-dichalcogenate series U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 as the size of the chalcogenate donor increases and that both 5f and 6d orbital participation is important in the M-E bonds of U-S, U-Se, and U-Te complexes.

  17. The Universal Arrow of Time V-VI: (Part V) Unpredictable dynamics (Part VI) Future of artificial intelligence - Art, not Science: Practical Application of Unpredictable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Kupervasser

    2013-05-23

    The paper consists of the two independent papers:(Part V) We see that exact equations of quantum and classical mechanics describe ideal dynamics which is reversible and leads to Poincare's returns. Real equations of physics describing observable dynamics, for example, hydrodynamic equations of viscous fluid, are irreversible and exclude Poincare's returns to the initial state. Besides, these equations describe systems in terms of macroparameters or phase distribution functions of microparameters. For many systems introduction of macroparameters that allow exhaustive describing of dynamics of the system is impossible. Their dynamics becomes unpredictable in principle, sometimes even unpredictable by the probabilistic way. We will refer to dynamics describing such system as unpredictable dynamics. Dynamics of unpredictable systems is not described and not predicted by scientific methods. Thus, the science itself puts boundaries for its applicability. But such systems can intuitively "understand itself" and "predict" the behavior "of its own" or even "communicate with each other" at intuitive level. (Part VI) Perspective of the future of artificial intellect (AI) is considered. It is shown that AI development in the future will be closer rather to art than to science. Complex dissipative systems whose behavior cannot be understood completely in principle will be the basis of AI. Nevertheless, it will not be a barrier for their practical use.

  18. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 46, NO. 2, MARCH 2000 687 where Vi is some integer and let fi be the number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goresky, Mark

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 46, NO. 2, MARCH 2000 687 ; = Vi2 m+1 where Vi sequences with Gold-like correla- tion but larger linear span," IEEE Trans. Inform. Theory, vol. 40, pp. 532-valued crosscorrelation: A proof of Welch's conjecture," IEEE Trans. Inform. Theory, vol. 46, pp. 4­8, Jan 2000. [3] A

  19. C:\\idrive\\web\\intro6e\\supplement\\Supplement6(d)JavaXML.doc Last printed Supplement VI.D: Java and XML

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Y. Daniel

    C:\\idrive\\web\\intro6e\\supplement\\Supplement6(d)JavaXML.doc Last printed Supplement VI.D: Java and XML For Introduction to Java Programming By Y. Daniel Liang This supplement introduces how to use Java is required for this supplement. To learn XML, please read Supplement VI.C, "XML." 0 Introduction

  20. A modified model for calculating lattice thermal expansion of I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} and I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4} tetrahedral compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar, M.S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Kurdistan (Iraq)]. E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com

    2007-05-03

    A general empirical formula was found for calculating lattice thermal expansion for compounds having their properties extended for compound groups having different mean ionicity as well as more than one type of cation atoms with that of different numbers of them such as I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} and I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4}. The difference in the valence electrons for cations and anions in the compound was used to correlate the deviations caused by the compound ionicity. The ionicity effects, which are due to their different numbers for their types, were also added to the correlation equation. In general, the lattice thermal expansion for a compound semiconductor can be calculated from a relation containing melting point, mean atomic distance and number of valence electrons for the atoms forming the compound. The mean ionicity for the group compounds forming I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} was found to be 0.323 and 0.785 for the ternary group compounds of I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4}.

  1. Adsorption of Fe(II) and U(VI) to carboxyl-functionalized microspheres: The influence of speciation on uranyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    on uranyl reduction studied by titration and XAFS Maxim I. Boyanov a,b,*, Edward J. O'Loughlin a , Eric E, the U(VI) cation was adsorbed as a mononuclear uranyl­carboxyl complex at both pH 7.5 and 8 may explain the commonly observed higher efficiency of uranyl reduction by adsorbed or structural Fe

  2. All-vapor processing of p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor and ohmic contacts thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCandless, Brian E. (Elkton, MD)

    2001-06-26

    An all dry method for producing solar cells is provided comprising first heat-annealing a II-VI semiconductor; enhancing the conductivity and grain size of the annealed layer; modifying the surface and depositing a tellurium layer onto the enhanced layer; and then depositing copper onto the tellurium layer so as to produce a copper tellurium compound on the layer.

  3. VI. EVALUATION OF FACULTY A. Third-year Review, Tenure and Promotion of Tenure-Track and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    VI. EVALUATION OF FACULTY A. Third-year Review, Tenure and Promotion of Tenure-Track and Tenured Instructional Faculty (Rev. April 2012) The President retains the power of approval for third-year review will continue. (Rev. April 2009) A third-year review should substantiate whether satisfactory progress toward

  4. Improving Soil Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Improving Soil Quality Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director of Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma. This publication is printed

  5. A lattice gas model of II{VI(001) semiconductor M. Biehl 1;2 , M. Ahr 1 , W. Kinzel 1 , M. Sokolowski 2;3 and T. Volkmann 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biehl, Michael

    {VI(001) semiconductor surfaces. Important properties of this class of materials are represented by e#11 parameters are chosen to represent certain properties of metal terminated II{ VI(001) semiconductor surfacesA lattice gas model of II{VI(001) semiconductor surfaces M. Biehl 1;2 , M. Ahr 1 , W. Kinzel 1 , M

  6. REVISED AND EXTENDED ANALYSIS OF FIVE TIMES IONIZED XENON, Xe VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, M.; Raineri, M.; Reyna Almandos, J.; Pagan, C. J. B.; Abrahão, R. A. E-mail: cesarpagan@fee.unicamp.br

    2015-01-01

    A capillary discharge tube was used to record the Xe spectrum in the 400-5500 Å  region. A set of 243 lines of the Xe VI spectrum was observed, and 146 of them were classified for the first time. For all known lines, we calculated the weighted oscillator strengths (gf) and weighted transition probabilities (gA) using the configuration interaction in a relativistic Hartree-Fock approach. The energy matrix was calculated using energy parameters adjusted to fit the experimental energy levels. Core polarization effects were taken into account in our calculations. Experimental energy values and calculated lifetimes are also presented for a set of 88 levels. From these levels, 32 were classified for the first time and 33 had their values revised. Our analysis of the 5s5p5d and 5s5p6s configurations was extended in order to clarify discrepancies among previous works.

  7. Genogroup IV and VI Canine Noroviruses Interact with Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caddy, Sarah; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-06-09

    ASM Journal go to: o n O ctober 3, 2014 by M RC LAB O F M O LECULAR BIO LO G Y http://jvi.asm.org/ D ow nloaded from o n O ctober 3, 2014 by M RC LAB O F M O LECULAR BIO LO G Y http://jvi.asm.org/ D ow nloaded from Genogroup IV and VI Canine... . 10377–10391 jvi.asm.org 10377 o n O ctober 3, 2014 by M RC LAB O F M O LECULAR BIO LO G Y http://jvi.asm.org/ D ow nloaded from wide variety of species. In addition, HBGAs can be secreted by these cells into bodily fluids, including saliva (13...

  8. Complex structure of type VI peptidoglycan muramidase effector and a cognate immunity protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Tianyu [Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ding, Jinjing; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Da-Cheng, E-mail: dcwang@ibp.ac.cn [Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Liu, Wei, E-mail: dcwang@ibp.ac.cn [The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2013-10-01

    The structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex associated with the bacterial type VI secretion system of P. aeruginosa has been solved and refined at 1.9 Å resolution. The structural basis of the recognition of the muramidase effector and its inactivation by its cognate immunity protein is revealed. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a bacterial protein-export machine that is capable of delivering virulence effectors between Gram-negative bacteria. The T6SS of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transports two lytic enzymes, Tse1 and Tse3, to degrade cell-wall peptidoglycan in the periplasm of rival bacteria that are competing for niches via amidase and muramidase activities, respectively. Two cognate immunity proteins, Tsi1 and Tsi3, are produced by the bacterium to inactivate the two antibacterial effectors, thereby protecting its siblings from self-intoxication. Recently, Tse1–Tsi1 has been structurally characterized. Here, the structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex is reported at 1.9 Å resolution. The results reveal that Tse3 contains a C-terminal catalytic domain that adopts a soluble lytic transglycosylase (SLT) fold in which three calcium-binding sites were surprisingly observed close to the catalytic Glu residue. The electrostatic properties of the substrate-binding groove are also distinctive from those of known structures with a similar fold. All of these features imply that a unique catalytic mechanism is utilized by Tse3 in cleaving glycosidic bonds. Tsi3 comprises a single domain showing a ?-sandwich architecture that is reminiscent of the immunoglobulin fold. Three loops of Tsi3 insert deeply into the groove of Tse3 and completely occlude its active site, which forms the structural basis of Tse3 inactivation. This work is the first crystallographic report describing the three-dimensional structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 effector–immunity pair.

  9. Halo mass dependence of H I and O VI absorption: evidence for differential kinematics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathes, Nigel L.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Kacprzak, Glenn G. [Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Charlton, Jane; Muzahid, Sowgat [The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We studied a sample of 14 galaxies (0.1 < z < 0.7) using HST/WFPC2 imaging and high-resolution HST/COS or HST/STIS quasar spectroscopy of Ly?, Ly?, and O VI ??1031, 1037 absorption. The galaxies, having 10.8 ? log (M {sub h}/M {sub ?}) ? 12.2, lie within D = 300 kpc of quasar sightlines, probing out to D/R {sub vir} = 3. When the full range of M {sub h} and D/R {sub vir} of the sample are examined, ?40% of the H I absorbing clouds can be inferred to be escaping their host halo. The fraction of bound clouds decreases as D/R {sub vir} increases such that the escaping fraction is ?15% for D/R {sub vir} < 1, ?45% for 1 ? D/R {sub vir} < 2, and ?90% for 2 ? D/R {sub vir} < 3. Adopting the median mass log M {sub h}/M {sub ?} = 11.5 to divide the sample into 'higher' and 'lower' mass galaxies, we find a mass dependency for the hot circumgalactic medium kinematics. To our survey limits, O VI absorption is found in only ?40% of the H I clouds in and around lower mass halos as compared to ?85% around higher mass halos. For D/R {sub vir} < 1, lower mass halos have an escape fraction of ?65%, whereas higher mass halos have an escape fraction of ?5%. For 1 ? D/R {sub vir} < 2, the escape fractions are ?55% and ?35% for lower mass and higher mass halos, respectively. For 2 ? D/R {sub vir} < 3, the escape fraction for lower mass halos is ?90%. We show that it is highly likely that the absorbing clouds reside within 4R {sub vir} of their host galaxies and that the kinematics are dominated by outflows. Our finding of 'differential kinematics' is consistent with the scenario of 'differential wind recycling' proposed by Oppenheimer et al. We discuss the implications for galaxy evolution, the stellar to halo mass function, and the mass-metallicity relationship of galaxies.

  10. ELECTRONIC SOLUTION SPECTRA FOR URANIUM AND NEPTUNIUM IN OXIDATION STATES (III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baluka, M.; Edelstein, N.; O'Donnell, T. A.

    1980-10-01

    Spectra have been recorded for solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium and neptunium in oxidation states (III) to (VI). The spectra for U(III), Np(III) and Np(IV) in AHF are very similar to those in acidified aqueous solution, but that for U(IV) suggests that the cationic species is UF{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The AHF spectra for the elements in oxidation states (V) and (VI) are not comparable with those of the formally analogous aqueous solutions, where the elements exist as well-defined dioxo-cations. However, the AHF spectra can be related to spectra in the gas phase, in the solid state or in non-aqueous solvents for each element in its appropriate oxidation state.

  11. Treatment tests for ex situ removal of chromate, nitrate, and uranium (VI) from Hanford (100-HR-3) groundwater. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, M.A.; Duncan, J.B.

    1993-11-15

    This report describes batch and anion exchange column laboratory-scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}), and uranium (present as uranyl (uranium [VI]) carbonato anionic species) from contaminated Hanford Site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium, and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium, and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1993). The goal of these tests was to determine the best method to remove selected contaminants to below the concentration of the project performance goals. The raw data and observations made during these tests can be found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) laboratory notebooks (Beck 1992, Herting 1993). The method recommended for future study is anion exchange with Dowex 21K resin.

  12. Real-time observation of morphological transformations in II-VI semiconducting nanobelts via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agarwal, Rahul; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Krook, Nadia M.; Liu, Wenjing; Berger, Jacob; Stach, Eric A.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-05-01

    It has been observed that wurtzite II–VI semiconducting nanobelts transform into single-crystal, periodically branched nanostructures upon heating. The mechanism of this novel transformation has been elucidated by heating II–VI nanobelts in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) in oxidizing, reducing and inert atmospheres while observing their structural changes with high spatial resolution. The interplay of surface reconstruction of high-energy surfaces of the wurtzite phase and environment-dependent anisotropic chemical etching of certain crystal surfaces in the branching mechanism of nanobelts has been observed. Understanding of structural and chemical transformations of materials via in situ microscopy techniques and their role in designingmore »new nanostructured materials is discussed.« less

  13. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}/II-VI semiconductor heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zhiyi Zhao, Lukas; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia; Garcia, Thor Axtmann; Tamargo, Maria C.; Hernandez-Mainet, Luis C.; Deng, Haiming

    2014-12-15

    Surfaces of three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) have been proposed to host quantum phases at the interfaces with other types of materials, provided that the topological properties of interfacial regions remain unperturbed. Here, we report on the molecular beam epitaxy growth of II-VI semiconductor–TI heterostructures using c-plane sapphire substrates. Our studies demonstrate that Zn{sub 0.49}Cd{sub 0.51}Se and Zn{sub 0.23}Cd{sub 0.25}Mg{sub 0.52}Se layers have improved quality relative to ZnSe. The structures exhibit a large relative upward shift of the TI bulk quantum levels when the TI layers are very thin (?6nm), consistent with quantum confinement imposed by the wide bandgap II-VI layers. Our transport measurements show that the characteristic topological signatures of the Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} layers are preserved.

  14. Upscaling of Long-Term U(VI) Desorption from Pore Scale Kinetics to Field-Scale Reactive Transport Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steefel, Carl I.; Li Li; Davis, J.A.; Curtis, G.P.; Honeyman, B.D.; Kent, D.B.; Kohler, M.; Rodriguez, D.R.; Johnson, K.J.; Miller, A.

    2006-06-01

    The focus of the project is the development of scientifically defensible approaches for upscaling reactive transport models (RTM) through a detailed understanding of U(VI) desorption across several spatial scales: bench-, intermediate-, and field-scales. The central hypothesis of the project is that the development of this methodology will lead to a scientifically defensible approach for conceptual model development for multicomponent RTM at contaminated DOE sites, leading to predictive transport simulations with reduced uncertainty.

  15. Eksamen MAT1140 -H2014 -Lsninger Vi setter opp en vanlig sannhetsverditabell. La betegne formelen i oppgaven.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindstrøm, Tom

    ingen løsning. I Z/(11) har vi at ¯42 = ¯5 og at (-¯4)2 = ¯5. -¯4 = ¯7. De to løsningene er alts°a ¯5 ¯2 oppgaven bare kan løses under de forutsetningene som er gitt i læreboka, at ingen graf inneholder løkker

  16. THE PROPERTIES OF TWO LOW-REDSHIFT O VI ABSORBERS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED GALAXIES TOWARD 3C 263 ,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, B. D.; Kim, T.-S.; Wakker, B. P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Keeney, B.; Stocke, J.; Syphers, D. [CASA, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Narayanan, A. [Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala (India)

    2012-07-01

    Ultraviolet observations of the QSO 3C 263 (z{sub em} = 0.652) with Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and FUSE reveal O VI absorption systems at z = 0.06342 and 0.14072. WIYN multi-object spectrograph observations provide information about the galaxies associated with the absorbers. The multi-phase system at z = 0.06342 traces cool photoionized gas and warm collisionally ionized gas associated with an L {approx} 0.31 L* compact spiral emission line galaxy with an impact parameter of 63 kpc. The cool photoionized gas in the absorber is well modeled, with log U {approx} -2.6, log N(H) {approx} 17.8, log n(H) {approx} -3.3 and [Si/H] = -0.14 {+-} 0.23. The collisionally ionized gas containing C IV and O VI probably arises in cooling shock-heated transition temperature gas with log T {approx} 5.5. The absorber is likely tracing circumgalactic gas enriched by gas ejected from the spiral emission line galaxy. The simple system at z = 0.14072 only contains O VI and broad and narrow H I. The O VI with b = 33.4 {+-} 11.9 km s{sup -1} is likely associated with the broad H I {lambda}1215 absorption, with b = 86.7 {+-} 15.4 km s{sup -1}. The difference in Doppler parameters implies the detection of a very large column of warm gas with log T = 5.61(+0.16, -0.25), log N(H) = 19.54(+0.26, -0.44), and [O/H] = -1.48 (+0.46, -0.26). This absorber is possibly associated with a 1.6 L* absorption line galaxy with an impact parameter of 617 kpc, although an origin in warm filament gas or in the halo of a fainter galaxy is more likely.

  17. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI.sub. 2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA) [Bellevue, WA; Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA) [Seattle, WA

    1985-08-13

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order ot about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5 .mu.m to .congruent.5.0 .mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the The Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. EG-77-C-01-4042, Subcontract No. XJ-9-8021-1 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI[sub 2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1982-06-15

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same are disclosed, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (1) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI[sub 2] chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin composition-graded'' layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns ([approx equal]2.5[mu]m to [approx equal]5.0[mu]m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (2), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, is allowed.

  19. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI.sub. 2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA); Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

    1982-01-01

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5.mu.m to .congruent.5.0.mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the transient n-type material in The Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. EG-77-C-01-4042, Subcontract No. XJ-9-8021-1 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI{sub 2}

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1985-08-13

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same are disclosed, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI{sub 2} chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin ``composition-graded`` layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns ({approx_equal}2.5 {mu}m to {approx_equal}5.0 {mu}m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii) a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion occurs (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer. 16 figs.

  1. CHIANTI - an Atomic Database for Emission Lines. Paper VI: Proton Rates and Other Improvements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Young; G. Del Zanna; E. Landi; K. P. Dere; H. E. Mason; M. Landini

    2002-09-24

    The CHIANTI atomic database contains atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities and electron excitation data for a large number of ions of astrophysical interest. Version 4 has been released, and proton excitation data is now included, principally for ground configuration levels that are close in energy. The fitting procedure for excitation data, both electrons and protons, has been extended to allow 9 point spline fits in addition to the previous 5 point spline fits. This allows higher quality fits to data from close-coupling calculations where resonances can lead to significant structure in the Maxwellian-averaged collision strengths. The effects of photoexcitation and stimulated emission by a blackbody radiation field in a spherical geometry on the level balance equations of the CHIANTI ions can now be studied following modifications to the CHIANTI software. With the addition of H I, He I and N I, the first neutral species have been added to CHIANTI. Many updates to existing ion data-sets are described, while several new ions have been added to the database, including Ar IV, Fe VI and Ni XXI. The two-photon continuum is now included in the spectral synthesis routines, and a new code for calculating the relativistic free-free continuum has been added. The treatment of the free-bound continuum has also been updated.

  2. Coupled spin and valley physics in monolayer MoS2 and group-VI dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Di; Liu, G. B.; Feng, wanxiang; Xu, Xiaodong; Yao, Wang

    2012-01-01

    We show that inversion symmetry breaking together with spin-orbit coupling leads to coupled spin and valley physics in monolayer MoS2 and group-VI dichalcogenides, making possible controls of spin and valley in these 2D materials. The spin-valley coupling at the valence band edges suppresses spin and valley relaxation, as flip of each index alone is forbidden by the 0.1 eV valley contrasting spin splitting. Valley Hall and spin Hall effects coexist in both electron-doped and hole-doped systems. Optical interband transitions have frequency-dependent polarization selection rules which allow selective photoexcitation of carriers with various combination of valley and spin indices. Photo-induced spin Hall and valley Hall effects can generate long lived spin and valley accumulations on sample boundaries. The physics discussed here provides a route towards the integration of valleytronics and spintronics in multi-valley materials with strong spin-orbit coupling and inversion symmetry breaking.

  3. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-- Microcosm tests and model development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Guoping; Wu, Wei-min; Watson, David B; Parker, Jack C.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brooks, Scott C; Shi, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Microcosm tests were conducted to study U(VI) bioreduction in contaminated sediments with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor. In the microcosms, EVO was degraded by indigenous microorganisms and stimulated Fe, U, and sulfate bioreduction, and methanogenesis. Removal of aqueous U occurred concurrently with sulfate reduction, with more reduction of total U in the case of higher initial sulfate concentrations. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed U(VI) reduction to U(IV). As the acetate concentration peaked in 10~20 days in oleate microcosms, the maximum was reached in 100~120 days in the EVO microcosms, indicating that EVO hydrolysis was rate-limiting. The acetate accumulation was sustained over 50 days longer in the oleate and EVO than in the ethanol microcosms, suggesting that acetate-utilizing methanogenesis was slower in the cases of oleate and EVO. Both slow hydrolysis and methanogenesis could contribute to potential sustained bioreduction in field application. Biogeochemical models were developed to couple degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, glycerol, acetate, and hydrogen, reduction of Fe(III), U(VI) and sulfate, and methanogenesis with growth and decay of microbial functional groups. The models were used to simulate the coupled processes in a field test in a companion article.

  4. Role of uranium(VI) in the ThO/sub 2/-UO/sub 3/ sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, P.H.; Campbell, A.B.

    1980-11-01

    Increases in pH and temperature of U(VI) solutions enhance adsorption of uranium on ThO/sub 2/ through hydrolysis of U(VI) as evidenced by absorption spectra changes of the solution. Sols of ThO/sub 2/-UO/sub 3/ are formed by adsorption of uranium on ThO/sub 2/. At low pH's (approx. pH 3.0), the sols behave as Newtonian fluids but at higher pH's the sols (especially the concentrated ones) transform into thixotropic gels. The increased adsorption of uranium by ThO/sub 2/ and the increased viscosity of the ThO/sub 2/-UO/sub 3/ sols with pH are related. Increased adsorption of uranium produces rod-shaped UO/sub 3/.2H/sub 2/O on the ThO/sub 2/ surface. These UO/sub 3/ nuclei link ThO/sub 2/ particles to form long rodlike particles. With further increased adsorption of uranium at higher pH's (less than or equal to 3.7), the particles crosslink to produce a structured network giving a thixotropic gel. Adsorption, electron microscopic, electrophoetic mobility, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic data are presented to explain the role of U(VI) in the sol-gel process. 6 figures, 1 table.

  5. Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A.

    2014-06-03

    Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly-crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge EXAFS indicated that “autunite-type” sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to “phosphuranylite-type” sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases.

  6. Near-Infrared Photoluminescence Enhancement in Ge/CdS and Ge/ZnS Core/Shell Nanocrystals: Utilizing IV/II-VI Semiconductor Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Yijun [Ames Laboratory; Rowland, Clare E [Argonne National Laboratory; Schaller, Richard D [Argonne National Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-26

    Ge nanocrystals have a large Bohr radius and a small, size-tunable band gap that may engender direct character via strain or doping. Colloidal Ge nanocrystals are particularly interesting in the development of near-infrared materials for applications in bioimaging, telecommunications and energy conversion. Epitaxial growth of a passivating shell is a common strategy employed in the synthesis of highly luminescent II–VI, III–V and IV–VI semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we use relatively unexplored IV/II–VI epitaxy as a way to enhance the photoluminescence and improve the optical stability of colloidal Ge nanocrystals. Selected on the basis of their relatively small lattice mismatch compared with crystalline Ge, we explore the growth of epitaxial CdS and ZnS shells using the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction method. Powder X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy techniques, including energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction, clearly show the controllable growth of as many as 20 epitaxial monolayers of CdS atop Ge cores. In contrast, Ge etching and/or replacement by ZnS result in relatively small Ge/ZnS nanocrystals. The presence of an epitaxial II–VI shell greatly enhances the near-infrared photoluminescence and improves the photoluminescence stability of Ge. Ge/II–VI nanocrystals are reproducibly 1–3 orders of magnitude brighter than the brightest Ge cores. Ge/4.9CdS core/shells show the highest photoluminescence quantum yield and longest radiative recombination lifetime. Thiol ligand exchange easily results in near-infrared active, water-soluble Ge/II–VI nanocrystals. We expect this synthetic IV/II–VI epitaxial approach will lead to further studies into the optoelectronic behavior and practical applications of Si and Ge-based nanomaterials.

  7. The structure of Serratia marcescens Lip, a membrane-bound component of the type VI secretion system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Vincenzo A.; Shepherd, Sharon M.; English, Grant; Coulthurst, Sarah J.; Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of S. marcescens Lip reveals a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Lip, a core component of the type VI secretion apparatus, is localized to the outer membrane and is positioned to interact with other proteins forming this complex system. Lip is a membrane-bound lipoprotein and a core component of the type VI secretion system found in Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of a Lip construct (residues 29–176) from Serratia marcescens (SmLip) has been determined at 1.92 Å resolution. Experimental phases were derived using a single-wavelength anomalous dispersion approach on a sample cocrystallized with iodide. The membrane localization of the native protein was confirmed. The structure is that of the globular domain lacking only the lipoprotein signal peptide and the lipidated N-terminus of the mature protein. The protein fold is dominated by an eight-stranded ?-sandwich and identifies SmLip as a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Transthyretin and the only other member of the family fold, 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase, form homotetramers important for their function. The asymmetric unit of SmLip is a tetramer with 222 symmetry, but the assembly is distinct from that previously noted for the transthyretin protein family. However, structural comparisons and bacterial two-hybrid data suggest that the SmLip tetramer is not relevant to its role as a core component of the type VI secretion system, but rather reflects a propensity for SmLip to participate in protein–protein interactions. A relatively low level of sequence conservation amongst Lip homologues is noted and is restricted to parts of the structure that might be involved in interactions with physiological partners.

  8. The O VI Absorbers Toward PG0953+415: High Metallicity, Cosmic-Web Gas Far From Luminous Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd M. Tripp; Bastien Aracil; David V. Bowen; Edward B. Jenkins

    2006-04-19

    The spectrum of the low-redshift QSO PG0953+415 shows two strong, intervening O VI absorption systems. To study the nature of these absorbers, we have used the Gemini Multiobject Spectrograph to conduct a deep spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey in the 5' x 5' field centered on the QSO. This survey is fully complete for r' web. Evidently, some regions of the web filaments are highly metal enriched. We discuss the origin of the high-metallicity gas and suggest that the enrichment might have occurred long ago (at high z).

  9. Microsoft Word - ViArray_Fact_ Sheet_SAND2011-3935P_updated_format.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetection of Hydrates7In389:UFCAugust 4,For4ViA Tru

  10. Extraction of uranium(VI) by N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide (DEHIBA): from the batch experimental data to the countercurrent process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miguirditchian, M.; Sorel, C.; Cames, B.; Bisel, I.; Baron, P.

    2008-07-01

    The selective separation of uranium(VI) in the first cycle of the GANEX process is operated by a hydrometallurgical process using a monoamide extractant DEHiBA (N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide). Distribution ratios of uranium(VI) and nitric acid in 1 M DEHiBA/HTP were determined with macro-concentrations of uranium, and the experimental data were modelled by taking into account the activity coefficients of the constituents in aqueous phases. A flowsheet was designed and tested in a countercurrent process in laboratory-scale mixer-settlers on a surrogate U(VI)/HNO 3 feed. More than 99.999% of the uranium was recovered. (authors)

  11. Fundamental properties of the new dwarf galaxy And VI - alias Pegasus Dwarf - another companion of M31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich Hopp; Regina E. Schulte-Ladbeck; Laura Greggio; Dorte Mehlert

    1998-11-18

    We present medium deep CCD imaging in B, V, and I of the Pegasus Dwarf galaxy (And VI) which was recently found by Karachentsev & Karachentseva (1998), and independently also by Armandroff et al. (1999). The Calar Alto 2.2m images show a low surface brightness galaxy. Its structure resembles that of the other known dSph companions of M31 And I, II, III, and V. The brightest stars are resolved in all three colors. Color-magnitude diagrams in either B-V or V-I show the tip of the red giant branch which allows us to estimate a true distance modulus of $24.5 \\pm 0.2$. The color-magnitude diagrams and the structure show no evidence for recent star formation, thus, a classification as spheroidal dwarf galaxy with a rather old population seems appropriate. The total absolute magnitude of this dwarf is $M_{V,0} = -10.4\\pm0.2$.

  12. Specifications for the development of BUGLE-93: An ENDF/B-VI multigroup cross section library for LWR shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, J.E.; Wright, R.Q.; Roussin, R.W.; Ingersoll, D.T.

    1992-11-01

    This report discusses specifications which have been developed for a new multigroup cross section library based on ENDF/B-VI data for light water reactor shielding and reactor pressure vessel dosimetry applications. The resulting broad-group library and an intermediate fine-group library are defined by the specifications provided in this report. Processing ENDF/B-VI into multigroup format for use in radiation transport codes will provide radiation shielding analysts with the most currently available nuclear data. it is expected that the general nature of the specifications will be useful in other applications such as reactor physics.

  13. Selective extraction of U(VI) and some other metals from nitric acid media by poly-phosphine poly-oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nogami, M.; Sugiyama, Y.; Ikeda, Y.; Maruyama, K.

    2008-07-01

    For the selective extraction of radionuclides from nitrate media, the extractabilities of organo-poly-phosphine poly-oxides were examined in the form of impregnated resins. It was found that the extractability of 1,1,3,5,5-pentaphenyl-1,3,5-tri-phospha-pentane trioxide (PPTPT) for U(VI) is quite unusual with very high values at both low and high concentrations of nitric acid, which is not observed for other types of extractants. Thus, this extractant might be promising for the selective extraction of U(VI) in very high concentrations of HNO{sub 3}. (authors)

  14. U.S.-China vehicle annex

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The United States and China conduct information exchanges, joint studies, technology demonstrations, and training sessions with national laboratories, automotive industry partners, and other private industries involved in energy efficient transportation.

  15. Emergency Support Function #12; Energy Annex

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergy (AZ,Local GovernmentofVoltage unbalance

  16. Emergency Support Function #12 Â… Energy Annex

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofAprilofEnergy 1 DOEEliminating

  17. AN ORIGIN FOR THE SOUTH POLE-AITKEN BASIN THORIUM. V.I. Chikmachev, S.G.Pugacheva, Sternberg State Astronomical institute. Moscow University.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shevchenko, Vladislav

    AN ORIGIN FOR THE SOUTH POLE-AITKEN BASIN THORIUM. V.I. Chikmachev, S.G.Pugacheva, Sternberg State, that within the limits of the possible Al-Khwarizmi/King basin [3]. The SPA basin thorium map: The using data Lunar Prospector [4] the thorium distribution map demonstrated a hemisphere of the Moon which contains

  18. Chromium Remediation or Release? Effect of Iron(II) Sulfate Addition on Chromium(VI) Leaching from Columns of Chromite Ore Processing Residue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geelhoed, Jeanine S; Meeussen, Johannes CL; Roe, Martin J; Hillier, Stephen; Thomas, Rhodri P; Farmer, John G; Paterson, Edward

    2003-01-01

    Chromite ore processing residue (COPR), derived from the so-called high lime processing of chromite ore, contains high levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) and has a pH between 11 and 12. Ferrous sulfate, which is used for ...

  19. C:\\idrive\\web\\intro6e\\supplement\\Supplement6(c)XML.doc Last printed Supplement VI.C: XML

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Y. Daniel

    C:\\idrive\\web\\intro6e\\supplement\\Supplement6(c)XML.doc Last printed Supplement VI.C: XML For Introduction to Java Programming By Y. Daniel Liang This supplement covers the following topics: · Creating XML to format and display query results and process database operations in Oracle. 1 #12;C:\\idrive\\web\\intro6e\\supplement\\Supplement

  20. A Novel Phosphorylation Event Activates Bacterial Type VI Secretion A research team led by Dr. Erh-Min Lai, an Associate Research Fellow at the Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    A Novel Phosphorylation Event Activates Bacterial Type VI Secretion A research team led by Dr. Erh-Min Lai, an Associate Research Fellow at the Institute of Plant and Microbial Biology, and Dr. Ming-Daw Tsai, a Distinguished Research Fellow at the Institute of Biological Chemistry, recently reported

  1. J. Phys. F : Metal Phys., Vol. 8. No. 5. 1978. Printed in Great Britain. @ 1978 Electronic structure of metals : VI. Magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Phys. F : Metal Phys., Vol. 8. No. 5. 1978. Printed in Great Britain. @ 1978 Electronic structure of metals : VI. Magnetic susceptibilities of simple metals S K Lai, S Wang and C B So Department metals. Each of the derived formulae contains a significant correction to that previously derived

  2. Sequential Extraction Method for Determination of Fe(II/III) and U(IV/ VI) in Suspensions of Iron-Bearing Phyllosilicates and Uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    -Bearing Phyllosilicates and Uranium Fubo Luan and William D. Burgos*, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Information ABSTRACT: Iron-bearing phyllosilicates strongly influence the redox state and mobility of uranium-times more Fe(II) than U(VI). INTRODUCTION Uranium contamination is a problem at many U.S. Department

  3. ViVUD: Virtual Server Cluster based View-Upload Decoupling for Multi-Channel P2P Video Streaming Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yong

    churn and resource imbalance, the View-Upload Decoupling (VUD) [1] P2P streaming design decouples peer in extreme peer churn scenarios, such as flash-crowd. In this paper, we propose ViVUD, a Virtual Server issues due to channel churn and resource imbalance in ISO systems, it still suffers from the following

  4. (CANCER RESEARCH 53. I02.VI026. March I. 1993] Benzene and Its Phenolic Metabolites Produce Oxidative DNA Damage in HL60

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    (CANCER RESEARCH 53. I02.VI026. March I. 1993] Benzene and Its Phenolic Metabolites Produce ABSTRACT Benzene, an important industrial chemical, is myelotoxic and leuke- mogenic in humans effects. Here we report the induction of oxida- tive DNA damage by benzene and its phenolic metabolites

  5. Future non-linear stability for solutions of the Einstein-Vlasov system of Bianchi types II and VI$_0$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernesto Nungesser

    2012-08-30

    In a recent paper arXiv:1208.4231 we have treated the future non-linear stability for reflection symmetric solutions of the Einstein-Vlasov system of Bianchi types II and VI$_0$. We have been able now to remove the reflection symmetry assumption, thus treating the non-diagonal case. Apart from the increasing complexity the methods have been essentially the same as in the diagonal case, showing that they are thus quite powerful. Here the challenge was to put the equations in a form that permits the use of the previous results. We are able to conclude that after a possible basis change the future of the non-diagonal spacetimes in consideration is asymptotically diagonal.

  6. ENDF/B-VII.0, ENDF/B-VI, JEFF-3.1, AND JENDL-3.3 RESULTS FOR UNREFLECTED PLUTONIUM SOLUTIONS AND MOX LATTICES (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOSTELLER, RUSSELL D.

    2007-02-09

    Previous studies have indicated that ENDF/B-VII preliminary releases {beta}-2 and {beta}-3, predecessors to the recent initial release of ENDF/B-VII.0, produce significantly better overall agreement with criticality benchmarks than does ENDF/B-VI. However, one of those studies also suggests that improvements still may be needed for thermal plutonium cross sections. The current study substantiates that concern by examining criticality benchmarks for unreflected spheres of plutonium-nitrate solutions and for slightly and heavily borated mixed-oxide (MOX) lattices. Results are presented for the JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-3.3 nuclear data libraries as well as ENDF/B-VII.0 and ENDF/B-VI. It is shown that ENDF/B-VII.0 tends to overpredict reactivity for thermal plutonium benchmarks over at least a portion of the thermal range. In addition, it is found that additional benchmark data are needed for the deep thermal range.

  7. In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 3: Federal Regions IV and VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

    1980-02-01

    This is the third volume of a five-volume report, designed to provide useful information for policy analysis in the Department of Energy, especially for the examination of possible areas of conflict between the implementation of a national energy policy calling for the increased use of coal and the pursuit of clean air. Information is presented for each state in Federal Regions IV and VI under the following section headings: state title page (includes a summary of air quality data); revised state implementation plan outline; maps of nonattainment areas, as designated; Storage and Retrieval of Aerometric Data (SAROAD); SAROAD data maps; power plant data; power plant maps; and county maps. States in Federal Region IV include: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Those in Federal Region VI include: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. (JGB)

  8. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, wanxiang; Ding, Jun; Yao, yugui

    2011-01-01

    The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science.1 A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity,2 5 which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors,6 and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism,7 9 make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

  9. Investigating the use of bismuth(V) for the oxidation and subsequent solvent extraction of americium(VI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, L.R.; Mincher, B.J.; Schmitt, N.C.

    2008-07-01

    The separation of Am from Cm and the lanthanides is still one of the most complex separations facing analytical chemistry, as well as any proposed advanced fuel cycle. Current research is focused on the oxidation of americium for its selective separation from the trivalent lanthanides and curium. We have already successfully demonstrated that Am oxidized to the hexavalent state using sodium bismuthate at room temperature can be extracted into 30% TBP/dodecane. Its behavior has been demonstrated to be analogous to that of hexavalent uranyl, neptunyl, and plutonyl ions. Using UV-visible spectrophotometry, the mechanism of the oxidation with sodium bismuthate has been probed to identify if it is a suitable reagent for deployment in solvent extraction systems. It has been identified that 97% of the Am is oxidized within the first 5 minutes. Significantly longer periods of time are required to obtain a solution containing greater than 50% Am(VI) limiting the use of Bi(V) for process applications. (authors)

  10. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Guoping; Watson, David B; Wu, Wei-min; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantial biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.

  11. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Constance J.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-12-28

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and in particular the U4f level, has been widely used to elucidate the chemical state of uranium in various materials. In large part, previous experimental work has relied on comparing the U4f spectra of an unknown to some “standard” or using qualitative intuitive judgments on the expected behavior of the primary lines and satellite structures as a function of oxidation state and bonding environment. Such approaches are useful and can be sufficiently robust to make defensible claims. Nonetheless, there is no quantitative understanding of the chemistry and physics that control satellite structures or even the shape of the primary peaks. To address this issue, we used a rigorous, strictly ab initio theoretical approach to investigate the U(4f) XPS of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our theoretical studies are based on the electronic structures of embedded cluster models, where bonding between U and O is explicitly incorporated. We demonstrate that treatment of the many-body character of the cluster wavefunctions is essential to correctly model and interpret the U4f XPS. Here we definitively show that shake configurations, where an electron is transferred from a dominantly O2p bonding orbital into dominantly 5f or 6d antibonding orbitals, are indeed responsible for the major satellite features. Based on this rigorous theoretical framework, it is possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and the chemistry of the material.

  12. Si m pa rele: Annexes I et II, Si m pa rele: Annexe III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998-01-01

    Gouvernement d'adopter les recommandations formulées par la Commission et de mettre en œuvre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour leur réalisation. Article 24 Pour le financement des activités de la Commission, le Gouvernement d'Haïti pourra rechercher la... collègues Commissaires et le dévouement des autres membres de la grande famille que nous formions, le but sera atteint. Je pars avec le sentiment d'avoir apporté le meilleur de moi-même à la Commission. Comme vous le savez, j'ai été appelé à faire partie...

  13. @h|i* _i A iLhi _ 5}?@* Vi?_hi_ e @h* 2ff c f ff2 ff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    @h|i* _i A iLhi _ 5}?@* Vi?_hi_ e @h* 2ff#12;c f ff2 ff @h|i* t@?t _LU 4i?|t EN?i ui **i e hi| it| *hi _ Thi4ih Lh_hi _i uL?U|L? _i |h@?tuih| MEs ' @n2Zs E@iU @ : f @||@^ i T@h ? t}?@* %E| ' rE| n KE|c L KE| it| ? Mh | M*@?U t|@|L??@hi

  14. @h|i* _i A iLhi _ 5}?@* Vi?_hi_ 22 4@ht 2ff2c f ff2 ff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    @h|i* _i A iLhi _ 5}?@* Vi?_hi_ 22 4@ht 2ff2c f ff2 ff @h|i* t@?t _LU 4i?|t EN?i ui **i e hiU|L ihtL it| @ |Lhtii , ihUUi 5L| fE| ? Mh | M*@?U t|@|L??@hi _i _i?t|i tTiU|h@*i rfEs ' Çf 2 @||@^ @?| *i t; ,? t TTLt@?| sf :: {s i| i? hi4@h^ @?| ^ i t EA @ *@ uLh4i _

  15. VI-1 PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics in Astrophysics V (NPA5), J. Phys.: Conference Series 337, 012014 (2012). Virial expansion of the nuclear equation of state, Ruslan Magana, Hua Zheng, Aldo Bonasera, Int....

  16. VI-1 PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewing system forPortal. 1.1Innovation1 - March

  17. VI-1 TALKS PRESENTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewing system forPortal. 1.1Innovation1 - March2

  18. VI-1 TALKS PRESENTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewing system forPortal. 1.1Innovation1 - March23

  19. FE(VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesofExtrans - Permeation Measurement2

  20. MONOGRAFIAS DE FISICA VI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport) | SciTech ConnectFuture3,LastMICKEYofReMMCRMMCR9%y

  1. Chemosensing strategies : utilizing the novel sulfonamidohydroxyquinoline amino acid Sox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shults, Melissa Dawn

    2005-01-01

    Modular peptide-based fluorescent chemosensors utilizing the chelation-sensitive fluorophore 8-hydroxy-5-(N,N-dimethylsulfonamido)-2-methylquinoline are powerful tools for sensing Zn²? and for sensing protein kinase activity. ...

  2. Method for reducing CO2, CO, NOX, and SOx emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu (Oak Ridge, TN); Li, Rongfu (Zhejiang, CH)

    2002-01-01

    Industrial combustion facilities are integrated with greenhouse gas-solidifying fertilizer production reactions so that CO.sub.2, CO, NO.sub.x, and SO.sub.x emissions can be converted prior to emission into carbonate-containing fertilizers, mainly NH.sub.4 HCO.sub.3 and/or (NH.sub.2).sub.2 CO, plus a small fraction of NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3 and (NH.sub.4).sub.2 SO.sub.4. The invention enhances sequestration of CO.sub.2 into soil and the earth subsurface, reduces N0.sub.3.sup.- contamination of surface and groundwater, and stimulates photosynthetic fixation of CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere. The method for converting CO.sub.2, CO, NO.sub.x, and SO.sub.x emissions into fertilizers includes the step of collecting these materials from the emissions of industrial combustion facilities such as fossil fuel-powered energy sources and transporting the emissions to a reactor. In the reactor, the CO.sub.2, CO, N.sub.2, SO.sub.x, and/or NO.sub.x are converted into carbonate-containing fertilizers using H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, or NH.sub.3. The carbonate-containing fertilizers are then applied to soil and green plants to (1) sequester inorganic carbon into soil and subsoil earth layers by enhanced carbonation of groundwater and the earth minerals, (2) reduce the environmental problem of NO.sub.3.sup.- runoff by substituting for ammonium nitrate fertilizer, and (3) stimulate photosynthetic fixation of CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere by the fertilization effect of the carbonate-containing fertilizers.

  3. Updates to the ORIGEN-S Cross-Section Libraries Using ENDF-VI, EAF-99, and FENDL-2.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, B.D.

    2004-11-04

    The standard cross-section library for light-water reactor (LWR) analyses used by the ORIGEN-S depletion and decay code has been extensively updated. This work entailed the development of broad multigroup neutron cross sections for ORIGEN-S from several sources of pointwise continuous-energy cross-section evaluations, including the U.S. Evaluated Nuclear Data Files ENDF/B-VI Release 7, the Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library FENDL-2.0, and the European Activation File EAF-99. The pointwise cross sections were collapsed to a three-group structure using a continuous-energy neutron flux spectrum representative of the typical neutronic conditions of typical LWR fuel and formatted for use by ORIGEN-S. In addition, the fission-product library has been expanded to include ENDF/B-VI fission yield data for 30 fissionable actinides. The processing codes and procedures are explained. Preliminary verification studies using the updated libraries were performed using the modules of the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) system. Comparisons between the previous basic ORIGEN-S libraries and the updated libraries developed in this work are presented.

  4. Final Report on Price Manipulation in the Western Markets at Chapter VI, pages 55-56 (Docket No. PA02-2-000 March 2003) (Staff Final Report). The Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    1 Final Report on Price Manipulation in the Western Markets at Chapter VI, pages 55-56 (Docket No Docket No. PA02-2-011 Manipulation of Electric and Natural Gas Prices BP Energy Company Docket No. EL03-60-000 and the Final Report on Price Manipulation in Western Markets in Docket No. PA02-2-000 .1 BACKGROUND 2

  5. I-III-VI.sub.2 based solar cell utilizing the structure CuInGaSe.sub.2 CdZnS/ZnO

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA); Stewart, John M. (Seattle, WA)

    1992-01-07

    A thin film I-III-VI.sub.2 based solar cell having a first layer of copper indium gallium selenide, a second layer of cadmium zinc sulfide, a double layer of zinc oxide, and a metallization structure comprised of a layer of nickel covered by a layer of aluminum. An optional antireflective coating may be placed on said metallization structure. The cadmium zinc sulfide layer is deposited by means of an aqueous solution growth deposition process and may actually consist of two layers: a low zinc content layer and a high zinc content layer. Photovoltaic efficiencies of 12.5% at Air Mass 1.5 illumination conditions and 10.4% under AMO illumination can be achieved.

  6. Theoretical analyses of (n,xn) reactions on sup 235 U, sup 238 U, sup 237 Np, and sup 239 Pu for ENDF/B-VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P.G.; Arthur, E.D.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical analyses were performed of neutron-induced reactions on {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu between 0.01 and 20 MeV in order to calculate neutron emission cross sections and spectra for ENDF/B-VI evaluations. Coupled-channel optical model potentials were obtained for each target nucleus by fitting total, elastic, and inelastic scattering cross section data, as well as low-energy average resonance data. The resulting deformed optical model potentials were used to calculate direct (n,n{prime}) cross sections and transmission coefficients for use in Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory analyses. A fission model with multiple barrier representation, width fluctuation corrections, and preequilibrium corrections were included in the analyses. Direct cross sections for higher-lying vibrational states were calculated using DWBA theory, normalized using B(E{ell}) values determined from (d,d{prime}) and Coulomb excitation data, where available, and from systematics otherwise. Initial fission barrier parameters and transition state density enhancements appropriate to the compound systems involved were obtained from previous analyses, especially fits to charged-particle fission probability data. The parameters for the fission model were adjusted for each target system to obtain optimum agreement with direct (n,f) cross section measurements, taking account of the various multichance fission channels, that is, the different compound systems involved. The results from these analyses were used to calculate most of the neutron (n,n), (n,n{prime}), and (n,xn) cross section data in the ENDF/B/VI evaluations for the above nuclei, and all of the energy-angle correlated spectra. The deformed optical model and fission model parameterizations are described. Comparisons are given between the results of these analyses and the previous ENDF/B-V evaluations as well as with the available experimental data. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume VI, workplace and environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This is the sixth in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume VI is to describe record series pertaining to workplace and environmental monitoring activities at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of workplace and environmental monitoring practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to workplace and environmental monitoring policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of this volume and the organization to contact for access to these records. Comprehensive introductory and background information is available in Volume I. Other volumes in the guide pertain to administrative and general subjects, facilities and equipment, production and materials handling, waste management, and employee health. In addition, HAI has produced a subject-specific guide, titled The September 1957 Rocky Flats Fire. A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and Its Contractors, which researchers should consult for further information about records related to this incident.

  8. Apparatus for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells employing materials selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA); Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus for forming thin-film, large area solar cells having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n-type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5 .mu.m to .congruent.5.0 .mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer to evolve into p-type material, thereby defining a thin layer heterojunction device characterized by the absence of voids, vacancies and nodules which tend to reduce the energy conversion efficiency of the system.

  9. Annex I ITER Organization Service Contract General Conditions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    All property of the Contractor while at the ITER Organization premises shall be at the risk of the Contractor and the ITER Organization shall accept no liability for any loss or...

  10. RCDG 10 14 Annex 2 Review of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoel, Steven

    's scientific league tables. Over 90 per cent of the world's science happens outside the UK and the rate of the most productive and efficient science systems in the world, and remains near the top of the world international scientific collaboration in order that we maintain our global scientific edge, and one of the ways

  11. Annex A Metrics for the Smart Grid System Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tax incentives, regulations and technical standards favor PHEVs. Supply Constrained - Infusion of PHEVs in marketplace constrained by automotive and battery manufacturers' ability...

  12. Annex: Attributes of Proliferation Resistance for Civilian Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Opportunities for Increasing the Proliferation Resistance of Global Civilian Nuclear Power Systems (TOPS) determined at its first meeting in November 1999 that a set of...

  13. University of California, Berkeley Doe Library, Doe Annex,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Failure - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 15 13. Flooding, Plumbing or Steam Line Failure - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 16 14. Natural Gas Release or Leak

  14. Annex I ITER Organization Service Contract General Conditions (2014)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropaneandAn319 12 BONNEVILLEa n d i a N

  15. Emergency Support Function #12; Energy Annex | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus,DepartmentFederal Register Noticeofseven1-20,

  16. UNFCCC-Global Map-Annex 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:TucsonLLC Jump to:UDIGEFproject(RedirectedGlobal

  17. Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility Construction

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergyNatural GasDepartmentApril 13,truckImmobilization Y-12

  18. Annex A Metrics for the Smart Grid System Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department of Energy TheAnnelise Plooster

  19. Emergency Support Function #12; Energy Annex - Support Agencies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofAprilofEnergy 1 DOEEliminatingDepartment of

  20. Smart Grid System Report (July 2009) - Annex | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES PursuantEnergy Small| August 2014 2014 Smart

  1. Annex: Attributes of Proliferation Resistance for Civilian Nuclear Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| DepartmentAL/FALGeologic CO2Solutions |Lawrence -

  2. Annex 1: Submission from Bruce McKirdy, NDA Annex 1: Submission from Bruce McKirdy, NDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the International Atomic Energy Agency sets safety30 requirements and gives guidance on geological disposal. It sets geological barriers work together to isolate and8 contain radioactivity. Therefore the suitability of a particular geological setting needs to be9 assessed in the context of a specific waste inventory

  3. Technical Research Centre of Finland VTT Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Implementing Agreement on District Heating and Cooling, including the integration of CHP. #12;IEA DISTRICT and the authors. ISBN 90-5748-021-2 #12;Abstract IEA DISTRICT HEATING AND COOLING, ANNEX VI: Report 2002: S1 has been to further develop and test simple models of district heating (DH) systems with respect

  4. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan (Program

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL(Technicalentanglements forusingandclusters

  5. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan (Program

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL(Technicalentanglements forusingandclustersDocument) |

  6. ENGLISH l TuanVietNam.Net l VieTimes l Lm bo cng VietNamNet l Tr c Tuy n l Th H CNTT -Vi n thng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummaa, Virpi

    25%, ng th i c h i l y ch ng cng gi m i 15%... ó là k t qu nghiên c u c a các nhà khoa h c thu c Tr v i nh ng bé gái sinh ôi cùng v i m t bé gái khác (song sinh n ). ng th i, nh ng bé gái ó cng có c h tr ng thành. Bà cho bi t vi c phi nhi m v i testosterone m c cao trong t cung cng có th làm tng nguy

  7. Distribution Behavior of U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), and Zr(IV) with N,N-Dihexyl Octanamide Under Uranium-Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manchanda, V.K.; Ruikar, P.B.; Sriram, S.; Nagar, M.S.; Pathak, P.N.; Gupta, K.K.; Singh, R.K.; Chitnis, R.R.; Dhami, P.S.; Ramanujam, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India)

    2001-06-15

    While the tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-based PUREX process has been the workhorse of the nuclear fuel reprocessing industry for the last four and a half decades, a few drawbacks associated with the use of TBP have caused concern to the separation scientists and technologists. These shortcomings may pose a serious challenge particularly during the reprocessing of (a) short cooled thermal reactor fuels, (b) fast reactor fuels with the larger Pu content and significantly higher burn up, and (c) while treating various waste streams for their disposal to the environment. The N,N-dialkyl aliphatic amides have received particular attention as alternate potential extractants for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels in view of (a) the innocuous nature of their degradation products, namely, carboxylic acids/amines and (b) the possibility to incinerate the used solvent leading to reduced volume of secondary waste. The physical and chemical properties of these amides are influenced strongly by the nature of alkyl groups. The extractant N,N-dihexyl octanamide (DHOA) was found to be a promising candidate among a large number of extractants studied. Laboratory batch studies as well as mixer settler studies were performed under process conditions with DHOA and compared with those of TBP. DHOA was found to extract Pu(IV) more efficiently than TBP, both at trace-level concentration as well as under uranium loading conditions. In addition, the extraction behavior of Am(III) and Zr(IV) was studied at varying nitric acid concentrations (1 to 6 M). Extraction behavior of uranium at macroconcentrations (9.9 to 157.7 g/l) was carried out at different temperatures, and it was observed that D{sub U} decreased with the increase in U loading as well as with the increase of temperature (in the range 25 to 45 deg. C) and that the two-phase reaction was exothermic in nature. Mixer settler studies on U(VI) revealed that DHOA is similar to TBP during the extraction cycle but better than TBP during the stripping cycle.

  8. TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT vi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROVER 6 3.2.2. BELL PROVER 7 4. SOURCES OF UNCERTAINTY 7 5. COMPONENTS OF UNCERTAINTY 9 5.1. UNCERTAINTY, Vc 20 5.2.2.1. BELL AREA 21 5.2.2.2. BELL WALL SECTIONAL AREA 21 . 5.2.2.3. COLLECTION LENGTH 22 5.001 standard cubic feet per minute (scfm) and 51 scfm, reference temperature and pressure are 293.15 K

  9. Appendix VI Corrective Action Strategy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. Geographic Available for sale to theEFIVVI

  10. Title VI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvestingRenewableTeach and Learn5Shopping for

  11. COS OBSERVATIONS OF METAL LINE AND BROAD LYMAN-{alpha} ABSORPTION IN THE MULTI-PHASE O VI AND Ne VIII SYSTEM AT z = 0.20701 TOWARD HE 0226-4110

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, B. D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lehner, N. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Narayanan, A. [Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala (India)

    2011-12-20

    Observations of the QSO HE 0226-4110 (z{sub em} = 0.495) with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) from 1134 to 1796 A with a resolution of {approx}17 km s{sup -1} and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) per resolution element of 20-40 are used to study the multi-phase absorption system at z = 0.20701 containing O VI and Ne VIII. The system was previously studied with lower S/N observations with Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The COS observations provide more reliable measures of the H I and metal lines present in the system and reveal the clear presence of broad Ly{alpha} (BLA) absorption with b = 72(+13, -6) km s{sup -1} and log N(H I) = 13.87 {+-} 0.08. Detecting BLAs associated with warm gas absorbers is crucial for determining the temperature, metallicity, and total baryonic content of the absorbers. The BLA is probably recording the trace amount of thermally broadened H I in the collisionally ionized plasma with log T {approx} 5.7 that also produces the O VI and Ne VIII absorption. The total hydrogen column in the collisionally ionized gas, log N(H) {approx} 20.1, exceeds that in the cooler photoionized gas in the system by a factor of {approx}22. The oxygen abundance in the collisionally ionized gas is [O/H] = -0.89 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.07. The absorber probably occurs in the circumgalactic environment (halo) of a foreground L = 0.25L{sub *} disk galaxy with an impact parameter of 109 h{sub 70}{sup -1} kpc identified by Mulchaey and Chen.

  12. Sox9andNFIACoordinateaTranscriptionalRegulatory Cascade during the Initiation of Gliogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gronostajski, Richard M.

    Deneen1,3,* 1Center for Cell and Gene Therapy 2Department of Molecular and Human Genetics 3Department). These sequential differentiative steps are governed by temporal changes in the transcription factor milieu

  13. SOX17 is a Critical Specifier of Human Primordial Germ Cell Fate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irie, Naoko; Weinberger, Leehee; Tang, Walfred W. C.; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Viukov, Sergey; Manor, Yair S.; Dietmann, Sabine; Hanna, Jacob H.; Surani, M. Azim

    2014-12-24

    cells/ 12-well were plated on vitro- nectin/gelatin-coated plates (Gafni et al., 2013) in N2B27 medium (Ying et al., 2008) with 1% KSR, 10 ng/ml bFGF (SCI), 1 ng/ml TGF-b1 (Peprotech), or 20 ng/ml Activin A (SCI) and 10 mM ROCK inhibitor. Medium...

  14. Impacts of reducing shipboard NOx? and SOx? emissions on vessel performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caputo, Ronald J., Jr. (Ronald Joseph)

    2010-01-01

    The international maritime community has been experiencing tremendous pressures from environmental organizations to reduce the emissions footprint of their vessels. In the last decade, air emissions, including nitrogen ...

  15. Ewing Sarcoma Eswa Protein Regulates Chondrogenesis of Meckel's Cartilage through Modulation of Sox9 in Zebrafish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merkes, Chris; Turkalo, Timothy K.; Wilder, Nicole; Park, Hyewon; Wenger, Luke W.; Lewin, Seth J.; Azuma, Mizuki

    2015-01-24

    directly to modulate transcription and oncogenesis in Ewing's sarcoma. Cancer Res 69: 9047–9055. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-1540 PMID: 19920188 7. Sohn EJ, Li H, Reidy K, Beers LF, Christensen BL, et al. (2010) EWS/FLI1 oncogene activates caspase 3...

  16. Common binding by redundant group B Sox proteins is evolutionarily conserved in Drosophila.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl, Sarah H.; Russell, Steven

    2015-04-13

    Three-way comparison of Dichaete binding. (A) Pie chart showin present in one species (47%), two species (23%) or all three species (30%). in D. melanogaster, D. simulans and D. yakuba clustered by binding affinity key and histogram shows...

  17. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The SNRB{trademark} Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration Project was cooperatively funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B&W, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Ohio Edison, Norton Chemical Process Products Company and the 3M Company. The SNRB{trademark} technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. Development of the SNRB{trademark} process at B&W began with pilot testing of high-temperature dry sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} removal in the 1960`s. Integration of NO{sub x} reduction was evaluated in the 1970`s. Pilot work in the 1980`s focused on evaluation of various NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, SO{sub 2} sorbents and integration of the catalyst with the baghouse. This early development work led to the issuance of two US process patents to B&W - No. 4,309,386 and No. 4,793,981. An additional patent application for improvements to the process is pending. The OCDO was instrumental in working with B&W to develop the process to the point where a larger scale demonstration of the technology was feasible. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B&W tested the SNRB{trademark} pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R. E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B&W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB{trademark} process. The SNRB{trademark} facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993.

  18. SOx-NOx-Rox Box Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration: A DOE Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2000-12-15

    The SNRB{trademark} test program demonstrated the feasibility of controlling multiple emissions from a coal-fired boiler in a single processing unit. The degree of emissions removals for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates all exceeded the project goals. A high degree of removal for HAPs was also achieved. The SNRB system offers low space requirements, control of multiple pollutants, and operating flexibility. The pneumatic SO{sub 2} sorbent and ammonia injection systems are expected to have high reliability because of their mechanical simplicity. Despite these advantages, the SNRB process may not be an economic choice for applications involving SO{sub 2} removals above about 85%. For lower levels of SO{sub 2} removal, the projected economics for SNRB appear to be more favorable than those of existing processes which involve separate units for the same degree of control for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} , and particulates. Specific findings are summarized as follows: (1) SO{sub 2} removal of 85-90% was achieved at a calcium utilization of 40-45%, representing a significant improvement in performance over other dry lime injection processes. (2) When firing 3-4% sulfur coal, compliance with the 1990 CAAA Phase I SO{sub 2} emissions limit of 2.5 lb/10{sup 6} Btu was achieved with a Ca/S molar ratio of less than 1.0. For the Phase II SO{sub 2} emissions limit of 1.2 lb/10{sup 6} Btu, compliance was achieved with a Ca/S molar ratio as low as 1.5. Phase II compliance is the more relevant emissions limit. (3) When using NaHCO{sub 3} as the sorbent, the Phase II SO{sub 2} emissions limit was achieved at a Na{sub 2}/S molar ratio of less than 2.0 (NSR < 1.0). (4) Compliance with the Phase I NO{sub x} emissions limit of 0.45 lb/10{sup 6} Btu for Group 1 boilers was achieved at an NH{sub 3}/NO{sub x} ratio of 0.85, with an ammonia slip of 5 ppm or less. (5) Particulate collection efficiency averaged 99.9%, corresponding to an average emissions rate of 0.018 lb/10{sup 6} Btu. This is significantly lower than the NSPS value of 0.03 lb/10{sup 6} Btu. The high-temperature baghouse design incorporating an SCR catalyst for NO{sub x} reduction was demonstrated successfully. The technology is ready for commercial application. The key feature of the technology is control of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates in a single process unit. However, this limits its commercial market to applications requiring control of all three components. Also, although the testing demonstrated greater than 90% SO{sub 2} capture, this was achieved at high sorbent/sulfur ratios. For applications requiring a high percentage of sulfur removal, a modern conventional FGD unit with LNBs for NO{sub x} control may be the preferred option.

  19. Systematic approach for simultaneously correcting the band-gap andp-dseparation errors of common cation III-V or II-VI binaries in density functional theory calculations within a local density approximation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-07-31

    We propose a systematic approach that can empirically correct three major errors typically found in a density functional theory (DFT) calculation within the local density approximation (LDA) simultaneously for a set of common cation binary semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, (Ga or In)X with X = N,P,As,Sb, and II-VI compounds, (Zn or Cd)X, with X = O,S,Se,Te. By correcting (1) the binary band gaps at high-symmetry points , L, X, (2) the separation of p-and d-orbital-derived valence bands, and (3) conduction band effective masses to experimental values and doing so simultaneously for common cation binaries, the resulting DFT-LDA-based quasi-first-principles methodmore »can be used to predict the electronic structure of complex materials involving multiple binaries with comparable accuracy but much less computational cost than a GW level theory. This approach provides an efficient way to evaluate the electronic structures and other material properties of complex systems, much needed for material discovery and design.« less

  20. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 7 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Federation Glyphosate-resistant Johnsongrass in Argentina Glyphosate-resistant johnson- grass has been identified in northern Argentina. While not an immediate threat to U.S. cropping fields, the development once again points to the necessity... with our Monsanto reps down in Argentina quite a bit about this. I’ve been working with them as they begin their research.” “It’s an area that’s been in pro- duction agriculture. They began (growing) Roundup Ready soy- beans there probably about seven...

  1. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 8 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Method for Rice Stink Bug ..........................6 Part 1: LCRA/SAWS Water Project ......................................8 State, National and International News ......................11 Rice Crop Update... the floodwater across the field and thus, there is potential for substantial ammonia volatilization losses of urea. In addition, the soil is not always dry when the preflood N fertilizer has to be applied, and urea applied to muddy soil aggravates ammonia...

  2. April 22, 2010 Seismic Reflection VI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    ;4/21/2010 2 Reflection configurations Reflection attributes Salt tectonics This profile from Germany displays

  3. VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zhiqiang Chen, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, China Accelerator Driven Systems Related Nuclear Data Research at IMP October 29 Prof. Peter...

  4. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    country’s ability to meet the food, feed, and fiber needs of future generations. Such provisions should address a future need for land to provide the housing and business infrastructure necessary to accommodate population growth, while maintaining... time, reduce methane emissions in rice production. The practices they are investigat- ing are intermittent irrigation, coupled with multiple inlet irrigation. Intermittent irrigation is a water management sys- tem where, once the initial flood...

  5. VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - March 31, 2014 Faculty and Research Group Leaders Aldo Bonasera, Senior Scientist Charles M. Folden III, Assist. Prof. of Nuclear Chemistry Rainer Fries, Assist. Professor of...

  6. Chapter VI: Integrating North American Energy Markets

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    percent of gross GHG emissions (on a CO 2 -equivalent basis) from U.S. anthropogenic sources, nearly one- quarter of which were emitted by natural gas systems. 34 While 80...

  7. VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - March 31, 2013 Faculty and Research Group Leaders Aldo Bonasera, Senior Scientist Charles M. Folden III, Assist. Prof. of Nuclear Chemistry Rainer Fries, Assist. Professor of...

  8. VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-March 31, 2013 2012 April 24 Dr. Antti Saastamoninen, University of Jyvaskyla and Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas Beta-Decay Studies for Nova...

  9. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    of scientists from Vietnam’s Insti- tute of Tropical Biology, the Loui- siana State University AgCenter, the International Rice Research Institute, and the Campus Interna- tional de Baillarguet, France. Scientists used a Bt fusion gene, which translates a single...

  10. Part VI: Section I: Contract Clause

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    under the procedures authorized in Executive Order 11246, as amended. In addition, sanctions may be imposed and remedies invoked against the Contractor as provided in Executive...

  11. Diluted II-VI Oxide Semiconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zn 1y Mn y O x Te 1x is a material perfectly satisfying the conditions for single-junction photovoltaics with the potential for power conversion efficiencies surpassing 50%....

  12. Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume VI, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faletra, P.; Schuetz, A.; Cherkerzian, D.; Clark, T.

    2006-01-01

    Students who conducted research at DOE National Laboratories during 2005 were invited to include their research abstracts, and for a select few, their completed research papers in this Journal. This Journal is direct evidence of students collaborating with their mentors. Fields in which these students worked include: Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Engineering; Environmental Science; General Sciences; Materials Sciences; Medical and Health Sciences; Nuclear Sciences; Physics; and Science Policy.

  13. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 5 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    served in the U.S. Army and rose to the rank of captain. While in the Army, he performed research on water desalination and microclimate cooling, a method for cooling soldiers wearing chemical protec- tive clothing. One of Holtzapple’s current research...

  14. Theory VI. Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z Y

    2008-06-25

    The Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN) is a virtual center consisting of scientists interested in working together, across organizational and disciplinary boundaries, to formulate and pursue projects that reflect challenging and relevant computational research in the materials sciences. The projects appropriate for this center involve those problems best pursued through broad cooperative efforts, rather than those key problems best tackled by single investigator groups. CMSN operates similarly to the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials, coordinated by George Samara at Sandia. As in the Synthesis and Processing Center, the intent of the modest funding for CMSN is to foster partnering and collective activities. All CMSN proposals undergo external peer review and are judged foremost on the quality and timeliness of the science and also on criteria relevant to the objective of the center, especially concerning a strategy for partnering. More details about CMSN can be found on the CMSN webpages at: http://cmpweb.ameslab.gov/ccms/CMSN-homepage.html.

  15. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    export market with duties and tariffs, on average, over 4 times greater in other countries. Almost every family who purchases food at U.S. markets has consumed trans-genetically modified food, most without knowing it. This same argument increasingly..., others push for required labeling of genetically modified food. Other controversies include the definition of patent and property pertaining to products of genetic engineer- ing, and the possibility of unforeseen global side ef- fects as a result...

  16. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    , revi- talize U.S. agriculture and much of rural America. Earlier this week, while driving to a meeting in College Station, Texas, I listened to a radio interview discussing the use of cellulose to produce biofuels. The individual being interviewed... of the main crop, along with better ra- toon crop management, has helped to increase ratoon stand uniformity. The lower cutting height, however, has also increased the developmental period of the ra- toon crop. Gibberellin (GA) is a plant hormone that promotes...

  17. Cours-VI/Clavin2015.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    d 1 Le d 2 d 2 w xd L U L U Ladia 1 cool D T R 2 Formulation (volumetric heat loss in a planar flame) L cool D T R U L 2 L D T U 2 L tube radius R (Joulin...

  18. Cours-VI/Clavin2015.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingConcentratingPortalCoolCoronaryCostsIV HydrodynamicIXVVI

  19. DarkStar VI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments Inc JumpIowa: EnergyDark River, Minnesota: Energy

  20. Microsoft Word - FeVI.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OF PAGESpersonal CERTIFIED MAIL August0 FOIAKansasAprilFe6

  1. Part VI: Section I - Contract Clauses

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT P - .EnergyHYDROGENParagona. PartPART IFGH

  2. Chapter VI: Integrating North American Energy Markets

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying caulkChapter 9 of the LANL34 QER38 QER

  3. VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewing system forPortal. 1.1Innovation1 -3

  4. VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewing system forPortal. 1.1Innovation1 -33-March

  5. VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewing system forPortal. 1.1Innovation1

  6. VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewing system forPortal. 1.1Innovation13 - March

  7. I.D I VI Figure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein KhalilResearch &ENERGY IPhysics from MiniBooNE

  8. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    design, and operation of net-zero energy buildings Develop “net importer of information” But also missed opportunities: Scandinavian solutions for indoor air quality in zero-energy

  9. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Materials for Solar Thermal Applications Energy Use, Materials for Solar  Thermal Applications Energy Use, Materials for Solar Thermal Applications Energy Use, 

  10. Commissioning of Building HVAC Systems for Improved Energy Performance: A Summary of Annex 40 Results 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visier, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    main achievements. These achievements can be split in 4 categories: 1) tools to manage the commissioning process, 2) manual commissioning tools, 3) approaches to use building energy management system to assist in building commissioning, 4) approaches...

  11. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Tokamaks* Multiphase Flow Sciences* Nuclear Technology of Fusion Reactors* Ocean Energy Systems* Photovoltaic Power Systems* Plasma Wall Interaction

  12. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    shc.org/. Summary of the IEA Evaluation. 2005. Projectsponsored Participation in IEA IAs 50 Appendix D. List of Active IEA

  13. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Thermal Energy Storage Technology Optimised Industrial Process Thermal Energy Storage Technology Optimised Industrial Process Thermal Energy Storage Technology Optimised Industrial Process 

  14. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Thermal Energy Storages TRT state?of?the?art New developments Evaluation methods and Thermal Energy Storages TRT state?of?the?art New developments Evaluation methods and Thermal Energy Storages TRT state?of?the?art New developments Evaluation methods and 

  15. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Energy, Washington, DC. Demand Side Management ImplementingEnergy Agency Demand Side Management Programme. Task XIII:Energy Agency Demand Side Management Program. Task XIII:

  16. IEA R&D Wind Annex XI Symposium on Wind Turbine Fatigue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ] and the WISPER protocol load spectrum for U.S. wind farm sites [Kelley, 1995]. The U.S. data base, developed underestimates the WISPER protocol load spectrum from a U.S. wind farm site; i.e., the WISPER load spectrum significantly underestimates the number and magnitude of the loads observed at a U.S. wind farm site. Further

  17. ANNEX A OF THE SVOS FINAL REPORT (Part A: The Auditory Filterbank)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    for predicting masking in helicopters with the accuracy available in the best auditory filter model, audible in military helicopters, and to devise an optimised set of auditory warnings for use in the helicopter fleet. Given the time constraints of the project we chose a model of auditory masking

  18. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Thermal Energy Utilizing Thermal Energy Storage TechnologyPower Generation with Thermal Energy Storage  Sustainable Cooling with Thermal Energy Storage Demonstration projects/

  19. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Demand-Side Management, District Heating & Cooling, and Heatbuildings. However, the District Heating and Cooling IA hassystems as part of district heating networks. SHC Tasks 38A

  20. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    costs for industry Sterling engine heat pumps: US learnedGermany and Japan on sterling engine heat pumps that allowed

  1. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels FE-24 GTN, Roomand Community Systems (ECBCS)* Clean Coal Sciences* ClimateHydrogen* Hydropower IEA Clean Coal Centre* Industrial

  2. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Runci, Paul; Meier, Alan

    2008-08-01

    This report presents results from a program evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy?s Buildings Technologies Program (BTP) participation in collaborative international technology implementing agreements. The evaluation was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the fall of 2007 and winter 2008 and was carried out via interviews with stakeholders in four implementing agreements in which BTP participates, reviews of relevant program reports, websites and other published materials. In addition to these findings, the report includes a variety of supporting materials such that aim to assist BTP managers who currently participate in IEA implementing agreements or who may be considering participation.

  3. Annex III-evaluation of past and ongoing enhanced oil recovery projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The Infill Drilling Predictive Model (IDPM) was developed by Scientific Software-Intercomp (SSI) for the Bartlesville Project Office (BPO) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The model and certain adaptations thereof were used in conjunction with other models to support the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission`s (IOGCC) 1993 state-by-state assessment of the potential domestic reserves achievable through the application of Advanced Secondary Recovery (ASR) and Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques. Funding for this study was provided by the DOE/BPO, which additionally provided technical support. The IDPM is a three-dimensional (stratified, five-spot), two-phase (oil and water) model which uses a minimal amount of reservoir and geologic data to generate production and recovery forecasts for ongoing waterflood and infill drilling projects. The model computes water-oil displacement and oil recovery using finite difference solutions within streamtubes. It calculates the streamtube geometries and uses a two-dimensional reservoir simulation to track fluid movement in each streamtube slice. Thus the model represents a hybrid of streamtube and numerical simulators.

  4. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Energy Storage, and District Heating and Cooling). Six otherbuildings. However, the District Heating and Cooling IA haslawrence.mansueti@hq.doe.gov District Heating and Cooling

  5. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Participation • Ground-Source Heat Pumps Overcoming Marketare found in the ground source heat pump technology area (Source Heat ground source heat pump cost for improved Pumps

  6. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    evaluate low-energy building performance. Stage 4 – InitialLighting for Buildings Targets  for energy performance and Lighting for Buildings Targets for energy performance and 

  7. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    ECBCS)* Clean Coal Sciences* Climate Technology Initiative (Clean Coal Centre* Industrial Energy-Related Technologies

  8. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    costs for industry Sterling engine heat pumps: US learnedsharing with industry Performance of US heat pump nationalPump Agreement. Intramural and Extramural IA Communications • Industry

  9. Rectorat de l'acadmie de paris Annexe 4 DP 7 DP 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesbah, Mounir

    'avancement Conditions requises Date d'examen des conditions Conditions requises INFIRMIER HORS CLASSE - au moins 1 an d INFIRMIER DE CLASSE SUPERIEURE - au moins 9 ans de services effectifs dans un corps ou cadre d'emplois d'infirmiers de catégorie A ou dans un corps militaire d'infirmiers de niveau équivalent ; - dont 4 années

  10. Rectorat de l'acadmie de Paris Annexe 4 DP 7 DP 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arleo, Angelo

    conditions Conditions requises INFIRMIER HORS CLASSE - au moins 1 an d'ancienneté dans le 1er échelon de la classe supérieure. 31.12.2014 Article 17 du décret n°2012-762 du 9 mai 2012 INFIRMIER DE CLASSE SUPERIEURE - au moins 9 ans de services effectifs dans un corps ou cadre d'emplois d'infirmiers de catégorie

  11. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Efficiency, Distributed Generation and Renewable Energyefficiency, distributed generation and renewable energy Efficiency, Distributed Generation and Renewable Energy 

  12. Guidelines for Company Reporting on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Annexes updated July 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    0.32 LPG kWh x 0.214 therms x 6.27 litres x 1.49 Coking Coal tonnes x 2736 kWh x 0.331 Aviation.63 Petrol tonnes x 3135 kWh x 0.24 litres x 2.30 Fuel Oil tonnes x 3223 kWh x 0.27 Coal2 tonnes x 2548 kWh xWh x 0.25 Petroleum Coke tonnes x 3410 kWh x 0.34 Refinery Miscellaneous kWh x 0.24 therms x 7

  13. Guidelines to Defra's GHG conversion factors for company reporting Annexes updated June 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .498 Coking Coal tonnes x 2810 x 2810 kWh x 0.349 x 0.332 Aviation Spirit tonnes x 3128 x 3128 kWh x 0.250 x 0.281 x 0.267 Burning Oil1 tonnes x 3150 x 3150 kWh x 0.258 x 0.245 litres x 2.518 x 2.518 Coal 2 tonnes xWh x 0.249 x 0.237 Lubricants tonnes x 3171 x 3171 kWh x 0.263 x 0.250 Petroleum Coke tonnes x 3410 x

  14. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Project Plan NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory OECD Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

  15. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    roof systems HVAC and solar systems Façade elements Monitoring and dissemination Energy Efficient roof systems 50c HVAC and solar systems 50d Façade elements 50e Monitoring and dissemination 51 Energy Efficient roof systems 50c HVAC and solar systems 50d Façade elements 50e Monitoring and dissemination 51 Energy Efficient 

  16. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRELL, R D

    2002-07-16

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

  17. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Finland, Germany, New Zealand, Netherlands, Sweden, Turkey,Germany, New Zealand, the Netherlands, Sweden, Turkey, and

  18. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    4729 Jay.Braitsch@hq.doe.gov Climate Technology Initiative (Clean Coal Sciences* Climate Technology Initiative (CTI)*Office of Climate Change Policy and Technology U.S.

  19. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    by U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program,for solar and low energy buildings. Also relevant is HP IAcommercial zero-energy building (ZEB), -Improved operational

  20. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and Environmental Effects Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marine renewable energy test centers around the world have been successful in testing new technologies to ensure devices perform up to standards and are able to survive in the marine environment....

  1. Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs (Annex 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watney, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    Interdisciplinary studies of the Upper Pennsylvanian Lansing and Kansas City groups have been undertaken in order to improve the geologic characterization of petroleum reservoirs and to develop a quantitative understanding of the processes responsible for formation of associated depositional sequences. To this end, concepts and methods of sequence stratigraphy are being used to define and interpret the three-dimensional depositional framework of the Kansas City Group. The investigation includes characterization of reservoir rocks in oil fields in western Kansas, description of analog equivalents in near-surface and surface sites in southeastern Kansas, and construction of regional structural and stratigraphic framework to link the site specific studies. Geologic inverse and simulation models are being developed to integrate quantitative estimates of controls on sedimentation to produce reconstructions of reservoir-bearing strata in an attempt to enhance our ability to predict reservoir characteristics.

  2. Annexation of Interchromosomal Space During Viral Infection of 3D Tissue Matrix 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crannell, Zachary

    2006-07-11

    The process of viral infection has been shown to be a tightly structured process that exerts precise control over the nucleus. By quantitatively documenting the dynamic nuclear changes in response to nuclear infection of cells suspended in a three...

  3. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Meredydd

    2008-01-01

    Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems (ECBCS)* Clean Coal Sciences* Climate Technology Initiative (

  4. Energy Sector-Specific Plan: An Annex to the National Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor Innovative SolarSavings PerformanceNationwidetoBillion

  5. Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to:Angola on the Lake, NewJump

  6. Emergency Support Function #8 Â… Public Health and Medical Services Annex

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. GeographicYucca faultEGG 11265-2039

  7. Independent Oversight Activity Report, K-West Annex Facility - June 2013 |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelBConservation StandardsEnergy In CaseFebruary

  8. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility - April

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelBConservation StandardsEnergy In2008 | DepartmentEnergyof2014 |

  9. ANNEX A TO APPENDIX G, Standard Remittance Advice For Payment of Fees

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas ReservesAlabama AlabamaSurvey Forms ProposedARenewablesD

  10. Fiscal year 1986 Department of Energy Authorization (uranium enrichment and electric energy systems, energy storage and small-scale hydropower programs). Volume VI. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Research and Production of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, February 28; March 5, 7, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Volume VI of the hearing record covers three days of testimony on the future of US uranium enrichment and on programs involving electric power and energy storage. There were four areas of concern about uranium enrichment: the choice between atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) and the advanced gas centrifuge (AGC) technologies, cost-effective operation of gaseous diffusion plants, plans for a gas centrifuge enrichment plant, and how the DOE will make its decision. The witnesses represented major government contractors, research laboratories, and energy suppliers. The discussion on the third day focused on the impact of reductions in funding for electric energy systems and energy storage and a small budget increase to encourage small hydropower technology transfer to the private sector. Two appendices with additional statements and correspondence follow the testimony of 17 witnesses.

  11. ) = {V0 V1 Vn | Vi Cn dimC Vi = i}

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishikawa, Masaharu

    (Cn ) T X Fl(Cn ) n Sn w Cw X X Cw X X Cw X Xw Xw [Xw] X H (X; Z) = wSn Z[Xw] [Xu][Xv] = wSn cw uv[Xw] cw uv

  12. Role of U(VI) Adsorption in U(VI) Reduction by Geobacter Species.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-03-09

    Previous work had suggested that Acholeplasma palmae has a higher capacity for uranium sorption than other bacteria studied. Sorption studies were performed with cells in suspension in various solutions containing uranium and results were used to generate uranium-biosorption isotherms.

  13. Diesel Engine CO2 and SOx Emission Compliance Strategy for the Royal Navy (RN) and Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) Flotillas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation from the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  14. Flue Gas Perification Utilizing SOx/NOx Reactions During Compression of CO2 Derived from Oxyfuel Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Fogash

    2010-09-30

    The United States wishes to decrease foreign energy dependence by utilizing the country’s significant coal reserves, while stemming the effects of global warming from greenhouse gases. In response to these needs, Air Products has developed a patented process for the compression and purification of the CO2 stream from oxyfuel combustion of pulverized coal. The purpose of this project was the development and performance of a comprehensive experimental and engineering evaluation to determine the feasibility of purifying CO2 derived from the flue gas generated in a tangentially fired coal combustion unit operated in the oxy-combustion mode. Following the design and construction of a 15 bar reactor system, Air Products conducted two test campaigns using the slip stream from the tangentially fired oxy-coal combustion unit. During the first test campaign, Air Products evaluated the reactor performance based on both the liquid and gaseous reactor effluents. The data obtained from the test run has enabled Air Products to determine the reaction and mass transfer rates, as well as the effectiveness of the reactor system. During the second test campaign, Air Products evaluated reactor performance based on effluents for different reactor pressures, as well as water recycle rates. Analysis of the reaction equations indicates that both pressure and water flow rate affect the process reaction rates, as well as the overall reactor performance.

  15. Flue Gas Purification Utilizing SOx/NOx Reactions During Compression of CO{sub 2} Derived from Oxyfuel Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogash, Kevin

    2010-09-30

    The United States wishes to decrease foreign energy dependence by utilizing the country’s significant coal reserves, while stemming the effects of global warming from greenhouse gases. In response to these needs, Air Products has developed a patented process for the compression and purification of the CO{sub 2} stream from oxyfuel combustion of pulverized coal. The purpose of this project was the development and performance of a comprehensive experimental and engineering evaluation to determine the feasibility of purifying CO{sub 2} derived from the flue gas generated in a tangentially fired coal combustion unit operated in the oxy-combustion mode. Following the design and construction of a 15 bar reactor system, Air Products conducted two test campaigns using the slip stream from the tangentially fired oxy-coal combustion unit. During the first test campaign, Air Products evaluated the reactor performance based on both the liquid and gaseous reactor effluents. The data obtained from the test run has enabled Air Products to determine the reaction and mass transfer rates, as well as the effectiveness of the reactor system. During the second test campaign, Air Products evaluated reactor performance based on effluents for different reactor pressures, as well as water recycle rates. Analysis of the reaction equations indicates that both pressure and water flow rate affect the process reaction rates, as well as the overall reactor performance.

  16. Transcriptional silencing of ?-globin by BCL11A involves long-range interactions and cooperation with SOX6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jian

    The developmental switch from human fetal (?) to adult (?) hemoglobin represents a clinically important example of developmental gene regulation. The transcription factor BCL11A is a central mediator of ?-globin silencing ...

  17. The Function and Genetic Interactions of Zebrafish atoh1 and sox2: Genes Involved in Hair Cell Development and Regeneration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millimaki, Bonny Butler

    2010-10-12

    The sensory cells of the inner ear, hair cells, provide vertebrates with the ability to detect auditory stimuli and balance. In mammals, cochlear hair cells, those responsible for hearing, do not regenerate. Zebrafish ...

  18. Evaluation and application of SOX measurement procedures for kraft recovery furnaces. Project report July 1976-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, A.K.; Blosser, R.O.; Newport, D.B.; Oglesby, H.S.

    1980-09-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the sulfuric acid (SO3/H2SO4) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from kraft recovery furnaces using an extractive sampling system. The Goksoyr and Ross controlled condensation technique was chosen. Equipment was designed and fabricated to evaluate the effect of coil length, grit porosity, temperature, flow rate, and concentration upon the efficiency of capture of H2SO4 in the modified Grahm condenser. The optimum design and operating conditions to minimize SO3/H2SO4 losses in filter holders used in the sampling train for particulate separation were determined, and the effects of recovery furnace particulate upon SO3/H2SO4 losses were investigated. Sampling of five representative Kraft recovery furnace stack gases showed that the SO3/H2SO4 concentrations varied from 0 to 2.98 ppm, while the range of SO2 concentrations was from 14 to 416 ppm. A comparison of these emissions with the SO3/H2SO4 and SO2 emissions from oil and coal fired utility boilers shows the kraft recovery furnace emissions to be much lower.

  19. This annex lists the relationship between RAE 2001 fields and those for RAE 2008. RAE 2001 RAE 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    ResearchGroup ResearchGroup Author1 CoAuthor1 External1 CoAuthor1External Author2 CoAuthor2 External2 Co

  20. A Comparative Study into Architecture-Based Safety Evaluation Methodologies using AADL's Error Annex and Failure Propagation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jun

    and Effects Analysis (FMEA) [25] are used to create evidence that the system fulfils its safety requirements design phase) are used to automatically produce Fault Trees and FMEA tables based on an architecture

  1. This annex describes which file format types are valid for each form or function in the import and export processes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    and export processes. Import MS MS Delimited XML Excel Access RAE2001 text EN RM RTF Research and export formats #12;Export MS MS Delimited XML Excel Access RAE2001 text EN RM RTF Research

  2. Emergency Action Plan and Annexes 2014 Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey emergency.rutgers.edu 18 of 39

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    .rutgers.edu 18 of 39 SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS AND LIGHTNING If you are caught outdoors in a severe thunderstorm or when lightning threatens: 1. Immediately seek shelter in a substantial building. DO NOT seek shelter stand on end, squat low to the ground on the balls of your feet. Place your hands over your ears

  3. Air Source Heat Pumps for Cold Climate Applications: Recent U. S. R&D Results from IEA HPP Annex 41

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Van D; Groll, Dr. Eckhard A.; Shen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Air source heat pumps are easily applied to buildings almost anywhere. They are widespread in milder climate regions but their use in cold regions is hampered due to low efficiency and heating capacity at cold outdoor temperatures. This article describes selected R&D activities aimed at improving their cold weather performance.

  4. Emergency Action Plan and Annexes 2014 Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey emergency.rutgers.edu 25 of 39

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    sources. PREVENT spill from spreading. CONTACT REHS for assistance. After hours call RUPD. FILE a formal incident report. If you require any more information, contact REHS at 848-445-2550 or REHS-Newark 973

  5. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 6. 8. cloud radiation field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, G.E.

    1985-04-01

    The object of this study was to measure the relationship between the spatial distribution of the radioactive fission products and the resultant radioactive field in an atomic-bomb cloud. Data obtained by the high-intensity rate meters and the jet impactors lead to the following conclusions: (1) There is a definite correlation between the particulate fission-particle density and the gamma-radiation intensity measured within the cloud; (2) The effective energy of the gamma radiation within the atomic bomb cloud is quite low, being of the order of 200 keV; (3) The structure of the atomic bomb cloud resembles a chimney with puffs of radioactive matter in the flue of the chimney; (4) The average roentgen dose accumulated by a plane passing through a cloud of the type tested in the Dog and Easy Shots 210 sec after bomb detonation is approximately 125 r. The average contamination on a plane after passing through a cloud is between 10 and 20 r/hr; no contamination could be detected within the plane; (5) The gamma-radiation effects extend beyond the limits of the particulate radioactive fission products; and, (6) The visible cloud adn the fission-product particulate cloud from the bomb do not coincide exactly; the visible cloud extended beyond the fission-product-cloud in those instances where data were obtained.

  6. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 2. 7. Thermal radiation injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearse, H.E.; Kingsley, H.D.; Schilling, J.A.; Hogg; Blakney, R.M.

    1985-09-01

    Information concerning the flash burn resulting from an atomic bomb explosion was necessary to understand the lesion, its systematic effects, and prevention and treatment of these effects. In order to reproduce similar sources in the laboratory, it was essential to know the characteristics of the energy producing the biological effect. In order to obtain this information, anesthetized experimental animals were placed in shielded positions at varying distances from bomb zero to cover a wide range of thermal-radiation intensities. Small areas of each animal's skin were exposed through aperture plates which were designed to analyze burn production as a function of time, intensity, and spectrum. Protection of the animal by fabrics covering the skin was also evaluated. Following exposure, animals were retrieved from the exposure stations and transported to a laboratory for analysis of the burn lesions by description, color photography, and microscopic study of biopsy materials.

  7. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 2. 9. Blast injuries in foxholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, J.M.; Maupin, C.S.

    1985-04-01

    This experiment was conducted to gain information about the amount of protection from direct blast effects that may be provided by foxholes of uniform dimensions located within distances of a nuclear explosion that are recognized as lethal for combinations of thermal and ionzing radiations and indirect blast injuries. Sixteen dogs protected in foxholes were exposed in pairs to the nuclear detonation. Autopsies performed between 10 and 15 hours after the blast demonstrated mild to moderately severe lung hemorrhages and three instances of mild to moderately severe brain hemorrhage. Ruptured ear drums and blast damage to abdominal viscera were infrequent. Evidences of acute ionizing radiation injury consisted in decreases in absolute lymphocyte counts and changes in lymph nodes and spleens. Photographs and diagrams of foxholes, animals, and tissue speciments; graphs of blast pressures, gamma doses, and neutron fluxes are included.

  8. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 6. 6. Evaluation of filter material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engquist, E,H.

    1985-04-01

    Four types of standard and developmental filter materials used in individual and collective-protective devices and one type of developmental filter material used for sampling of air for particulate matter were evaluated against the contamination produced by the detonation of an atomic bomb and present in the resulting radioactive cloud. These filter materials were evaluated in multilayer pads at the standard flow-rate conditions used by the Chemical Corps in evaluation studies of filter materials. This permitted correlation of results of laboratory data. Analysis of the materials was made by counting the gross beta activity collected on successive layers of the same filter material and the efficiency of the materials was calculated from the data obtained.

  9. PROGRAMA VI ENCUENTRO CIENTFICO ENTRE NIOS, MAESTROS E INVESTIGADORES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitze, Patrick

    Entreviñas (San Asensio, La Rioja). La grúa térmica. CP Horacio Fernández Inguanzo (Morcín, Asturias) y Escuela de Educación Infantil Peña Careses (Pola de Siero, Asturias). El punto de rocío. CEIP Las Rodríguez (Cieza, Murcia). El sismógrafo. CP Valdellera (Posada de Llanes, Asturias). Magnetismo

  10. Microsoft Word - APP VI, Rev 3 _03-19-20

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    D.L. Finnegan, J.L. Thompson, C.M. Miller, P.L. Baca, L.F. Olivas, C.G. Geoffrion, D.K. Smith, W. Goishi, B.K. Esser, J.W. Meadows, N. Namboodiri, and J.F. Wild. 2001. Nevada Test...

  11. North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material Presentation made by Carlisle Smith for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY North American...

  12. Diplomatic Metonymy and Antithesis in 3 Henry VI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craigwood, J.

    2014-06-19

    of English Poesie (London, 1589), 175. 7 Quintilian, Institutio oratoria, tr. H. Butler, vol. 3 (London, 1921), 494. 8 The First part of the Contention betwixt the two famous Houses of Yorke and Lancaster, with the death of the good Duke Humphrey (London...

  13. Proto Algic VI: Conditioned Yurok Reflexes of Proto Algic Vowels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proulx, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Wiyot kaiMfy 'daytime'; Wiyot B k^ihitw 'I sleep in the daytime'. Compare grade 3 PA *ke?y- 'be hot', as if from "keisy-. Infixed, there is also the durative iterative root *keyei-, in *k?yei?khw.- 'shine (the sun), be day': grade 1 Wiyot kitskwli...

  14. Texas Adapted Genetic Strategies for Beef Cattle VI: Creating Breeds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Stephen P.

    2009-06-17

    (herd) or groups, often with little if any outside introduction of breeding stock. Varying levels of sometimes intense inbreed-3. ing occurred, but more often linebreeding to highly favored individuals was practiced to increase the relationship... of J. D. Hudgins, Inc. 4 first breed created in the United States by combin- ing existing breeds?the American Brahman?was developed from a foundation better suited to those conditions than the British breeds. The Brahman was formed in the early 1900s...

  15. Institut fr Informatik VI Abteilung Autonome Intelligente Systeme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 3.4 Parrot AR.Drone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 #12;4 Entwurf der

  16. Festival Report: El VI Festival de Teatro Hispano (Miami, 1991)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escarpanter, José A.

    1991-10-01

    incorporaron nuevas actividades al Festival: un espectáculo de teatro para niños, otro sobre música y se celebraron dos talleres que subrayaron el propósito educacional del evento, uno sobre danzas afrocubanas y otro sobre el tango. También hubo cambios en.... Las razones de esta decepción se encuentran en la pobreza del texto de González, concebido dentro de los cánones de las "sit-comsM televisivas y dirigido al público concreto de los hispanos de Nueva York, y no en el indiscutible profesionalismo del...

  17. DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE VI AUTONOMOUS INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    Continuous Motion Planning for Domestic Service Robots with Multiresolution in Time Ricarda Steffens Primary this thesis independently and without the use of sources and aids other than those stated. All sources have Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.3.4 Current Motion Planning

  18. Microsoft Word - VI-1 Papers Published 2003.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L. Qin, R. Wada, and J. Wang Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 212701 (2002). Caloric curves and nuclear expansion J. B. Natowitz, K. Hagel, Y. Ma, M. Murray, L. Qin, S. Shlomo, R. Wada,...

  19. DOE human genome program contractor-grantee workshop VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    Research is presented from the workshop on the Human Genome Project. Topics include sequencing, genetic mapping, informatics, ethical and legal issues, and infrastructure.

  20. Statistical mechanical theory for steady state systems. VI. Variational principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attard, Phil

    production due to Prigogine Introduction to Thermodynamics of Irreversible Processes Interscience, New York, 1967 , the principle of maximum rate of entropy production, which is common on the internet and statistical mechanics. It continues a series1­5 on nonequilibrium theory, the culmination of which

  1. Precision engineering center. 1988 Annual report, Volume VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dow, T.; Fornaro, R.; Keltie, R.; Paesler, M.

    1988-12-01

    To reverse the downward trend in the balance of trade, American companies must concentrate on increasing research into new products, boosting productivity, and improving manufacturing processes. The Precision Engineering Center at North Carolina State University is a multidisciplinary research and graduate education program dedicated to providing the new technology necessary to respond to this challenge. One extremely demanding manufacturing area is the fabrication and assembly of optical systems. These systems are at the heart of such consumer products as cameras, lenses, copy machines, laser bar-code scanners, VCRs, and compact audio discs - products that the Japanese and other East Asian countries are building dominance. A second critical area is the fabrication of VLSI and ULSI circuits. The tolerances required to produce the next generation of components for such systems have created the need for new approaches - approaches that could either make or break America`s competitive position. This report contains individual reports on research projects grouped into three broad areas: measurement and actuation; real-time control; precision fabrication. Separate abstracts for these articles have been indexed into the energy database.

  2. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 9, Winter Issue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    the driplines was dependent on the PAN evaporation and rainfall for the period. A flow meter, placed directly after the irrigation pump, measured the volume of water applied to the drip-irrigated plots. A flow meter placed on the bonnet at the top... entirely on groundwater. In the long run, the result of the “no LSWP” sce- nario would be a complete reliance upon groundwater for irrigation. This would likely result in pumping that would exceed the sustainable capacity of the aquifer...

  3. Chromium(VI) Reduction by Hydrogen Sulfide in Aqueous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Baolin

    , A N D H U I F A N G X U § Department of Environmental Engineering, New Mexico Institute of Mining reductants including zero-valent iron (5, 6), divalent iron (7-15), Fe(II)-bearing minerals (8, 16

  4. Iron Corrosion Observations: Pu(VI)-Fe Reduction Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean-Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-11

    Iron and Pu Reduction: (1) Very different appearances in iron reaction products were noted depending on pH, brine and initial iron phase; (2) Plutonium was associated with the Fe phases; (3) Green rust was often noted at the higher pH; (4) XANES established the green rust to be an Fe2/3 phase with a bromide center; and (5) This green rust phase was linked to Pu as Pu(IV).

  5. Abiotic Reductive Immobilization of U(VI) by Biogenic Mackinawite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Newville, Mathew; Lanzirotti, Anthony; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F.

    2013-03-01

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in-situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U6+ reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe1+xS, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U6+ abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U6+ indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of Fe(II) and sulfide bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U6+ reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U6+ reduction.

  6. 2014LandesBioscience.Donotdistribute. Extra ViEws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shorter, James

    to function effectively.1 Therefore, protein folding is essential for all life.1 Accordingly, protein of cellular chap- erones. For instance, Hsp70 mediates protein folding and serves to proofread and repair proteins.12 Thus, Hsp70 is a plausible candidate for upregulation to enhance protein folding and restore

  7. An Octahedral Coordination Complex of Iron(VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropaneand LosAmesAmpedIntroductionDecade of Iron

  8. SEGS VI Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan:Roxbury,RushS.K Enterprise PvtSEEWEC ConsortiumVVI

  9. Microsoft Word - VI-1 Papers Published 2003.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetection of Hydrates7In389:UFCAugust 4,For Immediatea2 -

  10. Microsoft Word - VI_11_Organizational Chart.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetection of Hydrates7In389:UFCAugust 4,For

  11. Microsoft Word - VI_12_Degrees Awarded 2015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetection of Hydrates7In389:UFCAugust 4,For4 - March 31,

  12. An Octahedral Coordination Complex of Iron(VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWith PropaneNaturalTestAn Evolutionary Arms Race forAnAnAnAnAn

  13. EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to exportEndure Energy,Vitol Inc toDCDepartmentTECGreat

  14. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE VI-11 DIRECTOR Tribble

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNewsusceptometer underI REEECNO OF DOCUMENT2 DIRECTOR Tribble SEE

  15. Microsoft Word - APP VI, Rev 3 _03-19-20

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA.MOX Adventure TamaraCFR2005Table

  16. Ch. VI, The geophysical environment around Waunita Hot Springs | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPIDCavalloCerion Energy Inc JumpOpenCastle Rock

  17. Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. VI. Acetonitrile-Lithium Salt

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article) |ContinuumPhotoactiveMixtures: Highly

  18. Volume VI.i THE MISOSYS QUARTERLY -Autumn 1991 Volume VI.i The Blurb LB2: CLS Exit 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Tim

    - quired a power supply almost the size of the drive. On the other hand, a few com- panies are packing up: Cursors? 11 List of Advertisors J.F.R. Slinkman MTSOSYS, Inc. Pacific Computer Exchange Richard R. King TRSTimes magazine 48 22,44,48,IFC,IRC,RC 32 44 47 List of Patches in this Issue LBOV51/FIX 8 LBREDEF.EXE 9

  19. Solvent-extraction and purification of uranium(VI) and molybdenum(VI) by tertiary amines from acid leach solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Gamma, Ana M.G.; Becquart, Elena T.; Chocron, Mauricio

    2008-07-01

    Considering international interest in the yellow-cake price, Argentina is seeking to exploit new uranium ore bodies and processing plants. A study of similar plants would suggest that solvent- extraction with Alamine 336 is considered the best method for the purification and concentration of uranium present in leaching solutions. In order to study the purification of these leach liquors, solvent-extraction tests under different conditions were performed with simulated solutions which containing molybdenum and molybdenum-uranium mixtures. Preliminary extraction tests carried out on mill acid-leaching liquors are also presented. (authors)

  20. VI-1.20(A) pgina 1 VI-1.20(A) NORMATIVAS Y PROCEDIMIENTOS DE LA UNIVERSIDAD DE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    ACOSO SEXUAL (Aprobado Por El Presidente el 1De Agosto De 1991; Revisado el 13 de diciembre de 2004.) A prohíbe el acoso sexual. El acoso sexual puede causar otras ofensas, ansiedades y agravios también injustificables. El acoso sexual amenaza las expectativas de todos los miembros de la comunidad del Campus de que

  1. Archologie in Eurasien 29 10_Kapitel_VI Seite 272 19. 2. 14 VI Landwirtschaft und Landnutzung in der Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinova, Elena

    Landnutzung in der Region von Ovcarovo-Gorata: Archäobotanische Forschungen zum Frühneolithikum einen diachronen Überblick der Landwirtschaft und Landnutzung in der Region von Ovcarovo-Gorata erlauben

  2. William J. Keese Commissioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................. vi ... Natural Gas ........................................................................................................... vii ... Natural Gas.............................................................................................................. vi ... Transportation Energy

  3. NOx, SOx and CO2 Emissions Reduction from Continuous Commissioning® (CC®) Measures at the Rent-A-Car Facility in the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.

    2006-10-27

    The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station, Texas A&M University System was contracted to fulfill a Continuous Commissioning® (CC®)project on the Rent-a-Car facility (RAC) of the Dallas-Fort Worth International...

  4. Announcement and Call for Papers IWMST 2014 The International Workshop on Modern Science and Technology 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanai, Keiji

    Char, Fuel Cell, Renewable Energy, Methane Gas, Green House Gas, NOx, SOx, Natural Gas Hydrate, Marine

  5. Steam Plant MADONNA DELLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, John J.

    Annex Burrowes Hall BVM Hall Centennial Forum Coffey Hall Crown Center for the Humanities Cudahy Library

  6. Environnemental J. Schaeffer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    Exploiter Conclusion Annexes ANF Datacentre Monitoring Environnemental Ad-Hoc Jonathan Schaeffer jonathan

  7. Metals and Ceramics Division Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    (NIST) IEA Annex on Materials for Transportation Applications (ORNL) IEA ­ Rolling Contact Fatigue (ORNL

  8. Spadoni Park Circle University Boulevard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchens, John

    ) 16 Science Annex II (under construction) 17 Swain Hall (KESH) (College of Science) 18 Wall Building

  9. Spadoni Park Circle University Boulevard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchens, John

    Building (SCI) (College of Science) 16 Science Annex II (under construction) 17 Swain Hall (KESH) (College

  10. NIST HANDBOOK 150-17 ANNEX C CHECKLIST (REV. 2012-04-05) PAGE 1 OF 3 Enter Date: Enter NVLAP Lab Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rewritable (CD-RW) drive or other secure digital storage media and running Microsoft Windows XP1 (or later; and 4) a printer for reporting and documenting the test results. b) Software: 1) SUN1 Microsystems Java

  11. Engine-External HC-Dosing for Regeneration of Diesel Particulate Filters for Heavy Duty and NRMM According to Annex XXVII StVZO

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation discusses how a diesel particulate filter can be integrated in the exhaust piping of a heavy-duty engine.

  12. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 1. Prompt-gamma-ray measurements. Part 3. The measurement of transit time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, W.C.

    1985-04-01

    This report describes the procedures followed in measuring the transit time of the atomic explosions evaluated in Operation Greenhouse. It includes a description of the equipment used, the installations made, and the results obtained. Transmit time measurements were obtainded for the Easy, George and Item Shots; and on the whole, the transit-time recording equipment performed well.

  13. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's Report. Annex 1. 12. Long-distance measurement of energy yield of an atomic explosion. Nuclear explosions 1951

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudgins, A.J.

    1984-10-31

    The energy yield of an atomic explosion was determined at logn distance by measuring the time variation of the light from the explosion and applying an empirical formula that relates this to the energy yield. The light was detected by an RCA 5819 photomultiplier tube and was recorded on a magnetic-tape recorder. Measurements at Shot Easy were made from A C-54 airplane flying at 12,500 ft at a distance of 630 miles northwest of Eniwetok. The time to the minimum of light intensity was 23.5 + or - 0.8 msec, corresponding to a yield of 53 + or - 4 kt. The yield calculated from the radiochemical measurements was 46.8 + or - 1.0 kt. The peak intensity of the flash above the ambient was measured to be 1.7 millicandles/sq ft. This experiment indicated that energy yield can be measured at a distance greater than 630 miles at night. Possible propagation mechanisms are discussed. Studies of the maximum range in daylight and of improvements in technique are suggested.

  14. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 2, delayed gamma-ray measurements. Part 1. Gamma-ray spectrum measurements (abridged)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, H.F.; Miller, W.; Motz, J.W.; Smeltzer, J.C.; Wyckoff, H.O.

    1985-09-01

    The measurement of bomb efficiencies from the number of gamma rays requires fundamentally two separate experiments. The average number of gamma rays emitted from the fission fragments (delayed gamma rays) per fission must be determined. This experiment can be carried out in the laboratory, a second experiment, the absolute determination of the number of gamma rays from the bomb are also attempted. Because gamma rays are not directly observable but are measured only through their secondary effects, and because the probability of occurrence of the secondary effects depends upon the gamma ray energy, it is not usually possible to count directly the number of gamma rays in a heterochromatic spectrum. A spectral distribution must be first obtained from which the actual total number of gamma rays may be computed. This volume discusses the planning for the experiment and the spectral distribution of collimated gamma rays determined from the Greenhouse tests on two shots. A discussion of measurement of build-up factor which is needed to estimate the effect of collimation is also given.

  15. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 5. Neutron measurements. Part 3. High-energy spectrum (time-of-flight method)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, W.C.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the experiments performed to measure the energy spectrum of neutrons released in certain atomic-weapons tests in Operation Greenhouse. The measurements were made of two types: (1) the time-of-flight measurements designed to establish the fission neutron spectrum down to about 3 MeV energy, and (2) the so-called Tenex (Temperature-Neutron Experiment) measurements designed to obtain the velocity distribution of neutrons produced by the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions.

  16. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 9. Air-drop instrumentation. Part 2. Teller-alpha

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grier, H.E.

    1985-09-01

    It was the purpose of the Teller-Alpha experiment to measure the coefficient alpha by means of detectors placed a long distance from the bomb. The detectors are photoelectric devices that respond to visible light produced in the air surrounding the bomb by the absorbed gamma rays. A measurement of this sort was proposed by Edward Teller prior to the Sandstone Operation. The main components of the Teller-Alpha equipment were the photohead, the 200-Mc timing oscillator, and the high-speed-sensitivity recoding oscilloscope. A complete discussion of the experiment is provided.

  17. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 11. Timing and firing and fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grier, H.E.

    1985-09-01

    An automatic remote-control system armed and fired the bomb and sent out a sequence of time signals to experimental equipment on the atoll. A central station at Parry Island sent signals via submarine cables to a timer station on a shot island. The timer station controlled signals to the zero station and to experiments on the island, and through auxiliary stations, it also controlled signal distribution on adjacent islands. Light-sensitive triggering units for apparatus and for accurate standard zero-time reference were provided in the form of Blue Boxes, or fiducial markers.

  18. Operation Greenhouse: Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 9. Air drop instrumentation. Part 3. Disc camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The disc camera was designed for use to determine the growth characteristic of the fireball and so the yield. The instrument has three separate optical systems and can record three separate streak images of the fireball on a rotating glass photographic plate. The angular velocity of the photoplate at the time of exposure is determined by marker pips recorded on the photoplate. The marker generator is gated by a phototube and is turned off by a time delay. Time to minimum can be determined directly from the streaks and by the use of the scaling laws. Bhangmeter yield can also be determined. For Operation Greenhouse, two cameras were operated in phototowers. Good records were obtained on the first two shots. On the George Shot, which was a daylight test, the photocell in the fiducial marker did not function and no records were attained. The cameras were not operated on the Item Shot. The yields derived compare favorably with those from other fireball determinations.

  19. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 5. Neutron measurements. Part 1. Diagnostic neutron experiments, Section 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, E.H.

    1985-09-01

    The effects of radiation on the passage of an electromagnetic wave along a cable are too complicated to predict accurately from theory alone. Also, near the bomb, the intensity during the shot is so high that the results of laboratory measurements must be extrapolated by too many orders of magnitude to be applied with much confidence to the test conditions. Therefore, a number of cables were installed near the bomb for the sole purpose of study the radiation effects, both to help correct the data obtained in the present tests and to help predict shielding requirements in future tests. The two types of effects looked for were (1) a simple attenuation of a voltage across the line due to the shunt conductance set up when Compton-recoil electrons from the gamma rays ionize the gas between the inner and outer conductors; and (2) an induced signal due to the Compton electrons being knocked out of the inner and outer conductors in unequal amounts. On the basis of the results, a discussion is given of the adequacy of the coral shielding actually used to protect the horizontal cable runs.

  20. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 8. 2B. Interferometer gauge pressure-time measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, J.E.; Seacord, D.F.; Newman, R.W.

    1985-04-01

    This project was charged with the responsibility of conducting tests on static aircraft panels mounted on the ground at various ranges from the blast. Pressure-versus-time data were obtained using interferometer gauges. The gauge proved to be reliable and easy to operate. Its high-frequency response enabled it to record data to the pressure rise at the front of the blast wave which had not been noted previously. These results show, from measurements taken by pressure instruments mounted flush with the ground, that the rise times at the front of the blast waves were on gamma-radiation intensity by the smple expedient of stacking a few layers of lead breic around the gauge mounts.

  1. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 4. 2. Measurement of surface-air movements associated with atomic blasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rados, R.M.; Bogert, J.C.; Haig, T.O.

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to record continuous measurements of the surface winds in the vicinity of an atomic blast immediately prior to the blast, during passage of the shock wave, and immediately after the blast with special regard to the blast-induced afterwind following local dissipation of the shock wave. From the data obtained, it was concluded that following an atomic explosion there are two specific causes of air-mass movement. One is related to the shock phenomenon and the other to the rising fireball. It can also be concluded that the heated-thermopile-type and strain-gage-type anemometers could be developed to yield more complete data on the air-mass movement at ground level following an atomic explosion.

  2. Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs (Annex 1). Annual report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watney, W.L.

    1992-08-01

    Interdisciplinary studies of the Upper Pennsylvanian Lansing and Kansas City groups have been undertaken in order to improve the geologic characterization of petroleum reservoirs and to develop a quantitative understanding of the processes responsible for formation of associated depositional sequences. To this end, concepts and methods of sequence stratigraphy are being used to define and interpret the three-dimensional depositional framework of the Kansas City Group. The investigation includes characterization of reservoir rocks in oil fields in western Kansas, description of analog equivalents in near-surface and surface sites in southeastern Kansas, and construction of regional structural and stratigraphic framework to link the site specific studies. Geologic inverse and simulation models are being developed to integrate quantitative estimates of controls on sedimentation to produce reconstructions of reservoir-bearing strata in an attempt to enhance our ability to predict reservoir characteristics.

  3. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Review of the Hanford K-West Annex Facility OAR EA-HANFORD-2014-09 thru 2015-06

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergyNatural GasDepartmentApril 13,truck carries<Lessons Learned

  4. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szigethy, Geza

    2010-01-01

    and Related Methods of Nuclear Waste Management; Choppin, G.and Related Methods of Nuclear Waste Management; Choppin, G.

  5. U(VI) sorption and reduction kinetics on the magnetite (111) surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous reduction of uranyl by micas: Crystal chemicalLiu, C. X. , Reduction of uranyl in the interlayer region ofK. ; Brown Jr, G. E. , Uranyl-chlorite sorption/desorption:

  6. Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Brian A.

    2008-01-01

    G. D. The influence of uranyl hydrolysis and multiple site-values the positively charged uranyl dioxycation is repelledformation of soluble uranyl-carbonates. Although experiments

  7. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szigethy, Geza

    2010-01-01

    Design for the Uranyl Cation, UO 22+ ………………………. ……………….15tripodal ligands for uranyl chelation …………………….19 Figurestudies with the uranyl cation ………………………………………………. 36 Figure

  8. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    observed in the past for the uranyl moiety [40]. For the MSin previous studies with uranyl [40]. The Pu-O a path fitsin the literature [41] for uranyl and have been assigned as

  9. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, J.

    2011-01-01

    Through Potassium Uranyl Vanadate Precipitation. Environ.complexation modelling of uranyl adsorption onto kaolinite5). Precipitating of uranyl vanadates can lower U to below

  10. Thse de Doctorat de l'Universit Paris VI Pierre et Marie Curie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Begin, Thomas

    remercie également Francis Sourd, chercheur CNRS au LIP6, et Safia Kedad- Sidhoum, Maître de Conférence à l

  11. Photoluminescent metalloles for chemical sensing of nitroaromatic explosives and chromium(VI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toal, Sarah Josepha

    2005-01-01

    35 Pentolite is a mixture of PETN and TNT and Composition BN O 2 N OH ONO 2 O 2 NO ONO 2 PETN Figure 1-6 Structures ofis a mixture of TNT and PETN, and Composition B is a blend

  12. Magnetic resonance as a structural probe of a uranium (VI) sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, C.M.; Thompson, M.C.; Buchanan, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); King, R.B. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Garber, A.R. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1989-12-31

    NMR investigations on the ORNL process for sol-gel synthesis of microspherical nuclear fuel (UO{sub 2}), has been useful in sorting out the chemical mechanism in the sol-gel steps. {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H NMR studies on the HMTA gelation agent (Hexamethylene tetramine, C{sub 6}H{sub l2}N{sub 4}) has revealed near quantitative stability of this adamantane-like compound in the sol-Gel process, contrary to its historical role as an ammonia source for gelation from the worldwide technical literature. {sub 17}0 NMR of uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup ++}) hydrolysis fragments produced in colloidal sols has revealed the selective formation of a uranyl trimer, [(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)({mu}{sub 2}-OH){sub 3}]{sup +}, induced by basic hydrolysis with the HMTA gelation agent. Spectroscopic results show that trimer condensation occurs during sol-gel processing leading to layered polyanionic hydrous uranium oxides in which HMTAH{sup +} is occluded as an ``intercalation`` cation. Subsequent sol-gel processing of microspheres by ammonia washing results in in-situ ion exchange and formation of a layered hydrous ammonium uranate with a proposed structural formula of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 10}] {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}0. This compound is the precursor to sintered U0{sub 2} ceramic fuel.

  13. Magnetic resonance as a structural probe of a uranium (VI) sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, C.M.; Thompson, M.C.; Buchanan, B.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); King, R.B. (Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Garber, A.R. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-01-01

    NMR investigations on the ORNL process for sol-gel synthesis of microspherical nuclear fuel (UO{sub 2}), has been useful in sorting out the chemical mechanism in the sol-gel steps. {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H NMR studies on the HMTA gelation agent (Hexamethylene tetramine, C{sub 6}H{sub l2}N{sub 4}) has revealed near quantitative stability of this adamantane-like compound in the sol-Gel process, contrary to its historical role as an ammonia source for gelation from the worldwide technical literature. {sub 17}0 NMR of uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup ++}) hydrolysis fragments produced in colloidal sols has revealed the selective formation of a uranyl trimer, ((UO{sub 2}){sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)({mu}{sub 2}-OH){sub 3}){sup +}, induced by basic hydrolysis with the HMTA gelation agent. Spectroscopic results show that trimer condensation occurs during sol-gel processing leading to layered polyanionic hydrous uranium oxides in which HMTAH{sup +} is occluded as an intercalation'' cation. Subsequent sol-gel processing of microspheres by ammonia washing results in in-situ ion exchange and formation of a layered hydrous ammonium uranate with a proposed structural formula of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}((UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 10}) {center dot} 8H{sub 2}0. This compound is the precursor to sintered U0{sub 2} ceramic fuel.

  14. Infrared reflectance and transmission spectra in II-VI alloys and superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talwar, Devki N.

    Room temperature measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) reflectance spectra are reported for the polar optical phonons in a series of bulk Cd[subscript x]Zn[subscript 1?x]Te (0 ? x ? 1) and CdSe[subscript x]Te[subscript ...

  15. VI: CENTRAL FORCES and ORBITS 1st year CLASSICAL MECHANICS HT04 RCED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Peter L.

    of mass m at a vector position r from a fixed centre of force at O (Fig. 1(a)). The equation of motion is m¨r = F(r) = -f(r)^r. (^r is the unit vector along OP) (1) The characteristics of a central force are that it is directed along the radius vector and that it depends on r = |r| not r, hence the scalar function f(r

  16. GENERA[. VI1:\\\\ M I,OS ANGELES NORMAL MAL SCHOOL BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , June 27, 1907 #12;'WARD OF TRUSTEES GEORGE C. PARDEE, - - - - Governor of California };a Officio THOMAS /THOMAS R. CROSWELL , PH-D., Supervisor of Training School /SARAH P. MONKS , A.M., CURATOROlt MUSEUM, Zoology and Botany /HARRIET B. DUNN, SECRETARY OF FACULTY, History *AGNES ELLIOTT, History /FRED ALLISON

  17. Portable leD ViDeo light SyStem USER'S GUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Laurence J.

    first use. Beyond the initial charge, no additional battery conditioning is required. a. PlugD lighting system 2 Package Contents 2 Miniburst Controllers & Connectors 4 Charging the battery 5 operatingBurst lights can be plugged directly into a standard AC outlet to power the unit for longer shoots. b. Battery

  18. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szigethy, Geza

    2010-01-01

    V.4.024; Siemens Industrial Automation, Inc, Madison, WI,V.4.024; Siemens Industrial Automation, Inc, Madison, WI,

  19. Reaction of Plutonium(VI) with the Manganese-Substituted Iron Oxide Mineral Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin Hu

    2011-01-01

    in solution. Because UV-Vis measurements are macroscopic inelectrolyte for UV-Vis measurements, as well as in othersamples. For UV-Vis absorption measurements, the convention

  20. Microsoft Word - VI_1-8_Talks Presented 2014-2015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    next decade, C.A. Gagliardi, Invited Talk, 4 th Joint Meet. Nucl. Phys. Div. APS JPS (HAWAII 2014), RHIC Town Meeting, Waikoloa, Hawaii (October 2014). Gluon polarization and...

  1. The WARPS Survey: VI. Galaxy Cluster and Source Identifications from Phase I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Perlman; D. J. Horner; L. R. Jones; C. A. Scharf; H. Ebeling; G. Wegner; M. Malkan

    2002-09-25

    We present in catalog form the optical identifications for objects from the first phase of the Wide Angle ROSAT Pointed Survey (WARPS). WARPS is a serendipitous survey of relatively deep, pointed ROSAT observations for clusters of galaxies. The X-ray source detection algorithm used by WARPS is Voronoi Tessellation and Percolation (VTP), a technique which is equally sensitive to point sources and extended sources of low surface brightness. WARPS-I is based on the central regions of 86 ROSAT PSPC fields, covering an area of 16.2 square degrees. We describe here the X-ray source screening and optical identification process for WARPS-I, which yielded 34 clusters at 0.06

  2. .-4 Ijcie;we _SOi-ViCq h t U t . 9 Released upon receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WINDS-- me task of docking o r undocking an airship--- the operations of putting the vessel into her' and they are found to be vary complox. logical officer of the U.S. naval airship %os Angel.ss, Liout. h m c i s WO

  3. Liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors: Preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning LMFBR design characteristics; uranium-plutonium/uranium recycle homogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/uranium spiked recycle heterogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/uranium spiked recycle homogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle heterogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle homogeneous core; thorium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle homogeneous core; denatured uranium-233/thorium cycle homogeneous core; safety consideration for the LMFBR; and environmental considerations.

  4. CHANG-ES VI: Probing Supernova Energy Deposition in Spiral Galaxies Through Multi-Wavelength Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiang-Tao; Dettmar, Ralf-Jurgen; Heald, George; Irwin, Judith; Johnson, Megan; Kepley, Amanda A; Krause, Marita; Murphy, E J; Orlando, Elena; Rand, Richard J; Strong, A W; Vargas, Carlos J; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Q Daniel; Wiegert, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    How a galaxy regulates its SNe energy into different interstellar/circumgalactic medium components strongly affects galaxy evolution. Based on the JVLA D-configuration C- (6 GHz) and L-band (1.6 GHz) continuum observations, we perform statistical analysis comparing multi-wavelength properties of the CHANG-ES galaxies. The high-quality JVLA data and edge-on orientation enable us for the first time to include the halo into the energy budget for a complete radio-flux-limited sample. We find tight correlations of $L_{\\rm radio}$ with the mid-IR-based SFR. The normalization of our $I_{\\rm 1.6GHz}/{\\rm W~Hz^{-1}}-{\\rm SFR}$ relation is $\\sim$2-3 times of those obtained for face-on galaxies, probably a result of enhanced IR extinction at high inclination. We also find tight correlations between $L_{\\rm radio}$ and the SNe energy injection rate $\\dot{E}_{\\rm SN(Ia+CC)}$, indicating the energy loss via synchrotron radio continuum accounts for $\\sim0.1\\%$ of $\\dot{E}_{\\rm SN}$, comparable to the energy contained in CR ...

  5. SULPHATE/MOLYBDATE INTERACTIONS : IN VIVO AND IN VITRO STUDIES ON THE GROUP VI OXYANION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    « dépassement » a été observé en présence d'un gradient de Na+ (au début 100 mM de Na+ à l'extérieur contre 0 m on copper metabolism (Suttle 1980, Mason 1981),there is at least one report of bene- ficial effects

  6. David Alciatore ("Dr. Dave") ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES "Draw Shot Primer Part VI: Draw Shot Practice Drill"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alciatore, David G.

    Drill" Note: Supporting narrated video (NV) demonstrations, high-speed video (HSV) clips, and technical practices" for good draw technique. In this article, we will look at a practice drill that might help you further develop and improve your draw shot technique. Diagram 1 shows a drill you might find useful ... I

  7. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of II-VI Semiconductor Micro- and Nanoparticles towards Sensor Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majithia, Ravish

    2013-01-15

    be synthesized in as little as 20 minutes. ZnO nanopods exhibit a broad defect-related PL spanning the visible range with a peak at ~615 nm. Optical sensing based on changes in intensity of the defect PL in response to external environment (e.g., humidity...

  8. Reaction of Plutonium(VI) with the Manganese-Substituted Iron Oxide Mineral Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin Hu

    2011-01-01

    114] G. F. Knoll, Radiation Detection and Measurement, 3rdMeasurement and Detection of Radiation, 2 nd ed. (Taylor &radiation is not perceivable by the human eye. Therefore other means of detection

  9. Cataclysmic Variables From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. VI. the Sixth Year (2005)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szkody, Paula; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Henden, Arne; /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /AAVSO, Cambridge; Mannikko, Lee; Mukadam, Anjum; /Washington U., Seattle,; Schmidt, Gary D.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Bochanski, John J.; Agueros, Marcel; Anderson, Scott F.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; /Washington U., Seattle,; Dahab, William E.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Oguri, Masamune; /Princeton U. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Shin,; Strauss, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; West, Andrew A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

    2007-06-15

    The 28 cataclysmic variables found in 2005 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are presented with their coordinates, magnitudes and spectra. Five of these systems are previously known CVs (HH Cnc, SX LMi, QZ Ser, RXJ1554.2+2721 and HS1016+3412) and the rest are new discoveries. Additional spectroscopic, photometric and/or polarimetric observations of 10 systems were carried out, resulting in estimates of the orbital periods for seven of the new binaries. The 23 new CVs include one eclipsing system, one new Polar and five systems whose spectra clearly reveal atmospheric absorption lines from the underlying white dwarf.

  10. VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model is a next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system to the research community. The widely-used, established mesoscale models such as MM5 have recently begun

  11. VI. EVALUATION OF FACULTY E. Procedures for the Annual and Merit Evaluation of Regular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    of the salary pool allocated to the faculty member's school for raises. Each annual performance evaluation for the annual performance evaluation of each faculty member within their departments. In the exceptional case of the College of Charleston will be evaluated annually on the basis of performance over the last calendar year

  12. I-Scient? Service Feature ? BIIY THE ViEATHER 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    northeasterly wind was All the action took place aloft. Up there a warm, moist wind invaded the precincts might almost Bay that the warm wind undermined the heavy cold air still ing the warm air upward, line, and from'canada t o the Gulf of Mexico. The most severe weather occurred i n its southwestern qudrant

  13. The oxidation of manganese(II) by chromium(VI) in the presence of oxalate ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Charles F; Haight, G. P

    1976-01-01

    Cr(IV) and Cr(III).ll Ferrocyanide and octacyanomol- stant [than those observed for ferrocyanide and of carboxylic acids

  14. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T.K.

    2011-02-01

    Acidic uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in-situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in-situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/y) show that desorption of U and HA were non-detectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH < 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results demonstrated that HA-treatment is a promising in-situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

  15. Supernova Remnants in the Magellanic Clouds. VI. The DEML316 Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. M. Williams; Y. -H. Chu

    2005-09-22

    The DEML316 system contains two shells, both with the characteristic signatures of supernova remnants (SNRs). We analyze Chandra and XMM-Newton data for DEML316, investigating its spatial and spectral X-ray features. Our Chandra observations resolve the structure of the northeastern SNR (Shell A) as a bright inner ring and a set of "arcs" surrounded by fainter diffuse emission. The spectrum is well fit by a thermal plasma model with temperature ~1.4 keV; we do not find significant spectral differences for different regions of this SNR. The southwestern SNR (Shell B) exhibits an irregular X-ray outline, with a brighter interior ring of emission including a bright knot of emission. Overall the emission of the SNR is well described by a thermal plasma of temperature ~0.6 keV. The Bright Knot, however, is spectrally distinct from the rest of the SNR, requiring the addition of a high-energy spectral component consistent with a power-law spectrum of photon index 1.6--1.8. We confirm the findings of Nishiuchi et al. (2001) that the spectra of these shells are notably different, with Shell A requiring a high iron abundance for a good spectral fit, implying a Type Ia origin. We further explicitly compare abundance ratios to model predictions for Type Ia and Type II supernovae. The low ratios for Shell A (O/Fe of 1.5 and Ne/Fe of 0.2) and the high ratios for Shell B (O/Fe of 30--130 and Ne/Fe of 8--16) are consistent with Type Ia and Type II origins, respectively. The difference between the SNR progenitor types casts some doubt on the suggestion that these SNRs are interacting with one another.

  16. nh phm vi, Cc Web: http://www.gulfspillrestoration.noaa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.gulfspillrestoration.noaa.gov · earlyrestorationcomments@fws.gov · U F W f ngv tHoangdãHoaK),P.O.Box2099,Fairhope,AL 36533 t hi Tài nguyên Thiên nhiên

  17. Spring 199 2. Volume VI, Number 2. Nota Bene News from the Yale Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gazelle musicale in Sterling J"lemorial Library, manuscripts and first editions of operas by Meyerbeer adherents #12;engineered the decline of Meyerbeer's reputation. \\Xlagner was an obscure and impoverished

  18. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Mn-Substituted Goethite Synthesis Manganese substituted (Mn-The laboratory synthesis of Mn-substituted goethite requiresgoethite existed as Mn(III), even though Mn was added during mineral synthesis

  19. Reaction of Plutonium(VI) with the Manganese-Substituted Iron Oxide Mineral Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin Hu

    2011-01-01

    level. Goethite Synthesis Goethite (table 4.1) wasThe laboratory synthesis of goethite requires relativelyindicating that the goethite synthesis was successful. SEM

  20. Reaction of Plutonium(VI) with the Manganese-Substituted Iron Oxide Mineral Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin Hu

    2011-01-01

    4.2 Goethite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .on Manganese-Substituted Goethite . . . . . . . . . 7.4.14.3 Manganese-Substituted Goethite . . 4.3.1

  1. Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutting, R. S.

    2010-01-01

    Fe(II) associated with goethite. Environ Sci Technol 2000,Fe(II): Reactions on goethite and iron oxide nanoparticles.byproducts by synthetic goethite and magnetite. Environ Sci

  2. Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA

    2010-01-01

    hydrogarnet, brucite, and goethite (R-FeOOH). The µXRF map1 spot hydrogarnet, brucite, goethite cluster 4 3 spots with0.3-0.4 brucite in all spots goethite brownmillerite barite

  3. Klumme til Politikens Vid&Sans 17/12-2006 Hvad skal vi med rumforskning?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Anja C.

    . Spørgsmålet er reelt nok, for ingen kan vel være uenig i, at bekæmpelse af sult og sygdomme i verden bør have at forbedre alles dagligdag på Jorden. Når det nu tilsyneladende er sådan en god ide, kan det undre, at ingen

  4. Appendix VI Selected Self-Help Books For Patients/Clients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to patients with sexual and marital problems: a bibli- ography, J Sex Marital Ther 18(1):70-79, 1992. Aging

  5. Human-Robot Teaming for Rescue Missions: Team ViGIR's Approach to the 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryk, Oskar von

    motivated by the earthquake and tsunami that struck the Tohoku region of eastern Japan on March 11, 2011, and led to subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The DRC is designed to mimic

  6. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray spectroscopic methods to study the speciation of U and Cu in contaminated soil and sediment samples from the Hanford Site. To complement and complete our initial XAFS...

  7. Microsoft Word - ViArray_Fact_ Sheet_SAND2011-3935P_updated_format...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sour ke structure l Features Metal-via co Four Power- supplies for p Unused trans static current On-package ations incl Command & Instrumentat Sensor Moni Obsolescent Rad-hard...

  8. Sustainable Practices Policy Sections II, III.I. and V.I. Sustainable Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , or lubricating equipment. Purified Water: Water that is free of impurities such as microorganisms, particulate consumption because it contains objectionable pollution, contamination minerals or infective agents, including water quality standards for human consumption. Reclaimed or Recycled Water: Wastewater treated

  9. LISA VI, Pune, India, February 2010 -Holl: Small Data Archives & Libraries 1 Small Data Archives & Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, András

    material: relatively robust NOT risk free! difficult to measure & access Digitization of old material & science ready data + documents, etc. raw data: archiving by data acquisition pipeline science ready data 2010 - Holl: Small Data Archives & Libraries 10 Metadata Images fix the data acquisition pipeline

  10. Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spellman, Paul T.

    2011-01-01

    were likely to drive oncogenesis.  The overall power of the to be  involved in oncogenesis (e.g. , MAP2K4).    The for the development of oncogenesis.   The next step, which 

  11. Ac#vi#es of the US Burning Plasma Organiza#on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Goals of the USBPO · Coordinate and advocate US burning plasma (BP) research=ons · USBPO ­ Coordinates US burning plasma research, to advance scien=fic understanding USBPO organizes the US Fusion Energy Science community to support burning plasma

  12. 3-Cylinder Turbocharged Gasoline Direct Injection: A High Value Solution for Euro VI Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    3-cylindery gasoline direct injection engines offer similar value in CO2 reduction capability (Euros/% CO2 reduction) at a significantly lower on-cost.

  13. Standard test method for plutonium by Iron (II)/Chromium (VI) amperometric titration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of plutonium in unirradiated nuclear-grade plutonium dioxide, uranium-plutonium mixed oxides with uranium (U)/plutonium (Pu) ratios up to 21, plutonium metal, and plutonium nitrate solutions. Optimum quantities of plutonium to measure are 7 to 15 mg. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation made by Carlisle Smith for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY

  15. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. VI. EXCESS H I ABSORPTION WITHIN ONE PROPER Mpc OF z ~ 2 QUASARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prochaska, J. Xavier

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We use a sample of 650 projected quasar pairs to study the H I Ly? ...

  16. -A Science 9el-vi.. Fea&z Released upon receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the manzr rscorded casos i n which ball lightning has invaded houses occurred at Linguy, We-et-Loire, Fr Fitzhugh Talman, Authority on Metaorology . INDOOR BALL L1G:"bTIITG One of the most interesting on the floor. !&e spectators percaivad a f i e r y ball, which grazed t h e i r bed, passed within a fen

  17. Characterization of a type vi secretion system and related proteins of pseudomonas syringae 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Records, Angela Renee

    2009-05-15

    Pseudomonas syringae is a pathogen of numerous plant species, including several economically important crops. P. syringae pv. syringae B728a is a resident on leaves of common bean, where it utilizes several well-studied ...

  18. Microsoft Word - VI_13-14_Colloquia and Seminars 2015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    31, 2015 2014 April 18 Prof. Madappa Prakash, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio The Neutron Star in Cassiopeia A and What It Is Telling Us? May 20 Prof. D. Bandyopadhyay, Saha...

  19. Complexation of Gluconate with Uranium(VI) in Acidic Solutions: Thermodynamic Study with Structural Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhicheng

    2009-01-01

    uranium is approximately one order of magnitude lower than expected, suggesting that the coordination chemistry

  20. The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    advanced mechanistic, quantitative information on the physiochemical controls on uranium sorption and redox behavior in subsurface sediments. The influence of nanopore...

  1. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    geochemical models can be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Authors: Zachara, John M. ; Brown, Gordon, E. ;...

  2. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, J.

    2011-01-01

    uranium (U) contamination in groundwaters have resulted from mining,uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining

  3. 1989, VI. 103, No. 2, 246-253 Cryptopsychobiology: The Appearance, Disappearance, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Scott R.

    Departments of Psychology and Zoology Oregon State University Late in gestation, intraoral infusion of lemon-extension responses. Stretches occur after intraoral infusion of milk to fetuses on Day 20 or 21 of gestation in the rat fetus is facial wiping, which can reliably be elicited by in- traoral infusion of novel solutions

  4. Deformation Expression for Elements of Algebras (VI) --Vacuum representation of Heisenberg algebra--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideki Omori; Yoshiaki Maeda; Naoya Miyazaki; Akira Yoshioka

    2012-04-25

    The Weyl algebra (W_{2m}[h]; *) is the algebra generated by u=(u_1,...,u_m,v_1,.....,v_m) over C with the fundamental commutation relation [u_i,v_j]=-ih\\delta_{ij}, where h is a positive constant. The Heisenberg algebra (\\Cal H_{2m}[nu];*) is the algebra given by regarding the scalar parameter h in the Weyl algebra W_{2m}[h] to be a generator nu which commutes with all others.

  5. Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spellman, Paul T.; Heiser, Laura; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-06-18

    Breast cancer is predominantly a disease of the genome with cancers arising and progressing through accumulation of aberrations that alter the genome - by changing DNA sequence, copy number, and structure in ways that that contribute to diverse aspects of cancer pathophysiology. Classic examples of genomic events that contribute to breast cancer pathophysiology include inherited mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHK2 that contribute to the initiation of breast cancer, amplification of ERBB2 (formerly HER2) and mutations of elements of the PI3-kinase pathway that activate aspects of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and deletion of CDKN2A/B that contributes to cell cycle deregulation and genome instability. It is now apparent that accumulation of these aberrations is a time-dependent process that accelerates with age. Although American women living to an age of 85 have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer, the incidence of cancer in women younger than 30 years is uncommon. This is consistent with a multistep cancer progression model whereby mutation and selection drive the tumor's development, analogous to traditional Darwinian evolution. In the case of cancer, the driving events are changes in sequence, copy number, and structure of DNA and alterations in chromatin structure or other epigenetic marks. Our understanding of the genetic, genomic, and epigenomic events that influence the development and progression of breast cancer is increasing at a remarkable rate through application of powerful analysis tools that enable genome-wide analysis of DNA sequence and structure, copy number, allelic loss, and epigenomic modification. Application of these techniques to elucidation of the nature and timing of these events is enriching our understanding of mechanisms that increase breast cancer susceptibility, enable tumor initiation and progression to metastatic disease, and determine therapeutic response or resistance. These studies also reveal the molecular differences between cancer and normal that may be exploited to therapeutic benefit or that provide targets for molecular assays that may enable early cancer detection, and predict individual disease progression or response to treatment. This chapter reviews current and future directions in genome analysis and summarizes studies that provide insights into breast cancer pathophysiology or that suggest strategies to improve breast cancer management.

  6. The Spitzer c2d Survey of Large, Nearby, Interstellar Clouds: VI. Perseus Observed with MIPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. M. Rebull; K. R. Stapelfeldt; N. J. Evans II; J. K. Joergensen; P. M. Harvey; T. Y. Brooke; T. L. Bourke; D. L. Padgett; N. L. Chapman; S. -P. Lai; W. J. Spiesmann; A. Noreiga-Crespo; B. Merin; T. Huard; L. E. Allen; G. A. Blake; T. Jarrett; D. W. Koerner; L. G. Mundy; P. C. Myers; A. I. Sargent; E. F. van Dishoeck; Z. Wahhaj; K. E. Young

    2007-01-24

    We present observations of 10.6 square degrees of the Perseus molecular cloud at 24, 70, and 160 microns with the Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). The image mosaics show prominent, complex extended emission dominated by illuminating B stars on the East side of the cloud, and by cold filaments of 160 micron emission on the West side. Of 3950 point sources identified at 24 microns, 1141 have 2MASS counterparts. A quarter of these populate regions of the Ks vs. Ks-[24] diagram that are distinct from stellar photospheres and background galaxies, and thus are likely to be cloud members with infrared excess. Nearly half (46%) of these 24 micron excess sources are distributed outside the IC 348 and NGC 1333 clusters. NGC 1333 shows the highest fraction of stars with flat or rising spectral energy distributions (28%), while Class II SEDs are most common in IC 348. These results are consistent with previous relative age determinations for the two clusters. The intercluster region contains several tightly clumped (r~0.1 pc) young stellar aggregates whose members exhibit a wide variety of infrared spectral energy distributions characteristic of different circumstellar environments. One possible explanation is a significant age spread among the aggregate members, such that some have had time to evolve more than others. Alternatively, if the aggregate members all formed at roughly the same time, then remarkably rapid circumstellar evolution would be required to account for the association of Class I and Class III sources at ages <~1 Myr. We highlight important results for several other objects as well (full abstract in the paper).

  7. Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA

    2010-01-01

    work was supported by the University of Connecticut ResearchEngineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut

  8. Crystalline phases of II-VI compound semiconductors grown by pulsed laser deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwok, Hoi S.

    and 100 InP and GaAs substrates by PLD in this study. A clean stainless steel vacuum chamber . There was no annealing performed on the tar- get. Substrates were cut from single-crystal wafers and cleaned

  9. Advective Desorption of Uranium (VI) from Contaminated Hanford Vadose Zone Sediments under Saturated and Unsaturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Qafoku, Nikolla; Smith, Steven C.; Forrester, Steven W.

    2008-11-03

    Sedimentary, hydrologic, and geochemical variations in the Hanford subsurface environment, as well as compositional differences in contaminating waste streams, have created vast differences in the migration and mobility of uranium within the subsurface environment. A series of hydraulically-saturated and -unsaturated column experiments were performed to i.) assess the effect of water content on the advective desorption and migration of uranium from contaminated sediments, and ii.) evaluate the uranium concentration that can develop in porewater and/or groundwater as a result of desorption/dissolution reactions. Flow rate and moisture content were varied to evaluate the influence of contact time, pore water velocity, and macropore desaturation on aqueous uranium concentrations. Sediments were collected from the T-TX-TY tank farm complex and the 300 Area Process Ponds located on the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington State. The sediments vary in depth, mineralogy, and in contamination events. Experiments were conducted under mildly alkaline/calcareous conditions representative of conditions commonly encountered at repository sites across the arid western United States and, in particular, the Hanford site. Results illustrate the release of uranium from these sediments is kinetically controlled and low water contents encountered within the Hanford vadose zone result in the formation of mobile-immobile water regimes, which isolate a fraction of the reactive sites within the sediments, effectively reducing the concentration of uranium released into migrating porewaters.

  10. Characterization of U9VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon Borwn Jr.; Jeffrey Catalano; David Singer; John Zachara

    2007-05-24

    Long-term sequestration of uranium at sites within the DOE complex is a significant problem that requires molecular-level information on the speciation, phase association, and spatial distribution of uranium

  11. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szigethy, Geza

    2009-08-12

    Nuclear power is an attractive alternative to hydrocarbon-based energy production at a time when moving away from carbon-producing processes is widely accepted as a significant developmental need. Hence, the radioactive actinide power sources for this industry are necessarily becoming more widespread, which is accompanied by the increased risk of exposure to both biological and environmental systems. This, in turn, requires the development of technology designed to remove such radioactive threats efficiently and selectively from contaminated material, whether that be contained nuclear waste streams or the human body. Raymond and coworkers (University of California, Berkeley) have for decades investigated the interaction of biologically-inspired, hard Lewis-base ligands with high-valent, early-actinide cations. It has been established that such ligands bind strongly to the hard Lewis-acidic early actinides, and many poly-bidentate ligands have been developed and shown to be effective chelators of actinide contaminants in vivo. Work reported herein explores the effect of ligand geometry on the linear U(IV) dioxo dication (uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}). The goal is to utilize rational ligand design to develop ligands that exhibit shape selectivity towards linear dioxo cations and provides thermodynamically favorable binding interactions. The uranyl complexes with a series of tetradentate 3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (3,2-HOPO) ligands were studied in both the crystalline state as well as in solution. Despite significant geometric differences, the uranyl affinities of these ligands vary only slightly but are better than DTPA, the only FDA-approved chelation therapy for actinide contamination. The terepthalamide (TAM) moiety was combined into tris-beidentate ligands with 1,2- and 3,2-HOPO moieties were combined into hexadentate ligands whose structural preferences and solution thermodynamics were measured with the uranyl cation. In addition to achieving coordinative saturation, these ligands exhibited increased uranyl affinity compared to bis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligands. This result is due in part to their increased denticity, but is primarily the result of the presence of the TAM moiety. In an effort to explore the relatively unexplored coordination chemistry of Pu(IV) with bidentate moieties, a series of Pu(IV) complexes were also crystallized using bidentate hydroxypyridinone and hydroxypyrone ligands. The geometries of these complexes are compared to that of the analogous Ce(IV) complexes. While in some cases these showed the expected structural similarities, some ligand systems led to significant coordination changes. A series of crystal structure analyses with Ce(IV) indicated that these differences are most likely the result of crystallization condition differences and solvent inclusion effects.

  12. Cities of the Levites' in Joshua XXI and I Chronicles VI 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, John Paton

    1973-01-01

    The 'cities of the Levites' have left no trace in the historical and prophetical literature of Israel; they appear only in P and Chronicles. They must then be either a fiction of the later compilers of the Law, or an ...

  13. ORNL/TM-2008/069 KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) representatives, and International

  14. Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Brian A.

    2008-01-01

    in Hanford waste tank sludge simulants. J. Nucl. Sci.from simulated tank waste sludges. Sep. Sci. Tech. 38(2),Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates. In preparation,

  15. Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Martin, Leigh

    2006-01-01

    Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges Brian A. Powell 1 ,to produce a clay-like sludge layer, a slurry phase, and anto be concentrated in the sludge phase, which is primarily

  16. High detectivity short-wavelength II-VI quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravikumar, Arvind P. Gmachl, Claire F.; Garcia, Thor A.; Tamargo, Maria C.; Jesus, Joel De

    2014-08-11

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe-based short-wavelength photovoltaic Quantum Cascade Detector (QCD). The QCD operates in two spectral bands centered around 2.6??m and 3.6??m. Calibrated blackbody measurements yield a peak responsivity of 0.1?mA/W or 2400?V/W at 80?K, and a corresponding 300?K background radiation limited infrared performance detectivity (BLIP) of ?2.5?×?10{sup 10?}cm ?Hz/W. Comparison of background illuminated and dark current-voltage measurements demonstrates a BLIP temperature of 200?K. The device differential resistance-area product, decreases from about 10{sup 6} ? cm{sup 2} at 80?K to about 8000 ? cm{sup 2} at 300?K, indicative of the ultra-low Johnson noise in the detectors.

  17. Super hard cubic phases of period VI transition metal nitrides: First principles investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    and shear modulus for stable phases, potential hard coating materials for cutting tools have been identified July 2008 Keywords: Coatings Elastic properties Hardness Nitrides We report a systematic study B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Hard coatings of many transition metal nitrides have

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Automated determination of uranium(VI) at ultra trace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez, David

    techniques and spectrophotometric detection using a liquid waveguide capillary cell Jessica Avivar & Laura to a long path-length liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC) is proposed for the determination of uranium increased. For example, it is worth mentioning energy production from coal (coal mining, coal-fired power

  19. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szigethy, Geza

    2010-01-01

    in turn, requires very specific reprocessing and separation7 Ci, t ½ = 30.0 yr). Reprocessing this waste is a complexefficient storage and/or reprocessing applicaitons. 8

  20. Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spellman, Paul T.

    2011-01-01

    Rahman N.  ATM and breast cancer susceptibility.  Oncogene genes for inherited breast cancer.  Cancer Cell 2007;11: study identifies novel breast  cancer susceptibility loci.