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1

b144.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

00) 00) 3/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 3 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗ The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. N(1900) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1900) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1900) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1900) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 1900 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1900 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1900 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1900 OUR ESTIMATE 1905± 30 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1915± 60 NIKONOV 08 DPWA Multichannel * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1900± 8 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 1951± 53 PENNER 02C DPWA Multichannel 1879± 17 MANLEY 92 IPWA π N → π N & N π π N(1900) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(1900) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(1900) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(1900) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ∼ 250 OUR ESTIMATE ∼ 250 OUR ESTIMATE ∼ 250 OUR ESTIMATE ∼ 250 OUR ESTIMATE 250 + 120 - 50 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel

2

b087.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

80) 80) 1/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 1 2 + ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1870± 35 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1900± 36 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 1885± 30 MANLEY 92 IPWA π N → π N & N π π N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 235± 65 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 485± 142 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 113± 44 MANLEY 92 IPWA π N → π N & N π π N(1880) POLE POSITION N(1880) POLE POSITION N(1880) POLE POSITION N(1880) POLE POSITION REAL PART REAL PART REAL PART REAL PART

3

b087.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 N(1880) 1/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 1 2 + ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B087M NODE=B087M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1870 ± 35 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1900 ± 36 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 1885 ± 30 MANLEY 92 IPWA π N → π N & N π π N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(1880) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH NODE=B087W NODE=B087W VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 235 ± 65 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 485 ± 142 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 113 ± 44 MANLEY 92 IPWA π N → π N & N π π N(1880) POLE POSITION N(1880) POLE POSITION N(1880) POLE POSITION N(1880)

4

b066.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

650) 650) 1/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 1 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(1650) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1650) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1650) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1650) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1645 to 1670 (≈ 1655) OUR ESTIMATE 1645 to 1670 (≈ 1655) OUR ESTIMATE 1645 to 1670 (≈ 1655) OUR ESTIMATE 1645 to 1670 (≈ 1655) OUR ESTIMATE 1651 ± 6 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1634.7± 1.1 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1650 ± 30 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1670 ± 8 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1664 ± 2 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 1680 ± 40 ANISOVICH 10 DPWA Multichannel

5

b064.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

75) 75) 5/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 5 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(1675) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1675) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1675) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1675) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1670 to 1680 (≈ 1675) OUR ESTIMATE 1670 to 1680 (≈ 1675) OUR ESTIMATE 1670 to 1680 (≈ 1675) OUR ESTIMATE 1670 to 1680 (≈ 1675) OUR ESTIMATE 1664 ± 5 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1674.1± 0.2 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1675 ± 10 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1679 ± 8 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1679 ± 1 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 1678 ± 5 ANISOVICH 10 DPWA Multichannel

6

b061.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

440) 440) 1/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 1 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(1440) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1440) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1440) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1440) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1420 to 1470 (≈ 1440) OUR ESTIMATE 1420 to 1470 (≈ 1440) OUR ESTIMATE 1420 to 1470 (≈ 1440) OUR ESTIMATE 1420 to 1470 (≈ 1440) OUR ESTIMATE 1430 ± 8 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1485.0± 1.2 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1440 ± 30 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1410 ± 12 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1412 ± 2 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 1440 ± 12 ANISOVICH 10 DPWA Multichannel

7

b063.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

535) 535) 1/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 1 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(1535) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1535) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1535) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1535) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1525 to 1545 (≈ 1535) OUR ESTIMATE 1525 to 1545 (≈ 1535) OUR ESTIMATE 1525 to 1545 (≈ 1535) OUR ESTIMATE 1525 to 1545 (≈ 1535) OUR ESTIMATE 1519 ± 5 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1547.0± 0.7 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1550 ± 40 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1526 ± 7 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1538 ± 1 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 1535 ± 20 ANISOVICH 10 DPWA Multichannel

8

b015.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20) 20) 3/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 3 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(1720) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1720) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1720) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1720) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1700 to 1750 (≈ 1720) OUR ESTIMATE 1700 to 1750 (≈ 1720) OUR ESTIMATE 1700 to 1750 (≈ 1720) OUR ESTIMATE 1700 to 1750 (≈ 1720) OUR ESTIMATE 1690 + 70 - 35 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1763.8± 4.6 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1700 ± 50 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1710 ± 20 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1720 ± 5 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 1770 ± 100 ANISOVICH 10 DPWA

9

b024.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20) 20) 3/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 3 2 - ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Before the 2012 Review, all the evidence for a J P = 3/2 - state with a mass above 1800 MeV was filed under a two-star N(2080). There is now evidence from ANISOVICH 12A for two 3/2 - states in this region, so we have split the older data (according to mass) between a three-star N(1875) and a two-star N(2120). N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2120 OUR ESTIMATE 2120 OUR ESTIMATE 2120 OUR ESTIMATE 2120 OUR ESTIMATE 2150± 60 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 2060± 80 1 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 2081± 20 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 330± 45 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 300±

10

b005.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

60) 60) 5/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 5 2 - ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Before our 2012 Review, this state appeared in our Listings as the N(2200). The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. N(2060) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2060) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2060) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2060) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 2060 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2060 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2060 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2060 OUR ESTIMATE 2060± 15 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1900 BELL 83 DPWA π - p → Λ K 0 2180± 80 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1920 SAXON 80 DPWA π - p → Λ K 0 2228± 30 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2116± 21 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 2217± 27 BATINIC 10 DPWA π N → N π, N η N(2060) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2060) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2060) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2060) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH VALUE

11

b009.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

60) 60) 5/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 5 2 + ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Before the 2012 Review, all the evidence for a J P = 5/2 + state with a mass above 1800 MeV was filed under a two-star N(2000). There is now some evidence from ANISOVICH 12A for two 5/2 + states in this region, so we have split the older data (according to mass) between two two-star 5/2 + states, an N(1860) and an N(2000). N(1860) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1860) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1860) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1860) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1820 to 1960 (≈ 1860) OUR ESTIMATE 1820 to 1960 (≈ 1860) OUR ESTIMATE 1820 to 1960 (≈ 1860) OUR ESTIMATE 1820 to 1960 (≈ 1860) OUR ESTIMATE 1860 + 120 - 60 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1817.7 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1882 ± 10 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1900 ± 7 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel

12

b016.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16 16 N(1875) 3/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 3 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗ Before the 2012 Review, all the evidence for a J P = 3/2 - state NODE=B016 with a mass above 1800 MeV was filed under a two-star N(2080). There is now evidence from ANISOVICH 12A for two 3/2 - states in this region, so we have split the older data (according to mass) between a three-star N(1875) and a two-star N(2120). The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. N(1875) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1875) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1875) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1875) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B016M NODE=B016M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1820 to 1920 (≈ 1875) OUR ESTIMATE 1820 to 1920 (≈ 1875) OUR ESTIMATE 1820 to 1920 (≈ 1875) OUR ESTIMATE 1820 to 1920 (≈ 1875) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1880 ± 20 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1920 BELL 83 DPWA π - p → Λ K 0 1880 ± 100 1 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1900 SAXON 80 DPWA π

13

b016.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

75) 75) 3/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 3 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗ Before the 2012 Review, all the evidence for a J P = 3/2 - state with a mass above 1800 MeV was filed under a two-star N(2080). There is now evidence from ANISOVICH 12A for two 3/2 - states in this region, so we have split the older data (according to mass) between a three-star N(1875) and a two-star N(2120). The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. N(1875) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1875) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1875) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1875) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1820 to 1920 (≈ 1875) OUR ESTIMATE 1820 to 1920 (≈ 1875) OUR ESTIMATE 1820 to 1920 (≈ 1875) OUR ESTIMATE 1820 to 1920 (≈ 1875) OUR ESTIMATE 1880± 20 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1920 BELL 83 DPWA π - p → Λ K 0 1880± 100 1 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1900 SAXON 80 DPWA π - p → Λ K 0 * * * We do not use the following data for averages,

14

b011.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5) 5) 5/2 + I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 5 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). ∆(1905) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1905) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1905) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1905) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1855 to 1910 (≈ 1880) OUR ESTIMATE 1855 to 1910 (≈ 1880) OUR ESTIMATE 1855 to 1910 (≈ 1880) OUR ESTIMATE 1855 to 1910 (≈ 1880) OUR ESTIMATE 1861 ± 6 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1857.8± 1.6 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1910 ± 30 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1905 ± 20 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1818 ± 8 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 1890 ± 25 1 ANISOVICH 10

15

b012.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10) 10) 1/2 + I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 1 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). ∆(1910) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1910) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1910) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1910) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1860 to 1910 (≈ 1890) OUR ESTIMATE 1860 to 1910 (≈ 1890) OUR ESTIMATE 1860 to 1910 (≈ 1890) OUR ESTIMATE 1860 to 1910 (≈ 1890) OUR ESTIMATE 1860 ± 40 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 2067.9± 1.7 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1910 ± 40 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1888 ± 20 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1934 ± 5 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 1995 ± 12 VRANA 00 DPWA

16

b113.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 N(2250) 9/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 9 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Some obsolete results published before 1980 were last included in NODE=B113 our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(2250) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2250) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2250) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2250) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B113M NODE=B113M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2200 to 2350 (≈ 2275) OUR ESTIMATE 2200 to 2350 (≈ 2275) OUR ESTIMATE 2200 to 2350 (≈ 2275) OUR ESTIMATE 2200 to 2350 (≈ 2275) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 2280 ± 40 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 2302 ± 6 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 2250 ± 80 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 2268 ± 15 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N 2200 ± 100 HENDRY 78 MPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2376 ± 43 ARNDT 04 DPWA π N → π N, η N 2291 ARNDT 95 DPWA π N → N π N(2250) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2250) BREIT-WIGNER

17

b113.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50) 50) 9/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 9 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Some obsolete results published before 1980 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(2250) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2250) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2250) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2250) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2200 to 2350 (≈ 2275) OUR ESTIMATE 2200 to 2350 (≈ 2275) OUR ESTIMATE 2200 to 2350 (≈ 2275) OUR ESTIMATE 2200 to 2350 (≈ 2275) OUR ESTIMATE 2280± 40 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 2302± 6 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 2250± 80 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 2268± 15 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N 2200± 100 HENDRY 78 MPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2376± 43 ARNDT 04 DPWA π N → π N, η N 2291 ARNDT 95 DPWA π N → N π N(2250) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2250) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2250) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2250) BREIT-WIGNER

18

b071.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

90) 90) 7/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 7 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(2190) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2190) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2190) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2190) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2100 to 2200 (≈ 2190) OUR ESTIMATE 2100 to 2200 (≈ 2190) OUR ESTIMATE 2100 to 2200 (≈ 2190) OUR ESTIMATE 2100 to 2200 (≈ 2190) OUR ESTIMATE 2180 ± 20 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 2152.4± 1.4 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 2200 ± 70 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 2140 ± 12 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N 2140 ± 40 HENDRY 78 MPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2150 ± 26 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel

19

b006.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 N(2000) 5/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 5 2 + ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Before the 2012 Review, all the evidence for a J P = 5/2 + state with NODE=B006 a mass above 1800 MeV was filed under a two-star N(2000). There is now some evidence from ANISOVICH 12A for two 5/2 + states in this region, so we have split the older data (according to mass) between two two-star 5/2 + states, an N(1860) and an N(2000). N(2000) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2000) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2000) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2000) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B006M NODE=B006M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1950 to 2150 (≈ 2050) OUR ESTIMATE 1950 to 2150 (≈ 2050) OUR ESTIMATE 1950 to 2150 (≈ 2050) OUR ESTIMATE 1950 to 2150 (≈ 2050) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 2090 ± 120 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 2025 AYED 76 IPWA π N → π N 1970 1 LANGBEIN 73 IPWA π N → Σ K (sol. 2) 2175 ALMEHED 72 IPWA π N → π N 1930 DEANS 72 MPWA γ p →

20

b024.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 N(2120) 3/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 3 2 - ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Before the 2012 Review, all the evidence for a J P = 3/2 - state NODE=B024 with a mass above 1800 MeV was filed under a two-star N(2080). There is now evidence from ANISOVICH 12A for two 3/2 - states in this region, so we have split the older data (according to mass) between a three-star N(1875) and a two-star N(2120). N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B024M NODE=B024M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2120 OUR ESTIMATE 2120 OUR ESTIMATE 2120 OUR ESTIMATE 2120 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 2150 ± 60 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 2060 ± 80 1 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 2081 ± 20 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2120) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH NODE=B024W NODE=B024W

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21

b014.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10) 10) 1/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 1 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. N(1710) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1710) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1710) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1710) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1680 to 1740 (≈ 1710) OUR ESTIMATE 1680 to 1740 (≈ 1710) OUR ESTIMATE 1680 to 1740 (≈ 1710) OUR ESTIMATE 1680 to 1740 (≈ 1710) OUR ESTIMATE 1710± 20 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1700± 50 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1723± 9 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1662± 7 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 1725±

22

b117.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20) 20) 3/2 + I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 3 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. ∆(1920) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1920) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1920) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1920) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1900 to 1970 (≈ 1920) OUR ESTIMATE 1900 to 1970 (≈ 1920) OUR ESTIMATE 1900 to 1970 (≈ 1920) OUR ESTIMATE 1900 to 1970 (≈ 1920) OUR ESTIMATE 1900 ± 30 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1920 ± 80 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1868 ± 10 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2146 ± 32 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel

23

b064.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

49 49 Page 1 NODE=B064 N(1675) 5/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 5 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B064 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(1675) POLE POSITION N(1675) POLE POSITION N(1675) POLE POSITION N(1675) POLE POSITION NODE=B064215 REAL PART REAL PART REAL PART REAL PART NODE=B064RE NODE=B064RE VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1655 to 1665 (≈ 1660) OUR ESTIMATE 1655 to 1665 (≈ 1660) OUR ESTIMATE 1655 to 1665 (≈ 1660) OUR ESTIMATE 1655 to 1665 (≈ 1660) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1654 ± 4 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1657 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1656 1 HOEHLER 93 ARGD π N → π N 1660 ± 10 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages,

24

b063.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Page 1 NODE=B063 N(1535) 1/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 1 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B063 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(1535) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1535) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1535) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1535) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B063M NODE=B063M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1525 to 1545 (≈ 1535) OUR ESTIMATE 1525 to 1545 (≈ 1535) OUR ESTIMATE 1525 to 1545 (≈ 1535) OUR ESTIMATE 1525 to 1545 (≈ 1535) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1519 ± 5 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1547.0 ± 0.7 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1550 ± 40 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1526 ± 7 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. *

25

b012.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ∆(1910) 1/2 + I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 1 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B012 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). ∆(1910) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1910) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1910) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1910) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B012M NODE=B012M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1860 to 1910 (≈ 1890) OUR ESTIMATE 1860 to 1910 (≈ 1890) OUR ESTIMATE 1860 to 1910 (≈ 1890) OUR ESTIMATE 1860 to 1910 (≈ 1890) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1860 ± 40 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 2067.9 ± 1.7 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1910 ± 40 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1888 ± 20 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * *

26

b062.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 N(1520) 3/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 3 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B062 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(1520) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1520) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1520) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1520) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B062M NODE=B062M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1510 to 1520 (≈ 1515) OUR ESTIMATE 1510 to 1520 (≈ 1515) OUR ESTIMATE 1510 to 1520 (≈ 1515) OUR ESTIMATE 1510 to 1520 (≈ 1515) OUR ESTIMATE NEW;→ UNCHECKED ← [1515 to 1525 (≈ 1520) MeV OUR 2013 ESTIMATE] 1517 ± 3 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1514.5 ± 0.2 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1525 ± 10 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1519 ± 4 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data

27

b071.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

71 71 N(2190) 7/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 7 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B071 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(2190) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2190) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2190) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2190) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B071M NODE=B071M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2100 to 2200 (≈ 2190) OUR ESTIMATE 2100 to 2200 (≈ 2190) OUR ESTIMATE 2100 to 2200 (≈ 2190) OUR ESTIMATE 2100 to 2200 (≈ 2190) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 2180 ± 20 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 2152.4 ± 1.4 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 2200 ± 70 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 2140 ± 12 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N 2140 ± 40 HENDRY 78 MPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages,

28

b010.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Page 1 NODE=B010 ∆(1700) 3/2 - I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 3 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B010 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). ∆(1700) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1700) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1700) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1700) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B010M NODE=B010M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1670 to 1750 (≈ 1700) OUR ESTIMATE 1670 to 1750 (≈ 1700) OUR ESTIMATE 1670 to 1750 (≈ 1700) OUR ESTIMATE 1670 to 1750 (≈ 1700) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1715 + 30 - 15 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1695.0 ± 1.3 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1710 ± 30 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1680 ± 70 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits,

29

b065.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

53 53 Page 1 NODE=B065 N(1680) 5/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 5 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B065 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(1680) POLE POSITION N(1680) POLE POSITION N(1680) POLE POSITION N(1680) POLE POSITION NODE=B065215 REAL PART REAL PART REAL PART REAL PART NODE=B065RE NODE=B065RE VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1665 to 1680 (≈ 1675) OUR ESTIMATE 1665 to 1680 (≈ 1675) OUR ESTIMATE 1665 to 1680 (≈ 1675) OUR ESTIMATE 1665 to 1680 (≈ 1675) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1676 ± 6 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1674 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1673 1 HOEHLER 93 ARGD π N → π N 1667 ± 5 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages,

30

b011.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 ∆(1905) 5/2 + I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 5 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B011 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). ∆(1905) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1905) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1905) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1905) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B011M NODE=B011M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1855 to 1910 (≈ 1880) OUR ESTIMATE 1855 to 1910 (≈ 1880) OUR ESTIMATE 1855 to 1910 (≈ 1880) OUR ESTIMATE 1855 to 1910 (≈ 1880) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1861 ± 6 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1857.8 ± 1.6 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1910 ± 30 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1905 ± 20 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1818

31

b061.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 N(1440) 1/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 1 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B061 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(1440) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1440) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1440) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1440) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B061M NODE=B061M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1410 to 1450 (≈ 1430) OUR ESTIMATE 1410 to 1450 (≈ 1430) OUR ESTIMATE 1410 to 1450 (≈ 1430) OUR ESTIMATE 1410 to 1450 (≈ 1430) OUR ESTIMATE NEW;→ UNCHECKED ← [1420 to 1470 (≈ 1440) MeV OUR 2013 ESTIMATE] 1430 ± 8 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1485.0 ± 1.2 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1440 ± 30 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1410 ± 12 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data

32

b145.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 ∆(1750) 1/2 + I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 1 2 + ) Status: ∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Neither ARNDT 06 nor ANISOVICH 12A finds any evidence for this NODE=B145 resonance. ∆(1750) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1750) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1750) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1750) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B145M NODE=B145M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 1750 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1750 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1750 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1750 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1712 ± 1 PENNER 02C DPWA Multichannel 1721 ± 61 VRANA 00 DPWA Multichannel 1744 ± 36 MANLEY 92 IPWA π N → π N & N π π 1715.2 ± 21.0 1 CHEW 80 BPWA π + p → π + p OCCUR=2 1778.4 ± 9.0 1 CHEW 80 BPWA π + p → π + p ∆(1750) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(1750) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(1750) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(1750) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH NODE=B145W NODE=B145W VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN

33

b015.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 N(1720) 3/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 3 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B015 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(1720) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1720) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1720) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1720) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B015M NODE=B015M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1700 to 1750 (≈ 1720) OUR ESTIMATE 1700 to 1750 (≈ 1720) OUR ESTIMATE 1700 to 1750 (≈ 1720) OUR ESTIMATE 1700 to 1750 (≈ 1720) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1690 + 70 - 35 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1763.8 ± 4.6 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1700 ± 50 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1710 ± 20 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1720 ± 5 SHRESTHA

34

b033.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

33 33 ∆(1232) 3/2 + I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 3 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B033 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). ∆(1232) BREIT-WIGNER MASSES ∆(1232) BREIT-WIGNER MASSES ∆(1232) BREIT-WIGNER MASSES ∆(1232) BREIT-WIGNER MASSES NODE=B033205 MIXED CHARGES MIXED CHARGES MIXED CHARGES MIXED CHARGES NODE=B033M NODE=B033M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1230 to 1234 (≈ 1232) OUR ESTIMATE 1230 to 1234 (≈ 1232) OUR ESTIMATE 1230 to 1234 (≈ 1232) OUR ESTIMATE 1230 to 1234 (≈ 1232) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1228 ± 2 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1233.4 ± 0.4 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1232 ± 3 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1233 ± 2 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N

35

b066.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 N(1650) 1/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 1 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B066 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(1650) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1650) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1650) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1650) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B066M NODE=B066M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1645 to 1670 (≈ 1655) OUR ESTIMATE 1645 to 1670 (≈ 1655) OUR ESTIMATE 1645 to 1670 (≈ 1655) OUR ESTIMATE 1645 to 1670 (≈ 1655) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1651 ± 6 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1634.7 ± 1.1 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1650 ± 30 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1670 ± 8 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1664 ± 2 SHRESTHA

36

b019.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

00) 00) 3/2 + I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 3 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 are now obsolete and have been omitted. They may be found in our 1982 edition, Physics Let- ters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). The various analyses are not in good agreement. ∆(1600) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1600) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1600) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1600) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1500 to 1700 (≈ 1600) OUR ESTIMATE 1500 to 1700 (≈ 1600) OUR ESTIMATE 1500 to 1700 (≈ 1600) OUR ESTIMATE 1500 to 1700 (≈ 1600) OUR ESTIMATE 1510± 20 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1600± 50 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1522± 13 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1626± 8 SHRESTHA 12A

37

b014.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 N(1710) 1/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 1 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B014 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. N(1710) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1710) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1710) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1710) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B014M NODE=B014M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1680 to 1740 (≈ 1710) OUR ESTIMATE 1680 to 1740 (≈ 1710) OUR ESTIMATE 1680 to 1740 (≈ 1710) OUR ESTIMATE 1680 to 1740 (≈ 1710) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1710 ± 20 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1700 ± 50 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1723 ± 9 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits,

38

b117.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 ∆(1920) 3/2 + I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 3 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B117 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. ∆(1920) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1920) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1920) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1920) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B117M NODE=B117M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1900 to 1970 (≈ 1920) OUR ESTIMATE 1900 to 1970 (≈ 1920) OUR ESTIMATE 1900 to 1970 (≈ 1920) OUR ESTIMATE 1900 to 1970 (≈ 1920) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1900 ± 30 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1920 ± 80 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1868 ± 10 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages,

39

b018.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

00) 00) 3/2 - I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 3 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 are now obsolete and have been omitted. They may be found in our 1982 edition, Physics Let- ters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). The various partial-wave analyses do not agree very well. The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. N(1700) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1700) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1700) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1700) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1650 to 1750 (≈ 1700) OUR ESTIMATE 1650 to 1750 (≈ 1700) OUR ESTIMATE 1650 to 1750 (≈ 1700) OUR ESTIMATE 1650 to 1750 (≈ 1700) OUR ESTIMATE 1790± 40 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1675± 25 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1731± 15 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the

40

b030.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 ∆(1900) 1/2 - I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 1 2 - ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Some obsolete results published before 1980 were last included in NODE=B030 our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. ∆(1900) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1900) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1900) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1900) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B030M NODE=B030M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1840 to 1920 (≈ 1860) OUR ESTIMATE 1840 to 1920 (≈ 1860) OUR ESTIMATE 1840 to 1920 (≈ 1860) OUR ESTIMATE 1840 to 1920 (≈ 1860) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1840 ± 30 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1890 ± 50 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1908 ± 30 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following

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41

b030.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0) 0) 1/2 - I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 1 2 - ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Some obsolete results published before 1980 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. ∆(1900) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1900) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1900) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1900) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1840 to 1920 (≈ 1860) OUR ESTIMATE 1840 to 1920 (≈ 1860) OUR ESTIMATE 1840 to 1920 (≈ 1860) OUR ESTIMATE 1840 to 1920 (≈ 1860) OUR ESTIMATE 1840 ± 30 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1890 ± 50 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1908 ± 30 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1868 ± 12 SHRESTHA

42

b017.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 N(1990) 7/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 7 2 + ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Most of the results published before 1975 are now obsolete and have NODE=B017 been omitted. They may be found in our 1982 edition, Physics Let- ters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). The various analyses do not agree very well with one another. The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. N(1990) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1990) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1990) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1990) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B017M NODE=B017M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 1990 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1990 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1990 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1990 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 2060 ± 65 ANISOVICH 12A DPWA Multichannel 1970 ± 50 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 2005 ± 150 HOEHLER 79 IPWA

43

AOCS Official Method Ca 12a-02  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Colorimetric Determination of Phosphorus Content in Fats and Oils AOCS Official Method Ca 12a-02 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The test portion

44

m167.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 (1990) REFERENCES ANISOVICH 02 PL B542 8 A.V. Anisovich et al. ANISOVICH 01D PL B508 6 A.V. Anisovich et al. ANISOVICH 01E PL B513 281 A.V. Anisovich et al. ANISOVICH 00J PL...

45

m167.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANISOVICH 02 PL B542 8 A.V. Anisovich et al. REFID48327 ANISOVICH 01D PL B508 6 A.V. Anisovich et al. REFID48349 ANISOVICH 01E PL B513 281 A.V. Anisovich et al....

46

diff -ruN oommf12a4pre-20100719/app/mmdisp/scripts ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

diff -ruN oommf12a4pre-20100719/app/mmdisp/scripts/mmdisp.tcl oommf12a4pre-20100719bis/app/mmdisp/scripts/mmdisp.tcl --- oommf12a4pre ...

2011-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

47

b002.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15 GOPAL 80 DPWA K N K N 1955 15 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1755 or 1834 1 MARTIN 77 DPWA K N multichannel 2004 40 VANHORN 75 DPWA K - p 0 (2000) WIDTH...

48

b079.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

78 DPWA K N K N 1676 15 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1668 25 VANHORN 75 DPWA K - p 0 1670 20 KANE 74 DPWA K - p * * * We do not use the...

49

12 a ficha de exerccios de Mecanica Geometrica 27 de Maio de 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 a ficha de exerc??�cios de Mec??anica Geom??etrica 27 de Maio de 2002 1. Seja (M,#) uma variedade

Natário, José

50

Table HC4-12a. Air Conditioning by West Census Region, Million U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table HC4-12a. Air Conditioning by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S.

51

Influence of Alloy Microstructure on Oxide Growth in HCM12A in Supercritical Water Jeremy Bischoff1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corrosion resistance. Because of their radiation and stress corrosion cracking resistance, ferritic to oxidation appears to enhance the corrosion resistance of the alloy [2]. In the present study, HCM12A samples on the corrosion resistance but these results are not shown in this article. The oxide layers formed on HCM12A

Motta, Arthur T.

52

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 12 a-Linolenic Acid and Heart Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 12 a-Linolenic Acid and Heart Disease Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable

53

EFTEM and EELS analysis of the oxide layer formed on HCM12A exposed to SCW Jeremy Bischoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and stress corrosion cracking, ferritic­martensitic steels, such as HCM12A, are candidate materials the corrosion resistance of these alloys. ? 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction 1

Motta, Arthur T.

54

Data:244cda0a-21fd-4059-889a-12a0147a129b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a-21fd-4059-889a-12a0147a129b a-21fd-4059-889a-12a0147a129b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Monroe, North Carolina (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule TS - Traffic Signal Service Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.monroenc.org/services.php?cat=150 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

55

Data:1844e12d-12a3-4722-a554-be3c170bffaa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e12d-12a3-4722-a554-be3c170bffaa e12d-12a3-4722-a554-be3c170bffaa No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Tell City, Indiana (Utility Company) Effective date: 2008/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Tariff A1: Single Phase Residential, Greater Than 200 Amps and Less Than 400 Amps Sector: Residential Description: The charges derived in the Tariff A1 rate are subject to adjustment for: Purchased Power Adjustment Tracking Factor. Source or reference: Rates Binder 1, Illinois State University Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

56

Data:33d1657d-8616-4475-94a0-e6ed12a79571 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d1657d-8616-4475-94a0-e6ed12a79571 d1657d-8616-4475-94a0-e6ed12a79571 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Belmont, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2005/01/21 End date if known: Rate name: Rg-1 Residential Service Single Phase Sector: Residential Description: This rate will be applied to residential single phase customers for ordinary household purposes. Single-Phase motors may not exceed 5 horsepower individual-rated capacity without utility permission. Fixed Monthly Charge includes Commitment to Community Rider: $1.00 per customer per month Source or reference: http://psc.wi.gov/apps40/tariffs/viewfile.aspx?type=electric&id=440

57

b139.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 ∆(2000) 5/2 + I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 5 2 + ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this NODE=B139 resonance. ∆(2000) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2000) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2000) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2000) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B139M NODE=B139M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 2000 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2000 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2000 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2000 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1724 ± 61 VRANA 00 DPWA Multichannel OCCUR=2 2200 ± 125 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2015 ± 24 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 1752 ± 32 MANLEY 92 IPWA π N → π N & N π π ∆(2000) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2000) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2000) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2000) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH NODE=B139W NODE=B139W VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 138 ± 68 VRANA 00 DPWA Multichannel

58

Data:B04aa56c-12a5-43dc-86dd-3355e2a5cd72 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6c-12a5-43dc-86dd-3355e2a5cd72 6c-12a5-43dc-86dd-3355e2a5cd72 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Wild Rice Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/03/18 End date if known: Rate name: FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 15 KVA transformer Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.wildriceelectric.com/b-rate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

59

Data:7e12a3cc-a6ed-40c3-acfc-dffb0212ba16 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7e12a3cc-a6ed-40c3-acfc-dffb0212ba16 7e12a3cc-a6ed-40c3-acfc-dffb0212ba16 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Moorhead, Minnesota (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Small General Service/General Service: Dual-Fuel Sector: Commercial Description: Available to Small General Service and General Service customers in conformance with Moorhead Public Service' Source or reference: http://www.mpsutility.com/images/stories/rates/2013/Electric%20Rates.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

60

Data:B04adc72-6615-4040-901d-e4a8b12a0385 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-6615-4040-901d-e4a8b12a0385 2-6615-4040-901d-e4a8b12a0385 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Johnson City, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: STREET LIGHTING Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.jcpb.com/yourBusiness/meters/rates.asp#rateSheet Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anisovich 12a dpwa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

Data:D5afa075-e887-4728-97a1-2a2bc811845d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

afa075-e887-4728-97a1-2a2bc811845d afa075-e887-4728-97a1-2a2bc811845d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Rochester Public Utilities Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: SECURITY LIGHTING(250 Watt HPS) Sector: Lighting Description: At all locations whenever the service can be provided with overhead wiring on an existing RPU owned pole. Source or reference: http://www.rpu.org/documents/2012_rate_schedule.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

62

Data:Ad262f27-c738-4d12-a3a0-0c0b5f53221a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

62f27-c738-4d12-a3a0-0c0b5f53221a 62f27-c738-4d12-a3a0-0c0b5f53221a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Singing River Elec Pwr Assn (Mississippi) Effective date: 2009/12/04 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting MV 175 W Post Top (Includes Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: *Subject to power cost adjustment, tax expense adjustment, and an environmental compliance charge. Source or reference: http://www.singingriver.com/Files/R-18.pdf Source Parent: Comments Energy Adjustment is Power Cost Adjustment plus Environmental Clause plus Regulatory Adjustment Applicability Demand (kW)

63

Data:F1983099-90dc-4b12-a937-bc3c29638f2d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

99-90dc-4b12-a937-bc3c29638f2d 99-90dc-4b12-a937-bc3c29638f2d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Mt Carmel Public Utility Co Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Residential Sector: Residential Description: AVAILABILITY Available for any customer for Company's standard service for residential purposes. Where a residence and business are combined in one premise, the service classification shall be determined by the predominant electric use at the premise. Source or reference: http://www.mtcpu.com/includes/tariff_electric.htm?t=Residential_Electric_Service Source Parent:

64

Data:Dd3d2c12-a21e-43ef-a56f-eec753ee1976 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c12-a21e-43ef-a56f-eec753ee1976 c12-a21e-43ef-a56f-eec753ee1976 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Choctaw Nation Senior Citizens Center Sector: Commercial Description: * Available to the Choctaw Nation for multi-building complexes having electric space heating where more than one building is served from a single transformer. Electric service shall be billed to and paid by the Choctaw Nation on one monthly bill. Subject to Tax Adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4 Source Parent: Comments

65

Data:1eed3a36-f12a-4353-b92b-d5c5c0281e45 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eed3a36-f12a-4353-b92b-d5c5c0281e45 eed3a36-f12a-4353-b92b-d5c5c0281e45 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Three Notch Elec Member Corp Effective date: 2012/03/01 End date if known: Rate name: 175 Mercury vapor with Underground Wiring- (Type - 'MV-Open', Fiberglass Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only for dusk to dawn lighting by means of photo-electric controlled, ballast operated vapor lamp luminaries and poles conforming to the Cooperative's specifications. Service will be rendered only at locations that, solely in the opinion of the Cooperative, are readily accessible for installation and maintenance.

66

c12a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,522 3,228 1,772 18,031 33,384 20,243 84.4 96.7 87.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................. 193 300 193 2,168 2,904 1,850 89.0 103.2 104.2 5,001 to 10,000 ............................... 134 263 165 2,032 3,217 1,784 66.0 81.9 92.5 10,001 to 25,000 ............................. 241 432 226 3,273 5,679 3,707 73.6 76.1 60.9 25,001 to 50,000 ............................. 181 370 191 2,517 4,518 2,347 71.8 81.8 81.5 50,001 to 100,000 ............................ 156 473 285 2,095 4,763 3,433 74.3 99.3 82.9 100,001 to 200,000 .......................... 219 523 323 2,161 4,706 3,350 101.1 111.1 96.5 200,001 to 500,000 .......................... 221 371 160 2,179 3,623 1,692 101.4 102.3 94.3 Over 500,000 ................................... 179 497 Q 1,606 3,974 2,080 111.2 125.0 Q Principal Building Activity

67

Data:Bb1cc354-27f0-4e38-a12a-449df422b2f6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cc354-27f0-4e38-a12a-449df422b2f6 cc354-27f0-4e38-a12a-449df422b2f6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Miami-Cass County Rural E M C Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights Metered 250 watt high pressure sodium Sector: Lighting Description: The Miami-Cass County Rural Electric Membership Corporation (REMC) shall charge and collect for security lighting service on the following bases of availability, character of service, monthly rate, and tax adjustment. AVAILABILITY: Available to any member of the REMC for continuous year round service for outdoor lighting where 120 volt service exists ahead of the meter loop.

68

Data:37cfd1b4-12a3-480f-ba5b-79db36229eec | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cfd1b4-12a3-480f-ba5b-79db36229eec cfd1b4-12a3-480f-ba5b-79db36229eec No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Groton, South Dakota (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Schedule C - HEAT METER Geothermal/Heat Pump Rates Sector: Residential Description: #2 Heat Meter - All kwh at $.08 per kwh Minimum 10 kw resistance backup. Source or reference: http://city.grotonsd.gov/electric.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

69

Data:0c7149ef-adf6-42a7-963d-4b12a98d024d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ef-adf6-42a7-963d-4b12a98d024d ef-adf6-42a7-963d-4b12a98d024d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Duke Energy Ohio Inc Effective date: 2013/05/06 End date if known: Rate name: Rate OL - Outdoor Lighting Service - MV 400 Watts Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable for outdoor lighting services on private property with Company owned fixtures in the Company's entire service area where secondary distribution lines are adjacent to the premises to be served. Not applicable for lighting public roadways which are dedicated, or anticipated to be dedicated, except to meet the occasional singular need of a customer who has obtained written approval from the proper governmental authority.

70

Data:638bc389-fb01-4b31-96a5-0c12a8e0261b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bc389-fb01-4b31-96a5-0c12a8e0261b bc389-fb01-4b31-96a5-0c12a8e0261b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nevada Power Co Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: OLGS-1-TOU (Large General Service Time-Of-Use) Sector: Commercial Description: Optional for non-Domestic Service where consumption of energy exceeds 3,500 kWh in any one month, where the Billing Demand is equal to or less than 299 kW in any one month and where time-of-use pricing is requested by the Customer. All service will be supplied at one Point of Delivery and measured through one kilowatthour Meter. Not applicable to standby, resale, temporary, shared, or mixed class of service. Not applicable to supplemental service unless the Customer is a Qualifying Facility under Title 18, Code of Federal Regulations, Section 292.201 through 292.207. This schedule is limited to the addition of 1,000 new Customers per month on all optional time-of-use schedules.

71

Data:Eac1dd3a-0268-4e5c-b1d1-ed9feeb2a12a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dd3a-0268-4e5c-b1d1-ed9feeb2a12a dd3a-0268-4e5c-b1d1-ed9feeb2a12a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Ameren Illinois Company Effective date: 2010/11/19 End date if known: Rate name: DS-2 and BGS-2 Zone 2 - Bundled Small General Delivery Service 600V or Less Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY Service under this Rate is available for any eligible Non-Residential Customer within the territory served by Company that meets the following criteria: Customers served under this Rate shall have a maximum monthly Demand of less than 150 kilowatts (kW) as qualified in the Delivery Service Rate Reassignment section. A Customer without a demand meter installed, but with an average usage of less than 1,200 kWh per day during each monthly billing period will be normally assumed to have a maximum monthly Demand of less than 150 kW. Where Customer's average daily usage is 1,200 kWh per day or more in any monthly billing period, Company may install a demand meter at Company's expense to determine if Customer remains eligible for service under this Rate.

72

Data:4bb12a66-235d-4b62-8af0-1e344385ee34 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4bb12a66-235d-4b62-8af0-1e344385ee34 4bb12a66-235d-4b62-8af0-1e344385ee34 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (Florida) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting MHF 400 W Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.tcec.com/myBusiness/resSinglePhase.aspx Source Parent: http://www.tcec.com/ Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

73

Data:8100a82f-3ccb-4ce5-b6dc-12a267a595c1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0a82f-3ccb-4ce5-b6dc-12a267a595c1 0a82f-3ccb-4ce5-b6dc-12a267a595c1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Wahoo, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial Large General Service (Three Phase) Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: http://www.wahoo.ne.us/content_subcat.asp?SubCategoryID=88&CategoryID=125&ContentID=68 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

74

Data:5820ba98-12a4-4dd7-a83b-c3350ad462a2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ba98-12a4-4dd7-a83b-c3350ad462a2 ba98-12a4-4dd7-a83b-c3350ad462a2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Orange & Rockland Utils Inc Effective date: 2012/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: SC16 Street Lighting Induction Overhead and Underground 70w (Customer owned, retail service, multiple bills) Sector: Description: APPLICABLE TO USE OF SERVICE FOR: Sales and delivery of electric power supply provided by the Company or delivery of electric power supply provided by an Energy Service Company under the Company's Retail Access Program for outdoor lighting of areas, beyond the limits of public streets, highways or roadways, for use of individuals and private or public organizations where existing distribution facilities are suitable for the service requested.

75

Data:420fb714-7054-49c9-8b1f-f07dac56b12a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

14-7054-49c9-8b1f-f07dac56b12a 14-7054-49c9-8b1f-f07dac56b12a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: KEM Electric Coop Inc Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Electric Heat Service -7 M Sector: Residential Description: Available to all members under SE-1, where electric heat is the primary source of heating. Service shall be to a single point of service Type of Service Single Phase, 60 cycle, at secondary voltages. The Cooperative will provide meter, meter socket, and C.T. equipment necessary to measure electric usage. Source or reference: http://www.kemelectric.com/Customer_Service/Rate_Schedules/Schedule%20EH-7M/index.html

76

Data:De12a8fe-13b5-4491-9139-ea729b96ec3d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

De12a8fe-13b5-4491-9139-ea729b96ec3d De12a8fe-13b5-4491-9139-ea729b96ec3d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Seattle, Washington (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule LGB-Large Standard General Service:Burien(First Avenue South 1 Undergrounding Charge) Sector: Commercial Description: SCHEDULE LGS is for standard general service provided to Burien customers whose maximum monthly demand is equal to or greater than 1,000 kW but less than 10,000 kW. Minimum Charge: $34.21 per meter per day. First Avenue South 1 Undergrounding Charge: All kWh at 0.37 cent per kWh

77

Data:Eabd2142-fc95-40fa-b50c-1ac0c9a2d12a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eabd2142-fc95-40fa-b50c-1ac0c9a2d12a Eabd2142-fc95-40fa-b50c-1ac0c9a2d12a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Painesville, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: 1990/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Intersection flasher light-Within Corporate Limits Sector: Lighting Description: For the purpose of paying the expenses of conducting and managing the Electric Division, Utilities Department, of the City, the City Manager is hereby authorized and directed to charge the following rates, for all utility bills issued on and after the dates indicated below. These rates are applicable to service calls, unmetered services, standby power and miscellaneous installations which do not fall under the normal rate schedules, which rates are hereby adopted for all utility bills issued on and after July 1, 1990

78

Data:4f82f0e5-12a3-453d-9fbf-d3583d8e7236 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2f0e5-12a3-453d-9fbf-d3583d8e7236 2f0e5-12a3-453d-9fbf-d3583d8e7236 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Provo City Corp (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Private Outdoor Security (Closed Rate) - 250 W MV - Wood Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.provo.org/util.rates_summary.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

79

Data:6f693279-9c83-43fc-8432-a0927c12a5f9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-9c83-43fc-8432-a0927c12a5f9 9-9c83-43fc-8432-a0927c12a5f9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Kiel, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/05/06 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-3 Industrial Power Time-of-Day Service above 600kW Demand 8am-10pm Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0754 per kilowatt-hour.

80

Data:7fb75ac1-2a7e-4b4a-b21e-c51764137a9e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7fb75ac1-2a7e-4b4a-b21e-c51764137a9e 7fb75ac1-2a7e-4b4a-b21e-c51764137a9e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: New York Power Authority Effective date: 2013/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: SC 68 Conventional (Westchester Customers) Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.nypa.gov/about/documents.htm Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anisovich 12a dpwa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Data:28b54f08-c941-4fd0-93d1-2a577e3dd598 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-c941-4fd0-93d1-2a577e3dd598 8-c941-4fd0-93d1-2a577e3dd598 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Puget Sound Energy Inc Effective date: 2013/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Company Street Lights-120 watt Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://pse.com/aboutpse/Rates/Documents/elec_sch_053.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

82

Data:19280696-9d1c-44f3-a80a-12a25ad40f31 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

696-9d1c-44f3-a80a-12a25ad40f31 696-9d1c-44f3-a80a-12a25ad40f31 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Orange & Rockland Utils Inc Effective date: 2012/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: SC16 Street Lighting Induction Overhead and Underground 150w (Customer owned, full service, single bill) Sector: Description: APPLICABLE TO USE OF SERVICE FOR: Sales and delivery of electric power supply provided by the Company or delivery of electric power supply provided by an Energy Service Company under the Company's Retail Access Program for outdoor lighting of areas, beyond the limits of public streets, highways or roadways, for use of individuals and private or public organizations where existing distribution facilities are suitable for the service requested.

83

Data:Cb684dd4-12a1-4e54-928a-bf6281e7b00e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Data Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Data:Cb684dd4-12a1-4e54-928a-bf6281e7b00e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Sulphur Springs Valley E C Inc Effective date: 2013/03/18 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting: 250 Watt MV - Double/Wood Sector: Lighting Description: Customer provided Facilities and Cooperative Owned and Maintained Lighting Service. Source or reference: http://www.ssvec.org/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2013/03/SSVEC-Rates-03.18.13.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

84

Data:E72ee42e-a63e-4795-9893-3ef12a88bed0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ee42e-a63e-4795-9893-3ef12a88bed0 ee42e-a63e-4795-9893-3ef12a88bed0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Idaho Power Co Effective date: 2008/03/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule 62 - Green energy Purchase Program Rider Sector: Description: PURPOSE The Green Energy Purchase Program is an optional, voluntary program designed to provide customers and non-customer participants an opportunity to participate in the purchase of new environmentally friendly "green" energy. Funds collected in this program will be wholly distributed to the purchase of green energy products. APPLICABILITY Service under this schedule is applicable to all Customers and non-customer participants who choose to participate in this Program. MONTHLY GREEN ENERGY PURCHASE CONTRIBUTION Customers designate their level of participation by choosing a fixed dollar per month amount. The monthly Green Energy Purchase Program contribution is in addition to all other charges included in the service schedule under which the Customer receives electrical service and will be added to the Customer's monthly electric bill. Non-Customer participants will be issued a monthly invoice that reflects their designated fixed dollar per month amount. The Program funds will wholly be used to purchase green energy or cover the green energy price premium. PROGRAM CONSIDERATIONS No electric service disconnections will result in the event of non-payment of Program commitments.

85

Data:E2d97b12-a1ba-4919-b041-0ce6b9bc25dd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7b12-a1ba-4919-b041-0ce6b9bc25dd 7b12-a1ba-4919-b041-0ce6b9bc25dd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northern States Power Co - Wisconsin Effective date: 2012/01/15 End date if known: Rate name: Experimental Advanced Renewable Energy Purchase Service Solar Energy Systems 10 kW (at more than 200 amps) Sector: Description: Effective In All territories served by the Company. Definition: Distributed generation facilities are electricity generators owned by the customer, located R close to the point of energy consumption, and small in scale, usually no more than the existing load of the customer. Availability The advanced renewable energy tariff is available to retail customers who own small distributed generation facilities that are powered by a renewable resource and placed in initial service after January 1, 2012, or who executed an advanced renewable energy contract prior to January 1, 2012. aximum size project per customer is: Solar: 10 kW Technology Limit The solar technology category will be fully subscribed when 300 kW of capacity has been subscribed. Community-based Limits The Community-based Project Category is only applicable to the Biomass/Biogas and Wind technology categories and will be fully subscribed when 5 MW of capacity has been subscribed. In addition, the Community-based Category is applicable only to projects owned by local units of government (Village, City, Town or County), or to projects majority-owned by existing retail customers that choose to join together to develop a joint project. The customer will receive a $1.50/watt capital incentive payment up to a total of $15,000 per facility.

86

b013.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ∆(1930) 5/2 - I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 5 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our NODE=B013 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1984 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). ∆(1930) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1930) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1930) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(1930) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B013M NODE=B013M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1900 to 2000 (≈ 1950) OUR ESTIMATE 1900 to 2000 (≈ 1950) OUR ESTIMATE 1900 to 2000 (≈ 1950) OUR ESTIMATE 1900 to 2000 (≈ 1950) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 2233 ± 53 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 1940 ± 30 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1901 ± 15 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1930 ± 12 SHRESTHA 12A DPWA Multichannel 2046 ± 45

87

Thermally stable compositions including 2,4,8,10-tetranitro-5H-pyrido[3',2':4,5][1,2,3]triazolo[1,2-a]benzotriazo- l-6-ium, inner salt  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosive formulation including 2,4,8,10-tetranitro-5H-pyrido[3',2':4,5][1,2,3]triazolo[1,2-a]benzotriazo- l-6-ium, inner salt and a high temperature binder is disclosed together with a process of preparing 2,4,8,10-tetranitro-5H-pyrido[3',2':4,5][1,2,3]triazolo[1,2-a]benzotriazo- l-6-ium, inner salt.

Hiskey, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Huynh, My Hang (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

88

b040.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70) 70) 1/2 - I (J P ) = 0( 1 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ The measurements of the mass, width, and elasticity published be- fore 1974 are now obsolete and have been omitted. They were last listed in our 1982 edition Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Λ(1670) MASS Λ(1670) MASS Λ(1670) MASS Λ(1670) MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1660 to 1680 (≈ 1670) OUR ESTIMATE 1660 to 1680 (≈ 1670) OUR ESTIMATE 1660 to 1680 (≈ 1670) OUR ESTIMATE 1660 to 1680 (≈ 1670) OUR ESTIMATE 1677.5± 0.8 1 GARCIA-REC...03 DPWA K N multichannel 1673 ± 2 MANLEY 02 DPWA K N multichannel 1670.8± 1.7 KOISO 85 DPWA K - p → Σ π 1667 ± 5 GOPAL 80 DPWA K N → K N 1671 ± 3 ALSTON-... 78 DPWA K N → K N 1670 ± 5 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1675 ± 2 HEPP 76B DPWA K - N → Σ π 1679 ± 1 KANE 74 DPWA K - p → Σ π 1665 ± 5 PREVOST 74 DPWA K - N → Σ (1385) π * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc.

89

b040.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Λ(1670) 1/2 - I (J P ) = 0( 1 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ The measurements of the mass, width, and elasticity published be- NODE=B040 fore 1974 are now obsolete and have been omitted. They were last listed in our 1982 edition Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Λ(1670) MASS Λ(1670) MASS Λ(1670) MASS Λ(1670) MASS NODE=B040M NODE=B040M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1660 to 1680 (≈ 1670) OUR ESTIMATE 1660 to 1680 (≈ 1670) OUR ESTIMATE 1660 to 1680 (≈ 1670) OUR ESTIMATE 1660 to 1680 (≈ 1670) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1677.5 ± 0.8 1 GARCIA-REC...03 DPWA K N multichannel 1673 ± 2 MANLEY 02 DPWA K N multichannel 1670.8 ± 1.7 KOISO 85 DPWA K - p → Σ π 1667 ± 5 GOPAL 80 DPWA K N → K N 1671 ± 3 ALSTON-... 78 DPWA K N → K N 1670 ± 5 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1675 ± 2 HEPP 76B DPWA K - N → Σ π 1679 ± 1 KANE 74 DPWA K - p → Σ π 1665 ± 5 PREVOST 74 DPWA K - N → Σ (1385) π * * * We do

90

b067.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

880) 880) 1/2 + I (J P ) = 1( 1 2 + ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE A P 11 resonance is suggested by several partial-wave analyses, but with wide variations in the mass and other parameters. We list here all claims which lie well above the P 11 Σ (1770). Σ (1880) MASS Σ (1880) MASS Σ (1880) MASS Σ (1880) MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 1880 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1880 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1880 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1880 OUR ESTIMATE 1826± 20 GOPAL 80 DPWA K N → K N 1870± 10 CAMERON 78B DPWA K - p → N K ∗ 1847 or 1863 1 MARTIN 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1960± 30 2 BAILLON 75 IPWA K N → Λ π 1985± 50 VANHORN 75 DPWA K - p → Λ π 0 1898 3 LEA 73 DPWA Multichannel K-matrix ∼ 1850 ARMENTEROS70 IPWA K N → K N 1950± 50 BARBARO-... 70 DPWA K - N → Λ π 1920± 30 LITCHFIELD 70 DPWA K - N → Λ π 1850 BAILEY 69 DPWA K N → K N 1882± 40 SMART 68 DPWA K - N → Λ π Σ (1880) WIDTH Σ (1880) WIDTH Σ (1880) WIDTH Σ (1880)

91

b067.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Σ (1880) 1/2 + I (J P ) = 1( 1 2 + ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE A P 11 resonance is suggested by several partial-wave analyses, but NODE=B067 with wide variations in the mass and other parameters. We list here all claims which lie well above the P 11 Σ (1770). Σ (1880) MASS Σ (1880) MASS Σ (1880) MASS Σ (1880) MASS NODE=B067M NODE=B067M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 1880 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1880 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1880 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1880 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1826 ± 20 GOPAL 80 DPWA K N → K N 1870 ± 10 CAMERON 78B DPWA K - p → N K ∗ 1847 or 1863 1 MARTIN 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1960 ± 30 2 BAILLON 75 IPWA K N → Λ π 1985 ± 50 VANHORN 75 DPWA K - p → Λ π 0 1898 3 LEA 73 DPWA Multichannel K-matrix ∼ 1850 ARMENTEROS70 IPWA K N → K N 1950 ± 50 BARBARO-... 70 DPWA K - N → Λ π 1920 ± 30 LITCHFIELD 70 DPWA K - N → Λ π 1850 BAILEY 69 DPWA K N → K N 1882 ± 40 SMART 68 DPWA K - N → Λ

92

b001.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESTIMATE 1840 OUR ESTIMATE 1840 OUR ESTIMATE UNCHECKED 1798 or 1802 1 MARTIN 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1720 30 2 BAILLON 75 IPWA K N 1925 200...

93

m168.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J.Z. Bai et al. (BES Collab.) ANISOVICH 99K PL B468 309 A.V. Anisovich et al. BUGG 95 PL B353 378 D.V. Bugg et al. (LOQM, PNPI, WASH) HASAN 94 PL B334 215 A. Hasan, D.V. Bugg (LOQM...

94

LANGMUIR TURBULENCE AND SOLAR RADIO BURSTS F. B. RIZZATO1,2, A. C.-L. CHIAN2,3, M. V. ALVES3, R. ERICHSEN1, S. R. LOPES4,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weather and monitoring the space environment. For example, type-III solar radio bursts are producedLANGMUIR TURBULENCE AND SOLAR RADIO BURSTS F. B. RIZZATO1,2, A. C.-L. CHIAN2,3, M. V. ALVES3, R beam-plasma instability play a fundamental role in the generation of solar radio bursts. We report

95

b044.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/2 3/2 - I (J P ) = 1( 3 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ For most results published before 1974 (they are now obsolete), see our 1982 edition Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Results from production experiments are listed separately in the next entry. Σ (1670) MASS Σ (1670) MASS Σ (1670) MASS Σ (1670) MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1665 to 1685 (≈ 1670) OUR ESTIMATE 1665 to 1685 (≈ 1670) OUR ESTIMATE 1665 to 1685 (≈ 1670) OUR ESTIMATE 1665 to 1685 (≈ 1670) OUR ESTIMATE 1673 ± 1 GAO 12 DPWA K N → Λ π 1665.1± 4.1 KOISO 85 DPWA K - p → Σ π 1682 ± 5 GOPAL 80 DPWA K N → K N 1679 ± 10 ALSTON-... 78 DPWA K N → K N 1670 ± 5 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1670 ± 6 HEPP 76B DPWA K - N → Σ π 1685 ± 20 BAILLON 75 IPWA K N → Λ π 1659 + 12 - 5 VANHORN 75 DPWA K - p → Λ π 0 1670 ± 2 KANE 74 DPWA K - p → Σ π * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1667 or 1668 1 MARTIN 77

96

b055.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

90) 90) 3/2 - I (J P ) = 0( 3 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ The measurements of the mass, width, and elasticity published be- fore 1974 are now obsolete and have been omitted. They were last listed in our 1982 edition Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Λ(1690) MASS Λ(1690) MASS Λ(1690) MASS Λ(1690) MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1685 to 1695 (≈ 1690) OUR ESTIMATE 1685 to 1695 (≈ 1690) OUR ESTIMATE 1685 to 1695 (≈ 1690) OUR ESTIMATE 1685 to 1695 (≈ 1690) OUR ESTIMATE 1695.7± 2.6 KOISO 85 DPWA K - p → Σ π 1690 ± 5 GOPAL 80 DPWA K N → K N 1692 ± 5 ALSTON-... 78 DPWA K N → K N 1690 ± 5 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1690 ± 3 HEPP 76B DPWA K - N → Σ π 1689 ± 1 KANE 74 DPWA K - p → Σ π * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1687 or 1689 1 MARTIN 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1692 ± 4 CARROLL 76 DPWA Isospin-0 total σ Λ(1690) WIDTH Λ(1690) WIDTH Λ(1690) WIDTH

97

b055.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Λ(1690) 3/2 - I (J P ) = 0( 3 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ The measurements of the mass, width, and elasticity published be- NODE=B055 fore 1974 are now obsolete and have been omitted. They were last listed in our 1982 edition Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Λ(1690) MASS Λ(1690) MASS Λ(1690) MASS Λ(1690) MASS NODE=B055M NODE=B055M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1685 to 1695 (≈ 1690) OUR ESTIMATE 1685 to 1695 (≈ 1690) OUR ESTIMATE 1685 to 1695 (≈ 1690) OUR ESTIMATE 1685 to 1695 (≈ 1690) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1695.7 ± 2.6 KOISO 85 DPWA K - p → Σ π 1690 ± 5 GOPAL 80 DPWA K N → K N 1692 ± 5 ALSTON-... 78 DPWA K N → K N 1690 ± 5 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1690 ± 3 HEPP 76B DPWA K - N → Σ π 1689 ± 1 KANE 74 DPWA K - p → Σ π * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1687 or 1689 1 MARTIN 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1692 ± 4 CARROLL 76 DPWA Isospin-0

98

NEPA Determination: LM-12a-12  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Additional Considerations Amendment to LM #12-12, Routine and Non-Routine Activities at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Office Site

99

OOMMF 1.2a3 Patches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (Thanks to RP Boardman for reporting this.) Solution: Apply this patch, and if you haven't already, also the the patch at item 3, and rerun pimake. ...

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Data:Ea6a12a3-4a11-4d01-8ca1-0be1b3e38aeb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a12a3-4a11-4d01-8ca1-0be1b3e38aeb a12a3-4a11-4d01-8ca1-0be1b3e38aeb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northern Plains Electric Coop Effective date: 2012/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: SMALL RENEWABLE ENERGY PURCHASE RATE Sector: Description: Availability This rate is applicable for a member-owned renewable energy generating facility with a capacity less than 150 KW which is properly interconnected to the Northern Plains Electric Cooperative electrical system (Qualifying Facility) and which the generated power is sold to Northern Plains. Type of Service Single or three phase, 60 hertz, at available primary or secondary voltages.

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101

Data:04c64d7f-c7c7-43f6-aca1-2a7ab06dd02d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4d7f-c7c7-43f6-aca1-2a7ab06dd02d 4d7f-c7c7-43f6-aca1-2a7ab06dd02d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Delta Montrose Electric Assn Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: LARGE COMMERCIAL NET METERING Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.dmea.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=95&Itemid=72 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

102

Data:F157faf1-12a5-4c9e-84de-b1ea0d72e277 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

F157faf1-12a5-4c9e-84de-b1ea0d72e277 F157faf1-12a5-4c9e-84de-b1ea0d72e277 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: South Central Indiana REMC Effective date: 2010/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential & Farm Rate - RS - HP Sector: Residential Description: Availability Available as an optional rate to any residential or farm consumer of the Corporation for singlephase electric service at a single delivery point who has an air source heat pump with natural gas or LP gas backup. The air source heat pump system must not have any auxiliary emergency resistance heat installed. A representative of the Corporation must certify the air source heat pump as meeting the requirements of this rate schedule. A Demand Response Unit (DRU) must be installed that allows for control of the air conditioning load during peak periods as determined by the Corporation. The rated capacity of any motor served under this schedule in excess of ten (10) horsepower shall be subject to the approval of the Corporation. A consumer choosing this optional rate must remain on the rate for a minimum of six months. Consumers opting to change to a different rate schedule after the six month minimum period must wait a minimum of six months before returning to this optional rate.

103

b036.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Λ(1800) 1/2 - I (J P ) = 0( 1 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗ This is the second resonance in the S 01 wave, the first being the NODE=B036 Λ(1670). Λ(1800) MASS Λ(1800) MASS Λ(1800) MASS Λ(1800) MASS NODE=B036M NODE=B036M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1720 to 1850 (≈ 1800) OUR ESTIMATE 1720 to 1850 (≈ 1800) OUR ESTIMATE 1720 to 1850 (≈ 1800) OUR ESTIMATE 1720 to 1850 (≈ 1800) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1845 ± 10 MANLEY 02 DPWA K N multichannel 1841 ± 10 GOPAL 80 DPWA K N → K N 1725 ± 20 ALSTON-... 78 DPWA K N → K N 1825 ± 20 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1830 ± 20 LANGBEIN 72 IPWA K N multichannel * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1767 or 1842 1 MARTIN 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1780 KIM 71 DPWA K-matrix analysis 1872 ± 10 BRICMAN 70B DPWA K N → K N Λ(1800) WIDTH Λ(1800) WIDTH Λ(1800) WIDTH Λ(1800) WIDTH NODE=B036W NODE=B036W VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT

104

b036.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

00) 00) 1/2 - I (J P ) = 0( 1 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗ This is the second resonance in the S 01 wave, the first being the Λ(1670). Λ(1800) MASS Λ(1800) MASS Λ(1800) MASS Λ(1800) MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1720 to 1850 (≈ 1800) OUR ESTIMATE 1720 to 1850 (≈ 1800) OUR ESTIMATE 1720 to 1850 (≈ 1800) OUR ESTIMATE 1720 to 1850 (≈ 1800) OUR ESTIMATE 1845± 10 MANLEY 02 DPWA K N multichannel 1841± 10 GOPAL 80 DPWA K N → K N 1725± 20 ALSTON-... 78 DPWA K N → K N 1825± 20 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1830± 20 LANGBEIN 72 IPWA K N multichannel * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1767 or 1842 1 MARTIN 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1780 KIM 71 DPWA K-matrix analysis 1872± 10 BRICMAN 70B DPWA K N → K N Λ(1800) WIDTH Λ(1800) WIDTH Λ(1800) WIDTH Λ(1800) WIDTH VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 200 to 400 (≈ 300) OUR ESTIMATE 200 to 400 (≈ 300) OUR ESTIMATE 200

105

b001.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1840 OUR ESTIMATE 1840 OUR ESTIMATE 1840 OUR ESTIMATE 1798 or 1802 1 MARTIN 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1720 30 2 BAILLON 75 IPWA K N 1925 200 VANHORN...

106

trinity-aa-use-case-v1.2a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trinity Trinity Use Case Scenarios ( SAND 2 013---2941 P U nclassified, U nlimited R elease) Page 1 of 9 Trinity / N ERSC---8 U se C ase S cenarios April 5 , 2 013 This d ocument p rovides a dditional v iews o f a nticipated u sage s cenarios f or t wo o f the a dvanced a rchitecture f eatures o f T rinity, t he b urst b uffer a nd p ower/energy measurement a nd c ontrol. T his d ocument m ay c hange as our understanding of needs a nd t echnologies e volves. T hese scenarios are not intended to include all intended u ses o f t hese t echnologies. Format: E mbedded i n t he p rimary s cenario d escriptions a re n umbered t ags r eferring t o requirements ( listed f ollowing e ach s cenario) t hat a re i nferred b y t he s cenario. T he r eader should r ead t he s pecific r equirement, s pecified b y n umber, a t t he t ime i t i s e ncountered

107

OOMMF 1.2a4pre snapshots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This code requires Tcl/Tk. We recommend the latest stable (ie, not alpha or beta) release of Tcl and Tk concurrent with the snapshot. ...

2011-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

b048.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

250) 250) I (J P ) = 1(? ? ) Status: ∗∗∗ Results from partial-wave analyses are too weak to warrant sep- arating them from the production and cross-section experiments. LASINSKI 71 in K N using a Pomeron + resonances model, and DEBELLEFON 76, DEBELLEFON 77, and DEBELLEFON 78 in energy-dependent partial-wave analyses of K N → Λ π, Σ π, and N K , respectively, suggest two resonances around this mass. Σ (2250) MASS Σ (2250) MASS Σ (2250) MASS Σ (2250) MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2210 to 2280 (≈ 2250) OUR ESTIMATE 2210 to 2280 (≈ 2250) OUR ESTIMATE 2210 to 2280 (≈ 2250) OUR ESTIMATE 2210 to 2280 (≈ 2250) OUR ESTIMATE 2270± 50 DEBELLEFON 78 DPWA D 5 wave 2210± 30 DEBELLEFON 78 DPWA G 9 wave 2275± 20 DEBELLEFON 77 DPWA D 5 wave 2215± 20 DEBELLEFON 77 DPWA G 9 wave 2300± 30 1 DEBELLEFON 75B HBC K - p → Ξ ∗0 K 0 2251 + 30 - 20 VANHORN 75 DPWA K - p → Λ π 0 , F 5 wave 2280± 14 AGUILAR-...

109

b060.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

60 60 Λ(1890) 3/2 + I (J P ) = 0( 3 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ For results published before 1974 (they are now obsolete), see our NODE=B060 1982 edition Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). The J P = 3/2 + assignment is consistent with all available data (including polarization) and recent partial-wave analyses. The dom- inant inelastic modes remain unknown. Λ(1890) MASS Λ(1890) MASS Λ(1890) MASS Λ(1890) MASS NODE=B060M NODE=B060M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1850 to 1910 (≈ 1890) OUR ESTIMATE 1850 to 1910 (≈ 1890) OUR ESTIMATE 1850 to 1910 (≈ 1890) OUR ESTIMATE 1850 to 1910 (≈ 1890) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1897 ± 5 GOPAL 80 DPWA K N → K N 1908 ± 10 ALSTON-... 78 DPWA K N → K N 1900 ± 5 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1894 ± 10 HEMINGWAY 75 DPWA K - p → K N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1856 or 1868 1 MARTIN 77 DPWA K N multichannel

110

Citation: D.E. Groom  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

N(1535) N(1535) S 11 I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 1 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 are now obsolete and have been omitted. They may be found in our 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B (1982). N(1535) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1535) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1535) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(1535) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1520 to 1555 (≈ 1535) OUR ESTIMATE 1520 to 1555 (≈ 1535) OUR ESTIMATE 1520 to 1555 (≈ 1535) OUR ESTIMATE 1520 to 1555 (≈ 1535) OUR ESTIMATE 1534± 7 MANLEY 92 IPWA π N → π N & N π π 1550±40 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 1526± 7 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1532± 5 ARMSTRONG 99B DPWA γ ∗ p → p η 1549± 2 ABAEV 96 DPWA π - p → η n 1525±10 ARNDT 96 IPWA γ N → π N 1535 ARNDT 95 DPWA π N → N π 1542± 6 BATINIC 95 DPWA π N → N π, N η 1537 BATINIC 95B DPWA π N →

111

b032.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Σ (1620) 1/2 - I (J P ) = 1( 1 2 - ) Status: ∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE The S 11 state at 1697 MeV reported by VANHORN 75 is tentatively NODE=B032 listed under the Σ (1750). CARROLL 76 sees two bumps in the isospin-1 total cross section near this mass. GAO 12 sees no evidence for this resonance. Production experiments are listed separately in the next entry. Σ (1620) MASS Σ (1620) MASS Σ (1620) MASS Σ (1620) MASS NODE=B032M NODE=B032M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 1620 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1620 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1620 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1620 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1600 ± 6 1 MORRIS 78 DPWA K - n → Λ π - 1608 ± 5 2 CARROLL 76 DPWA Isospin-1 total σ OCCUR=2 1633 ± 10 3 CARROLL 76 DPWA Isospin-1 total σ 1630 ± 10 LANGBEIN 72 IPWA K N multichannel 1620 KIM 71 DPWA K-matrix analysis Σ (1620) WIDTH Σ (1620) WIDTH Σ (1620) WIDTH Σ (1620) WIDTH NODE=B032W NODE=B032W VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT

112

b088.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Σ (2080) 3/2 + I (J P ) = 1( 3 2 + ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Suggested by some but not all partial-wave analyses across this re- NODE=B088 gion. Σ (2080) MASS Σ (2080) MASS Σ (2080) MASS Σ (2080) MASS NODE=B088M NODE=B088M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 2080 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2080 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2080 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2080 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 2091 ± 7 1 CORDEN 76 DPWA K - n → Λ π - 2070 to 2120 DEBELLEFON 76 IPWA K - p → Λ π 0 2120 ± 40 BAILLON 75 IPWA K N → Λ π (sol. 1) OCCUR=2 2140 ± 40 BAILLON 75 IPWA K N → Λ π (sol. 2) 2082 ± 4 COX 70 DPWA See CORDEN 76 2070 ± 30 LITCHFIELD 70 DPWA K - N → Λ π Σ (2080) WIDTH Σ (2080) WIDTH Σ (2080) WIDTH Σ (2080) WIDTH NODE=B088W NODE=B088W VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 186 ± 48 1 CORDEN 76 DPWA K - n → Λ π - 100 DEBELLEFON 76 IPWA K - p → Λ π 0 240 ± 50 BAILLON 75 IPWA K N → Λ π (sol. 1) OCCUR=2 200 ± 50 BAILLON 75

113

b000.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

80) 80) 3/2 - I (J P ) = 1( 3 2 - ) Status: ∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Seen in the isospin-1 K N cross section at BNL (LI 73, CARROLL 76) and in a partial-wave analysis of K - p → Λ π 0 for c.m. energies 1560-1600 MeV by LITCHFIELD 74. LITCHFIELD 74 finds J P = 3/2 - . Not seen by ENGLER 78 or by CAMERON 78C (with larger statistics in K 0 L p → Λ π + and Σ 0 π + ). Neither OLMSTED 04 (in K - p → Λ π 0 ) nor PRAKHOV 04 (in K - p → Λ π 0 π 0 ) see any evidence for this state. Σ (1580) MASS Σ (1580) MASS Σ (1580) MASS Σ (1580) MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 1580 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1580 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1580 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1580 OUR ESTIMATE 1583± 4 1 CARROLL 76 DPWA Isospin-1 total σ 1582± 4 2 LITCHFIELD 74 DPWA K - p → Λ π 0 Σ (1580) WIDTH Σ (1580) WIDTH Σ (1580) WIDTH Σ (1580) WIDTH VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 15 1 CARROLL 76 DPWA Isospin-1 total σ 11± 4 2 LITCHFIELD 74 DPWA K - p → Λ π 0 Σ (1580)

114

b100.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Σ (1770) 1/2 + I (J P ) = 1( 1 2 + ) Status: ∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Evidence for this state now rests solely on solution 1 of BAILLON 75, NODE=B100 (see the footnotes) but the Λ π partial-wave amplitudes of this solu- tion are in disagreement with amplitudes from most other Λ π anal- yses. Σ (1770) MASS Σ (1770) MASS Σ (1770) MASS Σ (1770) MASS NODE=B100M NODE=B100M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 1770 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1770 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1770 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1770 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1738 ± 10 1 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1770 ± 20 2 BAILLON 75 IPWA K N → Λ π 1772 3 KANE 72 DPWA K - p → Σ π Σ (1770) WIDTH Σ (1770) WIDTH Σ (1770) WIDTH Σ (1770) WIDTH NODE=B100W NODE=B100W VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 72 ± 10 1 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 80 ± 30 2 BAILLON 75 IPWA K N → Λ π 80 3 KANE 72 DPWA K - p → Σ π Σ (1770) DECAY MODES Σ (1770) DECAY MODES Σ (1770)

115

Table HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.5 1.6 1.2 1.0 1.1 1.1 0.8 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.3 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 1.5 2.4 2.1 2.8 3.0 8.5 8.8 New England .............................. 5.4 0.4 0.7 0.4 0.8 0.9 2.3 11.3 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 1.1 1.7 1.7 2.0 2.2 6.2 11.2 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 2.8 3.7 3.6 2.9 3.5 8.1 10.2 East North Central ...................... 17.1 2.0 2.5 2.5 2.0 2.6 5.5 11.9

116

Notes 12. (a) Annular pressure (damper) seals, and (b) Hydrostatic journal bearings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mechanism of centering stiffness in seals. Force coefficients for short-length pressure seals. Design of annular seals: swirl brakes, impact on rotordynamics. Hydrostatic bearings in modern applications. The principle of hydrostatic lubrication. Effects of recess volume-fluid compressibility on force coefficients for operation at low and high frequencies. Applications of hydrostatic bearings

San Andres, Luis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

diff -crN oommf-1.2a2/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... renamed the port.h header file to ocport.h. + - support for Tcl/Tk up through release 8.4.1. +. ... support for Tcl/Tk up through release 8.4.1. +. ...

118

diff -crN oommf-1.2a0/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES  

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... 31,37 ****. with pre-compiled executables compatible with Tcl/Tk 8.3.x. Type. ... tclsh83 oommf.tcl pimake upgrade. tclsh83 oommf.tcl. ...

119

Table 8.12a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

7 East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement (ECAR). 20 United States excluding Alaska and Hawaii. 8 ECAR, MAAC, and MAIN dissolved at the ...

120

CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A  

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follow at a distance, are energy from Landfill Gas (LFG) extraction, co-incineration of SRF (Solid; BEP ­ Biomass Energy Plants; LFG ­ Landfill Gas; WtE ­ Waste-to-Energy 1 Excluding agricultural policy would be even more ambitious, replacing landfilling). Both the supply of renewable electricity

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121

Table HC1-12a. Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region, 2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.7 1.1 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 -- -- -- NF New England ............................................. 5.4 -- -- -- NF Middle Atlantic ........................................... 14.8 -- -- -- NF Midwest ....................................................... 24.5 -- -- -- NF East North Central ..................................... 17.1 -- -- -- NF West North Central ....................................

122

J12: A Modified Pidgeon Process for Energy Savings and Low ...  

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A18: Effect of Local Alendronate Delivery on In Vivo Osteogenesis From PCL ... A7: On-the-fly System Design for High Precision/Ultra Fast/Wide Area Fabrication .... C19: Dissolution Behavior of Cu Under Bump Metallization in Ball Grid Array ... High Volume and Fast Turnaround Automated Inline TEM Sample Preparation.

123

b041.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

00) 00) 7/2 - I (J P ) = 0( 7 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Discovered by COOL 66 and by WOHL 66. Most of the results published before 1973 are now obsolete and have been omitted. They may be found in our 1982 edition Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). This entry only includes results from partial-wave analyses. Param- eters of peaks seen in cross sections and in invariant-mass distribu- tions around 2100 MeV used to be listed in a separate entry immedi- ately following. It may be found in our 1986 edition Physics Letters 170B 170B 170B 170B 1 (1986). Λ(2100) MASS Λ(2100) MASS Λ(2100) MASS Λ(2100) MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2090 to 2110 (≈ 2100) OUR ESTIMATE 2090 to 2110 (≈ 2100) OUR ESTIMATE 2090 to 2110 (≈ 2100) OUR ESTIMATE 2090 to 2110 (≈ 2100) OUR ESTIMATE 2104± 10 GOPAL 80 DPWA K N → K N 2106± 30 DEBELLEFON 78 DPWA K N → K N 2110± 10 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 2105±

124

b046.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15) 15) 5/2 + I (J P ) = 1( 5 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Discovered by COOL 66. For results published before 1974 (they are now obsolete), see our 1982 edition Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). This entry only includes results from partial-wave analyses. Parame- ters of peaks seen in cross sections and invariant-mass distributions in this region used to be listed in in a separate entry immediately following. They may be found in our 1986 edition Physics Letters 170B 170B 170B 170B 1 (1986). Σ (1915) MASS Σ (1915) MASS Σ (1915) MASS Σ (1915) MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1900 to 1935 (≈ 1915) OUR ESTIMATE 1900 to 1935 (≈ 1915) OUR ESTIMATE 1900 to 1935 (≈ 1915) OUR ESTIMATE 1900 to 1935 (≈ 1915) OUR ESTIMATE 1937± 20 ALSTON-... 78 DPWA K N → K N 1894± 5 1 CORDEN 77C K - n → Σ π 1909± 5 1 CORDEN 77C K - n → Σ π 1920± 10 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 1900± 4 2 CORDEN 76 DPWA

125

b047.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Σ (2030) 7/2 + I (J P ) = 1( 7 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Discovered by COOL 66 and by WOHL 66. For most results pub- NODE=B047 lished before 1974 (they are now obsolete), see our 1982 edition Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). This entry only includes results from partial-wave analyses. Parame- ters of peaks seen in cross sections and invariant-mass distributions around 2030 MeV may be found in our 1984 edition, Reviews of Modern Physics 56 56 56 56 S1 (1984). Σ (2030) MASS Σ (2030) MASS Σ (2030) MASS Σ (2030) MASS NODE=B047M NODE=B047M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2025 to 2040 (≈ 2030) OUR ESTIMATE 2025 to 2040 (≈ 2030) OUR ESTIMATE 2025 to 2040 (≈ 2030) OUR ESTIMATE 2025 to 2040 (≈ 2030) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 2036 ± 5 GOPAL 80 DPWA K N → K N 2038 ± 10 CORDEN 77B K - N → N K ∗ 2040 ± 5 GOPAL 77 DPWA K N multichannel 2030 ± 3 1 CORDEN 76 DPWA K - n → Λ π - 2035 ± 15 BAILLON

126

b112.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

25) 25) 3/2 - I (J P ) = 0( 3 2 - ) Status: ∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE BACCARI 77 finds this state with either J P = 3/2 - or 3/2 + in a energy-dependent partial-wave analyses of K - p → Λ ω from 2070 to 2436 MeV. A subsequent semi-energy-independent analysis from threshold to 2436 MeV selects 3/2 - . DEBELLEFON 78 (same group) also sees this state in an energy-dependent partial-wave anal- ysis of K - p → K N data, and finds J P = 3/2 - or 3/2 + . They again prefer J P = 3/2 - , but only on the basis of model-dependent considerations. Λ(2325) MASS Λ(2325) MASS Λ(2325) MASS Λ(2325) MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 2325 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2325 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2325 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2325 OUR ESTIMATE 2342± 30 DEBELLEFON 78 DPWA K N → K N 2327± 20 BACCARI 77 DPWA K - p → Λ ω Λ(2325) WIDTH Λ(2325) WIDTH Λ(2325) WIDTH Λ(2325) WIDTH VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 177± 40 DEBELLEFON 78 DPWA

127

b090.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20) 20) 9/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 9 2 + ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Most of the results published before 1975 were last included in our 1982 edition, Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). Some further obsolete results published before 1980 were last included in our 2006 edition, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). N(2220) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2220) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2220) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2220) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2200 to 2300 (≈ 2250) OUR ESTIMATE 2200 to 2300 (≈ 2250) OUR ESTIMATE 2200 to 2300 (≈ 2250) OUR ESTIMATE 2200 to 2300 (≈ 2250) OUR ESTIMATE 2316.3± 2.9 ARNDT 06 DPWA π N → π N, η N 2230 ± 80 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 2205 ± 10 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N 2300 ± 100 HENDRY 78 MPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2270 ± 11 ARNDT 04 DPWA π N → π N, η N 2258 ARNDT 95 DPWA π N → N π N(2220) BREIT-WIGNER

128

file://C:\Documents%20and%20Settings\VM3\My%20Documents\hc6-12a  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2a. Usage Indicators by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 ____________________________________________________________________________________________ | | | | | West Census Region | | |___________________________________| | | | | | | | Census Division | | | |_______________________|

129

Data:12a700f2-b169-42ae-bcdf-25646587ea4b | Open Energy Information  

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-b169-42ae-bcdf-25646587ea4b -b169-42ae-bcdf-25646587ea4b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Loup River Public Power Dist Effective date: 2013/01/15 End date if known: Rate name: District Owned Lighting EMH 11000 Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.loup.com/customersvc/rates.asp Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

130

Data:12a45141-7972-4ec8-a2dc-37fedc8133d3 | Open Energy Information  

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5141-7972-4ec8-a2dc-37fedc8133d3 5141-7972-4ec8-a2dc-37fedc8133d3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Ameren Illinois Company Effective date: 2010/11/19 End date if known: Rate name: DS-2 Zone 2 - Small General Delivery Service 600V to 15kV Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY Service under this Rate is available for any eligible Non-Residential Customer within the territory served by Company that meets the following criteria: Customers served under this Rate shall have a maximum monthly Demand of less than 150 kilowatts (kW) as qualified in the Delivery Service Rate Reassignment section. A Customer without a demand meter installed, but with an average usage of less than 1,200 kWh per day during each monthly billing period will be normally assumed to have a maximum monthly Demand of less than 150 kW. Where Customer's average daily usage is 1,200 kWh per day or more in any monthly billing period, Company may install a demand meter at Company's expense to determine if Customer remains eligible for service under this Rate.

131

Generalized redundancies for time series analysis Dean Prichard 1;2a and James Theiler 2;3  

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, Nonproliferation and International Security Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 3 Santa

Theiler, James

132

diff -crN oommf12a3/app/mmdisp/scripts/avf2ovf.tcl oommf ...  

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... REAL8m>(step_count); Happ.push_back(((1-t)*h0) + (t*h1)); } + if(step_count> 0) Happ.push_back(h1); + } + vector::iterator it = Happ ...

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

133

Parametrization of a reactive force field for aluminum hydride J. G. O. Ojwang,1,2,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the total energy of atomic hydro- gen instead of that of molecular hydrogen. Therefore, in Table VIII we of hydro- gen desorption in the two instances are similar. In Fig. 5 ii there is a slight rise in energy is the development of solid-state hydrogen storage media for vehicles. The United States' Department of Energy Do

Goddard III, William A.

134

b112.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Λ(2325) 3/2 - I (J P ) = 0( 3 2 - ) Status: ∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE BACCARI 77 finds this state with either J P = 3/2 - or 3/2 + in a NODE=B112 energy-dependent partial-wave analyses of K - p → Λ ω from 2070 to 2436 MeV. A subsequent semi-energy-independent analysis from threshold to 2436 MeV selects 3/2 - . DEBELLEFON 78 (same group) also sees this state in an energy-dependent partial-wave anal- ysis of K - p → K N data, and finds J P = 3/2 - or 3/2 + . They again prefer J P = 3/2 - , but only on the basis of model-dependent considerations. Λ(2325) MASS Λ(2325) MASS Λ(2325) MASS Λ(2325) MASS NODE=B112M NODE=B112M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 2325 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2325 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2325 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2325 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 2342 ± 30 DEBELLEFON 78 DPWA K N → K N 2327 ± 20 BACCARI 77 DPWA K - p → Λ ω Λ(2325) WIDTH Λ(2325) WIDTH Λ(2325) WIDTH Λ(2325) WIDTH NODE=B112W

135

b000.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Σ (1580) 3/2 - I (J P ) = 1( 3 2 - ) Status: ∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Seen in the isospin-1 K N cross section at BNL (LI 73, CARROLL 76) NODE=B000 and in a partial-wave analysis of K - p → Λ π 0 for c.m. energies 1560-1600 MeV by LITCHFIELD 74. LITCHFIELD 74 finds J P = 3/2 - . Not seen by ENGLER 78 or by CAMERON 78C (with larger statistics in K 0 L p → Λ π + and Σ 0 π + ). Neither OLMSTED 04 (in K - p → Λ π 0 ) nor PRAKHOV 04 (in K - p → Λ π 0 π 0 ) see any evidence for this state. Σ (1580) MASS Σ (1580) MASS Σ (1580) MASS Σ (1580) MASS NODE=B000M NODE=B000M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 1580 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1580 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1580 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1580 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1583 ± 4 1 CARROLL 76 DPWA Isospin-1 total σ 1582 ± 4 2 LITCHFIELD 74 DPWA K - p → Λ π 0 Σ (1580) WIDTH Σ (1580) WIDTH Σ (1580) WIDTH Σ (1580) WIDTH NODE=B000W NODE=B000W VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT

136

b132.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

00) 00) 1/2 + I (J P ) = 1 2 ( 1 2 + ) Status: ∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. N(2100) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2100) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2100) BREIT-WIGNER MASS N(2100) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 2100 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2100 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2100 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2100 OUR ESTIMATE 2125± 75 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 2050± 20 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2157± 42 BATINIC 10 DPWA π N → N π, N η 2068± 3 + 15 - 40 ABLIKIM 06K BES2 J/ψ → (p π - ) n 2084± 93 VRANA 00 DPWA Multichannel 1986± 26 + 10 - 30 PLOETZKE 98 SPEC γ p → p η ' (958) N(2100) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2100) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2100) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH N(2100) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 260± 100 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 200± 30 HOEHLER

137

Data:12a99515-0eda-4991-8ebe-b838e14266e0 | Open Energy Information  

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15-0eda-4991-8ebe-b838e14266e0 15-0eda-4991-8ebe-b838e14266e0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Columbus Southern Power Co Effective date: 2012/03/09 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Storage Water Heating Energy Charge Sector: Residential Description: Storage Water Heating Provision: Availability of this provision is limited to those customers served under this provision as of December 31,2000.If the customer installs a Company approved storage water heating system which consumes electrical energy only during off-peak hours as specified by the Company and stores hot water for use during on-peak hours, the following shall apply: (a) For minimum capacity of 80 gallons, the last 300 KWH of use in any month shall be billed at the storage water heating energy charge. (Schedule Code 016)

138

Data:D12a4ee9-489c-4929-96b2-6324a0b8e925 | Open Energy Information  

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ee9-489c-4929-96b2-6324a0b8e925 ee9-489c-4929-96b2-6324a0b8e925 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Raton Public Service Company Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights 3- Prompt Payment Discount Sector: Lighting Description: Security lights are available to all (except as noted) residential, commercial and industrial customers served by the Raton Public Service Company for outside lighting purposes at the voltage and phase of the company's distribution system. RPS owns fixture and pole, power is furnished by customer. RPS furnishes parts & service.

139

Data:65a49a12-a982-4cf5-8447-6f7ea00191e7 | Open Energy Information  

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a982-4cf5-8447-6f7ea00191e7 a982-4cf5-8447-6f7ea00191e7 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Anoka, Minnesota (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Parallel Generation Rate Time of Day Purchase Rate Industrial Sector: Industrial Description: Less than 40KW Source or reference: Rate Binder Kelly 3 ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

140

Data:6e12a440-93b5-4896-a479-0a2a32a05d2a | Open Energy Information  

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2a440-93b5-4896-a479-0a2a32a05d2a 2a440-93b5-4896-a479-0a2a32a05d2a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Intermountain Rural Elec Assn Effective date: End date if known: 2013/02/01 Rate name: Residential Time of Use (A-TOU) Sector: Residential Description: Residential Time of Use rate. Assumes all adjustments are included. Source or reference: Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

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141

Data:12a72f65-3385-4f7c-ab20-1355dd6f6a6b | Open Energy Information  

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-3385-4f7c-ab20-1355dd6f6a6b -3385-4f7c-ab20-1355dd6f6a6b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Tri-County Elec Member Corp Effective date: 2008/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting HPS Underground Flood 400 W Sector: Lighting Description: Assuming Existing Pole Source or reference: http://www.tri-countyemc.com/skins/userfiles/file/Outdoor_lighting_1_2_3.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

142

Data:0b12a8f0-ce39-41bc-b6cf-16606647c57c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a8f0-ce39-41bc-b6cf-16606647c57c a8f0-ce39-41bc-b6cf-16606647c57c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Cuba City, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/10/14 End date if known: Rate name: Gs-1 General Service Three Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0765 per kilowatt-hour.

143

Data:F4d71c12-a075-4e42-ab03-ab9047022664 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a075-4e42-ab03-ab9047022664 a075-4e42-ab03-ab9047022664 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Borough of Kutztown, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: INSTITIONAL SERVICE RATE120000 Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.kutztownboro.org/kutztown/uploads/ElectricRatesJanuary2012.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

144

Data:B12a96b8-e5dc-4002-a47e-f82fe67c5828 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b8-e5dc-4002-a47e-f82fe67c5828 b8-e5dc-4002-a47e-f82fe67c5828 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: General Service Sector: Residential Description: Availability Available for all non-commercial service Source or reference: Rate Binder A Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

145

Data:424a30a1-d12a-4cb7-b0f4-9285e6014872 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2a-4cb7-b0f4-9285e6014872 2a-4cb7-b0f4-9285e6014872 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kit Carson Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2011/09/22 End date if known: Rate name: Market Based Rate Schedule Sector: Industrial Description: Available to all consumers within the Utility's service area who have entered into a contract, with a term of at least one year, for demand of 1,000 kW or more. Service shall be supplied through a point of delivery and measured through primary metering. Source or reference: www.kitcarson.com Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW)

146

Data:12a1bed7-432b-4810-83de-351ba5b1d371 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-432b-4810-83de-351ba5b1d371 -432b-4810-83de-351ba5b1d371 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Tipton Municipal Electric Util Effective date: 2004/08/13 End date if known: Rate name: Rate E- Outdoor Lighting Service: 400 Watt Metal Halide Sector: Lighting Description: Add $1.15 per month, if pole installation is required. Source or reference: Rates Binder 1, Illinois State University Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

147

Data:175de12a-c7bb-4312-8cd7-5013d702e8e6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2a-c7bb-4312-8cd7-5013d702e8e6 2a-c7bb-4312-8cd7-5013d702e8e6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Shelby, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Schedule B- Three Phase Sector: Description: Delivery Voltages: $0.15/kVA Source or reference: http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Ohio/shelby_oh/parttenstreetsutilitiesandpublicservices/titlefour-utilities/chapter1050electricity?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:shelby_oh$anc=JD_1050.02 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

148

ZPR-3 Assembly 12 : A cylindrical assembly of highly enriched uranium, depleted uranium and graphite with an average {sup 235}U enrichment of 21 atom %.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over a period of 30 years, more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited for nuclear data validation and to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. A number of the Argonne ZPR/ZPPR critical assemblies have been evaluated as ICSBEP and IRPhEP benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. ZPR-3 Assembly 12 (ZPR-3/12) was designed as a fast reactor physics benchmark experiment with an average core {sup 235}U enrichment of approximately 21 at.%. Approximately 68.9% of the total fissions in this assembly occur above 100 keV, approximately 31.1% occur below 100 keV, and essentially none below 0.625 eV - thus the classification as a 'fast' assembly. This assembly is Fast Reactor Benchmark No. 9 in the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) Benchmark Specifications and has historically been used as a data validation benchmark assembly. Loading of ZPR-3 Assembly 12 began in late Jan. 1958, and the Assembly 12 program ended in Feb. 1958. The core consisted of highly enriched uranium (HEU) plates, depleted uranium plates and graphite plates loaded into stainless steel drawers which were inserted into the central square stainless steel tubes of a 31 x 31 matrix on a split table machine. The core unit cell consisted of two columns of 0.125 in.-wide (3.175 mm) HEU plates, seven columns of 0.125 in.-wide depleted uranium plates and seven columns of 0.125 in.-wide graphite plates. The length of each column was 9 in. (228.6 mm) in each half of the core. The graphite plates were included to produce a softer neutron spectrum that would be more characteristic of a large power reactor. The axial blanket consisted of 12 in. (304.8 mm) of depleted uranium behind the core. The thickness of the radial blanket was approximately 12 in. and the length of the radial blanket in each half of the matrix was 21 in. (533.4 mm). The assembly geometry approximated a right circular cylinder as closely as the square matrix tubes allowed. According to the logbook and loading records for ZPR-3/12, the reference critical configuration was loading 10 which was critical on Feb. 5, 1958. The subsequent loadings were very similar but less clean for criticality because there were modifications made to accommodate reactor physics measurements other than criticality. Accordingly, ZPR-3/12 loading 10 was selected as the only configuration for this benchmark. As documented below, it was determined to be acceptable as a criticality safety benchmark experiment. An accurate transformation to a simplified model is needed to make any ZPR assembly a practical criticality-safety benchmark. There is simply too much geometric detail in an exact (as-built) model of a ZPR assembly, even a clean core such as ZPR-3/12 loading 10. The transformation must reduce the detail to a practical level without masking any of the important features of the critical experiment. And it must d

Lell, R. M.; McKnight, R. D.; Perel, R. L.; Wagschal, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Racah Inst. of Physics

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

Pages that link to "Data:De12a8fe-13b5-4491-9139-ea729b96ec3d...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91-9139-ea729b96ec3d: View (previous 50 | next 50) (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500) City of Seattle, Washington (Utility Company) ( links) View (previous 50 | next 50) (20 | 50 |...

150

Data:466ba082-9e49-4eac-a12a-24da3651e616 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WIND MACHINE SERVICE RATE SCHEDULE E-40 Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY This rate schedule is available in all territory served by the Company at all...

151

Data:72b22d28-179d-417f-83f5-80f86e12a95a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable for dusk to dawn lighting service by means of ballast operated lamp fixtures on a suitable wood pole. The service includes all electrical...

152

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Papers with 233 Measurements on 02-Jan-2014 2 Papers with 233 Measurements on 02-Jan-2014 Status Dates: 10/26/2013 to 12/31/2013 Status Flags are: UNRELEASED, RELEASED, ASSIGNED, ENCODED, OVERSEEN, ACCEPTED, VERIFIED, PUBLISHED Contents Modes are: UNKNOWN, DATA, EMPTY Publication Modes are: NEW, PUBLISHED Click on the journal reference to find article in INSPIRE. Make sure to use the journal, as opposed to arXiv, version for encoding. INSPIRE link EPJ A49 121 ANISOVICH 13A WORKMAN B999 Miscellaneous$ released unknown new WORKMAN 12/19/2013 pi- p --> Lam$ EPJ C73 2509 AAD 13AZ OTHER-REV ROTH Other reviews$ released unknown new OTHER-REV 12/20/2013 Fragm, ATLAS EPJ C73 2541 GAO 13 BARNETT Q004 c released unknown new MANOHAR 12/20/2013 T EPJ C73 2597 DAVIER 13 MESONTEAM M999 Mesons litera$

153

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23 Measurements for encoder WORKMAN on 02-Jan-2014 23 Measurements for encoder WORKMAN on 02-Jan-2014 Status Dates: 10/26/2013 to 12/31/2013 Status Flags are: UNRELEASED, RELEASED, ASSIGNED, ENCODED, OVERSEEN, ACCEPTED, VERIFIED, PUBLISHED Contents Modes are: UNKNOWN Publication Modes are: NEW, PUBLISHED Click on the journal reference to find article in INSPIRE. Make sure to use the journal, as opposed to arXiv, version for encoding. INSPIRE link EPJ A49 121 ANISOVICH 13A WORKMAN B999 Miscellaneous$ released unknown new WORKMAN 12/19/2013 pi- p --> Lam$ NP A914 51 SCHUMACHER 13 WORKMAN B037 Lambda(1405) released unknown new WORKMAN 12/20/2013 PL B727 287 RAMOS 13 WORKMAN B999 Miscellaneous$ released unknown new WORKMAN 12/20/2013 PR C87 015201 SHKLYAR 13 WORKMAN B006 N(2000)

154

Data:3c12a91f-c90f-4e1e-9d1e-7f1372e6b177 | Open Energy Information  

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1f-c90f-4e1e-9d1e-7f1372e6b177 1f-c90f-4e1e-9d1e-7f1372e6b177 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: CenterPoint Energy Effective date: 2013/01/25 End date if known: Rate name: Secondary Service - Greater than 10 kVa, IDR Metered, greater than 2000 kVa (TC-LOS-A) - Muni Discount Rate Sector: Commercial Description: Delivery Service will be single-phase, 60 hertz, at a standard secondary voltage. Delivery Service will be metered using Company's standard watt-hour Meter provided for this type of Delivery Service. Any other metering option(s) will be provided at an additional charge and/or will be provided by a Meter Owner other than the Company pursuant to Applicable Legal Authorities. Where Delivery Service of the type desired is not available at the Point of Delivery, additional charges and special contract arrangements may be required prior to Delivery Service being furnished, pursuant to Section 6.1.2.2, Construction Services, in this Tariff.

155

Chemical Rearrangement under Hydrothermal Conditions: Formation of Polymeric Chains (CuX)2(dpiz) and (CuX)3(dpiz) (X ) Cl, Br; dpiz ) Dipyrido[1,2-a:2,3-d]imidazole) and Crystal Structures of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to their excellent redox catalytic abilities.10 In this Communication, we report the synthesisL acid digestion bombs at 170 °C afforded orange crystals of 1 [(CuCl)2(C10H7N3)] (I) and 1 [(CuBr)3(C crystallographically independent copper sites in this common motif. Cu(1), the Cu atom in the tetrahedral site

Li, Jing

156

Data:E6782d3f-9dca-4fb8-88c1-2a34a6a548d8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the fall of 2008. Source or reference: UtilityRateAPCo-WPCo-July-2008-Tariff-Book.pdf Assume net metering (buy sell): Flat rate buy (kWh): Flat rate sell (kWh):...

157

m147.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 f 0 (1370) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (0 + + ) See also the mini-reviews on scalar mesons under f 0 (500) (see the NODE=M147 index for the page number) and on non-q q candidates in PDG 06, Journal of Physics, G 33 33 33 33 1 (2006). f 0 (1370) T-MATRIX POLE POSITION f 0 (1370) T-MATRIX POLE POSITION f 0 (1370) T-MATRIX POLE POSITION f 0 (1370) T-MATRIX POLE POSITION NODE=M147PP Note that Γ ≈ 2 Im( s pole ). NODE=M147PP NODE=M147PP VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT (1200-1500)-i(150-250) OUR ESTIMATE (1200-1500)-i(150-250) OUR ESTIMATE (1200-1500)-i(150-250) OUR ESTIMATE (1200-1500)-i(150-250) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * (1290 ± 50)-i(170 + 20 - 40 ) 1 ANISOVICH 09 RVUE 0.0 p p, π N (1373 ± 15)-i(137 ± 10) 2 BARGIOTTI 03 OBLX p p (1302 ± 17)-i(166 ± 18) 3 BARBERIS 00C 450 p p → p f 4π p s (1312 ± 25 ± 10)-i(109 ± 22 ± 15) BARBERIS

158

Citation: S. Eidelman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

370) 370) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (0 + + ) See also the mini-reviews on scalar mesons under f 0 (600) and on non-q q candidates. (See the index for the page number.) f 0 (1370) T-MATRIX POLE POSITION f 0 (1370) T-MATRIX POLE POSITION f 0 (1370) T-MATRIX POLE POSITION f 0 (1370) T-MATRIX POLE POSITION Note that Γ ≈ 2 Im( s pole ). VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT (1200-1500)-i(150-250) OUR ESTIMATE (1200-1500)-i(150-250) OUR ESTIMATE (1200-1500)-i(150-250) OUR ESTIMATE (1200-1500)-i(150-250) OUR ESTIMATE * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * (1373 ± 15)-i(137 ± 10) 12 BARGIOTTI 03 OBLX p p (1302 ± 17)-i(166 ± 18) 1 BARBERIS 00C 450 p p → p f 4π p s (1312 ± 25 ± 10)-i(109 ± 22 ± 15) BARBERIS 99D OMEG 450 p p → K + K - , π + π - (1406 ± 19)-i(80 ± 6) 2 KAMINSKI 99 RVUE π π → π π, K K , σ σ (1300 ± 20)-i(120 ± 20) ANISOVICH 98B RVUE Compilation (1290 ± 15)-i(145 ± 15)

159

m134.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 K ∗ 0 (1950) I (J P ) = 1 2 (0 + ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Seen in partial-wave analysis of the K - π + system. Needs confir- NODE=M134 mation. K ∗ 0 (1950) MASS K ∗ 0 (1950) MASS K ∗ 0 (1950) MASS K ∗ 0 (1950) MASS NODE=M134M NODE=M134M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT 1945 ± 10 ± 20 1945 ± 10 ± 20 1945 ± 10 ± 20 1945 ± 10 ± 20 1 ASTON 88 LASS 0 11 K - p → K - π + n * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1917 ± 12 2 ZHOU 06 RVUE K p → K - π + n 1820 ± 40 3 ANISOVICH 97C RVUE 11 K - p → K - π + n 1 We take the central value of the two solutions and the larger error given. NODE=M134M;LINKAGE=A 2 S-matrix pole. Using ASTON 88 and assuming K ∗ 0 (800), K ∗ 0 (1430). NODE=M134M;LINKAGE=ZU 3 T-matrix pole. Reanalysis of ASTON 88 data. NODE=M134M;LINKAGE=A1 K ∗ 0 (1950) WIDTH K ∗ 0 (1950) WIDTH K ∗ 0 (1950) WIDTH K ∗ 0 (1950) WIDTH NODE=M134W NODE=M134W VALUE (MeV)

160

b123.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ∆(2300) 9/2 + I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 9 2 + ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this NODE=B123 resonance. ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B123M NODE=B123M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 2300 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2300 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2300 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2300 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 2204.5 ± 3.4 CHEW 80 BPWA π + p → π + p 2400 ± 125 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 2217 ± 80 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N 2450 ± 100 HENDRY 78 MPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2400 CANDLIN 84 DPWA π + p → Σ + K + ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH NODE=B123W NODE=B123W VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 32.3 ± 1.0 CHEW

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161

b134.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50) 50) 5/2 - I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 5 2 - ) Status: ∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 2350 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2350 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2350 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2350 OUR ESTIMATE 2400± 125 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 2305± 26 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2459± 100 VRANA 00 DPWA Multichannel 2171± 18 MANLEY 92 IPWA π N → π N & N π π ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 400± 150 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 300± 70 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits,

162

b051.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Σ (1670) Bumps I (J P ) = 1(? ? ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Formation experiments are listed separately in the preceding entry. NODE=B051 Probably there are two states at the same mass with the same quan- tum numbers, one decaying to Σ π and Λ π, the other to Λ(1405) π. See the note in front of the preceding entry. Σ (1670) MASS Σ (1670) MASS Σ (1670) MASS Σ (1670) MASS NODE=B051M (PRODUCTION EXPERIMENTS) (PRODUCTION EXPERIMENTS) (PRODUCTION EXPERIMENTS) (PRODUCTION EXPERIMENTS) NODE=B051M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT ≈ 1670 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1670 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1670 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1670 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 1670 ± 4 1 CARROLL 76 DPWA Isospin-1 total σ 1675 ± 10 2 HEPP 76 DBC - K - N 1.6-1.75 GeV/c 1665 ± 1 APSELL 74 HBC K - p 2.87 GeV/c 1688 ± 2 or 1683 ± 5 1.2k BERTHON 74 HBC 0 Quasi-2-body σ 1670 ± 6 AGUILAR-... 70B HBC K - p → Σ π π 4 GeV OCCUR=2 1668 ±

163

b135.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

200) 200) 7/2 - I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 7 2 - ) Status: ∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE The various analyses are not in good agreement. The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. ∆(2200) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2200) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2200) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2200) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 2200 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2200 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2200 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2200 OUR ESTIMATE 2200± 80 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 2215± 60 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N 2280± 80 HENDRY 78 MPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2280± 40 CANDLIN 84 DPWA π + p → Σ + K + ∆(2200) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2200) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2200) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2200) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 450± 100 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 400± 100 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N 400± 150 HENDRY

164

b051.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bumps Bumps I (J P ) = 1(? ? ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Formation experiments are listed separately in the preceding entry. Probably there are two states at the same mass with the same quan- tum numbers, one decaying to Σ π and Λ π, the other to Λ(1405) π. See the note in front of the preceding entry. Σ (1670) MASS Σ (1670) MASS Σ (1670) MASS Σ (1670) MASS (PRODUCTION EXPERIMENTS) (PRODUCTION EXPERIMENTS) (PRODUCTION EXPERIMENTS) (PRODUCTION EXPERIMENTS) VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT ≈ 1670 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1670 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1670 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 1670 OUR ESTIMATE 1670± 4 1 CARROLL 76 DPWA Isospin-1 total σ 1675± 10 2 HEPP 76 DBC - K - N 1.6-1.75 GeV/c 1665± 1 APSELL 74 HBC K - p 2.87 GeV/c 1688± 2 or 1683 ± 5 1.2k BERTHON 74 HBC 0 Quasi-2-body σ 1670± 6 AGUILAR-... 70B HBC K - p → Σ π π 4 GeV 1668± 10 AGUILAR-... 70B HBC K - p → Σ 3π 4 GeV 1660± 10 ALVAREZ 63 HBC + K - p 1.51

165

b041.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Λ(2100) 7/2 - I (J P ) = 0( 7 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ Discovered by COOL 66 and by WOHL 66. Most of the results NODE=B041 published before 1973 are now obsolete and have been omitted. They may be found in our 1982 edition Physics Letters 111B 111B 111B 111B 1 (1982). This entry only includes results from partial-wave analyses. Param- eters of peaks seen in cross sections and in invariant-mass distribu- tions around 2100 MeV used to be listed in a separate entry immedi- ately following. It may be found in our 1986 edition Physics Letters 170B 170B 170B 170B 1 (1986). Λ(2100) MASS Λ(2100) MASS Λ(2100) MASS Λ(2100) MASS NODE=B041M NODE=B041M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2090 to 2110 (≈ 2100) OUR ESTIMATE 2090 to 2110 (≈ 2100) OUR ESTIMATE 2090 to 2110 (≈ 2100) OUR ESTIMATE 2090 to 2110 (≈ 2100) OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 2104 ± 10 GOPAL 80 DPWA K N → K N 2106 ± 30 DEBELLEFON

166

b123.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

300) 300) 9/2 + I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 9 2 + ) Status: ∗∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this resonance. ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 2300 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2300 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2300 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2300 OUR ESTIMATE 2204.5± 3.4 CHEW 80 BPWA π + p → π + p 2400 ± 125 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 2217 ± 80 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N 2450 ± 100 HENDRY 78 MPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2400 CANDLIN 84 DPWA π + p → Σ + K + ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2300) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 32.3± 1.0 CHEW 80 BPWA π + p → π + p 425 ± 150 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 300 ± 100 HOEHLER 79 IPWA

167

Influence of induced axial magnetic field on plasma dynamics and radiative characteristics of Z pinches  

SciTech Connect

The influence of an induced axial magnetic field on plasma dynamics and radiative characteristics of Z pinches is investigated. An axial magnetic field was induced in a novel Z-pinch load: a double planar wire array with skewed wires (DPWAsk), which represents a planar wire array in an open magnetic configuration. The induced axial magnetic field suppressed magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities (with m = 0 and m = 1 instability modes) in the Z-pinch plasma. The influence of the initial axial magnetic field on the structure of the plasma column at stagnation was manifested through the formation of a more uniform plasma column compared to a standard double planar wire array (DPWA) load [V. L. Kantsyrev et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 030704 (2008)]. The DPWAsk load is characterized by suppression of MRT instabilities and by the formation of the sub-keV radiation pulse that occurs before the main x-ray peak. Gradients in plasma parameters along the cathode-anode gap were observed and analyzed for DPWAsk loads made from low atomic number Z (Al) and mid-Z (brass) wires.

Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Osborne, G. C.; Shrestha, I.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Shlyaptseva, V. V. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Velikovich, A. L. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Rudakov, L. I. [Icarus Research Inc., Bethesda, Maryland 20824 (United States); Williamson, K. M. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory, Texas A and M University, Corpus Christi, TX 78412 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

b134.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 ∆(2350) 5/2 - I (J P ) = 3 2 ( 5 2 - ) Status: ∗ OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE The latest GWU analysis (ARNDT 06) finds no evidence for this NODE=B134 resonance. ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER MASS ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER MASS NODE=B134M NODE=B134M VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT ≈ 2350 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2350 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2350 OUR ESTIMATE ≈ 2350 OUR ESTIMATE → UNCHECKED ← 2400 ± 125 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 2305 ± 26 HOEHLER 79 IPWA π N → π N * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2459 ± 100 VRANA 00 DPWA Multichannel 2171 ± 18 MANLEY 92 IPWA π N → π N & N π π ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH ∆(2350) BREIT-WIGNER WIDTH NODE=B134W NODE=B134W VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 400 ± 150 CUTKOSKY 80 IPWA π N → π N 300 ±

169

A.12a (Pre-SAS 115) Letter to communicate significant deficiencies and/or material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting noted in an audit of financial statements of a nonpublic entity, excluding FDICIA engagements (Rev. 1/08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I325 8 I325 8 (8-89) EFG (07-90) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: December 22,2009 REPLY TO A I T N OF: IG-322 (A09FN006) SUBJECT: Management Letter on the Audit of the Department of Energy's Consolidated Financial Statements for Fiscal Year 2009 TO: Chief Financial Officer, CF- 1 Attached is the subject letter prepared by KPMG LLP, our contract auditors. The letter contains 21 new findings (see letter, Exhibit A) and 5 repeat findings (see letter, Exhibit B) that were issued during the course of the Fiscal Year 2009 audit of the Department of Energy's (Department) Consolidated Financial Statements. Management generally concurred with and provided planned corrective actions for most of the recommendations listed in the Management Letter and management's comments are

170

m036.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 a 0 (980) I G (J PC ) = 1 - (0 + + ) See our minireview on scalar mesons under f 0 (500). (See the index NODE=M036 for the page number.) a 0 (980) MASS a 0 (980) MASS a 0 (980) MASS a 0 (980) MASS NODE=M036205 NODE=M036MX VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID 980 ± 20 OUR ESTIMATE 980 ± 20 OUR ESTIMATE 980 ± 20 OUR ESTIMATE 980 ± 20 OUR ESTIMATE Mass determination very model dependent → UNCHECKED ← η π FINAL STATE ONLY η π FINAL STATE ONLY η π FINAL STATE ONLY η π FINAL STATE ONLY NODE=M036M1 NODE=M036M1 VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 982.5 ± 1.6 ± 1.1 16.9k 1 AMBROSINO 09F KLOE 1.02 e + e - → η π 0 γ 986 ± 4 ANISOVICH 09 RVUE 0.0 p p, π N 982.3 + 0.6 - 0.7 + 3.1 - 4.7 2 UEHARA 09A BELL γ γ → π 0 η 987.4 ± 1.0 ± 3.0 3,4 BUGG 08A RVUE 0 p p → π 0 π 0 η OCCUR=2 989.1 ± 1.0 ± 3.0 4,5 BUGG 08A RVUE 0 p p → π 0 π 0 η 985 ± 4 ± 6 318 ACHARD 02B

171

m036.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

980) 980) I G (J PC ) = 1 - (0 + + ) See our minireview on scalar mesons under f 0 (500). (See the index for the page number.) a 0 (980) MASS a 0 (980) MASS a 0 (980) MASS a 0 (980) MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID 980± 20 OUR ESTIMATE 980± 20 OUR ESTIMATE 980± 20 OUR ESTIMATE 980± 20 OUR ESTIMATE Mass determination very model dependent η π FINAL STATE ONLY η π FINAL STATE ONLY η π FINAL STATE ONLY η π FINAL STATE ONLY VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 982.5 ± 1.6 ± 1.1 16.9k 1 AMBROSINO 09F KLOE 1.02 e + e - → η π 0 γ 986 ± 4 ANISOVICH 09 RVUE 0.0 p p, π N 982.3 + 0.6 - 0.7 + 3.1 - 4.7 2 UEHARA 09A BELL γ γ → π 0 η 987.4 ± 1.0 ± 3.0 3,4 BUGG 08A RVUE 0 p p → π 0 π 0 η 989.1 ± 1.0 ± 3.0 4,5 BUGG 08A RVUE 0 p p → π 0 π 0 η 985 ± 4 ± 6 318 ACHARD 02B L3 183-209 e + e - → e + e - η π + π - 995 + 52 - 10 36 6 ACHASOV 00F SND e + e - → η π 0 γ 994 + 33 - 8 36 7 ACHASOV

172

m033.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 (2350) I G (J PC ) = 1 + (5 - - ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE This entry was previously called U 1 (2400). See also ρ(2150), f 2 (2150), ρ 3 (2250), f 4 (2300). ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2330± 35 2330± 35 2330± 35 2330± 35 ALDE 95 GAM2 38 π - p → ω π 0 n VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * ∼ 2303 HASAN 94 RVUE p p → π π ∼ 2300 1 MARTIN 80B RVUE ∼ 2250 1 MARTIN 80C RVUE ∼ 2500 2 CARTER 78B CNTR 0 0.7-2.4 p p → K - K + ∼ 2480 3 CARTER 77 CNTR 0 0.7-2.4 p p → π π S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2300± 45 4 ANISOVICH 02 SPEC 0.6-1.9 p p → ω π 0 , ω η π 0 , π + π - 2295±

173

Design Strategy for a Formally Veri ed Reliable Computing Platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Pecht, Ed., Product Reliability, Maintainability, and Supportability Hdbk: CRC Press, 1995. [12] A

Butler, Ricky W.

174

A Brief History of the Chemistry Department -Part II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geniuses during the great #12;A brief history, continued porn poge I the world, among them -Barcelona

Kounaves, Samuel P.

175

Microwave Graphene Electronics Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain Ecole Normale Suprieure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. RMP 2011, etc...... #12;A graphene capacitor thin oxide Thick metallic gate Vdc+Vrf CQ Cgeo r

Plaçais, Bernard

176

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, ... 8.12a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986

177

Metroflux: a high performance system for analysing flow at very fine-grain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

available on the market to perform traffic capture (for example, products from Endace, Solera #12;(a) all

Gonçalves, Paulo

178

EIA - Electricity Data - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA ... Table 1.12.A. Net Generation from Nuclear Energy: by State, by Sector, August 2013 and 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours)

179

TAC Entity Linking by Performing Full-document Entity ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... few major global economies that will see respectable GDP growth this ... entities per topic: 12 ... a request by the International Atomic Energy Agency to ...

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

180

Marginalized Monitoring: Adaptively Managing Urban Stormwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Case Study from Racine, Wisconsin, USA 12 A QUATIC Eand harbor - Milwaukee, Wisconsin. E. coli , Enterococcus,water in Racine, Wisconsin. Human-specific Bacteroides , E.

Scanlan, Melissa K; Tai, Stephanie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

596.ps - Optimization Online  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Mathematics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science ...... [6] B . Borchers, SDPLIB 1.2, a library of semide nite programming test problems,.

182

A First Order Method for Finding Minimal Norm-Like Solutions of ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introductory Lectures on Convex Optimization. Kluwer, Boston, 2004. [12] A. N. Tikhonov and V. Y. Arsenin. Solution of Ill-Posed Problems. Washington, DC:.

183

Annual Energy Review - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1.10 Cooling Degree-Days by Census Division, 1949 PDF XLS ... 8.12a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986

184

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1.10 Cooling Degree-Days by Census Division, 1949 PDF XLS ... 8.12a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986

185

Graphene and its Hybrid Nanostructures for Nanoelectronics and Energy Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improve the PCE of photovoltaic cells. Figure 1.12 (a) Ramantransparent electrode in photovoltaic cell. Novel synthesiswith ITO-based photovoltaic cell. And two approaches of

LIN, JIAN

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Diverse Firewall Design Alex X. Liu Mohamed G. Gouda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Privacy, pages 17­31, 1999. [12] A. Condor and G. Hinton. Fault tolerant and fail-safe de- sign of candu

Liu, Alex X.

187

Annual Energy Review - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... 8.12a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986 PDF XLS ...

188

Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Likelihood profile projection onto the sin 2 ? 13Likelihood profile projections onto the ?m 221 - and ? 12 -A.3 Likelihood profile projection onto the sin 2 ? 13 axis

O'Donnell, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Mechanochemical Behavior of BaNd 2 Ti 4 O 12 Powder in Ball ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When ball milling BaNd2Ti4O12, a high slurry viscosity reduces the capability of the grinding media to shear, and...

190

Reaction Kinetics Between Fiber and Matrix Components in Metal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

parabolic rate constants for the total growth of the reaction zone and the component of the reaction zone which displaces the fiber (12). (a). (b). Figure 4 - Cross-...

191

Fusion systems and biset functors via ghost algebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.2 Fusion Preserving1 Background 1.1 Fusion System Basics . . . . . . 1.2A. Craven. The theory of fusion systems. Vol. 131. Cambridge

O'Hare, Shawn Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A Lithium Experiment in the Program of Solar Neutrino Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experiments sensitive to pp-neutrinos from the Sun are very perspective for the precise measurement of a mixing angle $\\theta_{12}$. A $\

A. Kopylov; I. Orekhov; V. Petukhov; A. Solomatin

2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

193

No Slide Title  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A. Borgschulte et al. Journal of Catalysis 239 (2006) 263271 Page 12. ... A. Borgschulte et al. Journal of Catalysis 239 (2006) 263271 ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

194

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benefits Connected to Smart Grids M. Stadler 1,2,a , C.Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Michael Stadler , Chris

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Third Claude E. Shannon Memorial Lecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Physics) · Aperture · Frequency · Power · Shannon (Mathematics) · Error-Correction · Data Compression #12 It Worth the Effort? #12;"Frequently the messages have meaning" #12;A Tour of the Solar System. #12;A Tour of the Solar System. UCSD April 29, 2005 Ludwig van Beethoven, Moonlight Sonata Daniel Barenboim, pianist #12

Adolphs, Ralph

196

A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy A lifestyle-based scenario for U.S. buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy A lifestyle-based scenario for U.S. buildings the speculative nature of the #12;A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy exercise, the rationale was to broaden implications of these changes, and how might we create energy policies to 2 #12;A lifestyle-based scenario

Diamond, Richard

197

October 2007 BWXTymes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 J a w s o f l i f e a t Y- 12 , p g . 4 , * A l p h a b e t s o u p , p g . 6 * Y- 12 a w a r d w i n n e r s , p g . 8 Y-12: a good environmental steward The Y-12 National...

198

Non-rigid Registration and Restoration of Double-sided Historical Manuscripts Jie Wang and Chew Lim Tan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-sided document images. In IEEE WACV, 2000. [11] A. Tonazzini, L. Bedini, and E. Salerno. Independent com- ponent analysis for document restoration. IJDAR, 7(1):17­ 27, 2004. [12] A. Tonazzini, E. Salerno, and L. Bedini

Tan, Chew Lim

199

Participants si n an Pr c r  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

r r r r; as r s #12; arrati str ct r r r r #12; arrati c nt nt r r r #12; in r a a rati n str ct r #12; a rati n

Golbeck, Jennifer

200

EPL, 85 (2009) 50002 www.epljournal.org doi: 10.1209/0295-5075/85/50002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in neutrino oscillations M. Blasone1,2(a) , F. Dell'Anno1,2,3 , S. De Siena1,2,3 and F. Illuminati1,2,3,4 1

Blasone, Massimo

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201

The debate on the value of graduate education today WHAT'S IT WORTH?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physicist Ph.D. student Imre Bartos works to make his field accessible to others 8 A Cosmopolitan Degree T S 1 Message from the Dean 2 Found in Translation 8 The Applied Physicist 12 A Cosmopolitan Degree 16

Champagne, Frances A.

202

It's Elemental - The Element Nobelium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to produce nobelium-254, with a half-life of three seconds, by bombarding curium-246 with carbon-12. A third group, working at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna,...

203

A Present . . . And A Future | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.12.12 A Present . . . And A Future Students are...

204

1360.ps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Service d'architecture BSC (PC 12A7), Nortel GSM Access R&D, Parc d' activits ... Nortel GSM Access R&D Technical Report PE/BSC/INF/016550 V01/ EN,...

205

1365.ps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Service d'architecture BSC (PC 12A7), Nortel GSM Access R&D, Parc ... Technical report Nortel GSM Access R&D PE/BSC/INF/017912 V01/EN, to appear.

206

Measurements of relativistic effects in collective Thomson scattering at electron temperatures less than 1 keV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thomson scattering on the NIF . . 7.1.2 Electron featureon reduced-scale targets at the nif and omega lasers, Janparameter. . . . . . . Figure 1.2: A NIF Au hohlraum target

Ross, James Steven

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Quasi-isentropic and shock compression of FCC and BCC metals : effects of grain size and stacking-fault energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Figure 1.2: (a) Schematic of the NIF facility at LLNL (courtesy of: www.llnl.gov/nif); (b) Schematic of thethat takes place within the target chamber (from LLNL NIF

Jarmakani, Hussam N.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

AOCS Official Method H 12-52  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standard Sodium Hydroxide Solution AOCS Official Method H 12-52 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION SCOPE AA12A4E13DD339166389C3BD24255277 MC-H1252 2416

209

URANIUM PROJECT WATER-SOLUBLE SUBSTANCES IN KVANEFJELD LUJAVRITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

URANIUM PROJECT WATER-SOLUBLE SUBSTANCES IN KVANEFJELD LUJAVRITE NOVEMBER 1982 Emil S0rensen #12 a sample of 14.000 tonnes was mined from a 900 m long tunnel about 150 m below surface level. During

210

Striving for Social Status Nicole Immorlica, Northwestern University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that out-perform them. If an agent owns a Toyota Corolla (cheap car), then he prefers that his rich: January YYYY. #12;A:2 also own a Toyota Corolla as opposed to a Toyota Camry (a slightly more e

Fiat, Amos

211

DOE Oak Ridge Office Freda H. Hopper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development #12;A World Leading Research and Advanced Manufacturing Park Jun08 2008 © All Rights Reserved 3 experiments. Additionally, as a center for both basic and applied research, Jefferson Lab reaches out to help

212

Annual Energy Outlook 2009: With Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and 2030: Tables A12, A14, and D14. Table 10. Estimated recoverable resources from oil shale in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming: U.S. Depart- ment of Energy, Strategic Significance...

213

Representing Website Design Copyright 2003 David K. Farkas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Make Me Think. Que, 2000. #12;A web page with a simple, straightforward visual hierarchy #12;Visual are part of other things. In other words, each page should have a clear visual hierarchy." Steve Krug, Don't

214

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C12A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of...

215

REFERENCE: The Blue Planet An Introduction to Earth System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REFERENCE: The Blue Planet An Introduction to Earth System Science. Brian J. Skinner and Barbara Glacier E. Piedmont Glaciers #12;A. Cirque glaciers occupies a bowl shape depression on a mountainside

Gilbes, Fernando

216

10.1007%2Fs10570-013-0011-7.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mechanism and origin of high activity of cellulase TmCel12A at high temperature: a quantum mechanicalmolecular mechanical study Peng Lian * Hao-Bo Guo * Jeremy C. Smith *...

217

Review of California and National Methods for Energy Performance Benchmarking of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A-11 Hotel Energy Star Ratings (n=A-12 A-7 Hotel Energy Star Ratings (n=Star Rating Figure A-7. Hotel Energy Star Ratings (n=18) A-

Matson, Nance E.; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

TOD Version 2.0: Dreams and Realities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transit planning and good community development planning... #12;A new frame for considering TOD · AB 32 perspective, local funding Cost effective mobility enhancement Multi-modal access and mobility; co

Bertini, Robert L.

219

Security Policy Analysis using Deductive Spreadsheets 1 Anu Singh, C. R. Ramakrishnan, I. V. Ramakrishnan, Scott D. Stoller, David S. Warren  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................................................103 Xcel Energy (Northern States Power Company)...................................................................104 #12;A Survey of Utility Experience with Real Time Pricing v Xcel Energy (Public Service Company. Financial incentives to accelerate adoption of technologies that simplify and/or automate price response may

Ramakrishnan, C. R.

220

Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe to a stainless steel flange  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) to a stainless steel flange (12, 16), in which the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) is accommodated in a ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) in the flange (12, 16), the groove conforming to the dimensions of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18), where the gap remaining between the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) and the ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) is filled with a sealant (19).

Allais, Arnaud (D-30625 Hannover, DE); Hoffmann, Ernst (D-30855 Langenhagen, DE)

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Partial Eval Partial Eval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient Onl ine Partial E al ati n Eijiro Sumii o i o i i r i o o o umii o i u o o j #12; Partial/dynamic portions of p(s??,d) ¯ spec a e program p s?? (d) s p(s??,d) = = = = p s?? (d) or a am c pu d ope u e r . . . . -- -- -- . . #12; A Naive Onl ine Partial val at r E (expression) ::= x | l l l lx.E | E@E #12; A Naive Onl ine

Sumii, Eijiro

222

This is an author-deposited version published in: http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/ Eprints ID: 5091  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Behzadian, Majid A hybrid Delphi-SWOT paradigm for oil and gas pipeline strategic planning in Caspian Sea to the repository administrator: staff-oatao@inp-toulouse.fr #12;A hybrid Delphi-SWOT paradigm for oil and gas, Shomal University, Amol 46134, Iran Keywords: Oil and gas pipeline planning Caspian Sea Multi

Mailhes, Corinne

223

a) Conservation de la vorticit potentielle b) Description Heuristique des ondes de Rossby  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a) Conservation de la vorticité potentielle b) Description Heuristique des ondes de Rossby c, flott@lmd.ens.fr 4) Les ondes de Rossby 57 #12;a) Conservation de la vorticité potentielle Approximation;a) Conservation de la vorticité potentielle Rappel de la méthode générale En formant l

Lott, Francois

224

A Conservation Practices for Conserving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Conservation Catalog Practices for Conserving Pennsylvania's Natural Resources #12;#12;A Conservation Catalog 1 Introduction P ennsylvania is a land of great natural resources and Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania Conservation Catalog is a cooperative effort of the Pennsylvania Conservation Partnership which

Kaye, Jason P.

225

An iterative graph cut optimization algorithm for a double MRF Christian Wolf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis and Recognition, volume 1, pages 147­152, 1997. [9] A. Tonazzini and L. Bedini. Independent(1):17­27, 2004. [10] A. Tonazzini, L. Bedini, and E. Salerno. A markov model for blind image separation by a mean of the 13th european signal processing conference, 2005. [12] A. Tonazzini, E. Salerno, and L. Bedini. Fast

Wolf, Christian

226

PROPOSAL TO LEASE SPACE IN RESPONSE TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SQUARE FOOT RATE PER ANNUM (10b divided by 10a) (10c divided by 10a) *The Common Area Factor(F)/Partial(P) RENTABLE SQUARE FEET (a) COMMON AREA FACTOR* SQ. FT. RATE PER YEAR (b) AMOUNT (a) x (b) SQ. FT. RATE PER. 12. a. Initial term rate includes: (1) $__________ / sq. ft. for operating cost base rate and (2

227

OFFER TO LEASE SPACE IN RESPONSE TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SQUARE FOOT RATE PER ANNUM (10b divided by 10a) (10c divided by 10a) *The Common Area Factor(F)/Partial(P) RENTABLE SQUARE FEET (a) COMMON AREA FACTOR* SQ. FT. RATE PER YEAR (b) AMOUNT (a) x (b) SQ. FT. RATE PER. 12. a. Initial term rate includes: (1) $__________ / sq. ft. for operating cost base rate and (2

228

KINETICS AND MECHANISMS OF CHROMIUM(III) OXIDATION AND PRECIPITATION ON MANGANESE OXIDES, IN REAL-TIME AND AT THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Sugar Cube, Please: I Need to Charge My Cellphone Page 1 September 18, 2003 WHAT'S NEXT A Sugar Cube, Please: I Need to Charge My Cellphone By ANNE EISENBERG OTS of people shun sugar these days. It&ex=1064462400&pa12:15:50 PM 9/22/2003 #12;A Sugar Cube, Please: I Need to Charge My Cellphone Page 2

Sparks, Donald L.

229

Metadata for Digital Libraries: Architecture and Design Rationale \\Lambda Michelle Baldonado ChenChuan K. Chang Luis Gravano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the full text of #12; a textual document would be included as the value of its Full Text attribute, interoperabil­ ity, attribute model, attribute model translation, meta­ data repository, InfoBus, proxy this information metadata. In an earlier paper [1], we analyzed the needs of our digital library InfoBus archi

Gravano, Luis

230

Overview of new and emerging radiation resistant materials for space environment applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief overview of materials for use with a myriad of optical, photonic, electro-optic and photovoltaic devices are of great importance to DOD, NASA and the general space community1,2. A substantial amount of investigation has been directed towards ...

Edward W. Taylor

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

'5 ,-62994:'03-6958575:1533-6910950 e-mail: assa-gr@actcom.net.il  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;-82- -" . . . 40 , , , .ASTM110 . . . .NFPA-12A 34.02.5.: . 5" " " 5. " 1). , 2:1; 12): 110%-60; 125%-10; 13)150%-60; 1,000%-1; 14): 100%. -2 A . . . . " " . . 10, , 25. . -NFPA' ,1220. #12;-71- -" . "9002. . -. 34

Maoz, Shahar

232

Texas AgriLife Research & Extension Center, 1102 East FM 1294, Lubbock, TX 79403 (806) 746-6101, FAX (806) 746-4057, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., a component of fracking fluids) #12;A Few Thoughts · Uses range from a company needing a few tons to make tens fracking job could require 80 acres of guar production (750 lbs./A) #12;Guar Economics · Guar is a crop

Mukhtar, Saqib

233

Procedia Computer Science 00 (2010) 19 Computer Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­1895 #12;A. Barlow, D. Burton and M. Shashkov / Procedia Computer Science 00 (2010) 1­9 3 r R z u=0 v=0 pProcedia Computer Science 00 (2010) 1­9 Procedia Computer Science International Conference on Computational Science, ICCS 2010 Compatible, Energy and Symmetry Preserving 2D Lagrangian Hydrodynamics in rz

Shashkov, Mikhail

234

What Is Complementary and Alternative Medicine?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for health purposes typically combine physical postures, breathing techniques, and meditation or relaxation a component of energy medicine, manipulative and body-based practices, and traditional Chinese medicine. #12 a traditional healer (usage varied for the seven specific types of healers identified in the survey). Some CAM

Bandettini, Peter A.

235

High-field superconductivity in some bcc Ti-Mo and Nb-Zr alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zero electrical resistance at unusually high magnetic field strengths has been observed in the bcc alloys Ti-16 a/o (atomic percent) Mo, Nb-12 a/o Zr, and Nb-25 a/o Zr. The maximum highfield zero-resistance current density, Jc, in these ...

R. R. Hake; T. G. Berlincourt; D. H. Leslie

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

ANL Physics DivisionANL Physics Division ELECTRICAL SAFETY POLICY AND MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Construction XIII. ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION #12;A. Warning B. Monitoring C. Protection XIV. WORKING Electrical Safety Committee is authorized by and reports to the Director of the Physics Division at the time the equipment or facilities were constructed; 2. Must be listed by a Nationally Recognized Testing

Kemner, Ken

237

Light Field Microscopy Marc Levoy1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by photographing a speck of fluorescent crayon wax through a microscope objective and microlens array fluorescent specimens, the angular distribution of fluorescence is independent of the angular distribution research-grade fluorescent light sources. 3 #12;A B C D f (a) unrestricted optics (b) telecentric optics (c

Stanford University

238

CROSSED MOLECULAR BEAM STUDIES OF CHEMILUMINESCENT REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L , and M. A. D. F1uendy, Chemic 1ecular Beam 12. A. KantrowP. R. Br J I I Lawley. Chemic al an and 1ey, Chern. I 5) were of brass and chemic Each lens ho 1 der consists of a

Kahler, Carol Cuzens

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Syntactic Category Prediction for Improving Translation Quality in English-Korean Machine Translation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rd Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation, pages 710­717 #12;A small TCL interpreter, which can be linked into the code, interprets the strings. Segment-1: A small TCL interpreter NP: (small) TCL (interpreter), (code) (link) (which), (strings) (interprets). Translation-2: (code

240

:Black Board GHC GHC BinPro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2.3 BinProlog-Tcl/Tk : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 4 3 Black Board GHC 7 3.2 : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 17 5 19 20 21 ii #12;A 22 A.1 GHC : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 22 A.2 Tcl Prolog BinProlog C C Prolog (Continuation) Tcl/Tk [7] 2.2.1 BinProlog Prolog Source clause: a

Tanaka, Jiro

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241

MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX A MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES #12;A-1 APPENDIX A MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES 1.0 INTRODUCTION Differential composition of wind turbines at wind energy used is the number of fatalities per wind turbine per year (Anderson et al. 1999). This metric has

242

Scientists at BNL have identi-fied key elements in the bio-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ion conductors for lithium batteries via silica surface modification," Journal of Power Sources, 177, 561 for Lithium- ion Batteries," J. Electrochem. Soc., 154, (12) A1140-A1145 (2007). Khaled M. Youssef, Carl C "Synthesis of graphite coated Si-CuO composite as an anode for lithium ion battery by an abrasion-type mill

Ohta, Shigemi

243

CarbFix CO2 Injection Pilot Project, J. M. Matter, M. Stute & W. Broecker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fix Injection Site #12;A Conceptual Carbonation Model Injec8on well: CO2 fully dissolvedCarbFix CO2 Injection Pilot Project, Iceland J. M. Matter, M. Stute & W. Broecker Lamont Pétursson #12;CarbFix Injection Site #12;CarbFix CO2 Injection Site #12;CarbFix Injection Site 2

244

Modern Indian History & Society Seminar Winter Semester 2011/12  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Economics Paulinerkirche, Papendiek 14, 4-6 pm (Wednesday 12.12. !) A study in industrial hygiene: coal mines of Eastern India (c. 1901-1973) SANDIP CHATTERJEE, CeMIS, University of Göttingen 19.12. What

Krivobokova, Tatyana

245

1361.ps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Service d'architecture BSC (PC 12A7), Nortel GSM Access R&D, Parc d' activits. de Magny-Chteaufort, 78928 ... results demonstrating its practical relevance. The paper is ...... Lecture Notes in Computer Science, page 145. Springer, 2001.

246

Northeast Parallel Architectures Center at Syracuse University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Performance Computing Salim Hariri, Manish Parashar, JongBaek Park, Fang­Kuo Yu and Geoffrey C­1973 #12; A Case for Heterogeneous High Performance Computing Technical Report: SCCS­417 A Case for Heterogeneous High Performance Computing Salim Hariri, Manish Parashar, JongBaek Park, Fang­Kuo Yu and Geoffrey

Parashar, Manish

247

Biofuel Feedstock Inter-Island Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Feedstock Inter-Island Transportation Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office agency thereof. #12;A Comparison of Hawaii's Inter-Island Maritime Transportation of Solid Versus Liquid of Honolulu Advertiser ISO Tank Container, courtesy of Hawaii Intermodal Tank Transport Petroleum products

248

The Grand Challenge of Managing the Petascale Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2010 ­ p. 1/ #12;CEBAF - The Way It Is. CLAS12 Software Workshop - May 25, 2010 ­ p. 2/ #12;CEBAF Software Workshop - May 25, 2010 ­ p. 4/ #12;A New CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12). The CLAS12

249

Allinea DDT: Your Partner in Finding Debugged Paths on Mira  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for > 1 year Petascaled infrastructure and UI Scaling for IBM Blue Gene /P Acceptance testing at ALCF Scaling for IBM Blue Gene /Q Addressing ALCF requirements ­ Early access for IBM Blue Gene /Q expected.alcf.anl.gov/sites/www.alcf.anl.gov/files/L2PAllinea_0.pdf #12;A Path to Petascale on IBM BG /P Phase

Kemner, Ken

250

ADDRESSING SOCIETAL PROBLEMS WITH MOLECULAR SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility An instrument of Change #12;A Preeminent Global Resource t y #12;Argonne Leadership Computing Facility ALCF Continues a Tradition of Computing Innovation for researchers to understand how the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility can accelerate their research

Pritchard, Jonathan

251

BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12; #12;© Crown copyright 2007 ISBN: 978 0 7559 6506 9 Scottish% recyclable. #12;A BIOMASS ACTION PLAN FOR SCOTLAND #12;#12;1 CONTENTS FOREWORD 3 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 5 2. INTRODUCTION 9 3. WIDER CONTEXT 13 4. SCOTLAND'S ROLE IN THE UK BIOMASS STRATEGY 17 5. BIOMASS HEATING 23 6

252

How Different is Wireless Access? Implications for Internet Mergers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lqwhusuhwdwlrq dovr h{sodlqv ehwwhu zk| wud#17;f #16;rzv duh rqh0zd| dqg qrw wzr0zd| rqhv1 7 Iru dq ryhuylhz rq wkh wkhru| ri dffhvv sulflqj dqg zhoiduh frqvlghudwlrqv vhh Od#14;rqw dqg Wluroh ^43`/ Dupvwurqj ^5` dqg Hvwdfkh dqg Ydoohwwl ^:` #12; A1 B2 A2 B1 P1 P...

Giovannetti, Emanuele

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

253

Progress in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature Radius Massdensity Hot spot Burn wave Ablator DT ice #12;A-beam smoothing is critical to ICF ignition I1771 EO phase modulator Grating Amplifiers Grating Focusing optics Angular dispersion f Oscillator Phase Plates1 Measured far field of an OMEGA indirect-drive phase plate

254

GREEN HOMES LONG ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developed a program that enables residents to make improvements that will decrease their home energy usage energy bill, reduce your carbon footprint... at little or no cost to you. #12;A Message From Supervisor energy-efficient and reduce our community's carbon footprint. Why do we call it Long Island Green Homes

Kammen, Daniel M.

255

Path Selection Criteria for P2P Voice Cheng-Ying Ou, Chia-Li  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

should be the relay peer? such that the alternative path is better than the default one... 10 #12;A Fundamental QuestionQ Which is the right path selection criteria? Source Rate? Congestion Level? Delay;Two Questions to AddressQ 1 Does delay jitter speaks for all?1. Does delay jitter speaks for all

Huang, Polly

256

Oxidation behavior of ferriticmartensitic and ODS steels in supercritical water Jeremy Bischoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

swelling under irradiation and to stress cor- rosion cracking, ferritic­martensitic steels, such as HCM12A for these alloys is uniform corrosion. This article analyzes the oxide microstructure formed on these alloys to better understand their oxidation behavior. Corrosion tests were performed in both steam

Motta, Arthur T.

257

PLASMA PHYSICS & RADIATION TECHNOLOGY Dutch Physical Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-SiO2 nanocomposites for surface plasmon resonance- based red colored coatings A5 Electrostatic double). #12;A 4 Plasma deposition of multilayer Au-SiO2 nanocomposites for surface plasmon resonance- based of surface plasmon resonance- based deep colored coatings

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

258

A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy A lifestyle-based scenario for U.S. buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy A lifestyle-based scenario for U.S. buildings, and how might we create energy policies to take these changes into account. The assumption here environment. #12;A lifestyle-based scenario, Energy Policy 2 2. Methodology Forecasts for energy use

259

for a Sustainable Energy Future Sossina M. Haile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years · Diminishing Resources ­ Hubberts peak analysis suggests we are past "peak" oil · Geopolitical resistance ­ slow mass diffusion · power = I*V · peak efficiency at low I · peak power at mid I Current [A.8 theoretical voltagecross-over slow reaction kinetics membrane resistance slow mass diffusion peak power #12;A

Subramanian, Venkat

260

LBL-27170 (2011) Site Environmental Report for 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..........................................................................................................................G-1 Volume I Distribution List-1 #12;A-1 Appendix Monitoring Data Volume II of the Site Environmental Report for 2010 is provided sampling data, which may be found in the reports referred to in Chapter 4 of Volume I). The results from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anisovich 12a dpwa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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261

Investigating Bias and Incentives in Social Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in social media data · I'll touch on population biases · but spend more time on self-reporting bias. #12 by 1M users from Aug 2010 and Nov 2011 #12;A rumor "#verfollow I confirm that in the school 'Jorge & Semaan 2010; Monroy-Hernandez et al. 2012 · Public Sentiment · Political and election indices, market

Hunt, Galen

262

2010MIT SOLAR ELECTRIC VEHICLE TEAM A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IS SOLAR RACING? In a solar car race, highly specialized vehicles that run entirely on solar power, the battery monitor- ing circuitry, and the solar power track- ers, tracking vehicle performance in real time2010MIT SOLAR ELECTRIC VEHICLE TEAM #12;A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT President Hockfield poses

263

WARREN BUCKLER POWELL BIRTH DATE: April 11, 1955 HOME: 328 Christopher Drive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in their ecosystems. Above, the oyster fleet in Baltimore Harbor, circa 1885. Photo: Collection of Marion Doss #12;A the banner of restoration after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, learning from that history seems prudent before its ecosystem services (see box, Page11). Learning from the Exxon Valdez restoration efforts

Powell, Warren B.

264

Nanowire properties DOI: 10.1002/smll.200500311  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and nanorods, as well as nanowires made of silicon carbide,[10] gold,[3] silver,[11] and manganese oxide,[12] a specimens and microscale fibers of diameter >5 mm. However, recent indirect mechanical characteriza- tion, material fibers or wires of nanometer-scale diameter exhibit much higher strength than the corresponding

Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

265

CT MEASUREMENTS OF TWO-PHASE FLOW IN FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the blocks, and vii #12;a two-block system with no spacer. The blocks are sealed in epoxy so scanner. Preliminary results are presented from a water air experiment. These results suggest.5 inches thick. Permeability of the block was 27 Darcies and porosity was 45. The block was sealed

266

1 / 17 7/1/2007 9:57 AM UICE_EPRINT_IACR.doc UICE: A High-Performance Cryptographic Module  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicle security systems, also known as immobilizers, are required due to increased vehicle theft.1 Background Due to worldwide increases in automobile theft, there is a rapidly growing demand for less in 1993 theft numbers are decreasing again [12]. A second segment needing secure transactions

267

Materials Preparation and Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2011 ... When ball milling BaNd2Ti4O12, a high slurry viscosity reduces the ... to evaluate the suitability of MBS glass-ceramics as low-permittivity dielectric ... Erbium Doping into Various Cuts of Lithium Niobate : Pavla Nekvindova1;...

268

NASA's New Horizons Mission to the Planet Pluto  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a distant star. Its light slowly dims, revealing Pluto's radius and its atmosphere. Time[sec] Fluxfrom exploration requires a close-up visit #12;Why go to Pluto? · It's ancient: Exploring Pluto tells us what of bodies in the outer Solar System, and distant Solar Systems. #12;A Spacecraft to Pluto In 2001, NASA

Throop, Henry

269

BIODIVERSITY IN THE HIGH PARANA RIVER A.A. Agostinhol*, S.M. Thomazl, C."\\/: Minte-Veral and K.O. Winemiller2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUSTENTABILIDADE CONTIDOS NO BALAN?O SOCIAL DE UMA EMPRESA DO RAMO DE PAPEL E CELULOSE ELKER MARQUES BEZERRA #12(a) 2007 UMA ANÁLISE ECON?MICO-FINANCEIRA DO SETOR DE PAPEL E CELULOSE: A IMPORT?NCIA DA ANÁLISE DAS

Winemiller, Kirk O.

270

J. Aquat. Plant Manage. 36: 1997. 79 J. Aquat. Plant Manage. 36: 79-83  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUSTENTABILIDADE CONTIDOS NO BALAN?O SOCIAL DE UMA EMPRESA DO RAMO DE PAPEL E CELULOSE ELKER MARQUES BEZERRA #12(a) 2007 UMA ANÁLISE ECON?MICO-FINANCEIRA DO SETOR DE PAPEL E CELULOSE: A IMPORT?NCIA DA ANÁLISE DAS

Ferreira, Maria Teresa

271

Department of Mechanical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis, wheel profile optimization, bogie hunting etc. Measuring Wheel is also essential for analysis Explore and understand applicable science Create new materials #12;Indian Railways #12;Wheel Impact Load Design Indian Railways #12;Indian Railways Wheel Impact Load Detection System (WILD) #12;A prototype

Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

272

A Quick Guide for Applying at Mason Applying online is as easy as 1-2-3!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jobs" from the quick links.. You can search jobs in the following ways: · Keywords - enter your own search terms · Posted Within - a drop-down list will appear ­ select from day, week, or month Innovation Is Tradition Page 1 of 6 11/15/2012 #12;A Quick Guide for Applying at Mason Step 1: Search

273

Mobile Device Management iOS Device Enrollment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Setup Instructions 2. Get the App from the Apple App Store a. Launch the App Store. b. Search Enroll app. b. Click Enroll. #12;c. Enter your LSUHSC email address. d. Tap Next. e. Enter your LSUHSC password. f. Tap Next. g. Accept the Terms and Conditions. 4. Tap 1 - Install Company Profile. #12;a. Tap

274

Identify the Problem: Reduce Waste By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identify the Problem: Reduce Waste By Banning Plastic Bag Use Define Goal: Is the ban the most The 2008 EPA report asserts that while paper waste has remained relatively constant at approximately 31%, plastic waste has been rising from 0.4% in 1960 to the present value at 12%a. San Francisco sets the goal

Iglesia, Enrique

275

Preprint of the paper "A Validation of the Boundary Element Method for Grounding Grid Design and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- cades for substation grounding analysis, such as the Average Potential Method (APM), have been recentlyPreprint of the paper "A Validation of the Boundary Element Method for Grounding Grid Design://caminos.udc.es/gmni #12;A VALIDATION OF THE BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHOD FOR GROUNDING GRID DESIGN AND COMPUTATION I. Colominas

Colominas, Ignasi

276

Preprint of the paper "A Boundary Element Formulation for the Substation Grounding Design"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preprint of the paper "A Boundary Element Formulation for the Substation Grounding Design" I://caminos.udc.es/gmni #12;A BOUNDARY ELEMENT FORMULATION FOR THE SUBSTATION GROUNDING DESIGN I. Colominas, F. Navarrina A Boundary Element approach for the numerical computation of substation grounding systems is pre- sented

Colominas, Ignasi

277

Preprint of the paper "A Boundary Element Numerical Approach for Earthing Grid Computation"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the margin of error [4]. A Boundary Element approach for the numerical computation of substation grounding-90. http://caminos.udc.es/gmni #12;A Boundary Element Numerical Approach for Grounding Grid Computation I~na, SPAIN Abstract Analysis and design of substation earthing involves computing the equivalent re- sistance

Colominas, Ignasi

278

Preprint of the paper "A Boundary Element Numerical Approach for Substation Grounding in a Two  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preprint of the paper "A Boundary Element Numerical Approach for Substation Grounding in a Two://caminos.udc.es/gmni #12;A BOUNDARY ELEMENT NUMERICAL APPROACH FOR SUBSTATION GROUNDING IN A TWO LAYER EARTH STRUCTURE3~na, SPAIN SUMMARY Analysis and design of substation grounding requires computing the distribution

Colominas, Ignasi

279

Radiation Safety Manual Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Management Commitment B. Training C. Monitoring of Individual Radiation Exposures D. Program Reviews 1 of Radiation A. Research Applications 1. Non-Human User 2. Animal Use 3. Human Use B. Clinical Applications C Materials Chapter VI: Occupational Exposure to Radiation and Personnel Monitoring and Bioassay Program #12;A

Grishok, Alla

280

CommonA Newsletter for Alumni & Friends of the gaylord nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, UWMadison Louisiana is literally losing ground to the Gulf of Mexico.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Louisiana. A big part of our oil and gas industry is there. And because we've lost so many acres of wetlands Coastal Wetlands Sinking land and rising water overwhelm this lighthouse along the Louisiana coast. #12. A combination of sinking land and rising water is inundat- ing coastal wetlands. "We're losing about 35 square

Turner, Monica G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anisovich 12a dpwa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Algae Biodiesel: Commercialization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Inc. PetroAlgae Algae BioFuels Seambiotic Icon Energy LiveFuels Inc Inventure GreenFuel Technologies Biofuels & Technologies OriginOil Kwikpower International Alga Technologies Bio Fuel Systems SQC #12;A Look,Columnist, Biofuels InternationalBiofuels International HQHQ -- Houston, TXHouston, TX #12;BIODIESEL 2020: A GLOBAL

Tullos, Desiree

282

Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particulate and Gas phase Emissions from Biomass Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

literature. For example, EF of butane in this study was 5.0-Alkanes Propane 2M-Propane 2M-Propene Butane 2,2-DM-PropanePentane 2,2-DM-Butane 107-167 a , 169 b a b 8.69-13.12 a ,

Hosseini, Seyedehsan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

6/18/09 8:21 PMFiring up fusion Page 1 of 4http://paw.princeton.edu/issues/2009/06/10/pages/7255/index.xml?page=1&  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Republic of Vermont '89ers Rob and Kate Williams raise yaks, but that's just a piece of the plan #12 a starring role In the Republic of Vermont '89ers Rob and Kate Williams raise yaks, but that's just a piece

284

Basic Instrumentation for Hall A at Je erson J. Alcorn af , B.D. Anderson r , K.A. Aniol c , J.R.M. Annand ai ,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, Kentucky 40475, USA h Florida International University, Miami, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA ak University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506, USA 3 #12; a California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA c California State University Los Angeles

Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

285

A Once and Future Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Once and Future Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Restoration Recommendations of an Expert Working Group. Washington, DC. 112 pp. #12;A Once and Future Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Restoration Recommendations Introduction 9 Precedents and Principles for Restoring the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem 15 Acute and Chronic

Florida, University of

286

MI 3 --Seite 1 Pinkal / Siekmann / Benzmuller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Differentialgleichungen (bis 2/2000), Dozentur f¨ur Wissenschaftliches Rechnen, Institut f¨ur Wissenschaftliches Rechnen, Grundausstattung Dr. Gerd Kunert, Professur Wissenschaftliches Rechnen, Grundausstattung Dr. Michael The?¨ur Modellprobleme in Gebieten mit Kanten, betrachtet. #12;A3 Meyer/Jung 7 Im Arbeits- und Ergebnisbericht 1996

Benzmüller, Christoph - FR 6.2

287

Temporal Data Mining Approaches for Sustainable Chiller Management in Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and pumps for chilled water distribution, chiller units and cooling towers. Heat dissipated from extract heat from the chilled water system and reject it to the environment through cooling towers or heat, Publication date: January YYYY. #12;A:4 D. Patnaik et al. (a) Cooling Tower water loop Chiller Refrigerant

288

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This is relevant for geothermal exploration in hot sedimentary aquifers where upwelling zones of convection cells influences the single- phase flow field by studying the onset of convection in a hot sedimentary aquifer. We of the model (e.g. #12;a regular mesh) and thus derive a mesh with cell values 0 or 1 for each formation

Stanford University

289

Young modulus dependence of nanoscopic friction coefficient in hard coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with miniature moving parts, such as micro- electromechanical systems and hard-disk drives.1,2 A betterYoung modulus dependence of nanoscopic friction coefficient in hard coatings Elisa Riedoa with varying hardness obtained by different growth temperatures. For the CrN films, we show that the changes

Brune, Harald

290

Title of Dissertation: A Search for Short Duration Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of GRBs. #12;A Search for Short Duration Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts by David Noyes Gamma-Ray Bursts 1 1.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 3 The Gamma-Ray Burst Search 64 3.1 Introduction

California at Santa Cruz, University of

291

BIMA Memoranda Series Report from First Hat Creek Fiber-Optic Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-mode fibers.* * On Sept. 20, the fiber-optic link was disassembled and the normal system restored. 2 system. 2.2 Fiber-Optic Cable Two 100-m lengths of fiber-optic cable were used in the experiments. 5 #12; A Fiber-Optic Upgrade of the BIMA Array In light of the success of the fiber-optic link

292

Boron nitride substrates for high-quality graphene electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boron nitride substrates for high-quality graphene electronics C. R. Dean1,2 *, A. F. Young3 , I and J. Hone2 * Graphene devices on standard SiO2 substrates are highly disor- dered, exhibiting report the fabrication and characterization of high-quality exfoliated mono- and bilayer graphene devices

Shepard, Kenneth

293

Boron nitride substrates for high-quality graphene electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(right axis) versus gate voltage at B ¼ 14 T (solid line) and 8.5 T (dashed line) for monolayer grapheneBoron nitride substrates for high-quality graphene electronics C. R. Dean1,2 *, A. F. Young3 , I and J. Hone2 * Graphene devices on standard SiO2 substrates are highly disor- dered, exhibiting

Kim, Philip

294

A Search for Earth-size Planets Detection of Transiting Planet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Search for Earth-size Planets STScI!SAO Detection of Transiting Planet Candidates in Kepler Mission Data Peter Tenenbaum For the Kepler Transiting Planet Search Team 2012-June-06 #12;A Search for Earth-size Planets The Kepler Mission A space-based photometer searching for Earth-size exoplanets Uses

Masci, Frank

295

Quantum Computers What is the difference between a computer and a physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Computers Peter Shor MIT #12;What is the difference between a computer and a physics experiment? #12;One answer: A computer answers mathematical questions. A physics experiment answers physical. A computer is a little box that sits on your desk (or in your briefcase). #12;A third answer: You don't need

Shor, Peter W.

296

Computational Thinking: Languages and Computation Prof. Brigitte Pientka  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational Thinking: Languages and Computation Prof. Brigitte Pientka School of Computer Science McGill University Computer science is no more about computers than astronomy is about telescopes. ­ E. Dijkstra #12;A grand vision "Computational Thinking will be a fundamental skill used by everyone

Pientka, Brigitte

297

Future of Energy SecurityFuture of Energy Security Rajan Gupta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future of Energy SecurityFuture of Energy Security Rajan Gupta Theoretical Division Los Alamos the darkness #12;A mind-boggling global infrastructure (~$15 trillion) provides energy/mobility to ~3.5 billion Hydro Nuclear #12;Fossil fuels and Environment In the 20th century we started to act on pollution

298

Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > M & O Support Department > Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex DE-AC05-00OR22800 Operated by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC Updated to Modification 297 dated 09/30/2013 BASIC Contract (Official) Modifications (Official) Funding Mods Available Upon Request Conformed Contract (Unofficial) Basic Contract dated 8/31/2000 (pdf, 13,886KB) Y-12 A001 (9/15/00) (pdf, 60KB) Y-12 Conformed Contract (Conformed to Mod 297 dated 09/30/2013 (pdf, 4201 KB) Y-12 A002 (10/15/00) (pdf, 130KB) Y-12 M003 (10/26/00) (pdf, 77KB) Y-12 M004 (10/31/00) (pdf, 865KB) Y-12 M006 (10/31/00) (pdf, 191KB)

299

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories: Missions:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

results. Our areas of accomplishment for results. Our areas of accomplishment for 2010 include: Nuclear Weapons Engineering People photo 90-day Feasibility Study: Sandia researchers conducted a 90-day feasibility study for the Office of the Secretary of Defense in a common arming, fuzing, and firing (AF&F) system for the W78/Mk12A and W88/Mk5 warheads, with excursions of the AF&F for high-surety warheads and the W87/Mk21 systems. The study found that significant levels of AF&F commonality are possible with existing system architectures that support use in the Mk5, Mk12A, and Mk21 re-entry systems and enable modernization goals for the future stockpile. People photo Arming & Fuzing Subsystem Inspection: On July 23, 2010, the 500th Arming & Fuzing Subsystem (AFS) was accepted by the National Nuclear

300

Data:Dd74bc71-2a6c-4036-a66c-f437ba688eac | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1-2a6c-4036-a66c-f437ba688eac 1-2a6c-4036-a66c-f437ba688eac No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Bartholomew County Rural E M C Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: 2013/06/01 Rate name: Commercial and Small Power Service, Single Phase Service Sector: Commercial Description: Available in all territory served by the Corporation, subject to the established Service Rules and Regulations of the Corporation. Source or reference: http://www.bcremc.com/schedb.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anisovich 12a dpwa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

91.5x122 cm Poster Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 2008 www.PosterPresentations.com HST Cluster Supernova Survey Nao Suzuki 1 , G. Aldering 1 , R. Amanullah, K. Barbary 1,2 , L. Barrientos, M. Brodwin, N. Connolly, K. Dawson, R. de Jong, A. Dey, M. Doi, M. Donahue, P. Eisenhardt, E. Ellingson, L. Faccioli 1 , V. Fadeyev, H. Fakhouri 1,2 , A. Fruchter, D. Gilbank, M. Gladders, G. Goldhaber 1,2 , A. Gonzalez, A. Goobar, A. Gude 1,2 , J. Hennawi, H. Hoekstra, E. Hsiao 1 , X. Huang 1,2 , Y. Ihara, B. Jannuzi, M. J. Jee, B. Koester, M. Kowalski 2 , C. Lidman 1 , B. E. Linder 2 , L. Lubin, J. Meyers 12 , T. Morokuma, S. Perlmutter 1,2 , M. Postman, J. Rhodes, P. Rosati 2 , P. Ripoche 1 , D. Rubin 12 , D. Schlegel 1 , A. Spadafora 1 , A. Stanford, D. Stern, N. Yasuda, H. Yee, Supernova Cosmology Project 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,

302

Flat or curved thin optical display panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical panel 10 includes a plurality of waveguides 12 stacked together, with each waveguide 12 having a first end 12a and an opposite second end 12b. The first ends 12a collectively define a first face 16, and the second ends 12b collectively define a second face 18 of the panel 10. The second face 18 is disposed at an acute face angle relative to the waveguides 12 to provide a panel 10 which is relatively thin compared to the height of the second face. In an exemplary embodiment for use in a projection TV, the first face 16 is substantially smaller in height than the second face 18 and receives a TV image, with the second face 18 defining a screen for viewing the image enlarged.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

303

Generation of negative ions in the gas phase from a 12CaO{center_dot}7Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane-coated ceramic heater under atmospheric pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

12CaO{center_dot}7Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (C12A7) crystal is able to generate strong and high purity oxygen anion (O{sup -}) beam under reduced pressure. However, the emission of O{sup -} or related species under atmospheric pressure has not been evaluated. In this study, the characteristics of negative ion species emissions from the C12A7 membrane-coated ceramic heater under atmospheric pressure were investigated by quadrupole mass spectrometer. Negative ion species were confirmed to be emitted even under atmospheric pressure. It was supposed that the detected negative ion clusters, such as O{sup -}(H{sub 2}O){sub n}, O{sub 2}{sup -}(H{sub 2}O){sub n}, and CO{sub 4}{sup -}(H{sub 2}O){sub n}, were generated by the reaction of negative ions emitted from the heater with impurities in He gas.

Yamamoto, Mitsuo [College of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Shima, Akio [Department of Chemical System Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nishioka, Masateru [Research Center for Compact Chemical Process, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Miyagi 983-8551 (Japan); Sadakata, Masayoshi [Department of Environmental Chemical Engineering, Kogakuin University, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

ECM Process Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Electrolytes for the electrochemical machining of various metals...NaCl or KCl 0.30 (2 ) 2.1 (0.13) NaNO 3 0.60 (5) 2.1 (0.13) Steel; hardened tool steel NaClO 3 0.78 (6 ) 2.0 (0.12) Gray iron NaCl 0.30 (2 ) 2.0 (0.12) (a) (b) NaNO 3 0.60 (5) 2.0 (0.12) (a) (b) White cast iron NaNO 3 0.60 (5) 1.6 (0.10) (c) Aluminum and aluminum alloys (d) NaNO 3 0.60...

305

Electrolyte  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Electrolytes for the electrochemical machining of various metals...NaCl or KCl 0.30 (2 ) 2.1 (0.13) NaNO 3 0.60 (5) 2.1 (0.13) Steel; hardened tool steel NaClO 3 0.78 (6 ) 2.0 (0.12) Gray iron NaCl 0.30 (2 ) 2.0 (0.12) (a) (b) NaNO 3 0.60 (5) 2.0 (0.12) (a) (b) White cast iron NaNO 3 0.60 (5) 1.6 (0.10) (c) Aluminum and aluminum alloys (d) NaNO 3 0.60...

306

Electrolytes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Electrolytes for the electrochemical machining of metals...cobalt-base alloys NaCl or KCl 0.30 2.5 2.1 0.13 NaNO 3 0.60 5 2.1 0.13 Steel; hardened tool steel NaClO 3 0.78 6.5 2.0 0.12 Gray iron NaCl 0.30 2.5 2.0 (a) (b) 0.12 (a) (b) NaNO 3 0.60 5 2.0 (a) (b) 0.12 (a) (b) White cast iron NaNO 3 0.60 5 1.6 (c) 0.10 (c) Aluminum and aluminum

307

Newsletter 9-05.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 As part of the ongoing celebration of the World Year of Physics, the Education Office has put together a series of presentations for students in grades 2 through 12. A cryogenics show and some demonstrations de- veloped by graduate students, such as "Charge! Electricity and Magnetism" and "Light and Color," have been present- ed in the past. But new demonstrations, such as "Physics

308

Method for preparing ceramic composite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 particulates and nickle aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m.sup.1/2, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa.

Alexander, Kathleen B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Becher, Paul F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Waters, Shirley B. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Laboratory Evaluation of "Formula X-12" Combustion Additive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Formula X-12," a combustion additive produced by Advanced Petroleum Technologies LLC (APT), has been described as an advanced molecular nanotechnology that reduces pollutants and toxic emissions to negligible levels and contains no metals, with an all-natural nontoxic formulation. When combined with Southridge Enterprises, Inc. branded 85 pure ethanol product, claims were made in a press release that "Formula X-12 would increase energy yield by a minimum of 10." As similar claims regarding potential coa...

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

310

Magneto-Inertial Fusion (Magnetized Target Fusion)( g g )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2011 U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA Slide 1 for the DOE/NNSA Slide 2 Some MIF-IFE reactor considerations #12;A Wide Range of Driver/Target Combinations for the DOE/NNSA S. A. Slutz, et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010) A. G. Lynn, et al, Rev. Sci. Instr. 81

311

Magneto-Inertial Fusion (Magnetized Target Fusion)( g g )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA Slide 1 LA-UR-11-01898 #12;Some Observations An economic for the DOE/NNSA 2 #12;Magneto-inertial fusion: Part of a plan B · May allow more efficient drivers, lower Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA Slide 3 #12;A Wide Range of Driver

312

Give and Take: Political Competition, Participation and Public Finance in 20th Century Latin America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calculus (Mueller and Murrel, 1986). Subsidy recipients have a comparative advantage in organiz- ing collective action because they, typically, are few in numbers and the bene?ts bestowed are concentrated (Olson, 1965). An increase in political competition... services (such as pensions and public health). In particular, Lindert (1994) shows that ageing of the population contributed 11We obtain essentially identical results if we entered the Polity IV index directly in the regression model. 12A precise de...

Aidt, Toke S; Eterovic, Dalibor

313

Gestion des auto-occultations pour l'augmentation d'une surface deformable V. Gay-Bellile1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gestion des auto-occultations pour l'augmentation d'une surface d´eformable V. Gay-Bellile1,2 A peu. La surface est habituellement suppos´ee ne pas s'auto-occulter. En effet, l'estimation d'une fonction de d´eformation en pr´esence d'auto-occultations s'av`ere complexe. Cette article propose un

Bartoli, Adrien

314

The Effects of Bleached Kraft Pulp-Mill Effluent on Periphyton DOE FRAP 1996-08  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phenolics are a family of compounds comprised of three main classes, phenols, guaiacols and catechols - Catechols 0.51 + 0.10a 1.11 + 0.03a 2.45 + 0.21b Total Mono - Chlorinated Phenolics 0.68 + 0.12a 3.22 + 0 was also apparent when mono-, di-, tri-- and tetra- chlorinated phenolics and total catechols were

315

LIFE Economics and Delivery Pathway Presentation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anklam--NAS/NAE, January 29, 2011 2NIF-0111-20828s2.ppt #12;A minimum electrical gain of 3 to 4 gain may outweigh benefits LIFE Point Design Anklam--NAS/NAE, January 29, 2011NIF-0111-20828s2.ppt 3, 2011NIF-0111-20828s2.ppt 4 #12;Improvements to gain need to be weighed against cost impacts on affected

316

NDICES ESPACIAIS PARA MENSURAR A SEGREGAO RESIDENCIAL: O CASO DE SO JOS DOS CAMPOS (SP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polo encontrou Kublai Khan a sua espera, sentado diante de um tabuleiro de xadrez. Com um gesto formas se organiza e se destrói. Italo Calvino, em "As Cidades Invisíveis". #12;#12;A meus pais, Emilson índices de segregação nestes trabalhos não vem acompanhada da adoção de um limiar criterioso q

Camara, Gilberto

317

Volume 131, Number 2 tech.mit.edu Friday, February 4, 2011 Oldest and Largest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. SteelerS Sports staff make their picks for Super Bowl XLV -- can Pittsburgh pull it off against Green Bay's brews ArtS, p. 12 aS CaIrO bUrNS... Tech columnists opine on the situation in the Middle East opiNioN, p of the na- tion's largest, richest, and most influential schools have a big impact on how this town works

318

BIMA Memoranda Series Report from First Hat Creek FiberOptic Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cable system. Appendix A presents and costs a plan for upgrading the entire array to fiber­optic LO­stable single­mode fibers. On Sept. 20, the fiber­optic link was disassembled and the normal system restored. 2­meter lengths. 5 #12; A Fiber­Optic Upgrade of the BIMA Array In light of the success of the fiber­optic

319

CMU-ITC-85-037 LW P User Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structures 6 1.4. LWP Runtime Calls 8 2. The Lock Package 19 2.1. Key Design Choices 19 2.2. A Simple Example 20 2.3. Constants, Macros and Data Structures 21 2.4. Lock Calls 23 3. The IOMGR Package 29 3.1. Key Preface 1 1. The LWP Package 3 1.1. Key Design Choices 5 1.2. A Simple Example 5 1.3. Constants and Data

320

Fer + lger Fer + lourd a Bergquist and Boyle, 2006 ; De Jong et al., 2007; Escoube et al., 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

± ± ± ± ± ± ± ± ± #12; ±± ð ± #12;a Bergquist and Boyle, 2006 ; De Jong et al., 2007; Escoube et al., 2009 b Beard et al., 2003b ; Bergquist and Boyle, 2006 ; Ingri et al., 2006 ; Escoube et al., 2009 c Severmann et al., 2006; Homoky et al., 2009 ; Severmann et al., 2010. These 56Fe were observed

Lacan, Francois

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anisovich 12a dpwa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Rindler type acceleration in f(R) gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By choosing a fluid source in $f(R)$ gravity, defined by $f\\left(R\\right) =R-12a\\xi \\ln \\left\\ | R\\right\\ | $, where $a$ (=Rindler acceleration) and $\\xi $ are both constants, the field equations correctly yield the Rindler acceleration term in the metric. We identify domains in which the weak energy conditions (WEC) and the strong energy conditions (SEC) are satisfied.

S. Habib Mazharimousavi; M. Halilsoy

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

322

On the definition of quasi-Jordan algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Velasquez and Felipe recently introduced quasi-Jordan algebras based on the product $a \\triangleleft b = \\tfrac12 ( a \\dashv b + b \\vdash a )$ in an associative dialgebra with operations $\\dashv$ and $\\vdash$. We determine the polynomial identities of degree $\\le 4$ satisfied by this product. In addition to right commutativity and the right quasi-Jordan identity, we obtain a new associator-derivation identity.

Murray R. Bremner

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

323

Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009; Appendix A: Cross Cutting Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Appendix A: Cross Cutting Information A.1 Presentation: Renewable Resource Availability in Greensburg ................. 2 A.2 Summary: Financial Incentives for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ................................................................................... 12 A.3 Presentation: Renewable Energy Screening, Town of Greensburg, Kansas ................................................................... 25 2 A.1 Renewable Resource Availability in Greensburg Mary Werner National Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Resource Availability in Greensburg g Prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) June 8, 2007 3 4 5 Biofuels / Biomass 6 7 County Corn* Corn Ethanol (Gal)* Soybeans** Biodiesel (Gal) Cellulosic

324

Appliance Standards Program - The FY 2003 Priority Setting Report and Actions Proposed -Appendix A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A: A: Technical Support Document (TSD) Appendixes i A1 Introduction ........................................................................................ A1-1 A1.1 Methodology for Energy Consumption and Savings Estimate............... A1-2 A1.2 Energy Consumption and Savings Calculation Methodology ................ A1-3 A1.2.1 Device Annual Energy Consumption (AEC) Estimates ...........................A1-3 A1.2.1.1 Equipment Stock, S...................................................................................A1-4 A1.2.1.2 Usage Pattern ..........................................................................................A1-5 A1.2.1.3 Power draw by mode, P ...........................................................................A1-5 A1.2.2 Energy Savings Estimates

325

#12.11x17  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Control the Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers TOPICAL REPORT NUMBER 12 JUNE 1999 TOPICAL REPORT NUMBER 12 A report on three projects conducted under separate cooperative agreements between: The U.S. Department of Energy and * Pure Air * Southern Company Services * New York State Electric & Gas Corporation JUNE 1999 Advanced Technologies for the Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers Cover image: Plant Views of Bailly, Yates, and Milliken Stations Executive Summary ........................................................................................... 1 Background ........................................................................................................ 2 Emission Standards ...........................................................................................

326

Appliance Standards Program - The FY 2003 Priority Setting Report and Actions Proposed -Appendix A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A: A: Technical Support Document (TSD) Appendixes i A1 Introduction ........................................................................................ A1-1 A1.1 Methodology for Energy Consumption and Savings Estimate............... A1-2 A1.2 Energy Consumption and Savings Calculation Methodology ................ A1-3 A1.2.1 Device Annual Energy Consumption (AEC) Estimates ...........................A1-3 A1.2.1.1 Equipment Stock, S...................................................................................A1-4 A1.2.1.2 Usage Pattern ..........................................................................................A1-5 A1.2.1.3 Power draw by mode, P ...........................................................................A1-5 A1.2.2 Energy Savings Estimates

327

Rearrangement, Convection and Competition Yann BRENIER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steps) 500 grid points in x, heat profile y(t, x) versus x drawn every 2 time steps 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.2)2) - exp(-20(x - 0.4)2) t, x [0, 1] h = 0.005 (= 200 time steps) 500 grid points in x, heat profile y(t, x #12;A function and its rearrangement N = 200 grid points in x 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 0 0.1 0.2 0

Brenier, Yann

328

Preshot Predictions for Defect Induced Mix (DIME) Capsules  

SciTech Connect

In this memo, we evaluate the most probable yield and other results for the Defect Induced Mix (DIME-12A) Polar Direct Drive (PDD) capsule-only shots. We evaluate the expected yield, bang time, burn averaged ion temperature, and the average electron temperature of the Ge line-emitting region. We also include synthetic images of the capsule backlit by Cu K-{alpha} emission (8.39 keV) and core self-emission synthetic images. This memo is a companion to the maximum credible yield memo (LA-UR-12-00287) published earlier.

Bradley, Paul A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krasheninnikova, Natalia S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tregillis, Ian L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmitt, Mark J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Resonance test system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus (10) for applying at least one load to a specimen (12) according to one embodiment of the invention may comprise a mass (18). An actuator (20) mounted to the specimen (12) and operatively associated with the mass (18) moves the mass (18) along a linear displacement path (22) that is perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the specimen (12). A control system (26) operatively associated with the actuator (20) operates the actuator (20) to reciprocate the mass (18) along the linear displacement path (22) at a reciprocating frequency, the reciprocating frequency being about equal to a resonance frequency of the specimen (12) in a test configuration.

Musial, Walter (Boulder, CO); White, Darris (Superior, CO)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Microsoft Word - SoftXraySpectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.15 0.00 U4B a bend 0.9 0.9 0 U7A bend 0.8 0.8 0 U12A bend 0.25 0.25 0 X13A a wiggler (EPW) 0.1 0.1 0 X24C bend 0.1 0.1 0 other: U4A bend 0 0 0 U8B bend 0 0 0 APS 0.6 0.6 0.6...

331

Carbonaceous film coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making a carbonaceous film comprising heating tris(1,3,2-benzodiazaborolo)borazine or dodecahydro tris(1,3,2)diazaborine(1,2-a:1'2'-c:1''2''-e)borazine in an inert atmosphere in the presence of a substrate to a temperature at which the borazine compound decomposes, and the decomposition products deposit onto the substrate to form a thin, tenacious, highly reflective conductive coating having a narrow band gap which is susceptible of modification and a relatively low coefficient of friction.

Maya, L.

1988-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

332

NNSA Service Center -- Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex DE-AC05-00OR22800 Operated by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC Updated to Modification 222 dated 09/30/2010 BASIC Contract (Official) Modifications (Official) Funding Mods Available Upon Request Conformed Contract (Unofficial) Basic Contract dated 8/31/2000 (pdf, 13,886KB) Y-12 A001 (9/15/00) (pdf, 60KB) Y-12 Conformed Contract (Conformed to Mod 222 dated 9/30/10) (pdf, 7,982KB) Y-12 A002 (10/15/00) (pdf, 130KB) Y-12 M003 (10/26/00) (pdf, 77KB) Y-12 M004 (10/31/00) (pdf, 865KB) Y-12 M006 (10/31/00) (pdf, 191KB) Y-12 M009 (1/22/01) (pdf, 314KB) Y-12 M013 (4/6/01) (pdf, 293KB) Y-12 M015 (5/9/01) (pdf, 266KB) Y-12 M018 (7/2/01) (pdf, 520KB) Y-12 M021 (9/25/01) (pdf, 1,836KB) Y-12 M022 (9/25/01) (pdf, 193KB)

333

Data:A1e36612-a1ba-45d2-ae09-f9326518952f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

12-a1ba-45d2-ae09-f9326518952f 12-a1ba-45d2-ae09-f9326518952f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Marshfield, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-3 Industrial Power Time-of-Day Service above 500kW Demand Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0515 per kilowatt-hour.

334

Data:4c9c112a-12c6-4614-bc0a-281d7efb46a2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

12a-12c6-4614-bc0a-281d7efb46a2 12a-12c6-4614-bc0a-281d7efb46a2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Gresham, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Ms-1 Street, Area, and Athletic Field Lighting Service Ornamental 250 W HPS Sector: Lighting Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0762 per kilowatt-hour.

335

Portable basketball rim testing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable basketball rim rebound testing device 10 is illustrated in two preferred embodiments for testing the rebound or energy absorption characteristics of a basketball rim 12 and its accompanying support to determine likely rebound or energy absorption charcteristics of the system. The apparatus 10 includes a depending frame 28 having a C-clamp 36 for releasably rigidly connecting the frame to the basketball rim 12. A glide weight 60 is mounted on a guide rod 52 permitting the weight 60 to be dropped against a calibrated spring 56 held on an abutment surface on the rod to generate for deflecting the basketball rim and then rebounding the weight upwardly. A photosensor 66 is mounted on the depending frame 28 to sense passage of reflective surfaces 75 on the weight to thereby obtain sufficient data to enable a processing means 26 to calculate the rebound velocity and relate it to an energy absorption percentage rate of the rim system 12. A readout is provided to display the energy absorption percentage.

Abbott, W. Bruce (610 Clover St., Cheney, WA 99004); Davis, Karl C. (Box 722, Richland, WA 99352)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Microsoft Word - DOE Records Disposition Schedule Changes3.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Changes-to-Schedules REV 3 DOE Administrative Records Schedules Changes Last revised: 12/14/2009 Date DOE Admin Schedule Item(s) Change Authorizing Document 3/02/07 1 10b, 24, 27, 42a-c Added items for Form I-9 (GRS 1, Item 10b), reasonable accommodation records (GRS 1, Item 24), alternative dispute resolution records (GRS 1, item 27), and alternative worksite records (GRS 1, Item 42). Added item numbers for N1 citations. GRS Transmittal No. 11, 12/31/03; GRS Transmittal No. 12, 7/14/04; GRS 1 Item 42 6/14/07 1 11 Second sentence in NOTE deleted. 6/14/07 1 12 Moved the NOTE for 12a to the series title. GRS 1, item 12 6/14/07 1 21 Inserted the "see note" and the disposition authority for the series title. N1-343-98-4, item 21 and GRS

337

This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A: Handling of federal A: Handling of federal and selected state legislation and regulation in the AEO This page inTenTionally lefT blank 187 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Appendix A: Handling of federal and selected state legislation and regulation in the AEO Legislation Brief description AEO handling Basis Residential sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories with periodic updates Included for categories represented in the AEO residential sector forecast. Public Law 100-12. a. Room air conditioners Sets standards for room air conditioners in 2014. Require new purchases of room air conditioners to meet the standard.

338

Event:Open Data Workshop 2012 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Workshop 2012 Workshop 2012 Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Open Data Workshop 2012: 1:00pm Eastern on 2012/11/12 A follow-up event to the successful LOD Workshop held in Abu Dhabi last January, this event aims to bring together key parties in the states, to better educate them on the merits of LOD and introduce them to data sharing partners. Event Details Name Open Data Workshop 2012 Date 2012/11/12 Time 1:00pm Eastern Location Washington, District of Columbia Organizer National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership (REEEP), German Ministry Tags LOD, Linked Open Data, Open Data, Open Government, Workshop, 2012 Website Event Website Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from

339

Independent Oversight Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 National Security Complex - June Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Y-12 Implementation Verification Review Processes This report documents the independent review of implementation verification review (IVR) processes at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) conducted by the Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight, Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). The review was performed from March 12 - 30, 2012. The objective of this review was to evaluate the extent to which the site management and operating contractor, B&W Y-12, a partnership of Babcock & Wilcox and Bechtel Corporation, and the Y-12 Site

340

A Present . . . And A Future | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Present . . A Present . . . And A Future News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.12.12 A Present . . . And A Future Students are hitting the books - instead of the mall - in preparation for the 2013 National Science Bowl. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo 2013 National Science Bowl Thousands of middle- and high-school students across the country are headed for a slightly unusual holiday season. Instead of hitting the mall, they'll be hitting the books. And instead of trying to figure out which movie to see, they'll instead be trying to remember answers to questions such as:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anisovich 12a dpwa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Low Carbon Development Planning in the Power Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Power Sector the Power Sector Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Low Carbon Development Planning in the Power Sector Name Low Carbon Development Planning in the Power Sector Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector Energy Topics Low emission development planning Website http://www.esmap.org/esmap/nod Country Morocco, Nigeria UN Region Northern Africa References ESMAP[1] Overview "This new program was initiated in 2010 and aims to provide clients with analytical support to develop capacity for low-carbon development in power sector planning. It employs a learning-by doing approach with pilot activities in two countries in the initial stage (Nigeria and Morocco - 2010-12). A toolkit will be developed at the end of the pilot program to

342

Y-12 team raises more than $20,000 for Light the Night event | Y-12  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

team raises more than ... team raises more than ... Y-12 team raises more than $20,000 for Light the Night event Posted: November 8, 2013 - 12:00pm More than 86 Y-12 employees and family members participated at this year's Leukemia and Lymphoma Society's Light the Night walk held Oct. 24 at the University of Tennessee. The B&W Y 12 team, recognized as the largest corporate team at the event, raised more than $20,000. Participating in the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society's Light The Night Walk funds therapies and treatment advances for blood cancer patients. Follow Y-12 on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr. B&W Y-12, a limited liability enterprise of The Babcock and Wilcox Company and Bechtel National Inc., operates the Y-12 National Security Complex for the National Nuclear Security Administration.

343

June 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

day includes: day includes: * continental breakfast, * learning the "Oak Ridge Story," * bus and walking tour of Y-12 National Security Complex, * lunch with parents, * career presentations, and * American Museum of Science and Energy tour. Bring Your Future to Work To register, contact Latoya Shephard at 576-5535 June 20 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. All children ages 11 to 15 are invited. BWX TYmes Volume 2, Number 12 A newsletter for the employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex Beginning July 1, the Absence, Payroll and Labor Utilization System (more commonly referred to as APlus) will be implemented for time collection and absence reporting at Y-12. The new system uses the time-manage- ment functionality of the SAP program. Glenn Kizer, director of Financial Management, points

344

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reply to comment Reply to comment Slide17 Submitted by gibsone on Thu, 2013-09-12 12:38 quicktabs-title FY2006-grc Slide17 Contribute to the Geothermal Legacy Collection If you are interested in growing this collection with additional, worthwhile geothermal legacy reports - as several at this conference have commented already, please note this contact information. Contacts: Lynn Davis, DOE OSTI 865.241.6435, davisl@osti.gov Allan Jelacic, DOE GTP, allan.jelacic@ee.doe.gov Dan Entingh, PERI, Roanoke, VA, dentingh@cox.net DOE, OSTI, and PERI are seeking follow up to previous recommendations and additional contributions from the sources identified earlier. Add new comment Thumbnail Mobile_320x340 Icon_64x64 Reply (If you're a human, don't change the following field) Enter your name: 12a3469612a

345

C:\Forms\DOE F 3735.2.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 (08-80) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (Statement Concerning Gifts Received from a Foreign Government) 1. Name of Employee 3. Division 5. Name of Recipient 7. Description of Gift 8. Date of Acceptance 10. Circumstances Justifying Acceptance of the Gift 11. Foreign Government Donor 12a. Name of Individual Presenting Gift 13. Do you wish to participate in the sale of this item if it is sold by GSA? Signature of Recipient Date No Yes 12b. Position of Individual Presenting Gift 9. Value of Gift 4. Position 6. Relationship to Employee 2. Date FOREIGN GIFTS STATEMENT Statement Concerning Gifts Received From a Foreign Government Item 1. Item 9. Item 10. Item 2. Item 7. Item 8. Items 11 and 12. Items 5 and 6. Items 3 and 4. Item 13. This statement is to be filed pursuant to the provisions of the Foreign Gifts and Decorations

346

1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million U.S. Households; 45 pages, 128 kb) Million U.S. Households; 45 pages, 128 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-6a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4

347

Idaho Meeting #2 | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho Meeting #2 Idaho Meeting #2 Home > Groups > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today in Boise. Though the intent of the meeting was to focus on identifying permitting concerns, agencies and developers alike had few concerns with the current process. There were agency personnel in attendance who had not attended the first Idaho meeting, so the workshop was a great opportunity to work through the flowcharts relevant to those agencies. One such section was the federal flora and fauna impact evaluation process (GRR Section 12). A Fish and Wildlife representative was on hand to update these flowcharts - updated

348

The Y-12 Times, a newsletter for employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 October 2011 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Y-12: A winning team at the Super Bowl Page 3 Members of tomorrow's work force are Y-12 ambassadors Page 4 Reconnect with retiree Charlie Montgomery Page 8 Live a better life B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the Y-12 National Security Complex. A newsletter for employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex Managing Editors Amy Alley: alleyab@y12.doe.gov Heidi Spurling: spurlinghw@y12.doe.gov Layout Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ashley Douglas Kathy Fahey Scott Fraker John Holbrook David Keim Terry Marlar Jill McNutt Cindy Moffett

349

Attachment A: AIP Program Principles (Questions and Answers 1-12) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A: AIP Program Principles (Questions and Answers 1-12) A: AIP Program Principles (Questions and Answers 1-12) Attachment A: AIP Program Principles (Questions and Answers 1-12) AIP Program Principles This attachment contains twelve questions and answers that designate the mandatory AIP provisions that shall be included in new and renegotiated agreements and discusses the principles underlying these requirements. Headquarters approval is required if mandatory language is not included in a new or renegotiated AIP. Question #1: Can States use AIP funds to support State regulatory activities? Answer: No, States cannot use AIP funds to support their regulatory activities. The Office of Management and Budget and the Department's congressional oversight committees have consistently indicated that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the states are required to use their current

350

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Centro de Energías Renovables (CER), United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Webinar, Training materials References: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model[1] Logo: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Webinar Video SMARTSwebinar.JPG Announcement " Monday, December 6, 2010 11-12 a.m. Golden, CO 1-2 p.m., Washington, D.C. 3-4 p.m., Santiago, Chile

351

C:\My Documents\FORMS\DOE F 551.1.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Section Section I - Traveler Information DOE F 551.1 (08-02) OMB Control No. 1910-1800 Replaces DOE F 1512.1 All Other Editions Are Obsolete U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REQUEST FOR APPROVAL OF FOREIGN TRAVEL 1. Name (Last, First, Middle) 4. Birth Date (MO-DD-YYYY) 7. DOE Facility/Organization 11. Position/Title 13. Notes: 12a. Indicate whether you have held a DOE security clearance within the last 5 years. If yes, indicate the highest level received. ( ) Yes, please specify ( ) Top Secret ( ) Secret ( ) Q ( ) L ( ) No 12b. Indicate whether you have held any other security clearance within the last 5 years. If yes, enter agency and clearance level ( ) Yes, please specify Agency: Clearance: ( ) No 9. Employee Address: Street Address: City: 10. Contact Information State: Page 1 Zip: County: 8. Employee Type ( ) DOE Federal Employee ( ) Other Federal Employee ( ) Contractor ( ) Foreign National ( ) University Specify

352

Enforcement Letter , Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC - July  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Letter , Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC Letter , Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC - July 10, 2009 Enforcement Letter , Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC - July 10, 2009 July 10, 2009 Enforcement Letter issued to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC related to the Protection of Classified Information at the Y-12 National Security Complex The purpose of this enforcement letter is to communicate the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement concerns with the protection of classified information at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). A recent Office of Security Enforcement analysis of security incidents identified a number of concerns that warrant prompt attention by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) management to

353

EIA-814  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A_1","=Part4a!$B$11" A_1","=Part4a!$B$11" "_A_10","=Part4a!$B$20" "_A_100","=Part4b!$B$60" "_A_101","=Part4c!$B$11" "_A_102","=Part4c!$B$12" "_A_103","=Part4c!$B$13" "_A_104","=Part4c!$B$14" "_A_105","=Part4c!$B$15" "_A_106","=Part4c!$B$16" "_A_107","=Part4c!$B$17" "_A_108","=Part4c!$B$18" "_A_109","=Part4c!$B$19" "_A_11","=Part4a!$B$21" "_A_110","=Part4c!$B$20" "_A_111","=Part4c!$B$21" "_A_112","=Part4c!$B$22" "_A_113","=Part4c!$B$23" "_A_114","=Part4c!$B$24"

354

Remarks by The President at The National Academy of Sciences Annual Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at The National Academy of Sciences Annual at The National Academy of Sciences Annual Meeting Remarks by The President at The National Academy of Sciences Annual Meeting April 27, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary _____________________________________________________ For Immediate Release April 27, 2009 REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT AT THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES ANNUAL MEETING National Academy of Sciences Washington, D.C. 9:12 A.M. EDT THE PRESIDENT: Well, thank you so much for the wonderful welcome. To President Cicerone, thank you very much for your leadership and for hosting us today. To John Holdren, thanks, John, for the outstanding work that you are doing. I was just informed backstage that Ralph and John both are 1965 graduates of MIT -- same class. And so I'm not sure this is the perfectly

355

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0035-DNA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0035-DNA DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0035-DNA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0035-DNA DNA at Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Well Field {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type DNA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Geothermal Area Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Project Location California Project Phase Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Production Wells Comments Geothermal Drilling Permits 12-A-12, 54A-11, 62-11, and Sundry Notice Well 65-11 Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided

356

housingunit_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Tables Housing Unit Tables (Million U.S. Households; 49 pages, 210 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-6a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4

357

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virtual Virtual Resonance and Frequency Difference Generation by van der Waals Interaction L. Tetard, 1,2 A. Passian, 1,2, * S. Eslami, 3 N. Jalili, 3 R. H. Farahi, 1 and T. Thundat 1,2 1 Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6123, USA 2 Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996, USA 3 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA (Received 2 June 2010; published 6 May 2011) The ability to explore the interior of materials for the presence of inhomogeneities was recently demonstrated by mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy [L. Tetard, A. Passian, and T. Thundat, Nature Nanotech. 5, 105 (2009).]. Proposing a semiempirical nonlinear force, we show that difference frequency ! À generation, regarded as the simplest synthesized mode, occurs optimally when the force is tuned to

358

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

97 Federal Register 97 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 119 / Tuesday, June 21, 2011 / Notices conducted January through June 2012, and student data collection will take place January through September 2012. This submission requests approval for contacting institutions and students, list sampling, obtaining student enrollment lists and institution record data for the full-scale NPSAS:12. A separate request for review pertaining to student record data collection, the student interview, and post-data collection administrative record matching will be submitted in September 2011. Copies of the information collection submission for OMB review may be accessed from the RegInfo.gov Web site at http://www.reginfo.gov/public/do/ PRAMain or from the Department's Web site at http://edicsweb.ed.gov, by

359

NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Report Annual Report NERSC Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720-8148 This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2010 Annual Report i Table of Contents Table of Contents 1 The Year in Perspective 5 Research News 6 Overlooked Alternatives: New research restores photoisomerization and thermoelectrics to the roster of promising alternative energy sources 12 A Goldilocks Catalyst: Calculations show why a nanocluster may be "just right" for recycling carbon dioxide by converting it to methanol 16 Down with Carbon Dioxide: Detailed computational models help predict

360

Apparatus and method for pumping hot, erosive slurry of coal solids in coal derived, water immiscible liquid  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for and method of pumping hot, erosive slurry of coal solids in a coal derived, water immiscible liquid to higher pressure involves the use of a motive fluid which is miscible with the liquid of the slurry. The apparatus includes a pump 12, a remote check valve 14 and a chamber 16 between and in fluid communication with the pump 12 and check valve 14 through conduits 18,20. Pump 12 exerts pressure on the motive fluid and thereby on the slurry through a concentration gradient of coal solids within chamber 16 to alternately discharge slurry under pressure from the outlet port of check valve 14 and draw slurry in through the inlet port of check valve 14.

Ackerman, Carl D. (Olympia, WA)

1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "anisovich 12a dpwa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Slip stream apparatus and method for treating water in a circulating water system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus (10) for treating water in a circulating water system (12) t has a cooling water basin (14) includes a slip stream conduit (16) in flow communication with the circulating water system (12), a source (36) of acid solution in flow communication with the slip stream conduit (16), and a decarbonator (58) in flow communication with the slip stream conduit (16) and the cooling water basin (14). In use, a slip stream of circulating water is drawn from the circulating water system (12) into the slip stream conduit (16) of the apparatus (10). The slip stream pH is lowered by contact with an acid solution provided from the source (36) thereof. The slip stream is then passed through a decarbonator (58) to form a treated slip stream, and the treated slip stream is returned to the cooling water basin (14).

Cleveland, Joe R. (West Hills, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

HANSF 1.3 user's manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HANSF analysis tool is an integrated model considering phenomena inside a multi-canister overpack (MCO) spent nuclear fuel container such as fuel oxidation, convective and radiative heat transfer, and the potential for fission product release. It may be used for all phases of spent fuel disposition including cold vacuum drying, transportation, and storage. This manual reflects HANSF version 1.3, a revised version of version 1.2a. HANSF 1.3 was written to add new models for axial nodalization, add new features for ease of usage, and correct errors. HANSF 1.3 is intended for use on personal computers such as IBM-compatible machines with Intel processors running under a DOS-type operating system. HANSF 1.3 is known to compile under Lahey TI and Digital Visual FORTRAN, Version 6.0, but this does not preclude operation in other environments.

PLYS, M.G.

1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

363

Energy control strategy for a hybrid electric vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An energy control strategy (10) for a hybrid electric vehicle that controls an electric motor during bleed and charge modes of operation. The control strategy (10) establishes (12) a value of the power level at which the battery is to be charged. The power level is used to calculate (14) the torque to be commanded to the electric motor. The strategy (10) of the present invention identifies a transition region (22) for the electric motor's operation that is bounded by upper and lower speed limits. According to the present invention, the desired torque is calculated by applying equations to the regions before, during and after the transition region (22), the equations being a function of the power level and the predetermined limits and boundaries.

Phillips, Anthony Mark (Northville, MI); Blankenship, John Richard (Dearborn, MI); Bailey, Kathleen Ellen (Dearborn, MI); Jankovic, Miroslava (Birmingham, MI)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Energy control strategy for a hybrid electric vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An energy control strategy (10) for a hybrid electric vehicle that controls an electric motor during bleed and charge modes of operation. The control strategy (10) establishes (12) a value of the power level at which the battery is to be charged. The power level is used to calculate (14) the torque to be commanded to the electric motor. The strategy (10) of the present invention identifies a transition region (22) for the electric motor's operation that is bounded by upper and lower speed limits. According to the present invention, the desired torque is calculated by applying equations to the regions before, during and after the transition region (22), the equations being a function of the power level and the predetermined limits and boundaries.

Phillips, Anthony Mark (Northville, MI); Blankenship, John Richard (Dearborn, MI); Bailey, Kathleen Ellen (Dearborn, MI); Jankovic, Miroslava (Birmingham, MI)

2002-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

365

TL5002 Provides DDR Bus Termination Power Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Double data rate (DDR) bus termination power requirements bring new challenges to the power supply by requiring voltage tracking of a reference supply, requiring both sourcing and sinking current, and maintaining a high efficiency over a wide current range. This paper address these issues while presenting an example DDR design of 12 A of output current with voltage outputs between 0.9 V and 1.25 V. Issues and their solutions are provided for the power supply operating as a tradition buck power stage in the sourcing mode as well as for operating as a synchronous boost regulator in the sinking mode. Regulation and control loop characteristics of the examples are presented for both current sinking and sourcing modes of operation. Transient load response is also presented showing output voltage variation, as the current is transitioned from sourcing to sinking.

Robert Kollman; John Betten; Bang S. Lee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Multiple hearth furnace for reducing iron oxide  

SciTech Connect

A multiple moving hearth furnace (10) having a furnace housing (11) with at least two moving hearths (20) positioned laterally within the furnace housing, the hearths moving in opposite directions and each moving hearth (20) capable of being charged with at least one layer of iron oxide and carbon bearing material at one end, and being capable of discharging reduced material at the other end. A heat insulating partition (92) is positioned between adjacent moving hearths of at least portions of the conversion zones (13), and is capable of communicating gases between the atmospheres of the conversion zones of adjacent moving hearths. A drying/preheat zone (12), a conversion zone (13), and optionally a cooling zone (15) are sequentially positioned along each moving hearth (30) in the furnace housing (11).

Brandon, Mark M. (Charlotte, NC); True, Bradford G. (Charlotte, NC)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

367

Method for regeneration and activity improvement of syngas conversion catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for the treatment of single particle iron-containing syngas (synthes.s gas) conversion catalysts comprising iron, a crystalline acidic aluminosilicate zeolite having a silica to alumina ratio of at least 12, a pore size greater than about 5 Angstrom units and a constraint index of about 1-12 and a matrix. The catalyst does not contain promoters and the treatment is applicable to either the regeneration of said spent single particle iron-containing catalyst or for the initial activation of fresh catalyst. The treatment involves air oxidation, hydrogen reduction, followed by a second air oxidation and contact of the iron-containing single particle catalyst with syngas prior to its use for the catalytic conversion of said syngas. The single particle iron-containing catalysts are prepared from a water insoluble organic iron compound.

Lucki, Stanley J. (Runnemede, NJ); Brennan, James A. (Cherry Hill, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Novel strategies for ultrahigh specific activity targeted nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

We have developed novel strategies optimized for preparing high specific activity radiolabeled nanoparticles, targeting nuclear imaging of low abundance biomarkers. Several compounds have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64 for radiolabeling of SCK-nanoparticles via Copper(I) catalyzed or copper-free alkyne-azide cyclolization. Novel strategies have been developed to achieve ultrahigh specific activity with administrable amount of dose for human study using copper-free chemistry. Ligands for carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12), a low abundance extracellular biomarker for the responsiveness of breast cancer to endocrine therapie, have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64, and one of them has been evaluated in animal models. The results of this project will lead to major improvements in the use of nanoparticles in nuclear imaging and will significantly advance their potential for detecting low abundance biomarkers of medical importance.

Zhou, Dong

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

369

Thin-Film Solar Cell Fabricated on a Flexible Metallic Substrate  

SciTech Connect

A thin-film solar cell (10) is provided. The thin-film solar cell (10) comprises a flexible metallic substrate (12) having a first surface and a second surface. A back metal contact layer (16) is deposited on the first surface of the flexible metallic substrate (12). A semiconductor absorber layer (14) is deposited on the back metal contact. A photoactive film deposited on the semiconductor absorber layer (14) forms a heterojunction structure and a grid contact (24) deposited on the heterjunction structure. The flexible metal substrate (12) can be constructed of either aluminium or stainless steel. Furthermore, a method of constructing a solar cell is provided. The method comprises providing an aluminum substrate (12), depositing a semiconductor absorber layer (14) on the aluminum substrate (12), and insulating the aluminum substrate (12) from the semiconductor absorber layer (14) to inhibit reaction between the aluminum substrate (12) and the semiconductor absorber layer (14).

Tuttle, J. R.; Noufi, R.; Hasoon, F. S.

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Impact cratering on Mercury: consequences for the spin evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact basins identified by Mariner 10 and Messenger flyby images provide us a fossilized record of the impactor flux of asteroids on Mercury during the last stages of the early Solar System. The distribution of these basins is not uniform across the surface, and is consistent with a primordial synchronous rotation (Wieczorek et al. 2012). By analyzing the size of the impacts, we show that the distribution for asteroid diameters D power law of 1.2, a value that matches the predicted primordial distribution of the main-belt. We then derive a simple collisional model coherent with the observations, and when combining it with the secular evolution of the spin of Mercury, we are able to reproduce the present 3/2 spin-orbit resonance (about 50% of chances), as well as a primordial synchronous rotation. This result is robust with respect to variations in the dissipation and collisional models, or in the initial spin state of the planet.

Correia, Alexandre C M; 10.1088/2041-8205/751/2/L43

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

EGARCH models with fat tails, skewness and leverage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;)2 #0; 1; #0;1 #20; ut #20; #23;; #23; > 0: (2) The ?rst-order model, #21;t+1pt = #14; + #30;#21;tpt#0;1 + #20;ut; (3) is stationary if j#30;j < 1: Since ut is a martingale dierence (MD) and hence WN, #21;tpt#0;1 is weakly stationary... Y j=1 e#0; jm#12;#23;( jm); m < #23;; where j; j = 1; 2; :: are the coe cients in the moving average representation, #21;tpt#0;1 = ! + 1X j=1 jut#0;j; and #12;#23;(a) is Kummer?s (con?uent hypergeometric) function, 1F1(1=2; (#23; + 1)=2; a(#23...

Harvey, Andrew; Sucarrat, Genaro

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

Magnetic detection of underground pipe using timed-release marking droplets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system 10 and method of detecting an underground pipe 12 injects magnetic marking droplets 16 into the underground pipe 12 which coat the inside of the pipe 12 and may be detected from aboveground by a magnetometer 28. The droplets 16 include a non-adhesive cover 32 which allows free flow thereof through the pipe 12, with the cover 32 being ablatable for the timed-release of a central core 30 containing magnetic particles 30a which adhere to the inside of the pipe 12 and are detectable from aboveground. The rate of ablation of the droplet covers 32 is selectively variable to control a free flowing incubation zone 12a for the droplets 16 and a subsequent deposition zone 12b in which the magnetic particles 30a are released for coating the pipe 12.

Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Reich, Morris (Kew Garden Hills, NY)

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

373

Structure of Low-Energy Collective $0^{-}$-States in Doubly Magic Nuclei and Matrix Elements of the P-odd and P- and T-odd Weak Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of the collective low-energy $J^{\\pi}=0^{-}$ (T=0 and T=1) modes is studied for a doubly magic nucleus in a schematic analytic model of RPA. The $0^{-}$ phonon states ($T= 0,1$) lie at energies $E_{T=0}(0^{-}) \\alt \\omega$ and $E_{T=1}(0^{-}) > \\omega$, where $\\omega$ is the oscillator frequency. The matrix elements of P-odd and P- and T-odd weak one-body potentials connecting the ground state to these $0^{-}$-states, $W_{coll}$, are enhanced by the factor $\\sim 2 (\\frac{\\omega}{E})^{1/2}A^{1/3} \\sim 10$ as compared to the single-particle value $w_{sp}$ what can result in values $|W_{coll}| \\sim 20-30 eV$ if standard values of DDH parameters are used for $w_{sp}$. Similar enhancement arises in the P- and T-odd case.

O. K. Vorov; N. Auerbach; V. V. Flambaum

1996-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Chromosomal instability determines taxane sensitivity - supplementary materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n D ise as e? fre e S urv ivin g CIN_survival_genes=Expression CIN_survival_genes=Suppression HR = 0.44 (0.20 ? 0.97) logrank P = 0.037 5 Reference [1] Carter SL, Eklund AC, Kohane IS, Harris LN, Szallasi Z. A signature of chromosomal instability... GU 57 25 III ductal sinister 0/2 JD07 aGS 63 30 II ductal sinister 0/0 JD08 dGS 86 10 ND lobular sinister 0/0 JD09 dGS 61 ND II ductal sinister 0/0 JD10_33 aGU 85 45 III comedo dexter 0/3 JD11 aGS 88 20 III ductal sinister 0/0 JD12 aGU 55 40 III ductal...

Swanton, Charles; Nicke, Barbara; Schuett, Marion; Eklund, Aron C; Ng, Charlotte; Li, Qiyuan; Hardcastle, Thomas; Lee, Alvin; Roy, Rajat; East, Philip; Kschischo, Maik; Endesfelder, David; Wylie, Paul; Kim, Se Nyun; Chen, Jie-Guang; Howell, Michael; Ried, Thomas; Habermann, Jens K; Auer, Gert; Brenton, James D; Szallasi, Zoltan; Downward, Julian

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

375

Appendix A: Handling of Federal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and selected State legislation and regulation in the AEO This page inTenTionally lefT blank 177 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Appendix A: Handling of Federal and selected State legislation and regulation in the AEO Legislation Brief description AEO handling Basis Residential sector A. National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 Requires Secretary of Energy to set minimum efficiency standards for 10 appliance categories with periodic updates Included for categories represented in the AEO residential sector forecast. Public Law 100-12. a. Room air conditioners Sets standards for room air conditioners in 2014. Require new purchases of room air conditioners to meet the standard. Federal Register Notice

376

LCC-0047 cover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 08//00 7 08//00 LCLS-TN-00-12 A Transverse RF Deflecting Structure for Bunch Length and Phase Space Diagnostics August 2000 Paul Emma, Josef Frisch, Patrick Krejcik Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, CA Abstract: A traveling wave transverse rf deflecting structure is discussed as a tool for bunch length measurement and as an aid to detailed phase space diagnostics in future FEL and linear collider projects. The idea is an old one [ 1 ], [2], but the applications are new. The high frequency time variation of the deflecting fields is used to 'pitch' or 'yaw' the electron bunch where the resulting transverse beam width measured on a simple profile monitor represents a reliable, single-shot measure of the absolute bunch length. A small rf

377

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reply to comment Reply to comment Slide12 Submitted by gibsone on Thu, 2013-09-12 12:59 quicktabs-title FY2006-aaas Slide12 A global discovery gateway would advance science Our ultimate goal is to have a true Global Discovery facility. To help create it, we have undertaken a number of activities which, collectively, we call Innovations in Scientific Knowledge and Advancement, or ISKA.5 The Global Discovery facility would aggregate, search and rank all of the important, Web-accessible databases. It has the same goal as the fabled Library of Alexandria, namely to make all of science available in one place. Except in this case the place is everywhere at once, because anyone in the world could access the Global Discovery facility. Add new comment Thumbnail Mobile_320x340 Icon_64x64

378

System and method for producing metallic iron  

SciTech Connect

A hearth furnace 10 for producing metallic iron material has a furnace housing 11 having a drying/preheat zone 12, a conversion zone 13, a fusion zone 14, and optionally a cooling zone 15, the conversion zone 13 is between the drying/preheat zone 12 and the fusion zone 14. A moving hearth 20 is positioned within the furnace housing 11. A hood or separation barrier 30 within at least a portion of the conversion zone 13, fusion zone 14 or both separates the fusion zone 14 into an upper region and a lower region with the lower region adjacent the hearth 20 and the upper region adjacent the lower region and spaced from the hearth 20. An injector introduces a gaseous reductant into the lower region adjacent the hearth 20. A combustion region may be formed above the hood or separation barrier.

Bleifuss, Rodney L. (Grand Rapids, MN); Englund, David J. (Bovey, MN); Iwasaki, Iwao (Grand Rapids, MN); Fosnacht, Donald R. (Hermantown, MN); Brandon, Mark M. (Charlotte, NC); True, Bradford G. (Charlotte, NC)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

379

Remarks by The President at The National Academy of Sciences Annual Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remarks by The President at The National Academy of Sciences Annual Remarks by The President at The National Academy of Sciences Annual Meeting Remarks by The President at The National Academy of Sciences Annual Meeting April 27, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary _____________________________________________________ For Immediate Release April 27, 2009 REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT AT THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES ANNUAL MEETING National Academy of Sciences Washington, D.C. 9:12 A.M. EDT THE PRESIDENT: Well, thank you so much for the wonderful welcome. To President Cicerone, thank you very much for your leadership and for hosting us today. To John Holdren, thanks, John, for the outstanding work that you are doing. I was just informed backstage that Ralph and John both are 1965 graduates

380

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period U.S.¹ Summer Peak Load,² All Interconnections, 1986-2011 Summer Capacity Margin, 1996-2011 U.S.¹ Summer Peak Load² by NERC³ Regional Assessment Area, 2011 262 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 United States excluding Alaska and Hawaii. 2 See "Noncoincident Peak Load" in Glossary. 3 See "North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC)" in Glossary. Notes: * Values for 2011 are forecast. * The summer peak period is June through September. Source: Table 8.12a. 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0 300 600 900 Gigawatts 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 Percent 46 60 5 98 149 165 53 64 131 FRCC NPCC MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE

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381

Anti-inflammatory and Cytotoxic Activities of Mango (Mangifera indica L. var Keitt) Polyphenols in Cancer and Non-cancer Breast Fibroblasts in Vitro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide and polyphenols are under investigation as an alternative to conventional treatment approaches of breast cancer. The anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities of polyphenols have been demonstrated in many studies, yet cellular targets and the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear. The overall goal of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic properties of polyphenol compounds extracted from the mango variety Keitt in MCF-12A breast non-cancer and MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells by assessing the modulation of signaling pathways involved in inflammation and carcinogenesis. Mango polyphenols were identified by HPLC-MS analysis. The generation of reactive oxygen species was performed using fluorescence intensity in the DCFH-DA assay. Gene expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR, and protein expression was conducted by Western Blotting and Multiplex Bead assay analysis. Bioactive compounds identified in the mango pulp by HPLC-MS included a great variety of polyphenols such as gallic acid, galloyl glucosides with different degree of polymerization and other polyphenols. The anti-inflammatory activities of mango polyphenols were evaluated in MCF-12A non cancer breast fibroblasts. An inflammatory microenvironment for MCF-12A breast cells was induced with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?). The generation of reactive oxygen species was suppressed significantly compared to cells induced with TNF-?, where there was no significant difference between the concentrations of mango polyphenol extract. Results showed a significant down-regulation of mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory genes involved in the PI3K/AKT pathway and related downstream targets such as NF-?B and mTOR involved in biological processes including cell growth, proliferation and survival. Moreover, mango polyphenols had a significant impact on the miRNA-126-PI3K/AKT axis which plays an important role in inflammation and carcinogenesis, suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory underlying mechanism. The cytotoxic effects of mango polyphenols were investigated in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Mango polyphenols decreased the production of reactive oxygen species; however no significant differences were found between the tested concentrations of mango polyphenols. The gene expression of proapoptotic factors involved in the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway such as cytochrome C and caspase-3 were significantly regulated after mango polyphenol treatment. In addition, the suppression of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and downstream effectors such as HIF-1? and VEGF as well as the disruption of the miRNA-21-PTEN/AKT axis were identified as potential underlying mechanism of the cytotoxic properties of mango polyphenols. Overall, findings from this study show that mango polyphenols counteract inflammatory and cancerous cell signaling processes; therefore the potential of mango polyphenols in the prevention of breast-cancer focusing on the PI3K/AKT/mTOR-axis should be further investigated.

Arbizu Berrocal, Shirley Heidi

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

b037.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Λ(1405) 1/2 - I (J P ) = 0( 1 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ The nature of the Λ(1405) has been a puzzle for decades: three- NODE=B037 quark state or hybrid; two poles or one. We cannot here sur- vey the rather extensive literature. See, for example, CIEPLY 10, KISSLINGER 11, SEKIHARA 11, and SHEVCHENKO 12A for dis- cussions and earlier references. It seems to be the universal opinion of the chiral-unitary community that there are two poles in the 1400-MeV region. ZYCHOR 08 presents experimental evidence against the two-pole model, but this is disputed by GENG 07A. See also REVAI 09, which finds little basis for choosing between one- and two-pole models; and IKEDA 12, which favors the two-pole model. A single, ordinary three-quark Λ(1405) fits nicely into a J P = 1/2 - SU(4) 4 multiplet, whose other members are the Λ c (2595) + , Ξ c (2790) + , and Ξ c (2790) 0 ; see Fig. 1 of our note on "Charmed

383

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.12a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986-2011 (Megawatts, Except as Noted) Year Noncoincident Peak Load 1 by North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) 2 Regional Assessment Area Capacity Margin 21 (percent) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT 4 Western Inter- connection All Inter- connections FRCC 5 NPCC 6 Balance of Eastern Region 3 ECAR 7,8 MAAC 8,9 MAIN 8,10 MAPP 11 MISO 12 MRO 13 PJM 14 RFC 8,15 SERC 16 SPP 17 Subtotal TRE 18 WECC 19 Total 20 1986 - - 39,026 69,606 37,564 35,943 - - - - 21,029 - - - - 105,570 47,123 316,835 39,335 81,787 476,983 NA 1987 - - 42,651 72,561 40,526 37,446 - - - - 23,162 - - - - 109,798 47,723 331,216 39,339 82,967

384

Data:D0a76e5d-0a12-4abf-a5f5-9800c617ab12 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a76e5d-0a12-4abf-a5f5-9800c617ab12 a76e5d-0a12-4abf-a5f5-9800c617ab12 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Austin Energy Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Large Primary Service - Industrial Sector: Industrial Description: * This rate is applicable to electric service required by any customer who receives service at 12,500 volts (nominal) or higher and whose demand for power meets or exceeds 3,000 kilowatts for any two months within the previous twelve months or as determined by the City of Austin. This rate is also available for buildings, parks, and other establishments owned and operated by the City of Austin that implement conservation and peak shaving technologies, such as thermal energy storage systems.

385

Brief Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

highlights/ The Office highlights/ The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of national importance. It oversees - and is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en {B0DFBA1D-D6A0-4920-8E73-4779F8F5ACEA}http://science.energy.gov/np/highlights/2013/np-2013-12-a/ Modeling Cosmic Nucleosynthesis First measurements of isotopes produced by Argonne's new CARIBU facility provide insight into the creation of the elements in the universe. Thu, 09

386

b037.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

405) 405) 1/2 - I (J P ) = 0( 1 2 - ) Status: ∗∗∗∗ The nature of the Λ(1405) has been a puzzle for decades: three- quark state or hybrid; two poles or one. We cannot here sur- vey the rather extensive literature. See, for example, CIEPLY 10, KISSLINGER 11, SEKIHARA 11, and SHEVCHENKO 12A for dis- cussions and earlier references. It seems to be the universal opinion of the chiral-unitary community that there are two poles in the 1400-MeV region. ZYCHOR 08 presents experimental evidence against the two-pole model, but this is disputed by GENG 07A. See also REVAI 09, which finds little basis for choosing between one- and two-pole models; and IKEDA 12, which favors the two-pole model. A single, ordinary three-quark Λ(1405) fits nicely into a J P = 1/2 - SU(4) 4 multiplet, whose other members are the Λ c (2595) + , Ξ c (2790) + , and Ξ c (2790) 0 ; see Fig. 1 of our note on "Charmed Baryons."

387

Laboratory Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

laboratories/highlights/ The Office of Science is laboratories/highlights/ The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of national importance. It oversees - and is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en {B0DFBA1D-D6A0-4920-8E73-4779F8F5ACEA}http://science.energy.gov/np/highlights/2013/np-2013-12-a/ Modeling Cosmic Nucleosynthesis First measurements of isotopes produced by Argonne's new CARIBU facility provide insight into the creation of the elements in the universe. Thu, 09

388

NP Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

highlights/ The Office of Science is the highlights/ The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of national importance. It oversees - and is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en {B0DFBA1D-D6A0-4920-8E73-4779F8F5ACEA}http://science.energy.gov/np/highlights/2013/np-2013-12-a/ Modeling Cosmic Nucleosynthesis First measurements of isotopes produced by Argonne's new CARIBU facility provide insight into the creation of the elements in the universe. Thu, 09

389

Data:B4a5e006-6f1e-4202-996a-3b0af5586f12 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a5e006-6f1e-4202-996a-3b0af5586f12 a5e006-6f1e-4202-996a-3b0af5586f12 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of New Richmond, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/08/12 End date if known: Rate name: Ms-1 Street and Yard Lighting Service Ornamental 250 W MH(Double Head Facilities - 100% Outside Cost Contribution) Sector: Lighting Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0710 per kilowatt-hour.

390

University Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

universities/highlights/ The Office of Science is universities/highlights/ The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of national importance. It oversees - and is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en {B0DFBA1D-D6A0-4920-8E73-4779F8F5ACEA}http://science.energy.gov/np/highlights/2013/np-2013-12-a/ Modeling Cosmic Nucleosynthesis First measurements of isotopes produced by Argonne's new CARIBU facility provide insight into the creation of the elements in the universe. Thu, 09

391

PAD District / Refinery Location Total Atmospheric Distillation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Operable Date of Last Operation Date Shutdown Table 11. New, Shutdown and Reactivated Refineries During 2012 a b REACTIVATED PAD District I 185,000 366,700 Monroe Energy LLC Trainer, PA 185,000 366,700 09/12 c SHUTDOWN PAD District I 80,000 47,000 ChevronUSA Inc Perth Amboy, NJ 80,000 47,000 03/08 07/12 PAD District III 16,800 19,500 Western Refining Southwest Inc Bloomfield, NM 16,800 19,500 12/09 11/12 PAD District VI 500,000 1,086,000 Hovensa LLC Kingshill, VI 500,000 1,086,000 02/12 02/12 a b bbl/cd=Barrels per calendar day. bbl/sd=Barrels per stream day. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report" and Form EIA-820, "Annual Refinery Report." c Formerly owned by ConocoPhillips Company.

392

WMAP-Compliant Benchmark Surfaces for MSSM Higgs Bosons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore `benchmark surfaces' suitable for studying the phenomenology of Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM), which are chosen so that the supersymmetric relic density is generally compatible with the range of cold dark matter density preferred by WMAP and other observations. These benchmark surfaces are specified assuming that gaugino masses m_{1/2}, soft trilinear supersymmetry-breaking parameters A_0 and the soft supersymmetry-breaking contributions m_0 to the squark and slepton masses are universal, but not those associated with the Higgs multiplets (the NUHM framework). The benchmark surfaces may be presented as M_A-tan_beta planes with fixed or systematically varying values of the other NUHM parameters, such as m_0, m_{1/2}, A_0 and the Higgs mixing parameter mu. We discuss the prospects for probing experimentally these benchmark surfaces at the Tevatron collider, the LHC, the ILC, in B physics and in direct dark-matter detection experiments. An Appendix documents developments in the FeynHiggs code that enable the user to explore for her/himself the WMAP-compliant benchmark surfaces.

J. Ellis; T. Hahn; S. Heinemeyer; K. A. Olive; G. Weiglein

2007-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

393

Fracture toughness evaluations of TP304 stainless steel pipes  

SciTech Connect

In the IPIRG-1 program, the J-R curve calculated for a 16-inch nominal diameter, Schedule 100 TP304 stainless steel (DP2-A8) surface-cracked pipe experiment (Experiment 1.3-3) was considerably lower than the quasi-static, monotonic J-R curve calculated from a C(T) specimen (A8-12a). The results from several related investigations conducted to determine the cause of the observed toughness difference are: (1) chemical analyses on sections of Pipe DP2-A8 from several surface-cracked pipe and material property specimen fracture surfaces indicate that there are two distinct heats of material within Pipe DP2-A8 that differ in chemical composition; (2) SEN(T) specimen experimental results indicate that the toughness of a surface-cracked specimen is highly dependent on the depth of the initial crack, in addition, the J-R curves from the SEN(T) specimens closely match the J-R curve from the surface-cracked pipe experiment; (3) C(T) experimental results suggest that there is a large difference in the quasi-static, monotonic toughness between the two heats of DP2-A8, as well as a toughness degradation in the lower toughness heat of material (DP2-A8II) when loaded with a dynamic, cyclic (R = {minus}0.3) loading history.

Rudland, D.L.; Brust, F.W.; Wilkowski, G.M. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Breaking Criterion and Characteristics for Solitary Waves on Slopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shoaling and breaking of solitary waves is computed on slopes 1:100 to 1:8 using an experimentally validated fully nonlinear wave model based on potential flow equations. Characteristics of waves are computed at and beyond the breaking point, and geometric self-similarities of breakers are discussed as a function of wave height and bottom slope. No wave breaks for slopes steeper than 12 . A breaking criterion is derived for milder slopes, based on values of a nondimensional slope parameter o . This criterion predicts both whether waves will break or not and which type of breaking will occur (spilling, plunging, or surging). Empirical expressions for the breaking index and for the depth and celerity at breaking are derived based on computations. All results agree well with laboratory experiments. The NSW equations fail to predict these results with sufficient accuracy at the breaking point. Pre-breaking shoaling rates follow a more complex path than previously realized. Post-breaking behaviors exhibit a rapid (non-dissipative) decay, also observed in experiments, associated with a transfer of potential energy into kinetic energy. Wave celerity decreases in this zone of rapid decay.

S. T. Grilli; I.A. Svendsen; Member Asce; Member Asce; R. Subramanya

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

New line classifications in Ho I based on high-precision hyperfine-structure measurement of low levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doppler-free laser-fluorescence and laser-rf double-resonance studies have been made of the hyperfine structure (hfs) of four strong, previously unclassified visible lines in Ho I; all are shown to connect with low levels. The hfs of the 4f/sup 11/6s/sup 2/ /sup 4/I/sub 11/2,9/2/ levels is measured in detail, allowing evaluation of the dipole (a/sup 01/, a/sup 12/, a/sup 10/) and quadrupole (b/sup 02/,b/sup 11/,b/sup 13/) hfs radial integrals. The results are in close agreement with the ab initio values of Lindgren and Rosen (Case Stud. Atom. Phys. 4, 93--292 (1974). The value found for b/sup 02/ in the 4f/sup 11/6s/sup 2/ configuration is in reasonable agreement with that of Wyart and Camus (Physica 93C, 227-236 (1978)), thereby confirming their finding of a substantial dependence of this parameter on the number of 4f electrons in the core.

Childs, W.J.; Cok, D.R.; Goodman, L.S.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Solar coal gasification reactor with pyrolysis gas recycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal (or other carbonaceous matter, such as biomass) is converted into a duct gas that is substantially free from hydrocarbons. The coal is fed into a solar reactor (10), and solar energy (20) is directed into the reactor onto coal char, creating a gasification front (16) and a pyrolysis front (12). A gasification zone (32) is produced well above the coal level within the reactor. A pyrolysis zone (34) is produced immediately above the coal level. Steam (18), injected into the reactor adjacent to the gasification zone (32), reacts with char to generate product gases. Solar energy supplies the energy for the endothermic steam-char reaction. The hot product gases (38) flow from the gasification zone (32) to the pyrolysis zone (34) to generate hot char. Gases (38) are withdrawn from the pyrolysis zone (34) and reinjected into the region of the reactor adjacent the gasification zone (32). This eliminates hydrocarbons in the gas by steam reformation on the hot char. The product gas (14) is withdrawn from a region of the reactor between the gasification zone (32) and the pyrolysis zone (34). The product gas will be free of tar and other hydrocarbons, and thus be suitable for use in many processes.

Aiman, William R. (Livermore, CA); Gregg, David W. (Morago, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Deeply virtual Compton scattering with CLAS and CLAS12  

SciTech Connect

Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs) offer an insight into the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon and its internal dynamics, relating the transverse position of quarks to their longitudinal momentum. Two effective means of accessing GPDs are Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Meson Production (DVMP), in which a high energy electron scatters from a single quark in the nucleon and, respectively, a real photon or meson is produced as a result. Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), USA, is ideally suited for measuring these processes and a very active experimental programme has been underway in the recent years, making use of the lab's continuous electron beam up to 6 GeV in energy and its large angle spectrometer CLAS. In the future, a vast, new, as-yet unprobed kinematic region will become experimentally accessible when the current upgrade of the JLab accelerator to operate at a maximum energy of 12 GeV is completed in a few years. It is being complemented by the construction of a new suite of detectors, CLAS12, a number of them optimised specifically for exclusive reconstruction of DVCS and DVMP in the new kinematic region. We present a selection of recent results of DVCS and DVMP measurements using CLAS and introduce the exciting experimental programme planned for the future with CLAS12.

Sokhan, Daria [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay, France

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Corrections to Scaling in 2-Dimensional Polymer Statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Writing hR 2 N i = AN 2 (1 + BN \\Gamma\\Delta 1 + CN \\Gamma1 + :::) for the mean square end-- to--end length hR 2 N i of a self--avoiding polymer chain of N links, we have calculated \\Delta 1 for the two--dimensional continuum case from a new finite perturbation method based on the ground state of Edwards self consistent solution which predicts the (exact) = 3=4 exponent. This calculation yields \\Delta 1 = 1=2. A finite size scaling analysis of data generated for the continuum using a biased sampling Monte Carlo algorithm supports this value, as does a re--analysis of exact data for two--dimensional lattices. 36.20.Ey, 64.60.Fr Typeset using REVT E X A polymer chain is self--avoiding due to the excluded volume effect between monomer units which causes an expansion or `swelling' of the chain when compared to the free random walk. The central quantity of interest is therefore the mean square end--to--end length hR 2 N i. This is believed to have the form hR 2 N i = AN ...

S. R. Shannon; T. C. Choy; R. J. Fleming; I An

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Computational Thermodynamics for Interpreting Oxidation of Structural Materials in Supercritical Water  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the advanced nuclear reactors being developed to meet the soaring energy demand. The corrosion resistance of structural materials used in SCWR becomes one of the major concerns as the operation conditions being raised up to {approx}600 C and {approx}25 MPa. Oxidation has been observed as the major corrosion behavior. To mitigate the oxidation corrosion, stabilities of metals and oxides need to be understood with respect to environmental temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Computational thermodynamics provides a practical approach to assess phase stabilities of such multi-component multi-variable systems. In this study, calculated phase stability diagrams of alloys and corresponding oxides were used to guide the interpretation of oxidation behaviors of SCW-exposed structural materials. Examples include ferritic-martensitic steel, austenitic steels and Ni-base alloy, e.g., HCM12A (Fe-12Cr), D9 (Fe-15Cr-15Ni), 800H (Fe-21Cr-32Ni), and 690 (Ni-30Cr-10Fe). Calculated results are in good overall consistence with the experimental data.

Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Yang, Ying [ORNL; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Minkowski sum of a zonotope and the Voronoi polytope of the root lattice E{sub 7}  

SciTech Connect

We show that the Minkowski sum P{sub V}(E{sub 7})+Z(U) of the Voronoi polytope P{sub V}(E{sub 7}) of the root lattice E{sub 7} and the zonotope Z(U) is a 7-dimensional parallelohedron if and only if the set U consists of minimal vectors of the dual lattice E{sub 7}{sup *} up to scalar multiplication, and U does not contain forbidden sets. The minimal vectors of E{sub 7} are the vectors r of the classical root system E{sub 7}. If the r{sup 2}-norm of the roots is set equal to 2, then the scalar products of minimal vectors from the dual lattice only take the values {+-}1/2. A set of minimal vectors is referred to as forbidden if it consists of six vectors, and the directions of some of these vectors can be changed so as to obtain a set of six vectors with all the pairwise scalar products equal to 1/2. Bibliography: 11 titles.

Grishukhin, Vyacheslav P [Central Economics and Mathematics Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Central Economics and Mathematics Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Photothermal method for in situ microanalysis of the chemical composition of coal samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Successive minute regions (13) along a scan path on a coal sample (11) are individually analyzed, at a series of different depths if desired, to determine chemical composition including the locations, sizes and distributions of different maceral inclusions (12). A sequence of infrared light pulses (17) of progressively changing wavelengths is directed into each minute region (13) and a probe light beam (22) is directed along the sample surface (21) adjacent the region (13). Infrared wavelengths at which strong absorption occurs in the region (13) are identified by detecting the resulting deflections (.phi.) of the probe beam (22) caused by thermally induced index of refraction changes in the air or other medium (19) adjacent the region (13). The detected peak absorption wavelengths are correlated with known characteristic peak absorption wavelengths of specific coal constituents to identify the composition of each such minute region (13) of the sample (11). The method enables rapid, convenient and non-destructive analyses of coal specimens to facilitate mining, processing and utilization of coals.

Amer, Nabil M. (Berkeley, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

CLASSICAL NOVAE IN ANDROMEDA: LIGHT CURVES FROM THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY AND GALEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present optical light curves of 29 novae in M31 during the 2009 and 2010 observing seasons of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). The dynamic and rapid cadences in PTF monitoring of M31, from one day to ten minutes, provide excellent temporal coverage of nova light curves, enabling us to record the photometric evolution of M31 novae in unprecedented detail. We also detect eight of these novae in the near-ultraviolet (UV) band with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite. Novae M31N 2009-10b and M31N 2010-11a show prominent UV emission peaking a few days prior to their optical maxima, possibly implying aspherical outbursts. Additionally, our blueshifted spectrum of the recent outburst of PT And (M31N 2010-12a) indicates that it is a recurrent nova in M31 and not a dwarf nova in the Milky Way as was previously assumed. Finally, we systematically searched for novae in all confirmed globular clusters (GCs) of M31 and found only M31N 2010-10f associated with Bol 126. The specific nova rate in the M31 GC system is thus about one per year, which is not enhanced relative to the rate outside the GC system.

Cao Yi; Lou Yuqing [Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Neill, James D.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Quimby, Robert M. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ben-Ami, Sagi [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Nugent, Peter E. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Law, Nicholas M. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, M5S 3H4 Ontario (Canada); Ofek, Eran O. [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Poznanski, Dovi, E-mail: ycao@astro.caltech.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

403

Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by providing a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if they become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS) at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2) intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system (JBS) have resulted in high mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) in the gatewell slot at Units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square (RMS) value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS varied but were mostly less than 0.3 m/s. The sweep velocities also showed large variances across the face of the VBS with most measurements being less than 1.5 m/s. This study revealed that the approach velocities exceeded criteria recommended by NOAA Fisheries and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife intended to improve fish passage conditions.

Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Yuan, Yong

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

404

Reaction products of aquatic humic substances with chlorine. Environ. Health Perspect. 46  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major concern of the chlorination of aquatic humic materials is the ubiquitous production of trihalomethanes. A large number of other chlorinated organic compounds, however, have been shown to be formed by chlorine's reaction with humic substances. In this study, humic material was concentrated from a coastal North Carolina lake and chlorinated at a chlorine to carbon mole ratio of 1.5 at pH 12. A high pH was necessary for complete dissolution of the humic material and for production of adequate quantities of oxidation and chlorination products for extraction, separation and mass spectrometric identification. After concentration in ether, samples were methylated, separated with a 50-m OV-17 glass capillary column or a 25 m SP-2100 fused-silica column and identified. A Hewlett-Packard 5710A gas chromatograph interfaced to a VG Micromass 7070F double-focusing mass spectrometer was used. Low resolution, accurate mass measurements were made with a combined EI-CI source. The ability to do low resolution, accurate mass measurements made possible a rapid scan function necessary for capillary column gas chromatography. Accurate mass measurements allowed increased confidence in the identification of compounds, most of which are not available as standards. The products identified in these studies were chlorinated aliphatic straight-chain acids dominated by di- and trichloroacetic acid and the chlorinated dicarboxylic acids: succinic, fumaric and maleic acids. Chlorinated and unchlorinated aliphatic mono- and dicarboxylic acids and unchlorinated polycarboxylic aromatic acids comprise the remaining bulk of the compounds identified.

J. D. Johnson; R. F. Christman; D. L. Norwood; D. S. Millington

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Alignment and Magnet Error Tolerances for the LCLS X-Ray FEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have examined the influence of misalignments and magnet errors on the predicted performance of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Due to the extremely large number of wiggler periods (# 10 3 ) and the small optical mode size ( 20 #m), alignment and magnet tolerances will be quite demanding. These demands may increase if the wiggler is split into separate sections by the possible inclusion of diagnostic stations, dispersive sections, etc. We have attempted to quantify such tolerances using the numerical simulation code FRED-3D. 1 INTRODUCTION The LCLS is a multi-institutional proposal for a singlepass x-ray FEL operating in the 1-2 A wavelength region, using electron beams from the SLAC linac at # 15 GeV energy [1]. The effect of field and steering errors on the performance of an X-Ray FEL operating at an optical wavelength of 4 nm based on a 7 GeV electron beam from the SLAC linac has been studied before by Kim et. al. [2]. Since then the proposed target wavelength for t...

H. -d. Nuhn; E. T. Scharlemann; R. Schlter

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Standard Test Methods for Insulation Integrity and Ground Path Continuity of Photovoltaic Modules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for (1) testing for current leakage between the electrical circuit of a photovoltaic module and its external components while a user-specified voltage is applied and (2) for testing for possible module insulation breakdown (dielectric voltage withstand test). 1.2 A procedure is described for measuring the insulation resistance between the electrical circuit of a photovoltaic module and its external components (insulation resistance test). 1.3 A procedure is provided for verifying that electrical continuity exists between the exposed external conductive surfaces of the module, such as the frame, structural members, or edge closures, and its grounding point (ground path continuity test). 1.4 This test method does not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable results is beyond the scope of this test method. 1.5 There is no similar or equivalent ISO standard. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if a...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Polymer flood of the Rapdan pool  

SciTech Connect

A polymer-flood project in the Rapdan field is documented from laboratory design and numerical simulation to production performance and projected economics. The Rapdan field produces 10-mPa{center_dot}s oil from the Upper Shaunavon sand at a reservoir temperature of 55 C. Average permeability is 0.114 {mu}m{sup 2}, average porosity is 18%, and Dykstra-Parsons coefficient is 0.8. The field was discovered in 1953, and waterflood began in 1962. In January 1986, a polymer pilot was initiated in a portion of the field with a PV of 456 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3}. The pilot consists of 13 producers and 5 injectors drilled on 162 {times} 10{sup 3}-m{sup 2} spacing. By December 1994, 43% PV, of a 21-mPa{center_dot}s polymer solution had been injected into a confined, central five spot (Wells 12-12 and 12-12A). The oil cut increased from a stable value of 8% during the waterflood to a peak value of 25%. The corresponding daily oil production increased from 8 to 28 m{sup 3}/d at an oil cut of 36%. Production rate has declined from 140 m{sup 3}/d in 1991 to 106 m{sup 3}/d in December 1994, with a corresponding oil-cut decline from 25% to 20%.

Pitts, M.J.; Surkalo, H.; Wyatt, K. [Surtek Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Campbell, T.A. [Talisman Energy, Calgary, Alberta, CA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Higgs Boson Mass and Ward-Takahashi Identity in Gauged Nambu-Jona-Lasinio Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new formula for the composite Higgs boson mass is given, based on the Ward-Takahashi identity and the Schwinger-Dyson(SD) equation. In this formula the dominant asymptotic solution of the SD equation yields a correct answer, in sharp contrast to the Partially Conserved Dilatation Current(PCDC) approach where the sub- and sub-sub-dominant solutions should be taken into account carefully. In the gauged Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model we find M_H \\simeq \\sqrt{2}M for the composite Higgs boson mass M_H and the dynamical mass of the fermion M in the case of the constant gauge coupling(with large cut off), which is consistent with the PCDC approach and the renormalization-group approach. As to the case of the running gauge coupling, we find M_H \\simeq 2 \\sqrt{(A-1)/(2A-1)}M, where A \\equiv 18 C_2 /(11N_c - 2N_f) with C_2 being the quadratic Casimir of the fermion representation. We also discuss a straightforward application of our formula to QCD(without 4-Fermi coupling), which yields M_{\\sigma} \\sim \\sqrt{2}M_{dyn}, with M_{\\sigma} and M_{dyn} being the light scalar(``\\sigma-meson'') mass and mass of the constituent quark, respectively.

Michio Hashimoto

1998-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

409

Inclusive Particle Production Data in E+E- Interactions: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A comprehensive compilation of experimental data on inclusive particle production in e+e- interactions is presented. Data are given in both tabular and graphical form for multiplicities and inclusive differential cross sections from experiments at all of the world`s high energy e+e- colliders. To facilitate comparison between the data sets, curves are also shown from the JETSET 7.4 Monte Carlo program. (Taken from the abstract of A Compilation of Inclusive Particle Production Data in E+E- Annihilation, G.D. Lafferty, P.I. Reeves, and M.R. Whalley, Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics), Volume 21, Number 12A, 1995.) The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://durpdg.dur.ac.uk/spires/hepdata/reac.html.

Lafferty, G. D.; Reeves, P. I.; Whalley, M. R.

410

Study of liquid gallium at high pressure using synchrotron x-ray  

SciTech Connect

Liquid gallium has been studied at high pressure up to 2 GPa and ambient temperature in a diamond anvil cell using high energy synchrotron x-ray beam. The total x-ray scattering data of liquid gallium were collected up to Q = 12 A{sup -1} and analyzed using pair distribution functions (PDF). The results indicate that the first nearest neighbor peak and second nearest neighbor (shoulder) peak of PDF in liquid gallium does not change with pressure, whereas the higher order (i.e., third and fourth) nearest neighbor peaks shift towards shorter distance with increasing pressure. Reverse Monte Carlo modeling based on the observed data shows that the coordination number in the liquid gallium increases with pressure from 10.5 at 0.3 GPa to 11.6 at 2 GPa. An atomic arrangement similar to the crystalline phase of Ga(II) with coordination number of 12 is proposed for the locally dense-packed rigid unit in liquid gallium. The volume compression data derived from the structure modeling yield a bulk modulus of 12.1(6) GPa for liquid gallium.

Yu, Tony; Guo Quanzhong; Parise, John [Department of Geosciences, Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2100 (United States); Chen Jiuhua [Department of Geosciences, Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2100 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Center for the Study of Matters at Extreme Conditions, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Ehm, Lars [Department of Geosciences, Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2100 (United States); National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Huang Shu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Center for the Study of Matters at Extreme Conditions, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Luo Shengnian [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Multiple stage railgun  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple stage magnetic railgun accelerator (10) for accelerating a projectile (15) by movement of a plasma arc (13) along the rails (11,12). The railgun (10) is divided into a plurality of successive rail stages (10a-n) which are sequentially energized by separate energy sources (14a-n) as the projectile (15) moves through the bore (17) of the railgun (10). Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end (29) of the railgun (10) can be prevented by connection of the energy sources (14a-n) to the rails (11,12) through isolation diodes (34a-n). Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end of the railgun can also be prevented by dividing the rails (11,12) into electrically isolated rail sections (11a-n, 12a-n). In such case means (55a-n) are used to extinguish the arc at the end of each energized stage and a fuse (31) or laser device (61) is used to initiate a new plasma arc in the next energized rail stage.

Hawke, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Scudder, Jonathan K. (Pleasanton, CA); Aaland, Kristian (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Crack growth behavior of encapsulation processed SiC-PMMA particulate composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of processing on the fatigue crack propagation and fracture toughness of ceramic-polymer composites was investigated. A new process for composite production was developed with homogeneous particle distribution and low residual stress levels in mind. PMMA was uniformly distributed by encapsulating the SiC substrate by means of precipitation polymerization. The encapsulation processed powders were then compacted at temperatures above T{sub g} to form the composite. The encapsulation process was optimized by varying the initial concentrations of the reactants until homogeneous nucleation was suppressed. The coatings were found to be continuous at the SiC-PMMA interface, with particle agglomeration occurring between coated particles. Polymer loadings equivalent to 30 vol % SiC were achieved. Composites of several particle size ranges were tested under cyclic fatigue and static loading conditions. Fatigue growth rates and fracture toughness data display a trend of increasing crack growth resistance with increasing particle size, with encapsulation processed composites outperforming conventionally cast composites in both cyclic fatigue and fracture resistance. The largest K{sub Ic} value was found to be 2.95 MPa(m){sup 1/2}, a factor of 3 increase over un-reinforced PMMA. The roles of crack deflection, shielding, bridging, and pinning in enhancing toughness were discussed in light of crack profile fracture surface details. 65 refs., 30 figs., 2 tabs.

Sheu, C.H.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

ERYLFIUM OM PANY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ERYLFIUM OM PANY ERYLFIUM OM PANY 3714 CI-XIESTER /%"EXUE J &CO-74 -L;s C+SSIFICATION CANCELLED OR April 22, 1947 Dear 3. 3elmore: Xith reference to Contract X- 7401 ens 78, supp1emstit 11 calJi?Jg for 5000 pounds of SP ?eO 1350X, we have shipped 5000 pounds to the A. C. Spark E' lU~ co. in i?int i~i0hige.n. There were two s!lipi%ents made against this order. GE/L Kc. The first shipmast was ;lade on i.i)ril 12, ,A947 via ~rnili7c.y eqress on K,' -23305 copies .;; -"5 and ~$7 of which are enclosed. This ws a shipment of 125 poucds , and was covered by Gaterial Transfer Certificate Qo. 31% copies .$S er;d =$ of nhioh will be forwarded to your Xr. Eoboff by copy of this letter. The saoond shi?xent vras lnade cn April 19, 1947 via i:orwalk Truck Lines

414

Center for Catalysis at Iowa State University  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this proposal is to enable Iowa State University to establish a Center that enjoys world-class stature and eventually enhances the economy through the transfer of innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace. The funds have been used to support experimental proposals from interdisciplinary research teams in areas related to catalysis and green chemistry. Specific focus areas included: Catalytic conversion of renewable natural resources to industrial materials Development of new catalysts for the oxidation or reduction of commodity chemicals Use of enzymes and microorganisms in biocatalysis Development of new, environmentally friendly reactions of industrial importance These focus areas intersect with barriers from the MYTP draft document. Specifically, section 2.4.3.1 Processing and Conversion has a list of bulleted items under Improved Chemical Conversions that includes new hydrogenation catalysts, milder oxidation catalysts, new catalysts for dehydration and selective bond cleavage catalysts. Specifically, the four sections are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D) All funded projects are part of a soybean or corn biorefinery. Two funded projects that have made significant progress toward goals of the MYTP draft document are: Catalysts to convert feedstocks with high fatty acid content to biodiesel (Kraus, Lin, Verkade) and Conversion of Glycerol into 1,3-Propanediol (Lin, Kraus). Currently, biodiesel is prepared using homogeneous base catalysis. However, as producers look for feedstocks other than soybean oil, such as waste restaurant oils and rendered animal fats, they have observed a large amount of free fatty acids contained in the feedstocks. Free fatty acids cannot be converted into biodiesel using homogeneous base-mediated processes. The CCAT catalyst system offers an integrated and cooperative catalytic system that performs both esterification (of free fatty acids) and transesterification (of soybean oil) in a one-pot fashion. This will allow the biodiesel producers to use the aforementioned cheap feedstocks without any pretreatment. In addition, the catalyst system is heterogeneous and is highly recyclable and reusable. Although markets currently exist for glycerin, concern is mounting that the price of glycerin may plummet to $.05 - $.10 per pound if future production exceeds demand. Developing a system to make high value chemicals such as 1,3-propanediol from the glycerin stream will add value for biodiesel producers who implement the new technology. Given the fact that both DuPont and Shell chemicals have announced the commercialization of two new PDO-based polymers, a rapid increase of market demand for a cheaper PDO source is very likely. 4. Comparison of actual accomplishments with goals and objectives From our progress reports, the four areas are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D)

Kraus, George A.

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

415

Production and Handling Slide 35: UF6 Cylinder Data Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UF6 Cylinder Data Summary UF6 Cylinder Data Summary Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents UF6 Cylinder Data Summary Cylinder Model Nominal Diam. (in.) Material of Construction Minimum Volume Approximate Tare Weight Without Valve Protector Maximum Enrichment Uranium-235 Shipping Limit Maximum, a UF6 ft3 liters lb kg Weight % lb kg 1S 1.5 Nickel 0.0053 0.15 1.75 0.79 100.00 1.0 0.45 2S .5 Nickel 0.026 0.74 4.2 1.91 100.00 4.9 2.22 5A 5 Monel 0.284 8.04 55 25 100.00 55 24.95 5B 5 Nickel 0.284 8.04 55 25 100.00 55 24.95 8A 8 Monel 1.319 37.35 120 54 12.5 255 115.67 12A 12 Nickel 2.38 67.4 185 84 5.0 460 208.7 12B 12 Monel 2.38 67.4 185 84 5.0 460 208.7 308c 30 Steel 26.0 736.0 1,400 635 5.0b 5,020 2,277 48A 48 Steel 108.9 3,.84 4,500 2,041 4.5b 21,030 9,539 48Xd 48 Steel 108.9 3,084 4,500 2,041 4.5b,g 21,030 9,539 48F 48 Steel

416

m053.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ψ(3770) I G (J PC ) = 0 - (1 - - ) ψ(3770) MASS (MeV) ψ(3770) MASS (MeV) ψ(3770) MASS (MeV) ψ(3770) MASS (MeV) NODE=M053M OUR FIT includes measurements of m ψ(2S) , m ψ(3770) , and NODE=M053M m ψ(3770) - m ψ(2S) . NODE=M053M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 3773.15 ± 0.33 OUR FIT 3773.15 ± 0.33 OUR FIT 3773.15 ± 0.33 OUR FIT 3773.15 ± 0.33 OUR FIT 3778.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 3778.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 3778.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 3778.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 3779.2 + 1.8 - 1.7 + 0.6 - 0.8 1 ANASHIN 12A KEDR e + e - → D D 3775.5 ± 2.4 ± 0.5 57 AUBERT 08B BABR B → D D K 3776 ± 5 ± 4 68 BRODZICKA 08 BELL B + → D 0 D 0 K + 3778.8 ± 1.9 ± 0.9 AUBERT 07BE BABR e + e - → D D γ * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 3772.0 ± 1.9 2,3 ABLIKIM 08D BES2 e + e - → hadrons 3778.4 ± 3.0 ± 1.3 34 CHISTOV 04 BELL Sup. by BRODZICKA 08 1 Taking into account interference between the resonant and non-resonant

417

m053.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3770) 3770) I G (J PC ) = 0 - (1 - - ) ψ(3770) MASS (MeV) ψ(3770) MASS (MeV) ψ(3770) MASS (MeV) ψ(3770) MASS (MeV) OUR FIT includes measurements of m ψ(2S) , m ψ(3770) , and m ψ(3770) - m ψ(2S) . VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 3773.15± 0.33 OUR FIT 3773.15± 0.33 OUR FIT 3773.15± 0.33 OUR FIT 3773.15± 0.33 OUR FIT 3778.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 3778.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 3778.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 3778.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 3779.2 + 1.8 - 1.7 + 0.6 - 0.8 1 ANASHIN 12A KEDR e + e - → D D 3775.5 ± 2.4 ± 0.5 57 AUBERT 08B BABR B → D D K 3776 ± 5 ± 4 68 BRODZICKA 08 BELL B + → D 0 D 0 K + 3778.8 ± 1.9 ± 0.9 AUBERT 07BE BABR e + e - → D D γ * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 3772.0 ± 1.9 2,3 ABLIKIM 08D BES2 e + e - → hadrons 3778.4 ± 3.0 ± 1.3 34 CHISTOV 04 BELL Sup. by BRODZICKA 08 1 Taking into account interference between the resonant and non-resonant D D production. 2 Reanalysis of

418

DISCLAIMER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NXO-3071 NXO-3071 ON ANGULAR MOAfENTUM ' 1 . I n t r o d u c t i o n One of t h e methods of t r e a t i n g a general angular mo- mentum i n quantum mechanics is t o regard i t - a s the euper- popition of a number of elementary "epins", o r angular molrenta w i t h 3 = 1/2. a Rose-Einateln system, can h e u s e f u l l y discussed by t h e method o f second quantization. cedure u n i t e s t h e compact symbolism o f t h e group t h e o r e t i c a l approach with t h e e x p l i c i t operator techniques of quantum Such a spin assembly, considered as W e shall see that t h i s pro- I mechanics e W e introduce s p i n c r e a t i o n and a n n i h i l a t i o n operator8 a s s o c i a t e d w i t h a given s p a t i a l r e f e r e n c e system, a+ = (a+,a_) and a = (a+,a-),. which a a t i - s f y + + x t , The number of s p i n s and t h e r e s u l t a n t angular momentum m e t h

419

Switching power pulse system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source (10) to a load (20) using a storage capacitor (C3) charged through a rectifier (D1, D2), and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch (Q1) and voltage comparator (12). A thyristor (22) is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor (18) and fractional turn saturable transformer (16) having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n=n.sup.2. The saturable reactor (18) functions as a "soaker" while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor (C4) charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor (C3) into the load through the coupling capacitor (C4). The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core (26) having two secondary windings (28, 30) tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes (32, 34) for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe (40) for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network (42). To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core (44) is provided around the resistive beampipe (40) to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance (42) until it is fully charged.

Aaland, Kristian (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Benefits of Damage Engineering for PMOS Junction Stability  

SciTech Connect

As CMOS devices continue to shrink, the formation of ultra shallow junction (USJ) in the source/drain extension remains to be a key challenge requiring high dopant activation, shallow dopant profile and abrupt junctions. The next generations of sub nano-CMOS devices impose a new set of challenges such as elimination of residual defects resulting in higher leakage, difficulty to control lateral diffusion, junction stability post anneal and junction formation in new materials. To address these challenges for advanced technological nodes beyond 32 nm, it is imperative to explore novel species and techniques. Molecular species such as Carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}), a novel doping species and a promising alternative to monomer Boron is of considerable interest due to the performance boost for 22 nm low power and high performance devices. Also, to reduce residual defects, damage engineering methodologies have generated a lot of attention as it has demonstrated significant benefits in device performance. Varian proprietary techniques to perform implants at cold temperatures (PTC II) have demonstrated lower junction leakage, enhanced activation, reduced dopant diffusion and less dopant deactivation due to the reduction of self-interstitial atoms present at the end-of-range (EOR) with low implant temperatures. In this paper, for the first time, there is a comprehensive study of the effect of implant temperature on defect engineering affecting deactivation/reactivation, and it is well established in this paper that colder the implant temperature the better it is for damage engineering with reduced EOR defects and better amorphization. The effect has been studied over a wide range of implant temperature. To understand any difference in deactivation between molecular and monomer Boron and to provide direct comparison equivalent Boron implants, co-implanted with Carbon were also studied. Implants with wide range of temperatures are implemented using PTC II. This paper will also show how damage reduction correlates with optimum junction formation and stability.

Khaja, Fareen; Colombeau, Benjamin; Thanigaivelan, Thirumal; Ramappa, Deepak; Henry, Todd [Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc. 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

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421

VALIDATION OF COMPUTER MODELS FOR RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL SHIPPING PACKAGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer models are abstractions of physical reality and are routinely used for solving practical engineering problems. These models are prepared using large complex computer codes that are widely used in the industry. Patran/Thermal is such a finite element computer code that is used for solving complex heat transfer problems in the industry. Finite element models of complex problems involve making assumptions and simplifications that depend upon the complexity of the problem and upon the judgment of the analysts. The assumptions involve mesh size, solution methods, convergence criteria, material properties, boundary conditions, etc. that could vary from analyst to analyst. All of these assumptions are, in fact, candidates for a purposeful and intended effort to systematically vary each in connection with the others to determine there relative importance or expected overall effect on the modeled outcome. These kinds of models derive from the methods of statistical science and are based on the principles of experimental designs. These, as all computer models, must be validated to make sure that the output from such an abstraction represents reality [1,2]. A new nuclear material packaging design, called 9977, which is undergoing a certification design review, is used to assess the capability of the Patran/Thermal computer model to simulate 9977 thermal response. The computer model for the 9977 package is validated by comparing its output with the test data collected from an actual thermal test performed on a full size 9977 package. Inferences are drawn by performing statistical analyses on the residuals (test data--model predictions).

Gupta, N; Gene Shine, G; Cary Tuckfield, C

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

A DEEP CHANDRA X-RAY LIMIT ON THE PUTATIVE IMBH IN OMEGA CENTAURI  

SciTech Connect

We report a sensitive X-ray search for the proposed intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) in the massive Galactic cluster, {omega} Centauri (NGC 5139). Combining Chandra X-ray Observatory data from Cycles 1 and 13, we obtain a deep ({approx}291 ks) exposure of the central regions of the cluster. We find no evidence for an X-ray point source near any of the cluster's proposed dynamical centers, and place an upper limit on the X-ray flux from a central source of f{sub X}(0.5-7.0 keV) {<=}5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, after correcting for absorption. This corresponds to an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity of L{sub X}(0.5-7.0 keV) {<=}1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg s{sup -1}, for a cluster distance of 5.2 kpc, Galactic column density N{sub H} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, and power-law spectrum with {Gamma} = 2.3. If a {approx}10{sup 4} M{sub sun} IMBH resides in the cluster's core, as suggested by some stellar dynamical studies, its Eddington luminosity would be L{sub Edd} {approx}10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. The new X-ray limit would then establish an Eddington ratio of L{sub X}/L{sub Edd} {approx}< 10{sup -12}, a factor of {approx}10 lower than even the quiescent state of our Galaxy's notoriously inefficient supermassive black hole Sgr A*, and imply accretion efficiencies as low as {eta} {approx}< 10{sup -6}-10{sup -8}. This study leaves open three possibilities: either {omega} Cen does not harbor an IMBH or, if an IMBH does exist, it must experience very little or very inefficient accretion.

Haggard, Daryl [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, Physics and Astronomy Department, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Cool, Adrienne M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Ave., San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States); Heinke, Craig O. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Room 238 CEB, Edmonton, AB T6G 2G7 (Canada); Van der Marel, Roeland; Anderson, Jay [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cohn, Haldan N.; Lugger, Phyllis M., E-mail: dhaggard@northwestern.edu, E-mail: cool@sfsu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 E. Third St., Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

423

K{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7}: A transparent nonlinear optical crystal with frustrated magnetism  

SciTech Connect

A new noncentrosymmetric ferroborate crystal, K{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7}, has been grown from high temperature melt. Structure solution from single crystal X-ray diffraction shows that the title compound crystallizes in a trigonal space group P321 with cell dimensions of a=8.7475(12) A and c=8.5124(17) A. In the structure, FeO{sub 4} tetrahedron shares its three basal oxygen atoms with BO{sub 3} triangles forming a two-dimensional layer in the ab plane and the layers are connected by the apical Fe-O bonds along the c direction. The crystal is transparent in the visible and near infrared region from 500 to 2000 nm with three pronounced absorption bands ascribed to d-d transitions of tetrahedrally coordinated Fe{sup 3+} ions. Though, structurally analog to K{sub 2}Al{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7}, the further twisting of the BO{sub 3} groups between adjacent layers reduces its optical nonlinearity to a second-harmonic generation intensity of about 0.4 times that of KDP. Spin-glass behavior is observed at 20 K which is probably due to geometrically magnetic frustration of the triangular Fe net in the ab plane. - Graphical abstract: Single crystal of a new ferroborate K{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7}, space group P321, a=8.7475(3) A, c=8.5124(3) A, was obtained and characterized. It exhibits considerable SHG efficiency and frustrated magnetism originated from the triangular Fe net in the ab plane.

Wang Yonggang [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, R.K., E-mail: rkli@mail.ipc.ac.c [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Magnetotelluric measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ideas of flux quantization and Josephson tunneling are reviewed, and the operation of the dc SQUID as a magnetometer is described. The SQUID currently used for magnetotellurics has a sensitivity of 10/sup -14/ T Hz/sup -1/2/, a dynamic range at 10/sup 7/ in a 1 Hz bandwidth, a frequency response from 0 to 40 kHz, and a slewing rate of 5 x 10/sup -5/T s/sup -1/. Recent improvements in sensitivity are discussed: SQUIDS are rapidly approaching the limit imposed by the uncertainty principle. The essential ideas of magnetotelluric (MT) measurements are outlined, and it is shown how the remote reference method can lead to major reductions in bias errors compared to more conventional schemes. The field techniques of the Berkeley group are described. The practical application of MT requires that amplitude and phase spectra of apparent resistivities be transformed into a geologically useful distribution of subsurface resistivities. In many areas where MT is being applied today, the technique may not provide the information needed because stations are too few and widely spaced, or because we are unable to interpret data influenced by complex 3-D resistivity features. The results of two surveys, one detailed, the other regional, over the Klamath Basin, Oregon, are examined. The detailed survey is able to resolve small (1 km wide) structural features that are missed or add a component of spatial aliasing to the regional data. On the other hand, the regional survey avoids truncation effects that may occur when the survey undersamples an area.

Clarke, J.; Goldstein, N.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Corrosion Behavior of NiCrFe Alloy 600 in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water  

SciTech Connect

The corrosion behavior of Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) is investigated in hydrogenated water at 260 C. The corrosion kinetics are observed to be parabolic, the parabolic rate constant being determined by chemical descaling to be 0.055 mg dm{sup -2} hr{sup -1/2}. A combination of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, supplemented by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, are used to identify the oxide phases present (i.e., spinel) and to characterize their morphology and thickness. Two oxide layers are identified: an outer, ferrite-rich layer and an inner, chromite-rich layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with argon ion milling and target factor analysis is applied to determine spinel stoichiometry; the inner layer is (Ni{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3})(Fe{sub 0.3}Cr{sub 0.7}){sub 2}O{sub 4}, while the outer layer is (Ni{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1})(Fe{sub 0.85}Cr{sub 0.15}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. The distribution of trivalent iron and chromium cations in the inner and outer oxide layers is essentially the same as that found previously in stainless steel corrosion oxides, thus confirming their invariant nature as solvi in the immiscible spinel binary Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} (or NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}). Although oxidation occurred non-selectively, excess quantities of nickel(II) oxide were not found. Instead, the excess nickel was accounted for as recrystallized nickel metal in the inner layer, as additional nickel ferrite in the outer layer, formed by pickup of iron ions from the aqueous phase, and by selective release to the aqueous phase.

SE Ziemniak; ME Hanson

2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

426

A Study of Circadian Rhythm and Meteorological Factors Influencing Acute Myocardial Infarction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The circadian rhythm in the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was assessed in three hundred and twenty three patients admitted with AMI during the two-year period June 1992 to May 1994. The influence of the following meteorological, solar-geophysical and cosmic parameters in the causation of an infarct was also considered : (1) surface pressure (2) maximum temperature (3) minimum temperature (4) relative humidity (5) cosmic ray index (6) geomagnetic aa index (7) solar flares and (8) sunspot number. A well pronounced diurnal variability in AMI with a peak in the morning hours (6-12 a.m.) was seen. Further analysis of the data by considering one-hour periods revealed the presence of a smaller evening (10 p.m.) increase in incidence, i.e., the existence of a bimodal circadian rhythm. The simultaneous occurrence of the well documented semi-diurnal rhythm in surface pressure and incidence of acute myocardial infarction were evident. This may be one of the factors involved in the causation of the smaller evening peak-the reasons for which were unclear till now. Month-to-month variation in surface pressure was also found to be significantly correlated with incidence of acute myocardial infarction. Recognition of a circadian rhythm in the onset of AMI suggests the need for enhanced pharmacological protection during the vulnerable periods. Significant correlations were also found between monthly incidence of AMI and month-to-month variation of cosmic ray index and solar flare counts. The pattern of incidence of AMI was seen to be modified by full moon and new moon. There was no association between maximum temperature, minimum temperature or relative humidity and incidence of AMI.

A. M. Selvam; D. Sen; S. M. S. Mody

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

427

Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Metastatic Potential of Melanoma Xenografts  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has been suggested as a useful noninvasive method for characterizing the physiologic microenvironment of tumors. In the present study, we investigated whether Gd-DTPA-based DCE-MRI has the potential to provide biomarkers for hypoxia-associated metastatic dissemination. Methods and Materials: C-10 and D-12 melanoma xenografts were used as experimental tumor models. Pimonidazole was used as a hypoxia marker. A total of 60 tumors were imaged, and parametric images of K{sup trans} (volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v{sub e} (fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. The host mice were killed immediately after DCE-MRI, and the primary tumor and the lungs were resected and prepared for histologic assessment of the fraction of pimonidazole-positive hypoxic tissue and the presence of lung metastases, respectively. Results: Metastases were found in 11 of 26 mice with C-10 tumors and 14 of 34 mice with D-12 tumors. The primary tumors of the metastatic-positive mice had a greater fraction of hypoxic tissue (p = 0.00031, C-10; p < 0.00001, D-12), a lower median K{sup trans} (p = 0.0011, C-10; p < 0.00001, D-12), and a lower median v{sub e} (p = 0.014, C-10; p = 0.016, D-12) than the primary tumors of the metastatic-negative mice. Conclusions: These findings support the clinical attempts to establish DCE-MRI as a method for providing biomarkers for tumor aggressiveness and suggests that primary tumors characterized by low K{sup trans} and low v{sub e} values could have a high probability of hypoxia-associated metastatic spread.

Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Ellingsen, Christine; Galappathi, Kanthi [Group of Radiation Biology and Tumor Physiology, Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Rofstad, Einar K., E-mail: einar.k.rofstad@rr-research.no [Group of Radiation Biology and Tumor Physiology, Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

HIGH-CURRENT COLD CATHODE FIELD EMISSION ARRAY FOR ELECTRON LENS APPLICATION  

SciTech Connect

During Phase I, the following goals were achieved: (1) design and fabrication of a novel, nano-dimensional CNT field emitter assembly for high current density application, with high durability; (2) fabrication of a ceramic based micro channel plate (MCP) and characterization of its secondary electron emission; and (3) characterizing the CNT/MCP cathode for high field emission and durability. As a result of these achievements, a relatively high current density of ~ 1.2 A/cm2 from a CNT cathode and single channel MCP were measured. The emission current was also extremely stable with a peak-to-peak variation of only 1.8%. The emission current could be further enhanced to meet requirements for electron lens applications by increasing the number of MCP channels. A calculation for maximum possible current density with a 1200 channel/cm2 MCP, placed over a cathode with 1200 uniformly functioning CNTs, would be ~1.46 kA/cm2, neglecting space charge limitations. Clearly this level of emission is far greater than what is needed for the electron lens application, but it does offer a highly comforting margin to account for sub-standard emitters and/or to allow the lesser challenge of building a cathode with fewer channels/cm2. A satisfactory goal for the electron lens application would be a controllable emission of 2-4 mA per channel in an ensemble of 800-1200 uniformly-functioning channels/cm2, and a cathode with overall area of about 1 cm2.

Hirshfield, Jay L

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

429

Influence of pH of the impregnation solution on the catalytic properties of Co/{gamma}-alumina for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

SciTech Connect

The Co/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were prepared by the slurry impregnation of an aqueous solution of cobalt(II) nitrate precursor. Nitric acid or ammonium hydroxide was added to the cobalt nitrate solution, during impregnation, to give an acidic or basic environment. The changes in the particle size of cobalt species were estimated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and hydrogen chemisorption. The reduction degree of cobalt oxides was measured by temperature-programmed reduction (TPR). The catalysts prepared under acidic conditions showed a higher reduction degree compared to those prepared at higher pH because of the reduced salt-support interaction. During the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis at 220{sup o}C, employing the catalysts prepared at a different pH (0.80, 4.94, 9.96, and 11.12), a considerable difference in the initial activity was observed, depending upon the cobalt metal surface area. However, after stabilization, all of the catalysts attained a similar level of conversion, possibly because of the active-site rearrangement, deactivation, and wax formation on the catalyst surface. At a higher reaction temperature of 240{sup o}C, the catalysts prepared at lower solution pH exhibited higher conversion than those prepared at higher solution pH. The cobalt species on the catalysts prepared under acidic conditions had a heterogeneous particle size distribution, showing higher steady-state activity, because of the reduced interaction with the support. The product distribution revealed a higher selectivity to C{sub 1} and C{sub 8+} on the catalyst prepared with a higher solution pH. 44 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Jong Wook Bae; Yun-Jo Lee; Jo-Yong Park; Ki-Won Jun [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), Daejeon (Republic of Korea). Alternative Chemicals/Fuel Research Center

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Natural Product Biosynthesis: Friend or Foe? From Anti-tumor Agent to Disease Causation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biosynthetic natural products are invaluable resources that have been gleaned from the environment for generations, and they play an essential role in drug development. Natural product biosynthesis also possesses the latent ability to affect biological systems adversely. This work implements recent advances in genomic, proteomic and microbiological technologies to understand further biosynthetic molecules that may influence progression of human disease. Azinomycin A and B are antitumor metabolites isolated from the terrestrial bacterium Streptomyces sahachiroi. The azinomycins possess an unusual aziridine [1,2-a] pyrrolidine ring that reacts in concert with an epoxide moiety to produce DNA interstrand cross-links. Genomic sequencing of S. sahachiroi revealed a putative azinomycin resistance protein (AziR). Overexpression of AziR in heterologous hosts demonstrated the protein increases cell viability and decreases DNA damage response in the presence of azinomycin. Fluorescence titration indicated AziR functions as an azinomycin binding protein. An understanding of azinomycin resistance is important for future engineering and drug delivery strategies. Additionally, the S. sahachiroi draft genome obtained via 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina sequencing revealed several silent secondary metabolic pathways that may provide new natural products with biomedical application. ?-lactoglobulin (BLG), the most abundant whey protein in bovine milk, has been observed to promote the self-condensation of retinal and similar ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes. BLG is a possible non-genetic instigator of cycloretinal and A2E accumulation in the macula, a condition associated with age-related macular degeneration. BLG-mediated terpenal condensation has been optimized for in vitro study with the retinal mimic citral. In rabbits fed retinal and BLG or skim milk, cycloretinal formation was detected in the blood by 1H-NMR, and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated BLG was present in blood serum, suggesting the protein survives ingestion and retains catalytic activity. Mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis provided mechanistic insight toward this unusual moonlighting behavior. The experiments described in this dissertation serve to further natural product biosynthesis discovery and elucidation as they relate to consequences for human health. Efforts to solve azinomycin biosynthesis via enzymatic reconstitution, characterize compounds produced by orphan gene clusters within S. sahachiroi, and obtain a clear mechanism for BLG-promoted cycloterpenal formation are immediate goals within the respective projects.

Foulke-Abel, Jennifer

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Updating of ASME Nuclear Code Case N-201 to Accommodate the Needs of Metallic Core Support Structures for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors Currently in Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 29, 2005, ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) executed a multi-year, cooperative agreement with the United States DOE for the Generation IV Reactor Materials project. The project's objective is to update and expand appropriate materials, construction, and design codes for application in future Generation IV nuclear reactor systems that operate at elevated temperatures. Task 4 was embarked upon in recognition of the large quantity of ongoing reactor designs utilizing high temperature technology. Since Code Case N-201 had not seen a significant revision (except for a minor revision in September, 2006 to change the SA-336 forging reference for 304SS and 316SS to SA-965 in Tables 1.2(a) and 1.2(b), and some minor editorial changes) since December 1994, identifying recommended updates to support the current high temperature Core Support Structure (CSS) designs and potential new designs was important. As anticipated, the Task 4 effort identified a number of Code Case N-201 issues. Items requiring further consideration range from addressing apparent inconsistencies in definitions and certain material properties between CC-N-201 and Subsection NH, to inclusion of additional materials to provide the designer more flexibility of design. Task 4 developed a design parameter survey that requested input from the CSS designers of ongoing high temperature gas cooled reactor metallic core support designs. The responses to the survey provided Task 4 valuable input to identify the design operating parameters and future needs of the CSS designers. Types of materials, metal temperature, time of exposure, design pressure, design life, and fluence levels were included in the Task 4 survey responses. The results of the survey are included in this report. This research proves that additional work must be done to update Code Case N-201. Task 4 activities provide the framework for the Code Case N-201 update and future work to provide input on materials. Candidate materials such as Type 321 and Type 347 austenitic stainless steels, Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for core support structure construction, and Alloy 718 for Threaded Structural Fasteners were among the recommended materials for inclusion in the Code Case. This Task 4 Report identifies the need to address design life beyond 3 x 105 hours, especially in consideration of 60-year design life. A proposed update to the latest Code Case N-201 revision (i.e., Code Case N-201-5) including the items resolved in this report is included as Appendix A.

Mit Basol; John F. Kielb; John F. MuHooly; Kobus Smit

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

432

Hydrogen embrittlement of structural steels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon-manganese steels are candidates for the structural materials in hydrogen gas pipelines, however it is well known that these steels are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Decades of research and industrial experience have established that hydrogen embrittlement compromises the structural integrity of steel components. This experience has also helped identify the failure modes that can operate in hydrogen containment structures. As a result, there are tangible ideas for managing hydrogen embrittement in steels and quantifying safety margins for steel hydrogen containment structures. For example, fatigue crack growth aided by hydrogen embrittlement is a key failure mode for steel hydrogen containment structures subjected to pressure cycling. Applying appropriate structural integrity models coupled with measurement of relevant material properties allows quantification of safety margins against fatigue crack growth in hydrogen containment structures. Furthermore, application of these structural integrity models is aided by the development of micromechanics models, which provide important insights such as the hydrogen distribution near defects in steel structures. The principal objective of this project is to enable application of structural integrity models to steel hydrogen pipelines. The new American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B31.12 design code for hydrogen pipelines includes a fracture mechanics-based design option, which requires material property inputs such as the threshold for rapid cracking and fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic loading. Thus, one focus of this project is to measure the rapid-cracking thresholds and fatigue crack growth rates of line pipe steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas. These properties must be measured for the base materials but more importantly for the welds, which are likely to be most vulnerable to hydrogen embrittlement. The measured properties can be evaluated by predicting the performance of the pipeline using a relevant structural integrity model, such as that in ASME B31.12. A second objective of this project is to enable development of micromechanics models of hydrogen embrittlement in pipeline steels. The focus of this effort is to establish physical models of hydrogen embrittlement in line pipe steels using evidence from analytical techniques such as electron microscopy. These physical models then serve as the framework for developing sophisticated finite-element models, which can provide quantitative insight into the micromechanical state near defects. Understanding the micromechanics of defects can ensure that structural integrity models are applied accurately and conservatively.

Somerday, Brian P.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Y-12 Respirator Flow Cycle Time Reduction Project  

SciTech Connect

In mid-July 2000, a Cycle Time Reduction (CTR) project was initiated by senior management to improve the flow and overall efficiency of the respirator distribution process at Y-12. A cross-functional team was formed to evaluate the current process and to propose necessary changes for improvement. Specifically, the team was challenged to make improvements that would eliminate production work stoppages due to the unavailability of respirators in Y-12 Stores. Prior to the team initiation, plant back orders for a specific model respirator were averaging above 600 and have been as high as 750+. The Cycle Time Reduction team segmented the respirator flow into detailed steps, with the focus and emphasis primarily being on the movement of dirty respirators out of work areas, transportation to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laundry, and return back to Y-12 Stores inventory. The team selected a popular model respirator, size large, to track improvements. Despite a 30 percent increase in respirator usage for the same period of time in the previous year, the team has reduced the back orders by 89% with a steady trend downward. Summary of accomplishments: A 47 percent reduction in the average cycle time for dirty respirators to be laundered and stocked for reuse at the Y-12 Complex; A 73 percent reduction in the average cycle time for dirty respirators to be laundered and stocked for reuse specifically for major users: Enriched Uranium Operations (EUO) and Facilities Maintenance Organization (FMO); Development of a performance measure for tracking back orders; An 89 percent reduction in the number of laundered respirators on back order; Implementation of a tracking method to account for respirator loss; Achievement of an annual cost savings/avoidance of $800K with a one-time cost of $20K; Implementation of a routine pick-up schedule for EUO (major user of respirators); Elimination of activities no longer determined to be needed; Elimination of routine complaint calls to Stores requesting respirators; and Recommendation of improvements at the supplier (ORNL Laundry and Quality groups).

Hawk, C.T.; Rogers, P.E.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Probing the Biosynthesis and Mode of Action of Azinomycin B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the isolation of azinomycins A and B in 1954 from the soil bacterium, Streptomyces sahachiroi, these natural products have been synthetic targets. Both compounds exhibit in vitro cytotoxic activity at submicromolar levels and demonstrate anti-tumor activities comparable to that of mitomycin C in vivo. Unique to this class of natural products is the presence of an aziridine [1,2-a] pyrrolidine ring system. Coupled with an epoxide moiety, these structural functionalities impart the ability to form interstrand cross-links with DNA via the electrophilic C10 and C21 carbons of azinomycin and the N7 positions of suitably disposed purine bases. This dissertation investigates the global impact of azinomycin B treatment in a yeast model with special emphasis on DNA damage response, the resulting cell cycle effects, and cellular localization of the compound. The results provide the first demonstration of the in vivo actions of azinomycin B and are consistent with the proposed role of the drug as a DNA crosslinking agent. Biosynthesis of azinomycin B was investigated and appears to have polyketide, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and alkaloid origins. In pursuit of elucidating the biosynthetic origin we developed both a cell culturing system and a cell-free extract procedure capable of supporting azinomycin synthesis; we used these. These were employed with labeled metabolites to probe the biosynthetic origins of the molecule. Investigations with this enzyme preparation imparted important information regarding the substrate and cofactor requirements of the pathway. These results supported the premise of a mixed origin for the biosynthesis of the molecule and paved the way for expansive stable isotope labeling studies, which largely revealed the biosynthetic precursors and probable construction of the azinomycins. Some of these studies corroborate while other results conflict with initial proposed biosynthetic routes based upon the azinomycin biosynthetic gene cluster sequence. Future azinomycin biosynthetic gene cluster enzyme characterization, mechanistic investigations, and genetic modifications will ultimately provide definitive proof for the intermediacy of proposed biosynthetic precursors and the involvement of specific cofactors. Better understanding of how nature constructs unique molecule may provide insight into eventual chemoenzymatic/gene thearapy based approaches toward cancer therapy.

Kelly, Gilbert Thomson

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Drift-flux analysis of two-phase flow in microgravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As NASA programs such as the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle, the Space Nuclear Power Initiative, and other future spacecraft become more demanding, two-phase (gas-liquid) systems for advanced life support and thermal management are highly advantageous over single-phase systems. Two-phase fluid loops provide significant thermal transport advantages over their single-phase counterparts and are able to carry more energy per unit mass than single-phase systems. They are also able to transport more energy per unit pumping power than single-phase systems. These two advantages alone offer great reductions in both mass and volume, which are two primary design parameters for space-based systems. Unfortunately, the ability to predict two-phase phenomena such as flow regime transitions and void fraction at microgravity conditions is greatly limited and its development is still in its infancy. A Texas A&M University two-phase flow loop was tested aboard NASA's KC-135 aircraft to collect two-phase microgravity data for dichlorodifluoromethane (R-12). A wide variety of flow rates were tested and many different flow regimes were observed. Data produced by the two-phase microgravity experiment were analyzed in accordance with the drift-flux model to calculate the distribution parameter, C?, and the drift-velocity, V[gj], of the two-phase mixture. The C?and V[gj] found for each flow regime were compared with other microgravity and a one-g upflow data. The C? for the slug flow regime was greater than that of the transition and annular flow regimes respectively for the microgravity data and correlated well with other R-12 microgravity data for the slug flow regime. The V[gj] for slug flow was found to be negative, which was unexpected, but the drift velocities for the transition and annular flow regimes provided expected results. The V[gj] for the annular flow regime in microgravity was less than that of the one-g upflow system due to the lower superficial velocities required in microgravity. Similarly, the C? for the R-12 microgravity data was higher than for a one-g upflow system due to its lower void fraction. A common C? and V[gj] can be used to predict void fraction for the transition and annular flow regimes for R-12 for the same pipe diameter and operating conditions.

Braisted, Jonathan David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Eleven new compounds in the RE-Cd-Ge systems (RE=Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd-Yb; Y): Crystal chemistry of the RE{sub 2}CdGe{sub 2} series  

SciTech Connect

A large new family of rare-earth metal-cadmium-germanides RE{sub 2}CdGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd-Yb) has been synthesized and structurally characterized. All eleven structures have been established from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data and have been found to belong to the tetragonal Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} structure type (ordered ternary variant of the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure type-space group P4/mbm (No. 127), Z=2; Pearson symbol tP10). The structural variations among the three series of isostructural RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, RE{sub 2}InGe{sub 2}, and RE{sub 2}CdGe{sub 2} compounds are discussed, as well as the crystal chemistry changes as a function of the decreasing size of the rare-earth metals (lattice constants a=7.176(2)-7.4589(12) A and c=4.1273(14)-4.4356(13) A). The experimental results have been complemented by tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital (TB-LMTO) electronic structure calculations. - Graphical abstract: More than 300 compounds have been reported to crystallize with the tetragonal U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure type, or the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} structure type, which is its ordered ternary variant. Among them, there are several large RE{sub 2}CdX{sub 2} classes, where the X-elements are typically late transition metals such as Cu, Ni, Au, Pd, Pt, and Rh. The new RE{sub 2}CdGe{sub 2} phases (RE=Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd-Yb) increase the diversity and represent the first cadmium germanides. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RE{sub 2}CdGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd-Yb) are new ternary germanides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their structures can be recognized as a 1:1 intergrowth of CsCl- and AlB{sub 2}-like slabs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ge atoms are covalently bound into Ge{sub 2} dumbbells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost all RE{sub 2}CdGe{sub 2} phases are the first structurally characterized phases in the respective ternary RE-Cd-Ge systems.

Guo Shengping; Meyers, John J.; Tobash, Paul H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Bobev, Svilen, E-mail: bobev@udel.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES AND ANALYTICAL CAPABILITIES FOR VISION 21 ENERGY PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A software review meeting was held at Fluent Inc. in Lebanon, NH on January 31-February 1, 2002. The team reviewed the current status of the software and its compliance with the software requirements (Task 2). Work on a fuel cell based power-plant flow sheet that incorporates a reformer CFD model was started. This test case includes more features (multiple ports, temperature dependent properties) than the mixing tank test case developed earlier and will be used for the further testing of the software (Task 2). The software development plan was finalized (Task 2.7). The design and implementation of a CFD database was commenced. The CFD database would store various models that a process analyst can use in the flowsheet model (Task 2.8). The COM-CORBA Bridge was upgraded to use the recently published version 0.9.3 CAPE-OPEN specifications. Work on transferring reaction kinetics data from Aspen Plus to Fluent was started (Task 2.11). The requirements for extending CAPE-OPEN interfaces in Aspen Plus to transfer temperature dependent properties to Fluent was written and communicated to the Aspen Tech developer of CAPE-OPEN interfaces (Task 2.12). A prototype of low-order model based on the Multiple Regression technique was written. A low-order model is required to speed up the calculations with the integrated model (Task 2.19). The Berkshire Power (Agawam, MA) combined-cycle power plant was selected as the Demonstration Case 2 (Task 3.2). A CFD model of the furnace in Demonstration Case 1 was developed. The furnace model will be incorporated into the flowsheet model already developed for this case (Task 4.1). A new hire joined the Fluent development team for this project. The project management plan was revised based on the software development plan. A presentation on the project status was made at the Clearwater Conference, March 4-7, 2002. The final manuscript for ESCAPE-12 conference was submitted (Task 7.0).

Madhava Syamlal, Ph.D.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term Irradiation at Elevated Temperature: Critical Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, dislocation loop formation and growth, radiation induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, as well as the possibility for void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiation-induced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600C and doses to 200 dpa and beyond). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible, as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. This project builds upon joint work at the proposing institutions, under a NERI-C program that is scheduled to end in September, to understand the effects of radiation on these important materials. The objective of this project is to conduct critical experiments to understand the evolution of microstructural and microchemical features (loops, voids, precipitates, and segregation) and mechanical properties (hardening and creep) under high temperature and full dose range radiation, including the effect of differences in the initial material composition and microstructure on the microstructural response, including key questions related to saturation of the microstructure at high doses and temperatures.

Was, Gary; Jiao, Zhijie; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

439

Search for r-parity violating supersymmetry in multilepton final states with the D0 detector  

SciTech Connect

Results obtained from a search for the trilepton signature {mu}{mu}{ell} (with {ell} = e, or {mu}) are combined with two complementary searches for the trilepton signatures ee{ell} and eer and interpreted in the framework of R-parity violating Supersymmetry. Pairwise, R-parity conserving production of the supersymmetric particles is assumed, followed by R-parity violating decays via an LL{bar E}-operator with one dominant coupling {lambda}{sub 122}. An LL{bar E}-operator couples two weak isospin doublet and one singlet (s)lepton fields and thus violates lepton number conservation. The data, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider Tevatron, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of {integral} L dt = 360 {+-} 23 pb{sup -1}. No evident is observed, while 0.41 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.07(sys) events are expected from Standard Model processes. The resulting 95% confidence level cross section limits on new physics producing a {mu}{mu}{ell} signature in the detector are of the order of 0.020 to 0.136 pb. They are interpreted in two different supersymmetry scenarios: the mSUGRA and the MSSM model. The corresponding lower limits on the masses of the lightest neutralino ({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) and the lightest chargino ({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) in case of the mSUGRA model are found to be in the range of: mSUGRA, {mu} > 0: M({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) {approx}> 115-128 GeV and M({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) {approx}> 215-241 GeV; mSUGRA, {mu} < 0: ({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) {approx}> 101-114 GeV and M({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) {approx}> 194-230 GeV, depending on the actual values of the model parameters: m{sub 0}, m{sub 1/2}, A{sub 0}, tan{beta}, and {mu}. The first and second parameters provide the boundary conditions for the masses of the supersymmetric spin-0 and spin-1/2 particles, respectively, while A{sub 0} gives the universal value for the trilinear couplings at the GUT scale. The parameter tan {beta} denotes the ratio of the vacuum expectation values of the two Higgs fields and {mu}, finally, represents the Higgs mixing parameter. In the MSSM scenario the lower bound on the mass of the lightest chargino (for fixed neutralino mass) is found to be in the range of: M({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) {approx}> 205 GeV, for M({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) = 30 GeV; M({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) {approx}> 232 GeV, for M({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) = 200 GeV. The parameters of the considered MSSM model are: M{sub 1}, M{sub 2}, M{sub 3}, A{sub 0}, tan {beta}, {mu}, and m{sub A}. The first three parameters define the common masses of the superpartners of the U(1){sub Y}, SU(2){sub L}, and SU(3){sub C} bosons at the electroweak scale, respectively. The following three parameters are identical to those defined in the mSUGRA model above, while m{sub A} denotes the mass of the pseudoscalar Higgs boson, present in the supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. In addition all sfermion masses are set to 1000 GeV.

Kaefer, Daniela; /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Corrosion in Supercritical carbon Dioxide: Materials, Environmental Purity, Surface Treatments, and Flow Issues  

SciTech Connect

The supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle is gaining importance for power conversion in the Generation IV fast reactor system because of its high conversion efficiencies. When used in conjunction with a sodium fast reactor, the supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle offers additional safety advantages by eliminating potential sodium-water interactions that may occur in a steam cycle. In power conversion systems for Generation IV fast reactors, supercritical CO{sub 2} temperatures could be in the range of 30C to 650C, depending on the specific component in the system. Materials corrosion primarily at high temperatures will be an important issue. Therefore, the corrosion performance limits for materials at various temperatures must be established. The proposed research will have four objectives centered on addressing corrosion issues in a high-temperature supercritical CO{sub 2} environment: Task 1: Evaluation of corrosion performance of candidate alloys in high-purity supercritical CO{sub 2}: The following alloys will be tested: Ferritic-martensitic Steels NF616 and HCM12A, austenitic alloys Incoloy 800H and 347 stainless steel, and two advanced concept alloys, AFA (alumina forming austenitic) steel and MA754. Supercritical CO{sub 2} testing will be performed at 450C, 550C, and 650C at a pressure of 20 MPa, in a test facility that is already in place at the proposing university. High purity CO{sub 2} (99.9998%) will be used for these tests. Task 2: Investigation of the effects of CO, H{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} impurities in supercritical CO{sub 2} on corrosion: Impurities that will inevitably present in the CO{sub 2} will play a critical role in dictating the extent of corrosion and corrosion mechanisms. These effects must be understood to identify the level of CO{sub 2} chemistry control needed to maintain sufficient levels of purity to manage corrosion. The individual effects of important impurities CO, H{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} will be investigated by adding them separately to high purity CO{sub 2}. Task 3: Evaluation of surface treatments on the corrosion performance of alloys in supercritical CO{sub 2}: Surface treatments can be very beneficial in improving corrosion resistance. Shot peening and yttrium and aluminum surface treatments will be investigated. Shot peening refines the surface grain sizes and promotes protective Cr-oxide layer formation. Both yttrium and aluminum form highly stable oxide layers (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which can get incorporated in the growing Fe-oxide layer to form an impervious complex oxide to enhance corrosion resistance. Task 4: Study of flow-assisted corrosion of select alloys in supercritical CO{sub 2} under a selected set of test conditions: To study the effects of flow-assisted corrosion, tests will be conducted in a supercritical CO{sub 2} flow loop. An existing facility used for supercritical water flow studies at the proposing university will be modified for use in this task. The system is capable of flow velocities up to 10 m/s and can operate at temperatures and pressures of up to 650C and 20 MPa, respectively. All above tasks will be performed in conjunction with detailed materials characterization and analysis using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) techniques, and weight change measurements. Inlet and outlet gas compositions will be monitored using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS).

Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term and Elevated Temperature Irradiation: Modeling and Experimental Inbestigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by dislocation loop formation and growth, microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, radiation-induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, and in some cases, void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiationinduced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600C and doses beyond 200 dpa). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. Predictive modeling relies on an understanding of the physical processes and also on the development of microstructure and microchemical models to describe their evolution under irradiation. This project will focus on modeling microstructural and microchemical evolution of irradiated alloys by performing detailed modeling of such microstructure evolution processes coupled with well-designed in situ experiments that can provide validation and benchmarking to the computer codes. The broad scientific and technical objectives of this proposal are to evaluate the microstructure and microchemical evolution in advanced ferritic/martensitic and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for cladding and duct reactor materials under long-term and elevated temperature irradiation, leading to improved ability to model structural materials performance and lifetime. Specifically, we propose four research thrusts, namely Thrust 1: Identify the formation mechanism and evolution for dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a and determine whether the defect microstructure (predominately dislocation loop/dislocation density) saturates at high dose. Thrust 2: Identify whether a threshold irradiation temperature or dose exists for the nucleation of growing voids that mark the beginning of irradiation-induced swelling, and begin to probe the limits of thermal stability of the tempered Martensitic structure under irradiation. Thrust 3: Evaluate the stability of nanometer sized Y- Ti-O based oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) particles at high fluence/temperature. Thrust 4: Evaluate the extent to which precipitates form and/or dissolve as a function of irradiation temperature and dose, and how these changes are driven by radiation induced segregation and microchemical evolutions and determined by the initial microstructure.

Wirth, Brian; Morgan, Dane; Kaoumi, Djamel; Motta, Arthur

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term and Elevated Temperature Irradiation: Modeling and Experimental Inbestigation  

SciTech Connect

The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by dislocation loop formation and growth, microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, radiation-induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, and in some cases, void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiationinduced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600C and doses beyond 200 dpa). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. Predictive modeling relies on an understanding of the physical processes and also on the development of microstructure and microchemical models to describe their evolution under irradiation. This project will focus on modeling microstructural and microchemical evolution of irradiated alloys by performing detailed modeling of such microstructure evolution processes coupled with well-designed in situ experiments that can provide validation and benchmarking to the computer codes. The broad scientific and technical objectives of this proposal are to evaluate the microstructure and microchemical evolution in advanced ferritic/martensitic and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for cladding and duct reactor materials under long-term and elevated temperature irradiation, leading to improved ability to model structural materials performance and lifetime. Specifically, we propose four research thrusts, namely Thrust 1: Identify the formation mechanism and evolution for dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a<100> and determine whether the defect microstructure (predominately dislocation loop/dislocation density) saturates at high dose. Thrust 2: Identify whether a threshold irradiation temperature or dose exists for the nucleation of growing voids that mark the beginning of irradiation-induced swelling, and begin to probe the limits of thermal stability of the tempered Martensitic structure under irradiation. Thrust 3: Evaluate the stability of nanometer sized Y- Ti-O based oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) particles at high fluence/temperature. Thrust 4: Evaluate the extent to which precipitates form and/or dissolve as a function of irradiation temperature and dose, and how these changes are driven by radiation induced segregation and microchemical evolutions and determined by the initial microstructure.

Wirth, Brian; Morgan, Dane; Kaoumi, Djamel; Motta, Arthur

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Enhancing the role of veterinary vaccines reducing zoonotic diseases of humans: Linking systems biology with vaccine development  

SciTech Connect

The aim of research on infectious diseases is their prevention, and brucellosis and salmonellosis as such are classic examples of worldwide zoonoses for application of a systems biology approach for enhanced rational vaccine development. When used optimally, vaccines prevent disease manifestations, reduce transmission of disease, decrease the need for pharmaceutical intervention, and improve the health and welfare of animals, as well as indirectly protecting against zoonotic diseases of people. Advances in the last decade or so using comprehensive systems biology approaches linking genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, and biotechnology with immunology, pathogenesis and vaccine formulation and delivery are expected to enable enhanced approaches to vaccine development. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the role of computational systems biology analysis of host:pathogen interactions (the interactome) as a tool for enhanced rational design of vaccines. Systems biology is bringing a new, more robust approach to veterinary vaccine design based upon a deeper understanding of the host pathogen interactions and its impact on the host's molecular network of the immune system. A computational systems biology method was utilized to create interactome models of the host responses to Brucella melitensis (BMEL), Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (STM), and a Salmonella mutant (isogenic *sipA, sopABDE2) and linked to the basis for rational development of vaccines for brucellosis and salmonellosis as reviewed by Adams et al. and Ficht et al. [1,2]. A bovine ligated ileal loop biological model was established to capture the host gene expression response at multiple time points post infection. New methods based on Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) machine learning were employed to conduct a comparative pathogenicity analysis of 219 signaling and metabolic pathways and 1620 gene ontology (GO) categories that defined the host's biosignatures to each infectious condition. Through this DBN computational approach, the method identified significantly perturbed pathways and GO category groups of genes that define the pathogenicity signatures of the infectious agent. Our preliminary results provide deeper understanding of the overall complexity of host innate immune response as well as the identification of host gene perturbations that defines a unique host temporal biosignature response to each pathogen. The application of advanced computational methods for developing interactome models based on DBNs has proven to be instrumental in elucidating novel host responses and improved functional biological insight into the host defensive mechanisms. Evaluating the unique differences in pathway and GO perturbations across pathogen conditions allowed the identification of plausible host pathogen interaction mechanisms. Accordingly, a systems biology approach to study molecular pathway gene expression profiles of host cellular responses to microbial pathogens holds great promise as a methodology to identify, model and predict the overall dynamics of the host pathogen interactome. Thus, we propose that such an approach has immediate application to the rational design of brucellosis and salmonellosis vaccines.

Adams, Leslie G.; Khare, Sangeeta; Lawhon, Sara D.; Rossetti, Carlos A.; Lewin, Harris A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Turse, Joshua E.; Wylie, Dennis C.; Bai, Yu; Drake, Kenneth L.

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

444

PHEV-EV Charger Technology Assessment with an Emphasis on V2G Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

More battery powered electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) will be introduced to the market in 2011 and beyond. Since these vehicles have large batteries that need to be charged from an external power source or directly from the grid, their batteries, charging circuits, charging stations/infrastructures, and grid interconnection issues are garnering more attention. This report summarizes information regarding the batteries used in PHEVs, different types of chargers, charging standards and circuits, and compares different topologies. Furthermore, it includes a list of vehicles that are going to be in the market soon with information on their charging and energy storage equipment. A summary of different standards governing charging circuits and charging stations concludes the report. There are several battery types that are available for PHEVs; however, the most popular ones have nickel metal hydride (NiMH) and lithium-ion (Li-ion) chemistries. The former one is being used in current hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), but the latter will be used in most of the PHEVs and EVs due to higher energy densities and higher efficiencies. The chargers can be classified based on the circuit topologies (dedicated or integrated), location of the charger (either on or off the vehicle), connection (conductive, inductive/wireless, and mechanical), electrical waveform (direct current (dc) or alternating current (ac)), and the direction of power flow (unidirectional or bidirectional). The first PHEVs typically will have dedicated, on-board, unidirectional chargers that will have conductive connections to the charging stations or wall outlets and will be charged using either dc or ac. In the near future, bidirectional chargers might also be used in these vehicles once the benefits of practical vehicle to grid applications are realized. The terms charger and charging station cause terminology confusion. To prevent misunderstandings, a more descriptive term of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) is used instead of charging station. The charger is the power conversion equipment that connects the battery to the grid or another power source, while EVSE refers to external equipment between the grid or other power source and the vehicle. EVSE might include conductors, connectors, attachment plugs, microprocessors, energy measurement devices, transformers, etc. Presently, there are more than 40 companies that are producing EVSEs. There are several standards and codes regarding conductive and inductive chargers and EVSEs from the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the Underwriter Laboratories (UL), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), and the National Electric Code (NEC). The two main standards from SAE describe the requirements for conductive and inductive coupled chargers and the charging levels. For inductive coupled charging, three levels are specified: Level 1 (120 V and 12 A, single-phase), Level 2 (208 V-240 V and 32 A, single-phase), and Level 3 (208-600 V and 400 A, three-phase) . The standard for the conductive-coupled charger also has similar charging ratings for Levels 1 and 2, but it allows higher current ratings for Level 2 charging up to 80 A. Level 3 charging for this standard is still under development and considers dc charging instead of three-phase ac. More details in these areas and related references can be found in this Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report on PHEV-EV charger technology assessment.

Kisacikoglu, Mithat C [ORNL; Bedir, Abdulkadir [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Syntheses, crystal structures, and characterization of two new Tl{sup +}-Cu{sup 2+}-Te{sup 6+} oxides: Tl{sub 4}CuTeO{sub 6} and Tl{sub 6}CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10}  

SciTech Connect

Crystals and polycrystalline powders of two new oxide materials, Tl{sub 4}CuTeO{sub 6} and Tl{sub 6}CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10}, have been synthesized by hydrothermal and solid-state methods. The materials were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Tl{sub 4}CuTeO{sub 6} and Tl{sub 6}CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10} exhibit one dimensional anionic slabs of [CuTeO{sub 6}]{sup 4-} and [CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10}]{sup 6-}, respectively. Common to both slabs is the occurrence of Cu{sup 2+}O{sub 4} distorted squares and Te{sup 6+}O{sub 6} octahedra. The slabs are separated by Tl{sup +} cations. For Tl{sub 4}CuTeO{sub 6}, magnetic measurements indicate a maximum at {approx}8 K in the temperature dependence of the susceptibility. Low temperature neutron diffraction data confirm no long-range magnetic ordering occurs and the susceptibility was adequately accounted for by fits to a Heisenberg alternating chain model. For Tl{sub 6}CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10} on the other hand, magnetic measurements revealed paramagnetism with no evidence of long-range magnetic ordering. Infrared, UV-vis spectra, thermogravimetric, and differential thermal analyses are also reported. Crystal data: Tl{sub 4}CuTeO{sub 6}, Triclinic, space group P-1 (No. 2), a=5.8629(8) A, b=8.7848(11) A, c=9.2572(12) A, {alpha}=66.0460(10), {beta}=74.2010(10), {gamma}=79.254(2), V=417.70(9) A{sup 3}, and Z=2; Tl{sub 6}CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10}, orthorhombic, space group Pnma (No. 62), a=10.8628(6) A, b=11.4962(7) A, c=10.7238(6) A, V=1339.20(13) A{sup 3}, and Z=4. - Graphical Abstract: Two new oxide materials, Tl{sub 4}CuTeO{sub 6} and Tl{sub 6}CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10}, have been synthesized and characterized. The materials exhibit one dimensional crystal structures consisting of CuO{sub 4} and TeO{sub 6} polyhedra. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two New Tl-Te-Cu-oxides have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For Tl{sub 4}CuTeO{sub 6}, magnetic measurements indicate a maximum at {approx}8 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low temperature neutron diffraction data confirm no long-range magnetic ordering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For Tl{sub 6}CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10} magnetic measurements revealed no long-range magnetic ordering.

Yeon, Jeongho; Kim, Sang-Hwan [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, 136 Fleming Building, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, 136 Fleming Building, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States); Green, Mark A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 20742-2115 and NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standard and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6103 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 20742-2115 and NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standard and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6103 (United States); Bhatti, Kanwal Preet; Leighton, C. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0132 (United States)] [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0132 (United States); Shiv Halasyamani, P., E-mail: psh@uh.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, 136 Fleming Building, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Formulation, Implementation and Validation of a Two-Fluid model in a Fuel Cell CFD Code  

SciTech Connect

Water management is one of the main challenges in PEM Fuel Cells. While water is essential for membrane electrical conductivity, excess liquid water leads to ooding of catalyst layers. Despite the fact that accurate prediction of two-phase transport is key for optimal water management, understanding of the two-phase transport in fuel cells is relatively poor. Wang et. al. [1], [2] have studied the two-phase transport in the channel and diffusion layer separately using a multiphase mixture model. The model fails to accurately predict saturation values for high humidity inlet streams. Nguyen et. al. [3] developed a two-dimensional, two-phase, isothermal, isobaric, steady state model of the catalyst and gas diffusion layers. The model neglects any liquid in the channel. Djilali et. al. [4] developed a three-dimensional two-phase multicomponent model. The model is an improvement over previous models, but neglects drag between the liquid and the gas phases in the channel. In this work, we present a comprehensive two- fluid model relevant to fuel cells. Models for two-phase transport through Channel, Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) and Channel-GDL interface, are discussed. In the channel, the gas and liquid pressures are assumed to be same. The surface tension effects in the channel are incorporated using the continuum surface force (CSF) model. The force at the surface is expressed as a volumetric body force and added as a source to the momentum equation. In the GDL, the gas and liquid are assumed to be at different pressures. The difference in the pressures (capillary pressure) is calculated using an empirical correlations. At the Channel-GDL interface, the wall adhesion affects need to be taken into account. SIMPLE-type methods recast the continuity equation into a pressure-correction equation, the solution of which then provides corrections for velocities and pressures. However, in the two-fluid model, the presence of two phasic continuity equations gives more freedom and more complications. A general approach would be to form a mixture continuity equation by linearly combining the phasic continuity equations using appropriate weighting factors. Analogous to mixture equation for pressure correction, a difference equation is used for the volume/phase fraction by taking the difference between the phasic continuity equations. The relative advantages of the above mentioned algorithmic variants for computing pressure correction and volume fractions are discussed and quantitatively assessed. Preliminary model validation is done for each component of the fuel cell. The two-phase transport in the channel is validated using empirical correlations. Transport in the GDL is validated against results obtained from LBM and VOF simulation techniques. The Channel-GDL interface transport will be validated against experiment and empirical correlation of droplet detachment at the interface. References [1] Y. Wang S. Basu and C.Y. Wang. Modeling two-phase flow in pem fuel cell channels. J. Power Sources, 179:603{617, 2008. [2] P. K. Sinha and C. Y. Wang. Liquid water transport in a mixed-wet gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell. Chem. Eng. Sci., 63:1081-1091, 2008. [3] Guangyu Lin and Trung Van Nguyen. A two-dimensional two-phase model of a pem fuel cell. J. Electrochem. Soc., 153(2):A372{A382, 2006. [4] T. Berning and N. Djilali. A 3d, multiphase, multicomponent model of the cathode and anode of a pem fuel cell. J. Electrochem. Soc., 150(12):A1589{A1598, 2003.

Kunal Jain, Vernon Cole, Sanjiv Kumar and N. Vaidya

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Results of Performance Tests Performed on the John Watts WW Casing Connection on 7" Pipe  

SciTech Connect

Stress Engineering Services (SES) was contracted by Mr. John Watts to test his ''WW'' threaded connection developed for oilfield oil and gas service. This work was a continuation of testing performed by SES as reported in August of 1999. The connection design tested was identified as ''WW''. The samples were all integral (no coupled connections) and contained a wedge thread form with 90{sup o} flank angles relative to the pipe centerline. The wedge thread form is a variable width thread that primarily engages on the flanks. This thread form provides very high torque capacity and good stabbing ability and makeup. The test procedure selected for one of the samples was the newly written ISO 13679 procedure for full scale testing of casing and tubing connections, which is currently going through the ISO acceptance process. The ISO procedure requires a variety of tests that includes makeup/breakout testing, internal gas sealability/external water sealability testing with axial tension, axial compression, bending, internal gas thermal cycle tests and limit load (failure) tests. This test procedure was performed with one sample. Four samples were tested to failure. Table 1 contains a summary of the tasks performed by SES. The project started with the delivery of test samples by Mr. Watts. Pipe from the previous round of tests was used for the new samples. Figure 1 shows the structural and sealing results relative to the pipe body. Sample 1 was used to determine the torque capacity of the connection. Torque was applied to the capacity of SES's equipment which was 28,424 ft-lbs. From this, an initial recommended torque range of 7,200 to 8,800 ft-lbs. was selected. The sample was disassembled and while there was no galling observed in the threads, the end of the pin had collapsed inward. Sample 2 received three makeups. Breakouts 1 and 2 also had collapsing of the pin end, with no thread galling. From these make/breaks, it was decided to reduce the amount of lubricant applied to the connection by applying it to the box or pin only and reducing the amount applied. Samples 3 and 4 received one makeup only. Sample 5 initially received two make/breaks to test for galling resistance before final makeup, No galling was observed. Later, three additional make/breaks were performed with no pin end collapse and galling over 1/2 a thread occurring on one of the breakouts. During the make/break tests, the stabbing and hand tight makeup of the WW connection was found to be very easy and trouble free. There was no tendency to crossthread, even when stabbed at an angle, and it screwed together very smoothly up to hand tight. During power tight makeup, there was no heat generated in the box (as checked by hand contact) and no jerkiness associated with any of the makeups or breakouts. Sample 2 was tested in pure compression. The maximum load obtained was 1,051 kips and the connection was beginning to significantly deform as the sample buckled. Actual pipe yield was 1,226 kips. Sample 3 was capped-end pressure tested to failure. The capped-end yield pressure of the pipe was 16,572 psi and the sample began to leak at 12,000 psi. Sample 4 was tested in pure tension. The maximum load obtained was 978 kips and the connection failed by fracture at the pin critical section. Actual pipe yield was 1,226 kips. Sample 5 was tested in combined tension/compression and internal gas pressure. The sample was assembled, setup and tested four times. The first time was with a torque of 7,298 ft-lbs and the connection leaked halfway to ISO Load Point 2 with loads of 693 kips and 4,312 psi. The second time the torque was increased to 14,488 ft-lbs and a leak occurred at 849 kips and 9,400 psi, which was ISO Load Point 2. The third time the makeup torque was again increased, to 20,456 ft-lbs, and a leak occurred at 716 kips and 11,342 psi, ISO Load Point 4. The fourth test was with the same torque as before, 20,617 ft-lbs, and the connection successfully tested up to load step 56, ISO Load Point 6 (second round) before leaking at 354 kips and 11,876 psi. At this point,

John D. Watts

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an annual report on our long-term R&D grant for development of new technology for future colliders. The organizing theme of our development is to develop a compact high-field collider dipole, utilizing wind-and-react Nb3Sn coil fabrication, stress man-agement, conductor optimization, bladder preload, and flux plate suppression of magnetization multipoles . The development trail for this new technology began over four years ago with the successful testing of TAMU12, a NbTi model in which we put to a first test many of the construction details of the high-field design. We have built TAMU2, a mirror-geometry dipole containing a single coil module of the 3-module set required for the 14 Tesla design. This first Nb3Sn model was built using ITER conductor which carries much less current than high-performance conductor but enables us to prove in practice our reaction bake and impregnation strategies with free su-perconductor. TAMU2 has been shipped to LBNL for testing. Work is beginning on the con-struction of TAMU3, which will contain two coil modules of the 14 Tesla design. TAMU3 has a design field of 13.5 Tesla, and will enable us to fully evaluate the issues of stress management that will be important to the full design. With the completion of TAMU2 and the construction of TAMU3 the Texas A&M group comes of age in the family of superconducting magnet R&D laboratories. We have completed the phase of developing core technologies and fixtures and entered the phase of building and testing a succession of TAMU3 model dipoles that each build incrementally upon a proven core design. TAMU3 provides a testbed in which we can build a succession of model dipoles in which each new model uses one new winding module coupled with one module from the previ-ous model, and uses all of the same structural elements in successive models. This incremental development should enable us to keep to a minimum the time between the completion and test-ing of successive models. Each new model will incorporate a particular design element that we wish to evaluate: first the basic TAMU3 structure, then substitute one pancake using high-performance superconductor (3,000 A/mm2 @ 12 T, 4.2 K), then substitute one pancake using mixed-strand cable, then insert a steel nose to reduce the peak field in the end region of a single-pancake coil. While we are building and testing this succession of TAMU3 models we will de-velop the tooling and evaluate strategies for flaring the ends of the center double-pancake coil needed for.TAMU4. TAMU4 is a full implementation of the design, culminating in 14 Tesla performance. Pending the proposed increase of budget from the present 3-year-flat budget and providing that the tests of each model dipole do not lead to substantial modifications of the de-sign, the time to build and test each succeeding model could be ~9 months. During the present funding year we made a sequence of innovations that have major poten-tial benefit for the commissioning of LHC, upgrade of its luminosity, and its long-term future: An electrode assembly, suitable for integration within the existing LHC dipoles, ca-pable of killing the electron cloud effect an effect that threatens to limit the lumi-nosity that could be attained in LHC; A Nb3Sn structured cable, which makes it possible to design very high gradient quadrupoles for upgrade of the interaction regions of LHC to enhance its luminosity; A Nb3Sn/NbTi levitated-pole dipole for use in the D1 bends that combine and sepa-rate the beams at the intersection regions. The levitated-pole design uniquely solves the problems of radiation damage and heating from particles swept from the beam. A hybrid dipole technology, in which inner windings of Bi-2212 are integrated in a Nb3Sn block-coil dipole to push to 24 Tesla, opening the possibility of a future trip-ler upgrade of LHC .

Peter McIntyre

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z