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1

Effects of soil substrate and nitrogen fertilizer on biomass production of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of soil substrate and nitrogen fertilizer on biomass production of Acacia senegal;Effects of soil substrate and nitrogen fertilizer on biomass production of Acacia senegal and Acacia, biomass allocation, fertilizer, growth rate, nitrogen, soil substrate Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet

2

Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and apparatus for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers including ammonium nitrate, urea, urea-ammonium nitrate, and/or ammonia utilizing a source of carbon, a source of nitrogen, and/or a source of hydrogen. Implementing an electrolyte serving as ionic charge carrier, (1) ammonium nitrate is produced via the reduction of a nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a nitrogen source at the anode; (2) urea or its isomers are produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source; (3) ammonia is produced via the reduction of nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a hydrogen source at the anode; and (4) urea-ammonium nitrate is produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source, and anodic oxidation of a nitrogen source. The electrolyte can be solid.

Aulich, Ted R.; Olson, Edwin S.; Jiang, Junhua

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

3

JV Task-121 Electrochemical Synthesis of Nitrogen Fertilizers  

SciTech Connect

An electrolytic renewable nitrogen fertilizer process that utilizes wind-generated electricity, N{sub 2} extracted from air, and syngas produced via the gasification of biomass to produce nitrogen fertilizer ammonia was developed at the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center. This novel process provides an important way to directly utilize biosyngas generated mainly via the biomass gasification in place of the high-purity hydrogen which is required for Haber Bosch-based production of the fertilizer for the production of the widely used nitrogen fertilizers. Our preliminary economic projection shows that the economic competitiveness of the electrochemical nitrogen fertilizer process strongly depends upon the cost of hydrogen gas and the cost of electricity. It is therefore expected the cost of nitrogen fertilizer production could be considerably decreased owing to the direct use of cost-effective 'hydrogen-equivalent' biosyngas compared to the high-purity hydrogen. The technical feasibility of the electrolytic process has been proven via studying ammonia production using humidified carbon monoxide as the hydrogen-equivalent vs. the high-purity hydrogen. Process optimization efforts have been focused on the development of catalysts for ammonia formation, electrolytic membrane systems, and membrane-electrode assemblies. The status of the electrochemical ammonia process is characterized by a current efficiency of 43% using humidified carbon monoxide as a feedstock to the anode chamber and a current efficiency of 56% using high-purity hydrogen as the anode gas feedstock. Further optimization of the electrolytic process for higher current efficiency and decreased energy consumption is ongoing at the EERC.

Junhua Jiang; Ted Aulich

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

JV Task-121 Electrochemical Synthesis of Nitrogen Fertilizers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electrolytic renewable nitrogen fertilizer process that utilizes wind-generated electricity, N{sub 2} extracted from air, and syngas produced via the gasification of biomass to produce nitrogen fertilizer ammonia was developed at the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center. This novel process provides an important way to directly utilize biosyngas generated mainly via the biomass gasification in place of the high-purity hydrogen which is required for Haber Bosch-based production of the fertilizer for the production of the widely used nitrogen fertilizers. Our preliminary economic projection shows that the economic competitiveness of the electrochemical nitrogen fertilizer process strongly depends upon the cost of hydrogen gas and the cost of electricity. It is therefore expected the cost of nitrogen fertilizer production could be considerably decreased owing to the direct use of cost-effective 'hydrogen-equivalent' biosyngas compared to the high-purity hydrogen. The technical feasibility of the electrolytic process has been proven via studying ammonia production using humidified carbon monoxide as the hydrogen-equivalent vs. the high-purity hydrogen. Process optimization efforts have been focused on the development of catalysts for ammonia formation, electrolytic membrane systems, and membrane-electrode assemblies. The status of the electrochemical ammonia process is characterized by a current efficiency of 43% using humidified carbon monoxide as a feedstock to the anode chamber and a current efficiency of 56% using high-purity hydrogen as the anode gas feedstock. Further optimization of the electrolytic process for higher current efficiency and decreased energy consumption is ongoing at the EERC.

Junhua Jiang; Ted Aulich

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Food benefit and climate warming potential of nitrogen fertilizer uses in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical nitrogen (N) fertilizer has long been used to help meet the increasing food demands in China, the top N fertilizer consumer in the world. Growing concerns have been raised on the impacts of N fertilizer uses on ...

Tian, Hanqin

6

Aqueous and gaseous nitrogen losses induced by fertilizer application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years concern has grown over the contribution of nitrogen (N) fertilizer use to nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) water pollution and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), nitric oxide (NO), and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) atmospheric pollution. Characterizing soil N effluxes is essential in developing a strategy to mitigate N leaching and emissions to the atmosphere. In this paper, a previously described and tested mechanistic N cycle model (TOUGHREACT-N) was successfully tested against additional observations of soil pH and N{sub 2}O emissions after fertilization and irrigation, and before plant emergence. We used TOUGHREACT-N to explain the significantly different N gas emissions and nitrate leaching rates resulting from the different N fertilizer types, application methods, and soil properties. The N{sub 2}O emissions from NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N fertilizer were higher than from urea and NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N fertilizers in coarse-textured soils. This difference increased with decreases in fertilization application rate and increases in soil buffering capacity. In contrast to methods used to estimate global terrestrial gas emissions, we found strongly non-linear N{sub 2}O emissions as a function of fertilizer application rate and soil calcite content. Speciation of predicted gas N flux into N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} depended on pH, fertilizer form, and soil properties. Our results highlighted the need to derive emission and leaching factors that account for fertilizer type, application method, and soil properties.

Gu, C.; Maggi, F.; Riley, W.J.; Hornberger, G.M.; Xu, T.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Spycher, N.; Miller, N.L.; Venterea, R.T.; Steefel, C.

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Study on the Release Property of Nitrogen in Sustained-release Fertilizer with Carrier of Bentonite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mineral bentonite as the carrier of raw fertilizer NH4H2PO4", " added urea-formaldehyde resin to bond and mixed them, then made the bentonite carrier slow release nitrogen fertilizer by electric tablet press machine. Through the method of water dissolution ... Keywords: Bentonite, Sustained-release fertilizer, Carrier, Nitrogen element

Li Wangwang, Huang Chengcheng, Xie Huixing, Bi Yafan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Yield and nitrogen levels of silage corn fertilized with urea and zeolite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an increase in DM production of corn. Urea has been the mosturea-N is used to fertilized corn, especially on acid soils.levels of nitrogen of silage corn fertilized with urea and

Bernardi, Alberto C. de Campos; Souza, Gilberto Batista de; Polidoro, José Carlos; Paiva, Paulo Renato Perdigăo; Monte, Marisa Bezerra de Melo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

On-farm Assessment of Nitrogen Fertilizer application to corn on Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in soils cropped to corn with varying N fertilization. Can.as affected by tillage, corn-soybean-alfalfa rotations, andsoil nitrogen mineralization for corn production in eastern

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Yield, quality components and nitrogen levels of silage corn fertilized with urea and zeolite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and N fertilization affect corn silage yield and quality. Jand the nitrogen status of corn. J Prod Agric. 1991;4:525-and nitrogen effects on corn silage. Agron. J. ___, Kalonge

Bernardi, Alberto C. de Campos; Souza, Gilberto Batista de; Polidoro, José Carlos; Paiva, Paulo Renato Perdigăo; Monte, Marisa Bezerra de Melo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization on Bioenergy Sorghum Yield and Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forage sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) is one of the prospective crops that may be used to produce biofuels in the future. Therefore, it is of interest to find management practices that improve both the production of biomass yield and quality. This study presents observations of the effects different rates of nitrogen fertilization have on yield, tissue nitrogen content, and tissue quality measures such as ash, lignin, sucrose, xylans, cellulose and starch content, based on three years of field trials from the Brazos Bottom and one year of field trials from near China, Texas. Data for the quality components were obtained using near infrared spectroscopy, with the exception of tissue nitrogen which was determined by using the dry combustion method. This study has showed fertilizer nitrogen had a strong positive correlation with the tissue nitrogen of sorghum biomass. Changes in tissue quality in relationship with fertilizer nitrogen levels and tissue nitrogen concentration were also observed. Ash showed a strong positive and sucrose showed a strong negative correlation to both tissue nitrogen concentration and fertilizer nitrogen application. Similarly to sucrose, starch also decreased with higher nitrogen levels and lignin was found to increase slightly. The concentration of cellulose and xylans were very weakly affected by nitrogen application and nitrogen concentration.

Zilahi-Sebess, Szilvia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Market Potential for Nitrogen Fertilizers Derived from the Electric Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technology evaluation report describes the potential market for fertilizer materials derived from utility by-products from developing ammonia-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to control sulfur oxides (SOx) and nitrogen oxides (NOx).

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

13

Fuzzy logic approach for spatially variable nitrogen fertilization of corn based on soil, crop and precipitation information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuzzy Inference System (FIS) was developed to generate recommendations for spatially variable applications of nitrogen (N) fertilizer using soil, plant and precipitation information. Experiments were conducted over three seasons (2005-2007) to assess ... Keywords: fuzzy inference systems, nitrogen sufficiency index, precipitations, soil electrical conductivity, variable nitrogen fertilization, water supply

Yacine Bouroubi; Nicolas Tremblay; Philippe Vigneault; Carl Bélec; Bernard Panneton; Serge Guillaume

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Long-term tillage, cropping sequence, and nitrogen fertilization effects on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management practices that may increase soil organic matter (SOM) storage include conservation tillage, especially no till (NT), enhanced cropping intensity, and fertilization. My objectives were to evaluate management effects on labile [soil microbial biomass (SMB) and mineralizable, particulate organic matter (POM), and hydrolyzable SOM] and slow (mineral-associated and resistant organic) C and N pools and turnover in continuous sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.], wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], sorghum-wheat/soybean, and wheat/soybean sequences under convent ional tillage (CT) and NT with and without N fertilization. A Weswood silty clay loam (fine, mixed, thermic Fluventic Ustochepts) in southern central Texas was sampled at three depth increments to a 30-cm depth after wheat, sorghum, and soybean harvesting. Soil organic C and total N showed similar responses to tillage, cropping sequence, and N fertilization following wheat, sorghum, and soybean. Most effects were observed in surface soils. NT significantly increased SOC. Nitrogen fertilization significantly increased SOC only under NT. Compared to NT or N addition, enhanced cropping intensity only slightly increased SOC. Estimates of C sequestration rates under NT indicated that SOC would reach a new equilibrium after 20 yr or less of imposition of this treatment. Labile pools were all significantly greater with NT than CT at 0 to 5 cm and decreased with depth. SMB, mineralizable C and N, POM, and hydrolyzable C were highly correlated with each other and SOC, but their slopes were significantly different, being lowest in mineralizable C and highest in hydrolyzable C. These results indicated that different methods determined various fractions of total SOC. Results from soil physical fractionation and 13C concentrations further supported these observations. Carbon turnover rates increased in the sequence: ROC < silt- and clayassociated C < microaggregate-C < POM-C. Long-term incubation showed that 4 to 5% of SOC was in active pools with mean residence time (MRT) of about 50 days, 50% of SOC was in slow pools with an average MRT of 12 years, and the remainder was in resistant pools with an assumed MRT of over 500 years.

Dou, Fugen

15

Response of "Alamo" switchgrass tissue chemistry and biomass to nitrogen fertilization in west Tennessee, USA  

SciTech Connect

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) is a perennial, warm-season grass that has been identified as a potential biofuel feedstock over a large part of North America.Weexamined above- and belowground responses to nitrogen fertilization in “Alamo” switchgrass grown in West Tennessee, USA. The fertilizer study included a spring and fall sampling of 5-year old switchgrass grown under annual applications of 0, 67, and 202 kgNha?1 (as ammonium nitrate). Fertilization changed switchgrass biomass allocation as indicated by root:shoot ratios. End-of-growing season root:shoot ratios (mean±SE) declined significantly (P?0.05) at the highest fertilizer nitrogen treatment (2.16±0.08, 2.02±0.18, and 0.88±0.14, respectively, at 0, 67, and 202 kgNha?1). Fertilization also significantly increased above- and belowground nitrogen concentrations and decreased plant C:N ratios. Data are presented for coarse live roots, fine live roots, coarse dead roots, fine dead roots, and rhizomes. At the end of the growing season, there was more carbon and nitrogen stored in belowground biomass than aboveground biomass. Fertilization impacted switchgrass tissue chemistry and biomass

Garten, Jr, C. T.; Brice, D. J.; Castro, H. F.; Graham, Robin L.; Mayes, Melanie A.; Phillips, Jana R.; Post, W. M.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Tyler, Donald D.; Jardine, Philip M.; Jastrow, J. D.; Matamala, R.; Miller, R. M.; Moran, K. K.; Vugteveen, T.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; West, Tristram O.; Amonette, James E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Metting, F. Blaine; Smith, Jeffery L.

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

The effects of chronic nitrogen fertilization on alpine tundra soil microbial communities: implications for carbon and nitrogen cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many studies have shown that changes in nitrogen (N) availability affect primary productivity in a variety of terrestrial systems, but less is known about the effects of the changing N cycle on soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. We used a variety of techniques to examine the effects of chronic N amendments on SOM chemistry and microbial community structure and function in an alpine tundra soil. We collected surface soil (0-5 cm) samples from five control and five long-term N-amended plots established and maintained at the Niwot Ridge Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Samples were bulked by treatment and all analyses were conducted on composite samples. The fungal community shifted in response to N amendments, with a decrease in the relative abundance of basidiomycetes. Bacterial community composition also shifted in the fertilized soil, with increases in the relative abundance of sequences related to the Bacteroidetes and Gemmatimonadetes, and decreases in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobia. We did not uncover any bacterial sequences that were closely related to known nitrifiers in either soil, but sequences related to archaeal nitrifiers were found in control soils. The ratio of fungi to bacteria did not change in the N-amended soils, but the ratio of archaea to bacteria dropped from 20% to less than 1% in the N-amended plots. Comparisons of aliphatic and aromatic carbon compounds, two broad categories of soil carbon compounds, revealed no between treatment differences. However, G-lignins were found in higher relative abundance in the fertilized soils, while proteins were detected in lower relative abundance. Finally, the activities of two soil enzymes involved in N cycling changed in response to chronic N amendments. These results suggest that chronic N fertilization induces significant shifts in soil carbon dynamics that correspond to shifts in microbial community structure and function.

Nemergut, Diana R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Townsend, Alan R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Taylor, John [University of California, Berkeley; Sattin, Sarah R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Freeman, Kristen R [University of Colorado, Boulder; Fierer, Noah [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Neff, Jason [University of Colorado, Boulder; Bowman, William D [University of Colorado, Boulder; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Weintraub, Michael N [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Schmidt, Steven K. [University of Colorado

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Effects of CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilization on growth and nutrient content of juvenile ponderosa pine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This data set presents measured values of plant diameter and height, biomass of plant components, and nutrient (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, potassium, calcium, magnesium, boron, copper, iron, manganese, and zinc) concentrations from a study of the effects of carbon dioxide and nitrogen fertilization on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) conducted in open-top chambers in Placerville, California, from 1991 through 1996. This data set contains values from 1991 through 1993.

Johnson, D.W. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States). Biological Sciences Center]|[Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Coll. of Agriculture; Ball, J.T. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States). Biological Sciences Center; Walker, R.F. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Coll. of Agriculture; Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Effects of CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilization on soils planted with ponderosa pine  

SciTech Connect

The effects of elevated CO{sub 2} (ambient, 525, and 700 {micro}l l{sup -1})and N fertilization (0, 10, and 20 g N m{sup 2} yr{sup -1}) on soil pCO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} efflux, soil solution chemistry, and soil C and nutrients in an open-top chamber study with Pinus ponderosa are described. Soil pCO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} efflux were significantly greater with elevated CO{sub 2}, at first (second growing season) in the 525 {micro}l l{sup -1} and later (fourth and fifth growing seasons) in the 700 {micro}l l{sup -1} CO{sub 2} treatments. Soil solution HCO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations were temporarily elevated in the 525 {micro}l l{sup -1} CO{sub 2} treatment during the second growing season, consistent with the elevated pCO{sub 2}. Nitrogen fertilization had no consistent effect on soil pCO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} efflux, but did have the expected negative effect on exchangeable Ca{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and Mg{sup 2+}, presumed to be caused by increased nitrate leaching. Elevated CO{sub 2} had no consistent effects on exchangeable Ca{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, and Mg{sup 2+}, but did cause temporary reductions in soil NO{sup 3{sup -}} (second growing season). Statistically significant negative effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on soil extractable P were noted in the third and sixth growing seasons. However, these patterns in extractable P reflected pre-treatment differences, which, while not statistically significant, followed the same pattern. Statistically significant effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on total C and N in soils were noted in the third and sixth growing seasons, but these effects were inconsistent among N treatments and years. The clearest effect of elevated CO{sub 2} was in the case of C/N ratio in year 6, where there was a consistent, positive effect. The increases in C/N ratio with elevated CO{sub 2} in year six were largely a result of reductions in soil N rather than increases in soil C. Future papers will assess whether this apparent reduction in soil N could have been accounted for by plant uptake.

Johnson, D.W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Effect of corn stover harvest and winter rye cover crop on corn nitrogen fertilization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Improvement in N management to optimize corn N fertilization requirement and minimize NO33 – N loss from agricultural fields is an ongoing need for continuous corn… (more)

Pantoja, Jose L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Proto col for US Midwest Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Millar, N; Robertson, GP; Grace, PR; Gehl, RJ; and Hoben, JP. 2010. Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Protocol for US Midwest Agriculture. In Journal of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change,Volume 15, Number 2, 2010, pp. 185-204. Link to Journal Publication: See Journal of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Redu ction Protocol for U.S. Midwest Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Millar, N; Robertson, GP; Grace, PR; Gehl, RJ; and Hoben; JP. 2010. Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Protocol for U.S. Midwest Agriculture. In Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 15, Number 2, 2010, pp. 185-204. A peer-reviewed journal article that identifies, describes and analyzes socio-economic factors that may encourage or inhibit farmers from participat...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

22

Nitrogen supply from fertilizer and legume cover crop in the transition to no-tillage for irrigated row crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

152–155 CTIC (2004) National crop residue management survey.15 labeled legume cover crop. Soil Sci Soc Am J 53:822–827fertilizer and legume cover crop in the transition to no-

Doane, Timothy A.; Horwath, William R.; Mitchell, Jeffrey P.; Jackson, Jim; Miyao, Gene; Brittan, Kent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen ...  

Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers United States Patent. Patent Number: 8,152,988: Issued: April 10, 2012: Official Filing:

24

Composting Large Animal Carcasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposing of large animal carcasses can be a problem for agricultural producers. Composting is a simple, low-cost method that yields a useful product that can be used as fertilizer. In this publication you'll learn the basics of composting, how to build and maintain a compost pile, tools you will need, and how to use the finished compost.

Auvermann, Brent W.; Mukhtar, Saqib; Heflin, Kevin

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Global GHG abatement potential for the nitrogen fertlizer industry up to 2030.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation studies the global GHG abatement potential of nitrogen fertilizer industry up to 2030. In order to acknowledge it, a data base of the… (more)

Rangel Campos, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Influence of nitrogen on weed growth and competition with grain sorghum.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nitrogen (N) fertilizer intended for the crop may benefit highly competitive weeds to the detriment of the crop. A field experiment was conducted in 2009… (more)

Unruh, Bryan Jacob

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas. 5 figs.

Friesen, D.T.; Babcock, W.C.; Edlund, D.J.; Miller, W.K.

1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

28

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, D.T.; Babcock, W.C.; Edlund, D.J.; Miller, W.K.

1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

31

Taxa-area Relationship (TAR) of Microbial Functional Genes with Long-TGerm Fertilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diversity and spatial patterns in plant and animal communities are well documented as a positive-power law of a taxa-area relationship (TAR). At present little is known whether this also applies to soil microbial communities and whether long-term fertilization has an influence on the underlying microbial diversity. To test the effects of long-term fertilization on above-ground botanical diversity and below-ground microbial diversity, a nested sampling approach on Park Grass plots (12d& 11/2c) of Rothamsted Reseach in United Kingdom, both at ~;; pH 5 but with plant diversities of between 42 and 13 respectively were used. GeoChip 3.0, covering approximately 57, 000 gene sequences of 292 gene families involved in nitrogen, carbon, sulfur and phosphorus cycling, metal reduction and resistance, and organic contaminant degradation, was used to determine the gene area relationships for both functional and phylogenetic groups and the relationship to plant diversity. Our analysis indicated that the microbial communities were separated by different plant diversity based on DCA. The soil microbial diversity was in accord with plant diversity. Soil microbial community exhibited different z value with different plant diversity, z = 0.0449 with higher plant diversity and z = 0.0583 with lower plant diversity (P< 0.0001). These results suggest that the turnover in space of microorganisms may be higher with long-term fertilization.

Liang, Yuting; Wu, Liyou; Clark, Ian; Xue, Kai; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Hirsch, Penny; Mcgrath, Steve; Zhou, Jizhong

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

32

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen Previous Video (Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Shattering Pennies) Shattering Pennies Liquid Nitrogen Cooled...

33

Fertilizing and Burning Flint Hills Bluestem CLENTON E. OWENSBY AND ED F. SMITH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fertilizing and Burning Flint Hills Bluestem CLENTON E. OWENSBY AND ED F. SMITH Abstract Burned of nitrogen applied more than 80 lb N/acre did. Maintenance of good quality range was favored by burning and 0 and 40 lb N/acre compared to not burning and the same fertilizer rates. Eighty lb N/acre produced poor

Owensby, Clenton E.

34

Understanding Nitrogen Fixation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of our program is to explore fundamental chemistry relevant to the discovery of energy efficient methods for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into more value-added nitrogen-containing organic molecules. Such transformations are key for domestic energy security and the reduction of fossil fuel dependencies. With DOE support, we have synthesized families of zirconium and hafnium dinitrogen complexes with elongated and activated N-N bonds that exhibit rich N{sub 2} functionalization chemistry. Having elucidated new methods for N-H bond formation from dihydrogen, C-H bonds and Broensted acids, we have since turned our attention to N-C bond construction. These reactions are particularly important for the synthesis of amines, heterocycles and hydrazines with a range of applications in the fine and commodity chemicals industries and as fuels. One recent highlight was the discovery of a new N{sub 2} cleavage reaction upon addition of carbon monoxide which resulted in the synthesis of an important fertilizer, oxamide, from the diatomics with the two strongest bonds in chemistry. Nitrogen-carbon bonds form the backbone of many important organic molecules, especially those used in the fertilizer and pharamaceutical industries. During the past year, we have continued our work in the synthesis of hydrazines of various substitution patterns, many of which are important precursors for heterocycles. In most instances, the direct functionalization of N{sub 2} offers a more efficient synthetic route than traditional organic methods. In addition, we have also discovered a unique CO-induced N{sub 2} bond cleavage reaction that simultaneously cleaves the N-N bond of the metal dinitrogen compound and assembles new C-C bond and two new N-C bonds. Treatment of the CO-functionalized core with weak Broensted acids liberated oxamide, H{sub 2}NC(O)C(O)NH{sub 2}, an important slow release fertilizer that is of interest to replace urea in many applications. The synthesis of ammonia, NH{sub 3}, from its elements, H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, via the venerable Haber-Bosch process is one of the most significant technological achievements of the past century. Our research program seeks to discover new transition metal reagents and catalysts to disrupt the strong N {triple_bond} N bond in N{sub 2} and create new, fundamental chemical linkages for the construction of molecules with application as fuels, fertilizers and fine chemicals. With DOE support, our group has discovered a mild method for ammonia synthesis in solution as well as new methods for the construction of nitrogen-carbon bonds directly from N{sub 2}. Ideally these achievements will evolve into more efficient nitrogen fixation schemes that circumvent the high energy demands of industrial ammonia synthesis. Industrially, atmospheric nitrogen enters the synthetic cycle by the well-established Haber-Bosch process whereby N{sub 2} is hydrogenated to ammonia at high temperature and pressure. The commercialization of this reaction represents one of the greatest technological achievements of the 20th century as Haber-Bosch ammonia is responsible for supporting approximately 50% of the world's population and serves as the source of half of the nitrogen in the human body. The extreme reaction conditions required for an economical process have significant energy consequences, consuming 1% of the world's energy supply mostly in the form of pollution-intensive coal. Moreover, industrial H{sub 2} synthesis via the water gas shift reaction and the steam reforming of methane is fossil fuel intensive and produces CO{sub 2} as a byproduct. New synthetic methods that promote this thermodynamically favored transformation ({Delta}G{sup o} = -4.1 kcal/mol) under milder conditions or completely obviate it are therefore desirable. Most nitrogen-containing organic molecules are derived from ammonia (and hence rely on the Haber-Bosch and H{sub 2} synthesis processes) and direct synthesis from atmospheric nitrogen could, in principle, be more energy-efficient. This is particularly attractive giv

Paul J. Chirik

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

35

Animal vision  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animal vision Name: the outlaw Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Do cats see in black and white? What animals see in color? Replies: Yes, cats can see color; in...

36

Animating explosions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce techniques for animating explosions and their effects. The primary effect of an explosion is a disturbance that causes a shock wave to propagate through the surrounding medium. The disturbance determines the behavior of nearly ... Keywords: animation, atmospheric effects, computational fluid dynamics, natural phenomena, physically based animation

Gary D. Yngve; James F. O'Brien; Jessica K. Hodgins

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book gives the reader an up-to-date view of several aspects of male fertility in relation to lipid and fatty acid metabolism. Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents diet

38

animated gif  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2) Click on the optomized tab to 'optimize' the image. (I don't know if you really need to do this.). b) Show the animation palette, if not already there. ...

39

Animal Noise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why do animals make sounds, are they trying to talk to us? Replies: You bet. When the dog barks loud and nasty, he's trying to tell you to stay out of his yard, and when he...

40

Exotic Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exotic Animals Exotic Animals Nature Bulletin No. 440-A January 15, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation EXOTIC ANIMALS When people settle in a new land they always bring to it plants and animals that are strangers there. The early colonists in North America brought the seeds of grains, grasses, clovers, garden crops and flowers they grew in Europe. They brought horses, cattle, sheep, goats, swine, poultry, cats and dogs. They brought honeybees because there were none here. Unfortunately, mixed with their seeds or in forage for their animals, they brought the seeds of many pesky weeds. As stowaways, they brought rats, mice and injurious insects. The colonists found a continent teeming with a great abundance and variety of wildlife, including billions of wild pigeons, ducks, geese and turkeys, but they brought their own domesticated kinds, including turkeys which had been introduced into Europe from Mexico by the Spaniards. It is a curious fact that our only domestic animal native to North America is this noble bird.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Aqueous and gaseous nitrogen losses induced by fertilizer application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and E. R. Hunt. (2005). Biome-BGC: Terrestrial EcosystemLeonard et al, 1987], BIOME-BGC [Running and Gower, 1994;

Gu, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Mitigating greenhouse gas and nitrogen loss with improved fertilizer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

impacts on greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, N loss and economic implication are rarely analysed. A decision support system (DSS) has been developed to.

43

Nocturnal Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nocturnal Animals Nocturnal Animals Nature Bulletin No. 151 April 17, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation NOCTURNAL ANIMALS When the sun goes down and dusk steals over the land, the animals of the day grow drowsy and seek some sheltered spot to await another dawn. Birds slip quietly to their nests or favorite roosts. The chattering squirrel curls up in his hollow tree or a summer nest of leaves. Butterflies fold their wings and bees creep into their quiet hives. Bats and whip-poor-wills and nighthawks zigzag expertly through the air to feast on flying insects. Then darkness comes. Then the land becomes alive again as the animals of the night take over -- the hunted and the hunters. The cottontail rabbits come out to play and gorge themselves on fresh young clover and tender grass -- welcome food after nibbling all winter on the bark of hawthorn, willow, sumac and wild rose. Millions of mice scurry about. Muskrats emerge from the underwater entrances to their lodges and bank tunnels to swim and splash as they feed on tender shoots of cattails and sedges. Wild ducks and some of the shore birds feed regularly at night.

44

Moss Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moss Animals Moss Animals Nature Bulletin No. 138 January 17, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation MOSS ANIMALS Last summer, several visitors in the forest preserves were puzzled by finding masses of jelly-like substance stuck to sunken sticks in certain ponds and lakes. These masses were usually round or egg-shaped, ranging in size from that of a tennis ball to that of a football. On the outside they were covered by a grayish scum with faint lines in a coarse design. Inside there was apparently nothing but a clear colorless jelly that quivered and shook like a well-chilled gelatin dessert. One man guessed that it was some sort of garbage; another, reasonably, that it was some strange plant growth.

45

Swine Finishing Manure Applied on Frozen Ground as a Top-Dress Nitrogen Source on Wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were similar in the manure and urea reps with approximately 15 plants per square foot. Urea cost was $0.65 per pound. Urea replications had $48.75 per acre in nitrogen expense plus the cost of application and field conditions supported the fertilizer buggy. The urea application rate was 75 pounds of nitrogen per

Jones, Michelle

46

Cave Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cave Animals Cave Animals Nature Bulletin No. 95 December 14, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation CAVE ANIMALS Our Senior Naturalist, with a group of scientists exploring one of the big limestone quarries southwest of Chicago, found several dozen strange animals where a small underground stream pours from a seam in the rock wall. They were nearly an inch long, slender, with legs on both ends and snow white. That was a rare discovery because they were Blind Amphipods -- small members of the crayfish family that live their entire lives in secret subterranean waters. A large part of the United States is underlain by limestone, sometimes hundreds of feet thick, often close to the surface as it is here. Surface water gradually seeps down through crevices in this limestone and along horizontal seams, dissolving the rock to form channels that grow larger and larger. As the centuries pass, these form underground rivers and the caves so common in some parts of this country.

47

Nitrogen Deposition Data Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Deposition Data Available This data set, prepared by Elizabeth Holland and colleagues, contains data for wet and dry nitrogen-species deposition for the United States and...

48

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream If you have access to liquid nitrogen and the proper safety equipment and training, try this in place of your normal cryogenics demonstration Download...

49

Animal Hibernation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hibernation Hibernation Nature Bulletin No. 44 December 8, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation ANIMAL HIBERNATION Many animals in this northern region go into a winter sleep, called "hibernation". They usually retire to some place where they do not actually freeze, or where they at least are protected from zero temperatures. Birds do not hibernate but most species migrate to warmer regions Fish to not hibernate but withdraw to deeper waters and their body processes slow down to the point where tbeir food and oxygen requirements are a tiny fraction of the needs during summer months Aquatic insects do not hibernate. Most land insects die, leaving behind them their descendants in the egg, larva or pupa stages. Some insects, though, as for instance certain species of mosquito, hibernate in basements, cisterns and such protected places.

50

Animal Noses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Noses Noses Nature Bulletin No. 729 October 26, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor ANIMAL NOSES "Of all the animals, man has the poorest nose; he has virtually lost the sense of smell". Like so many general statements, that remark by Ernest Thompson Seton, the great naturalist, artist and storyteller, should be taken with a grain of salt. Seton was speaking of mammals only. Modern man does have a sense of smell and in some individuals, such as wine tasters, coffee tasters and perfumers, it is highly developed but, in general, his nose is far inferior to the smellers of other mammals. Nearly all of them have noses which provide the most acute and discriminating of the five senses: smell, sight, hearing, touch and taste. Among the few exceptions are the toothed whales, believed to have no sense of smell at all.

51

National Fertilizer Development Center  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

h-L h-L National Fertilizer Development Center May 15, 1980 nww Hr. William Et Mott, Director Environmental Control Technology Division Office of Environment Dcpartiaent of Energy Washington, DC 20545 Dear Mr. Mott: This is in response to your letter of May 5 requesting ccmments on a report dated Xarct; 1930 which summarizes a preliminary radiological survey of facilities used in the early 1950's for studies of recovery of uranium from leached zone ore. I have made a few suggested changes to the report, which is being returned to you. * Thaul, you for the opportunity to review this report. Sincerely, , Enclosure Development Branch . 1 -a' . I . . . PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY MUSCLE SHOALS, ALA&A Work .performed by the Health and Safety Research Division

52

Animal Hands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hands Hands Nature Bulletin No. 611 October 1, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist ANIMAL HANDS Muddy footprints shaped like babies' hands can be seen on almost every trash barrel in our forest preserve picnic areas. These are made by raccoons which come at night to eat discarded sandwiches, chicken bones and other food scraps. The hind feet as well as the front feet of the coon are built like hands and that its front foot, especially in mud or soft snow, leaves a print of the palm with four spread fingers and a thumb. The track of the hind foot is longer with a definite heal. The coon feels for fish, crawfish, frogs and snails along the water's edge, scrubbing each thoroughly before eating. Full of curiosity and mischief, a pet coon quickly learns to unlatch doors, play with small objects and pick people's pockets.

53

Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Two Tropical Forests: Ecosystem-Level Patterns and Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and high elevation forests of Puerto Rico. Appl Soil Ecolthe Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico. Biotropica 23:386–92.hillslope Tabonuco forest, Puerto Rico. Biogeochemistry 46:

Cusack, Daniela F.; Silver, Whendee; McDowell, William H.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Quantifying Cradle-to-Farm Gate Life-Cycle Impacts Associated with Fertilizer used for Corn, Soybean, and Stover Production  

SciTech Connect

Fertilizer use can cause environmental problems, particular eutrophication of water bodies from excess nitrogen or phosphorus. Increased fertilizer runoff is a concern for harvesting corn stover for ethanol production. This modeling study found that eutrophication potential for the base case already exceeds proposed water quality standards, that switching to no-till cultivation and collecting stover increased that eutrophication potential by 21%, and that switching to continuous-corn production on top of that would triple eutrophication potential.

Powers, S. E.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Genomic Differences Between Highly Fertile and Sub-Fertile Holstein Dairy Heifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infertility in dairy cattle remains a major economic loss to dairy producers. Identifying dairy cattle with superior genetic potential for improved fertility would increase dairy farm profitability. Dairy heifers were classified into two groups based upon services per conception (SPC); those animals with a single SPC were determined to be highly fertile and animals with greater than or equal to 4 SPC were classified as sub-fertile. Whole genome association analysis was performed on 20 individual heifers from each group utilizing a 777K highly density (HD) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip. Genomic data were evaluated utilizing PLINK, a whole genome association analysis toolset, and 570,620 SNP were available for analysis with a total of 39 samples being analyzed. Forty-four SNP were determined to be associated with fertility classification (P <= 0.00001) and were located on Bos taurus chromosome (BTA) 2, 4, 9, 19, and 26. The SNP and ranges between SNP were analyzed using BLAST-Like Alignment Tool (BLAT); SNP were associated with 5 candidate genes for reproduction. The SNP on BTA 2 were located within the region coding for the non-imprinted Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome 2 (NIPA2) gene, which is involved in gestational magnesium transport. Also on BTA 2, SNP were identified within the region encoding for cytoplasmic fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) interaction protein 1 (CYFIP1). The CYFIP1 gene is involved with the functionality of FMR1 and has been linked to premature ovarian failure in humans. Additionally, 3 SNP on BTA 9 were located near monofunctional C1-tetrahydrofolate synthase (MTHFD1L), which has been linked to neural tube defects during gestation in humans A difference in allele frequency was observed between the two groups for SNP located on BTA19 in proximity to two genes, zinc finger 18 (ZNF18) and mitogen activated protein kinase 4 (MAP2K4). The ZNF18 motif and MAP2K4 were found to be involved in heart development of the early embryo and associated with toll-like receptors (TLR) involved in gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) signaling, respectively. The involvement of one or all of these genes may further explain reduced fertility in dairy cattle.

Navarrette, Ashley Elizabeth

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Glossary Term - Liquid Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lepton Previous Term (Lepton) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Mercury) Mercury Liquid Nitrogen Liquid nitrogen boils in a frying pan on a desk. The liquid state of the element...

57

Energy Conservation in Fertilizer Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An energy efficient fertilizer production device called the Pipe Cross Reactor (PCR) was developed by the National Fertilizer Development Center (NFDC) of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The Office of Industrial Programs (OIPI of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) provided funding to NFDC to promote acceptance of this technology by the fertilizer production industry. The PCR uses the heat of reaction of ammonia with phosphoric acid and sulfuric acid to replace fossil fuel heat used in granulating and drying fertilizer. The device has been installed in about 30 fertilizer plants across the U.S.A. resulting in current annual energy savings equivalent to approximately 11 million gallons of fuel oil. In six years of cooperation with the TVA, the DOE spent about one million dollars on the PCR technology transfer effort. This TVA project is a notable success based upon demonstrated energy savings and industry acceptance of the technology. The technology is applicable to producing NPKS, DAP and MAP types of fertilizer. This paper discusses the technology with emphasis on the technology transfer work conducted by TVA and supported by DOE-DIP.

Mings, W. J.; Sonnett, W. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

AnimationStyle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the animation forward, then backwards, then forwards again, ad infinitum. Description. This class describes different ways of running animations of ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

59

Reading Comprehension - Liquid Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen Liquid Nitrogen Nitrogen is the most common substance in Earth's _________ crust oceans atmosphere trees . In the Earth's atmosphere, nitrogen is a gas. The particles of a gas move very quickly. They run around and bounce into everyone and everything. The hotter a gas is, the _________ slower faster hotter colder the particles move. When a gas is _________ cooled warmed heated compressed , its particles slow down. If a gas is cooled enough, it can change from a gas to a liquid. For nitrogen, this happens at a very _________ strange warm low high temperature. If you want to change nitrogen from a gas to a liquid, you have to bring its temperature down to 77 Kelvin. That's 321 degrees below zero _________ Kelvin Celsius Centigrade Fahrenheit ! Liquid nitrogen looks like water, but it acts very differently. It

60

Challenges for Plant Nutrition Management from the Fertilizer Industry's Viewpoint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007/08.International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA),International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA), Paris,International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA), Paris,

Maene, Luc M; Olegario, Angela B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nitrogen spark denoxer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NO.sub.X control system for an internal combustion engine includes an oxygen enrichment device that produces oxygen and nitrogen enriched air. The nitrogen enriched air contains molecular nitrogen that is provided to a spark plug that is mounted in an exhaust outlet of an internal combustion engine. As the nitrogen enriched air is expelled at the spark gap of the spark plug, the nitrogen enriched air is exposed to a pulsating spark that is generated across the spark gap of the spark plug. The spark gap is elongated so that a sufficient amount of atomic nitrogen is produced and is injected into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine. The injection of the atomic nitrogen into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine causes the oxides of nitrogen to be reduced into nitrogen and oxygen such that the emissions from the engine will have acceptable levels of NO.sub.X. The oxygen enrichment device that produces both the oxygen and nitrogen enriched air can include a selectively permeable membrane.

Ng, Henry K. (Naperville, IL); Novick, Vincent J. (Downers Grove, IL); Sekar, Ramanujam R. (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Soil fertility decline: Definitions and assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In permanent agricultural systems, soil fertility is maintained through applications of manure, other organic materials, inorganic fertilizers, lime, the inclusion of legumes in the cropping systems, or a combination of

Alfred E. Hartemink

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nitrogen Fixation by Lightning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When some of the uncertainties associated with lightning are reviewed, it becomes difficult to support a large production of fixed nitrogen from the lightning shock wave.

G. A. Dawson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment; Years 4 and 5, Technical Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the fourth and fifth year (2002 and 2003, respectively) of a five-year fertilization experiment on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The goal of the experiment was to increase kokanee populations impacted from hydroelectric development on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The impacts resulted in declining stocks of kokanee, a native land-locked sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), a key species of the ecosystem. Arrow Lakes Reservoir, located in southeastern British Columbia, has undergone experimental fertilization since 1999. It is modeled after the successful Kootenay Lake fertilization experiment. The amount of fertilizer added in 2002 and 2003 was similar to the previous three years. Phosphorus loading from fertilizer was 52.8 metric tons and nitrogen loading from fertilizer was 268 metric tons. As in previous years, fertilizer additions occurred between the end of April and the beginning of September. Surface temperatures were generally warmer in 2003 than in 2002 in the Arrow Lakes Reservoir from May to September. Local tributary flows to Arrow Lakes Reservoir in 2002 and 2003 were generally less than average, however not as low as had occurred in 2001. Water chemistry parameters in select rivers and streams were similar to previous years results, except for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations which were significantly less in 2001, 2002 and 2003. The reduced snow pack in 2001 and 2003 would explain the lower concentrations of DIN. The natural load of DIN to the Arrow system ranged from 7200 tonnes in 1997 to 4500 tonnes in 2003; these results coincide with the decrease in DIN measurements from water samples taken in the reservoir during this period. Water chemistry parameters in the reservoir were similar to previous years of study except for a few exceptions. Seasonal averages of total phosphorus ranged from 2.11 to 7.42 {micro}g/L from 1997 through 2003 in the entire reservoir which were indicative of oligo-mesotrophic conditions. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations have decreased in 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. These results indicate that the surface waters in Arrow Lakes Reservoir were approaching nitrogen limitation. Results from the 2003 discrete profile series indicate nitrate concentrations decreased significantly below 25 {micro}g/L (which is the concentration where nitrate is considered limiting to phytoplankton) between June and July at stations in Upper Arrow and Lower Arrow. Nitrogen to phosphorus ratios (weight:weight) were also low during these months indicating that the surface waters were nitrogen deficient. These results indicated that the nitrogen to phosphorus blends of fertilizer added to the reservoir need to be fine tuned and closely monitored on a weekly basis in future years of nutrient addition. Phytoplankton results shifted during 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. During 2002, there was a co-dominance of potentially 'inedible' diatoms (Fragilaria spp. and Diatoma) and 'greens' (Ulothrix). Large diatom populations occurred in 2003 and these results indicate it may be necessary to alter the frequency and amounts of weekly loads of nitrogen and phosphorus in future years to prevent the growth of inedible diatoms. Zooplankton density in 2002 and 2003, as in previous years, indicated higher densities in Lower Arrow than in Upper Arrow. Copepods and other Cladocera (mainly tiny specimens such as Bosmina sp.) had distinct peaks, higher than in previous years, while Daphnia was not present in higher numbers particularly in Upper Arrow. This density shift in favor to smaller cladocerans was mirrored in a weak biomass increase. In Upper Arrow, total zooplankton biomass decreased from 1999 to 2002, and in 2003 increased slightly, while in Lower Arrow the biomass decreased from 2000-2002. In Lower Arrow the majority of biomass was comprised of Daphnia throughout the study period except in 2002, while in Upper Arrow the total biomass was comprised of copepods from 2000-2003.

Schindler, E.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

SNAP Animation Gallery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MULTIMEDIA GALLERY PRESENTATIONS RELATED LINKS Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Animations Below are computer generated animations of what the SNAP satellite might look like,...

66

Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed. 13 figs.

Goldstein, A.H.; Rogers, R.D.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed.

Goldstein, Alan H. (Beverly Hills, CA); Rogers, Robert D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Plants & Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plant and animal monitoring is performed to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain. April 12, 2012 A rabbit on LANL land. A rabbit on LANL land. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We sample many plants and animals, including wild and domestic crops, game animals, fish, and food products from animals, as well as other plants and animals not considered food sources. What plants and animals do we monitor? LANL monitors both edible and non-edible plants and animals to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain, or to find contaminants that indicate they are being moved in the

69

Nitrogen Deposition Data Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Cycle Data Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of a data set prepared by Elisabeth Holland and colleagues titled "Global N Cycle: Fluxes and N2O Mixing Ratios...

70

Fertilizer Imports/Exports | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fertilizer Imports/Exports Fertilizer Imports/Exports Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Fertilizer Imports/Exports Dataset Summary Description This product provides U.S. annual data on imports and exports of selected fertilizer types. The data cover imports from 1995 to 2009 and exports from 1990 to 2009 for 26 major fertilizer products and materials, and for 82 major trading countries. Tags {U.S.,imports,exports,fertilizer,agriculture,USDA} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated July 5, 2012 Publisher Economic Research Service, Department of Agriculture

71

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 8 Lipid Composition of Chicken Semen and Fertility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 8 Lipid Composition of Chicken Semen and Fertility Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Lipid

72

Color Blind Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blind Animals Name: Hillary Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Are dogs and cats colorblind? If so what is the percentage? Are all animals color blind? Replies: yes,...

73

Sequestration of CO2 by Ocean Fertilization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation for NETL Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 SEQUESTRATION OF CO 2 BY OCEAN FERTILIZATION Authors: Dr. Michael Markels, Jr. (Markels@greenseaventure.com...

74

Animal Testing Medical Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Animal Testing In Medical Research Past, present and future. Marte Thomassen Ellen Trolid Tonje Arondsen Marit Gystøl #12;ZO-8091 Forsøksdyrlære Animal experiments in medical research NTNU ­ Norges ................................................................................................................................................ 9 7. THE FUTURE OF ANIMALS IN MEDICAL RESEARCH.21

Bech, Claus

75

Alternative approaches for promoting fertilizer use in africa, with particular reference to the role of fertilizer subsidies. Revised draft paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why promote fertilizer use? Revised draft 1Table of Contents 1. Introduction................................................................................................................................. 1 2. Rationale for increased use of fertilizer in Africa....................................................................... 3 2.1 Structural transformation and the role of soil fertility.......................................................... 3 2.2 Soil fertility and fertilizer use in Africa................................................................................ 4

Eric W. Crawford; T. S. Jayne; Valerie A. Kelly

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Trainable videorealistic speech animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe how to create with machine learning techniques a generative, speech animation module. A human subject is first recorded using a videocamera as he/she utters a predetermined speech corpus. After processing the corpus automatically, a visual ... Keywords: facial animation, facial modeling, lip synchronization, morphing, optical flow, speech synthesis

Tony Ezzat; Gadi Geiger; Tomaso Poggio

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen in a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freeze Liquid Nitrogen! Freeze Liquid Nitrogen! Previous Video (Let's Freeze Liquid Nitrogen!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Freeze the Rainbow!) Freeze the Rainbow! Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! What happens when the world's most beloved cryogenic liquid meets one of the most common household appliances? Find out when we try to microwave liquid nitrogen! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: A little while ago we received an email from Star of the Sea Catholic School in Virginia Beach, Virginia, asking what happens when you place liquid nitrogen in a microwave. Well, I just happen to have some liquid nitrogen! Steve: And I just happen to have a microwave!

78

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freeze the Rainbow! Freeze the Rainbow! Previous Video (Freeze the Rainbow!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen and Fire!) Liquid Nitrogen and Fire! Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze! What happens when the freezing power of liquid nitrogen meets the antifreezing power of ethylene glycol? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: What happens when the freezing power of liquid nitrogen... Steve: ...meets the antifreezing power of ethylene glycol! Joanna: While a mix of 70 percent ethylene glycol and 30 percent water doesn't freeze until 60 degrees below zero, it's still no match for liquid nitrogen. At 321 degrees below zero, liquid nitrogen easily freezes

79

Plant and Animal Immigrants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Animal Immigrants and Animal Immigrants Nature Bulletin No. 43 December 1, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation PLANT AND ANIMAL IMMIGRANTS When foreign plants and animals are brought to a new country they either become naturalized and thrive, or they cling to their old ways and die out. after they, too, find new freedoms because they leave their enemies, competitors, parasites, and some of their diseases behind them -- much as immigrant people do. The United States now supports about 300 times as many people as it did when Columbus discovered America. This is possible because the domesticated plants and animals that the early settlers brought with them give much higher yields of food and clothing than the Indians got from wild ones.

80

A Mechanistic Treatment of the Dominant Soil Nitrogen Cycling Processes: Model Development, Testing, and Application  

SciTech Connect

The development and initial application of a mechanistic model (TOUGHREACT-N) designed to characterize soil nitrogen (N) cycling and losses are described. The model couples advective and diffusive nutrient transport, multiple microbial biomass dynamics, and equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions. TOUGHREACT-N was calibrated and tested against field measurements to assess pathways of N loss as either gas emission or solute leachate following fertilization and irrigation in a Central Valley, California, agricultural field as functions of fertilizer application rate and depth, and irrigation water volume. Our results, relative to the period before plants emerge, show that an increase in fertilizer rate produced a nonlinear response in terms of N losses. An increase of irrigation volume produced NO{sub 2}{sup -} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} leaching, whereas an increase in fertilization depth mainly increased leaching of all N solutes. In addition, nitrifying bacteria largely increased in mass with increasing fertilizer rate. Increases in water application caused nitrifiers and denitrifiers to decrease and increase their mass, respectively, while nitrifiers and denitrifiers reversed their spatial stratification when fertilizer was applied below 15 cm depth. Coupling aqueous advection and diffusion, and gaseous diffusion with biological processes, closely captured actual conditions and, in the system explored here, significantly clarified interpretation of field measurements.

Riley, William; Maggi, F.; Gu, C.; Riley, W.J.; Hornberger, G.M.; Venterea, R.T.; Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Steefel, C.; Miller, N.L.; Oldenburg, C.M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Menlo Park, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

83

Cargill Fertilizer Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cargill Fertilizer Biomass Facility Cargill Fertilizer Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cargill Fertilizer Biomass Facility Facility Cargill Fertilizer Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Hillsborough County, Florida Coordinates 27.9903597°, -82.3017728° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.9903597,"lon":-82.3017728,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

84

Land animal sizes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land animal sizes Name: tamar c Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: Why are today's land mammals so much smaller than prehistoric mammals?...

85

Electrochromic Glazings: Animation Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glazings Glazings Animation Simulation Parameters The Electrochromic Glazing Office Animation is created using an image compositing method whereby separate images of the office generated with only one source of illumination are added together in variable percentages to come up with the final image. This method assumes that the sources of illumination do not change position through the animation sequence. Although the sun does move approximately 5 degrees during the span of this 20 minute animation sequence, because this movement is not the focus of the simulation and does not significantly change the intensity of the solar exposure, it is ignored. This method takes advantage of the principal of the scalability of light to avoid the significant time involved in calculating separate Radiance renderings for each combination of sky condition (direct sun versus no direct sun) and electrochromic glazing transmission.

86

Senses of Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Animals Name: saravanan Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I read that fishes can figure out taste through their fins and tail,so are insects through their legs,...

87

Facial modeling and animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this course we present an overview of the concepts and current techniques in facial modeling and animation. We introduce this research area by its history and applications. As a necessary prerequisite for facial modeling, data acquisition is discussed ...

Jörg Haber; Demetri Terzopoulos

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Animals that Hide Underground  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animals that Hide Underground Animals that Hide Underground Nature Bulletin No. 733 November 23, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist ANIMALS THAT HIDE UNDERGROUND A hole in the ground has an air of mystery about it that rouses our curiosity. No matter whether it is so small that only a worm could squeeze into it, or large enough for a fox den, our questions are much the same. What animal dug the hole? Is it down there now? What is it doing? When will it come out? An underground burrow has several advantages for an animal. In it, many kinds find safety from enemies for themselves and their young. For others, it is an air-conditioned escape from the burning sun of summer and a snug retreat away from the winds and cold of winter. The moist atmosphere of a subterranean home allows the prolonged survival of a wide variety of lower animals which, above the surface, would soon perish from drying.

89

The Shapes of Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shapes of Animals Shapes of Animals Nature Bulletin No. 698 December 15, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE SHAPES OF ANIMALS The shape of an animal tells a great deal about the kind of life it leads. Unlike common plants which stay rooted to one spot, they are active creatures that move about under their own power. They crawl, walk, run, jump, climb, dig, swim or fly. They hunt food, make homes, produce young, flee from their enemies or fight them. Certain body proportions and types of legs, wings or other features go along with each habit of life. Animals, even when they are at rest, give the impression of being ready to do something or go somewhere. For example, animals that specialize in jumping, such as the rabbit, frog, flea, grasshopper and kangaroo, have long powerful hind legs. The climbers may have the grasping feet of the opossum and raccoon; the hooked claws of tree squirrels, cats, woodpeckers and many insects; or the suction cups of the tree frog's toes, or the housefly's feet, by which they can walk up a window pane or upside down across a ceiling. The best diggers -- the mole, woodchuck, badger and the underground young of a 17-year cicada -- have short stout forelegs equipped with heavy claws for scooping earth.

90

Nitrogen fixation apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

Chen, Hao-Lin (Walnut Creek, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

India's Fertilizer Industry: Productivity and Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's fertilizer sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. Our analysis shows that in the twenty year period, 1973 to 1993, productivity in the fertilizer sector increased by 2.3% per annum. An econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's fertilizer sector has been biased towards the use of energy, while it has been capital and labor saving. The increase in productivity took place during the era of total control when a retention price system and distribution control was in effect. With liberalization of the fertilizer sector and reduction of subsidies productivity declined substantially since the early 1990s. Industrial policies and fiscal incentives still play a major role in the Indian fertilizer sect or. As substantial energy savings and carbon reduction potential exists, energy policies can help overcome barriers to the adoption of these measures in giving proper incentives and correcting distorted prices.

Schumacher, K.; Sathaye, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Expression of genes associated with immunity in the endometrium of cattle with disparate postpartum uterine disease and fertility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of animals with dispa- rate disease outcomes and found that during Period 1, infertile animals had higher levels of IL1A and IL1B, and their cognate IL1R2, compared with fertile animals. Ratio of IL1A and IL1B to IL10 expressionFigure 7 Ratio of IL1A and IL1B... and follicle growth and function in cattle. Reproduction 2002, 123:837-845. 23. Rozen S, Skaletsky H: Primer3 on the WWW for general users and for biologist programmers Totowa, NJ: Humana Press; 2000. 24. Dohmen MJ, Joop K, Sturk A, Bols PE, Lohuis JA...

Herath, Shan; Lilly, Sonia T; Santos, Natalia R; Gilbert, Robert O; Goetze, Leopold; Bryant, Clare; White, John O; Cronin, James; Sheldon, I Martin

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

93

EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect

A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

Finkel, M.P.

1964-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen and Fire!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Antifreeze! Antifreeze! Previous Video (Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery!) Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery! Liquid Nitrogen and Fire! A burning candle is placed in a container of liquid nitrogen! Filmed in front of a live studio audience. Well, they were live when we started... [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Steve: Now, then. I'm a little bit afraid to ask this next question because I think I already know the answer, but is anyone in here feeling a little... dangerous? You're willing to take a chance? Because I am willing to do an experiment they haven't let me do since 'The Incident.' Now, because of the danger, I cannot have a volunteer. I must do this on my

95

VISUALS: Crystal Structure Animations - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... This site contains animated ball and stick models of anhydrite, aragonite, barite, beryl, biotite, calcite, ... "Crystal Structure Animations.

96

Animal Waste Technology Fund (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A bill passed in 2012 transferred responsibility for animal waste management technology projects to the Maryland Department of Agriculture. The Department will maintain the Animal Waste Technology...

97

EMSL: News: Videos and Animations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fellowships and Awards BOOKMARK US RSS Facebook icon YouTube icon flickr Videos and Animations Videos and Animations showcase research conducted by EMSL users, EMSL's...

98

Medieval Names for Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medieval Names for Animals Medieval Names for Animals Nature Bulletin No. 449-A March 18, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MEDIEVAL NAMES FOR ANIMALS The English language is a polyglot -- a confusion of several languages - - and it contains many words dating back to medieval times. Some of them are still in common use; some now have entirely different meanings; many have been forgotten; others are rarely heard but are defined, as archaic words, in the unabridged dictionaries. Recently the narrator on a television program, showing great numbers of wild beasts in Africa, used the expression: "a pride of lions". An acquaintance remembered having seen it in "Sir Nigel", a novel about the days when knighthood was in flower, written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle who is famous for his stories about Sherlock Holmes. Searching through a copy of that book in a public library, we found two pages which contained many ancient terms for gatherings or numbers of animals, such as: "a pride of lions", "a cete of badgers", and a "swarm" or "skulk" of foxes.

99

EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MAINTENANCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of housing experimental animals such as mice in individual tube- like plastic enclosures is described. Contrary to experience, when this was tried with metal the mice did not become panicky. Group housing, with its attendant difficulties, may thus be dispensed with. (AEC)

Finkel, M.P.

1962-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

100

Kootenay Lake Fertilization Experiment; Years 11 and 12, Technical Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the results from the eleventh and twelfth years (2002 and 2003) of the Kootenay Lake fertilization experiment. Experimental fertilization has occurred with an adaptive management approach since 1992 in order to restore productivity lost as a result of upstream dams. One of the main objectives of the experiment is to restore kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations, which are a main food source for Gerrard rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Kootenay Lake is located between the Selkirk and Purcell mountains in southeastern British Columbia. It has an area of 395 km2, a maximum depth of 150 m, a mean depth of 94 m, and a water renewal time of approximately two years. The quantity of agricultural grade liquid fertilizer (10-34-0, ammonium polyphosphate and 28-0-0, urea ammonium nitrate) added to Kootenay Lake in 2002 and 2003 was similar to that added from 1992 to 1996. After four years of decreased fertilizer loading (1997 to 2000), results indicated that kokanee populations had declined, and the decision was made to increase the loads again in 2001. The total load of fertilizer in 2002 was 47.1 tonnes of phosphorus and 206.7 tonnes of nitrogen. The total fertilizer load in 2003 was 47.1 tonnes of phosphorus and 240.8 tonnes of nitrogen. Additional nitrogen was added in 2003 to compensate for nitrogen depletion in the epilimnion. The fertilizer was applied to a 10 km stretch in the North Arm from 3 km south of Lardeau to 3 km south of Schroeder Creek. The maximum surface water temperature in 2002, measured on July 22, was 22 C in the North Arm and 21.3 C in the South Arm. In 2003, the maxima were recorded on August 5 at 20.6 C in the North Arm and on September 2 at 19.7 C in the South Arm. The maximum water temperature in the West Arm was 18.7 C on September 2, 2003. Kootenay Lake had oxygen-saturated water throughout the sampling season with values ranging from about 11-16 mg/L in 2002 and 2003. In both years, Secchi depth followed the expected pattern for an oligo-mesotrophic lake of decreasing in May, June, and early July, concurrent with the spring phytoplankton bloom, and clearing again as the summer progressed. Total phosphorus (TP) ranged from 2-11 {micro}g/L in 2002 and 2-21 {micro}g/L in 2003. With average TP values generally in the range of 3-10 {micro}g/L, Kootenay Lake is considered to be an oligotrophic to oligo-mesotrophic lake. Total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) followed the same seasonal trends as TP in 2002 and 2003 and ranged from 2-7 {micro}g/L in 2002 and from 2-10 {micro}g/L in 2003. Total nitrogen (TN) ranged from 90-380 {micro}g/L in 2002 and 100-210 {micro}g/L in 2003. During both the 2002 and 2003 sampling seasons, TN showed an overall decline in concentration with mid-summer and fall increases at some stations, which is consistent with previous years results. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations showed a more pronounced declining trend over the sampling season compared with TN, corresponding to nitrate (the dominant component of DIN) being used by phytoplankton during summer stratification. DIN ranged from 7-176 {micro}g/L in 2002 and from 8-147 {micro}g/L in 2003. During 2003, discrete depth sampling occurred, and a more detailed look at the nitrate concentrations in the epilimnion was undertaken. There was a seasonal decline in nitrate concentrations, which supports the principle of increasing the nitrogen loading and the nitrogen to phosphorus (N:P) ratio during the fertilizer application period. Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations in Kootenay Lake were in the range of 1.4-5.1 {micro}g/L in 2002 and 0.5-4.9 {micro}g/L in 2003. Over the sampling season, Chl a at North Arm stations generally increased in spring corresponding with the phytoplankton bloom, decreased during the summer, and increased again in the fall with mixing of the water column. The trend was similar, but less pronounced, at South Arm stations in these years, and spring Chl a concentrations were lower. During 2002, total algal biomass averaged during June, July and August was lower in the North

Schindler, E.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Nitrogen chiller acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This document includes the inspection and testing requirements for the Nitrogen Chiller unit. The Chiller will support the Rotary Mode core Sampling System during the summer. The Chiller cools the Nitrogen Purge Gas that is used when drilling in tank wastes to cool the drill bit.

Kostelnik, A.J.

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

102

Effects of nitrogen additions on above- and belowground carbon dynamics in two tropical forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition is increasing rapidly in tropical regions, adding N to ecosystems that often have high background N availability. Tropical forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, yet the effects of N deposition on C cycling in these ecosystems are poorly understood. We used a field N-fertilization experiment in lower and upper elevation tropical rain forests in Puerto Rico to explore the responses of above- and belowground C pools to N addition. As expected, tree stem growth and litterfall productivity did not respond to N fertilization in either of these Nrich forests, indicating a lack of N limitation to net primary productivity (NPP). In contrast, soil C concentrations increased significantly with N fertilization in both forests, leading to larger C stocks in fertilized plots. However, different soil C pools responded to N fertilization differently. Labile (low density) soil C fractions and live fine roots declined with fertilization, while mineral-associated soil C increased in both forests. Decreased soil CO2 fluxes in fertilized plots were correlated with smaller labile soil C pools in the lower elevation forest (R2 = 0.65, p\\0.05), and with lower live fine root biomass in the upper elevation forest (R2 = 0.90, p\\0.05). Our results indicate that soil C storage is sensitive to N deposition in tropical forests, even where plant productivity is not N-limited. The mineral-associated soil C pool has the potential to respond relatively quickly to N additions, and can drive increases in bulk soil C stocks in tropical forests.

Cusack, D.; Silver, W.L.; Torn, M.S.; McDowell, W.H.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Optimal nitrogen application rates for three intensively-managed hardwood tree species in the southeastern USA.  

SciTech Connect

Forest production can be limited by nutrient and water availability, and tree species are expected to respond differently to fertilization and irrigation. Despite these common expectations, multi-species comparisons are rare, especially ones implementing a range of fertilization rates crossed with irrigation. This study compares the response of three forest hardwood species to numerous nitrogen (N) fertilization levels and water availability using a novel non-replicated technique. A range of N levels was included to determine how N affected the growth response curve, and statistical procedures for comparing these non-linear response functions are presented. We used growth and yield data to calculate the Land Expectation Value (LEV) for these intensive management treatments, and to determine the optimal growing conditions (accounting for tree productivity and grower expenses). To accomplish these objectives, we used a series of cottonwood, sycamore, and sweetgum plots that received a range of N fertilization with or without irrigation. Regression is an economical approach to define treatment responses in large-scale experiments, and we recommend >3 treatment levels so the response of any single plot does not disproportionally influence the line. The non-replicated plots showed a strong positive N response below 150 kg N ha -1 yr -1, beyond which little response was observed. However, different amounts of fertilization were required for the greatest biomass accumulation rate in each tree species. Cottonwood and sycamore growth was optimized with less than 150 kg N ha -1 yr -1 while sweetgum growth was optimized with less than 100 kg N ha -1 yr -1. Results from this experiment should be representative of many of the nutrient-poor soils in the Coastal Plain in the southeastern USA. The LEVs were not positive for any treatment x genotype combination tested when using irrigation or liquid fertilizer, but our analysis showed that several non-irrigated treatments in sycamore and sweetgum did result in positive LEVs when fertilized with granular urea.

Coyle, David; Aubrey, Doug P.; Siry, Jacek P.; Volfovicz-Leon, Roberto R.; Coleman, Mark D.

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Gender Equity and Fertility in European Below-Replacement Fertility Countries: Poland and Estonia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much of the recent scholarly attention has been devoted to the low fertility situation experienced by a growing number of developed countries. In this context, the theoretical framework explicitly incorporating the issues of gender in explanations of low fertility has been gaining notable popularity. This dissertation is focused primarily on the application of McDonald's theory of gender equity to the fertility context of two post-communist "low" and "very low" fertility countries, namely Poland and Estonia. Additionally, it tests the relative importance of gender equity at the societal level and the level of the family, contrasts the results of using different operationalizations of gender equity in the family, and compares the effects of gender equity on male and female fertility. I estimate two sex-specific models for Poland and two-sex specific models for Estonia, which respectively use three and two independent variables capturing gender equity in different institutions as well as in the family. All the models use intended fertility as the dependent variable operationalized as either the intention to have the second or higher order birth or the number of additional children intended. The main findings of this dissertation support the gendered explanation of low fertility in Poland and Estonia. More specifically, they indicate that gender equity in the family significantly increases fertility intentions of Polish men and women and Estonian women but not men. However, in none of the models there is evidence that gender equity in institutions outside the family matters to fertility. All in all, the findings support the gendered approach to fertility. The results of my dissertation indicate that it is important to pay attention to how we measure gender equity. I observe some variation in the findings depending on how stringent definition of equity is used. Finally, my research suggests that the importance of gender equity for women's fertility might be more universal but it is also not completely irrelevant to the fertility of men. I conclude this dissertation with a discussion of the implications of my findings and the potential for future development of research in this area.

Iwinska-Nowak, Anna Malgorzata

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

On-farm Assessment of Nitrogen Fertilizer application to corn on Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions by agriculture. Nutr.1998. Nitrous oxide emission in three years as affected by2008. Soil-surface gas emissions. p.851-861. In: M.R. Carter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Fertilization with nitrogen and phosphorus increases abundance of non-native species in Hawaiian montane forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the understory plant commu- nity of two montane wet forests in Hawaii. One site occupies a young substrate, where montane forests Rebecca Ostertag1,3,* and Julia H. Verville2,4 1 Department of Botany, University address: Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA; *Author

Ostertag, Rebecca

108

RESPONSE OF TWO CANOLA VARIETIES (Brassica napus L.) TO NITROGEN FERTILIZER LEVELS AND ZINC FOLIAR APPLICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and yield attributes of canola plants (combined data ofand yield attributes of canola plants (combined data ofby imports from abroad. Canola (Brassica napus ) is one of

El Habbasha, El Sayed Fathi; El Salam, Mostafa Abd

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Effects of CO2 and Nitrogen Fertilization on Growth and Nutrient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-96OR22464 Contents Abstract Background Information Experimental Setup and Methods Applications of the Data Data Limitations and...

110

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Superconductors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Main Index Next Video (Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen) Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen Superconductors What happens when a magnet is placed on a superconductor? Play the video to find...

111

Do Animals Talk?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Do Animals Talk? Do Animals Talk? Nature Bulletin No. 635 April 1, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist DO ANIMALS TALK ? Amateur bird fans are not all bird watchers. Some of us are bird listeners. In the forest preserves and rural regions, the big black noisy crow is a continual challenge. At the first light of dawn an evenly spaced "caw, caw, caw" seems to say "Hello! Is anybody awake?" Soon it is answered by sleepy crow voices. They have food calls, assembly calls, alarm calls, courtship calls and a lot of squabbling over roosting spots as they settle down for the night. The adults are very quiet near the nest but the fledglings make loud gargling sounds as they are fed. The discovery of an owl or cat sets off a sort of mob hysteria. By hiding a microphone among a flock of crows it has been found that they also talk in whispers.

112

Animal carcinogen testing challenged  

SciTech Connect

The past 15 years have seen a long list of man-made chemicals indicated as potential human carcinogens. Now, a prominent cancer researcher says that the risks of those chemicals have been overestimated partly because of a serious design flaw in the animal tests used to assess their carcinogenicity. The researcher, Bruce Ames of the University of California, Berkeley, has become well known for his views that many of the newsmaking carcinogens pose little risk to the general human population. He also argues that current policies for testing and regulating carcinogens, which emphasize synthetic chemicals, are misdirected. In animal tests the chemicals are usually administered in the maximum tolerated doses (MTDs), which are the highest doses that can be given without causing severe weight loss or other life-threatening signs of toxicity. Even though these levels are much higher than the doses to which people are likely to be exposed, MTDs are used to cut down on the number of animals- and thus the cost-required to obtain statistically significant results. Although the MTDs don't cause overt signs of toxicity, they can still have more subtle toxic effects, however, and that is what Ames thinks accounts for the large number of compounds that test positive for carcinogenicity.

Marx, J.

1990-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

113

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 5 Phospholipid Composition of Human Sperm and Seminal Plasmain Relation to Sperm Fertility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 5 Phospholipid Composition of Human Sperm and Seminal Plasmain Relation to Sperm Fertility Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downl

114

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Instant Liquid Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freezing Balloons! Freezing Balloons! Previous Video (Freezing Balloons!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Shattering Flowers!) Shattering Flowers! Instant Liquid Nitrogen Balloon Party! Need a bunch of balloons blown-up quickly? Liquid nitrogen to the rescue! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: We've been making videos for a while now and we've learned that people like balloons and liquid nitrogen! Steve: So... Here you go! Balloon: Crackling... Balloon: Pop! Joanna: Ooh! Balloon: Pop! Balloon: Pop! Steve: If you'd like to know the science of what's going on behind this, please one of our first videos, "Liquid Nitrogen Experiments: The Balloon."

115

It's Elemental - The Element Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen The Element Nitrogen [Click for Isotope Data] 7 N Nitrogen 14.0067 Atomic Number: 7 Atomic Weight: 14.0067 Melting Point: 63.15 K (-210.00°C or -346.00°F) Boiling Point: 77.36 K (-195.79°C or -320.44°F) Density: 0.0012506 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek words nitron and genes, which together mean "saltpetre forming." Say what? Nitrogen is pronounced as NYE-treh-gen. History and Uses: Nitrogen was discovered by the Scottish physician Daniel Rutherford in 1772. It is the fifth most abundant element in the universe and makes up

116

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

Brown, Nancy J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Nitrogen removal from natural gas  

SciTech Connect

According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fertile, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fertile, Iowa: Energy Resources Fertile, Iowa: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.2644001°, -93.418263° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.2644001,"lon":-93.418263,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

119

Energy Basics: Wind Power Animation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Wind Power Animation This animation discusses the advantages of wind power, the workings of a wind turbine, and wind resources in the United States. It also...

120

Conditions for learning from animations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animated diagrams representing dynamic systems hold great potential for improving the way people learn. However, so far the literature failed to find clear benefits of animated diagrams. Consequently it is worthwhile to investigate conditions under which ...

Herre Van Oostendorp; Michiel J. Beijersbergen; Sam Solaimani

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Emergency Animal Management during Disasters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains how communities and counties can incorporate animal issues into their emergency management plans. It explains what local plans should include, what role county Extension agents can play, and how animal management plans can best be used.

Dement, Angela

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

Interactive Animation of Dynamic Manipulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lifelike animation of manipulation must account for the dynamicinteraction between animated characters, objects, and their environment. Failing to do so would ignore the often significant effects objectshave on the motion ...

Abe, Yeuhi

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

123

Social Interactions, Ethnicity and Fertility in Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are grateful to Wiji Arulampalam, Ethan Cohen-Cole, Partha Dasgupta, Gernot Doppelhofer, Steven Durlauf, Timothy Guinnane, Andrew Harvey, Larry Iannaccone, Hashem Pesaran, Richard Smith, and Chander Velu. We acknowledge funding from the Centre for Research... of the group is small, such as interaction e¤ects within extended families of small communities. 3 Overview of ethnic groups in Kenya Social interactions and channels of message transmission about fertility behaviour are important at the level of ethnicity...

Iyer, Sriya; Weeks, Melvyn

124

Painterly animation using motion maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Starting from an input video, we replicate the manual technique of paint-on-glass animation. Motion maps are used to represent the regions where changes occur between frames. Edges are the key to identifying frame-to-frame changes, and a strong motion ... Keywords: Metamorphosis, Motion map, Non-photorealistic rendering & animation, Painterly rendering & animation, Strong edges

Youngsup Park; Kyunghyun Yoon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A Classic Model in a Low Fertility Context: The Proximate Determinants of Fertility in South Korea and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

John Bongaarts' proximate determinants model of fertility has accounted for over 90 percent of variation in the total fertility rate (TFR) of primarily developing nations and historical populations. Recently, dramatically low fertility rates across the globe have raised questions regarding whether this model could be applied to exclusively below-replacement nations. This study follows Knodel, Chamratrithirong, and Debavalya's 1987 analysis of fertility decline in Thailand by conducting in-depth case studies of the proximate determinants in two low fertility countries over time: South Korea, where fertility is well below the level of replacement, and the United States, where fertility has hovered around replacement level for many years. Then, the fertility-inhibiting effect of the proximate determinants is assessed by comparing the quantitative index representing each determinant measured in the 1960s/1970s with its measurement in the 2000s. For both years, I consider the fertility level that would prevail in the determinant's presence as well as the level that would exist in its absence. Finally, I use each of the indices to calculate the TFR and assess how the strength of the model varies over time in the two countries. Ultimately, results indicate that the proximate determinants model does not offer a clean picture of the fertility level in either South Korea or the United States; when trends uncovered by the case studies are compared to the results of the quantitative analysis, a number of inconsistencies are revealed. This suggests that certain components in the model may need to be respecified for more effective application in low-fertility contexts. However, that is not to say that it offers no insight into fertility at all or that it is no longer a useful tool. On the contrary, it is shown that the proximate determinants model holds a lot of potential for analysis in low-fertility nations. The implications of these results, as well as the need for improvements in international data collection efforts, are also discussed.

Guarneri, Christine E.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options for Coal-Fired Electric Utility Boilers Ravi K. Srivastava and Robert E. Hall U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Research Triangle Park, NC Sikander Khan and Kevin Culligan U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Clean Air Markets Division, Washington, DC Bruce W. Lani U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Environmental Projects Division, Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increas- ingly important to implement state-of-the-art NO x con- trol technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NO x control

127

METHOD OF FIXING NITROGEN FOR PRODUCING OXIDES OF NITROGEN  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for fixing nitrogen from air by compressing the air, irradiating the compressed air in a nuclear reactor, cooling to remove NO/ sub 2/, compressing the cooled gas, further cooling to remove N/sub 2/O and recirculating the cooled compressed air to the reactor.

Harteck, P.; Dondes, S.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

PCS Nitrogen: Combustion Fan System Optimization Improves Performance and Saves Energy at a Chemical Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program case study describes how, in 2003, PCS Nitrogen, Inc., improved the efficiency of the combustion fan on a boiler at the company's chemical fertilizer plant in Augusta, Georgia. The project saved $420,000 and 76,400 million British thermal units (MBtu) per year. In addition, maintenance needs declined, because there is now less stress on the fan motor and bearings and less boiler feed water usage. This project was so successful that the company has implemented more efficiency improvements that should result in energy cost savings of nearly $1 million per year.

Not Available

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

VISUALS: Diffusion couple animation - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 25, 2007 ... This Quicktime animation of a diffusion couple shows side-by-side views of two different atomic species - red and green - diffusing across a flat ...

130

ANIMATION: Crystallography: Gamma Prime - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 9, 2007 ... This 21-second animation demonstrates the crystal structure of gamma prime in nickel based superalloys. SOURCE: Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H. ...

131

Domestic Animals that go Wild  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and become tamer than their wild relatives. By the artificial selection of breeding stock, these domesticated animals have been greatly modified to fill man's needs for better...

132

Atmospheric Nitrogen Fixation by Lightning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production Of nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) by lightning flashes has been computed from a model of gaseous molecular reactions occurring as heated lightning-channel air cools by mixing with surrounding ambient air. The effect of ozone (O3) on ...

R. D. Hill; R. G. Rinker; H. Dale Wilson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

134

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

135

Nucleation and Characteristics of Liquid Nitrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes experiments on a refrigerating catalyst?liquid nitrogen (LN)?in different cloud chambers and their results. The nucleation threshold temperature of liquid nitrogen is 0°C, and when the temperature less than ?2°C, the ice ...

Cao Xuecheng; Wang Weimin

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

Schmidt, G.W.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Meshless animation of fracturing solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new meshless animation framework for elastic and plastic materials that fracture. Central to our method is a highly dynamic surface and volume sampling method that supports arbitrary crack initiation, propagation, and termination, while ... Keywords: elasticity, fracture, meshless methods, physics-based animation, plasticity

Mark Pauly; Richard Keiser; Bart Adams; Philip Dutré; Markus Gross; Leonidas J. Guibas

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Lumo: illumination for cel animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented to approximate lighting on 2D drawings. The specific problem solved is the incorporation of 2D cel animation into live-action scenes, augmenting the existing method of drawn "rims and tones" with subtle environmental illumination. ... Keywords: cel animation, non-photorealistic rendering, sparse interpolation

Scott F. Johnston

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen Show!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insulators! Insulators! Previous Video (Insulators!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Superconductors!) Superconductors! Liquid Nitrogen Show! All of your favorite liquid nitrogen experiments all in one place! Flowers! Balloons! Racquetballs! Nothing is safe! Just sit back, relax, and enjoy the show! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Usually, every couple years, Jefferson Lab hosts an Open House. This is the one time the public and come and tour our accelerator and end stations. Steve: During the 2010 Open House, our cameraman snuck into one of the ongoing cryo shows that are held throughout the day. He missed half of it. So if you want to see the entire thing, check our website to see when the

140

The Life Span of Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Span of Animals Span of Animals Nature Bulletin No. 486-A March 24, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE LIFE SPAN OF ANIMALS Signs of senility, or extreme old age, are seldom seen in the wild. Animals living under natural conditions rarely approach their maximum possible age because of very high death rates due to infant mortality, diseases, predators, bad weather, accidents, or competition for food and shelter. For this reason, most of the reliable information about the length of the life span comes from zoos, where accurate records are kept and animals live under conditions almost ideally suited to prolong life. A mouse whose life is measured in months in the wild can survive years of captivity.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC) Employment Opportunity in Washington, DC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC) Employment Opportunity in Washington, DC Science and Technology Officer - VFRC IFDC has launched the Virtual Fertilizer Research Center (VFRC), a global research, website, other media) 5. Liaison with VFRC BoA Science Committee, IFDC RDD and other technical bodies

Ma, Lena

142

Impaired fertility in T-stock female mice after superovulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superovulation of female mice with exogenous gonadotrophins is routinely used for increasing the number of eggs ovulated by each female in reproductive and developmental studies. We report an unusual effect of superovulation on fertilization in mice. In vivo matings of superovulated T-stock females with B6C3F1 males resulted in a 2-fold reduction (Pstock females had reached the metaphase stage of the first cleavage division versus 87% in B6C3F1 females (P stock males did not improve the reproductive performance of T-stock females. To investigate the possible cause(s) for the impaired fertilization and zygotic development, the experiments were repeated using in vitro fertilization. Under these conditions, the frequencies of fertilized eggs were not different in superovulated T-stock and B6C3F1 females (51.7% {+-} 6.0 and 64.5% {+-}3.8, P=0.10). There was a 7-fold increase in the frequencies of fertilized T-stock eggs that completed the first cell cycle of development after in vitro versus in vivo fertilization. These results rule out an intrinsic deficiency of the T-stock oocyte as the main reason for the impaired fertility after in vivo matings and suggest that superovulation of T-stock females induces a hostile oviductal and uterine environment with dramatic effects on fertilization and zygotic development.

Wyrobek, A J; Bishop, J B; Marchetti, F; Zudova, D

2003-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

143

Impaired fertility in T-stock female mice after superovulation  

SciTech Connect

Superovulation of female mice with exogenous gonadotrophins is routinely used for increasing the number of eggs ovulated by each female in reproductive and developmental studies. We report an unusual effect of superovulation on fertilization in mice. In vivo matings of superovulated T-stock females with B6C3F1 males resulted in a 2-fold reduction (P<0.001) in the frequencies of fertilized eggs compared to control B6C3F1 matings. In addition, {approx}22 hr after mating only 15% of fertilized eggs recovered in T-stock females had reached the metaphase stage of the first cleavage division versus 87% in B6C3F1 females (P < 0.0001). Matings with T-stock males did not improve the reproductive performance of T-stock females. To investigate the possible cause(s) for the impaired fertilization and zygotic development, the experiments were repeated using in vitro fertilization. Under these conditions, the frequencies of fertilized eggs were not different in superovulated T-stock and B6C3F1 females (51.7% {+-} 6.0 and 64.5% {+-}3.8, P=0.10). There was a 7-fold increase in the frequencies of fertilized T-stock eggs that completed the first cell cycle of development after in vitro versus in vivo fertilization. These results rule out an intrinsic deficiency of the T-stock oocyte as the main reason for the impaired fertility after in vivo matings and suggest that superovulation of T-stock females induces a hostile oviductal and uterine environment with dramatic effects on fertilization and zygotic development.

Wyrobek, A J; Bishop, J B; Marchetti, F; Zudova, D

2003-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

144

Environmentally-friendly animal litter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An animal litter composition that includes geopolymerized ash particulates having a network of repeating aluminum-silicon units is described herein. Generally, the animal litter is made from a quantity of a pozzolanic ash mixed with an alkaline activator to initiate a geopolymerization reaction that forms geopolymerized ash. This geopolymerization reaction may occur within a pelletizer. After the geopolymerized ash is formed, it may be dried and sieved to a desired size. These geopolymerized ash particulates may be used to make a non-clumping or clumping animal litter or other absorbing material. Aluminum sulfate, clinoptilolite, silica gel, sodium alginate and mineral oil may be added as additional ingredients.

Boxley, Chett; McKelvie, Jessica

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

145

Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment, Technical Report 1999-2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Arrow Lakes food web has been influenced by several anthropogenic stressors during the past 45 years. These include the introduction of mysid shrimp (Mysis relicta) in 1968 and 1974 and the construction of large hydroelectric impoundments in 1969, 1973 and 1983. The construction of the impoundments affected the fish stocks in Upper and Lower Arrow lakes in several ways. The construction of Hugh Keenleyside Dam (1969) resulted in flooding that eliminated an estimated 30% of the available kokanee spawning habitat in Lower Arrow tributaries and at least 20% of spawning habitat in Upper Arrow tributaries. The Mica Dam (1973) contributed to water level fluctuations and blocked upstream migration of all fish species including kokanee. The Revelstoke Dam (1983) flooded 150 km of the mainstem Columbia River and 80 km of tributary streams which were used by kokanee, bull trout, rainbow trout and other species. The construction of upstream dams also resulted in nutrient retention which ultimately reduced reservoir productivity. In Arrow Lakes Reservoir (ALR), nutrients settled out in the Revelstoke and Mica reservoirs, resulting in decreased productivity, a process known as oligotrophication. Kokanee are typically the first species to respond to oligotrophication resulting from aging impoundments. To address the ultra-oligotrophic status of ALR, a bottom-up approach was taken with the addition of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus in the form of liquid fertilizer from 1999 to 2004). Two of the main objectives of the experiment were to replace lost nutrients as a result of upstream impoundments and restore productivity in Upper Arrow and to restore kokanee and other sport fish abundance in the reservoir. The bottom-up approach to restoring kokanee in ALR has been successful by replacing nutrients lost as a result of upstream impoundments and has successfully restored the productivity of Upper Arrow. Primary production rates increased, the phytoplankton community responded with a shift in species and zooplankton biomass was more favorable for kokanee. With more productive lower trophic levels, the kokanee population increased in abundance and biomass, resulting in improved conditions for bull trout, one of ALR's piscivorous species.

Schindler, E.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

In vivo Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility for Total Body Nitrogen and Cd  

SciTech Connect

A Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system has been designed and constructed to measure the total body nitrogen and Cd for in vivo studies. An aqueous solution of KNO{sub 3} was used as phantom for system calibration. The facility has been used to monitor total body nitrogen (TBN) of mice and found that is related to their diet. Some mice swallowed diluted water with Cl{sub 2}Cd, and the presence of Cd was detected in the animals. The minimum Cd concentration that the system can detect was 20 ppm.

Munive, Marco; Revilla, Angel [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Solis, Jose L. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Lima (Peru)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

147

Focus + context visualization with animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present some novel animation techniques to help users understand complex structures contained in volumetric data from the medical imaging and scientific simulation fields. Because of the occlusion of 3D objects, these complex structures ...

Yingcai Wu; Huamin Qu; Hong Zhou; Ming-Yuen Chan

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Animal testing of beauty products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animal testing of beauty products Animal testing of beauty products Name: Wayers Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I consider animal testing to be cruel and unnecessary in most cases. I do not disapprove entirely with the testing of drugs and beneficial technology on animals; but I completely have a problem with testing unimportant items, such as make up, hair spray, and other beauty products on innocent lives. Are there any other methods of testing companies can use that wouldn't involve the harming of animals? Wayers Replies: Experience, theoretical models and testing on cell cultures can offer guidelines for a good guess as to what will happen when you throw some new chemical into a human body, but there are examples of where even very careful guesses have proved in practice to be terribly wrong (Thalidomide and DES come to mind). Given the very high level of safety that people demand from substances that go in or on their bodies, the only testing method that is considered reliable enough at present for new chemicals is to try the stuff out on some living creature that can tell you if it hurts or is sick. And even then you must be sure the creature is as similar as possible, at least in the part of the body you are worried about, to human beings. (This is itself a real challenge, and progress in treating disease is often hampered by the lack of a suitable animal model.) Thus ultimately comes the difficult ethical choice you are concerned with: namely, who or what gets to be the guinea pig? In terms of beauty products, there are enough people who feel as you do that there are a number of product lines which are guaranteed to be made without animal testing (they use ingredients that have been tested earlier on animals and are now recognized as safe). You can find them in natural foods and ecologically-conscious stores.

149

Lied Animal Shelter Animal campus Renewable Energy Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Animal Shelter campus plan includes a new adoption center coupled with a dog adoption park, a wellness/veterinary technician education center, a show arena, and an addition to the existing shelter that will accommodate all animal control and sheltering for the Las Vegas Valley. The new facility will provide a sophisticated and innovative presentation of the animals to be adopted in an attempt to improve the public's perception of shelter animals. Additionally, the Regional Animal Campus will be a ''green building'', embodying a design intent on balancing environmental responsiveness, resource efficiency and cultural and community sensitivity. Designing an energy-efficient building helps reduce pollution from burning fossil fuels, reduce disturbance of natural habitats for the harvesting of resources and minimizes global warming. The project will be a leader in the use of renewable energy by relying on photovoltaic panels, wind turbines, and solar collectors to produce a portion of the project's energy needs The building will operate more efficiently in comparison to a typical shelter through the use of monitoring and specialized cooling/heating equipment. Windows bringing in natural daylight will reduce the center's demand for electricity.

Randy Spitzmesser, AIA

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

150

Lied Animal Shelter Animal campus Renewable Energy Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The Animal Shelter campus plan includes a new adoption center coupled with a dog adoption park, a wellness/veterinary technician education center, a show arena, and an addition to the existing shelter that will accommodate all animal control and sheltering for the Las Vegas Valley. The new facility will provide a sophisticated and innovative presentation of the animals to be adopted in an attempt to improve the public's perception of shelter animals. Additionally, the Regional Animal Campus will be a ''green building'', embodying a design intent on balancing environmental responsiveness, resource efficiency and cultural and community sensitivity. Designing an energy-efficient building helps reduce pollution from burning fossil fuels, reduce disturbance of natural habitats for the harvesting of resources and minimizes global warming. The project will be a leader in the use of renewable energy by relying on photovoltaic panels, wind turbines, and solar collectors to produce a portion of the project's energy needs The building will operate more efficiently in comparison to a typical shelter through the use of monitoring and specialized cooling/heating equipment. Windows bringing in natural daylight will reduce the center's demand for electricity.

Randy Spitzmesser, AIA

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

151

Biological nitrogen fixation in sugar cane: A key to energetically viable biofuel production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advantages of producing biofuels to replace fossil energy sources are derived from the fact that the energy accumulated in the biomass in captured directly from photosynthesis and is thus renewable, and that the cycle of carbon dioxide fixation by the crop, followed by burning of the fuel makes no overall contribution to atmospheric CO{sub 2} or, consequently, to global warming. However, these advantages are negated if large quantities of fossil fuels need to be used to grow or process the biofuel crop. In this regard, the Brazilian bioethanol program, based on the fermentation/distillation of sugar cane juice, is particularly favorable, not only because the crop is principally hand harvested, but also because of the low nitrogen fertilizer use on sugar cane in Brazil. Recent {sup 15}N and N balance studies have shown that in some Brazilian cane varieties, high yields are possible without N fertilization because the plants are able to obtain large contributions of nitrogen from plant-associated biological N{sub 2} fixation (BNF). The N{sub 2}-fixing acid-tolerant bacterium Acetobacter diazotrophicus was first found to occur within roots, stems, and leaves of sugar cane. Subsequently, two species of Herbaspirillum also have been found to occur within the interior of all sugar cane tissues. The discovery of these, and other N{sub 2}-fixing bacteria that survive poorly in soil but thrive within plant tissue (endophytic bacteria), may account for the high BNF contributions observed in sugar cane. Further study of this system should allow the gradual elimination of N fertilizer use on sugar cane, at least in Brazil, and opens up the possibility of the extension of this efficient N{sub 2}-fixing system to cereal and other crops with consequent immense potential benefits to tropical agriculture. 44 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Boddey, R.M. [Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Agrobiologia, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition » Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen.

153

Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O[sub 2]/cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N[sub 2]. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N[sub 2] at a much quicker rate than unexcited N[sub 2], greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed. 1 fig.

Chen, H.L.

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

154

Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

Chen, Hao-Lin (Walnut Creek, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Genocide, Nuptiality, and Fertility in Rwanda and Bosnia-Herzegovina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??How does exposure to genocide affect nuptiality and fertility among the surviving population? Genocides in Rwanda and in Bosnia-Herzegovina in the early 1990s caused high… (more)

Staveteig, Sarah Elizabeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Bevatron liquid nitrogen circulation system  

SciTech Connect

A nitrogen liquefier and computer controlled valving system have been added to the Bevatron cryoliner vacuum system to cut operating costs by reducing liquid nitrogen consumption. The computer and interface electronic systems, which control the temperatures of twenty-eight liquid nitrogen circuits, have been chosen and designed to operate in the Bevatron's pulsating magnetic field. The nitrogen exhaust is routed back to a liquefier, of about five kilowatt capacity, liquefied, and rerouted through the cooling circuits. A description of the system and operating results are presented.

Hunt, D.; Stover, G.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN NITROGEN METABOLISM AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RG and JA Bassham, Photosynthesis by isolated chloroplasts.chloroplasts during photosynthesis. Plant Physiol ~0:22H-2?NITROGEN METABOLISM AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS James A. Bassham,

Bassham, James A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Conversion of performance mesh animation into cage-based animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Markerless highly-detailed performance capture is an emerging technology in vision-based graphics and 3D video. For instance, a framework for generating mesh animations from multi-view silhouettes is presented in [Vlasic et al. 2008]. Achieving inverse ...

Yann Savoye; Jean-Sébastien Franco

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Animation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on...

160

VISUALS: 3-D Animation of Dislocation Glide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Animation of edge-screw dislocation glide. Citation: van der Pluijm, Ben. "3-D Animation of Dislocation Glide." Teach the Earth: The SERC ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Nitrogen and phosphorus dynamics in tropical soils of Mali, West Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low soil fertility is one of the major biophysical constraints affecting African agriculture. Phosphorus and nitrogen are the two most common limiting nutrients. Before fertility amendment recommendations are made a soil's natural nutrient availability should be assessed. In 1998, soil samples were collected at Cinzana, Mali, West Africa for the purpose of documenting the seasonal dynamics of soil nitrogen and phosphorus in two soils after nine years under five crop management systems. The cropping systems are: continuous grain (sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) or millet (Pennisetum glaucum)), continuous grain with stalk residue returned to the field every second year, grain in rotation with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), grain in rotation with a sesbania (Sesbania rostrata) green manure crop, and grain in rotation with a dolichos (Dolichos lablab) green manure crop. Nitrogen availability graphs showed an inorganic nitrogen flush early in the rainy season in both soils. Extractable N concentration in a loamy sand soil peaked around 10-15 mg N kg?ą soil or 15-22 kg N in the upper 10 cm of soil ha?ą. The inorganic N concentration declined four weeks after the onset of the rainy season. Extractable N concentration in the clay soil reached a maximum of 22-34 mg N kg?ą soil or 33-51 kg N in the upper 10 cm of soil ha?ą. In the clay soil the high N concentrations associated with the early season flush lasted eight weeks after the onset of the rain. Further improvement of cereal grain yield may not be possible by rotation with sesbania and dolichos green manure or cowpea without additional nutrient input. Nitrogen and P return through rotation crops and crop residue is low. Phosphorous Bray-1 measurements fluctuated by 1.43 mg P kg?ą in the clay soil in 1998. Soil P availability in the clay soil was not influenced by the crop management systems. Bray-1 P measurements in loamy sand soil five months after Tilemsi phosphate rock application were surprisingly significantly lower than before application. Findings from this study can be used to make future crop management recommendations in the Cinzana, Mali, region.

Blanton-Knewtson, Sharon Joy

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils Model Applications at Different Scales in Time Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 #12;Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils. Model Applications at Different Scales in Time and Space Abstract An understanding of soil organic carbon (C

163

nitrogen oxides | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 20 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279720 Varnish cache server nitrogen oxides Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago)

164

INSENSITIVE HIGH-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conventional approach to developing energetic molecules is to chemically place one or more nitro groups onto a carbon skeleton, which is why the term ''nitration'' is synonymous to explosives preparation. The nitro group carries the oxygen that reacts with the skeletal carbon and hydrogen fuels, which in turn produces the heat and gaseous reaction products necessary for driving an explosive shock. These nitro-containing energetic molecules typically have heats of formation near zero and therefore most of the released energy is derived from the combustion process. Our investigation of the tetrazine, furazan and tetrazole ring systems has offered a different approach to explosives development, where a significant amount of the chemical potential energy is derived from their large positive heats of formation. Because these compounds often contain a large percentage of nitrogen atoms, they are usually regarded as high-nitrogen fuels or explosives. A general artifact of these high-nitrogen compounds is that they are less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine, several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. Some of the first compounds are 3,6-diamino-s-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide (LAX-112) and 3,6-dihydrazino-s-tetrazine (DHT). LAX-112 was once extensively studied as an insensitive explosive by Los Alamos; DHT is an example of a high-nitrogen explosive that relies entirely on its heat of formation for sustaining a detonation. Recent synthesis efforts have yielded an azo-s-tetrazine, 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, which has a very high positive heat of formation. The compounds, 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB--the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is equal to that of hexanitrostilbene (HNS), yet it too is a better explosive performer. The recently discovered tetrazol derivative, 3,6-bis-(1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-ylamino)-s-tetrazine (BTATz) was measured to have exceptional positive heats of formation and to be insensitive to explosive initiation. Because of its high burn rate with low sensitivity to pressure, this material is of great interest to the propellant community.

D. CHAVEZ; ET AL

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

NITROGEN K-SHELL PHOTOABSORPTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable atomic data have been computed for the spectral modeling of the nitrogen K lines, which may lead to useful astrophysical diagnostics. Data sets comprise valence and K-vacancy level energies, wavelengths, Einstein A-coefficients, radiative and Auger widths, and K-edge photoionization cross sections. An important issue is the lack of measurements that are usually employed to fine-tune calculations so as to attain spectroscopic accuracy. In order to estimate data quality, several atomic structure codes are used and extensive comparisons with previous theoretical data have been carried out. In the calculation of K photoabsorption with the Breit-Pauli R-matrix method, both radiation and Auger dampings, which cause the smearing of the K edge, are taken into account. This work is part of a wider project to compute atomic data in the X-ray regime to be included in the database of the popular XSTAR modeling code.

GarcIa, J. [Catholic University of America, IACS, Physics Department, Washington DC 20064 (United States); Kallman, T. R.; Witthoeft, M.; Behar, E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mendoza, C. [Centro de Fisica, IVIC, Caracas 1020A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P. [Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Mons, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Bautista, M.A. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Klapisch, M. [ARTEP, Inc., Ellicott City, MD 21042 (United States)], E-mail: javier@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov, E-mail: michael.c.witthoeft@nasa.gov, E-mail: timothy.r.kallman@nasa.gov, E-mail: behar@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov, E-mail: claudio@ivic.ve, E-mail: palmeri@umons.ac.be, E-mail: quinet@umons.ac.be, E-mail: bautista@vt.edu, E-mail: marcel.klapisch.ctr@nrl.navy.mil

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Freezing Balloons!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Season Two Bloopers Season Two Bloopers Previous Video (Season Two Bloopers) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Instant Liquid Nitrogen Balloon Party!) Instant Liquid Nitrogen Balloon Party! Freezing Balloons! What happens when a balloon full of air is plunged into a container full of liquid nitrogen? Play the video to find out! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a container of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And this is a really big balloon! Joanna: Let's see what happens when we place the balloon in the liquid nitrogen! Steve: Okay! Wait! Wait! Wait! Wait! Wait! Isn't the balloon going to pop? Joanna: We'll see! Steve: Aw, man... Huh. Okay, so the balloon didn't pop. But, there's

167

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Insulators!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Popping Film Canisters! Popping Film Canisters! Previous Video (Popping Film Canisters!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen Show!) Liquid Nitrogen Show! Insulators! Cups full of water are placed into bowls of liquid nitrogen! Which cup will insulate the best? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a container of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And these are two plastic cups! Joanna: Let's see which cup is the better insulator! Steve: Okay! So, um, how do we do that? Joanna: Well, we'll pour water into each of the cups and then we'll pour the liquid nitrogen into each of the bowls. If we then place the cup in the bowl, the heat from the water will try to pass through the cup into the

168

Visualizing Individual Nitrogen Dopants in Monolayer Graphene  

SciTech Connect

In monolayer graphene, substitutional doping during growth can be used to alter its electronic properties. We used scanning tunneling microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray spectroscopy, and first principles calculations to characterize individual nitrogen dopants in monolayer graphene grown on a copper substrate. Individual nitrogen atoms were incorporated as graphitic dopants, and a fraction of the extra electron on each nitrogen atom was delocalized into the graphene lattice. The electronic structure of nitrogen-doped graphene was strongly modified only within a few lattice spacings of the site of the nitrogen dopant. These findings show that chemical doping is a promising route to achieving high-quality graphene films with a large carrier concentration.

L Zhao; R He; K Rim; T Schiros; K Kim; H Zhou; C Gutierrez; S Chockalingam; C Arguello; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Environmental considerations of selected energy-conserving manufacturing process options. Volume XVII. Nitrogen oxides summary report. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Arthur D. Little, Inc. undertook a study of the 'Environmental Consideration of Selected Energy-Conserving Manufacturing Process Options.' Some 80 industrial process options were examined in 13 industrial sectors. Results were published in 15 volumes, including a summary, industry prioritization report, and 13 industry oriented reports. The present report summarizes the information regarding nitrogen oxide pollutants in the 13 industry reports. Topics considered include the following: Processes and potential nitrogen oxide emissions--(Bases of calculations, NOx control methods, petroleum refining industry, cement industry, olefins industry, alumina and aluminum industry, glass industry, copper industry, fertilizer industry, ammonia, iron and steel, phosphorus/phosphoric acid, textile industry, pulp and paper industry, and chlor-alkali industry).

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation. Final program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Animation of JILA Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animation of JILA Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique. The new JILA "frequency comb spectroscopy" technique ...

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

172

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Eligibility Commercial...

173

On-site generated nitrogen cuts cost of underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of on-site generated nitrogen, instead of liquid nitrogen, has reduced the cost of drilling underbalanced horizontal wells in Canada and the western US. Because nitrogen is inert and inflammable, it is the preferred gas for underbalanced drilling. Nitrogen can be supplied for oil field use by three different methods: cryogenic liquid separation, pressure swing adsorption, and hollow fiber membranes. The selection of nitrogen supply from one of these methods depends on the cost of delivered nitrogen, the required flow rates and pressure, the required nitrogen purity, and the availability and reliability of the equipment for nitrogen generation. These three methods are described, as well as the required equipment.

Downey, R.A. [Energy Ingenuity Co., Englewood, CO (United States)

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

174

Energy in synthetic fertilizers and pesticides: Revisited. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

Agricultural chemicals that are derived from fossil-fuels are the major energy intensive inputs in agriculture. Growing scarcity of the world`s fossil resources stimulated research and development of energy-efficient technology for manufacturing these chemicals in the last decade. The purpose of this study is to revisit the energy requirements of major plant nutrients and pesticides. The data from manufacturers energy survey conducted by The Fertilizer Institute are used to estimate energy requirements of fertilizers. Energy estimates for pesticides are developed from consulting previously published literature. The impact of technical innovation in the fertilizer industry to US corn, cotton, soybean and wheat producers is estimated in terms of energy-saving.

Bhat, M.G.; English, B.C.; Turhollow, A.F.; Nyangito, H.O. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Soil organic carbon dynamics and carbon sequestration in a semiarid Mediterranean agroecosystem: effects of conservation tillage and nitrogen fertilization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??El balanç entre l´entrada de C (dels residus vegetals) i sortides de C (principalment com CO2 de la descomposició del carboni orgŕnic del sňl -SOC-),… (more)

Morell Soler, Francisco Joaquín

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Development of rapid methods for estimating the fertilizing ability (nitrogen and potassium) of pig slurry and its changes during storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studied. The volume of biogas produced, the biogas required for the maintenance of fermentation (self. The digester output expressed as ml biogas/M3 tank/day ranged from 0.4 to 1.3 m"11' m3. d over a period of 9 can be checked #12;by the ratio of biogas production to organic matter input : 0.20 to 0.3 M3/kg

Recanati, Catherine

177

Impact of nitrogen fertilization and the soil type on the quality and yield of sweet sorghum juice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

while using it for biofuel production, a great attentionprofitably used for biofuel production; challenges such assorghum’s use for biofuel production. Today, very little

Holou, Roland A; Stevens, Gene

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Impact of nitrogen fertilization and the soil type on the quality and yield of sweet sorghum juice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is increasing in biofuel crops such as sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). Unfortunately, many challenges must begrowth and therefore sorghum’s use for biofuel production.

Holou, Roland A; Stevens, Gene

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Impact of nitrogen fertilization and the soil type on the quality and yield of sweet sorghum juice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethanol yield while using it for biofuel production, a greatfuel, interest is increasing in biofuel crops such as sweetand profitably used for biofuel production; challenges such

Holou, Roland A; Stevens, Gene

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Impact of nitrogen fertilization and the soil type on the quality and yield of sweet sorghum juice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the lowest value was obtained in the sandy soil. The freshbiomass yield recorded in the sandy soil was 39 Mg/ha andlowest value was obtained in the sandy soil (25.2 Mg/ha). In

Holou, Roland A; Stevens, Gene

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Index of /images/whole.frog/data/masks/animations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Index of imageswhole.frogdatamasksanimations Parent Directory animatedBloodMasks.gif animatedBrainMasks.gif animatedDuodenumMasks.gif animatedEyeMasks.gif...

182

Comminution employing liquid nitrogen pretreatments  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to develop a methodology that will lead to the establishment of an effective, efficient technique for ultrafine grinding of coal. We believe that the key to successful coal grinding is strongly dependent upon the change of the brittleness of coal under a freezing temperature pretreatment. Furthermore, a cryogenic grinding process may provide the basis for the development of advanced technologies involving the separation of the pyritic minerals from coal. Specific objectives of the program are to: determine the effect of low temperature pretreatments on the microfracture development along the coal/pyrite interface and on the fracture resistance (brittleness) of coal. Specifically, we intend to examine the effect of direct contact of coal with liquid nitrogen, dry ice, and dry-iced acetone. Also, we intend to study pyrite liberation as a result of these treatments; determine the fracture resistance of coal under different low temperature pretreatments; determine the relationships between the fracture resistance of coal and the effectiveness of a grinding process; determine the effect of the frozen coal grinding on the pyrite liberation; evaluate factors which might effect process design, scale-up, and economics; and make a first pass economic assessment of the process. 15 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Yen, S.C. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Mechanics); Hippo, E.J. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes)

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Kootenay Lake Fertilization Experiment, Year 15 (North Arm) and Year 3 (South Arm) (2006) Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results from the fifteenth year (2006) of nutrient additions to the North Arm of Kootenay Lake and three years of nutrient additions to the South Arm. Experimental fertilization of the lake has been conducted using an adaptive management approach in an effort to restore lake productivity lost as a result of nutrient uptake in upstream reservoirs. The primary objective of the experiment is to restore kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations, which are the main food source for Gerrard rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). The quantity of agricultural grade liquid fertilizer (10-34-0, ammonium polyphosphate and 28-0-0, urea ammonium nitrate) added to the North Arm in 2006 was 44.7 tonnes of P and 248.4 tonnes of N. The total fertilizer load added to the South Arm was 257 tonnes of nitrogen; no P was added. Kootenay Lake has an area of 395 km{sup 2}, a maximum depth of 150 m, a mean depth of 94 m, and a water renewal time of approximately two years. Kootenay Lake is a monomictic lake, generally mixing from late fall to early spring and stratifying during the summer. Surface water temperatures generally exceed 20 C for only a few weeks in July. Results of oxygen profiles were similar to previous years with the lake being well oxygenated from the surface to the bottom depths at all stations. Similar to past years, Secchi disc measurements at all stations in 2006 indicate a typical seasonal pattern of decreasing depths associated with the spring phytoplankton bloom, followed by increasing depths as the bloom gradually decreases by the late summer and fall. Total phosphorus (TP) ranged from 2-7 {micro}g/L and tended to decrease as summer advanced. Over the sampling season dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations decreased, with the decline corresponding to nitrate (the dominant component of DIN) being utilized by phytoplankton during summer stratification. Owing to the importance of epilimnetic nitrate that is required for optimal phytoplankton growth discrete depth water sampling occurred in 2006 to measure more accurately changes in the nitrate concentrations. As expected there was a seasonal decline in nitrate concentrations, thus supporting the strategy of increasing the nitrogen loading in both arms. These in-season changes emphasize the need for an adaptive management approach to ensure the nitrogen to phosphorus (N:P) ratio does not decrease below 15:1 (weight:weight) during the fertilizer application period. Phytoplankton composition determined from the integrated samples (0-20m) was dominated by diatoms, followed by cryptophytes and chrysophytes. The contribution of cryptophytes to total biomass was higher in 2006 than in 2005. Cryptophytes, considered being edible biomass for zooplankton and Daphnia spp., increased in 2006. Phytoplankton in the discrete depth samples (2, 5, 10, 15 and 20m) demonstrated a clear north to south gradient in average phytoplankton density and biomass among the three stations sampled, with highest values at the North Arm station (KLF 2) and lowest values in the most southern station in the South Arm (KLF 7). Populations were dominated by flagellates at all stations and depths in June and July, then dominated by diatoms in August and September in the North and South arms of the lake. There were no large bluegreen (cyanobacteria) populations in either arm of the lake in 2006. Seasonal average zooplankton abundance and biomass in both the main body of the lake and in the West Arm increased in 2006 compared to 2005. Zooplankton density was numerically dominated by copepods and biomass was dominated by Daphnia spp. The annual average mysid biomass data at deep stations indicated that the North Arm of Kootenay Lake was more productive than the South Arm in 2006. Mysid densities increased through the summer and declined in the winter; mean whole lake values remain within prefertilization densities. Kokanee escapement to Meadow Creek declined in 2006 to approximately 400,000 spawners. The Lardeau River escapement also declined wit

Schindler, E.U.; Sebastian, D.; Andrusak, G.F. [Fish and Wildlife Science and Allocation, Ministry of Environment, Province of British Columbia

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The speciality fertilizer market--scope and issues  

SciTech Connect

The specialty fertilizer market is a subset of the fertilizer market. The specialty market is characterized by high-value crops, usually with a very limited time between planting and market and subject to price variations due to quality and market timing. Additional characteristics of this market include innovations in development of new products, use of new products, and new developments and modifications in use of older products. Issues affecting this market include concerns associated with excessive nutrient runoff from irrigation. This paper focuses on the scope (including definitions) of the specialty market and issues affecting the industry.

Schmidlkofer, R.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

FERTILITY STUDY. HIROSHIMA AND NAGASAKI PROVISIONAL RESEARCH PLAN  

SciTech Connect

A proposed program is described for a fertility study on populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. An attempt will be made to determine whether exposure of either or both parents to the ionizing radiation from atomic bombs approximately 16 yr previously resulted in reduced fertility defined as a reduction in the number of conceptions as well as the actual number of offspring. The study will also attempt to determine whether presence in either city at the time of the bombings resulted in voluntary restrictions in family size because of economic disruption or fear of radiation effects. (C.H.)

Sawada, H.; Finch, S.C.

1964-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Nitrogen oxide delivery systems for biological media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elevated levels of nitric oxide (NO) in vivo are associated with a variety of cellular modifications thought to be mutagenic or carcinogenic. These processes are likely mediated by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as ...

Skinn, Brian Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Nitrogen Removal From Low Quality Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. It is especially important in the residential sector, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy consumed in U.S. homes. However, significant quantities of natural gas cannot be produced economically because its quality is too low to enter the pipeline transportation system without some type of processing, other than dehydration, to remove the undesired gas fraction. Such low-quality natural gas (LQNG) contains significant concentration or quantities of gas other than methane. These non- hydrocarbons are predominantly nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, but may also include other gaseous components. The nitrogen concentrations usually exceeds 4%. Nitrogen rejection is presently an expensive operation which can present uneconomic scenarios in the potential development of natural gas fields containing high nitrogen concentrations. The most reliable and widely used process for nitrogen rejection from natural gas consists of liquefying the feed stream using temperatures in the order of - 300{degrees}F and separating the nitrogen via fractionation. In order to reduce the gas temperature to this level, the gas is compressed, cooled by mullet-stream heat exchangers, and expanded to low pressure. Significant energy for compression and expensive materials of construction are required. Water and carbon dioxide concentrations must be reduced to levels required to prevent freezing. SRI`s proposed research involves screening new nitrogen selective absorbents and developing a more cost effective nitrogen removal process from natural gas using those compounds. The long-term objective of this project is to determine the technical and economical feasibility of a N{sub 2}2 removal concept based on complexation of molecular N{sub 2} with novel complexing agents. Successful development of a selective, reversible, and stable reagent with an appropriate combination of capacity and N{sub 2} absorption/desorption characteristics will allow selective separation of N{sub 2} from LQNG.

Alvarado, D.B.; Asaro, M.F.; Bomben, J.L.; Damle, A.S.; Bhown, A.S.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A toolbox for calculating net anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (NANI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ''Net Anthropogenic Nitrogen Input'' (NANI) to a region represents an estimate of anthropogenic net nitrogen (N) fluxes across its boundaries, and is thus a measure of the effect of human activity on the regional nitrogen cycle. NANI accounts for ... Keywords: Anthropogenic, Nitrogen, Synthesis, Toolbox, Watershed

Bongghi Hong; Dennis P. Swaney; Robert W. Howarth

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nudging Farmers to Use Fertilizer: Theory and Experimental Evidence from Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We model farmers as facing small fixed costs of purchasing fertilizer and assume some are stochastically present biased and not fully sophisticated about this bias. Such farmers may procrastinate, postponing fertilizer ...

Duflo, Esther

190

U.S. fertilizer industry and the environment - from mine to farm  

SciTech Connect

This article looks at the US fertilizer industry covering the following topics: phosphate mining, basic integrated production, retail dealers, and farm practices. At each point the impact of environmental concerns and compliance on the fertilizer industry is discussed.

Shields, J.T.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Variations in patterns of low fertility in South Korea in 2004: a county level analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the early 1960s, South Korea has been going through a rapid fertility decline, along with its socioeconomic development and effective family planning programs. After achieving a desired replacement level of fertility in 1984, the total fertility rate (TFR) of Korea has gradually declined to the level of lowest-low fertility. According to 2004 vital statistics, the TFR for Korea was 1.16-below the lowest-low fertility level of 1.3. Also, Korea's fertility rates have fluctuated and varied spatially, even at the level of low fertility. Undoubtedly, Korean family planning programs have been effective in population control through the last 40 years, but since 2000, the shift to pro-natal policies indicates that Korea's fertility transition is no longer a response to family planning policies. Rather, the level of socioeconomic development is still considered to have a significant effect on Korea's fertility decline. Thus, in this thesis, the primary objective is to examine the socioeconomic determinants of fertility differentials and the variation in low fertility among the counties in South Korea in 2004. Using data from the 2000 census and 2004 vital statistics, I tested the hypothesized relationships between the level of socioeconomic development and fertility based on the demographic transition theory (DTT), by estimating several Ordinary Least Square (OLS) multiple regression models. Specifically, socioeconomic predictors, such as agricultural attainment, labor force participation, and educational attainment, were primarily examined to test the validity of the DTT hypotheses. In addition, this thesis also examined the effects of women's status and traditional norms and cultural values on variation in fertility. My results showed that the DTT is applicable to an accounting of the variance in fertility rates among the Korean counties in 2004. Although the levels of fertility are extremely low all across the country, it is apparent that socioeconomic conditions are having an impact on fertility differentials in Korea.

Yoon, Jungwon

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Animal Waste Treatment System Loan Program (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of the Animal Waste Treatment System Loan Program is to finance animal waste treatment systems for independent livestock and poultry producers at below conventional interest rates. Loan...

193

Giving animals in need a HOME  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

413HOME 11142013 Giving animals in need a HOME Breanna Bishop, LLNL, (925) 423-9802, bishop33@llnl.gov Sheri Savage is affiliated with East of Eden K9 Rescue, a companion animal...

194

Tweakable light and shade for cartoon animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light and shade in the context of non-photorealistic imaging, such as digital cel animation, are semantic notations, rather than physical phenomena. Therefore stylized light and shade should be intentionally animated instead of simulated. This ...

Ken-ichi Anjyo; Shuhei Wemler; William Baxter

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Computer animation via optical video disc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the notion of marrying two technologies: raster-scan computer animation and optical video discs. Animated sequences, generated at non real-time rates, then transfered to video disc, can be recalled under ...

Bender, Walter

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Animal Science Curriculum (BS) Freshman Year  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Animal Science Curriculum (BS) Freshman Year Animal Science 111 Sciences (GER) Biological Sciences 130, 131, 132, 133.....................8 Plant Science 101......................................................3 Social/Behavioral Sciences (GER)............................3 32 Sophomore Year Agricultural Business 220

Selmic, Sandra

197

9.20 Animal Behavior, Fall 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course will sample the broad diversity of animal behavior and the behavioral adaptation of animals to the environments in which they live. This will include discussion of both field observations and controlled laboratory ...

Ramus, Seth Jacob

198

Collision Detection and Response for Computer Animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When several objects are moved about by computer animation, there is the chance that they will interpenetrate. This is often an undesired state, particularly if the animation is seeking to model a realistic world. Two issues are involved: detecting ... Keywords: analytical solution, collision detection, collision response, computer animation, dynamical simulation

Matthew Moore; Jane Wilhelms

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Data management for animation of construction processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animation of construction processes is a useful tool to understand the complexity of civil engineering projects. The basic idea of existing four-dimensional (4D) animation approaches is to establish a link between a construction task and the component ... Keywords: Animation, Construction processes, Process modelling, Visualization

Wolfgang Huhnt; Sven Richter; Steffen Wallner; Tarek Habashi; Torsten Krämer

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

Gabriel Miller

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nitrogen control of chloroplast development and differentiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growth and development of plants and photosynthetic microorganisms is commonly limited by the availability of nitrogen. Our work concerns understanding the mechanisms by which plants and algae that are subjected to nitrogen deprivation alter the composition of photosynthetic membranes and enzymes involved in photosynthetic carbon metabolism. Toward these ends, we study biosynthetic and gene expression processes in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is grown in an ammonium-limited continuous culture system. We have found that the expression of nuclear genes, including those encoding for light-harvesting proteins, are severely repressed in nitrogen-limited cells whereas, in general, chloroplast protein synthesis is attenuated primarily at the level of mRNA translation. Conversely, nitrogen deprivation appears to lead to enhanced synthesis of enzymes that are involved in starch and storage lipid deposition. In addition, as a possible means by which photosynthetic electron transport activities and ATP synthesis is sustained during chronic periods of nitrogen deprivation, thylakoid membranes become enriched with components for chlororespiration. Characterization of the chlororespiratory electron transport constituents, including cytochrome complexes and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase is a major current effort. Also, we are striving to isolate the genes encoding chlororespiration proteins toward determining how they and others that are strongly responsive to nutrient availability are regulated.

Schmidt, G.W.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Perceptual Modeling for Behavioral Animation of Fishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The realistic animation of animal behavior by autonomous animate agents requires that the agents able to perceive their virtual worlds. We have created a virtual marine world inhabited by artificial fishes which can swim hydrodynamically in simulated water through the motor control of internal muscles. Artificial fishes exploit a rudimentary model of fish perception. Complex individual and group behaviors, including target tracking, obstacle avoidance, feeding, preying, schooling, and mating, result from the interplay between the internal cognitive state of the artificial fish and its perception of the external world. 1 Introduction Considerable research has focused on the computer animation of animals, such as insects, reptiles, birds, horses, and humans. 1 Unlike their natural counterparts, the earliest graphics models of animals had no autonomy and their motions had to be laboriously keyframed like animated cartoons. Subsequently, researchers developed kinematic and then dynamic...

Xiaoyuan Tu; Demetri Terzopoulos

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Dry Ice vs. Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Previous Video (Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water!) Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water! Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Dry ice is cold. Liquid nitrogen is cold, too. What happens when the two are mixed together? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Have you ever wondered what happens when you mix dry ice and liquid nitrogen? Steve: Well, we just happen to have a chunk of dry ice left over from when we filmed 'How to Make a Cloud Chamber,' and here at Jefferson Lab, liquid nitrogen flows like water, so we're going to find out!

204

A preliminary report on zinc-induced resistance to nitrogen mustard toxicity in mice  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies with cultured human normal fibroblasts indicated that treatment of cells with zinc before exposure to alkylating agents enhanced cell survival by seven- to nine-fold. To establish whether a similar zinc-induced protective response could be elicited in vivo, a set of preliminary experiments was carried out in which Balb/cJ mice were treated with zinc chloride (2 mg/kg body weight) or saline by intraperitoneal (ip) injection at 48, 36, 24, and 12 h before ip administration of 4 mg/kg of the alkylating agent nitrogen mustard. Of the animals that received saline before nitrogen mustard, 57% were killed compared with only 20% in the group treated with zinc before administration of the alkylating agent. These results (which almost certainly were achieved with less than optimal induction conditions) provide evidence for the existence, in vivo, of a zinc-inducible process that reduces alkylating agent lethality. 12 refs., 4 figs.

Shackelford, M.E.; Tobey, R.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Nitrogen heat pipe for cryocooler thermal shunt  

SciTech Connect

A nitrogen heat pipe was designed, built and tested for the purpose of providing a thermal shunt between the two stages of a Gifford-McMahan (GM) cryocooler during cooldown. The nitrogen heat pipe has an operating temperature range between 63 and 123 K. While the heat pipe is in the temperature range during the system cooldown, it acts as a thermal shunt between the first and second stage of the cryocooler. The heat pipe increases the heat transfer to the first stage of the cryocooler, thereby reducing the cooldown time of the system. When the heat pipe temperature drops below the triple point, the nitrogen working fluid freezes, effectively stopping the heat pipe operation. A small heat leak between cryocooler stages remains because of axial conduction along the heat pipe wall. As long as the heat pipe remains below 63 K, the heat pipe remains inactive. Heat pipe performance limits were measured and the optimum fluid charge was determined.

Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Green, G.F.; Roth, E.W. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Characterization of nitrogen compound types in hydrotreated Paraho shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results from the separation and characterization of nitrogen compound types in hydrotreated Paraho shale oil samples were obtained. Two samples of Paraho shale oil were hydrotreated by Chevron Research Company such that one sample contained about 0.05 wt. percent nitrogen and the other sample contained about 0.10 wt. percent nitrogen. A separation method concentrate specific nitrogen compound types was developed. Characterization of the nitrogen types was accomplished by infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, potentiometric titration, and elemental analysis. The distribution of nitrogen compound types in both samples and in the Paraho crude shale oil is compared.

Holmes, S.A.; Latham, D.R.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Open Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration K. Coale coale@mlml.calstate.edu (831) 632-4400 Moss Landing Marine Laboratories 8272 Moss Landing Road Moss Landing, California 95039 USA Abstract The trace element iron has been recently shown to play a critical role in nutrient utilization, phytoplankton growth and therefore the uptake of carbon dioxide from the surface waters of the global ocean. Carbon fixation in the surface waters, via phytoplankton growth, shifts the ocean/atmosphere exchange equilibrium for carbon dioxide. As a result, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) and iron flux to the oceans have been linked to climate change (glacial to interglacial transitions). These recent findings have led some to suggest that large scale

208

Biogeophysical effects of CO2-fertilization on global climate  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2}-fertilization affects plant growth, which modifies surface physical properties, altering the surface albedo, and fluxes of sensible and latent heat. We investigate how such CO{sub 2}-fertilization effects on vegetation and surface properties would affect the climate system. Using a global three-dimensional climate-carbon model that simulates vegetation dynamics, we compare two multi-century simulations: a ''Control'' simulation with no emissions, and a ''Physiol-noGHG'' simulation where physiological changes occur as a result of prescribed CO{sub 2} emissions, but where CO{sub 2}-induced greenhouse warming is not included. In our simulations, CO{sub 2}-fertilization produces warming; we obtain an annual- and global-mean warming of about 0.65 K (and land-only warming of 1.4 K) after 430 years. This century-scale warming is mostly due to a decreased surface albedo associated with the expansion of the Northern Hemisphere boreal forests. On decadal time scales, the CO{sub 2} uptake by afforestation should produce a cooling effect that exceeds this albedo-based warming; but if the forests remain in place, the CO{sub 2}-enhanced-greenhouse effect would diminish as the ocean equilibrates with the atmosphere, whereas the albedo effect would persist. Thus, on century time scales, there is the prospect for net warming from CO{sub 2}-fertilization of the land biosphere. Further study is needed to confirm and better quantify our results.

Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C; Phillips, T J

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

209

Coal gasification for the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer  

SciTech Connect

TVA is proposing to develop and commercially demonstrate the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer (urea) using integrated gasification/combined cycle (IGCC) technology. The coal-based coproduction demonstration project will show that the coproduction process can economically and environmentally enhance the production of both electric power and urea. As conceptualized, the proposed coproduction demonstration project facility would be designed for a nominal electrical capacity of about 250 megawatts (MW), Table I. During normal operation, the facility would produce about 150 MW of base-load electrical power and 1,000 tons per day of urea. Sulfur from the coal would be recovered as elemental sulfur. During peak power demand, the fertilizer capacity could be reduced or bypassed and the full 250 MW could be made available. This scheme would allow continuous operation of the gasifier at 100% of its rated capacity which would reduce the annual revenue requirements for power generation by permitting the production of fertilizer. As TVA's vision of this proposal matures (i.e., as consideration is given to alternative schemes, as TVA reviews its power demands, and as more detailed engineering estimates are developed), the nature and scope of cyclic-operation may be altered.

Kelly, D.A.; Nichols, D.E.; Faucett, H.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Coal gasification for the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer  

SciTech Connect

TVA is proposing to develop and commercially demonstrate the coproduction of electricity and fertilizer (urea) using integrated gasification/combined cycle (IGCC) technology. The coal-based coproduction demonstration project will show that the coproduction process can economically and environmentally enhance the production of both electric power and urea. As conceptualized, the proposed coproduction demonstration project facility would be designed for a nominal electrical capacity of about 250 megawatts (MW), Table I. During normal operation, the facility would produce about 150 MW of base-load electrical power and 1,000 tons per day of urea. Sulfur from the coal would be recovered as elemental sulfur. During peak power demand, the fertilizer capacity could be reduced or bypassed and the full 250 MW could be made available. This scheme would allow continuous operation of the gasifier at 100% of its rated capacity which would reduce the annual revenue requirements for power generation by permitting the production of fertilizer. As TVA`s vision of this proposal matures (i.e., as consideration is given to alternative schemes, as TVA reviews its power demands, and as more detailed engineering estimates are developed), the nature and scope of cyclic-operation may be altered.

Kelly, D.A.; Nichols, D.E.; Faucett, H.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Education: Digital Resource Center - VISUALS: Process Animations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Eight quick animations of the steps needed to produce a silicon wafer: crystal pulling, rod grinding, wire cutting, edge profiling, lapping, ...

212

VISUALS: Animations of polymeric materials - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 11, 2007 ... In this page you will find animations on the structure of polymeric materials, mechanical deformation of polymers, crack formation and ...

213

OOF.Graphics_n.File.Animate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... do not have a when parameter, or whose when parameter is set to anything other than latest , will be drawn but will not change during the animation ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

214

Teasing out technique : animating Boston's City Hall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What were once considered advanced visualization techniques have now become commonplace. With the advancement of visualization tools, animation has quickly become a primary means of representation within architecture; ...

Woods, Ann C., M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Modelling nitrogen leaching from overlapping urine patches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urine depositions have been shown to be the main source of N leaching from grazing systems and thus it is important to consider them in simulation models. The inclusion of urine patches considerably increases the complexity of the model and this can ... Keywords: APSIM, Grazing system, Heterogeneity, Leaching, Nitrogen, Simulation modelling, Urine patches

R. Cichota; V. O. Snow; I. Vogeler

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Oxygen vs. Liquid Nitrogen - Liquid Oxygen and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Previous Video (Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Paramagnetism) Paramagnetism Liquid Oxygen and Fire! What happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a test tube of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And this is a test tube of liquid oxygen! Joanna: Let's see what happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire. Steve: Fire?! Joanna: Yeah! Steve: Really?! Joanna: Why not! Steve: Okay! Joanna: As nitrogen boils, it changes into nitrogen gas. Because it's so cold, it's denser than the air in the room. The test tube fills up with

217

Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Redmond, OR); Lyon, David K. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print Wednesday, 25 February 2009 00:00 The behavior of the core hole...

219

Plant Communities, Soil Carbon, and Soil Nitrogen Properties in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brye KR, Kucharik CJ (2003) Carbon and nitrogen sequestration in two prairie topochronosequences on contrasting soils in Southern. Wisconsin. American ...

220

NATURAL CONVECTION OF SUBCOOLED LIQUID NITROGEN IN A VERTICAL CAVITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power transformer cooled by natural convection of subcooled liquid nitrogen. A liquid nitrogen bath temperature superconductor) power devices, such as HTS transformers, fault current limiters, and terminals of subcooled liquid nitrogen system for an HTS transformer, operating at around 65 K. This system consists

Chang, Ho-Myung

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NITROGEN EVOLUTION AND SOOT FORMATION DURING SECONDARY COAL PYROLYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor to provide a high temperature, oxygen-free post-flame environment to study secondary reactions yields of the primary tar as a function of reactor temperature in coal [N]tar nitrogen content in tar or soot N nitrogen N2 molecular nitrogen NH3 ammonia NMR Nuclear

Fletcher, Thomas H.

222

Supporting Information Awareness Using Animated Widgets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­0280 fmccricks,azhaog@cc.gatech.edu Abstract This paper describes a Tcl/Tk widget set extension that supports easy creation and use of ani­ mated effects we have integrated animation support into Tcl/Tk via three made in constructing animated widgets, including more reasons behind our choice of Tcl/Tk

McCrickard, Scott

223

Physically based modeling and animation of fire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a physically based method for modeling and animating fire. Our method is suitable for both smooth (laminar) and turbulent flames, and it can be used to animate the burning of either solid or gas fuels. We use the incompressible Navier-Stokes ... Keywords: blackbody radiation, chemical reaction, fire, flames, implicit surface, incompressible flow, smoke, stable fluids, vorticity confinement

Duc Quang Nguyen; Ronald Fedkiw; Henrik Wann Jensen

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Autonomous behaviors for interactive vehicle animations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a method for synthesizing animations of autonomous space, water, and land-based vehicles in games or other interactive simulations. Controlling the motion of such vehicles to achieve a desirable behavior is difficult due to the constraints ... Keywords: online search, path planning, real-time animation, steering behaviors, vehicle motion

Jared Go; Thuc D. Vu; James J. Kuffner

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Striking nitrogen isotope anomaly in the Bencubbin and Weatherford meteorites  

SciTech Connect

The stony-iron meteorites Bencubbin and Weatherford contain nitrogen with a ratio of nitrogen-15 to nitrogen-14 larger than normal by as much as a factor of 2. The excess nitrogen-15 may be due either to a nucleosynthetic origin or to extreme isotopic fractionation. In the former case, it may reflect failure to homogenize nitrogen-15 produced in nova explosions. In the latter case, it may reflect chemical processing at temperatures below 40 K in a presolar molecular cloud. 34 references.

Prombo, C.A.; Clayton, R.N.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

NITROGEN -N2 MSDS (Document # 001040) PAGE 1 OF 10 MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an emergency? 1. PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION CHEMICAL NAME; CLASS: NITROGEN - N2 LIQUEFIED NITROGEN N2, (CryogenicNITROGEN - N2 MSDS (Document # 001040) PAGE 1 OF 10 MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET Prepared to U ppm ppm ppm Nitrogen 7727-37-9 >99 % There are no specific exposure limits for Nitrogen. Nitrogen

Choi, Kyu Yong

227

Unwanted Fertility, Contraceptive Technology and Crime: Exploiting a Natural Experiment in Access to The Pill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contraceptive Technology and Crime: Exploiting a Naturalthe recent decline in U.S. crime rates with the legalization¤ect of unwanted fertility on crime. Preliminary results are

Pantano, Juan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Research and Development of Controlled-Release Fertilizers as High Efficient Nutrient Management Materials in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sinica, 2006? UNIDO and IFDC (ed). 1998. Fertilizer Manual[defined as SRF or CRF (UNIDO& IFDC, 1998), it is necessary

Fan, Xiaolin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions in fertiliser production. IFS (The InternationalImpact of Agricultural Crop Production using the Life CycleN fertilizer rates in cereal production. Europ. J. Agronomy

Brentrup, Frank

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Evaluation of corn and soybean response to phosphorus and potassium fertilization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Corn (Zea mays) response to fertilization and placement methods has been studied extensively; however studies on soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] response to placement have… (more)

Arns, Ingrid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of Agricultural Crop Production using the Life Cyclefield with the harvested crops and the nutrients supplied bysee Fig. 1). Supply of crop residues & organic fertilizer

Brentrup, Frank

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Nature Bulletin No. 751 April 11, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist REGENERATION OF LOST PARTS IN ANIMALS For ages, mankind has been fascinated with the idea that lost parts of animals can be regrown. According to Greek legend, one of the twelve "labors" of Hercules was the destruction of the Hydra, a gigantic monster with nine serpents' heads. Finding that as soon as one head was cut off two new ones grew in its place, at last he burned out their roots with firebrands. All animals have the power of regeneration to a greater or lesser degree. In man and higher animals it is quite limited. We see it most often in the healing of wounds and the mending of bones. A lost fingernail can be replaced but not a lost finger. Lower animals have a much greater ability to replace parts. For instance, the little half-inch flatworm, Planaria, that lives under rocks in clean creeks can be cut into as many as 32 pieces and each fragment is able to rebuild a miniature flatworm complete with head, tail, eyes, mouth and internal organs.

233

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Let's Freeze Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shattering Pennies! Shattering Pennies! Previous Video (Shattering Pennies!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave!) Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! Let's Freeze Liquid Nitrogen! By removing the hottest molecules, we're able to freeze liquid nitrogen! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Today, we're going to freeze liquid nitrogen! Joanna and Steve: Yeah! Joanna: The obvious way to do this is to put the liquid nitrogen into something colder. Something that we have lots of around here! Something like... liquid helium! Steve: Yes! Joanna: Yeah, but we're not going to do that. Instead, we're going to freeze the nitrogen by removing the hottest molecules!

234

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Freeze the Rainbow!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! Previous Video (Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze!) Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze! Freeze the Rainbow! Starburst candy. They're fruity. They're chewy. They're delicious! But, can they survive taking a bath in liquid nitrogen? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: A student visiting Jefferson Lab from Huntington Middle School in Newport News, Virginia, asked what happens to a starburst if you put it in liquid nitrogen. Well, we're going to find out! Steve: At room temperature, starburst isn't really all that special. I can kind of squish it if I squeeze it hard enough and, if I drop it, nothing

235

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Giant Koosh Ball!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Let's Pour Liquid Nitrogen on the Floor! Let's Pour Liquid Nitrogen on the Floor! Previous Video (Let's Pour Liquid Nitrogen on the Floor!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse!) Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Giant Koosh Ball! Sometimes, you just want to know what's going to happen! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! A while ago, I was at the mall and I saw this. And, the first thing that popped into my head was 'I wonder what would happen if we were to put this in liquid nitrogen?' Now, that's one thing I really love about science. If you have a question, you can, sometimes, do an experiment to find out what the answer is! Here at the Lab, we have a lot of liquid nitrogen, so that's

236

Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to investigate the processes that influence the destruction of NO in the fuel rich stage of the reburning process. The objective is to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms that control the fate of coal nitrogen in the fuel rich zone of a combustion process. Time resolved profiles of temperature, major (CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}), nitrogenous (NO, HCN and NH{sub 3}) and hydrocarbon (CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) species were obtained for various reburning tests. A slow continuous source of HCN was observed in the reburn zone for most tests. HCN formation from NO + CH{sub i} reactions would partially explain this trend. It has been proposed in the past that these reactions would be fast (less than 0.1s) and the produced HCN would be short lived. However, evidence was provided in this study indicating that NO + CH{sub i} reactions might contribute to HCN formation at longer residence times in the reburn zone. Reactions of molecular nitrogen with hydrocarbon radicals were determined to be a significant source of HCN formation, especially as NO levels decreased in the reburn zone. The results of several tests would justify the exclusion of continued coal devolatilization in the reburn zone as a major source of HCN.

Wendt, J.O.L.; Mereb, J.B.

1989-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

237

Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was directed toward understanding at the physiological, biochemical and molecular levels of how photosynthetic organisms adapt to long-term nitrogen-deficiency conditions is quite incomplete even though limitation of this nutrient is the most commonly restricts plant growth and development. For our work on this problem, the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was grown in continuous cultures in which steady-state levels of nitrogen can be precisely controlled. N-limited cells exhibit the classical symptoms of deficiency of this nutrient, chlorosis and slow growth rates, and respond to nitrogen provision by rapid greening and chloroplast differentiation. We have addressed three aspects of this problem: (1) the regulation of pigment synthesis; (2) control of expression of nuclear genes encoding photosynthetic proteins; (3) changes in metabolic and electron transport pathways that enable sustained CO{sub 2} fixation even though they cannot be readily converted into amino and nucleic acids. For the last, principle components are: (a) enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity intimately associated with photosynthates, and (b) the occurrence in thylakoids of a supplemental electron transport pathway that facilitates reduction of the plastoquinone pool. Together, these distinguishing features of N-limited cells are likely to enable cell survival, especially under conditions of high irradiance stress.

Schmidt, G.W.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Humic substances and nitrogen-containing compounds from low rank brown coals  

SciTech Connect

Coal is one of the sources of nitrogen-containing compounds (NCCs). Recovery of NCCs from brown coals in high yield was carried out from tars of stepwise semicoking of brown coals. Humic acids have been shown to contain many types of nitrogen compounds. Humic acids are thought to be complex aromatic macromolecules with amino acids, amino sugars, peptides, and aliphatic compounds that are involved in the linkages between the aromatic groups. Humic acids extracted from peats, brown coals, and lignites, are characterized using different techniques. Humic substances (HSs) have several known benefits to agriculture. The properties of humic substances vary from source to source, because they are heterogeneous mixtures of biochemical degradation products from plant and animal residues, and synthesis activities of microorganisms. HSs have been considered to be a significant floculant in surface water filtration plants for the production of drinking water as well as the processing of water. HSs are produced from chemical and biological degradation of plant and animal residues and from synthetic activities of microorganisms.

Demirbas, A.; Kar, Y.; Deveci, H. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Animal Farm Powers Village | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Animal Farm Powers Village Animal Farm Powers Village Jump to: navigation, search Name Animal Farm Powers Village Agency/Company /Organization M2 Presswire Sector Energy Focus Area Agriculture, Energy Efficiency - Central Plant, Economic Development, Renewable Energy, Biomass - Anaerobic Digestion, Biomass, Biomass - Waste To Energy Phase Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Publicly available; free Publication Date 4/18/2011 Website http://news.tradingcharts.com/ Locality Hatherop, England References Animal Farm Powers Village[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Highlights 3 Environmental Aspects 4 Related Tools 5 References Overview This press release describes a project completed in Hatherop, a small English village. The project is a combined heat and power (CHP) plant

240

Strands and hair: modeling, animation, and rendering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last six years has seen a renaissance in hair modeling, rendering and animation. This course covers the gamut of hair simulation problems and present working solutions, from recent and novel research ideas to time tested industrial practices that ...

Sunil Hadap; Marie-Paule Cani; Ming Lin; Tae-Yong Kim; Florence Bertails; Steve Marschner; Kelly Ward; Zoran Ka?i?-Alesi?

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Animal Care Enforcement Actions | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animal Care Enforcement Actions Animal Care Enforcement Actions Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Animal Care Enforcement Actions Dataset Summary Description Contains monthly reports on 7060s and stipulations related to enforcement of the Animal Welfare and Horse Protection Acts. Form 7060 - Official warning of an alleged violation of statue or regulation and notice to the subject that APHIS may seek civil or criminal penalties for alleged violation in the future if the subject again violates. Stipulation - a pre-litigation monetary settlement between APHIS and the subject. The stipulation provides the subject with notice of alleged violation, affords the subject an opportunity for an administrative hearing, and offers the subject an opportunity to waive the hearing and pay a monetary penalty calculated within Civil Penalty guidelines.

242

Realistic hair simulation: animation and rendering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last five years have seen a profusion of innovative solutions to one of the most challenging tasks in character synthesis: hair simulation. This class covers both recent and novel research ideas in hair animation and rendering, and presents time ...

Florence Bertails; Sunil Hadap; Marie-Paule Cani; Ming Lin; Tae-Yong Kim; Steve Marschner; Kelly Ward; Zoran Ka?i?-Alesi?

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

ACM SIGGRAPH 2013 Computer Animation Festival  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2013, SIGGRAPH's Computer Animation Festival celebrates its 40th year as the world's leading festival of the most innovative and accomplished computer graphics. An internationally recognized jury receives hundreds of submissions and presents outstanding ...

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

ACM SIGGRAPH 2010 Computer Animation Fesitval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the SIGGRAPH 2010 Computer Animation Festival, the international event that continues to be the premier place where creativity and innovation meets technology and industry. For 2010, we are proud to present a unique mix of independent creations ...

Isaac Kerlow

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

PROCESS FOR CONTROLLING ANIMAL GROWTH RATE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of injecting growing animals with the enzyme urease subcutaneously in increasing dosages is described; this generates within the blood anti-urease which enters the intestinal tract and inhibits the enzymatic decomposition of urea by urease in that location. Ammonia, one of the decomposition products, is thereby kept from diffusing through the intestinal walls into the blood, and this greatly reduces the energy requirements of the liver for removing the ammonia, thereby increasing the feeding efficiency of the animals. (AEC)

Visek, W.J.

1962-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

246

Farm scale electrical power production from animal waste. Volume I. Final report, 30 June 1981-30 December 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 1 1/2 (dry) tons per day biodigester cogeneration plant has been designed and constructed. This project is part of a federal program to promote energy conservation and the use of non-conventional energy resources. The main purpose of the project is to demonstrate that a dairy farm can generate its own power and supply excess power to a local utility. Such a facility can produce significant energy savings to livestock farms and small communities by allowing them to get energy from raw animal and human waste. Also, an odorless by-product is produced that is nearly pathogenically free and has the possibility of several end uses such as: fertilizer and soil conditioner, protein-rich animal refeed, livestock bedding material, and aquatic food for fish farming. 53 references, 18 figures, 4 tables.

Carpenter, P.A.

1984-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not been preceded by the evolution of nitrogen fixation, and if these organisms had not also acquired the ability to fix nitrogen at the beginning of or very early in their history. The evolution of nitrogen fixation also appears to have been a precondition for the evolution of (bacterio)chlorophyll-based photosynthesis. Given that some form of chlorophyll is obligatory for true photosynthesis, and its light absorption and chemical properties make it a "universal pigment," it may be predicted that the evolution of nitrogen fixation and photosynthesis are also closely linked on other Earth- like planets.

John W. Grula

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

248

Responses of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil organic and fertilizer amendments under long-term management  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) co-exist in soil, but their relative distribution may vary depending on the environmental conditions. Effects of changes in soil organic matter and nutrient content on the AOB and AOA are poorly understood. Our aim was to compare effects of long-term soil organic matter depletion and amendments with labile (straw) and more recalcitrant (peat) organic matter, with and without easily plant-available nitrogen, on the activities, abundances and community structures of AOB and AOA. Soil was sampled from a long-term field site in Sweden that was established in 1956. The potential ammonia oxidation rates, the AOB and AOA amoA gene abundances and the community structures of both groups based on T-RFLP of amoA genes were determined. Straw amendment during 50 years had not altered any of the measured soil parameters, while the addition of peat resulted in a significant increase of soil organic carbon as well as a decrease in pH. Nitrogen fertilization alone resulted in a small decrease in soil pH, organic carbon and total nitrogen, but an increase in primary production. Type and amount of organic matter had an impact on the AOB and AOA community structures and the AOA abundance. Our findings confirmed that AOA are abundant in soil, but showed that under certain conditions the AOB dominate, suggesting niche differentiation between the two groups at the field site. The large differences in potential rates between treatments correlated to the AOA community size, indicating that they were functionally more important in the nitrification process than the AOB. The AOA abundance was positively related to addition of labile organic carbon, which supports the idea that AOA could have alternative growth strategies using organic carbon. The AOB community size varied little in contrast to that of the AOA. This indicates that the bacterial ammonia oxidizers as a group have a greater ecophysiological diversity and potentially cover a broader range of habitats.

Wessen, E.; Nyberg, K.; Jansson, J.K.; Hallin, S.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Ties That Double-Bind Us: Amy Agigian Speaks on Feminism and the Fertility Industry for the Annual Roe v. Wade lecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Feminism and the Fertility Industry for the Annual Roe v.Feminism and the Fertility Industry,” both “pri- vacy” and “who use the fertility industry to become mothers and women

Heiliger, Vange

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Kiel Policy Brief Ocean Iron Fertilization: An Option for Mitigating Climate Change?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world is very likely to experience a range of adverse climate change impacts in the coming decades and ocean iron fertilization is discussed as one measure to contribute to the mitigation of these impacts. Ocean iron fertilization aims at stimulating phytoplankton growth in certain parts of the ocean, thus enhancing oceanic CO2 uptake and reducing atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

Christine Bertram

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

LIPID PRODUCTION BY DUNALIELLA SALINA IN BATCH CULTURE: EFFECTS OF NITROGEN LIMITATION AND LIGHT INTENSITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are increasing and may cause unknown deleterious environmental effects if left unchecked. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has predicted in its latest report a 2°C to 4°C increase in global temperatures even with the strictest CO2 mitigation practices. Global warming can be attributed in large part to the burning of carbon-based fossil fuels, as the concentration of atmospheric CO2 is directly related to the burning of fossil fuels. Biofuels which do not add CO2 to the atmosphere are presently generated primarily from terrestrial plants, i.e., ethanol from corn grain and biodiesel from soybean oil. The production of biofuels from terrestrial plants is severely limited by the availability of fertile land. Lipid production from microalgae and its corresponding biodiesel production have been studied since the late 1970s but large scale production has remained economically infeasible due to the large costs of sterile growing conditions required for many algal species. This study focuses on the potential of the halophilic microalgae species Dunaliella salina as a source of lipids and subsequent biodiesel production. The lipid production rates under high light and low light as well as nitrogen suffi cient and nitrogen defi cient culture conditions were compared for D. salina cultured in replicate photobioreactors. The results show (a) cellular lipid content ranging from 16 to 44% (wt), (b) a maximum culture lipid concentration of 450mg lipid/L, and (c) a maximum integrated lipid production rate of 46mg lipid/L culture*day. The high amount of lipids produced suggests that D. salina, which can be mass-cultured in non-sterile outdoor ponds, has strong potential to be an economically valuable source for renewable oil and biodiesel production.

Weldy, C.S.; Huesemann, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The green manure value of seven clover species grown as annual crops on low and high fertility temperate soils.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Annual and perennial clover species may differ in green manure value. Seven clover (Trifolium) species were grown as annual crops on low fertility (Breton) and high fertility 15 (Edmonton) soils in Alberta

Ross, Shirley M.; King, Jane R.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; O'Donovan, John T.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Synthesis of complex dynamic character motion from simple animations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a general method for rapid prototyping of realistic character motion. We solve for the natural motion from a simple animation provided by the animator. Our framework can be used to produce relatively complex realistic motion ... Keywords: animation, animation w/constraints, motion transformation, physically based animation, physically based modeling, spacetime constraints

C. Karen Liu; Zoran Popovi?

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not ...

Grula, J W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Resource Management; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Program on Technology Innovation: Water Quality Trading Program for Nitrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic releases of nitrogen have greatly increased environmental fluxes of biologically available nitrogen and contributed to serious ecological problems, such as algal blooms that cause waters to become severely depleted of oxygen. Power plant sources of nitrogen include NOx air emissions, the ammonia required for the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) systems that are used for NOx reduction, and the ammonia used for SOx control and ash pond condition...

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Mineralogical and geochemical characterisation of phosphogypsum waste material and its potential for use as backfill at WMC Fertilizers' Mine site, Phosphate Hill, N-W Queensland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The WMC Fertilizers operation at Phosphate Hill, north-west Queensland, began production of ammonium phosphate fertilizer in late 1999. In the production process, Cambrian marine phosphorites… (more)

Dippel, Susan Katherine

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogeneous Species in Gas Turbine Exhaust, from Conkle, et82) Percent of Organic Gas Turbine Emissions which containnitrogen dioxide from gas turbines (from the data presented

Matthews, Ronald D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Passive measurement of nitrogen oxides to assess traffic-related...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

393-403 Date Published 012004 Keywords Freeways, nitrogen dioxide, Passive sampler, schools Abstract The East Bay Children's Respiratory Health Study is examining associations...

260

Numerical Simulation of Carbon and Nitrogen Profiles Produced by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In advance of the nitrogen diffusion zone the carbon concentration is as high as 10 at. pct. ... Discovery of Efficient Metal-Organic Frameworks for CO2 Capture.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Method for the purification of noble gases, nitrogen and hydrogen ...  

... methane, ammonia, nitrogen and water vapor are utilized to purify the gaseous mixture of impurities. After purification hydrogen isotopes may be more ...

262

Why sequence functional metagenomics of methane and nitrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

functional metagenomics of methane and nitrogen cycles in freshwater lakes? Methane is a more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide, but it is also a potential source of...

263

Modeling nitrogen cycling in forested watersheds of Chesapeake Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chesapeake Bay Agreement calls for a 40% reduction of controllable phosphorus and nitrogen to the tidal Bay by the year 2000. To accomplish this goal the Chesapeake Bay Program needs accurate estimates of nutrient loadings, including atmospheric deposition, from various land uses. The literature was reviewed on forest nitrogen pools and fluxes, and nitrogen data from research catchments in the Chesapeake Basin were identified. The structure of a nitrogen module for forests is recommended for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model along with the possible functional forms for fluxes.

Hunsaker, C.T.; Garten, C.T.; Mulholland, P.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene ...  

Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene purge gas United States Patent. Patent Number: 6,576,043: Issued: June 10, 2003: Official Filing:

265

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with...

266

Multi-stage combustion using nitrogen-enriched air - Energy ...  

Multi-stage combustion technology combined with nitrogen-enriched air technology for controlling the combustion temperature and products to extend the maintenance and ...

267

Nitrogen removal from natural gas using two types of membranes ...  

A process for treating natural gas or other methane-rich gas to remove excess nitrogen. The invention relies on two-stage membrane separation, using ...

268

21H.909 People and Other Animals, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A historical survey of the ways that people have interacted with their closest animal relatives, for example: hunting, domestication of livestock, worship of animal gods, exploitation of animal labor, scientific study of ...

Ritvo, Harriet

269

A landscape level analysis of potential excess nitrogen in east-central North Carolina, USA  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to arrive at an assessment of potential excess nitrogen (N) under different land cover categories in the Neuse River Basin (North Carolina, USA) on a seasonal basis. Data on five processes (atmospheric N deposition, fertilization, net soil N mineralization, plant uptake, and denitrification) that contribute to potential excess N under different land cover categories were obtained from a literature review. Factors were also estimated to apportion annual N fluxes among different seasons of the year. Potential excess N was calculated as the difference between inputs to and outputs from an inorganic N pool. If inputs exceeded outputs, then the difference was assumed to represent N at risk of loss from the landscape to surface receiving waters and groundwaters. Land covers that were classified as potential N sources were influenced by soil N inventories and rates of net soil N mineralization (which is a natural process). The results indicated that there are large land areas in the Neuse River Basin that could be classified as either a N source or a N sink. Such areas are potentially sensitive because future changes in land use, or small alterations in N fluxes, could convert areas that are essentially in balance with respect to N biogeochemistry into the N source or N sink category. In this respect, model predictions indicate that the timing of N inputs and outputs on the landscape can be a critical determinant of potential excess N.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Animal fat (tallow) as fuel for stationary internal combustion engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main aim of this thesis is to verify the suitability of waste animal fat, obtained from animal by-products in a process called rendering, as… (more)

Piaszyk, Jakub

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Animated Graphics in Meteorological Research and Presentations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past two years, the authors have been involved in the production of computer-animated movies at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The computer-generated frames are high-quality graphs of two- and three-dimensional ...

Richard Grotjahn; Robert M. Chervin

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Animated axial surface mapping: The multimedia companion  

SciTech Connect

This newly expanded version of AAPG`s first DataShare Disk brings to life the concepts and applications of a new method of structural trend analysis. Through the dynamic use of color, sound, animation, and humor, this multimedia companion to the May 1994 article on Axial Surface Mapping introduces the reader (or viewer) to the concepts of rigid-block translation, fault-bend folding, and axial surface mapping. Animated models of growing fault-bend folds allow the viewer to see in four dimensions. The axial surface map shows the horizontal plane; the folding lines show depth planes; and the animations show the structure and its two-dimensional map changing with time and increasing slip. The animations create theoretical map patterns under varying, but controlled conditions that can be compared to axial surface maps from real data. The model patterns are then used to interpret seismic data and axial surface maps from a producing gas field in offshore California and from an exploration play in Pennsylvania.

Hook, S.C.; Shaw, J.H. [Texaco EPTD, Houston, TX (United States); Suppe, J. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Painterly Rendering for Animation Barbara J. Meier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coherence, we model surfaces as 3d particle sets which are rendered as 2d paint brush strokes in screen: painterly rendering, non-photorealistic rendering, particle systems, painting, abstract images. Author frame methods for animation is getting the paint to "stick" to surfaces rather than randomly change

Meier, Barbara J.

274

Ryan: rendering your animation nonlinearly projected  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artistic rendering is an important research area in Computer Graphics, yet relatively little attention has been paid to the projective properties of computer generated scenes. Motivated by the surreal storyboard of an animation in production---Ryan---this ... Keywords: Non-Photorealistic Rendering, local illumination, multiprojection, nonlinear perspective

Patrick Coleman; Karan Singh

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Stochastic Version of the Brass PF Ratio Adjustment of Age-Specific Fertility Schedules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of age-specific fertility rates based on survey data are known to suffer down-bias associated with incomplete reporting. Previously, William Brass (1964, 1965, 1968) proposed a series of adjustments of such data to reflect more appropriate levels of fertility through comparison with data on children-ever-born by age, a measure of cohort-specific cumulative fertility. His now widely-used Parity/Fertility or PF ratio method makes a number of strong assumptions, which have been the focus of an extended discussion in the literature on indirect estimation. However, while it is clear that the measures used in making adjusted age-specific fertility estimates with this method are captured with statistical uncertainty, little discussion of the nature of this uncertainty around PF-ratio based estimates of fertility has been entertained in the literature. Since both age-specific risk of childbearing and cumulative parity (children ever born) are measured with statistical uncertainty, an unknown credibility interval must surround every PF ratio-based estimate. Using the standard approach, this is unknown, limiting the ability to make statistical comparisons of fertility between groups or to understand stochasticity in population dynamics. This paper makes use of approaches applied to similar problems in engineering, the natural sciences, and decision analysis—often discussed under the title of uncertainty analysis or stochastic modeling—to characterize this uncertainty and to present a new method for making PF ratio-based fertility estimates with 95 percent uncertainty intervals. The implications for demographic analysis, between-group comparisons of fertility, and the field of statistical demography are explored.

Jack Baker; Adélamar Alcantara; Xiaomin Ruan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics of Temperate and Subarctic Heath  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics of Temperate and Subarctic Heath Ecosystems with Emphasis on Cold-season cycling of carbon and nitrogen in temperate and subarctic heath ecosystems. Over the last three years, I spend many hours introducing me to modeling carbon exchange, thank you. Also thanks to Karina Clemmensen

277

Nitrogen modification of highly porous carbon for improved supercapacitor performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen modification of highly porous carbon for improved supercapacitor performance Stephanie L for supercapacitor applications. Surface modification increases the amount of nitrogen by four times when compared elements in highly porous carbon used for electric double-layer supercapacitors.1 These elements modify

Cao, Guozhong

278

Spectroscopic detection of nitrogen concentrations in sagebrush  

SciTech Connect

The ability to estimate foliar nitrogen (N) in semi-arid landscapes can yield information on nutritional status and improve our limited understanding of controls on canopy photosynthesis. We examined two spectroscopic methods for estimating sagebrush dried leaf and live shrub N content: first derivative reflectance (FDR) and continuum removal. Both methods used partial least squares (PLS) regression to select wavebands most significantly correlated with N concentrations in the samples. Sagebrush dried leaf spectra produced PLS models (R2 = 0.76–0.86) that could predict N concentrations within the dataset more accurately than PLS models generated from live shrub spectra (R2 = 0.41–0.63). Inclusion of wavelengths associated with leaf water in the FDR transformations appeared to improve regression results. Findings are encouraging and warrant further exploration into sagebrush reflectance spectra to characterize N concentrations.

J. J. MITCHELL; N. F. GLENN; T.T. SANKEY; D. R. DERRYBERRY; R. C. HRUSKA; M. O. Anderson

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Removal of basic nitrogen compounds from hydrocarbon liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for reducing the concentration of basic nitrogen compounds in hydrocarbonaceous feedstock fluids used in the refining industry by providing a solid particulate carbonaceous adsorbent/fuel material such as coal having active basic nitrogen complexing sites on the surface thereof and the coal with a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock containing basic nitrogen compounds to facilitate attraction of the basic nitrogen compounds to the complexing sites and the formation of complexes thereof on the surface of the coal. The adsorbent coal material and the complexes formed thereon are from the feedstock fluid to provide a hydrocarbonaceous fluid of reduced basic nitrogen compound concentration. The coal can then be used as fuel for boilers and the like.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Questions and Answers - Is there anything colder than liquid nitrogen?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How cold is liquid nitrogen? How cold is liquid nitrogen? Previous Question (How cold is liquid nitrogen?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen, would your body instantly crystallize?) If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen,would your body instantly crystallize? Is there anything colder than liquid nitrogen? Yes, there are things colder than liquid nitrogen, like most of the Universe! I assume, though, that you mean things on the Earth. There actually is an entire branch of science called cryogenics that deals with really cold things. Generally the science of cryogenics is when the temperature goes below that which we can reach with conventional refrigeration equipment, around 250 degrees (Fahrenheit) below zero. Many

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Popping Film Canisters!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploding Rubber Stopper! Exploding Rubber Stopper! Previous Video (Exploding Rubber Stopper!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Insulators!) Insulators! Popping Film Canisters! What happens when liquid nitrogen is trapped inside a sealed container? Play the video to find out! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a container of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And these are a bunch of film canisters! Joanna: Let's see what happens when we trap the liquid nitrogen in the film canisters! Steve: Okay! Now the room, and everything in it, is way too hot for the liquid nitrogen to stay as a liquid. As soon as the liquid nitrogen touches anything in the room, it boils and changes into a gas.

282

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) nitrogen trailers propane tanks  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is the evaluation and authorization of the onsite transport of propane tanks that are mounted on the Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation Characterization Project`s nitrogen trailers. This SEP authorizes onsite transport of the nitrogen trailers, including the propane tanks, until May 31, 1998. The three nitrogen trailers (HO-64-4966, HO-64-4968, and HO-64-5170) are rated for 1,361 kg (30,000 lb) and are equipped with tandem axles and pintel hitches. Permanently mounted on each trailer is a 5,678 L (1,500 gal) cryogenic dewar that is filled with nitrogen, and a propane fired water bath vaporizer system, and a 454 L (1 20 gal) propane tank. The nitrogen trailer system is operated only when it is disconnected from the tow vehicle and is leveled and stabilized. When the trailers are transported, the propane tanks are isolated via closed supply valves.

Ferrell, P.C.

1998-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

283

Process for separating nitrogen from methane using microchannel process technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosed invention relates to a process for separating methane or nitrogen from a fluid mixture comprising methane and nitrogen, the process comprising: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator, the microchannel separator comprising a plurality of process microchannels containing a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the methane or nitrogen is sorbed by the sorption medium, and removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing the methane or nitrogen from the sorption medium and removing the desorbed methane or nitrogen from the microchannel separator. The process is suitable for upgrading methane from coal mines, landfills, and other sub-quality sources.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee (Marysville, OH); Qiu, Dongming (Dublin, OH); Dritz, Terence Andrew (Worthington, OH); Neagle, Paul (Westerville, OH); Litt, Robert Dwayne (Westerville, OH); Arora, Ravi (Dublin, OH); Lamont, Michael Jay (Hilliard, OH); Pagnotto, Kristina M. (Cincinnati, OH)

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

One-to-many: example-based mesh animation synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an example-based approach for synthesizing diverse mesh animations. Provided a short clip of deformable mesh animation, our method synthesizes a large number of different animations of arbitrary length. Combining an automatically inferred ... Keywords: animation, bone graph, cut node, synthesis, transition

Changxi Zheng

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Energy Production from Zoo Animal Wastes  

SciTech Connect

Elephant and rhinoceros dung was used to investigate the feasibility of generating methane from the dung. The Knoxville Zoo produces 30 cubic yards (23 m{sup 3}) of herbivore dung per week and cost of disposal of this dung is $105/week. The majority of this dung originates from the Zoo's elephant and rhinoceros population. The estimated weight of the dung is 20 metric tons per week and the methane production potential determined in experiments was 0.033 L biogas/g dung (0.020 L CH{sub 4}/g dung), and the digestion of elephant dung was enhanced by the addition of ammonium nitrogen. Digestion was better overall at 37 C when compared to digestion at 50 C. Based on the amount of dung generated at the Knoxville Zoo, it is estimated that two standard garden grills could be operated 24 h per day using the gas from a digester treating 20 metric ton herbivore dung per week.

Klasson, KT

2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

286

Characterizing the Spatial Patterns of Global Fertilizer Application and Manure Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agriculture has had a tremendous impact on soil nutrients around the world. In some regions, soil nutrients are depleted because of low initial soil fertility or excessive nutrient removals through intense land use relative to nutrient additions. ...

Philip Potter; Navin Ramankutty; Elena M. Bennett; Simon D. Donner

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Fertility, child care outside the home, and pay-as-you-go social ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 20, 2005 ... In this study, we abstract from gender differences in the model to focus on the social security effects on fertility, and we call the basic unit of.

288

Water Vapor Transport and the Production of Precipitation in the Eastern Fertile Crescent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study presented here attempts to quantify the significance of southerly water vapor fluxes on precipitation occurring in the eastern Fertile Crescent region. The water vapor fluxes were investigated at high temporal and spatial resolution by ...

J. P. Evans; R. B. Smith

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Fertilizer basics for the smart gardener Rebecca Finneran, Michigan State University Extension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-season, high need crops such as vegetables. Pelletized fertilizer consists of granules that are A wide variety not be the same thing. Organic compounds contain the element carbon, which would represent naturally derived

290

RAW MATERIALS USED FOR THE PHOSPHATE FERTILIZER PRODUCTION IN ROMANIA -NEW RADIOMETRIC DATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of phosphate fertilizer produced by sulfuric acid attack and the nature of phosphogypsum samples used in the production of phosphoric acid and phosphogypsum are given in Table 1. Table 1. Radio

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

291

Rotational Nanoactuator/Nanomotor Images and Animations  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Zettl Research Group is an experimental solid state physics group in the Department of Physics at the University of California, Berkeley. These images and computer animations are referred to in a letter from the Group to Nature in 2003. They document the creation of what was then the world's smallest synthetic motor using a multiwall carbon nanotube. Their research won one of DOE's 2004 R&D 100 awards.

Zettle, Alex; Zettle Research Group (U.C. Berkeley and LBNL); Fennimore, Adam; Yuzvinsky, Tom; Bodzin, Noah; Han, Wei-Qiang; Fuhrer, M.S.; Cumings, J.

292

One strategy for estimating the potential soil carbon storage due to CO{sub 2} fertilization  

SciTech Connect

Soil radiocarbon measurements can be used to estimate soil carbon turnover rates and inventories. A labile component of soil carbon has the potential to respond to perturbations such as CO{sub 2} fertilization, changing climate, and changing land use. Soil carbon has influenced past and present atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels and will influence future levels. A model is used to calculate the amount of additional carbon stored in soil because of CO{sub 2} fertilization.

Harrison, K.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bonani, G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Mittelenergiephysik

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Nitrogen-Doped Graphitic Nanoribbons: Synthesis, Characterization and Transport  

SciTech Connect

Nitrogen-doped graphitic nanoribbons (Nx-GNRs), synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using pyrazine as a nitrogen precursor, are reported for the first time. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveal that the synthesized materials are formed by multi-layered corrugated graphitic nanoribbons (GNRs) which in most cases exhibit the formation of curved graphene edges (loops). This suggests that during growth, nitrogen atoms promote loop formation; undoped GNRs do not form loops at their edges. Transport measurements on individual pure carbon GNRs exhibit a linear I-V (current-voltage) behavior, whereas Nx-GNRs show reduced current responses following a semiconducting-like behavior, which becomes more prominent for high nitrogen concentrations. To better understand the experimental findings, electron density of states (DOS), quantum conductance for nitrogen doped zigzag and armchair single-layer GNRs are calculated for different N doping concentrations using Density Functional Theory (DFT) and non-equilibrium Green functions. These calculations confirm the crucial role of nitrogen atoms in the transport properties, confirming that the nonlinear I-V curves are due to the presence of nitrogen atoms within the Nx-GNRs lattice that act as scattering sites. These characteristic Nx-GNRs transport could be advantageous in the fabrication of electronic devices including sensors in which metal-like undoped GNRs are unsuitable.

Jia, Xiaoting [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Dresselhaus, M [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Cruz Silva, Eduardo [ORNL; Munoz-Sandoval, E [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC); Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto [ORNL; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto [ORNL; Lopez, Florentino [IPICyT

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

METHANE AND NITROGEN ABUNDANCES ON PLUTO AND ERIS  

SciTech Connect

We present spectra of Eris from the MMT 6.5 m Telescope and Red Channel Spectrograph (5700-9800 A, 5 A pixel{sup -1}) on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and of Pluto from the Steward Observatory 2.3 m Telescope and Boller and Chivens Spectrograph (7100-9400 A, 2 A pixel{sup -1}) on Kitt Peak, AZ. In addition, we present laboratory transmission spectra of methane-nitrogen and methane-argon ice mixtures. By anchoring our analysis in methane and nitrogen solubilities in one another as expressed in the phase diagram of Prokhvatilov and Yantsevich, and comparing methane bands in our Eris and Pluto spectra and methane bands in our laboratory spectra of methane and nitrogen ice mixtures, we find Eris' bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are {approx}10% and {approx}90% and Pluto's bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are {approx}3% and {approx}97%. Such abundances for Pluto are consistent with values reported in the literature. It appears that the bulk volatile composition of Eris is similar to the bulk volatile composition of Pluto. Both objects appear to be dominated by nitrogen ice. Our analysis also suggests, unlike previous work reported in the literature, that the methane and nitrogen stoichiometry is constant with depth into the surface of Eris. Finally, we point out that our Eris spectrum is also consistent with a laboratory ice mixture consisting of 40% methane and 60% argon. Although we cannot rule out an argon-rich surface, it seems more likely that nitrogen is the dominant species on Eris because the nitrogen ice 2.15 {mu}m band is seen in spectra of Pluto and Triton.

Tegler, S. C.; Cornelison, D. M.; Abernathy, M. R.; Bovyn, M. J.; Burt, J. A.; Evans, D. E.; Maleszewski, C. K.; Thompson, Z. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States); Grundy, W. M. [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Romanishin, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Vilas, F., E-mail: Stephen.Tegler@nau.ed, E-mail: David.Cornelison@nau.ed, E-mail: W.Grundy@lowell.ed, E-mail: wjr@nhn.ou.ed, E-mail: fvilas@mmto.or [MMT Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

295

Removal of sulfur and nitrogen containing pollutants from discharge gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxides of sulfur and of nitrogen are removed from waste gases by reaction with an unsupported copper oxide powder to form copper sulfate. The resulting copper sulfate is dissolved in water to effect separation from insoluble mineral ash and dried to form solid copper sulfate pentahydrate. This solid sulfate is thermally decomposed to finely divided copper oxide powder with high specific surface area. The copper oxide powder is recycled into contact with the waste gases requiring cleanup. A reducing gas can be introduced to convert the oxide of nitrogen pollutants to nitrogen.

Joubert, James I. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

297

Effect of Temperature on NOx Reduction by Nitrogen Atom Injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical reduction of NO{sub x} can be accomplished by injection of nitrogen atoms into the diesel engine exhaust stream. The nitrogen atoms can be generated from a separate stream of pure N{sub 2} by means of plasma jets or non-thermal plasma reactors. This paper examines the effect of exhaust temperature on the NO{sub x} reduction efficiency that can be achieved by nitrogen atom injection. It is shown that to achieve a high NO{sub x} reduction efficiency at a reasonable power consumption penalty, the exhaust temperature needs to be 100 C or less.

Penetrante, B

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

298

Nitrogen-doped Graphene and Its Electrochemical Applications  

SciTech Connect

Nitrogen-doped graphene (N-graphene) is obtained by exposing graphene to nitrogen plasma. N-graphene exhibits much higher electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction and H2O2 reduction than graphene, and much higher durability and selectivity than the widely-used expensive Pt. The excellent electrochemical performance of N-graphene is attributed to nitrogen functional groups and the specific properties of graphene. This indicates that N-graphene is promising for applications in electrochemical energy devices (fuel cells, metal-air batteries) and biosensors.

Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Sheng; Engelhard, Mark H.; Li, Guosheng; Shao, Guocheng; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Lin, Yuehe

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

299

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen Isotopes of the Element Nitrogen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 14 99.636% STABLE 15 0.364% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 10 No Data Available Proton Emission 100.00% 11 5.49Ă—10-22 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 12 11.000 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% 13 9.965 minutes Electron Capture 100.00% 14 STABLE - - 15 STABLE - - 16 7.13 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00% Beta-minus Decay with delayed Alpha Decay 1.2Ă—10-3 % 17 4.173 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

300

Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research reported here is concerned with the application of secondary fuel addition, otherwise known as reburning, as a means of NO{sub x} destruction downstream of the primary flame zone in boilers. This paper consists of two parts: First, results from a statistically correct design of parametric experiments on a laboratory coal combustor are presented. These allow the effects of the most important variables to be isolated and identified. Second, mechanisms governing the inter-conversion and destruction of nitrogenous species in the fuel rich reburning zone of a laboratory coal combustor were explored, using fundamental kinetic arguments. The objective here was to extract models, which can be used to estimate reburning effectiveness in other, more practical combustion configurations. Emphasis is on the use of natural gas as the reburning fuel for a pulverized coal primary flame. Then, reburning mechanisms occur in two regimes; one in which fast reactions between NO and hydrocarbons are usually limited by mixing; the other in which reactions have slowed and in which known gas phase chemistry controls. For the latter regime, a simplified model based on detailed gas phase chemical kinetic mechanisms and known rate coefficients was able to predict temporal profiles of NO, NH{sub 3} and HCN. Reactions with hydrocarbons played important roles in both regimes and the Fenimore N{sub 2} fixation reactions limited reburning effectiveness at low primary NO values.

Wendt, J.O.L.; Mereb, J.B.

1990-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Global projections for anthropogenic reactive nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere: an assessment of scenarios in the scientific literature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most long-term scenarios of global N emissions are produced by Integrated Assessment Models in the context of climate change assessment. The scenarios indicate that N emissions are likely to increase in the next decades, followed by a stabilization or decline. Critical factors for future N emissions are the development of the underlying drivers (especially fertilizer use, animal husbandry, transport and power generation), air pollution control policy and climate policy. The new scenarios made for climate change assessment, the Representative Concentration Pathways - RCPs, are not representative of the range of possible N-emission projections. A more focused development of scenarios for air pollution may improve the relevance and quality of the scenarios.

Van Vuuren, Detlef; Bouwman, Lex; Smith, Steven J.; Dentener, Frank

2011-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

302

The nitrogen cycle and ecohydrology of seasonally dry grasslands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the coupling of hydrologic and biogeochemical processes and, specifically, the organization of ecosystem traits with the water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles. Observations from a factorial irrigation- ...

Parolari, Anthony Joseph

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - The Flying Ring!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery! Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery! Previous Video (Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Pewter Bells) Pewter Bells The Flying Ring! A copper ring leaps off an electromagnet when it's turned on. What happens when the ring's resistance is lowered using liquid nitrogen? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is an AC powered electromagnet. And this is a copper ring. When I place the copper ring on the electromagnet and turn it on, the magnet's changing magnetic field will induce an electric current in the copper ring. The current in the ring will then create it's own magnetic

304

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Let's Pour Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shattering Flowers! Shattering Flowers! Previous Video (Shattering Flowers!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Giant Koosh Ball!) Giant Koosh Ball! Let's Pour Liquid Nitrogen on the Floor! Liquid nitrogen?! On the floor?! Who's going to clean that mess up?! See what really happens when one of the world's most beloved cryogenic liquids comes into contact with a room temperature floor. [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: From time to time, we spill a little liquid nitrogen! The reaction we sometimes get is.... Shannon: Did they just pour LIQUID NITROGEN on the FLOOR?!?! Joanna: Yes. Yes we did. Steve: One thing people seem to have a problem with is the mess that liquid

305

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations apply to stationary sources with the potential to emit 50 tons of nitrogen oxides (NOx) per year from all pollutant-emitting equipment or activities. The regulations describe possibilities for exemptions (i.e., for sources which have the potential to emit 50 tons but do not actually reach that level) and Reasonably Available Control

306

Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen trifluoride (NF[subscript 3]) has potential to make a growing contribution to the Earth’s radiative budget; however, our understanding of its atmospheric burden and emission rates has been limited. Based on a ...

Ivy, Diane J.

307

Effects of atmospheric inorganic nitrogen deposition on ocean biogeochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to decadal global forcing for ocean and sea-ice models: Theorganic nitrogen to the oceans, Nature, 376, 243 – 246.trace species to the world ocean, Global Biogeochem. Cycles,

Krishnamurthy, Aparna; Moore, J. Keith; Zender, Charles S; Luo, Chao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The relationship between iron and nitrogen fixation in Trichodesmium spp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trichodesmium spp. are considered the dominant nitrogen (N) fixing cyanobacteria in tropical and subtropical oceans, regimes frequently characterized by low iron (Fe). Limited information exists about what levels of Fe ...

Chappell, Phoebe Dreux

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Evolution of Nitrogen Oxide Chemistry in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nocturnal cycle of nitrogen oxides in the atmospheric boundary layer is studied by means of a one-dimensional model. The model solves the conservation equations of momentum, entropy, total water content, and of five chemical species. The ...

S. Galmarini; P. G. Duynkerke; J. Vilŕ-Guerau de Arellano

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Land Use and Reactive Nitrogen Discharge: Effects of Dietary Choices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern agriculture alters natural biological and geophysical processes, with magnitudes proportional to its spatial extent. Cultivation is also the main cause of artificially enhanced reactive nitrogen (Nr) availability in natural ecosystems. ...

Gidon Eshel; Pamela A. Martin; Esther E. Bowen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Membrane-augmented cryogenic methane/nitrogen separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process combined with a cryogenic separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane, nitrogen and at least one other component. The membrane separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and the other component and rejecting nitrogen. The process is particularly useful in removing components such as water, carbon dioxide or C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons that might otherwise freeze and plug the cryogenic equipment.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid (Menlo Park, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Membrane-augmented cryogenic methane/nitrogen separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process is described which is combined with a cryogenic separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane, nitrogen and at least one other component. The membrane separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and the other component and rejecting nitrogen. The process is particularly useful in removing components such as water, carbon dioxide or C{sub +2} hydrocarbons that might otherwise freeze and plug the cryogenic equipment. 10 figs.

Lokhandwala, K.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Computer animation of Phanerozoic plate motions  

SciTech Connect

Since 1985, the PALEOMAP Project, in collaboration with research groups both in the US and abroad, has assembled a digital model that describes global plate motions during the last 600 million years. In this paper the authors present a series of computer animations that dynamically illustrates the movement of continents and terranes, and the evolution of the ocean basins since the breakup of the late Precambrian supercontinent. These animations depict the motion of the plates from both equatorial and polar perspectives. Mesozoic and Cenozoic plate tectonic reconstructions are based on a synthesis of linear magnetic anomalies, fracture zone locations, intracontinental rifts, collision and thrust belts, and zones of strike-slip. Paleozoic plate reconstructions, though more speculative, are based on evidence of past subduction, continental collision, and inferred sea floor spreading. The relative longitudinal positions of the continents during the Paleozoic and the width of intervening oceans have been adjusted to best explain changing biogeographic and paleoclimatic patterns. A new paleomagnetic/hot spot reference frame has been constructed that combines paleomagnetic data compiled by Rob Van der Voo (1992) with inferred motion relative to a fixed frame of hot spots. Using probable Early Mesozoic and Paleozoic hot spot tracks on the major continents, the authors have extended plate motions relative to the hot spot reference frame back to 400 million years.

Scotese, C.R. (Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Towards believable cloth motion in computer animation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis covers the implementation of a cloth modeling algorithm within a computer animation package. The main objective of this thesis is to prove the feasibility of simulating the behavior of cloth using an empirically based model coupled with constraint dynamics and establish the groundwork for future studies into the use of cloth models in computer animation. To achieve a quick and accurate solution, two different forward dynamic constraint based system algorithms are studied and implemented. One approach, pioneered by Breen-DeVaul-House, computes the solution to the cloth equation by breaking up the cloth model into an acyclic length constraint system that may be solved in linear time with respect to the number of constraints. This approach is well suited for cloth models that collide only with force fiends, yet, is unacceptable for the proposed application. Therefore the Breen-DeVaul-House approach is modified to incorporate collision with polygonal objects. Even though the single matrix approach does not break up the cloth model and is slower in computing a solution for a dense mesh, this approach accurately calculates collisions between a mesh and a polygonal surface through the use of surface constraints and surface force dampers.

Segu, Sunil Venkatesh

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Phosphorus utilization from 32P-triple superphosphate by corn plants, as affected by green manures and nitrogen and phosphate fertilizer rates in cerrado (savannah) soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phosphate rock mixtures on corn growth. Scientia Agricola.the factors responsible for low corn crop yield, allied tothe amount of N applied to corn in Brazil is, in average, 60

Muraoka, Takashi; Silva, Edson Cabral da; Buzetti, Salatier; Alvarez V., Felipe Carlos; Franzini, Vinicius Ide

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Method and apparatus for animal positioning in imaging systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for imaging an animal includes a first mounting surface, a bed sized to support the animal and releasably secured to or integral with the first mounting surface. The apparatus also includes a plurality of straps, each having a first end in a fixed position relative to the bed and a second end for tightening around a limb of the animal. A method for in-vivo imaging of an animal includes providing an animal that has limbs, providing a first mounting surface, and providing a bed removably secured to or integral with the mounting surface and sized to support the animal as well as being coupled to a plurality of straps. The method also includes placing the animal on the bed between the plurality of straps and tightening at least two of the plurality of straps around at least two of the limbs such that the animal is substantially secured in place relative to the bed.

Hadjioannou, Arion-Xenofon; Stout, David B.; Silverman, Robert W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The Opening of the Tasman Sea: A Gravity Anomaly Animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first plate tectonic gravity anomaly grid animation using data from the Tasman Sea is presented. In this animation the tectonic elements are represented by their respective gravity fields, based on recent marine-satellite-derived gravity ...

C. Gaina; R. D. Müller; W. R. Roest; P. Symonds

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Going Forth and Multiplying: Animal Acclimatization and Invasion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nineteenth century saw numerous transfers and attempted transfers of animal populations, mostly as the result of the spread of European agriculture. The exchange of animal populations facilitated by the acclimatization ...

Ritvo, Harriet

319

Linear Bellman combination for control of character animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controllers are necessary for physically-based synthesis of character animation. However, creating controllers requires either manual tuning or expensive computer optimization. We introduce linear Bellman combination as a method for reusing existing ... Keywords: optimal control, physically based animation

Marco da Silva; Frédo Durand; Jovan Popovi?

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 11 Physiological and Biophysical Properties of Male Germ CellSulfogalactosylglycerolipid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 11 Physiological and Biophysical Properties of Male Germ CellSulfogalactosylglycerolipid Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloa

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Impact of biochar application on nitrogen nutrition of rice, greenhouse-gas emissions and soil organic carbon dynamics in two paddy soils of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two field microcosm experiments and 15N labeling techniques were used to investigate the first-year effects of biochar addition on rice N nutrition and GHG emissions in an Inceptisol and an Ultisol. Biochar N bioavailability and effect of biochar on fertilizer nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) were studied by 15N-enriched wheat biochar (7.8803 atom% 15N) and fertilizer urea (5 atom% 15N) (Experiment I). Corn biochar and corn stalks were applied at 12 Mg ha-1 to study their effects on GHG emissions (Experiment II). Biochar had no significant impact on rice production and less than 2% of the biochar N was available to plants in the first season. Biochar addition increased soil C and N contents and decreased urea NUE.. Seasonal cumulative CH4 emissions with biochar were similar to the controls, but significantly lower than the local practice of straw amendment. Soil emissions of N2O with biochar amendment were similar to the control in the acidic Ultisol, but significantly higher in the slightly alkaline Inceptisol. Carbon-balance calculations found no major losses of biochar-C. Low bio-availability of biochar N did not make a significant impact on rice production or N nutrition during the first year.. Replacement of straw amendments with biochar could decrease CH4 emissions and increase SOC stocks.

Xie, Zubin; Xu, Yanping; Liu, Gang; Liu, Qi; Zhu, Jianguo; Tu, Cong; Amonette, James E.; Cadisch, Georg; Yong, Jean W.; Hu, Shuijin

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Lead levels in whole blood of New Zealand domestic animals  

SciTech Connect

A survey of whole-blood lead in domestic animals of New Zealand was conducted. 1142 animals were examined (252 cattle, 113 cats, 271 dogs, 258 horses, and 248 sheep). Data was analyzed as to age, sex, breed and animals known to be poisoned. Variations in lead concentration with different environments were noted with special reference to elevated lead in animals near automobile service stations, which could indicate potential danger to humans working in such areas.

Ward, N.I.; Brooks, R.R.; Roberts, E.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Animation projects in CS1 from scheme to Java  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scheme animation projects are transformed into Java projects. Keywords: computer science for liberal arts, introductory programming course, java programming

Mirela Djordjevi?

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management.  

SciTech Connect

Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus deltoides Bartr. and Platanus occidentalis L.) and broad (Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Pinus taeda L.) site requirements while grown with a range of nutrient and water resources. We constructed N budgets by measuring N concentration ([N]) and N content (N{sub C}) of above- and belowground perennial and ephemeral tissues, determined N uptake (N{sub UP}), and calculated N use efficiency (NUE). Forest stands regulated [N] within species-specific operating ranges without clear temporal or treatment patterns, thus demonstrating equilibrium between tissue [N] and biomass accumulation. Forest stand N{sub C} and N{sub UP} increased with stand development and paralleled treatment patterns of biomass accumulation, suggesting productivity is tightly linked to N{sub UP}. Inclusion of above- and belowground ephemeral tissue turnover in N{sub UP} calculations demonstrated that maximum N demand for narrow-sites adapted species exceeded 200 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} while demand for broad-site adapted species was below this level. NUE was species dependent but not consistently influenced by N availability, suggesting relationships between NUE and resource availability were species dependent. Based on early stand development, species with broad site adaptability are favored for woody cropping systems because they maintain high above- and belowground productivity with minimal fertilization requirements due to higher NUE than narrow site adapted species.

Aubrey, Doug, P.; Coyle, David, R. Coleman, Mark, D.

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

325

Edutainment animated folktales software to motivate socio-cultural awareness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the design and development of an animated folk tales edutainment software to motivate socio-cultural awareness among children and adolescents. One application of multimedia technology is in edutainment, which includes animated cartoon, ... Keywords: 2D animation, edutainment, multimedia application software, socio-cultural values

Nor Azan Mat Zin; Nur Yuhanis Mohd Nasir

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Dynamic, expressive speech animation from a single mesh  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we present a method for human face animation which allows us to generate animations for a novel person given just a single mesh of their face. These animations can be of arbitrary text and may include emotional expressions. We build a multilinear ...

Kevin Wampler; Daichi Sasaki; Li Zhang; Zoran Popovi?

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Carbon dioxide enrichment: Data on the response of cotton to varying CO{sub 2}, irrigation, and nitrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents results from field CO{sub 2}-enrichment experiments conducted over five consecutive growing seasons, 1983--1987. These results comprise data concerning the effects of continuous CO{sub 2} enrichment on the growth of cotton under optimal and limiting levels of water and nitrogen. Unlike many prior C0{sub 2} enrichment experiments in growth chambers or greenhouses, these studies were conducted on field-planted cotton at close to natural conditions using the open-top chamber approach. Measurements were made on a variety of crop response variables at intervals during the growing season and upon crop harvest. The initial experiment examined the effects of varying C0{sub 2} concentration only. In the following two seasons, the interactive effects of C0{sub 2} concentration and water availability were studied. In the final two seasons, the effects of the three-way interaction between C0{sub 2} concentration, water availability, and nitrogen fertility were investigated. The data comprise three types of information: identification variables (such as year, institution and situ codes, and treatment regimens), intermediate growth measurements (such as plant height, leaf area index, number of flowers, and dry weight of leaves) taken at various times during the growing season, and crop harvest results (such as lint yield, seed yield, and total aboveground dry biomass). They are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NAP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. The NAP consists of this document and a magnetic tape (or a floppy diskette, upon request) containing machine-readable files. This document provides sample listings of the CO{sub 2} enrichment response data as they appear on the magnetic tape or floppy diskette and provides detailed descriptions of the design and methodology of these experiments, as well as a complete hard copy listing of all of the data in the form of a supplemental text provided as an appendix.

Sepanski, R.J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Kimball, B.A.; Mauney, J.R.; La Morte, R.L.; Guinn, G.; Nakayama, F.S.; Radin, J.W.; Mitchell, S.T.; Parker, L.L.; Peresta, G.J.; Nixon, P.E. III; Savoy, B.; Harris, S.M.; MacDonald, R.; Pros, H.; Martinez, J. [Agricultural Research Service, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Lakatos, E.A. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Soil and Water Science

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Fertilization Increases Below-Ground Carbon Sequestration of Loblolly Pine Plantations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FERTILIZATION INCREASES BELOW-GROUND FERTILIZATION INCREASES BELOW-GROUND CARBON SEQUESTRATION OF LOBLOLLY PINE PLANTATIONS K.H. Johnsen 1,2 , J.R. Butnor 1 , C. Maier 1 , R. Oren 3 , R. Pangle 4 , L. Samuelson 5 , J. Seiler 4 , S.E. McKeand 6 , and H.L Allen 6 1 Southern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 3041 Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA 2 email: kjohnsen@fs.fed.us, ph: 919-549-4012, fax: 919-549-4047 3 School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 4 Dept. of Forestry, Virginia Tech., Blacksburg, VA 24061 5 School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 6 College of Natural Resources, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 Abstract The extent of fertilization of southern pine forests is increasing rapidly; industrial

329

Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting Operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years there has been an increasing demand to reduce and control the amount of dissolved gases in steel. Hydrogen and nitrogen are two of the most important gases which when dissolved in liquid steel affect its properties significantly. Several steelmaking additions have been investigated in this research for their effect on the hydrogen and nitrogen content of steels. It has been established that calcium hydroxide (hydrated lime) acts as a source of hydrogen. Carburizers, such as metallurgical coke, were found to result in no hydrogen pickup when added to liquid steel. Addition of petroleum coke, on the other hand, increased the hydrogen content of liquid steel. Ferroalloy such as medium carbon ferromanganese when added to the liquid iron was found to increase its nitrogen content, the increase being proportional to the amount of ferroalloy added. Similarly, addition of pitch coke, which had a significant nitrogen impurity, increased the nitrogen content of liquid iron. A mathematical model was developed to quantify the absorption of nitrogen and hydrogen from the air bubbles entrained during tapping of liquid steel. During the bottom stirring of liquid metal in a ladle, the inert gas escaping from the top displaces the slag layer and often forms an open eye. The absorption of atmospheric nitrogen through the spout eye was estimated for different slag thickness and gas flow rate. The ultimate goal of this research was to develop a comprehensive set of equations which could predict the nitrogen and hydrogen pickup from their various sources. Estimates of hydrogen and nitrogen pickup during the steel transfer operations such as tapping and ladle stirring and the predicted pickup from steelmaking additions were integrated into empirical equations. The comprehensive model is designed to predict the gas pickup under varying operating conditions such as the metal oxygen and sulfur content, the total tapping or stirring time, the stirring gas flow rate and the slag thickness. The model predictions are based on mathematical and empirical evidence which are derived from thermodynamic and kinetic fundamental principles.

Richard J. Fruehan; Siddhartha Misra

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Nitrogen control of chloroplast development and differentiation. Annual progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growth and development of plants and photosynthetic microorganisms is commonly limited by the availability of nitrogen. Our work concerns understanding the mechanisms by which plants and algae that are subjected to nitrogen deprivation alter the composition of photosynthetic membranes and enzymes involved in photosynthetic carbon metabolism. Toward these ends, we study biosynthetic and gene expression processes in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is grown in an ammonium-limited continuous culture system. We have found that the expression of nuclear genes, including those encoding for light-harvesting proteins, are severely repressed in nitrogen-limited cells whereas, in general, chloroplast protein synthesis is attenuated primarily at the level of mRNA translation. Conversely, nitrogen deprivation appears to lead to enhanced synthesis of enzymes that are involved in starch and storage lipid deposition. In addition, as a possible means by which photosynthetic electron transport activities and ATP synthesis is sustained during chronic periods of nitrogen deprivation, thylakoid membranes become enriched with components for chlororespiration. Characterization of the chlororespiratory electron transport constituents, including cytochrome complexes and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase is a major current effort. Also, we are striving to isolate the genes encoding chlororespiration proteins toward determining how they and others that are strongly responsive to nutrient availability are regulated.

Schmidt, G.W.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Phosphorus versus nitrogen limitation in the marine environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Limnological and marine geochemical opinion favors phosphorus limitation of organic production in aquatic environments, while marine biological opinion favors nitrogen limitation. Clues in the literature and nutrient budgets for selected marine ecosystems suggest that phosphorus vs. nitrogen limitation is a function of the relative rates of water exchange and internal biochemical processes acting to adjust the ratio of ecosystem N:P availability. A limiting factor to biological activity is that material available in an amount most closely approaching the critical minimum required to sustain that activity (Odum 197 1). This definition can be applied at any scale from cellular metabolism to global biogeochemical cycles. This paper deals with inorganic plant nutrients as limiting factors for the net production of new organic material in marine systems. Marine geochemists and biologists hold antithetical views about nutrient limitation in the ocean. The view held by most marine geochemists (e.g. Lerman et al. 1975; Meybeck 1982; Broecker and Peng 1982) can apparently be traced to the seminal paper by Redfield ( 1958). Redfield concluded that phosphorus availability limits net organic production in the sea. He pointed out that any nitrogen deficits can be met by the biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, hence nitrogenous compounds can accumulate until the available phosphorus is utilized.

S. V. Smith

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Method of detoxifying animal suffering from overdose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for accumulating drugs or other chemicals within synthetic, lipid-like vesicles by means of a pH gradient imposed on the vesicles just prior to use is described. The method is suited for accumulating molecules with basic or acid moieties which are permeable to the vesicles membranes in their uncharged form and for molecules that contain charge moieties that are hydrophobic ions and can therefore cross the vesicle membranes in their charged form. The method is advantageous over prior art methods for encapsulating biologically active materials within vesicles in that it achieves very high degrees of loading with simple procedures that are economical and require little technical expertise, furthermore kits which can be stored for prolonged periods prior to use without impairment of the capacity to achieve drug accumulation are described. A related application of the method consists of using this technology to detoxify animals that have been exposed to poisons with basic, weak acid or hydrophobic charge groups within their molecular structure.

Mehlhorn, Rolf J. (Richmond, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) Nitrogen Oxide Emission Statements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency requires any facility that emits 25 tons or more of NOx and/or 25 tons or more of VOC during the calendar year and is located in a county designated as nonattainment for the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone submit emission statements. Any facility that is located in a county described above is exempt from these requirements. If NOx

334

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic molecules in which both atoms are the same element. An international team of scientists from the University of Frankfurt in Germany, Berkeley Lab, Kansas State University, and Auburn University has now resolved the issue with an appropriate twist of quantum fuzziness. By means of coincident detection of the photoelectron ejected from molecular nitrogen and the Auger electron emitted femtoseconds later, the team found that how the measurements are done determines which description-localized or delocalized-is valid.

335

Change in Pacific nitrogen content tied to climate change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 For immediate release: 12/15/2013 | NR-13-12-04 High Resolution Image Living and fossilized coral are gathered from dives in the Hawaiian Islands. A Lawrence Livermore scientist and collaborators have studied coral to determine that a long-term shift in nitrogen content in the Pacific Ocean has occurred as a result of climate change. Image courtesy of NOAA Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory. Change in Pacific nitrogen content tied to climate change Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Using deep sea corals gathered near the Hawaiian Islands, a Lawrence Livermore scientist, in collaboration with UC Santa Cruz colleagues, has determined that a long-term shift in nitrogen content in the Pacific Ocean has occurred as a result of climate change.

336

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic molecules in which both atoms are the same element. An international team of scientists from the University of Frankfurt in Germany, Berkeley Lab, Kansas State University, and Auburn University has now resolved the issue with an appropriate twist of quantum fuzziness. By means of coincident detection of the photoelectron ejected from molecular nitrogen and the Auger electron emitted femtoseconds later, the team found that how the measurements are done determines which description-localized or delocalized-is valid.

337

Nitrogen fertiliser management of sugarcane crops for meeting global environmental challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Australian commercial sugarcane. Plant and Soil, 238: 21–30.GJ and Tandon HLS 2006. Plant nutrition for food security: Amanagement. FAO Fertilizer and Plant Nutrition Bulletin 16,

Thorburn, Peter J; Webster, Tony J; Biggs, Jody S; Biggs, Ian M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Engineering shallow spins in diamond with nitrogen delta-doping  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate nanometer-precision depth control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center creation near the surface of synthetic diamond using an in situ nitrogen delta-doping technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Despite their proximity to the surface, doped NV centers with depths (d) ranging from 5 to 100 nm display long spin coherence times, T{sub 2} > 100 {mu}s at d = 5 nm and T{sub 2} > 600 {mu}s at d {>=} 50 nm. The consistently long spin coherence observed in such shallow NV centers enables applications such as atomic-scale external spin sensing and hybrid quantum architectures.

Ohno, Kenichi; Joseph Heremans, F.; Bassett, Lee C.; Myers, Bryan A.; Toyli, David M.; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C.; Palmstrom, Christopher J.; Awschalom, David D. [Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

339

Soil fertility and soil loss constraints on crop residue removal for energy production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the methodologies used to estimate the soil fertility and soil loss constraints on crop residue removal for energy production is presented. Estimates of excess residue are developed for wheat in north-central Oklahoma and for corn and soybeans in central Iowa. These sample farming situations are analyzed in other research in the Analysis Division of the Solar Energy Research Institute.

Flaim, S.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 6 Fertilizer Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 6 Fertilizer Microscopy Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS 8C45832E2AA310DD11A6FEA4BDB93C6B Press Downloadable pdf...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Interactions between organic amendments and phosphate fertilizers modify phosphate sorption processes in an acid soil  

SciTech Connect

To determine how organic amendments and phosphate fertilizers interact to modify P sorption processes, three phosphate fertilizers were applied to lignite- and compost-amended acid soil and incubated for either 3 or 26 days. The fertilizers applied were potassium dihydrogen phosphate, triple superphosphate, and diammonium phosphate (DAP). After 3 days of incubation, sorption of all three P sources was decreased in the lignite-amended treatments, whereas P sorption was increased in the compost-amended treatments. Increased incubation time (26 days) resulted in significantly decreased P sorption when DAP was added to lignite-amended treatments. Addition of triple superphosphate increased P sorption in lignite- and compost-amended treatments and decreased solution pH compared with DAP application. In addition to the effect of P source, differences in P sorption between the lignite- and compost-amended treatments were driven by differences in solution chemistry, predominantly solution pH and cation dynamics. Soil amendment and fertilizer addition also increased microbial activity in the incubation systems, as measured by carbon dioxide respiration. It is proposed that the combination of lignite and DAP may contribute to decreased P sorption in acid soils, with the positive effects likely caused by both chemical and biological processes, including the formation of soluble organic-metal complexes.

Sckefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, W.R. [Rutherglen Center, Rutherglen, Vic. (Australia)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nitrogen actinometry for measurement of nitrogen radical spatial distribution in large-area plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Density distributions of radicals in the large-area silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process were measured using a spatially resolvable optical emission spectrometer (SROES). To determine the qualitative distribution of a target radical, the authors used optical actinometry with nitrogen (N{sub 2}) gas as an actinometer. To compare the SROES data and process results, the thickness of the deposited Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} thin films using an ellipsometer was measured. By introducing nitrogen-based optical actinometry, the authors obtained very good agreement between the experimental results of the distributions of atomic nitrogen radical and the deposited thicknesses of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} thin films. Based on these experimental results, the uniformity of the process plasma in the PECVD process at different applied radio frequency powers was analyzed.

Oh, Changhoon; Kang, Minwook; Hahn, Jae W. [Nano Photonics Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonesi-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Seungsuk [Based Technology of Equipment Team, LG Display, Paju-City, Gyeonggi-do 413-811 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Digg

344

Removal of nitrogen oxides from a gas stream by using monatomic nitrogen induced by a pulsed arc  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effectiveness of N atoms, nitrogen, induced by a pulsed electric arc, in reducing nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) was studied. Goal is reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from automobile emissions by this alternative technique, which can be cost-effective and has the potential to reduce NO{sub x} in exhaust containing up to 10% oxygen. Initial tests with 100, 500, and 1,000 ppM NO in pure nitrogen have shown that a greater than 50% reduction of NO/NO{sub x} is readily achievable. At an NO concentration of 100 ppM, a greater than 90% NO/NO{sub x} reduction was recorded. Different flow rates of the monatomic nitrogen and the gas stream were tested. The flow rate of the monatomic nitrogen did not have a significant effect on the reduction efficiency, unlike the flow rate of the gas stream. The cross-sectional flow area of the gas stream was varied in order to assess whether the proximity of the gas stream to the arc would affect NO/NO{sub x} reduction. Results of the tests revealed that the smallest cross-sectional area had the best reduction, but also the highest chance of contacting the arc. The composition of the gas stream was also varied to elucidate the effects of N0{sub 2} and 0{sub 2} on the NO/NO{sub x} reduction efficiency. When N0{sub 2} and 0{sub 2} are present in the gas stream, both gases lower the reduction efficiency significantly by creating more NO or N0{sub 2}. Experiments are continuing to improve the reduction efficiency. The electrical power, a function of pulse frequency, voltage, and current, was treated as a key parameter in the investigation. The power consumption of the high-voltage purser apparatus for a 100-kW engine was estimated to be 3 kW.

Ng, H.K.; Novick, V.J.; Sekar, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Pierucci, K.A. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States); Geise, M.F. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Radio controlled release apparatus for animal data acquisition devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel apparatus for reliably and selectively releasing a data acquisition package from an animal for recovery. The data package comprises two parts: 1) an animal data acquisition device and 2) a co-located release apparatus. One embodiment, which is useful for land animals, the release apparatus includes two major components: 1) an electronics package, comprising a receiver; a decoder comparator, having at plurality of individually selectable codes; and an actuator circuit and 2) a release device, which can be a mechanical device, which acts to release the data package from the animal. To release a data package from a particular animal, a radio transmitter sends a coded signal which is decoded to determine if the code is valid for that animal data package. Having received a valid code, the release device is activated to release the data package from the animal for subsequent recovery. A second embodiment includes floatation means and is useful for releasing animal data acquisition devices attached to sea animals. This embodiment further provides for releasing a data package underwater by employing an acoustic signal.

Stamps, James Frederick (5252 Norma Way, Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Engines - 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates Diesel particulate matter has a very complex geometry Most studies have observed these three-dimensional structures in...

347

Innovations in Steel Production—Animations for Aluminium ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 30, 2008 ... Innovations in Steel Production—Animations for Aluminium Technologies? by Reiner Kopp. Publisher: TMS. Product Format: Webcast. Pages ...

348

Education: Digital Resource Center - VISUALS: Animation and video ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 25, 2007 ... This Quicktime animation of solidification of solid crystals from a liquid demonstrates the development of grain structure. An accompanying ...

349

Solid-Liquid Separation of Animal Manure and Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid-liquid separation is an alternative treatment for animal manure and process-generated wastewater. This publication explains the techniques, equipment, performance and economics of separators.

Mukhtar, Saqib; Sweeten, John M.; Auvermann, Brent W.

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

350

Biomass Gasification: An Alternative Solution to Animal Waste Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The overall goal of this research was to evaluate gasification of animal waste as an alternative manure management strategy, from the standpoints of syngas production… (more)

Wu, Hanjing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Carbon and nitrogen allocation in trees R.E. Dickson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon and nitrogen allocation in trees R.E. Dickson USDA-Forest Service, NCFES, Rhinelander, WI, U.S.A. Introduction Growth of trees and all plants depends up- on maintaining a positive carbon balance despite to multiple environ- mental stresses (Chapin et aL, 1987; Osmond et al., 1987). Light, carbon, water

Recanati, Catherine

352

Nitrogen Adsorption in Carbon Aerogels: A Molecular Simulation Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen Adsorption in Carbon Aerogels: A Molecular Simulation Study S. Gavalda, K. E. Gubbins,*, Y a molecular model for carbon aerogel in which the mesopore space is represented by carbon spheres-ray diffraction. The resulting model aerogel had a surface area, porosity, and pore size distribution that closely

353

NOx reduction by electron beam-produced nitrogen atom injection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Deactivated atomic nitrogen generated by an electron beam from a gas stream containing more than 99% N.sub.2 is injected at low temperatures into an engine exhaust to reduce NOx emissions. High NOx reduction efficiency is achieved with compact electron beam devices without use of a catalyst.

Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream (1st Grade) Lesson Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream (1st Grade) Lesson Plan Science Standards Addressed (From the Colorado=0 Standard 1 - Physical Science 1st Grade: Outcome 1: Solids and liquids have unique properties) Large Metal or plastic mixing bowl Wire whisk and wooden spoon 4 cups heavy cream 1-1/2 Half & Half

355

International Council for Laboratory Animal Science: International activities. Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources annual report, 1993--1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In late 1987, the Interagency Research Animal Committee (IRAC) requested that the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (ILAR), National Research Council (NRC), National Academy of Sciences, reestablish US national membership in the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS). The ICLAS is the only worldwide organization whose goal is to foster the humane use of animals in medical research and testing. ILAR`s Mission Statement reflects its commitment to producing highly respected documents covering a wide range of scientific issues, including databases in genetic stocks, species specific management guides, guidelines for humane care of animals, and position papers on issues affecting the future of the biological sciences. As such, ILAR is recognized nationally and internationally as an independent, scientific authority in the development of animal sciences in biomedical research.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Nitrogen-incorporation induced changes in the microstructure of nanocrystalline WO3 thin films  

SciTech Connect

Nitrogen doped tungsten oxide (WO3) films were grown by reactive magnetron sputter-deposition by varying the nitrogen content in the reactive gas mixture keeping the deposition temperature fixed at 400 C. The crystal structure, surface morphology, chemical composition, and electrical resistivity of nitrogen doped WO3 films were evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrical conductivity measurements. The results indicate that the nitrogen-doping induced changes in the microstructure and electrical properties of WO3 films are significant. XRD measurements coupled with SEM analysis indicates that the increasing nitrogen content decreases the grain size and crystal quality. The nitrogen concentration increases from 0 at.% to 1.35 at.% with increasing nitrogen flow rate from 0 to 20 sccm. The corresponding dc electrical conductivity of the films had shown a decreasing trend with increasing nitrogen content.

Vemuri, Venkata Rama Sesha R.; Noor-A-Alam, M.; Gullapalli, Satya K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Ramana, C.V.

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Electronic Properties of Nitrogen-/Boron-Doped Graphene Nanoribbons With Armchair Edges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculation of electronic structures has been performed for graphene nanoribbons with eight-armchair edges containing nitrogen or boron substitutional impurity by using ab initio density functional theory. It is found that the electronic structures ... Keywords: Doping, graphene, nanotechnology, nitrogen

Shan Sheng Yu; Wei Tao Zheng; Qing Jiang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Annual progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

Schmidt, G.W.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The influence of Fe catalysts on the release of nitrogen oxides during the gasification of nitrogen doped carbon-13 material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

855 The influence of Fe catalysts on the release of nitrogen oxides during the gasification. (Received 12 June 19%; accepted in revised form 4 April 1997) Key Words - A. Char, B. gasification, the rapid devol- atilisation of the coal is accompanied by the ignition/gasification of the volatiles

Thomas, Mark

360

Animation programming: an alternative approach to CS1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current problem faced by many computing departments is that only those already self-selected into computing sign up for "CS121 Programming and Problem Solving I", or the similarly named and presented first course. An Animation Programming course ... Keywords: animation, computer science curriculum, object oriented

Louise Moses

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Effective Use of Procedural Shaders in Animated Scenes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex procedural shaders are commonly used to enrich the appearance of high-quality computer animations. In traditional rendering architectures the shading computation is performed independently for each animation frame which leads to significant costs. In this paper we propose an approach which eliminates redundant computation between subsequent frames by exploiting temporal coherence in shading. The shading

Polina Kondratieva; Vlastimil Havran; Hans-Peter Seidel

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A terrestrial animal-borne video system for large mammals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animal-borne video and environmental data collection systems (AVEDs) are integrated sensor systems that collect video from the animal's perspective and combine it with data from other sensors, including audio, location, temperature, acceleration, and ... Keywords: AVED, Telemetry, Video, White-tailed deer, Wildlife

Remington J. Moll; Joshua J. Millspaugh; Jeff Beringer; Joel Sartwell; Zhihai He; Jay A. Eggert; Xiwen Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Occupational Health and Safety Program Laboratory Animal Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupational Health and Safety Program Laboratory Animal Resources Binghamton University State University of New York P.O. Box 6000 Health Services, IN-204 (607) 777-4610, Fax: (607) 777-2881 Health is strictly for the use of the Occupational Health and Safety Program for Laboratory Animal Resources and may

Suzuki, Masatsugu

364

Per-plant eco-physiological responses of maize to varied nitrogen availability at low and high plant densities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and low nitrogen availability. Agron. J. 2009; forthcoming.the impacts of nitrogen (N) availability on intra-specificgenotypes to varied N availability at both low and high

Boomsma, Christopher R; Vyn, Tony J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Methods of detection and identificationoc carbon- and nitrogen-containing materials  

SciTech Connect

Methods for detecting and identifying carbon- and/or nitrogen-containing materials are disclosed. The methods may comprise detection of photo-nuclear reaction products of nitrogen and carbon to detect and identify the carbon- and/or nitrogen-containing materials.

Karev, Alexander Ivanovich; Raevsky, Valery Georgievich; Dzhalivyan, Leonid Zavenovich; Brothers, Louis Joseph; Wilhide, Larry K

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

366

A MOLECULAR SIMULATION STUDY OF ADSORPTION OF NITROGEN AND METHANE IN TITANIUM SILICATE (ETS-4)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, those obtained from nitrogen injection through enhanced gas recovery2 or from landfill gases3. Even when the nitrogen content in natural gas or landfill gases is consid- erably lower than the CO2 content viable when natural gas prices are high enough4. Therefore, understanding the fundamentals of nitrogen

Lisal, Martin

367

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Billings Hospital - Small Animal  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Billings Hospital - Small Animal Billings Hospital - Small Animal Facility - University of Chicago - IL 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Billings Hospital, Small Animal Facility, University of Chicago (IL 01) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP due to limited scope of activities and 15 day half-life of P-32 Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Small Animal Facility, U. of Chicago IL.01-1 Location: University of Chicago , Chicago , Illinois IL.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1979 IL.01-1 Site Operations: Nature of operations is not clear. Portions of Billings Hospital were reported to have been used as an animal research facility. IL.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated IL.01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Phosphorus - 32 IL.01-1

368

The significant human-animal bond: Pets with cancer  

SciTech Connect

Veterinarians have responsibilities to both the animal and its owner. In the past several years there has been an increased awareness and concern about human-animal bonds. As a result, we have begun to appreciate the nature, strength, and significance of bonds that develop between humans and companion animals. It is typical for a pet to be perceived as and treated as a member of the family and as a result, animals provide special and beneficial relationships for many years. It is partly because of this role of the pet in promoting human health and happiness that we as veterinarians have an obligation to assist both owner and animal. The mark of the good practitioner concerns not only the ability to diagnose and treat accurately, but also the ability to show understanding and compassionate judgement.

Weller, R.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of removing of nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas which method comprises contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate complex. The NO absorption efficiency of ferrous urea-dithiocarbamate and ferrous diethanolamine-xanthate as a function of time, oxygen content and solution ph is presented. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Liu, D. Kwok-Keung; Chang, Shih-Ger

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

370

Medical Records for Animals Used in Research, Teaching, and Testing: Public Statement from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Records for Animals Used in Research, Teaching, and Testing: Public Statement from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine ACLAM Medical Records Committee: Karl Field (Chair), Michele. Suckow Abstract Medical records are considered to be a key element of a program of adequate veterinary

Oliver, Douglas L.

371

Biofilter for removal of nitrogen oxides from contaminated gases under aerobic conditions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A biofilter is described for reducing concentrations of gaseous nitrogen oxides in a polluted gas comprises a porous organic filter bed medium disposed in a housing, the filter bed medium including a mixed culture of naturally occurring denitrifying bacteria for converting the nitrogen oxides to nitrogen gas, carbon dioxide, and water. A method is described of reducing concentrations of nitrogen oxides in polluted gas comprises conducting the polluted gas through the biofilter so that the denitrifying bacteria can degrade the nitrogen oxides. A preferred filter medium is wood compost, however composts of other organic materials are functional. Regulation of pH, moisture content, exogenous carbon sources, and temperature are described. 6 figs.

Apel, W.A.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

372

Biofilter for removal of nitrogen oxides from contaminated gases under aerobic conditions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A biofilter for reducing concentrations of gaseous nitrogen oxides in a polluted gas comprises a porous organic filter bed medium disposed in a housing, the filter bed medium including a mixed culture of naturally occurring denitrifying bacteria for converting the nitrogen oxides to nitrogen gas, carbon dioxide, and water. A method of reducing concentrations of nitrogen oxides in polluted gas comprises conducting the polluted gas through the biofilter so that the denitrifying bacteria can degrade the nitrogen oxides. A preferred filter medium is wood compost, however composts of other organic materials are functional. Regulation of pH, moisture content, exogenous carbon sources, and temperature are described.

Apel, William A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 2 Metabolism of Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids inTesticular Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 2 Metabolism of Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids inTesticular Cells Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

374

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 13 Significance of Oxidative Stress and Sperm Chromatin Damagein Male Infertility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 13 Significance of Oxidative Stress and Sperm Chromatin Damagein Male Infertility Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable p

375

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 3 Fatty Acid Remodeling During Sperm Maturation: Variation of Docosahexaenoic Acid Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 3 Fatty Acid Remodeling During Sperm Maturation: Variation of Docosahexaenoic Acid Content Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downl

376

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 9 Regulation of Avian and Mammalian Sperm Production by Dietary Fatty Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 9 Regulation of Avian and Mammalian Sperm Production by Dietary Fatty Acids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

377

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 12 Regulation of Oxytocinase Activity in the Testis by Dietary Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 12 Regulation of Oxytocinase Activity in the Testis by Dietary Lipids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf

378

Male Fertility and Lipid MetabolismChapter 6 Docosahexaenoic Acid-Rich Marine Oils and Improved Reproductive Efficiency in Pigs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male Fertility and Lipid Metabolism Chapter 6 Docosahexaenoic Acid-Rich Marine Oils and Improved Reproductive Efficiency in Pigs Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadabl

379

Development DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF SOIL FERTILITY IMPROVEMENT: A BIOECONOMIC MODEL FOR SENEGAL By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agricultural productivity growth and food security in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), especially in agroecologically fragile regions like the Sahel. At present, low-external-input farming practices are mining SSA’s nutrient-poor soils, which are subjected to continuous cropping and wind and water erosion. Despite evidence that inorganic fertilizers can contribute substantially to sustainable land use and crop production (Mudahar 1986; Padwick 1983;

Bocar N. Diagana; Valerie A. Kelly; Eric W. Crawford

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Methyl-parathion decreases sperm function and fertilization capacity after targeting spermatocytes and maturing spermatozoa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paternal germline exposure to organophosphorous pesticides (OP) has been associated with reproductive failures and adverse effects in the offspring. Methyl parathion (Me-Pa), a worldwide-used OP, has reproductive adverse effects and is genotoxic to sperm. Oxidative damage has been involved in the genotoxic and reproductive effects of OP. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Me-Pa on spermatozoa function and ability to fertilize. Male mice were exposed to Me-Pa (20 mg/kg bw, i.p.) and spermatozoa from epididymis-vas deferens were collected at 7 or 28 days post-treatment (dpt) to assess the effects on maturing spermatozoa and spermatocytes, respectively. DNA damage was evaluated by nick translation (NT-positive cells) and SCSA (percentDFI); lipoperoxidation (LPO) by malondialdehyde production; sperm function by spontaneous- and induced-acrosome reactions (AR); mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by using the JC-1 flurochrome; and, fertilization ability by an in vitro assay and in vivo mating. Results showed alterations in DNA integrity (percentDFI and NT-positive cells) at 7 and 28 dpt, in addition to decreased sperm quality and a decrease in induced-AR; reduced MMP and LPO was observed only at 7 dpt. We found negative correlations between LPO and all sperm alterations. Altered sperm functional parameters were associated with reduced fertilization rates at both times, evaluated either in vitro or in vivo. These results show that Me-Pa exposure of maturing spermatozoa and spermatocytes affects many sperm functional parameters that result in a decreased fertilizing capacity. Oxidative stress seems to be a likely mechanism ofthe detrimental effects of Me-Pa in male germ cells.

Pina-Guzman, Belem; Sanchez-Gutierrez, M.; Marchetti, Francesco; Hernandez-Ochoa, I.; Solis-Heredia, M.J .; Quintanilla-Vega, B.

2009-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nitrogen Deposition onto the United States and Western Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL DAAC Data Set Change Information ORNL DAAC Data Set Change Information Data Set: Nitrogen Deposition onto the United States and Western Europe Effective Date of Revision: May 2, 2005 Data Set Citation: Holland, E. A., B. H. Braswell, J. M. Sulzman, and J. -F. Lamarque. 2005. Nitrogen Deposition onto the United States and Western Europe. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Revision Summary: The investigator advised us that data in two of the deposition files were a factor of 100 too large and the order of the records was reversed from the description in the documentation. NADP_wet_deposition_no3_0.5x0.5_grid_annual.txt NADP_wet_deposition_nh4_0.5x0.5_grid_annual.txt Data File Changes:

382

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Cells vs. Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superconductors! Superconductors! Previous Video (Superconductors!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Oxygen and Fire!) Liquid Oxygen and Fire! Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Let's say you've carelessly dunked your hand into a vat of liquid nitrogen and let it freeze solid. Every movie you've seen where this happens tells you that your hand will shatter like fine china should you bump it into something. If you're extremely careful, will your hand be okay once it thaws out? We'll explore this issue, using flower and onion cells rather than our hands! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: By now, we all know what happens when you place a flower in liquid

383

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL 1909 Pushnik, J.C., R.S. Demaree, J.L.J. Houpis, W.B. Flory, S.M. Bauer, and P.D. Anderson. 1995. The effect of elevated carbon dioxide on a Sierra-Nevadan dominant species: Pinus ponderosa. Journal of Biogeography 22(2-3):249-254. The impact of increasing atmospheric CO2 has not been fully evaluated on western coniferous forest species. Two year old seedlings of Pinus ponderosa were grown in environmentally controlled chambers under increased CO2 conditions (525 mu L L(-1) and 700 mu L L(-1)) for 6 months. These trees exhibited morphological, physiological and biochemical alterations when compared to our controls (350 mu L L(- 1)). Analysis of whole plant biomass distribution has shown no

384

Questions and Answers - Are nitrogen, arsenic, and tantalum radioactive?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How many neutrons can you add to anatom without it getting unbalanced? How many neutrons can you add to an<br>atom without it getting unbalanced? Previous Question (How many neutrons can you add to an atom without it getting unbalanced?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (How long is the life span of an atom?) How long is the life span of an atom? Are nitrogen, arsenic, and tantalum radioactive? The answer is yes and no. Let's see why. When you want to know about elements, you go look in the periodic table. But what you see listed in the periodic table of the elements is only part of the picture. For every element listed, there are different "flavors" called isotopes. All of the elements have at least one isotope that is radioactive. So, we can say that there is such a thing as radioactive nitrogen, arsenic and tantalum. Some

385

Questions and Answers - What's the difference between hydrogen, nitrogen,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Which element has 11 protonsand 12 neutrons? Which element has 11 protons<br>and 12 neutrons? Previous Question (Which element has 11 protons and 12 neutrons?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Does sodium have any isotopes? Is it radioactive?) Does sodium have anyisotopes? Is it radioactive? What's the difference between hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, copper, gold and magnesium? Hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, copper, gold and magnesium all have different physical and chemical properties. You can find descriptions of all of these elements on our Periodic Table of Elements. The single most important difference between these elements is the number of protons each one contains in its nucleus. The number of protons an atom contains dictates how many electrons it will have. It is the arrangement of

386

Method For Selective Catalytic Reduction Of Nitrogen Oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxide compounds (NO.sub.x, defined as nitric oxide, NO, +nitrogen dioxide, NO.sub.2) in a gas by a material comprising a base metal consisting essentially of CuO and Mn, and oxides of Mn, on an activated metal hydrous metal oxide support, such as HMO:Si. A promoter, such as tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide, can be added and has been shown to increase conversion efficiency. This method provides good conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2, good selectivity, good durability, resistance to SO.sub.2 aging and low toxicity compared with methods utilizing vanadia-based catalysts.

Mowery-Evans, Deborah L. (Broomfield, CO); Gardner, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM); McLaughlin, Linda I. (Albuquerque, NM)

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxide compounds (NO.sub.x, defined as nitric oxide, NO, +nitrogen dioxide, NO.sub.2) in a gas by a material comprising a base metal consisting essentially of CuO and Mn, and oxides of Mn, on an activated metal hydrous metal oxide support, such as HMO:Si. A promoter, such as tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide, can be added and has been shown to increase conversion efficiency. This method provides good conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2, good selectivity, good durability, resistance to SO.sub.2 aging and low toxicity compared with methods utilizing vanadia-based catalysts.

Mowery-Evans, Deborah L. (Broomfield, CO); Gardner, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM); McLaughlin, Linda I. (Albuquerque, NM)

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Shock Wave Structure for Argon, Helium, and Nitrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compare the thickness of shock wave fronts at different Mach numbers, modeled via Navier-Stokes (NS) and Quasi-gasdynamic (QGD) equations, with experimental results from the literature. Monoatomic argon and helium, and diatomic nitrogen, are considered. In this modeling a finite-difference scheme with second-order spatial accuracy is employed. For argon the density thickness calculated via QGD and NS models are in good agreement with each other, and with the experimental results. For helium QGD and NS results agree well with those from the bimodal model. For nitrogen, the QGD results are closer to the experimental data than NS results. The QGD-based algorithm converges to the steady state solution faster than the NS-based one.

T. G. Elizarova; I. A. Shirokov; S. Montero

2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

Aromatic nitrogen compounds in fossil fuels: a potential hazard  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To achieve energy independence in the United States, converting coal to oil or extracting oil from shale will be required. Before commercial scale fossil fuel conversion facilities become a reality, chemical and biological studies of currently available synfuel samples derived from coal or shale are urgently needed in order to determine what the potential health problems, such as from occupational exposure, might be. Aromatic nitrogen compounds such as basic aza-arenes, neutral aza-arenes, and aromatic amines are considered environmentally important and several members of these classes of compounds possess biological activity. For example, dibenz(a,h)acridine, 7 H-dibenzo(c,g)carbazole, and 2-naphthylamine, are well known as carcinogens. The methods used to isolate the basic aromatic nitrogen compounds and neutral aza-arenes from one shale oil and one coal-derived oil are discussed. The mutagenic activities of these fractions, based on the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test, are compared.

Ho, C H; Clark, B R; Guerin, M R; Ma, C Y; Rao, T K

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Method for reducing nitrogen oxides in combustion effluents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for reducing nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) in the gas stream from the combustion of fossil fuels is disclosed. In a narrow gas temperature zone, NO.sub.x is converted to nitrogen by reaction with urea or ammonia with negligible remaining ammonia and other reaction pollutants. Specially designed injectors are used to introduce air atomized water droplets containing dissolved urea or ammonia into the gaseous combustion products in a manner that widely disperses the droplets exclusively in the optimum reaction temperature zone. The injector operates in a manner that forms droplet of a size that results in their vaporization exclusively in this optimum NO.sub.x -urea/ammonia reaction temperature zone. Also disclosed is a design of a system to effectively accomplish this injection.

Zauderer, Bert (Merion Station, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic ecosystem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This proposal requests funding for the completion of our current ecological studies at the MS-117 research site at Toolik Lake, Alaska. We have been using a mix of stable and radioisotope techniques to assess the fluxes of carbon and nitrogen within the ecosystem and the implications for long-term carbon storage or loss from the tundra. Several tentative conclusions have emerged from our study including: Tundra in the foothills is no longer accumulating carbon. Surficial radiocarbon abundances show little or no accumulation since 1000--2500 yrs BP. Coastal plain tundra is still accumulating carbon, but the rate of accumulation has dropped in the last few thousand years. Carbon export from watersheds in the Kuparuk and Imnavait Creek drainages are in excess of that expected from estimated primary productivity; and Nitrogen isotope abundances vary between species of plants and along hydrologic gradients.

Schell, D.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic ecosystem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This proposal requests funding for the completion of our current ecological studies at the MS-117 research site at Toolik Lake, Alaska. We have been using a mix of stable and radioisotope techniques to assess the fluxes of carbon and nitrogen within the ecosystem and the implications for long-term carbon storage or loss from the tundra. Several tentative conclusions have emerged from our study including: Tundra in the foothills is no longer accumulating carbon. Surficial radiocarbon abundances show little or no accumulation since 1000--2500 yrs BP. Coastal plain tundra is still accumulating carbon, but the rate of accumulation has dropped in the last few thousand years. Carbon export from watersheds in the Kuparuk and Imnavait Creek drainages are in excess of that expected from estimated primary productivity; and Nitrogen isotope abundances vary between species of plants and along hydrologic gradients.

Schell, D.M.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Development of a rapid and efficient microinjection technique for gene insertion into fertilized salmonid eggs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An efficient one-step injection technique for gene insertion into fertilized rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) eggs is described, and basic parameters affecting egg survival are reported. Freshly fertilized rainbow trout eggs were injected in the perivitelline space with a recombinant mouse metallothionein-genomic bovine growth hormone (bGH) DNA construct using a 30-gauge hypodermic needle and a standard microinjection system. Relative to control, site of injection and DNA concentration did not affect the egg survival, but injections later than 3--4 hours post fertilization were detrimental. The injection technique permitted treatment of 100 eggs/hr with survivals up to 100%, resulting in a 4% DNA uptake rate as indicated by DNA dot blot analysis. Positive dot blot results also indicated that the injected DNA is able to cross the vitelline membrane and persist for 50--60 days post hatching, obviating the need for direct injection into the germinal disk. Results are consistent with previous transgenic fish work, underscoring the usefulness of the technique for generating transgenic trout and salmonids. 24 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Chandler, D.P.; Welt, M.; Leung, F.C.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Corn fiber hulls as a food additive or animal feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a novel animal feed or food additive that may be made from thermochemically hydrolyzed, solvent-extracted corn fiber hulls. The animal feed or food additive may be made, for instance, by thermochemically treating corn fiber hulls to hydrolyze and solubilize the hemicellulose and starch present in the corn fiber hulls to oligosaccharides. The residue may be extracted with a solvent to separate the oil from the corn fiber, leaving a solid residue that may be prepared, for instance by aggolmerating, and sold as a food additive or an animal feed.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IN); Cecava, Michael J. (Decatur, IN); Doane, Perry H. (Decatur, IN)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

395

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Core-Hole Localization Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print Wednesday, 25 February 2009 00:00 The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic molecules in which both atoms are the same element. An international team of scientists from the University of Frankfurt in Germany, Berkeley Lab, Kansas State University, and Auburn University has now resolved the issue with an appropriate twist of quantum fuzziness. By means of coincident detection of the photoelectron ejected from molecular nitrogen and the Auger electron emitted femtoseconds later, the team found that how the measurements are done determines which description-localized or delocalized-is valid.

396

A Very Short Ruthenium(II) - Nitrogen Heterocycle Bond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Very Short Ruthenium(II) - Nitrogen Heterocycle Bond: The Crystal Very Short Ruthenium(II) - Nitrogen Heterocycle Bond: The Crystal Structures of Pentaammine(N-methylpyrazinium)ruthenium(II) Iodide and Pentaammine(N-methylpyrazinium)ruthenium(III) p-Toluenesulfonate Pentahydrate James F. Wishart, Avi Bino and Henry Taube Inorg. Chem. 25, 3318-3321 (1986) Abstract: The crystal structures of [(NH3)5Ru(NC4H4NCH3)] I3 and [(NH3)5Ru(NC4H4NCH3)] (CH3C6H4SO3)4°5H2O have been solved to weighted R factors of 0.053 and 0.083, respectively. For the former structure, the space group is Pmma with a = 10.655(2)Å, b = 7.704(1)Å, c = 21.488(3)Å, and Z = 4. The Ru(II)-N(Mepyz) distance of 1.95(1)Å in this complex is the shortest yet reported for a ruthenium(II) to heteroctclic nitrogen bond. A difference of 0.04(1)Å between the cis (2.122(7)Å and 2.136(8)Å) and

397

Stability Regimes of Turbulent Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Flames  

SciTech Connect

One option for combustion in zero-emission Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants is non-premixed combustion of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen in air. An important aspect to non-premixed combustion is flame stability or anchoring, though only a few fundamental stability studies of these flames have taken place to date. The following paper presents the results of experiments investigating the effects of nitrogen diluent fraction, jet diameter, and exit velocity on the static stability limits of a turbulent hydrogen jet flame issuing from a thin-lipped tube into a quiescent atmosphere. Four different stability limits are observed: detachment from the burner lip, reattachment to the burner lip, transition from a laminar lifted flame base to blowout or to a turbulent lifted flame, and transition from a turbulent lifted flame to blowout. The applicability of existing theories and correlations to the stability results is discussed. These results are an important step in assessing the viability of a non-premixed combustion approach using hydrogen diluted with nitrogen as a fuel.

Weiland, N.T.; Strakey, P.A.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Comparison of five organic wastes regarding their behaviour during composting: Part 2, nitrogen dynamic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aimed to compare household waste, separated pig solids, food waste, pig slaughterhouse sludge and green algae regarding processes ruling nitrogen dynamic during composting. For each waste, three composting simulations were performed in parallel in three similar reactors (300 L), each one under a constant aeration rate. The aeration flows applied were comprised between 100 and 1100 L/h. The initial waste and the compost were characterized through the measurements of their contents in dry matter, total carbon, Kjeldahl and total ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate. Kjeldahl and total ammoniacal nitrogen and nitrite and nitrate were measured in leachates and in condensates too. Ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions were monitored in continue. The cumulated emissions in ammonia and in nitrous oxide were given for each waste and at each aeration rate. The paper focused on process of ammonification and on transformations and transfer of total ammoniacal nitrogen. The parameters of nitrous oxide emissions were not investigated. The removal rate of total Kjeldahl nitrogen was shown being closely tied to the ammonification rate. Ammonification was modelled thanks to the calculation of the ratio of biodegradable carbon to organic nitrogen content of the biodegradable fraction. The wastes were shown to differ significantly regarding their ammonification ability. Nitrogen balances were calculated by subtracting nitrogen losses from nitrogen removed from material. Defaults in nitrogen balances were assumed to correspond to conversion of nitrate even nitrite into molecular nitrogen and then to the previous conversion by nitrification of total ammoniacal nitrogen. The pool of total ammoniacal nitrogen, i.e. total ammoniacal nitrogen initially contained in waste plus total ammoniacal nitrogen released by ammonification, was calculated for each experiment. Then, this pool was used as the referring amount in the calculation of the rates of accumulation, stripping and nitrification of total ammoniacal nitrogen. Separated pig solids were characterised by a high ability to accumulate total ammoniacal nitrogen. Whatever the waste, the striping rate depended mostly on the aeration rate and on the pool concentration in biofilm. The nitrification rate was observed as all the higher as the concentration in total ammoniacal nitrogen in the initial waste was low. Thus, household waste and green algae exhibited the highest nitrification rates. This result could mean that in case of low concentrations in total ammoniacal nitrogen, a nitrifying biomass was already developed and that this biomass consumed it. In contrast, in case of high concentrations, this could traduce some difficulties for nitrifying microorganisms to develop.

Guardia, A. de, E-mail: amaury.de-guardia@cemagref.f [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, F-35000 Rennes (France); Mallard, P.; Teglia, C.; Marin, A.; Le Pape, C.; Launay, M.; Benoist, J.C.; Petiot, C. [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, F-35000 Rennes (France)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Combined Water-Fertilizer Management to Minimize Non-Point Water Pollution While Achieving High Crop Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POLLUTION WHILE ACHIEVING HIGH CROP PRODUCTION JOHN ~ETEYand broccoli relationships and crop yield and nitrogen as amust anticipate Applica- crop nutrient and must be placed in

Letey, John; Jarrell, Wesley M

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Education: Digital Resource Center - VISUALS: Animation of the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 25, 2007 ... This animation of the effect of temperature on conductivity of an n-type semiconductor shows side-by-side diagrams of the band diagram, the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Constraint-based animation: temporal constraints in the Animus systems  

SciTech Connect

Algorithm animation has a growing role in computer-aided algorithm design documentation and debugging, since interactive graphics is a richer channel than text for communication. Most animation is currently done laboriously by hand, and it often has the character of canned demonstrations with restricted user interaction. Animus is a system that allows easy construction of an animation with minimal concern for lower-level graphics programming. Constraints are used to describe the appearance and structure of a picture as well as how those pictures evolve in time. The implementation and support of temporal constraints is a substantive extension to previous constraint languages which had only allowed specification of static state. Use of the Animus system is demonstrated in the creation of animations of dynamic mechanical and electrical-circuit simulations, sorting algorithms, problems in operating systems, and geometric curve-drawing algorithms.

Duisberg, R.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Automated Video Analysis of Animal Movements Using Gabor Orientation Filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Single frame from a video clip, after de-interlacing.median of all frames in the video sequence. c The output of010-9062-1 Automated Video Analysis of Animal Movements

Wagenaar, Daniel A.; Kristan, Wiliam B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Soft body animation in real-time simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a novel approach for creating deformable object animations. A deformable object can be represented as a discrete lattice of particles, and transforming those particles defines a new state for the ...

Sullivan, Mark A., III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Surf's up: the making of an animated documentary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CG animated documentary Surf's Up called for unique production techniques to be leveraged throughout the creation of the film. This half day course presents an in-depth look at several of the key aspects of the production: • Integration ...

Rob Bredow; David Schaub; Daniel Kramer; Matthew Hausman; Danny Dimian; R. Stirling Duguid

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Diachonic DNA Analyses of Animal Breeds and Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the animals they breed and raise for sustenance and secondary products such as traction, milk and wool. Since initial domestication, humans have continued to affect and modify these species until the present day. Although much attention has been paid...

Campana, Michael Gray

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Are Animals Heterozygous...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lymphocytes from animals of known genotypes. Radiation-induced foci occur in a time and dose dependent manner in the nuclei of normal cells, NBS cells on the other hand, do not...

407

Characterizing the transformation and transfer of nitrogen during the aerobic treatment of organic wastes and digestates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonia emissions varied depending on the nature of wastes and the treatment conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen losses resulted from ammonia emissions and nitrification-denitrification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonification can be estimated from biodegradable carbon and carbon/nitrogen ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonification was the main process contributing to N losses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrification rate was negatively correlated to stripping rate of ammonia nitrogen. - Abstract: The transformation and transfer of nitrogen during the aerobic treatment of seven wastes were studied in ventilated air-tight 10-L reactors at 35 Degree-Sign C. Studied wastes included distinct types of organic wastes and their digestates. Ammonia emissions varied depending on the kind of waste and treatment conditions. These emissions accounted for 2-43% of the initial nitrogen. Total nitrogen losses, which resulted mainly from ammonia emissions and nitrification-denitrification, accounted for 1-76% of the initial nitrogen. Ammonification was the main process responsible for nitrogen losses. An equation which allows estimating the ammonification flow of each type of waste according to its biodegradable carbon and carbon/nitrogen ratio was proposed. As a consequence of the lower contribution of storage and leachate rates, stripping and nitrification rates of ammonia nitrogen were negatively correlated. This observation suggests the possibility of promotingnitrification in order to reduce ammonia emissions.

Zeng Yang, E-mail: yang.zeng@irstea.fr [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes Cedex (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, F-35000 Rennes (France); Guardia, Amaury de; Daumoin, Mylene; Benoist, Jean-Claude [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes Cedex (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

ON THE MOVE! The New Jersey Department of Agriculture Division of Animal Health and Animal Health Di-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Health, Environmental, and Agricultural Laboratories (NJPHEAL) facility, located in Ewing, New residues. All Division Staff will now be located at the NJPHEAL. The Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory provides diagnostic services to support disease control programs, health management, and productivity

Delgado, Mauricio

409

Nitrogen and carbon oxides chemistry in the HRS retorting process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HRS Oil Shale Retort process consists of a pyrolysis section which converts kerogen of the shale to liquid and gaseous products, and a combustion section which burns residual carbon on the shale to heat the process. Average gas concentrations of selected gas phase species were determined from data measured at several placed on the combustion system of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hot-Recycled-Solids Retort Pilot Plant for representative rich and lean shale runs. The data was measured on-line and in real time by on-line meters (CO{sub 2}, CO, O{sub 2}), mass spectrometry (CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NO, CH{sub 4}, SO{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and Ar), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O, NO, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and HCN). For both the rich and leans shale runs, the Lift-Pipe Combustor (LFT) exhibited gas concentrations (sampled at the exit of the LFT) indicative of incomplete combustion and oxidation; the Delayed-Fall Combustor (DFC) exhibited gas concentrations (sampled at the annulus and the exit of the DFC) indicative of much more complete combustion and oxidation. The Fluidized-Bed Combustor exhibited gas concentrations which were controlled to a large extent by the injection atmosphere of the FBC. High levels of nitrogen oxides and low levels of CO were detected when full air injection was used, while high levels of CO and low levels of nitrogen-oxides were detected with partial N{sub 2} injection. Sequential sampling limitations and nitrogen balances are also discussed.

Reynolds, J.G.

1993-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

410

Frostbite Theater - Just for Fun - How to Make Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Total Lunar Eclipse of December 21, 2010 The Total Lunar Eclipse of December 21, 2010 Previous Video (The Total Lunar Eclipse of December 21, 2010) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen Viewer Requests!) Liquid Nitrogen Viewer Requests! How to Make Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream What do you do if you need to make ice cream in a hurry? Liquid nitrogen to the rescue! [ Show Transcript ] Steve: Okay! So, We are here at Jefferson Lab and it's about 100 degrees outside and we though "Why not make a little bit of ice cream?" Now, of course we don't have a lot of ice cream on hand, but we do have half-and-half, sugar and vanilla and, since we are at Jefferson Lab where we have a superconductive accelerator, we have lots of liquid nitrogen. So, we're going to make ourselves some liquid nitrogen ice cream. So, Joanna

411

Plant growth is influenced by glutamine synthetase-catalyzed nitrogen metabolism  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ammonia assimilation has been implicated as participating in regulation of nitrogen fixation in free-living bacteria. In fact, these simple organisms utilize an integrated regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism; we except to observe an integration of nitrogen and carbon fixation in plants; how could these complex systems grow efficiently and compete in the ecosystem without coordinating these two crucial activities We have been investigating the role of ammonia assimilation regulating the complex symbiotic nitrogen fixation of legumes. Just as is observed in the simple bacterial systems, perturbation of ammonia assimilation in legumes results in increased overall nitrogen fixation. The perturbed plants have increased growth and total nitrogen fixation capability. Because we have targeted the first enyzme in ammonia assimilation, glutamine synthetase, this provides a marker that could be used to assist selection or screening for increased biomass yield. 45 refs., 4 tabs.

Langston-Unkefer, P.J.

1991-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

412

Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O/sub 2//cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N/sub 2/. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N/sub 2/ at a much quicker rate than unexcited N/sub 2/, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

Chen, H.L.

1981-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

413

Method for the purification of noble gases, nitrogen and hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the purification and collection of hydrogen isotopes in a flowing inert gaseous mixture containing impurities, wherein metal alloy getters having the capability of sorbing non-hydrogen impurities such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ammonia, nitrogen and water vapor are utilized to purify the gaseous mixture of impurities. After purification hydrogen isotopes may be more efficiently collected. A plurality of parallel process lines utilizing metal getter alloys can be used to provide for the continuous purification and collection of the hydrogen isotopes.

Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID); Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tuggle, Dale G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Mass and energy budgets of animals: Behavioral and ecological implications  

SciTech Connect

The common goal of these diverse projects is to understand the mechanisms of how animal populations respond to the continual changes in their environment in both time and space. Our models are mechanistic allowing us to explore how a wide array of environmental variables may determine individual performance. Large scale climate change and its effect on animal populations can be seen as quantitative extensions of biological responses to smaller scales of environmental variability. Changes in developmental rates or reproductive levels of individuals, extension or contraction of geographic ranges, and modification of community organization have all been documented in response to previous changes in habitats. We know from our biophysical work that some changes in function are driven by microclimate conditions directly, and some are mediated indirectly through ecological parameters such as the food supply. Our research is guided by a comprehensive conceptual scheme of the interaction of an animal with its environment. The physical and physiological properties of the organism, and the range of available microclimates, set bounds on the performance of organismal function, such as growth, reproduction, storage, and behavior. To leave the most offspring over a lifetime, animals must perform those functions in a way that maximizes the amount of resources devoted to reproduction. Maximizing the total size of the budget and minimizing those budget items not devoted to reproduction are crucial. Animals trade off among expenditures for current and future reproduction. Both water and energy are important, potentially limiting resources. Projects described here include empirical studies and theoretical models.

Porter, W.P.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Prepulse effect on laser-induced water-window radiation from a liquid nitrogen jet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is schematically shown in Fig. 1. A high-purity nitrogen gas was cooled and liquefied through the cooling stagesPrepulse effect on laser-induced water-window radiation from a liquid nitrogen jet J. Son,a M. Cho.3­4.4 nm x ray from a liquid nitrogen jet. It is observed that a prepulse of only 2 mJ enhances

Kim, Jae-Hoon

416

Reduction of nitrogen oxides with catalytic acid resistant aluminosilicate molecular sieves and ammonia  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Noxious nitrogen oxides in a waste gas stream such as the stack gas from a fossil-fuel-fired power generation plant or other industrial plant off-gas stream is catalytically reduced to elemental nitrogen and/or innocuous nitrogen oxides employing ammonia as reductant in the presence of a zeolite catalyst in the hydrogen or sodium form having pore openings of about 3 to 10 A.

Pence, Dallas T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Thomas R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fissions are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for .sup.239 Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

Caldwell, John T. (Los Alamos, NM); Kunz, Walter E. (Santa Fe, NM); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Genome of Simplest Animal Reveals Ancient  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

21, 2008 21, 2008 Genome of Simplest Animal Reveals Ancient Lineage, Confounding Array of Complex Capabilities WALNUT CREEK, CA-As Aesop said, appearances are deceiving-even in life's tiniest critters. From first detection in the 1880s, clinging to the sides of an aquarium, to its recent characterization by the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), a simple and primitive animal, Trichoplax adhaerens, appears to harbor a far more complex suite of capabilities than meets the eye. The findings, reported in the August 21 online edition of the journal Nature, establish a group of organisms as a branching point of animal evolution and identify sets of genes, or a "parts list," employed by organisms that have evolved along particular branches.

419

DOE Permitting Hydrogen Facilities: Animation of a Telecommunications Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animation of a Telecommunications Site Example Layout Animation of a Telecommunications Site Example Layout The animation below provides an example of a telecommunications site layout that uses hydrogen fuel cells for backup power along with some of the codes and standards that apply to such a site. Roll over each of the colored bars below to reveal individual setback requirements, which identify the mandatory separation distances of the site's various components, or select the "Go to Setback Details" button for a chart that summarizes these requirements as defined by the 2006 International Fire Code. Select the "Construction Approval" button for a detailed list of codes and standards related to the construction of a site, or select the "Operation Approval" button for codes and standards related to ongoing operation and

420

The effects of sulfate fertilization and high levels of sulfate and salt drinking water on the growth and mineral status of ruminants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of sulfate (SO?˛?) in forage and drinking water on the performance and mineral status of cattle and sheep. In Experiment 1, forty-eight late gestation crossbred cows were grazed on twelve 10-acre oat pastures for 112 days (Jan 6 to Apr 28) to determine the effects of oat forage fertilized with ammonium sulfate ((NH?)?SO?) on serum Ca, Mg and P status of cows. Pastures were assigned to either an (NH?)?SO? (400 kg/ha) or ammonium nitrate (NH?NO?, 247 kg\\ha) fertilizer treatment. The forage sulfur (S) concentrations were higher (P water on the performance and mineral status of growing cattle. Twelve crossbred growing cattle were grazed on twelve 1.4-hectare native pastures for 56 d (from Jun 16 to Aug 11). The cattle were given a single source of water: tap water (n=4), SO?˛? water (1139 mg SO?˛?/L, n=4) and SO?˛?/NaCl water (1546mg SO?˛?/L and 3489 mg Na/L, n=4). The average daily gain (ADG) of cattle provided with tap water and SO?˛? water was greater than that of cattle drinking SO?˛?/NaCl water (Pwater sources (P>.05). There was no difference in serum Ca, P, Mg, K and Cu of the cattle due to source of water (P> .05). ne water intake of cattle with different treatments was associated with climatic factors differently. In Experiment 3, nine growing wethers were randomly assigned to an individual pen in the metallic laboratory to determine mineral balance in sheep provided with tap water, SO?˛? watwe or SO?˛?/NaCl water. The periods of the feeding and metabolic trial were 28 d and 12 d, respectively. There were no significant differences for ADG and feed efficiency of animals provided the treatments (P>.05). There was no difference for serum Na, Ca, P, Mg and Zn in sheep among the treatments (P> .05). But serum Cu of the sheep drinking tap water was Feater than that of the sheep drinking SO?˛?/NaCl water (Pwater and SO?˛?/NaCl water did not affect the OM intake, digestibility of OM and NDF, and ADG of sheep during the trial (P>.05).

Xie, Kehe

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nitrogen Removal in Aerobic Granular Sludge SBR: Real?time Control Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with aerobic granules was operated to determine the effect of different DO concentration on biological nitrogen removal for synthetic sewage treatment

Xiangjuan Yuan; Dawen Gao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005). Particulate emissions from construction activities.M. S. , (2000b). In-use emissions from heavy- duty dieseland nitrogen dioxide emissions from gasoline- and diesel-

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Nitrogen Management and the Effects of Compost Tea on Organic Irish Potato and Sweet Corn.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Supply and synchronization of plant-available nitrogen (N) to the soil is a major challenge for organic farmers, especially when growing crops in soils that are… (more)

Stevens, Paul Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Corn and weed interactions with nitrogen in dryland and irrigated environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Corn yield potential is limited by water deficit stress and limited soil nitrogen. Field and greenhouse experiments were conducted near Manhattan, KS in 2005 and… (more)

Ruf, Ella Kathrene

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Annulation strategies for the synthesis of azulenes and polycyclic nitrogen heterocycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly convergent annulation strategies have been developed for the synthesis of azulenes and polycyclic nitrogen heterocycles. Specifically, substituted azulenes have been synthesized via a ring expansion-annulation ...

Crombie, Aimee Lynn, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Nitrogen-Oxygen Battery for Large Scale...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 Frank Delnick, David Ingersoll, Karen Waldrip, Peter Feibelman NitrogenOxygen Battery A Transformational Architecture for Large Scale Energy Storage Power Sources...

427

Changes in Soil Organic Carbon and Nitrogen as a Result of Cultivation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Program Abstract We assembed and analyzed a data base of soil organic carbon and nitrogen information from over 1100 profiles in order to explore factors...

428

Cooperative Effects in the Incorporation of Nitrogen into GaAsN ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study looks to the cooperative reactions between ammonia and alternative nitrogen sources, such as UDMH, TBHy and TBAm. In particular, the cooperative  ...

429

Adsorptive removal of nitrogen from coal-based needle coke feedstocks using activated carbon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A low percentage of nitrogen in needle coke feedstocks is desired for the reduction of puffing during the process of graphitization of needle coke. The… (more)

Madala, Sreeja.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Journey to the East : the re(make) of Chinese animation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis attempts to look at how Chinese animation cinema has evolved over the years and how the Chinese nation is being constructed and contested through animation filmic texts and animation filmmaking practices as ...

Huang, He, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Health Effects of CO2 in Animals of Economic Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CT&S) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in animals of economic importance. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans and selected animals, primarily labor...

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible. 1 figure

Roman, I.C.; Baker, R.W.

1990-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

433

Influence of heavy natural radioactive nuclides introduced in soil with labelled fertilizers and ameliorants on cytogenetic effects in plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of heavy natural radioactive nuclides (STYU, STSTh, SSWRa, S Po, and S Pb) in labeled fertilizers and ameliorants on the number of meiotic chromosome aberrations was studied in field experiments on the major crop plants, wheat, barley and corn. The mining and use of coal and oil and the processing of raw materials in the production of rare and nonferrous metals produce high quantities of wastes with an elevated content of natural radionuclides. One possible way for technogenically altering the natural radiation background of soil is the active utilization of phosphorus fertilizers in agriculture, and also the use, as fertilizers and ameliorants of wastes from nonferrous metallurgy, of the ash from heat and power plants and various intermediates from the chemical industry. The authors conclude that the introduction of labeled ammophos, nitrophos and phosphogypsum, which raised the soil background concentration of the specified elements, produced an increase in the number of cells with meiotic chromosome aberrations.

Arkhipov, N.P.; Bazylev, V.V.; Bobrikova, E.T.; Fevraleva, L.T.; Kal'chenko, VA.; Shevchenko, V.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Goal is to assess technical and economic feasibility for producing fertilizer-grade ammonium sulfate from gypsum produced in limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD). This is the 1st year of a 2-year program among Illinois State Geological Survey, University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign), Allied-Signal, Marketing Chem. Process Inc., Henry Fertilizer, Illinois Power Co., and Central Illinois Public Services. In previous quarter, chemistry and process conditions were reviewed and a reactor system set up and used to conduct laboratory tests. FGD-gypsum from Abbott power plant was used. The scrubber, a Chiyoda Thoroughbred 121 FGD, produced a filter cake (98.36% gypsum and < 0.01% CaSO{sub 3}). Conversion of FGD- gypsum to ammonium sulfate was tested at 60-70{degree}C for 5-6 hr. Yield up to 82% and purity up to 95% were achieved for the ammonium sulfate production. During this quarter, more bench-scale experiments including a mass balance analysis were conducted; a yield up to 83% and up to 99% purity were achieved. A literature survey was completed and a preliminary process flow sheet was developed. Economics of the process is being estimated.

Chou, M.I.M.; Rostam-Abadi, Ml; Lytle, J.M.; Bruinius, J.A.; Li, Y.C. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Urbana, IL (United States); Hoeft, R. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Dewey, S. [AlliedSignal-Chemicals (United States); Achorn, F. [Southeast Marketing Chem. Process INc. (SE-ME) (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

International radiobiology archives of long-term animal studies. I. Descriptions of participating institutions and studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes archived radiobiology animal studies. Information is presented on experimental details, pathology, radioactivity, results, dosimetry, status, and animal type employed.

Gerber, G.B.; Watson, C.R.; Sugahara, T.; Okada, S.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Family Structure, Marital Fertility and Premarital Sex among Married and Never-Married Women in Contemporary China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to Chinese traditions, patrilocal residence is believed to be linked with early and high marital fertility. However, despite the rapid fertility decline and the enormous social and economic changes that have occurred in recent years in China, research still shows that family structure in China is relatively stable compared to western countries. This dissertation investigates the effects of family structure on fertility in contemporary China. This dissertation had two main objectives: first, to examine the effects of family structure on the marital fertility of married women; and second, to better understand the effects of family structure on the premarital fertility by examining the effects of family structure on premarital sex of never-married women. This dissertation utilizes data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey and the Chinese Health and Family Life Survey. Logistic regression model and Cox proportional hazards model are used to to estimate the the effects of family structure on marital fertility and premarital sex. The major finding in this dissertation shows that patrilocal residence has been well preserved in contemporary china. After controlling for relevant factors, co-residence or quasi-coresidence with parents-in-law significantly accelerates the transition from marriage to first birth, and promotes a desire for more children. However, second births are significantly impacted by factors associated with socioeconomic status and family planning policy other than family structure. This dissertation also confirmed the effects of family structure on premarital sex in terms of behavior, but not in terms of attitudes. After controlling for relevant factors, co-residence with parents significantly decreased the odds of engaging in premarital sex.

He, Lei 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

24 Animal, Vegetable, Mineral Did you read chapter 24  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chicken Fat & Marbling in Meat Solid Fat Shortening (Crisco) Solid Fat Butter Solid Fat Margarine Liquid CHEMISTRY Atomic-Level Structure of Complex Materials Determines Properties Animals & Vegetables Fats: Margarine and Olive oil Fats and oils at room temperature ­ What observations can we make? Butter Easy

Hart, Gus

438

Interactive painterly stylization of images, videos and 3D animations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a real-time system that converts images, video, or 3D animation sequences to artistic renderings in various painterly styles. The algorithm, which is entirely executed on the GPU, can efficiently process 512 resolution frames containing ... Keywords: GPU processing, non-photorealistic rendering, painterly rendering, particle systems, video processing

Jingwan Lu; Pedro V. Sander; Adam Finkelstein

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Modeling facial expression of uncertainty in conversational animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building animated conversational agents requires developing a fine-grained analysis of the motions and meanings available to interlocutors in face-to-face conversation and implementing strategies for using these motions and meanings to communicate effectively. ... Keywords: embodied conversational agents, face-to-face conversation, facial displays, uncertainty

Matthew Stone; Insuk Oh

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Self-protecting transistor oscillator for treating animal tissues  

SciTech Connect

A transistor oscillator circuit wherein the load current applied to animal tissue treatment electrodes is fed back to the transistor. Removal of load is sensed to automatically remove feedback and stop oscillations. A thermistor on one treatment electrode senses temperature, and by means of a control circuit controls oscillator transistor current.

Doss, James D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Providing signed content on the Internet by synthesized animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Written information is often of limited accessibility to deaf people who use sign language. The eSign project was undertaken as a response to the need for technologies enabling efficient production and distribution over the Internet of sign language ... Keywords: Animation, HamNoSys, SiGML, avatar, deaf accessibility, scripting, sign language, virtual reality

J. R. Kennaway; J. R. W. Glauert; I. Zwitserlood

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Extended abstract a field computer for animal trackers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field computer system has been developed to gather complex data on amimal behaviour that is observed by expert animal trackers. The system is location aware using the satellite Global Positioning Sytem. The system has been designed to empower semi-literate ... Keywords: context aware, cybertracker, empowerment, location aware, user interface

Edwin H. Blake

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

PINOKY: a ring that animates your plush toys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PINOKY is a wireless ring-like device that can be externally attached to any plush toy as an accessory that animates the toy by moving its limbs. A user is thus able to instantly convert any plush toy into a soft robot. The user can control the toy remotely ... Keywords: interactive plush toy, robots, tangible user interface, ubiquitous computing

Yuta Sugiura; Calista Lee; Masayasu Ogata; Anusha Withana; Yasutoshi Makino; Daisuke Sakamoto; Masahiko Inami; Takeo Igarashi

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Interpreting the visual and cinematic style of Japanese anime using three-dimensional computer graphics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the international popularity of Japanese anime and its recognition as a cinematic art form, creative professionals in the animation industry are impressed with not only the complexity and artistic fluidity of the animation style but also the variety of narrative themes. As an acceptable alternative to live action films, Japanese directors and animators have more liberty with narrative themes and explicit imagery in anime than their western counterparts, and anime is attracting a variety of audiences ranging from young children to adults. As a stylistic form of animation with a distinct line art style, anime is traditionally produced by hand. With the development of non-photorealistic rendering techniques such as toon shading, three-dimensional computer graphics are used in anime production, though with limited application. This thesis attempts to interpret the visual and cinematic style of anime entirely within a three-dimensional digital environment through character design, modeling, character animation, cinematography, and non-photorealistic rendering.

Mistry, Pradeep Champaklal

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Method for combined removal of mercury and nitrogen oxides from off-gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing elemental Hg and nitric oxide simultaneously from a gas stream is provided whereby the gas stream is reacted with gaseous chlorinated compound to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds and the nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide. The method works to remove either mercury or nitrogen oxide in the absence or presence of each other.

Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Downers Grove, IL); Livengood, C. David (Lockport, IL)

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

446

Nitrogenated porous carbon electrodes for supercapacitors Betzaida Batalla Garcia Stephanie L. Candelaria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogenated porous carbon electrodes for supercapacitors Betzaida Batalla Garcia · Stephanie L characterized and tested for supercapacitor applications. From X-ray photo- electron spectroscopy, the nitrogen­5]. An example can be seen in supercapacitors that use an aqueous electrolyte to promote redox reactions [2

Cao, Guozhong

447

Improved Prediction of Nitrogen Oxides Using GRNN with K-Means Clustering and EDA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current study presented a generalized regression neural network (GRNN) based approach to predict nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted from coal-fired boiler. A novel 'multiple' smoothing parameters, which is different from the standard algorithm in which ... Keywords: GRNN, EDA, K-means Clustering, Nitrogen Oxides, Power plants

Ligang Zheng; Shuijun Yu; Wei Wang; Minggao Yu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

TCE degradation by methane-oxidizing cultures grown with various nitrogen sources  

SciTech Connect

Methane-oxidizing microorganisms exhibit great potential for vadose zone bioremediation. This paper reports the effects of supplying nitrogen as nitrate, ammonia, and molecular nitrogen on the growth, trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation capacity, and energy storage capacity of a mixed methane-oxidizing culture. Cells inoculated from a nitrate-supplied methane-oxidizing culture grew fastest while fixing atmospheric nitrogen when oxygen partial pressures were kept less than 8%. Cell growth and methane oxidation were more rapid for ammonia-supplied cells than for nitrate-supplied or nitrogen-fixing cells. However, nitrogen-fixing cells were capable of oxidizing TCE as efficiently as nitrate or ammonia-supplied cells, and they exhibited the highest TCE transformation capacity of all three cultures both with and without formate as an exogenous reducing energy source. The TCE product toxicity was not as pronounced for the nitrogen fixing cells as for the nitrate- or ammonia-supplied cells after exposure to high (20 mg/L) or low (2 mg/L) TCE concentrations. Energy storage in the form of poly-{beta}- hydroxybutyrate was 20% to 30% higher for nitrogen-fixing cells; increased energy storage may be responsible for the higher transformation capacity of nitrogen-fixing cells when no external reducing energy was available. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Chu, K.H.; Alvarez-Cohen, L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Investigation of SPAD meter-based indices for estimating rice nitrogen status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One solution-culture and two field experiments with four rice genotypes were conducted to relate SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter readings to variables reflecting nitrogen (N) status at different developmental stages. We systemically compared differences of ... Keywords: Chlorophyll meter, Leaf, Plant nitrogen diagnosis, Rice

Fen Fang Lin; Le Feng Qiu; Jing Song Deng; Yuan Yuan Shi; Li Su Chen; Ke Wang

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Why and How They are Controlled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Quality EPA 456/F-99-006R Air Quality EPA 456/F-99-006R Environmental Protection Planning and Standards November 1999 Agency Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 Air EPA-456/F-99-006R November 1999 Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Why and How They Are Controlled Prepared by Clean Air Technology Center (MD-12) Information Transfer and Program Integration Division Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711 ii DISCLAIMER This report has been reviewed by the Information Transfer and Program Integration Division of the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and approved for publication. Approval does not signify that the contents of this report reflect the views and policies of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Mention of trade

451

Nitrogen oxide emissions from coal fired MHD plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this topical report, the nitrogen oxide emission issues from a coal fired MHD steam combined cycle power plant are summarized, both from an experimental and theoretical/calculational viewpoint. The concept of staging the coal combustion to minimize NO{sub x} is described. The impact of NO{sub x} control design choices on electrical conductivity and overall plant efficiency are described. The results of the NO{sub x} measurements in over 3,000 hours of coal fired testing are summarized. A chemical kinetics model that was used to model the nooks decomposition is described. Finally, optimum design choices for a low nooks plant are discussed and it is shown that the MHD Steam Coal Fired Combined Cycle Power Plant can be designed to operate with nooks emissions less than 0.05 lbm/MMBTU.

Chapman, J.N. [ed.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic aquatic ecosystem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Phase II studies of the R4D Program on stream and watershed ecology reflect the accomplishments and accumulation of baseline information obtained during the past studies. Although our rough estimates indicate that nitrogen inputs to the watershed ba lance losses, the carbon fluxes suggest that they are not in equilibrium and that there is a net loss of carbon from the tundra ecosystem through respiration and transport out of the watershed via the stream system. Radiocarbon profiles of soil sections coupled with mass transport calculations revealed that peat accumulation has essentially ceased in the R4D watershed and appears to be in ablative loss. Thus the carbon flux measurements provide validation tests for the PLANTGRO and GAS-HYDRO models of the PHASE II studies. These findings are also important in the context of global CO{sub 2} increases from positive feedback mechanisms in peatlands associated with climatic warming in the subarctic regions.

Schell, D.M.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic aquatic ecosystem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Phase II studies of the R4D Program on stream and watershed ecology reflect the accomplishments and accumulation of baseline information obtained during the past studies. Although our rough estimates indicate that nitrogen inputs to the watershed ba lance losses, the carbon fluxes suggest that they are not in equilibrium and that there is a net loss of carbon from the tundra ecosystem through respiration and transport out of the watershed via the stream system. Radiocarbon profiles of soil sections coupled with mass transport calculations revealed that peat accumulation has essentially ceased in the R4D watershed and appears to be in ablative loss. Thus the carbon flux measurements provide validation tests for the PLANTGRO and GAS-HYDRO models of the PHASE II studies. These findings are also important in the context of global CO[sub 2] increases from positive feedback mechanisms in peatlands associated with climatic warming in the subarctic regions.

Schell, D.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Phytoremediation of the Nitrogen-Contaminated Subpile Soil at the Former  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phytoremediation of the Nitrogen-Contaminated Subpile Soil at the Phytoremediation of the Nitrogen-Contaminated Subpile Soil at the Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Monument Valley, Arizona, 2004 Status Report Phytoremediation of the Nitrogen-Contaminated Subpile Soil at the Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Monument Valley, Arizona, 2004 Status Report Phytoremediation of the Nitrogen-Contaminated Subpile Soil at the Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Monument Valley, Arizona, 2004 Status Report Phytoremediation of the Nitrogen-Contaminated Subpile Soil at the Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Monument Valley, Arizona, 2004 Status Report More Documents & Publications Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site EA-1313: Final Environmental Assessment

455

Predicting plant available nitrogen in land-applied biosolids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rate at which biosolids (municipal sewage sludge) may be applied to land is dependent on factors including concentrations of metals, pathogens, toxic organic compounds, and nutrients. Where other properties are not limiting, land application rates are often based on matching crop N needs with the plant available N (PAN). The objectives of this study were to quantify biosolids PAN under field conditions and to propose methods including computer simulation to estimate biosolids PAN in a land application program. Six biosolids were evaluated over a 2-yr period. Laboratory incubations were used to obtain decomposition kinetics. Field studies provided a relationship between inorganic fertilizer N rate and sorghum sudangrass [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] tissue N concentration, which was used to determine biosolids PAN in a Captina silt loam soil. Biosolids PAN released during the field experiment was linearly related to biosolids C/N ratio, organic N, or total N. Computer model predictions of PAN in the field were also linearly related to field estimates of biosolids PAN. Decay series obtained using the computer model, average biosolids decomposition kinetics, and average application site weather were very similar to decay series obtained using the computer model, actual weather, and kinetic data. Either decay series and routine analytical data for biosolids are proposed to estimate PAN for a given situation. Use of the computer model and weather data makes the approach site-specific, while analytical data for a specific biosolids makes the approach biosolids-specific.

Gilmour, J.T.; Skinner, V.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Son preference and fertility in China, South Korea, and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this dissertation is to contribute in three ways to the literature on son preference and fertility through a comparative perspective. First, I examine the impact of son preference on fertility in China and South Korea compared with the United States. The impact that a female birth has on the likelihood of a woman having another birth is of the most concern: Women who have one or two daughter(s) as previous child(ren) are expected to be more likely to experience the hazard of having a second or a third birth. Second, my dissertation attempts to examine the effects of women’s status on son preference if women’s education reduces son preference. Third, my dissertation examines son preference and fertility in the U.S. Even though the U.S. has never shown son preference regarding sex ratios at birth, recent research has shown this association to exist among poor Hispanics. My dissertation used data from a national sample, 2002 National Survey of Family Growth. The results showed that women in China and South Korea who had a daughter instead of a son as their first child had a higher hazard of having a second birth as expected. Moreover, the results showed that the hazard ratio of having a third birth for Chinese and South Korean women was almost four and five times more, respectively. As expected, the hazard ratios for the U.S. were not significant and thus did not support the hypothesis. And the more educated women who had a daughter(s) instead of a son(s) as their previous child(ren) were less likely to have a second birth, but not in the third birth. This means women’s education apparently does not reduce son preference in the case of the third birth. Thus, women’s education apparently has limited or no influence on the childbearing decision where son preference is strong. Third, Hispanic women with low socioeconomic status did not have a significant hazard ratio of having a higher order birth. Accordingly, the dissertation does not find any statistical evidence of American son preference at the national level.

Min, Ho Sik

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Geomicrobiology of nitrogen in a coastal aquifer : isotopic and molecular methods to examine nitrification and denitrification in groundwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excess nitrogen input is deleterious to coastal waters, resulting in deterioration of the water quality, increases in harmful algal blooms and disease in commercial fish stocks. A significant portion of this nitrogen enters ...

Rogers, Daniel Richard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Animation and Multimedia Collection  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a world-class scientific research facility that began operation in 2000, following 10 years of development and onstruction. Hundreds of physicists from around the world use RHIC to study what the universe may have looked like in the first few moments after its creation. RHIC drives two intersecting beams of gold ions head-on, in a subatomic collision. This library of animations and multimedia includes virtual video tours of the RHIC complex, of the spin configuration, and of experiments; documentaries of the science involved; animations of the various kinds of collisions and reactions; event displays; and even interactive Java games about RHIC and RHIC physics.

459

Combining Spatial and Telemetric Features for Learning Animal Movement Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a new graphical model for tracking radio-tagged animals and learning their movement patterns. The model provides a principled way to combine radio telemetry data with an arbitrary set of userdefined, spatial features. We describe an efficient stochastic gradient algorithm for fitting model parameters to data and demonstrate its effectiveness via asymptotic analysis and synthetic experiments. We also apply our model to real datasets, and show that it outperforms the most popular radio telemetry software package used in ecology. We conclude that integration of different data sources under a single statistical framework, coupled with appropriate parameter and state estimation procedures, produces both accurate location estimates and an interpretable statistical model of animal movement.

Kapicioglu, Berk; Wikelski, Martin; Broderick, Tamara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

EFFECTS OF OVERPRESSURES IN GROUP SHELTERS ON ANIMALS AND DUMMIES  

SciTech Connect

S>Relative biological hazards of blast were studied in two types of communal air-raid shelters during Shots 1 and 8. Dogs, restrained within the shelters during detonation, were studied pathologically and clinically for blast injuries. Two anthropometric dummies were test objects for displacement studies utilizing high-speed photography. Physical data included pressure vs time and air-drag determinations. During Shot 1, animals sustained marked blast damages (hemorrhages in lungs and abdominal organs), three dogs were ataxic. and the dummies were rather violently displaced. In Shot 8, however, no significant injuries were found in the animals, and the dummies were minimally displaced. Analysis of the physical data indicated that blast injuries and violent displacements may occur at much lower static overpressures than previously assumed from conventional explosion data. Furthermore, biological damage appeared to be related to the rate of rise of the overpressure and air drag, as well as the maximum overpressure values. (auth)

Roberts, J.E.; White, C.S.; Chiffelle, T.L.

1953-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animals nitrogen fertilization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Water Quality Hydrology of Lands Receiving Farm Animal Wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant pollution potential from cattle manure has developed as a result of the cattle feeding industry progressing to large, high density feeding operations. Two major potential sources of pollution from beef feedlots is storm runoff and solid waste (manure). The objectives of this research were to determine the characteristics of storm runoff from a beef feedlot, to determine the nitrogen transformations and ammonia volatilization from soils receiving large manure applications, to determine the chemical quality of surface runoff and groundwater from plots receiving large manure applications, to evaluate techniques of deep plowing large amounts of manure into the soil, and to determine the crop quality and yields on field plots receiving large manure application rates. Feedlot runoff was found to carry large amounts of chemical elements. The concentrations of chemical elements did not vary with size and intensity of rainstorm as much as by differences in topography of the watersheds. More ammonia was volatilized from limed soil columns than unlimed but an unexplained decrease in total nitrogen of 10 to 20 percent occurred in the unlimed and limed soil columns, respectively. A 30-in. moldboard plowing 30 to 36-in. deep can safely turn under up to 900 tons/acre of manure and not create a major surface water pollution problem. An increase of chemical elements in the groundwater occurred during the first year and then were reduced to initial values during the second year. No N03 pollution of groundwater occurred. Crops can be effectively grown on land receiving up to 900 tons/acre of manure. Peak yields will not be obtained the first year after plowing the 900 tons under, but yields will increase the second and third years.

Reddell, R. D.; Wise, G. G.; Peters, R. E.; Lyerly, P. J.

1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Unique method for liquid nitrogen precooling of a plate fin heat exchanger in a helium refrigeration cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unique method for liquid nitrogen precooling of a plate fin heat exchanger in a helium refrigeration cycle

Weber, T B; Howell, G; Racine, M; Weisend, J G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The Therapeutic Lamp: Treating Small-Animal Phobias  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We all have an irrational fear or two. Some of us get scared by an unexpected visit from a spider in our house; others get nervous when they look down from a high building. Fear is an evolutionary and adaptive function that can promote self-preservation ... Keywords: Animals,Medical treatment,Games,Visualization,Augmented reality,computer graphics,augmented reality,cockroach phobia,spider phobia,arachnophobia,anxiety,anxiety disorders,phobias,phobia therapy,psychological treatment

Maja Wrzesien, Mariano Alcaniz, Cristina Botella, Jean-Marie Burkhardt, Juana Breton-Lopez, Mario Ortega, Daniel Beneito Brotons

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

THE NATURE AND IMPORTANCE OF SELENIUM METABOLITES IN THE ANIMAL  

SciTech Connect

Although the toxicity of selenium has been known for several decades and its essentiality has been established for over one decade, very little is known concerning the organic forms of selenium occurring within animals and their functions. Dimethyl selenide has been shown to be an exhalation product from rats injected with selenate or selenite. Recently trimethylselenonium ion has been shown to be excreted in the urine of rats receiving selenite. The work reported here concerns the biological activity and metabolism of trimethylselenonium ion.

Halverson, A W; Palmer, I S; Whitehead, E I

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Management of lignite fly ash for improving soil fertility and crop productivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignite fly ash (LFA), being alkaline and endowed with excellent pozzolanic properties, a silt loam texture, and plant nutrients, has the potential to improve soil quality and productivity. Long-term field trials with groundnut, maize, and sun hemp were carried out to study the effect of LFA on growth and yield. Before crop I was sown, LFA was applied at various doses with and without press mud (an organic waste from the sugar industry, used as an amendment and source of nutrients). LFA with and without press mud was also applied before crops III and V were cultivated. Chemical fertilizer, along with gypsum, humic acid, and bioferfertilizer, was applied in all treatments, including the control. With one-time and repeat applications of LFA (with and without press mud), yield increased significantly (7.0-89.0%) in relation to the control crop. The press mud enhanced the yield (3.0-15.0%) with different LFA applications. One-time and repeat application of LFA (alone and in combination with press mud) improved soil quality and the nutrient content of the produce. The highest dose of LFA (200 t/ha) with and without press mud showed the best residual effects (eco-friendly increases in the yield of succeeding crops). Some increase in trace- and heavy metal contents and in the level of gamma-emitters in soil and crop produce, but well within permissible limits, was observed. Thus, LFA can be used on a large scale to boost soil fertility and productivity with no adverse effects on the soil or crops, which may solve the problem of bulk disposal of fly ash in an eco-friendly manner.

Ram, L.C.; Srivastava, N.K.; Jha, S.K.; Sinha, A.K.; Masto, R.E.; Selvi, V.A. [Central Fuel Research Institute, Dhanbad (India)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus availability on the expression of the coccolith-vesicle V-ATPase (subunit c) of Pleurochrysis (Haptophyta)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to light, nitrate and availability of inorganic carbon. NewOF NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS AVAILABILITY ON THE EXPRESSION OFbe- tween nutrient availability, principally nitrogen and

Corstjens, PLAM; Gonzalez, Elma L

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Determination of the forms of nitrogen released in coal tar during rapid devolatilization  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this work is determined the forms of nitrogen in coal that lead to nitrogen release during devolatilization. Experiments are to be performed in two existing laminar flow reactors available at Brigham Young University, which are both capable of temperatures (up to 2000 K), particle heating rates (10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5} K/s), and residence times (up to 500 ms) relevant to conditions commonly encountered in industrial pulverized coal combustors. the forms of nitrogen in coal, char, and tar samples will be analyzed using state-of-the-art techniques, including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and high resolution nitrogen-specific chromatography. These sophisticated analysis techniques will be preformed in collaboration with other research at BYU, the University of Utah, and industrial organizations. Coals will be obtained as a function of rank, including eight coals from the University of Utah that are to be used in pilot scale tests in support of the DOE Coal-2000 HiPPS (high Performance Power Systems) and LEBS (Low-Emission Boiler Systems) program. Anticipated results from the proposed research will be (a) nitrogen release parameters during devolatilization for specific coals pertinent to the HiPPS and LEBS projects, (b) better fundamental understanding of the chemistry of nitrogen release, and (c) a nitrogen release submodel based on fundamental chemistry that may be more widely applicable than existing empirical relationships.

Fletcher, T.H.

1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

Influence of nitrogen background pressure on structure of niobium nitride films grown by pulsed laser deposition  

SciTech Connect

Depositions of niobium nitride thin films on Nb using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with different nitrogen background pressures (10.7 to 66.7 Pa) have been performed. The effect of nitrogen pressure on NbN formation in this process was examined. The deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Hexagonal {beta}-Nb{sub 2}N and cubic {delta}-NbN phases resulted when growth was performed in low nitrogen background pressures. With an increase in nitrogen pressure, NbN films grew in single hexagonal {beta}-Nb{sub 2}N phase. The formation of the hexagonal texture during the film growth was studied. The c/a ratio of the hexagonal {beta}-Nb{sub 2}N unit cell parameter increases with increasing nitrogen pressure. Furthermore, the N:Nb ratio has a strong influence on the lattice parameter of the {delta}-NbN, where the highest value was achieved for this ratio was 1.19. It was found that increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to change in the phase structure of the NbN film. With increasing nitrogen pressure, the film structure changes from hexagonal to a mixed phase and then back to a hexagonal phase.

Ashraf H. Farha, Ali O. Er, Yüksel Ufuktepe, Ganapati Myneni, Hani E. Elsayed-Ali

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Variation in foliar 15N abundance and the availability of soil nitrogen on Walker Branch Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial patterns in natural {sup 15}N abundance ({sup o}{sup 15}N) in soil, soil solutions, and non-N{sub 2}-fixing plants were studied in the deciduous forest on Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values are related to the availability of inorganic nitrogen in mineral soil. Soils collected in or near valley bottoms on the watershed had higher levels of net nitrogen mineralization and net nitrification potential than those sampled from ridges and slopes. More positive foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values occurred in valley bottoms, which, relative to other positions on the watershed, were characterized by greater availability of soil nitrogen and lower C-to-N ratios in the O{sub i}-horizon, in the surface mineral soil, and in autumn leaf fall. Although leaf nitrogen concentrations changed significantly over the course of the growing season, there was little seasonal variation in foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values. A hypothesis about the relative importance of different sources of nitrogen to the forest and how nitrogen cycling varies with topography in this nitrogen-deficient ecosystem was derived, in part, from spatial patterns in natural {sup 15}N abundance. There appear to be two processes affecting the topographic patterns in foliar {sup 15}N abundance on this watershed: (1) greater uptake from isotopically heavy pools of inorganic soil nitrogen by plants in valley bottoms, and (2) uptake of isotopically light ammonium-N in atmospheric deposition by plants on ridges and slopes (where the availability of inorganic soil nitrogen to plant roots is more limited). Results from this study indicate that foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values are positively correlated with net nitrification potential in surface soil.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Impact on Grain Quality Parameters when Nitrogen Is `Sensor Applied' by the `Hydro Precise System'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yield and grain quality maps have been produced at full-scale field trials within a 10.5 ha field for four different nitrogen strategies. Grain samples have been collected directly from the grain flow of a combine harvester and analysed for quality in the laboratory and merged with the yield meter registrations. Within the field great variance was observed in yield and grain quality. This paper evaluates the impact on yield and grain quality -- protein when nitrogen is sensor applied by the Hydro-Precise N-Sensor system. The results are discussed in terms of a potential new precision nitrogen application strategy for Danish winter wheat

R.N. Jřrgensen; R. N. Jřrgensen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Indriect Measurement Of Nitrogen In A Mult-Component Natural Gas By Heating The Gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of indirectly measuring the nitrogen concentration in a natural gas by heating the gas. In two embodiments, the heating energy is correlated to the speed of sound in the gas, the diluent concentrations in the gas, and constant values, resulting in a model equation. Regression analysis is used to calculate the constant values, which can then be substituted into the model equation. If the diluent concentrations other than nitrogen (typically carbon dioxide) are known, the model equation can be solved for the nitrogen concentration.

Morrow, Thomas B. (San Antonio, TX); Behring, II, Kendricks A. (Torrance, CA)

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

472

Vehicle Technologies Office: 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-D Animation Shows 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates on AddThis.com... 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates

473

Thermal signature reduction through liquid nitrogen and water injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The protection of aircraft against shoulder fired heat seeking missiles is of growing concern in the aviation community. This thesis presents a simple method for shielding the infrared signature of a jet engine from heat seeking missiles. The research efforts investigated two approaches to shield the thermal signature of the Noel Penny Type 401 turbojet at the Texas A&M University Propulsion Lab Test Cell. First, liquid nitrogen was injected through a manifold at a flow rate equivalent to the flow rate of exhaust gases, producing a small temperature reduction in the exhaust but no infrared shielding. Second, water was injected at a flow rate of 13% of the flow of exhaust gases, producing a greater temperature reduction and some shielding. Water was then injected through a manifold at a ?ow rate of 118% of the flow rate of exhaust gases, producing a substantial reduction in temperature and complete shielding of the infrared signature. Additionally, numerical simulations were performed using FLUENT to support these experiments. Results are presented in the form of thermocouple data and thermal images from the experiments, and in the form of temperature contours and streamtraces from the simulations.

Guarnieri, Jason Antonio

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Nitrogen oxides emission control through reburning with biomass in coal-fired power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxides of nitrogen from coal-fired power stations are considered to be major pollutants, and there is increasing concern for regulating air quality and offsetting the emissions generated from the use of energy. Reburning is an in-furnace, combustion control technology for NOx reduction. Another environmental issue that needs to be addressed is the rapidly growing feedlot industry in the United States. The production of biomass from one or more animal species is in excess of what can safely be applied to farmland in accordance with nutrient management plans and stockpiled waste poses economic and environmental liabilities. In the present study, the feasibility of using biomass as a reburn fuel in existing coal-fired power plants is considered. It is expected to utilize biomass as a low-cost, substitute fuel and an agent to control emission. The successful development of this technology will create environment-friendly, low cost fuel source for the power industry, provide means for an alternate method of disposal of biomass, and generate a possible revenue source for feedlot operators. In the present study, the effect of coal, cattle manure or feedlot biomass, and blends of biomass with coal on the ability to reduce NOx were investigated in the Texas A&M University 29.31 kW (100,000 Btu/h) reburning facility. The facility used a mixture of propane and ammonia to generate the 600 ppm NOx in the primary zone. The reburn fuel was injected using air. The stoichiometry tested were 1.00 to 1.20 in the reburn zone. Two types of injectors, circular jet and fan spray injectors, which produce different types of mixing within the reburn zone, were studied to find their effect on NOx emissions reduction. The flat spray injector performed better in all cases. With the injection of biomass as reburn fuel with circular jet injector the maximum NOx reduction was 29.9 % and with flat spray injector was 62.2 %. The mixing time was estimated in model set up as 936 and 407 ms. The maximum NOx reduction observed with coal was 14.4 % and with biomass it was 62.2 % and the reduction with blends lay between that of coal and biomass.

Arumugam, Senthilvasan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Methane recovery from animal manures: A current opportunities casebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Casebook examines some of the current opportunities for the recovery of methane from the anaerobic digestion of animal manures US livestock operations currently employ four types of anaerobic digester technology: Slurry, plug flow, complete mix, and covered lagoon. An introduction to the engineering economies of these technologies is provided, and possible end-use applications for the methane gas generated by the digestion process are discussed. The economic evaluations are based on engineering studies of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Regression models, which can be used to estimate digester cost and internal rate of return, are developed from the evaluations.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

A Folk Tale of a Man Who Saves Three Animals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sman shad folk tale.WAV Length of track 00:17:16 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Title of track A Folk Tale of a Man Who Saves Three Animals Translation of title Description (to be used in archive entry... sgrol ma Date of recording November 17th 2009. Place of recording Ra'i kha , Mda’ ma Township, Sde dge County, Dkar mdzes Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province, China. Name(s), age, sex, place of birth of performer(s) Dben zen, born...

Zla ba sgrol ma

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

477

RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY USING BIOMASS FROM DAIRY AND BEEF ANIMAL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT The Texas Panhandle is regarded as the â??Cattle Feeding Capital of the Worldâ?ť, producing 42% of the fed beef cattle in the United States within a 200-mile radius of Amarillo generating more than 5 million tons of feedlot manure /year. Apart from feedlots, the Bosque River Region in Erath County, just north of Waco, Texas with about 110,000 dairy cattle in over 250 dairies, produces 1.8 million tons of manure biomass (excreted plus bedding) per year. While the feedlot manure has been used extensively for irrigated and dry land crop production, most dairies, as well as other concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOâ??s), the dairy farms utilize large lagoon areas to store wet animal biomass. Water runoff from these lagoons has been held responsible for the increased concentration of phosphorus and other contaminates in the Bosque River which drains into Lake Wacoâ??the primary source of potable water for Wacoâ??s 108,500 people. The concentrated animal feeding operations may lead to land, water, and air pollution if waste handling systems and storage and treatment structures are not properly managed. Manure-based biomass (MBB) has the potential to be a source of green energy at large coal-fired power plants and on smaller-scale combustion systems at or near confined animal feeding operations. Although MBB particularly cattle biomass (CB) is a low quality fuel with an inferior heat value compared to coal and other fossil fuels, the concentration of it at large animal feeding operations can make it a viable source of fuel. The overall objective of this interdisciplinary proposal is to develop environmentally benign technologies to convert low-value inventories of dairy and beef cattle biomass into renewable energy. Current research expands the suite of technologies by which cattle biomass (CB: manure, and premature mortalities) could serve as a renewable alternative to fossil fuel. The work falls into two broad categories of research and development. Category 1 â?? Renewable Energy Conversion. This category addressed mostly in volume I involves developing. Thermo-chemical conversion technologies including cofiring with coal, reburn to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO, N2O, NOx, etc.) and Hg emissions and gasification to produce low-BTU gas for on-site power production in order to extract energy from waste streams or renewable resources. Category 2 â?? Biomass Resource Technology. This category, addressed mostly in Volume II, deals with the efficient and cost-effective use of CB as a renewable energy source (e.g. through and via aqueous-phase, anaerobic digestion or biological gasification). The investigators formed an industrial advisory panel consisting fuel producers (feedlots and dairy farms) and fuel users (utilities), periodically met with them, and presented the research results; apart from serving as dissemination forum, the PIs used their critique to red-direct the research within the scope of the tasks. The final report for the 5 to 7 year project performed by an interdisciplinary team of 9 professors is arranged in three volumes: Vol. I (edited by Kalyan Annamalai) addressing thermo-chemical conversion and direct combustion under Category 1 and Vol. II and Vol. III ( edited by J M Sweeten) addressing biomass resource Technology under Category 2. Various tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume I were performed by the Department of Mechanical Engineering (a part of TEES; see Volume I), while other tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume II and IIII were conducted by Texas AgriLife Research at Amarillo; the TAMU Biological & Agricultural Engineering Department (BAEN) College Station; and West Texas A&M University (WTAMU) (Volumes II and III). The three volume report covers the following results: fuel properties of low ash and high ash CB (particularly DB) and MB (mortality biomass and coals, non-intrusive visible infrared (NVIR) spectroscopy techniques for ash determination, dairy energy use surveys at 14 dairies in Texas and Califor

John M. Sweeten, Kalyan Annamalai Brent Auvermann Saqib Mukhtar Sergio C. Capareda Cady Engler Wyatte Harman J.N. Reddy, Robert DeOtte David B. Parker Dr. B.A. Stewart

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

478

RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY USING BIOMASS FROM DAIRY AND BEEF ANIMAL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

The Texas Panhandle is regarded as the 'Cattle Feeding Capital of the World', producing 42% of the fed beef cattle in the United States within a 200-mile radius of Amarillo generating more than 5 million tons of feedlot manure/year. Apart from feedlots, the Bosque River Region in Erath County, just north of Waco, Texas with about 110,000 dairy cattle in over 250 dairies, produces 1.8 million tons of manure biomass (excreted plus bedding) per year. While the feedlot manure has been used extensively for irrigated and dry land crop production, most dairies, as well as other concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO's), the dairy farms utilize large lagoon areas to store wet animal biomass. Water runoff from these lagoons has been held responsible for the increased concentration of phosphorus and other contaminates in the Bosque River which drains into Lake Waco - the primary source of potable water for Waco's 108,500 people. The concentrated animal feeding operations may lead to land, water, and air pollution if waste handling systems and storage and treatment structures are not properly managed. Manure-based biomass (MBB) has the potential to be a source of green energy at large coal-fired power plants and on smaller-scale combustion systems at or near confined animal feeding operations. Although MBB particularly cattle biomass (CB) is a low quality fuel with an inferior heat value compared to coal and other fossil fuels, the concentration of it at large animal feeding operations can make it a viable source of fuel. The overall objective of this interdisciplinary proposal is to develop environmentally benign technologies to convert low-value inventories of dairy and beef cattle biomass into renewable energy. Current research expands the suite of technologies by which cattle biomass (CB: manure, and premature mortalities) could serve as a renewable alternative to fossil fuel. The work falls into two broad categories of research and development. Category 1 - Renewable Energy Conversion. This category addressed mostly in volume I involves developing. Thermo-chemical conversion technologies including cofiring with coal, reburn to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO, N2O, NOx, etc.) and Hg emissions and gasification to produce low-BTU gas for on-site power production in order to extract energy from waste streams or renewable resources. Category 2 - Biomass Resource Technology. This category, addressed mostly in Volume II, deals with the efficient and cost-effective use of CB as a renewable energy source (e.g. through and via aqueous-phase, anaerobic digestion or biological gasification). The investigators formed an industrial advisory panel consisting fuel producers (feedlots and dairy farms) and fuel users (utilities), periodically met with them, and presented the research results; apart from serving as dissemination forum, the PIs used their critique to red-direct the research within the scope of the tasks. The final report for the 5 to 7 year project performed by an interdisciplinary team of 9 professors is arranged in three volumes: Vol. I (edited by Kalyan Annamalai) addressing thermo-chemical conversion and direct combustion under Category 1 and Vol. II and Vol. III ( edited by J M Sweeten) addressing biomass resource Technology under Category 2. Various tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume I were performed by the Department of Mechanical Engineering (a part of TEES; see Volume I), while other tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume II and IIII were conducted by Texas AgriLife Research at Amarillo; the TAMU Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department (BAEN) College Station; and West Texas A and M University (WTAMU) (Volumes II and III). The three volume report covers the following results: fuel properties of low ash and high ash CB (particularly DB) and MB (mortality biomass) and coals, non-intrusive visible infrared (NVIR) spectroscopy techniques for ash determination, dairy energy use surveys at 14 dairies in Texas and California, cofiring of low quality CB with high quality coal, emission results and ash fouling beh

Kalyan Annamalai, John M. Sweeten, Brent W. Auvermann, Saqib Mukhtar, Sergio Caperada Cady R. Engler, Wyatte Harman Reddy JN Robert Deotte

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

479

RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY USING BIOMASS FROM DAIRY AND BEEF ANIMAL PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Texas Panhandle is regarded as the �Cattle Feeding Capital of the World�, producing 42% of the fed beef cattle in the United States within a 200-mile radius of Amarillo generating more than 5 million tons of feedlot manure /year. Apart from feedlots, the Bosque River Region in Erath County, just north of Waco, Texas with about 110,000 dairy cattle in over 250 dairies, produces 1.8 million tons of manure biomass (excreted plus bedding) per year. While the feedlot manure has been used extensively for irrigated and dry land crop production, most dairies, as well as other concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO�s), the dairy farms utilize large lagoon areas to store wet animal biomass. Water runoff from these lagoons has been held responsible for the increased concentration of phosphorus and other contaminates in the Bosque River which drains into Lake Waco�the primary source of potable water for Waco�s 108,500 people. The concentrated animal feeding operations may lead to land, water, and air pollution if waste handling systems and storage and treatment structures are not properly managed. Manure-based biomass (MBB) has the potential to be a source of green energy at large coal-fired power plants and on smaller-scale combustion systems at or near confined animal feeding operations.