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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Diachonic DNA Analyses of Animal Breeds and Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the animals they breed and raise for sustenance and secondary products such as traction, milk and wool. Since initial domestication, humans have continued to affect and modify these species until the present day. Although much attention has been paid...

Campana, Michael Gray

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

Inhabiting the hillside : projections, process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is an exploration of form in three projections for inhabiting the hill side. Each projection encompasses a different approach or focus. The first, in Chelsea, Massachusetts, is within an urban context; the ...

Giamportone, Keith F

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Respiratory and Reproductive Characteristics of Eastern Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin B. P. Staub, W. A. Hopkins, J. Novak, J. D. Congdon Savannah River 2002/Accepted: 29 March 2002 Abstract. Coal fly ash and effluent from coal ash settling basins viable populations in areas contaminated by coal ash. While eastern mosquitofish are present

Hopkins, William A.

4

Sulfur determination in blood from inhabitants of Brazil using neutron activation analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the NAA technique was applied to analyze sulfur in blood from inhabitants of Brazil for the proposition of an indicative interval. The measurements were performed considering lifestyle factors (non-smokers, non-drinkers and no history of toxicological exposure) of Brazilian inhabitants. The influence of gender was also investigated considering several age ranges (18-29, 30-39, 40-49, >50 years). These data are useful in clinical investigations, to identify or prevent diseases caused by inadequate sulfur ingestion and for nutritional evaluation of Brazilian population.

Oliveira, Laura C.; Zamboni, Cibele B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP) Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

5

Perceptual Modeling for Behavioral Animation of Fishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The realistic animation of animal behavior by autonomous animate agents requires that the agents able to perceive their virtual worlds. We have created a virtual marine world inhabited by artificial fishes which can swim hydrodynamically in simulated water through the motor control of internal muscles. Artificial fishes exploit a rudimentary model of fish perception. Complex individual and group behaviors, including target tracking, obstacle avoidance, feeding, preying, schooling, and mating, result from the interplay between the internal cognitive state of the artificial fish and its perception of the external world. 1 Introduction Considerable research has focused on the computer animation of animals, such as insects, reptiles, birds, horses, and humans. 1 Unlike their natural counterparts, the earliest graphics models of animals had no autonomy and their motions had to be laboriously keyframed like animated cartoons. Subsequently, researchers developed kinematic and then dynamic...

Xiaoyuan Tu; Demetri Terzopoulos

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Animal vision  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animal vision Name: the outlaw Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Do cats see in black and white? What animals see in color? Replies: Yes, cats can see color; in...

7

Animating explosions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce techniques for animating explosions and their effects. The primary effect of an explosion is a disturbance that causes a shock wave to propagate through the surrounding medium. The disturbance determines the behavior of nearly ... Keywords: animation, atmospheric effects, computational fluid dynamics, natural phenomena, physically based animation

Gary D. Yngve; James F. O'Brien; Jessica K. Hodgins

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

animated gif  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2) Click on the optomized tab to 'optimize' the image. (I don't know if you really need to do this.). b) Show the animation palette, if not already there. ...

9

Animal Noise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why do animals make sounds, are they trying to talk to us? Replies: You bet. When the dog barks loud and nasty, he's trying to tell you to stay out of his yard, and when he...

10

Exotic Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exotic Animals Exotic Animals Nature Bulletin No. 440-A January 15, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation EXOTIC ANIMALS When people settle in a new land they always bring to it plants and animals that are strangers there. The early colonists in North America brought the seeds of grains, grasses, clovers, garden crops and flowers they grew in Europe. They brought horses, cattle, sheep, goats, swine, poultry, cats and dogs. They brought honeybees because there were none here. Unfortunately, mixed with their seeds or in forage for their animals, they brought the seeds of many pesky weeds. As stowaways, they brought rats, mice and injurious insects. The colonists found a continent teeming with a great abundance and variety of wildlife, including billions of wild pigeons, ducks, geese and turkeys, but they brought their own domesticated kinds, including turkeys which had been introduced into Europe from Mexico by the Spaniards. It is a curious fact that our only domestic animal native to North America is this noble bird.

11

Nocturnal Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nocturnal Animals Nocturnal Animals Nature Bulletin No. 151 April 17, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation NOCTURNAL ANIMALS When the sun goes down and dusk steals over the land, the animals of the day grow drowsy and seek some sheltered spot to await another dawn. Birds slip quietly to their nests or favorite roosts. The chattering squirrel curls up in his hollow tree or a summer nest of leaves. Butterflies fold their wings and bees creep into their quiet hives. Bats and whip-poor-wills and nighthawks zigzag expertly through the air to feast on flying insects. Then darkness comes. Then the land becomes alive again as the animals of the night take over -- the hunted and the hunters. The cottontail rabbits come out to play and gorge themselves on fresh young clover and tender grass -- welcome food after nibbling all winter on the bark of hawthorn, willow, sumac and wild rose. Millions of mice scurry about. Muskrats emerge from the underwater entrances to their lodges and bank tunnels to swim and splash as they feed on tender shoots of cattails and sedges. Wild ducks and some of the shore birds feed regularly at night.

12

Moss Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moss Animals Moss Animals Nature Bulletin No. 138 January 17, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation MOSS ANIMALS Last summer, several visitors in the forest preserves were puzzled by finding masses of jelly-like substance stuck to sunken sticks in certain ponds and lakes. These masses were usually round or egg-shaped, ranging in size from that of a tennis ball to that of a football. On the outside they were covered by a grayish scum with faint lines in a coarse design. Inside there was apparently nothing but a clear colorless jelly that quivered and shook like a well-chilled gelatin dessert. One man guessed that it was some sort of garbage; another, reasonably, that it was some strange plant growth.

13

Cave Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cave Animals Cave Animals Nature Bulletin No. 95 December 14, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation CAVE ANIMALS Our Senior Naturalist, with a group of scientists exploring one of the big limestone quarries southwest of Chicago, found several dozen strange animals where a small underground stream pours from a seam in the rock wall. They were nearly an inch long, slender, with legs on both ends and snow white. That was a rare discovery because they were Blind Amphipods -- small members of the crayfish family that live their entire lives in secret subterranean waters. A large part of the United States is underlain by limestone, sometimes hundreds of feet thick, often close to the surface as it is here. Surface water gradually seeps down through crevices in this limestone and along horizontal seams, dissolving the rock to form channels that grow larger and larger. As the centuries pass, these form underground rivers and the caves so common in some parts of this country.

14

Going Forth and Multiplying: Animal Acclimatization and Invasion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nineteenth century saw numerous transfers and attempted transfers of animal populations, mostly as the result of the spread of European agriculture. The exchange of animal populations facilitated by the acclimatization ...

Ritvo, Harriet

15

Animal Hibernation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hibernation Hibernation Nature Bulletin No. 44 December 8, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation ANIMAL HIBERNATION Many animals in this northern region go into a winter sleep, called "hibernation". They usually retire to some place where they do not actually freeze, or where they at least are protected from zero temperatures. Birds do not hibernate but most species migrate to warmer regions Fish to not hibernate but withdraw to deeper waters and their body processes slow down to the point where tbeir food and oxygen requirements are a tiny fraction of the needs during summer months Aquatic insects do not hibernate. Most land insects die, leaving behind them their descendants in the egg, larva or pupa stages. Some insects, though, as for instance certain species of mosquito, hibernate in basements, cisterns and such protected places.

16

Animal Noses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Noses Noses Nature Bulletin No. 729 October 26, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor ANIMAL NOSES "Of all the animals, man has the poorest nose; he has virtually lost the sense of smell". Like so many general statements, that remark by Ernest Thompson Seton, the great naturalist, artist and storyteller, should be taken with a grain of salt. Seton was speaking of mammals only. Modern man does have a sense of smell and in some individuals, such as wine tasters, coffee tasters and perfumers, it is highly developed but, in general, his nose is far inferior to the smellers of other mammals. Nearly all of them have noses which provide the most acute and discriminating of the five senses: smell, sight, hearing, touch and taste. Among the few exceptions are the toothed whales, believed to have no sense of smell at all.

17

Animal Hands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hands Hands Nature Bulletin No. 611 October 1, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist ANIMAL HANDS Muddy footprints shaped like babies' hands can be seen on almost every trash barrel in our forest preserve picnic areas. These are made by raccoons which come at night to eat discarded sandwiches, chicken bones and other food scraps. The hind feet as well as the front feet of the coon are built like hands and that its front foot, especially in mud or soft snow, leaves a print of the palm with four spread fingers and a thumb. The track of the hind foot is longer with a definite heal. The coon feels for fish, crawfish, frogs and snails along the water's edge, scrubbing each thoroughly before eating. Full of curiosity and mischief, a pet coon quickly learns to unlatch doors, play with small objects and pick people's pockets.

18

Animal carcinogen testing challenged  

SciTech Connect

The past 15 years have seen a long list of man-made chemicals indicated as potential human carcinogens. Now, a prominent cancer researcher says that the risks of those chemicals have been overestimated partly because of a serious design flaw in the animal tests used to assess their carcinogenicity. The researcher, Bruce Ames of the University of California, Berkeley, has become well known for his views that many of the newsmaking carcinogens pose little risk to the general human population. He also argues that current policies for testing and regulating carcinogens, which emphasize synthetic chemicals, are misdirected. In animal tests the chemicals are usually administered in the maximum tolerated doses (MTDs), which are the highest doses that can be given without causing severe weight loss or other life-threatening signs of toxicity. Even though these levels are much higher than the doses to which people are likely to be exposed, MTDs are used to cut down on the number of animals- and thus the cost-required to obtain statistically significant results. Although the MTDs don't cause overt signs of toxicity, they can still have more subtle toxic effects, however, and that is what Ames thinks accounts for the large number of compounds that test positive for carcinogenicity.

Marx, J.

1990-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

19

AnimationStyle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the animation forward, then backwards, then forwards again, ad infinitum. Description. This class describes different ways of running animations of ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

20

SNAP Animation Gallery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MULTIMEDIA GALLERY PRESENTATIONS RELATED LINKS Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Animations Below are computer generated animations of what the SNAP satellite might look like,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Plants & Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plant and animal monitoring is performed to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain. April 12, 2012 A rabbit on LANL land. A rabbit on LANL land. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We sample many plants and animals, including wild and domestic crops, game animals, fish, and food products from animals, as well as other plants and animals not considered food sources. What plants and animals do we monitor? LANL monitors both edible and non-edible plants and animals to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain, or to find contaminants that indicate they are being moved in the

22

Color Blind Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blind Animals Name: Hillary Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Are dogs and cats colorblind? If so what is the percentage? Are all animals color blind? Replies: yes,...

23

Animal Testing Medical Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Animal Testing In Medical Research Past, present and future. Marte Thomassen Ellen Trolid Tonje Arondsen Marit Gystøl #12;ZO-8091 Forsøksdyrlære Animal experiments in medical research NTNU ­ Norges ................................................................................................................................................ 9 7. THE FUTURE OF ANIMALS IN MEDICAL RESEARCH.21

Bech, Claus

24

Trainable videorealistic speech animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe how to create with machine learning techniques a generative, speech animation module. A human subject is first recorded using a videocamera as he/she utters a predetermined speech corpus. After processing the corpus automatically, a visual ... Keywords: facial animation, facial modeling, lip synchronization, morphing, optical flow, speech synthesis

Tony Ezzat; Gadi Geiger; Tomaso Poggio

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Plant and Animal Immigrants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Animal Immigrants and Animal Immigrants Nature Bulletin No. 43 December 1, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation PLANT AND ANIMAL IMMIGRANTS When foreign plants and animals are brought to a new country they either become naturalized and thrive, or they cling to their old ways and die out. after they, too, find new freedoms because they leave their enemies, competitors, parasites, and some of their diseases behind them -- much as immigrant people do. The United States now supports about 300 times as many people as it did when Columbus discovered America. This is possible because the domesticated plants and animals that the early settlers brought with them give much higher yields of food and clothing than the Indians got from wild ones.

26

Land animal sizes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land animal sizes Name: tamar c Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: Why are today's land mammals so much smaller than prehistoric mammals?...

27

Senses of Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Animals Name: saravanan Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I read that fishes can figure out taste through their fins and tail,so are insects through their legs,...

28

Facial modeling and animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this course we present an overview of the concepts and current techniques in facial modeling and animation. We introduce this research area by its history and applications. As a necessary prerequisite for facial modeling, data acquisition is discussed ...

Jrg Haber; Demetri Terzopoulos

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Electrochromic Glazings: Animation Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glazings Glazings Animation Simulation Parameters The Electrochromic Glazing Office Animation is created using an image compositing method whereby separate images of the office generated with only one source of illumination are added together in variable percentages to come up with the final image. This method assumes that the sources of illumination do not change position through the animation sequence. Although the sun does move approximately 5 degrees during the span of this 20 minute animation sequence, because this movement is not the focus of the simulation and does not significantly change the intensity of the solar exposure, it is ignored. This method takes advantage of the principal of the scalability of light to avoid the significant time involved in calculating separate Radiance renderings for each combination of sky condition (direct sun versus no direct sun) and electrochromic glazing transmission.

30

Animals that Hide Underground  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animals that Hide Underground Animals that Hide Underground Nature Bulletin No. 733 November 23, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist ANIMALS THAT HIDE UNDERGROUND A hole in the ground has an air of mystery about it that rouses our curiosity. No matter whether it is so small that only a worm could squeeze into it, or large enough for a fox den, our questions are much the same. What animal dug the hole? Is it down there now? What is it doing? When will it come out? An underground burrow has several advantages for an animal. In it, many kinds find safety from enemies for themselves and their young. For others, it is an air-conditioned escape from the burning sun of summer and a snug retreat away from the winds and cold of winter. The moist atmosphere of a subterranean home allows the prolonged survival of a wide variety of lower animals which, above the surface, would soon perish from drying.

31

The Shapes of Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shapes of Animals Shapes of Animals Nature Bulletin No. 698 December 15, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE SHAPES OF ANIMALS The shape of an animal tells a great deal about the kind of life it leads. Unlike common plants which stay rooted to one spot, they are active creatures that move about under their own power. They crawl, walk, run, jump, climb, dig, swim or fly. They hunt food, make homes, produce young, flee from their enemies or fight them. Certain body proportions and types of legs, wings or other features go along with each habit of life. Animals, even when they are at rest, give the impression of being ready to do something or go somewhere. For example, animals that specialize in jumping, such as the rabbit, frog, flea, grasshopper and kangaroo, have long powerful hind legs. The climbers may have the grasping feet of the opossum and raccoon; the hooked claws of tree squirrels, cats, woodpeckers and many insects; or the suction cups of the tree frog's toes, or the housefly's feet, by which they can walk up a window pane or upside down across a ceiling. The best diggers -- the mole, woodchuck, badger and the underground young of a 17-year cicada -- have short stout forelegs equipped with heavy claws for scooping earth.

32

EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect

A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

Finkel, M.P.

1964-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

VISUALS: Crystal Structure Animations - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... This site contains animated ball and stick models of anhydrite, aragonite, barite, beryl, biotite, calcite, ... "Crystal Structure Animations.

34

Animal Waste Technology Fund (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A bill passed in 2012 transferred responsibility for animal waste management technology projects to the Maryland Department of Agriculture. The Department will maintain the Animal Waste Technology...

35

EMSL: News: Videos and Animations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fellowships and Awards BOOKMARK US RSS Facebook icon YouTube icon flickr Videos and Animations Videos and Animations showcase research conducted by EMSL users, EMSL's...

36

Medieval Names for Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medieval Names for Animals Medieval Names for Animals Nature Bulletin No. 449-A March 18, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MEDIEVAL NAMES FOR ANIMALS The English language is a polyglot -- a confusion of several languages - - and it contains many words dating back to medieval times. Some of them are still in common use; some now have entirely different meanings; many have been forgotten; others are rarely heard but are defined, as archaic words, in the unabridged dictionaries. Recently the narrator on a television program, showing great numbers of wild beasts in Africa, used the expression: "a pride of lions". An acquaintance remembered having seen it in "Sir Nigel", a novel about the days when knighthood was in flower, written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle who is famous for his stories about Sherlock Holmes. Searching through a copy of that book in a public library, we found two pages which contained many ancient terms for gatherings or numbers of animals, such as: "a pride of lions", "a cete of badgers", and a "swarm" or "skulk" of foxes.

37

EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MAINTENANCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of housing experimental animals such as mice in individual tube- like plastic enclosures is described. Contrary to experience, when this was tried with metal the mice did not become panicky. Group housing, with its attendant difficulties, may thus be dispensed with. (AEC)

Finkel, M.P.

1962-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

38

Composting Large Animal Carcasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposing of large animal carcasses can be a problem for agricultural producers. Composting is a simple, low-cost method that yields a useful product that can be used as fertilizer. In this publication you'll learn the basics of composting, how to build and maintain a compost pile, tools you will need, and how to use the finished compost.

Auvermann, Brent W.; Mukhtar, Saqib; Heflin, Kevin

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Do Animals Talk?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Do Animals Talk? Do Animals Talk? Nature Bulletin No. 635 April 1, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist DO ANIMALS TALK ? Amateur bird fans are not all bird watchers. Some of us are bird listeners. In the forest preserves and rural regions, the big black noisy crow is a continual challenge. At the first light of dawn an evenly spaced "caw, caw, caw" seems to say "Hello! Is anybody awake?" Soon it is answered by sleepy crow voices. They have food calls, assembly calls, alarm calls, courtship calls and a lot of squabbling over roosting spots as they settle down for the night. The adults are very quiet near the nest but the fledglings make loud gargling sounds as they are fed. The discovery of an owl or cat sets off a sort of mob hysteria. By hiding a microphone among a flock of crows it has been found that they also talk in whispers.

40

Conditions for learning from animations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animated diagrams representing dynamic systems hold great potential for improving the way people learn. However, so far the literature failed to find clear benefits of animated diagrams. Consequently it is worthwhile to investigate conditions under which ...

Herre Van Oostendorp; Michiel J. Beijersbergen; Sam Solaimani

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy Basics: Wind Power Animation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Wind Power Animation This animation discusses the advantages of wind power, the workings of a wind turbine, and wind resources in the United States. It also...

42

Emergency Animal Management during Disasters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains how communities and counties can incorporate animal issues into their emergency management plans. It explains what local plans should include, what role county Extension agents can play, and how animal management plans can best be used.

Dement, Angela

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

43

Interactive Animation of Dynamic Manipulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lifelike animation of manipulation must account for the dynamicinteraction between animated characters, objects, and their environment. Failing to do so would ignore the often significant effects objectshave on the motion ...

Abe, Yeuhi

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

44

Painterly animation using motion maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Starting from an input video, we replicate the manual technique of paint-on-glass animation. Motion maps are used to represent the regions where changes occur between frames. Edges are the key to identifying frame-to-frame changes, and a strong motion ... Keywords: Metamorphosis, Motion map, Non-photorealistic rendering & animation, Painterly rendering & animation, Strong edges

Youngsup Park; Kyunghyun Yoon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

VISUALS: Diffusion couple animation - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 25, 2007 ... This Quicktime animation of a diffusion couple shows side-by-side views of two different atomic species - red and green - diffusing across a flat...

46

ANIMATION: Crystallography: Gamma Prime - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 9, 2007 ... This 21-second animation demonstrates the crystal structure of gamma prime in nickel based superalloys. SOURCE: Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H....

47

Domestic Animals that go Wild  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and become tamer than their wild relatives. By the artificial selection of breeding stock, these domesticated animals have been greatly modified to fill man's needs for better...

48

Meshless animation of fracturing solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new meshless animation framework for elastic and plastic materials that fracture. Central to our method is a highly dynamic surface and volume sampling method that supports arbitrary crack initiation, propagation, and termination, while ... Keywords: elasticity, fracture, meshless methods, physics-based animation, plasticity

Mark Pauly; Richard Keiser; Bart Adams; Philip Dutr; Markus Gross; Leonidas J. Guibas

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Lumo: illumination for cel animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented to approximate lighting on 2D drawings. The specific problem solved is the incorporation of 2D cel animation into live-action scenes, augmenting the existing method of drawn "rims and tones" with subtle environmental illumination. ... Keywords: cel animation, non-photorealistic rendering, sparse interpolation

Scott F. Johnston

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Life Span of Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Span of Animals Span of Animals Nature Bulletin No. 486-A March 24, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE LIFE SPAN OF ANIMALS Signs of senility, or extreme old age, are seldom seen in the wild. Animals living under natural conditions rarely approach their maximum possible age because of very high death rates due to infant mortality, diseases, predators, bad weather, accidents, or competition for food and shelter. For this reason, most of the reliable information about the length of the life span comes from zoos, where accurate records are kept and animals live under conditions almost ideally suited to prolong life. A mouse whose life is measured in months in the wild can survive years of captivity.

51

Environmentally-friendly animal litter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An animal litter composition that includes geopolymerized ash particulates having a network of repeating aluminum-silicon units is described herein. Generally, the animal litter is made from a quantity of a pozzolanic ash mixed with an alkaline activator to initiate a geopolymerization reaction that forms geopolymerized ash. This geopolymerization reaction may occur within a pelletizer. After the geopolymerized ash is formed, it may be dried and sieved to a desired size. These geopolymerized ash particulates may be used to make a non-clumping or clumping animal litter or other absorbing material. Aluminum sulfate, clinoptilolite, silica gel, sodium alginate and mineral oil may be added as additional ingredients.

Boxley, Chett; McKelvie, Jessica

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

52

Focus + context visualization with animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present some novel animation techniques to help users understand complex structures contained in volumetric data from the medical imaging and scientific simulation fields. Because of the occlusion of 3D objects, these complex structures ...

Yingcai Wu; Huamin Qu; Hong Zhou; Ming-Yuen Chan

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Animal testing of beauty products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animal testing of beauty products Animal testing of beauty products Name: Wayers Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I consider animal testing to be cruel and unnecessary in most cases. I do not disapprove entirely with the testing of drugs and beneficial technology on animals; but I completely have a problem with testing unimportant items, such as make up, hair spray, and other beauty products on innocent lives. Are there any other methods of testing companies can use that wouldn't involve the harming of animals? Wayers Replies: Experience, theoretical models and testing on cell cultures can offer guidelines for a good guess as to what will happen when you throw some new chemical into a human body, but there are examples of where even very careful guesses have proved in practice to be terribly wrong (Thalidomide and DES come to mind). Given the very high level of safety that people demand from substances that go in or on their bodies, the only testing method that is considered reliable enough at present for new chemicals is to try the stuff out on some living creature that can tell you if it hurts or is sick. And even then you must be sure the creature is as similar as possible, at least in the part of the body you are worried about, to human beings. (This is itself a real challenge, and progress in treating disease is often hampered by the lack of a suitable animal model.) Thus ultimately comes the difficult ethical choice you are concerned with: namely, who or what gets to be the guinea pig? In terms of beauty products, there are enough people who feel as you do that there are a number of product lines which are guaranteed to be made without animal testing (they use ingredients that have been tested earlier on animals and are now recognized as safe). You can find them in natural foods and ecologically-conscious stores.

54

Mass and energy budgets of animals: Behavioral and ecological implications  

SciTech Connect

The common goal of these diverse projects is to understand the mechanisms of how animal populations respond to the continual changes in their environment in both time and space. Our models are mechanistic allowing us to explore how a wide array of environmental variables may determine individual performance. Large scale climate change and its effect on animal populations can be seen as quantitative extensions of biological responses to smaller scales of environmental variability. Changes in developmental rates or reproductive levels of individuals, extension or contraction of geographic ranges, and modification of community organization have all been documented in response to previous changes in habitats. We know from our biophysical work that some changes in function are driven by microclimate conditions directly, and some are mediated indirectly through ecological parameters such as the food supply. Our research is guided by a comprehensive conceptual scheme of the interaction of an animal with its environment. The physical and physiological properties of the organism, and the range of available microclimates, set bounds on the performance of organismal function, such as growth, reproduction, storage, and behavior. To leave the most offspring over a lifetime, animals must perform those functions in a way that maximizes the amount of resources devoted to reproduction. Maximizing the total size of the budget and minimizing those budget items not devoted to reproduction are crucial. Animals trade off among expenditures for current and future reproduction. Both water and energy are important, potentially limiting resources. Projects described here include empirical studies and theoretical models.

Porter, W.P.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Lied Animal Shelter Animal campus Renewable Energy Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Animal Shelter campus plan includes a new adoption center coupled with a dog adoption park, a wellness/veterinary technician education center, a show arena, and an addition to the existing shelter that will accommodate all animal control and sheltering for the Las Vegas Valley. The new facility will provide a sophisticated and innovative presentation of the animals to be adopted in an attempt to improve the public's perception of shelter animals. Additionally, the Regional Animal Campus will be a ''green building'', embodying a design intent on balancing environmental responsiveness, resource efficiency and cultural and community sensitivity. Designing an energy-efficient building helps reduce pollution from burning fossil fuels, reduce disturbance of natural habitats for the harvesting of resources and minimizes global warming. The project will be a leader in the use of renewable energy by relying on photovoltaic panels, wind turbines, and solar collectors to produce a portion of the project's energy needs The building will operate more efficiently in comparison to a typical shelter through the use of monitoring and specialized cooling/heating equipment. Windows bringing in natural daylight will reduce the center's demand for electricity.

Randy Spitzmesser, AIA

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

56

Lied Animal Shelter Animal campus Renewable Energy Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The Animal Shelter campus plan includes a new adoption center coupled with a dog adoption park, a wellness/veterinary technician education center, a show arena, and an addition to the existing shelter that will accommodate all animal control and sheltering for the Las Vegas Valley. The new facility will provide a sophisticated and innovative presentation of the animals to be adopted in an attempt to improve the public's perception of shelter animals. Additionally, the Regional Animal Campus will be a ''green building'', embodying a design intent on balancing environmental responsiveness, resource efficiency and cultural and community sensitivity. Designing an energy-efficient building helps reduce pollution from burning fossil fuels, reduce disturbance of natural habitats for the harvesting of resources and minimizes global warming. The project will be a leader in the use of renewable energy by relying on photovoltaic panels, wind turbines, and solar collectors to produce a portion of the project's energy needs The building will operate more efficiently in comparison to a typical shelter through the use of monitoring and specialized cooling/heating equipment. Windows bringing in natural daylight will reduce the center's demand for electricity.

Randy Spitzmesser, AIA

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

57

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Animation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on...

58

Conversion of performance mesh animation into cage-based animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Markerless highly-detailed performance capture is an emerging technology in vision-based graphics and 3D video. For instance, a framework for generating mesh animations from multi-view silhouettes is presented in [Vlasic et al. 2008]. Achieving inverse ...

Yann Savoye; Jean-Sbastien Franco

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

VISUALS: 3-D Animation of Dislocation Glide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Animation of edge-screw dislocation glide. Citation: van der Pluijm, Ben. "3-D Animation of Dislocation Glide." Teach the Earth: The SERC...

60

Animation of JILA Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animation of JILA Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique. The new JILA "frequency comb spectroscopy" technique ...

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Index of /images/whole.frog/data/masks/animations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Index of imageswhole.frogdatamasksanimations Parent Directory animatedBloodMasks.gif animatedBrainMasks.gif animatedDuodenumMasks.gif animatedEyeMasks.gif...

62

Giving animals in need a HOME  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

413HOME 11142013 Giving animals in need a HOME Breanna Bishop, LLNL, (925) 423-9802, bishop33@llnl.gov Sheri Savage is affiliated with East of Eden K9 Rescue, a companion animal...

63

Animal Waste Treatment System Loan Program (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of the Animal Waste Treatment System Loan Program is to finance animal waste treatment systems for independent livestock and poultry producers at below conventional interest rates. Loan...

64

Computer animation via optical video disc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the notion of marrying two technologies: raster-scan computer animation and optical video discs. Animated sequences, generated at non real-time rates, then transfered to video disc, can be recalled under ...

Bender, Walter

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Animal Science Curriculum (BS) Freshman Year  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Animal Science Curriculum (BS) Freshman Year Animal Science 111 Sciences (GER) Biological Sciences 130, 131, 132, 133.....................8 Plant Science 101......................................................3 Social/Behavioral Sciences (GER)............................3 32 Sophomore Year Agricultural Business 220

Selmic, Sandra

66

9.20 Animal Behavior, Fall 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course will sample the broad diversity of animal behavior and the behavioral adaptation of animals to the environments in which they live. This will include discussion of both field observations and controlled laboratory ...

Ramus, Seth Jacob

67

Tweakable light and shade for cartoon animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light and shade in the context of non-photorealistic imaging, such as digital cel animation, are semantic notations, rather than physical phenomena. Therefore stylized light and shade should be intentionally animated instead of simulated. This ...

Ken-ichi Anjyo; Shuhei Wemler; William Baxter

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Collision Detection and Response for Computer Animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When several objects are moved about by computer animation, there is the chance that they will interpenetrate. This is often an undesired state, particularly if the animation is seeking to model a realistic world. Two issues are involved: detecting ... Keywords: analytical solution, collision detection, collision response, computer animation, dynamical simulation

Matthew Moore; Jane Wilhelms

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Data management for animation of construction processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animation of construction processes is a useful tool to understand the complexity of civil engineering projects. The basic idea of existing four-dimensional (4D) animation approaches is to establish a link between a construction task and the component ... Keywords: Animation, Construction processes, Process modelling, Visualization

Wolfgang Huhnt; Sven Richter; Steffen Wallner; Tarek Habashi; Torsten Krmer

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Teasing out technique : animating Boston's City Hall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What were once considered advanced visualization techniques have now become commonplace. With the advancement of visualization tools, animation has quickly become a primary means of representation within architecture; ...

Woods, Ann C., M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Education: Digital Resource Center - VISUALS: Process Animations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Eight quick animations of the steps needed to produce a silicon wafer: crystal pulling, rod grinding, wire cutting, edge profiling, lapping,...

72

VISUALS: Animations of polymeric materials - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 11, 2007 ... In this page you will find animations on the structure of polymeric materials, mechanical deformation of polymers, crack formation and...

73

OOF.Graphics_n.File.Animate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... do not have a when parameter, or whose when parameter is set to anything other than latest , will be drawn but will not change during the animation ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

74

Autonomous behaviors for interactive vehicle animations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a method for synthesizing animations of autonomous space, water, and land-based vehicles in games or other interactive simulations. Controlling the motion of such vehicles to achieve a desirable behavior is difficult due to the constraints ... Keywords: online search, path planning, real-time animation, steering behaviors, vehicle motion

Jared Go; Thuc D. Vu; James J. Kuffner

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Supporting Information Awareness Using Animated Widgets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­0280 fmccricks,azhaog@cc.gatech.edu Abstract This paper describes a Tcl/Tk widget set extension that supports easy creation and use of ani­ mated effects we have integrated animation support into Tcl/Tk via three made in constructing animated widgets, including more reasons behind our choice of Tcl/Tk

McCrickard, Scott

76

Physically based modeling and animation of fire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a physically based method for modeling and animating fire. Our method is suitable for both smooth (laminar) and turbulent flames, and it can be used to animate the burning of either solid or gas fuels. We use the incompressible Navier-Stokes ... Keywords: blackbody radiation, chemical reaction, fire, flames, implicit surface, incompressible flow, smoke, stable fluids, vorticity confinement

Duc Quang Nguyen; Ronald Fedkiw; Henrik Wann Jensen

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Nature Bulletin No. 751 April 11, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist REGENERATION OF LOST PARTS IN ANIMALS For ages, mankind has been fascinated with the idea that lost parts of animals can be regrown. According to Greek legend, one of the twelve "labors" of Hercules was the destruction of the Hydra, a gigantic monster with nine serpents' heads. Finding that as soon as one head was cut off two new ones grew in its place, at last he burned out their roots with firebrands. All animals have the power of regeneration to a greater or lesser degree. In man and higher animals it is quite limited. We see it most often in the healing of wounds and the mending of bones. A lost fingernail can be replaced but not a lost finger. Lower animals have a much greater ability to replace parts. For instance, the little half-inch flatworm, Planaria, that lives under rocks in clean creeks can be cut into as many as 32 pieces and each fragment is able to rebuild a miniature flatworm complete with head, tail, eyes, mouth and internal organs.

78

Animal Care Enforcement Actions | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animal Care Enforcement Actions Animal Care Enforcement Actions Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Animal Care Enforcement Actions Dataset Summary Description Contains monthly reports on 7060s and stipulations related to enforcement of the Animal Welfare and Horse Protection Acts. Form 7060 - Official warning of an alleged violation of statue or regulation and notice to the subject that APHIS may seek civil or criminal penalties for alleged violation in the future if the subject again violates. Stipulation - a pre-litigation monetary settlement between APHIS and the subject. The stipulation provides the subject with notice of alleged violation, affords the subject an opportunity for an administrative hearing, and offers the subject an opportunity to waive the hearing and pay a monetary penalty calculated within Civil Penalty guidelines.

79

Animal Farm Powers Village | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Animal Farm Powers Village Animal Farm Powers Village Jump to: navigation, search Name Animal Farm Powers Village Agency/Company /Organization M2 Presswire Sector Energy Focus Area Agriculture, Energy Efficiency - Central Plant, Economic Development, Renewable Energy, Biomass - Anaerobic Digestion, Biomass, Biomass - Waste To Energy Phase Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Publicly available; free Publication Date 4/18/2011 Website http://news.tradingcharts.com/ Locality Hatherop, England References Animal Farm Powers Village[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Highlights 3 Environmental Aspects 4 Related Tools 5 References Overview This press release describes a project completed in Hatherop, a small English village. The project is a combined heat and power (CHP) plant

80

Strands and hair: modeling, animation, and rendering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last six years has seen a renaissance in hair modeling, rendering and animation. This course covers the gamut of hair simulation problems and present working solutions, from recent and novel research ideas to time tested industrial practices that ...

Sunil Hadap; Marie-Paule Cani; Ming Lin; Tae-Yong Kim; Florence Bertails; Steve Marschner; Kelly Ward; Zoran Ka?i?-Alesi?

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Realistic hair simulation: animation and rendering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last five years have seen a profusion of innovative solutions to one of the most challenging tasks in character synthesis: hair simulation. This class covers both recent and novel research ideas in hair animation and rendering, and presents time ...

Florence Bertails; Sunil Hadap; Marie-Paule Cani; Ming Lin; Tae-Yong Kim; Steve Marschner; Kelly Ward; Zoran Ka?i?-Alesi?

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

ACM SIGGRAPH 2013 Computer Animation Festival  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2013, SIGGRAPH's Computer Animation Festival celebrates its 40th year as the world's leading festival of the most innovative and accomplished computer graphics. An internationally recognized jury receives hundreds of submissions and presents outstanding ...

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

ACM SIGGRAPH 2010 Computer Animation Fesitval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the SIGGRAPH 2010 Computer Animation Festival, the international event that continues to be the premier place where creativity and innovation meets technology and industry. For 2010, we are proud to present a unique mix of independent creations ...

Isaac Kerlow

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

PROCESS FOR CONTROLLING ANIMAL GROWTH RATE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of injecting growing animals with the enzyme urease subcutaneously in increasing dosages is described; this generates within the blood anti-urease which enters the intestinal tract and inhibits the enzymatic decomposition of urea by urease in that location. Ammonia, one of the decomposition products, is thereby kept from diffusing through the intestinal walls into the blood, and this greatly reduces the energy requirements of the liver for removing the ammonia, thereby increasing the feeding efficiency of the animals. (AEC)

Visek, W.J.

1962-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

85

Population | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Population Population Dataset Summary Description Total population (in millions) by country, 1980 to 2010. Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Population world Data text/csv icon population_by_country_1980_2010millions.csv (csv, 59.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2010 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments If you rate this dataset, your published comment will include your rating.

86

Synthesis of complex dynamic character motion from simple animations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a general method for rapid prototyping of realistic character motion. We solve for the natural motion from a simple animation provided by the animator. Our framework can be used to produce relatively complex realistic motion ... Keywords: animation, animation w/constraints, motion transformation, physically based animation, physically based modeling, spacetime constraints

C. Karen Liu; Zoran Popovi?

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Population and Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356 Coastal and Marine Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 Energy, Air Pollution or growth. Indeed, an overlay of graphs depicting global trends in population, energy consumption, carbon; coastal and marine environments; and energy, air pollu- tion, and climate change. In the concluding

88

21H.909 People and Other Animals, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A historical survey of the ways that people have interacted with their closest animal relatives, for example: hunting, domestication of livestock, worship of animal gods, exploitation of animal labor, scientific study of ...

Ritvo, Harriet

89

Animal fat (tallow) as fuel for stationary internal combustion engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main aim of this thesis is to verify the suitability of waste animal fat, obtained from animal by-products in a process called rendering, as (more)

Piaszyk, Jakub

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Visualizing Diurnal Population Change in Urban Areas for Emergency Management  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing need for a quick, simple method to represent diurnal population change in metropolitan areas for effective emergency management and risk analysis. Many geographic studies rely on decennial U.S. Census data that assume that urban populations are static in space and time. This has obvious limitations in the context of dynamic geographic problems. The U.S. Department of Transportation publishes population data at the transportation analysis zone level in fifteen-minute increments. This level of spatial and temporal detail allows for improved dynamic population modeling. This article presents a methodology for visualizing and analyzing diurnal population change for metropolitan areas based on this readily available data. Areal interpolation within a geographic information system is used to create twenty-four (one per hour) population surfaces for the larger metropolitan area of Salt Lake County, Utah. The resulting surfaces represent diurnal population change for an average workday and are easily combined to produce an animation that illustrates population dynamics throughout the day. A case study of using the method to visualize population distributions in an emergency management context is provided using two scenarios: a chemical release and a dirty bomb in Salt Lake County. This methodology can be used to address a wide variety of problems in emergency management.

Kobayashi, Tetsuo [University of Utah; Medina, Richard M [ORNL; Cova, Thomas [University of Utah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Painterly Rendering for Animation Barbara J. Meier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coherence, we model surfaces as 3d particle sets which are rendered as 2d paint brush strokes in screen: painterly rendering, non-photorealistic rendering, particle systems, painting, abstract images. Author frame methods for animation is getting the paint to "stick" to surfaces rather than randomly change

Meier, Barbara J.

92

Animated axial surface mapping: The multimedia companion  

SciTech Connect

This newly expanded version of AAPG`s first DataShare Disk brings to life the concepts and applications of a new method of structural trend analysis. Through the dynamic use of color, sound, animation, and humor, this multimedia companion to the May 1994 article on Axial Surface Mapping introduces the reader (or viewer) to the concepts of rigid-block translation, fault-bend folding, and axial surface mapping. Animated models of growing fault-bend folds allow the viewer to see in four dimensions. The axial surface map shows the horizontal plane; the folding lines show depth planes; and the animations show the structure and its two-dimensional map changing with time and increasing slip. The animations create theoretical map patterns under varying, but controlled conditions that can be compared to axial surface maps from real data. The model patterns are then used to interpret seismic data and axial surface maps from a producing gas field in offshore California and from an exploration play in Pennsylvania.

Hook, S.C.; Shaw, J.H. [Texaco EPTD, Houston, TX (United States); Suppe, J. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Animated Graphics in Meteorological Research and Presentations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past two years, the authors have been involved in the production of computer-animated movies at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The computer-generated frames are high-quality graphs of two- and three-dimensional ...

Richard Grotjahn; Robert M. Chervin

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Ryan: rendering your animation nonlinearly projected  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artistic rendering is an important research area in Computer Graphics, yet relatively little attention has been paid to the projective properties of computer generated scenes. Motivated by the surreal storyboard of an animation in production---Ryan---this ... Keywords: Non-Photorealistic Rendering, local illumination, multiprojection, nonlinear perspective

Patrick Coleman; Karan Singh

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

One-to-many: example-based mesh animation synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an example-based approach for synthesizing diverse mesh animations. Provided a short clip of deformable mesh animation, our method synthesizes a large number of different animations of arbitrary length. Combining an automatically inferred ... Keywords: animation, bone graph, cut node, synthesis, transition

Changxi Zheng

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Rotational Nanoactuator/Nanomotor Images and Animations  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Zettl Research Group is an experimental solid state physics group in the Department of Physics at the University of California, Berkeley. These images and computer animations are referred to in a letter from the Group to Nature in 2003. They document the creation of what was then the world's smallest synthetic motor using a multiwall carbon nanotube. Their research won one of DOE's 2004 R&D 100 awards.

Zettle, Alex; Zettle Research Group (U.C. Berkeley and LBNL); Fennimore, Adam; Yuzvinsky, Tom; Bodzin, Noah; Han, Wei-Qiang; Fuhrer, M.S.; Cumings, J.

97

Bacterial Population Genetics in a Forensic Context  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the recent Department of Homeland Security (DHS) call for a Phase I study to (1) assess gaps in the forensically relevant knowledge about the population genetics of eight bacterial agents of concern, (2) formulate a technical roadmap to address those gaps, and (3) identify new bioinformatics tools that would be necessary to analyze and interpret population genetic data in a forensic context. The eight organisms that were studied are B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, Brucella spp., E. coli O157/H7, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and C. botulinum. Our study focused on the use of bacterial population genetics by forensic investigators to test hypotheses about the possible provenance of an agent that was used in a crime or act of terrorism. Just as human population genetics underpins the calculations of match probabilities for human DNA evidence, bacterial population genetics determines the level of support that microbial DNA evidence provides for or against certain well-defined hypotheses about the origins of an infecting strain. Our key findings are: (1) Bacterial population genetics is critical for answering certain types of questions in a probabilistic manner, akin (but not identical) to 'match probabilities' in DNA forensics. (2) A basic theoretical framework for calculating likelihood ratios or posterior probabilities for forensic hypotheses based on microbial genetic comparisons has been formulated. This 'inference-on-networks' framework has deep but simple connections to the population genetics of mtDNA and Y-STRs in human DNA forensics. (3) The 'phylogeographic' approach to identifying microbial sources is not an adequate basis for understanding bacterial population genetics in a forensic context, and has limited utility, even for generating 'leads' with respect to strain origin. (4) A collection of genotyped isolates obtained opportunistically from international locations augmented by phylogenetic representations of relatedness will not and enzootic outbreaks noted through international outbreak surveillance systems, and 'representative' genetic sequences from each outbreak. (5) Interpretation of genetic comparisons between an attack strain and reference strains requires a model for the network structure of maintenance foci, enzootic outbreaks, and human outbreaks of that disease, coupled with estimates of mutational rate constants. Validation of the model requires a set of sequences from exemplary outbreaks and laboratory data on mutation rates during animal passage. The necessary number of isolates in each validation set is determined by disease transmission network theory, and is based on the 'network diameter' of the outbreak. (6) The 8 bacteria in this study can be classified into 4 categories based on the complexity of the transmission network structure of their natural maintenance foci and their outbreaks, both enzootic and zoonotic. (7) For B. anthracis, Y. pestis, E. coli O157, and Brucella melitensis, and their primary natural animal hosts, most of the fundamental parameters needed for modeling genetic change within natural host or human transmission networks have been determined or can be estimated from existing field and laboratory studies. (8) For Burkholderia mallei, plausible approaches to transmission network models exist, but much of the fundamental parameterization does not. In addition, a validated high-resolution typing system for characterizing genetic change within outbreaks or foci has not yet been demonstrated, although a candidate system exists. (9) For Francisella tularensis, the increased complexity of the transmission network and unresolved questions about maintenance and transmission suggest that it will be more complex and difficult to develop useful models based on currently available data. (10) For Burkholderia pseudomallei and Clostridium botulinum, the transmission and maintenance networks involve complex soil communities and metapopulations about which very little is known. It is not clear that these pathogens can be brought into the in

Velsko, S P

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

98

Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Progress report, 1 October 1974--30 September 1977  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress has been made in determining the mechanisms by which large ectotherms adjust to thermal stress in their natural environment. The effect of mouth gaping on head temperatures and the role of radiation, conduction and convection on body temperatures of alligators have been determined. The utility of energy budget modeling as a method for studying the thermoregulatory mechanisms of animals has been demonstrated. Steady state and time dependent models of body temperature have been tested. Convection coefficients and evaporative water loss rates have been measured for the turtle, Chysemys scripta. Climate space diagrams have been formulated and are being tested. Behavioral thermoregulation of turtles has been studied in PAR pond on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, S.C. Steady state energy budget equations have been computed for largemouth bass. Experimental heat transfer coefficients indicate that most heat transfer is through the body wall and not via the gills. A time dependent model is being tested. It predicts the body temperature of a fish in a heterothermal environment. Theoretical calculations have been made of the effects of body size, color, and metabolism on the temperature regulation of ectotherms.

Spotila, J.R.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Population Monte Carlo algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a cross-disciplinary survey on ``population'' Monte Carlo algorithms. In these algorithms, a set of ``walkers'' or ``particles'' is used as a representation of a high-dimensional vector. The computation is carried out by a random walk and split/deletion of these objects. The algorithms are developed in various fields in physics and statistical sciences and called by lots of different terms -- ``quantum Monte Carlo'', ``transfer-matrix Monte Carlo'', ``Monte Carlo filter (particle filter)'',``sequential Monte Carlo'' and ``PERM'' etc. Here we discuss them in a coherent framework. We also touch on related algorithms -- genetic algorithms and annealed importance sampling.

Yukito IBA

2000-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the Arabian Horse Populations from Syria and other Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humans and horses weaved together wonderful stories of adventure and generosity. As a part of human history and civilization, Arabian horses ignite imagination throughout the world. Populations of this breed exist in many countries. Here I explored different populations of Arabians representing Middle Eastern and Western populations. The main two aims of this study were to provide the genetic diversity description of Arabians from different origins and to examine the traditional classification system of the breed. A third aim was to tackle the distribution pattern of the genetic variability within the genome to show whether there are differences in relative variability of different types of markers. First, I analyzed the genetic structure of 537Arabian horses from seven populations by using microsatellites. The results consistently showed higher levels of diversity within the Middle Eastern populations compared to the Western populations. All American-Arabians showed differentiation from Middle Eastern populations. Second, I sequenced the whole mtDNA D-loop of 251 Arabian horses. The whole D-loop sequence was more informative than using just the HVR1. Native populations from the Middle East, such as Syrian, represented a hot spot of genetic diversity. Most importantly, there was no evidence that the Arabian horse breed has clear subdivisions depending on the traditional maternal based strain classification system. Third, I tested the heterozygosity distribution pattern along the genome of 22 Peruvian Paso horses using 232 microsatellites and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). The pattern of genetic diversity was completely different between these two markers where no correlation was found. Runs of homozygosity test of SNPs and associated microsatellites noticeably showed that all of associated microsatellites loci were homozygous in the matched case. The findings of this study will help in understanding the evolutionary history and developing breeding and conservation programs of horses. This study provided databases including parentage testing system and maternal lineages that will help to recover the Syrian Arabian population after the armed conflict started in Syria in 2011. The results here can be applied not only to horses, but also to other animal species with similar criteria.

Khanshour, Anas M

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Computer animation of Phanerozoic plate motions  

SciTech Connect

Since 1985, the PALEOMAP Project, in collaboration with research groups both in the US and abroad, has assembled a digital model that describes global plate motions during the last 600 million years. In this paper the authors present a series of computer animations that dynamically illustrates the movement of continents and terranes, and the evolution of the ocean basins since the breakup of the late Precambrian supercontinent. These animations depict the motion of the plates from both equatorial and polar perspectives. Mesozoic and Cenozoic plate tectonic reconstructions are based on a synthesis of linear magnetic anomalies, fracture zone locations, intracontinental rifts, collision and thrust belts, and zones of strike-slip. Paleozoic plate reconstructions, though more speculative, are based on evidence of past subduction, continental collision, and inferred sea floor spreading. The relative longitudinal positions of the continents during the Paleozoic and the width of intervening oceans have been adjusted to best explain changing biogeographic and paleoclimatic patterns. A new paleomagnetic/hot spot reference frame has been constructed that combines paleomagnetic data compiled by Rob Van der Voo (1992) with inferred motion relative to a fixed frame of hot spots. Using probable Early Mesozoic and Paleozoic hot spot tracks on the major continents, the authors have extended plate motions relative to the hot spot reference frame back to 400 million years.

Scotese, C.R. (Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Towards believable cloth motion in computer animation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis covers the implementation of a cloth modeling algorithm within a computer animation package. The main objective of this thesis is to prove the feasibility of simulating the behavior of cloth using an empirically based model coupled with constraint dynamics and establish the groundwork for future studies into the use of cloth models in computer animation. To achieve a quick and accurate solution, two different forward dynamic constraint based system algorithms are studied and implemented. One approach, pioneered by Breen-DeVaul-House, computes the solution to the cloth equation by breaking up the cloth model into an acyclic length constraint system that may be solved in linear time with respect to the number of constraints. This approach is well suited for cloth models that collide only with force fiends, yet, is unacceptable for the proposed application. Therefore the Breen-DeVaul-House approach is modified to incorporate collision with polygonal objects. Even though the single matrix approach does not break up the cloth model and is slower in computing a solution for a dense mesh, this approach accurately calculates collisions between a mesh and a polygonal surface through the use of surface constraints and surface force dampers.

Segu, Sunil Venkatesh

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Opening of the Tasman Sea: A Gravity Anomaly Animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first plate tectonic gravity anomaly grid animation using data from the Tasman Sea is presented. In this animation the tectonic elements are represented by their respective gravity fields, based on recent marine-satellite-derived gravity ...

C. Gaina; R. D. Mller; W. R. Roest; P. Symonds

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Method and apparatus for animal positioning in imaging systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for imaging an animal includes a first mounting surface, a bed sized to support the animal and releasably secured to or integral with the first mounting surface. The apparatus also includes a plurality of straps, each having a first end in a fixed position relative to the bed and a second end for tightening around a limb of the animal. A method for in-vivo imaging of an animal includes providing an animal that has limbs, providing a first mounting surface, and providing a bed removably secured to or integral with the mounting surface and sized to support the animal as well as being coupled to a plurality of straps. The method also includes placing the animal on the bed between the plurality of straps and tightening at least two of the plurality of straps around at least two of the limbs such that the animal is substantially secured in place relative to the bed.

Hadjioannou, Arion-Xenofon; Stout, David B.; Silverman, Robert W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Linear Bellman combination for control of character animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controllers are necessary for physically-based synthesis of character animation. However, creating controllers requires either manual tuning or expensive computer optimization. We introduce linear Bellman combination as a method for reusing existing ... Keywords: optimal control, physically based animation

Marco da Silva; Frdo Durand; Jovan Popovi?

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Lead levels in whole blood of New Zealand domestic animals  

SciTech Connect

A survey of whole-blood lead in domestic animals of New Zealand was conducted. 1142 animals were examined (252 cattle, 113 cats, 271 dogs, 258 horses, and 248 sheep). Data was analyzed as to age, sex, breed and animals known to be poisoned. Variations in lead concentration with different environments were noted with special reference to elevated lead in animals near automobile service stations, which could indicate potential danger to humans working in such areas.

Ward, N.I.; Brooks, R.R.; Roberts, E.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Animation projects in CS1 from scheme to Java  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scheme animation projects are transformed into Java projects. Keywords: computer science for liberal arts, introductory programming course, java programming

Mirela Djordjevi?

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Mass and energy budgets of animals: Behavioral and ecological implications. Annual technical progress report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The common goal of these diverse projects is to understand the mechanisms of how animal populations respond to the continual changes in their environment in both time and space. Our models are mechanistic allowing us to explore how a wide array of environmental variables may determine individual performance. Large scale climate change and its effect on animal populations can be seen as quantitative extensions of biological responses to smaller scales of environmental variability. Changes in developmental rates or reproductive levels of individuals, extension or contraction of geographic ranges, and modification of community organization have all been documented in response to previous changes in habitats. We know from our biophysical work that some changes in function are driven by microclimate conditions directly, and some are mediated indirectly through ecological parameters such as the food supply. Our research is guided by a comprehensive conceptual scheme of the interaction of an animal with its environment. The physical and physiological properties of the organism, and the range of available microclimates, set bounds on the performance of organismal function, such as growth, reproduction, storage, and behavior. To leave the most offspring over a lifetime, animals must perform those functions in a way that maximizes the amount of resources devoted to reproduction. Maximizing the total size of the budget and minimizing those budget items not devoted to reproduction are crucial. Animals trade off among expenditures for current and future reproduction. Both water and energy are important, potentially limiting resources. Projects described here include empirical studies and theoretical models.

Porter, W.P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Edutainment animated folktales software to motivate socio-cultural awareness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the design and development of an animated folk tales edutainment software to motivate socio-cultural awareness among children and adolescents. One application of multimedia technology is in edutainment, which includes animated cartoon, ... Keywords: 2D animation, edutainment, multimedia application software, socio-cultural values

Nor Azan Mat Zin; Nur Yuhanis Mohd Nasir

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Dynamic, expressive speech animation from a single mesh  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we present a method for human face animation which allows us to generate animations for a novel person given just a single mesh of their face. These animations can be of arbitrary text and may include emotional expressions. We build a multilinear ...

Kevin Wampler; Daichi Sasaki; Li Zhang; Zoran Popovi?

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Biological effects of raw and processed oil shale particles in the lungs of laboratory animals  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and occupational health concerns will have an effect on the developing oil shale technologies. The mining and crushing of large volumes of rock will be a characteristic of at least some of these technologies, and above ground disposal of processed shale will require adequate control measures. Exposure by inhalation to the dusts that may arise from shale oil technologies may present a hazard both in the work force and in the local population. Animal studies dealing with the effects of oil shale-related materials in the lung are in progress. Experiments involving Syrian hamsters exposed by inhalation and by intratracheal instillation are described.

Holland, L.M.; Smith, D.M.; Thomas, R.G.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Method of detoxifying animal suffering from overdose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for accumulating drugs or other chemicals within synthetic, lipid-like vesicles by means of a pH gradient imposed on the vesicles just prior to use is described. The method is suited for accumulating molecules with basic or acid moieties which are permeable to the vesicles membranes in their uncharged form and for molecules that contain charge moieties that are hydrophobic ions and can therefore cross the vesicle membranes in their charged form. The method is advantageous over prior art methods for encapsulating biologically active materials within vesicles in that it achieves very high degrees of loading with simple procedures that are economical and require little technical expertise, furthermore kits which can be stored for prolonged periods prior to use without impairment of the capacity to achieve drug accumulation are described. A related application of the method consists of using this technology to detoxify animals that have been exposed to poisons with basic, weak acid or hydrophobic charge groups within their molecular structure.

Mehlhorn, Rolf J. (Richmond, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Energy Production from Zoo Animal Wastes  

SciTech Connect

Elephant and rhinoceros dung was used to investigate the feasibility of generating methane from the dung. The Knoxville Zoo produces 30 cubic yards (23 m{sup 3}) of herbivore dung per week and cost of disposal of this dung is $105/week. The majority of this dung originates from the Zoo's elephant and rhinoceros population. The estimated weight of the dung is 20 metric tons per week and the methane production potential determined in experiments was 0.033 L biogas/g dung (0.020 L CH{sub 4}/g dung), and the digestion of elephant dung was enhanced by the addition of ammonium nitrogen. Digestion was better overall at 37 C when compared to digestion at 50 C. Based on the amount of dung generated at the Knoxville Zoo, it is estimated that two standard garden grills could be operated 24 h per day using the gas from a digester treating 20 metric ton herbivore dung per week.

Klasson, KT

2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Animation of a Hydrogen Fueling Station Example Layout (Text Version) on Digg

115

Radio controlled release apparatus for animal data acquisition devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel apparatus for reliably and selectively releasing a data acquisition package from an animal for recovery. The data package comprises two parts: 1) an animal data acquisition device and 2) a co-located release apparatus. One embodiment, which is useful for land animals, the release apparatus includes two major components: 1) an electronics package, comprising a receiver; a decoder comparator, having at plurality of individually selectable codes; and an actuator circuit and 2) a release device, which can be a mechanical device, which acts to release the data package from the animal. To release a data package from a particular animal, a radio transmitter sends a coded signal which is decoded to determine if the code is valid for that animal data package. Having received a valid code, the release device is activated to release the data package from the animal for subsequent recovery. A second embodiment includes floatation means and is useful for releasing animal data acquisition devices attached to sea animals. This embodiment further provides for releasing a data package underwater by employing an acoustic signal.

Stamps, James Frederick (5252 Norma Way, Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Engines - 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates Diesel particulate matter has a very complex geometry Most studies have observed these three-dimensional structures in...

117

Innovations in Steel ProductionAnimations for Aluminium ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 30, 2008 ... Innovations in Steel ProductionAnimations for Aluminium Technologies? by Reiner Kopp. Publisher: TMS. Product Format: Webcast. Pages...

118

Education: Digital Resource Center - VISUALS: Animation and video ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 25, 2007 ... This Quicktime animation of solidification of solid crystals from a liquid demonstrates the development of grain structure. An accompanying...

119

Solid-Liquid Separation of Animal Manure and Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid-liquid separation is an alternative treatment for animal manure and process-generated wastewater. This publication explains the techniques, equipment, performance and economics of separators.

Mukhtar, Saqib; Sweeten, John M.; Auvermann, Brent W.

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

120

Biomass Gasification: An Alternative Solution to Animal Waste Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The overall goal of this research was to evaluate gasification of animal waste as an alternative manure management strategy, from the standpoints of syngas production (more)

Wu, Hanjing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Estimated population near uranium tailings  

SciTech Connect

Population studies, which took place during the months of April, May, and June 1983, were performed for 27 active and 25 inactive mill sites. For each mill site, a table showing population by radius (1/2, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 km) in 16 compass directions was generated. 22 references, 6 tables.

Bloomster, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Bruno, G.A.; Craig, S.N.; Dirks, J.A.; Griffin, E.A.; Reis, J.W.; Young, J.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Population-split genetic algorithm for retrieval of ultrafast laser parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Authors modify the traditional or standard genetic algorithm by splitting the initial population. This crucial step is an imitation of sexual and asexual reproduction mechanism in the life cycle of many plants or animals. Asexual reproduction shall happen ... Keywords: frequency resolved optical gating, genetic algorithm, pulse retrieving, ultrafast lasers

S. F. Shu; C. L. Pan; C. T. Sun

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

International Council for Laboratory Animal Science: International activities. Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources annual report, 1993--1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In late 1987, the Interagency Research Animal Committee (IRAC) requested that the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (ILAR), National Research Council (NRC), National Academy of Sciences, reestablish US national membership in the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS). The ICLAS is the only worldwide organization whose goal is to foster the humane use of animals in medical research and testing. ILAR`s Mission Statement reflects its commitment to producing highly respected documents covering a wide range of scientific issues, including databases in genetic stocks, species specific management guides, guidelines for humane care of animals, and position papers on issues affecting the future of the biological sciences. As such, ILAR is recognized nationally and internationally as an independent, scientific authority in the development of animal sciences in biomedical research.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Animation programming: an alternative approach to CS1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current problem faced by many computing departments is that only those already self-selected into computing sign up for "CS121 Programming and Problem Solving I", or the similarly named and presented first course. An Animation Programming course ... Keywords: animation, computer science curriculum, object oriented

Louise Moses

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A terrestrial animal-borne video system for large mammals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animal-borne video and environmental data collection systems (AVEDs) are integrated sensor systems that collect video from the animal's perspective and combine it with data from other sensors, including audio, location, temperature, acceleration, and ... Keywords: AVED, Telemetry, Video, White-tailed deer, Wildlife

Remington J. Moll; Joshua J. Millspaugh; Jeff Beringer; Joel Sartwell; Zhihai He; Jay A. Eggert; Xiwen Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Occupational Health and Safety Program Laboratory Animal Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupational Health and Safety Program Laboratory Animal Resources Binghamton University State University of New York P.O. Box 6000 Health Services, IN-204 (607) 777-4610, Fax: (607) 777-2881 Health is strictly for the use of the Occupational Health and Safety Program for Laboratory Animal Resources and may

Suzuki, Masatsugu

127

Effective Use of Procedural Shaders in Animated Scenes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex procedural shaders are commonly used to enrich the appearance of high-quality computer animations. In traditional rendering architectures the shading computation is performed independently for each animation frame which leads to significant costs. In this paper we propose an approach which eliminates redundant computation between subsequent frames by exploiting temporal coherence in shading. The shading

Polina Kondratieva; Vlastimil Havran; Hans-Peter Seidel

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The significant human-animal bond: Pets with cancer  

SciTech Connect

Veterinarians have responsibilities to both the animal and its owner. In the past several years there has been an increased awareness and concern about human-animal bonds. As a result, we have begun to appreciate the nature, strength, and significance of bonds that develop between humans and companion animals. It is typical for a pet to be perceived as and treated as a member of the family and as a result, animals provide special and beneficial relationships for many years. It is partly because of this role of the pet in promoting human health and happiness that we as veterinarians have an obligation to assist both owner and animal. The mark of the good practitioner concerns not only the ability to diagnose and treat accurately, but also the ability to show understanding and compassionate judgement.

Weller, R.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Billings Hospital - Small Animal  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Billings Hospital - Small Animal Billings Hospital - Small Animal Facility - University of Chicago - IL 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Billings Hospital, Small Animal Facility, University of Chicago (IL 01) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP due to limited scope of activities and 15 day half-life of P-32 Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Small Animal Facility, U. of Chicago IL.01-1 Location: University of Chicago , Chicago , Illinois IL.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1979 IL.01-1 Site Operations: Nature of operations is not clear. Portions of Billings Hospital were reported to have been used as an animal research facility. IL.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated IL.01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Phosphorus - 32 IL.01-1

130

Medical Records for Animals Used in Research, Teaching, and Testing: Public Statement from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Records for Animals Used in Research, Teaching, and Testing: Public Statement from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine ACLAM Medical Records Committee: Karl Field (Chair), Michele. Suckow Abstract Medical records are considered to be a key element of a program of adequate veterinary

Oliver, Douglas L.

131

Inhabiting Indianness : US colonialism and indigenous geographies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the banner of Operation Redwing, a series of tests wereIn addition to Operation Redwing, the 1957 Shasta test (

Barnd, Natchee Blu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Tiffany Plaza [The Inhabited Landscape: An Exhibition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A white stucco and glass block wall defines the spaceof concrete, stucco and glass block to define a hard-paved

and di Domenico, Weintraub

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Reed Garden [The Inhabited Landscape: An Exhibition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collaboration between architect and client. At the inceptionyet varied, setting. A Architect's Statement The ongoing

Robertson Architects, Eisenman

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Corn fiber hulls as a food additive or animal feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a novel animal feed or food additive that may be made from thermochemically hydrolyzed, solvent-extracted corn fiber hulls. The animal feed or food additive may be made, for instance, by thermochemically treating corn fiber hulls to hydrolyze and solubilize the hemicellulose and starch present in the corn fiber hulls to oligosaccharides. The residue may be extracted with a solvent to separate the oil from the corn fiber, leaving a solid residue that may be prepared, for instance by aggolmerating, and sold as a food additive or an animal feed.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IN); Cecava, Michael J. (Decatur, IN); Doane, Perry H. (Decatur, IN)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

135

Soft body animation in real-time simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a novel approach for creating deformable object animations. A deformable object can be represented as a discrete lattice of particles, and transforming those particles defines a new state for the ...

Sullivan, Mark A., III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Education: Digital Resource Center - VISUALS: Animation of the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 25, 2007 ... This animation of the effect of temperature on conductivity of an n-type semiconductor shows side-by-side diagrams of the band diagram, the...

137

Constraint-based animation: temporal constraints in the Animus systems  

SciTech Connect

Algorithm animation has a growing role in computer-aided algorithm design documentation and debugging, since interactive graphics is a richer channel than text for communication. Most animation is currently done laboriously by hand, and it often has the character of canned demonstrations with restricted user interaction. Animus is a system that allows easy construction of an animation with minimal concern for lower-level graphics programming. Constraints are used to describe the appearance and structure of a picture as well as how those pictures evolve in time. The implementation and support of temporal constraints is a substantive extension to previous constraint languages which had only allowed specification of static state. Use of the Animus system is demonstrated in the creation of animations of dynamic mechanical and electrical-circuit simulations, sorting algorithms, problems in operating systems, and geometric curve-drawing algorithms.

Duisberg, R.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Automated Video Analysis of Animal Movements Using Gabor Orientation Filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Single frame from a video clip, after de-interlacing.median of all frames in the video sequence. c The output of010-9062-1 Automated Video Analysis of Animal Movements

Wagenaar, Daniel A.; Kristan, Wiliam B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Are Animals Heterozygous...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lymphocytes from animals of known genotypes. Radiation-induced foci occur in a time and dose dependent manner in the nuclei of normal cells, NBS cells on the other hand, do not...

140

Surf's up: the making of an animated documentary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CG animated documentary Surf's Up called for unique production techniques to be leveraged throughout the creation of the film. This half day course presents an in-depth look at several of the key aspects of the production: Integration ...

Rob Bredow; David Schaub; Daniel Kramer; Matthew Hausman; Danny Dimian; R. Stirling Duguid

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ON THE MOVE! The New Jersey Department of Agriculture Division of Animal Health and Animal Health Di-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Health, Environmental, and Agricultural Laboratories (NJPHEAL) facility, located in Ewing, New residues. All Division Staff will now be located at the NJPHEAL. The Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory provides diagnostic services to support disease control programs, health management, and productivity

Delgado, Mauricio

142

Combining environmental chemistry, somatic biomarkers, and population genetics: an innovative approach in wildlife ecotoxicology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Caspian region and specifically the Apsheron peninsula of Azerbaijan is known to be polluted with a variety of environmental contaminants, making risk assessment difficult. The wetlands of Sumgayit contain particularly complex mixtures of contaminants. Flow cytometry and the micronucleus assay were used to assess chromosomal damage in aquatic turtles and frogs inhabiting contaminated wetlands in Azerbaijan. By evaluating biomarkers that are indicative of somatic effects, elevated chromosomal damage was documented at several sites in Azerbaijan relative to reference sites. Sediment samples were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorines (OCs), and mercury to evaluate contaminant associations with genetic damage. Sediment samples revealed heterogeneous patterns of PAH and mercury concentrations throughout Sumgayit. Significant positive correlations were documented between both PAH and mercury sediment concentrations and chromosomal damage. Population genetic methods were employed to study the effects of long-term chronic contaminant exposure in marsh frogs from Sumgayit. The Sumgayit region has reduced levels of genetic diversity, likely due to environmental degradation. One of the most contaminated sites in Sumgayit, WTP, appears to be a source of new mutations as a result of an increased mutation rate. Finally, the Sumgayit region seems to act as an ecological sink, with levels of gene flow into the region exceeding gene flow out of the region. This study provides not only exposure and biomarker data, but also an integrated method for assessing the cumulative population impacts of contaminant exposure by studying both population genetic and evolutionary effects. The results presented here will be used in conjunction with those of ongoing research involving both wildlife and humans to develop comprehensive ecological and human risk assessments.

Matson, Cole Wesley

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Journey to the East : the re(make) of Chinese animation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis attempts to look at how Chinese animation cinema has evolved over the years and how the Chinese nation is being constructed and contested through animation filmic texts and animation filmmaking practices as ...

Huang, He, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Genome of Simplest Animal Reveals Ancient  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

21, 2008 21, 2008 Genome of Simplest Animal Reveals Ancient Lineage, Confounding Array of Complex Capabilities WALNUT CREEK, CA-As Aesop said, appearances are deceiving-even in life's tiniest critters. From first detection in the 1880s, clinging to the sides of an aquarium, to its recent characterization by the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), a simple and primitive animal, Trichoplax adhaerens, appears to harbor a far more complex suite of capabilities than meets the eye. The findings, reported in the August 21 online edition of the journal Nature, establish a group of organisms as a branching point of animal evolution and identify sets of genes, or a "parts list," employed by organisms that have evolved along particular branches.

145

DOE Permitting Hydrogen Facilities: Animation of a Telecommunications Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animation of a Telecommunications Site Example Layout Animation of a Telecommunications Site Example Layout The animation below provides an example of a telecommunications site layout that uses hydrogen fuel cells for backup power along with some of the codes and standards that apply to such a site. Roll over each of the colored bars below to reveal individual setback requirements, which identify the mandatory separation distances of the site's various components, or select the "Go to Setback Details" button for a chart that summarizes these requirements as defined by the 2006 International Fire Code. Select the "Construction Approval" button for a detailed list of codes and standards related to the construction of a site, or select the "Operation Approval" button for codes and standards related to ongoing operation and

146

Health Effects of CO2 in Animals of Economic Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CT&S) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in animals of economic importance. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans and selected animals, primarily labor...

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

147

International radiobiology archives of long-term animal studies. I. Descriptions of participating institutions and studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes archived radiobiology animal studies. Information is presented on experimental details, pathology, radioactivity, results, dosimetry, status, and animal type employed.

Gerber, G.B.; Watson, C.R.; Sugahara, T.; Okada, S.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Modeling facial expression of uncertainty in conversational animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building animated conversational agents requires developing a fine-grained analysis of the motions and meanings available to interlocutors in face-to-face conversation and implementing strategies for using these motions and meanings to communicate effectively. ... Keywords: embodied conversational agents, face-to-face conversation, facial displays, uncertainty

Matthew Stone; Insuk Oh

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Providing signed content on the Internet by synthesized animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Written information is often of limited accessibility to deaf people who use sign language. The eSign project was undertaken as a response to the need for technologies enabling efficient production and distribution over the Internet of sign language ... Keywords: Animation, HamNoSys, SiGML, avatar, deaf accessibility, scripting, sign language, virtual reality

J. R. Kennaway; J. R. W. Glauert; I. Zwitserlood

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Extended abstract a field computer for animal trackers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field computer system has been developed to gather complex data on amimal behaviour that is observed by expert animal trackers. The system is location aware using the satellite Global Positioning Sytem. The system has been designed to empower semi-literate ... Keywords: context aware, cybertracker, empowerment, location aware, user interface

Edwin H. Blake

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Self-protecting transistor oscillator for treating animal tissues  

SciTech Connect

A transistor oscillator circuit wherein the load current applied to animal tissue treatment electrodes is fed back to the transistor. Removal of load is sensed to automatically remove feedback and stop oscillations. A thermistor on one treatment electrode senses temperature, and by means of a control circuit controls oscillator transistor current.

Doss, James D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

PINOKY: a ring that animates your plush toys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PINOKY is a wireless ring-like device that can be externally attached to any plush toy as an accessory that animates the toy by moving its limbs. A user is thus able to instantly convert any plush toy into a soft robot. The user can control the toy remotely ... Keywords: interactive plush toy, robots, tangible user interface, ubiquitous computing

Yuta Sugiura; Calista Lee; Masayasu Ogata; Anusha Withana; Yasutoshi Makino; Daisuke Sakamoto; Masahiko Inami; Takeo Igarashi

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

24 Animal, Vegetable, Mineral Did you read chapter 24  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chicken Fat & Marbling in Meat Solid Fat Shortening (Crisco) Solid Fat Butter Solid Fat Margarine Liquid CHEMISTRY Atomic-Level Structure of Complex Materials Determines Properties Animals & Vegetables Fats: Margarine and Olive oil Fats and oils at room temperature ­ What observations can we make? Butter Easy

Hart, Gus

154

Interactive painterly stylization of images, videos and 3D animations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a real-time system that converts images, video, or 3D animation sequences to artistic renderings in various painterly styles. The algorithm, which is entirely executed on the GPU, can efficiently process 512 resolution frames containing ... Keywords: GPU processing, non-photorealistic rendering, painterly rendering, particle systems, video processing

Jingwan Lu; Pedro V. Sander; Adam Finkelstein

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Interpreting the visual and cinematic style of Japanese anime using three-dimensional computer graphics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the international popularity of Japanese anime and its recognition as a cinematic art form, creative professionals in the animation industry are impressed with not only the complexity and artistic fluidity of the animation style but also the variety of narrative themes. As an acceptable alternative to live action films, Japanese directors and animators have more liberty with narrative themes and explicit imagery in anime than their western counterparts, and anime is attracting a variety of audiences ranging from young children to adults. As a stylistic form of animation with a distinct line art style, anime is traditionally produced by hand. With the development of non-photorealistic rendering techniques such as toon shading, three-dimensional computer graphics are used in anime production, though with limited application. This thesis attempts to interpret the visual and cinematic style of anime entirely within a three-dimensional digital environment through character design, modeling, character animation, cinematography, and non-photorealistic rendering.

Mistry, Pradeep Champaklal

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Hantavirus testing in small mammal populations of northcentral New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

In 1993, an outbreak of a new strain of hantavirus in the southwestern US indicated that deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) was the primary carrier of the virus. In 1993 and 1994, the Ecological Studies Team (EST) at Los Alamos National Laboratory surveyed small mammal populations in Los Alamos County, New Mexico, primarily for ecological risk assessment (ecorisk) studies. At the request of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the School of Medicine at the University of New Mexico, EST also collected blood samples from captured animals for use in determining seroprevalence of hantavirus in this region due to the recent outbreak of this virus in the four-comers region of the Southwest. The deer mouse was the most commonly captured species during the tripping sessions. Other species sampled included harvest mice (Reithrodontomys megalotis), least chipmunk (Eutamias minimus), long-tailed vole (Microtus longicaudus), Mexican woodrat (Neotoma mexicana), and brush mouse (Peromyscus boylii). The team collected blood samples from tripped animals following CDC`s suggested guidelines. Results of the 1993 and 1994 hantavirus testing identified a total overall seroprevalence of approximately 5.5% and 4.2%, respectively. The highest seroprevalence rates were found in deer mice seri (3--6%), but results on several species were inconclusive; further studies will be necessary, to quantify seroprevalence rates in those species. Seroprevalence rates for Los Alamos County were much lower than elsewhere in the region.

Biggs, J.; Bennett, K.; Foxx, T. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Combining Spatial and Telemetric Features for Learning Animal Movement Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a new graphical model for tracking radio-tagged animals and learning their movement patterns. The model provides a principled way to combine radio telemetry data with an arbitrary set of userdefined, spatial features. We describe an efficient stochastic gradient algorithm for fitting model parameters to data and demonstrate its effectiveness via asymptotic analysis and synthetic experiments. We also apply our model to real datasets, and show that it outperforms the most popular radio telemetry software package used in ecology. We conclude that integration of different data sources under a single statistical framework, coupled with appropriate parameter and state estimation procedures, produces both accurate location estimates and an interpretable statistical model of animal movement.

Kapicioglu, Berk; Wikelski, Martin; Broderick, Tamara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Animation and Multimedia Collection  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a world-class scientific research facility that began operation in 2000, following 10 years of development and onstruction. Hundreds of physicists from around the world use RHIC to study what the universe may have looked like in the first few moments after its creation. RHIC drives two intersecting beams of gold ions head-on, in a subatomic collision. This library of animations and multimedia includes virtual video tours of the RHIC complex, of the spin configuration, and of experiments; documentaries of the science involved; animations of the various kinds of collisions and reactions; event displays; and even interactive Java games about RHIC and RHIC physics.

159

EFFECTS OF OVERPRESSURES IN GROUP SHELTERS ON ANIMALS AND DUMMIES  

SciTech Connect

S>Relative biological hazards of blast were studied in two types of communal air-raid shelters during Shots 1 and 8. Dogs, restrained within the shelters during detonation, were studied pathologically and clinically for blast injuries. Two anthropometric dummies were test objects for displacement studies utilizing high-speed photography. Physical data included pressure vs time and air-drag determinations. During Shot 1, animals sustained marked blast damages (hemorrhages in lungs and abdominal organs), three dogs were ataxic. and the dummies were rather violently displaced. In Shot 8, however, no significant injuries were found in the animals, and the dummies were minimally displaced. Analysis of the physical data indicated that blast injuries and violent displacements may occur at much lower static overpressures than previously assumed from conventional explosion data. Furthermore, biological damage appeared to be related to the rate of rise of the overpressure and air drag, as well as the maximum overpressure values. (auth)

Roberts, J.E.; White, C.S.; Chiffelle, T.L.

1953-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Therapeutic Lamp: Treating Small-Animal Phobias  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We all have an irrational fear or two. Some of us get scared by an unexpected visit from a spider in our house; others get nervous when they look down from a high building. Fear is an evolutionary and adaptive function that can promote self-preservation ... Keywords: Animals,Medical treatment,Games,Visualization,Augmented reality,computer graphics,augmented reality,cockroach phobia,spider phobia,arachnophobia,anxiety,anxiety disorders,phobias,phobia therapy,psychological treatment

Maja Wrzesien, Mariano Alcaniz, Cristina Botella, Jean-Marie Burkhardt, Juana Breton-Lopez, Mario Ortega, Daniel Beneito Brotons

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

THE NATURE AND IMPORTANCE OF SELENIUM METABOLITES IN THE ANIMAL  

SciTech Connect

Although the toxicity of selenium has been known for several decades and its essentiality has been established for over one decade, very little is known concerning the organic forms of selenium occurring within animals and their functions. Dimethyl selenide has been shown to be an exhalation product from rats injected with selenate or selenite. Recently trimethylselenonium ion has been shown to be excreted in the urine of rats receiving selenite. The work reported here concerns the biological activity and metabolism of trimethylselenonium ion.

Halverson, A W; Palmer, I S; Whitehead, E I

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Transport Energy Use and Population Density  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Energy Use and Population Density Transport Energy Use and Population Density Speaker(s): Masayoshi Tanishita Date: July 1, 2004 - 10:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Jonathan Sinton After Peter Newman and Jeffrey Kenworthy published "Cities and Automobile Dependence" in 1989, population density was brought to public attention as an important factor to explain transport mobility and energy use. However, several related issues still remain open: Is an increase in population density more effective than rising gas prices in reducing transport energy use? How much does per capita transport energy use change as population density in cities changes? And what kind of factors influence changes in population density? In this presentation, using city-level data in the US, Japan and other countries, the population-density elasticity of

163

Vehicle Technologies Office: 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-D Animation Shows 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates on AddThis.com... 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates

164

Supernova rates and stellar populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the results about the nature of type Ia Supernovae that can be derived by studying their rates in different stellar populations. While the evolution of SN photometry and spectra can constrain the explosion mechanism, the SN rate depends on the progenitor system. We review the current available data on rates as a function of parent galaxy color, morphology, star formation rate, radio luminosity and environment. By studying the variation of the rates with the color of the parent galaxy, a strong evidence was established that type Ia SNe come from both young and old stars. The dependence of the rates with the radio power of the parent galaxy is best reproduced by a bimodal distribution of delay time between the formation of the progenitor and its explosion as a SN. Cluster early-type galaxies show higher type Ia SN rate with respect to field galaxies, and this effect can be due either to traces of young stars or to differences in the delay time distribution.

F. Mannucci

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

165

Methane recovery from animal manures: A current opportunities casebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Casebook examines some of the current opportunities for the recovery of methane from the anaerobic digestion of animal manures US livestock operations currently employ four types of anaerobic digester technology: Slurry, plug flow, complete mix, and covered lagoon. An introduction to the engineering economies of these technologies is provided, and possible end-use applications for the methane gas generated by the digestion process are discussed. The economic evaluations are based on engineering studies of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Regression models, which can be used to estimate digester cost and internal rate of return, are developed from the evaluations.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better characterize mixed waste incoming streams from animal and vegetable residues. Task 4 Fundamental Research in Waste Processing Technologies - This task focused on studies performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the chemical reformation reaction of agricultural biomass compounds in a hydrothermal medium. Many of the challenges to optimize, improve and perfect the technology, equipment and processes in order to provide an economically viable means of creating sustainable energy were identified in the DOE Stage Gate Review, whose summary report was issued on July 30, 2004. This summary report appears herein as Appendix 1, and the findings of the report formed the basis for much of the subsequent work under the grant. An explanation of the process is presented as well as the completed work on the four tasks.

Gabriel Miller

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

167

A Folk Tale of a Man Who Saves Three Animals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sman shad folk tale.WAV Length of track 00:17:16 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Title of track A Folk Tale of a Man Who Saves Three Animals Translation of title Description (to be used in archive entry... sgrol ma Date of recording November 17th 2009. Place of recording Ra'i kha , Mda ma Township, Sde dge County, Dkar mdzes Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province, China. Name(s), age, sex, place of birth of performer(s) Dben zen, born...

Zla ba sgrol ma

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

168

Nuclear Star Clusters - Structure and Stellar Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an overview of nuclear star cluster observations, covering their structure, stellar populations, kinematics and possible connection to black holes at the centers of galaxies.

Neumayer, Nadine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Four Most Populous States - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997. OVERVIEW: MOST POPULOUS STATES ... Homes with air-conditioning: 62%... with a central air-conditioning system: 18%

170

Optimal control of leukemic cell population dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 5, 2013 ... This issue can be formulated as an optimal control problem. The dynamics of leukemic cell populations in culture is given by age-structured...

171

Improvements in intrinsic feature pose measurement for awake animal imaging  

SciTech Connect

Development has continued with intrinsic feature optical motion tracking for awake animal imaging to measure 3D position and orientation (pose) for motion compensated reconstruction. Prior imaging results have been directed towards head motion measurement for SPECT brain studies in awake unrestrained mice. This work improves on those results in extracting and tracking intrinsic features from multiple camera images and computing pose changes from the tracked features over time. Previously, most motion tracking for 3D imaging has been limited to measuring extrinsic features such as retro-reflective markers applied to an animal's head. While this approach has been proven to be accurate, the use of external markers is undesirable for several reasons. The intrinsic feature approach has been further developed from previous work to provide full pose measurements for a live mouse scan. Surface feature extraction, matching, and pose change calculation with point tracking and accuracy results are described. Experimental pose calculation and 3D reconstruction results from live images are presented.

J.S. Goddard, J.S. Baba, S.J. Lee, A.G. Weisenberger, A. Stolin, J. McKisson, M.F. Smith

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Solar heating of integrated greenhouse-animal shelter systems  

SciTech Connect

An analytical procedure to determine the effectiveness of greenhouses as solar collectors was presented. This procedure was used to predict the effect of several construction parameters on solar radiation input to greenhouses. The orientation of the greenhouse was found to be the most effective construction parameter controlling solar radiation input to greenhouses. The effective albedo of the plant canopy was also found to be a significant factor. A new solar greenhouse design, suitable for high latitude regions was developed. The results showed that an internal solar collector could be incorporated as an integral part of the greenhouse design. The concept developed could be used as a free-standing greenhouse or in a combination with livestock building. The efficiency of the solar input was investigated for the conventional and the shed greenhouses, both as a free-standing unit and a greenhouse-animal shelter system, using computer simulation analyses. The results indicated that the efficiency of solar input is highly dependent on location; the effect of location on the shed type design is more profound. A typical case of a greenhouse-hog barn production system was investigated using computer simulation analyses. The results showed that such a food production system achieves a significant reduction in conventional fuel consumption due to both animal waste heat recovery and solar energy utilization.

Ben-Abdallah, N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Origin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Origin Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Feed Ingredients of Animal Or

174

Autonomous Pinniped Environmental Samplers: Using Instrumented Animals as Oceanographic Data Collectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data-recording tags applied to marine animals store data for later retrieval and can return valuable information on animal behavior and ecology, including habitat preference, physiology, and movement patterns, as well as environmental data. If ...

George W. Boehlert; Daniel P. Costa; Daniel E. Crocker; Phaedra Green; Todd O'Brien; Syd Levitus; Burney J. Le Boeuf

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Re-using traditional animation: methods for semi-automatic segmentation and inbetweening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large body of traditional animation exists that contains characters with poses, expressions, and appeal not easily achievable with modern 3D techniques. To create new uses for this body of animation, this paper presents components of a system that ...

Christina N. de Juan; Bobby Bodenheimer

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

fMRI assessment of small animals' phobia using virtual reality as stimulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to now, still images or videos of real animals have been used in functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) protocols to evaluate brain activations associated to small animals' phobia. Our aim in the present work is to evaluate the use of virtual ... Keywords: clinical assessment, neuroimaging, small animals' phobia, virtual reality

Miriam Clemente; Beatriz Rey; Mariano Alcaiz; Aina Rodrguez-Pujadas; Alfonso Barros-Loscertales; Csar vila; Juani Bretn-Lpez; Cristina Botella; Rosa M. Baos

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Slow down, you move too fast: examining animation aesthetics to promote eco-driving  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine how people perceive visual properties of new concepts for the design of animated vehicle instrument clusters, with emphasis on aesthetic aspects. The project is placed in the context of animations for eco-conscious driving. It consists of ... Keywords: aesthetics, animation, design, drivers, eco-efficiency, evaluation, in-vehicle

Noam Tractinsky; Ohad Inbar; Omer Tsimhoni; Thomas Seder

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Energy Systems and Population Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well-documented that energy and energy systems have a central role in social and economic development and human welfare at all scales, from household and community to regional and national (41). Among its various welfare effects, energy is closely linked with people s health. Some of the effects of energy on health and welfare are direct. With abundant energy, more food or more frequent meals can be prepared; food can be refrigerated, increasing the types of food items that are consumed and reducing food contamination; water pumps can provide more water and eliminate the need for water storage leading to contamination or increased exposure to disease vectors such as mosquitoes or snails; water can be disinfected by boiling or using other technologies such as radiation. Other effects of energy on public health are mediated through more proximal determinants of health and disease. Abundant energy can lead to increased irrigation, agricultural productivity, and access to food and nutrition; access to energy can also increase small-scale income generation such as processing of agricultural commodities (e.g., producing refined oil from oil seeds, roasting coffee, drying and preserving fruits and meats) and production of crafts; ability to control lighting and heating allows education or economic activities to be shielded from daily or seasonal environmental constraints such as light, temperature, rainfall, or wind; time and other economic resources spent on collecting and/or transporting fuels can be used for other household needs if access to energy is facilitated; energy availability for transportation increases access to health and education facilities and allow increased economic activity by facilitating the transportation of goods and services to and from markets; energy for telecommunication technology (radio, television, telephone, or internet) provides increased access to information useful for health, education, or economic purposes; provision of energy to rural and urban health facilities allows increased delivery and coverage of 3 various health services and interventions such as tests and treatments, better storage of medicine and vaccines, disinfection of medical equipment by boiling or radiation, and more frequent and efficient health system encounters through mobile clinics or longer working hours; and so on. In fact, while the dominant view of development-energy-health linkages has been that improvements in energy and health are outcomes of the socioeconomic development process (e.g., the ''energy ladder'' framework discussed below), it has even been argued that access to higher quality energy sources and technologies can initiate a chain of demographic, health, and development outcomes by changing the household structure and socioeconomic relationships. For example, in addition to increased opportunities for food and income production, reduced infant mortality as a result of transition to cleaner fuels or increased coverage of vaccination with availability of refrigerators in rural clinics may initiate a process of ''demographic transition'' to low-mortality and low-fertility populations (14). Such a transition has historically been followed with further improvements in maternal and child health and increased female participation in the labor markets and other economic activities.

Ezzati, Majid; Bailis, Rob; Kammen, Daniel M.; Holloway, Tracey; Price, Lynn; Cifuentes, Luis A.; Barnes, Brendon; Chaurey, Akanksha; Dhanapala, Kiran N.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

Methane Recovery from Animal Manures The Current Opportunities Casebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Growth and concentration of the livestock industry create opportunities for the proper disposal of the large quantities of manures generated at dairy, swine, and poultry farms. Pollutants from unmanaged livestock wastes can degrade the environment, and methane emitted from decomposing manure may contribute to global climate change. One management system not only helps prevent pollution but can also convert a manure problem into a new profit center. Economic evaluations and case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion of livestock manures is a commercially viable conversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable coproducts, including a cost-effective renewable fuel for livestock production operations. This casebook examines some of the current opportunities for recovering methane from anaerobic digestion animal manures.

Lusk, P.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

180

Methane recovery from animal manures: A current opportunities casebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One manure management system provides not only pollution prevention but also converts a manure management problem into a new profit center. Economic evaluations and case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion of livestock manures is a commercially-available bioconversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable co-products including a cost-effective renewable fuel for livestock production operations. This Casebook examines some of the current opportunities for the recovery of methane from the anaerobic digestion of animal manures. The economic evaluations are based on engineering studies of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Regression models, which can be used to estimate digester cost and internal rate of return, are developed from the evaluations. Finally, anaerobic digestion has considerable potential beyond agribusiness. Examples of digesters currently employed by other industries are provided.

Lusk, P. [Resource Development Associates, Marietta, GA (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fuel gas production from animal residue. Dynatech report No. 1551  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive mathematical model description of anaerobic digestion of animal residues was developed, taking into account material and energy balances, kinetics, and economics of the process. The model has the flexibility to be applicable to residues from any size or type of animal husbandry operation. A computer program was written for this model and includes a routine for optimization to minimum unit gas cost, with the optimization variables being digester temperature, retention time, and influent volatile solids concentration. The computer program was used to determine the optimum base-line process conditions and economics for fuel gas production via anaerobic digestion of residues from a 10,000 head environmental beef feedlot. This feedlot at the conditions for minimum unit gas cost will produce 300 MCF/day of methane at a cost of $5.17/MCF (CH/sub 4/), with a total capital requirement of $1,165,000, a total capital investment of $694,000, and an annual average net operating cost of $370,000. The major contributions to this unit gas cost are due to labor (37 percent), raw manure (11 percent), power for gas compression (10 percent), and digester cost (13 percent). A conceptual design of an anaerobic digestion process for the baseline conditions is presented. A sensitivity analysis of the unit gas cost to changes in the major contributions to unit gas cost was performed, and the results of this analysis indicate areas in the anaerobic digestion system design where reasonable improvements could be expected so as to produce gas at an economically feasible cost. This sensitivity analysis includes the effects on unit gas cost of feedlot size and type, digester type, digester operating conditions, and economic input data.

Ashare, E.; Wise, D.L.; Wentworth, R.L.

1977-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

182

Assessment of Technologies Used to Characterize Wildlife Populations in the Offshore Environment  

SciTech Connect

Wind energy development in the offshore environment can have both direct and indirect effects on wildlife, yet little is known about most species that use near-shore and offshore waters due in part to the difficulty involved in studying animals in remote, challenging environments. Traditional methods to characterize offshore wildlife populations include shipboard observations. Technological advances have provided researches with an array of technologies to gather information about fauna from afar. This report describes the use and application of radar, thermal and optical imagery, and acoustic detection technologies for monitoring birds, bats, and marine mammals in offshore environments.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Larson, Kyle B.

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hanford Site Regional Population - 2010 Census  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy conducts radiological operations in south-central Washington State. Population dose estimates must be performed to provide a measure of the impact from site radiological releases. Results of the U.S. 2010 Census were used to determine counts and distributions for the residential population located within 50-miles of several operating areas of the Hanford Site. Year 2010 was the first census year that a 50-mile population of a Hanford Site operational area exceeded the half-million mark.

Hamilton, Erin L.; Snyder, Sandra F.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

Estimating Traveler Populations at Airport and Cruise Terminals for Population Distribution and Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, uses of high-resolution population distribution databases are increasing steadily for environmental, socioeconomic, public health, and disaster-related research and operations. With the development of daytime population distribution, temporal resolution of such databases has been improved. However, the lack of incorporation of transitional population, namely business and leisure travelers, leaves a significant population unaccounted for within the critical infrastructure networks, such as at transportation hubs. This paper presents two general methodologies for estimating passenger populations in airport and cruise port terminals at a high temporal resolution which can be incorporated into existing population distribution models. The methodologies are geographically scalable and are based on, and demonstrate how, two different transportation hubs with disparate temporal population dynamics can be modeled utilizing publicly available databases including novel data sources of flight activity from the Internet which are updated in near-real time. The airport population estimation model shows great potential for rapid implementation for a large collection of airports on a national scale, and the results suggest reasonable accuracy in the estimated passenger traffic. By incorporating population dynamics at high temporal resolutions into population distribution models, we hope to improve the estimates of populations exposed to or at risk to disasters, thereby improving emergency planning and response, and leading to more informed policy decisions.

Jochem, Warren C [ORNL; Sims, Kelly M [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Urban, Marie L [ORNL; Rose, Amy N [ORNL; Coleman, Phil R [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Method for spatially distributing a population  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for spatially distributing a population count within a geographically defined area can include the steps of logically correlating land usages apparent from a geographically defined area to geospatial features in the geographically defined area and allocating portions of the population count to regions of the geographically defined area having the land usages, according to the logical correlation. The process can also include weighing the logical correlation for determining the allocation of portions of the population count and storing the allocated portions within a searchable data store. The logically correlating step can include the step of logically correlating time-based land usages to geospatial features of the geographically defined area. The process can also include obtaining a population count for the geographically defined area, organizing the geographically defined area into a plurality of sectors, and verifying the allocated portions according to direct observation.

Bright, Edward A [Knoxville, TN; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [Knoxville, TN; Coleman, Phillip R [Knoxville, TN; Dobson, Jerome E [Lawrence, KS

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

186

HUMAN SUBJECT RESEARCH INVOLVING SPECIAL SUBJECT POPULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, April 18, 1979. While there are legitimate ethical concerns whenever vulnerable populations are studied of which are intended to be submitted later to, or held for inspection by, the Food and Drug Administration

Sibille, Etienne

187

Planning combat outposts to maximize population security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combat outposts (COPs) are small, well-protected bases from which soldiers reside and conduct operations from. Used extensively during the "Surge" in Iraq, COPs are usually established in populated areas and are prevalent ...

Seidel, Scott B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Methane Recovery from Animal Manures The Current Opportunities Casebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Growth and concentration of the livestock industry create opportunities for the proper disposal of the large quantities of manures generated at dairy, swine, and poultry farms. Pollutants from unmanaged livestock wastes can degrade the environment, and methane emitted from decomposing manure may contribute to global climate change. One management system not only provides pollution prevention but also can convert a manure problem into a new profit center. Economic evaluations and case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion (AD) of livestock manures is a commercially available bioconversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable coproducts, including a cost-effective renewable fuel for livestock production operations. This Casebook examines some of the current opportunities for the recovery of methane from the AD animal manures. U.S. livestock operations currently employ four types of anaerobic digester technology: slurry, plug-flow, complete-mix, and covered lagoon. An introduction to the engineering economies of these technologies is provided, and possible end-use applications for the methane gas generated by the digestion process are discussed. The economic evaluations are based on engineering studies of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Case studies of operating digesters, with project and maintenance histories and the operators ''lessons learned,'' are included as reality checks. Factors necessary for successful projects, as well as a list of reasons explaining why some AD projects fail, are provided. The role of farm management is key; not only must digesters be well engineered and built with high-quality components, they must also be sited at farms willing to incorporate the uncertainties of a new technology. More than two decades of research has provided much information about how manure can be converted to an energy source; however, the American farmer has not been motivated to adopt new practices. More cost-effective and easily managed manure management techniques are still needed to encourage farmers to use animal manure for conversion into energy and nutrients, especially for smaller farms. AD benefits farmers monetarily and mitigates possible manure pollution problems, thereby sustaining development while maintaining environmental quality. Moreover, rural economic development will benefit from the implicit multiplier effect resulting from jobs created by implementing digester systems. Promising future waste-to-profit activities may add to the economic performance of AD. New end-use applications, which provide added value to coproducts, are discussed.

Lusk, P.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Epidemiology of Bacterial Food-borne Pathogens: Linking Intermittent Pathogen Shedding and Transmission in Their Animal Hosts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most bacterial foodborne pathogens are shed intermittently from their animal hosts and are able to grow and persist in the environment. Cattle and pigs constitute the major animal reservoirs for these pathogens. The overall objective of this dissertation research was to improve understanding of the role of intermittent shedding and environmental persistence in the transmission and maintenance of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in their animal host populations. This objective was addressed through five interdepended studies. The study in Chapter II, describes the transmission of E. coli O157:H7 in a dairy herd using mathematical modeling that includes indirect transmission from the contaminated environment. The model predicts that the elevated ambient temperature during summer, together with the availability of large amount of drinking water per cattle, are the major factors for increased pathogen load in water and high prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in cattle populations. The second study, in Chapter III, determined the variation in water-to-cattle ratios among feedlot pens and evaluated the association with the pen level management and environmental factors. Water-to-cattle ratio was found to vary greatly between feedlots and pens with lower water-to-cattle ratios on average had cooler drinking water. The study in Chapter IV, used a compartmental mathematical model of infection transmission, to evaluate the effect of cleaning on Salmonella Typhimurium control in a grower-finisher pig herd. Cleaning alone was not found to be an effective measure of control unless combined with other measures to reduce the level of bacterial shedding. The study in Chapter V, developed the multi-state Markov chain model to describe the fecal shedding pattern of three E. coli O157:H7 strains in cattle. One strain was not detected to shed, while the other two strains had on average different durations of host colonization, albeit not at the statistically significant level. The study in Chapter VI, used an experimental infection transmission approach to estimate and compare transmission rates for three different strains of E. coli O157:H7 in steers. The results revealed that the transmission rate of E. coli O157:H7 increases significantly with increasing levels of environmental contamination. Collectively, the five studies have highlighted the role of these pathogen characteristics in their transmission. The improved understanding of these characteristics will allow for better design of control measure to ensure food safety.

Gautam, Raju

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome Variation of Eastern Aleut Populations: Implications for the Genetic Structure and Peopling of the Aleutian Archipelago.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Aleuts are the native inhabitants of the Aleutian archipelago off the southwest coast of Alaska and, since Russian contact in 1741, have experienced a (more)

Zlojutro, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

United Nations Population Information Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United Nations Population Information Network United Nations Population Information Network Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: United Nations Population Information Network Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Focus Area: People and Policy Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.un.org/popin/ Cost: Free United Nations Population Information Network Screenshot References: United Nations Population Information Network[1] Logo: United Nations Population Information Network The Population Information Network (POPIN) strives to make international, regional and national population information, particularly information available from United Nations sources, easily available to the international community. "The Population Information Network (POPIN) was founded on 9 May 1979, by

192

Anatomic and functional imaging of tagged molecules in animals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel functional imaging system for use in the imaging of unrestrained and non-anesthetized small animals or other subjects and a method for acquiring such images and further registering them with anatomical X-ray images previously or subsequently acquired. The apparatus comprises a combination of an IR laser profilometry system and gamma, PET and/or SPECT, imaging system, all mounted on a rotating gantry, that permits simultaneous acquisition of positional and orientational information and functional images of an unrestrained subject that are registered, i.e. integrated, using image processing software to produce a functional image of the subject without the use of restraints or anesthesia. The functional image thus obtained can be registered with a previously or subsequently obtained X-ray CT image of the subject. The use of the system described herein permits functional imaging of a subject in an unrestrained/non-anesthetized condition thereby reducing the stress on the subject and eliminating any potential interference with the functional testing that such stress might induce.

Weisenberger, Andrew G. (Yorktown, VA); Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, VA)

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

193

Biological effectiveness of neutron irradiation on animals and man  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron experiments on a highly radiosensitive in vivo system - oocytes in mice - provide new insight into the nature of the radiosensitive targets of these important cells. With the radiobiological literature as background, neutron data from animals and humans are integrated, and the controversial question of radiation protection standards for neutrons is addressed. Oocyte killing in juvenile mice by 0.43-MeV, /sup 252/Cf-fission, and 15 MeV neutrons, compared with that by /sup 60/Co gamma rays, yields unusually low neutron RBEs (relative biological effectiveness). At 0.1 rad of 0.43-MeV neutrons the RBE is only 1.8, contrasting greatly with values of 100 or more reported at low-doses for other endpoints. In mice just prior to birth, however, when oocytes are less radiosensitive, the neutron RBE is much higher, similar to values for most other mammalian endpoints. This dramatic change in neutron RBE with mouse age (occurring within 2 to 3 days) can be explained as the result of a shift from a less radiosensitive target (presumably nuclear DNA) to a much more radiosensitive one (probably the oocyte plasma membrane). Using various approaches, a value for the neutron Quality Factor (Q, a radiation protection standard) is estimated as 17 (+-100%), much lower than 100 which has been suggested. With the large uncertainty, 17 is not markedly different from the value of 10 presently in general use.

Straume, T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

S&TR | March/April 2008: Animation Brings Science to Life  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animation Brings Science to Life; caption: This fly-over view of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge is included in a series of earthquake simulations. Livermore animator Michael Loomis used blueprints from 1936 to re-create the bridge's structure in three dimensions. Animation Brings Science to Life; caption: This fly-over view of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge is included in a series of earthquake simulations. Livermore animator Michael Loomis used blueprints from 1936 to re-create the bridge's structure in three dimensions. COMMUNICATING complex scientific and technological concepts to a variety of audiences may seem daunting to some, but for Lawrence Livermore animator Michael Loomis, it is all in a day's work. Through animation, Loomis helps scientists and engineers effectively explain their ideas and research to peers, colleagues, laypeople, and decision makers. He blends his knowledge of computer science, art, and communications to create technically accurate, aesthetically pleasing visualizations that bring

195

The Stellar Populations of Seyfert 2 Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a preliminary analysis of the stellar populations in the central parsecs of a sample of 22 Seyfert 2 galaxies, based on a careful separation of nebular emission and stellar light in high-spatial resolution HST-STIS spectra. 10% of the surveyed nuclei display stellar populations of intermediate age, 1-2 Gyr old, whereas the remaining targets appear to be evenly split between objects showing only very old stellar populations and nuclei requiring also an additional blue featureless component, which we characterise by means of very young, few-Myr-old stars. The small fraction of stellar population of intermediate age seems to argue against the presence of such a young component, however, since the short lifetime of O-stars would imply recurrent star-formation episodes and the build-up over the last 1-2 Gyr of a detectable intermediate-age population. Additionally, a correlation between the luminosity of such a blue component and the emission from highly-ionised species, together with the general absence of Wolf-Rayet features, further suggests that the featureless continuum arises from the central engine rather than from star-forming regions. We discuss our results in the framework of the unification paradigm and of models for star formation close to supermassive black holes.

Marc Sarzi; Joe Shields; Rick Pogge; Paul Martini

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Mitigation of Animal-Caused Outages For Distribution Lines and Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant number of electric outages throughout North America are caused by animals -- mammals, birds, snakes, etc. These animal-caused outages are increasingly common in both urban and residential areas. By taking a pro-active approach to mitigating outages, utilities will spare the lives of wildlife and address the increasing pressures from environmental groups and concerned utility customers. This document describes a study designed to mitigate animal-caused outages for distribution lines and subs...

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

197

REVIEW ARTICLE Preclinical animal research on therapy dosimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into radionuclide therapies based on radiation dosimetry will enable the use of any LETequivalent radionuclide. Radiation dose and dose rate have significant influence on dose effects in the tumour depending on its radiation sensitivity, possibilities for repair of sublethal damage, and repopulation during or after the therapy. Models for radiation response of preclinical tumour models after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy based on the linear quadratic model are presented. The accuracy of the radiation dose is very important for observation of dose-effects. Uncertainties in the radiation dose estimation arise from incomplete assay of the kinetics, low accuracy in volume measurements and absorbed dose S-values for stylized models instead of the actual animal geometry. Normal dose uncertainties in the order of 20 % might easily make the difference between seeing a dose-effect or missing it altogether. This is true for the theoretical case of a homogeneous tumour type behaving in vivo in the same way as its cells do in vitro. Heterogeneity of tumours induces variations in clonogenic cell density, radiation sensitivity, repopulation capacity and repair kinetics. The influence of these aspects are analysed within the linear quadratic model for tumour response to radionuclide therapy. Preclinical tumour models tend to be less heterogenic than the clinical conditions they should represent. The results of various preclinical radionuclide therapy experiments for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy are compared to the outcome of theoretical models and the influence of increased heterogeneity is analysed when the results of preclinical research is transferred to the clinic. When the radiation dose and radiobiology of the tumour response is known well enough it may be possible to leave the current phenomenological approach in preclinical radionuclide therapy

Dual Isotopes; Mark W. Konijnenberg; Marion De Jong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Selling the sweatdrop : the translation of 'Japaneseness' in manga and anime fan fiction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The worldwide popularity of Japanese comics (manga) and cartoons (anime) is significantly dependent on the translation of these texts for local contexts, and a number (more)

Leong, Jane Ying Yieng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Awake Animal Imaging at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Awake Animal Imaging at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIRSTTR Applications of...

200

Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted From Natural...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted From Natural Gas Cooking Burners Title Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted From Natural Gas Cooking Burners...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Tracer populations in the local group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, in good agreement with previous work. I go on to develop a set of tracer mass estimators that build on previous work which make use of actual (and not projected) distance and proper motion data, reflecting the amount and quality of data now available to us... ages range from 1-10 Gyr; the scale height of the population increases with age from 200 kpc to around 700 kpc and the metallicity decreases with age to around 20% solar. The typical content of this disk population are A stars, planetary nebulae...

Watkins, Laura Louise

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

202

Energy implications of an aging population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides various demographic, medical, and economic information relative to energy usage on a segment of the population, the elderly, which is growing in absolute numbers and relative population percentage. This growth is expected to continue well into the twenty-first century. The US aging population numbered 3.1 million in 1900, and by 1977 it had climbed to 23.5 million. It can be stated with reasonable certainty that this figure will rise to 31 million in the year 2000 and 43 million in the year 2020. These figures, corresponding to more than 10% of our population, are by no means insignificant. As our fossil-fuel reserves are being depleted and the cost of energy mounts, it becomes apparent that the elderly will become increasingly vulnerable to the energy crisis, primarily beause of their physical tendency to infirmity, their economic and social situation, and their susceptibility to psychological depression. This white paper concentrates on those aspects of aging and the nation's energy problem which are not usually related in our everyday consideration of these as separable problems. It seeks to identify the peculiar energy problems of the aged and to consider alternatives in the solution of these problems in light of modern technology.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus) Population Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus) Population Dynamics Delineated by Organochlorine Tracers R bluefin tuna (ABFT) are highly valued and heavily exploited, and critical uncertainties regarding. Hereweshowthatorganochlorinepesticidesandpolychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can be used as tracers of bluefin tuna foraging grounds in the North Atlantic

Hilton, Eric J.

204

Ontology-driven, unsupervised instance population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Semantic Web's need for machine understandable content has led researchers to attempt to automatically acquire such content from a number of sources, including the web. To date, such research has focused on ''document-driven'' systems that individually ... Keywords: Classification, Confidence assessment, Instance population, Ontology-driven, Semantic Web

Luke K. McDowell; Michael Cafarella

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Digitally complemented zoomorphism: a theoretical foundation for human-animal interaction design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From an interspecies perspective, we advocate for a theoretical foundation aimed at facilitating further research towards digitally mediated human-animal interaction. The proposed framework follows an approach we call 'digitally complemented zoomorphism' ... Keywords: design, human-animal interaction, play, technology, user experience

Michelle Westerlaken, Stefano Gualeni

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

An optical see-through augmented reality system for the treatment of phobia to small animals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an optical see-through (OST) Augmented Reality (AR) system for the treatment of phobia to small animals. Our group has already presented two AR systems for this treatment. The first system was a video see-through (VST) AR system. ... Keywords: augmented reality, optical see-through, phobia to small animals, virtual therapy

M. Carmen Juan; Mariano Alcaiz; Jrme Calatrava; Irene Zaragoz; Rosa Baos; Cristina Botella

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Is the presence of a companion animal dog beneficial for computer operators?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was conducted to assess whether workers' social facilitation-inhibition could be evoked by introducing a companion animal dog into the workplace or not. The experiments were carried out with three kinds of work conditions: working alone, ... Keywords: companion animal dog, physiological changes, social facilitation and inhibition, task performance

Rie Takeshima; Iiji Ogawa

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A color-action perceptual approach to the classification of animated movies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address a particular case of video genre classification, namely the classification of animated movies. This task is achieved using two categories of content descriptors, temporal and color based, which are adapted to this particular content. Temporal ... Keywords: action content, animated genre classification, color properties, video indexing

Bogdan Ionescu; Constantin Vertan; Patrick Lambert; Alexandre Benoit

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Understanding how children understand robots: Perceived animism in child-robot interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Centuries ago, the existence of life was explained by the presence of a soul (Tylor, 1871). Known as animism, this term was re-defined in the 1970s by Piaget as young children's beliefs that inanimate objects are capable of actions and have life-like ... Keywords: Animism, Child development, Children, Developmental psychology, Human-robot interaction, Robotics

Tanya N. Beran; Alejandro Ramirez-Serrano; Roman Kuzyk; Meghann Fior; Sarah Nugent

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Technical Section: Stream-based animation of real-time crowd scenes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new way of drawing a crowd of animated characters in real-time. Previous work has focused almost exclusively on how to visualize ever larger crowd scenes and the current state-of-the-art can display tens of thousands of virtual humans with ... Keywords: Animation, Crowd simulation, OpenCL

Wayne Daniel Lister; Andy Day

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Real-time motion effect enhancement based on fluid dynamics in figure animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In fast figure animation, motion blur is often employed to generate fantastic effects of figure motion, for exaggerating the atmosphere one wants to convey. In the previous works for long time, the solution based on certain kind of image blending in ... Keywords: GPU geometric processing, fluid dynamics, motion blur, skeletal animation

Tian-Chen Xu; En-Hua Wu; Mo Chen; Ming Xie

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASHINGTON WASHINGTON February 11, 1994 MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF ALL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT: Executive Order on Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low- Income Populations Today I have issued an Executive Order on Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations. That order is designed to focus Federal attention on the environmental and human health conditions in minority communities and low-income communities with the goal of achieving environmental justice. That order is also intended to promote nondiscrimination in Federal programs substantially affecting human health and the environment, and to provide minority communities and low-income communities access to public

213

Population Viability Analysis of Riverine Fishes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many utilities face conflkts between two goals: cost-efficient hydropower generation and protecting riverine fishes. Research to develop ecological simulation tools that can evaluate alternative mitigation strategies in terms of their benefits to fish populations is vital to informed decision-making. In this paper, we describe our approach to population viability analysis of riverine fishes in general and Snake River white sturgeon in particular. We are finding that the individual-based modeling approach used in previous in-stream flow applications is well suited to addressing questions about the viability of species of concern for several reasons. Chief among these are: (1) the abiIity to represent the effects of individual variation in life history characteristics on predicted population viabili~, (2) the flexibili~ needed to quanti~ the ecological benefits of alternative flow management options by representing spatial and temporal variation in flow and temperaturty and (3) the flexibility needed to quantifi the ecological benefits of non-flow related manipulations (i.e., passage, screening and hatchery supplementation).

Bates, P.; Chandler, J.; Jager, H.I.; Lepla, K.; Van Winkle, W.

1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

214

(2) Quantities and Prices of Animal Manure and Gaseous Fuels Generated:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this context, we are defining animal manure as the excrement of livestock reared in agricultural operations as well as straw, sawdust, and other residues used as animal bedding. Gaseous fuels may be derived from municipal and industrial landfills (landfill gas) or from animal manure and solid biomass such as crop silage or the organic fraction of MSW (biogas). Both landfill gas and biogas are generated via anaerobic digestion, a multi-stage process whereby bacteria convert carbohydrates, fats, and proteins to methane (Evans 2001). EPA does not consider these materials to be wastes in themselves, when used as fuel, but rather materials derived from wastes.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A Tangible Interface for High-Level Direction of Multiple Animated Characters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many training, education, and visualization environments would benefit from realistic animated characters. Unfortunately, interfaces for character motion specification are often complex and ill-suited to non-experts. We present a tangible interface for basic character manipulation on planar surfaces. In particular, we focus on interface aspects specific to 2D gross character animation such as path and timing specification. Our approach allows for character manipulation and high-level motion specification through a natural metaphor the figurine. We present an example interface for designing and visualizing strategy in the sport of American football and discuss usability studies of this interface. Key words: tangible interfaces, animation 1

Ronald A. Metoyer

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: February 7, 1: February 7, 2011 Population Density to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density on AddThis.com... Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density The density of the population in the U.S., measured as the number of people

217

Personal Virtual Humans Inhabiting the TalkZone and beyond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the fundamental goals of graphics has always been to visually create a three-dimensional person that is indistinguishable from a real person. This target is only slightly short of being reached, as was demonstrated when Columbia Pictures released ...

D. Ballin; M. Lawson; M. A. Lumkin; J. Osborne

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Toward a shifting inhabitation, Kaho'olawe, Hawaii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The island of Kaho'olawe is a desert island in the Romantic sense: it is unapproachable and unsettleable, yet always an object of desire. Waterless, used for military target practice, cleaned up, and being replanted, the ...

Gillmar, Emily S. T., 1978-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Protecting Lab land and the creatures that inhabit it  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

100 tons of biomass, and chipping that debris to make it available for landscaping and compost through the Los Alamos County landfill; Grading roads to create fire breaks and...

220

Awake Animal Imaging at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Awake Animal Imaging at BNL Awake Animal Imaging at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Awake Animal Imaging at BNL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Awake Animal Imaging at BNL - micro PET Developed at: BNL Developed in: 2002- current Result of NP research: Basic NP research - Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

There can still be only one: independent animation production for the lonely  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This course is designed to introduce the participant to professional digital production procedures used in the animation industry and their application for use by individuals or small groups. Participants will learn the logical order of production, organization, ...

Steve Rittler

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Tracking animals in freshwater with electronic tags: past, present and future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2013:819860. Eiler JH: Tracking aquatic animals with radioRamm DC: Electromagnetic tracking of rock lobsters (Jasuswith a new estuarine fish tracking system. J Fish Biol 1988,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

Gambhir, Sanjiv (Portola Valley, CA); Pritha, Ray (Mountain View, CA)

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

224

Methods and technologies for high-throughput and high-content small animal screening  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-throughput and high-content screening (HTS and HCS) of whole animals requires their immobilization for high-resolution imaging and manipulation. Here we present methods to enable HTS and HCS of the nematode Caenorhabditis ...

Rohde, Christopher, 1979-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal OriginChapter 5 Conclusions on Saponification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal Origin Chapter 5 Conclusions on Saponification Food Science eChapters Food Science & Technology Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 5 Conclusions on Saponification from ...

226

Animal /sup 13/C//sup 12/C correlates with trophic level in pelagic food webs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whatever the underlying cause(s), our observations further substantiate the existence of small but progressive increases in animal tissue /sup 13/C//sup 12/C with increasing trophic level. Such a relationship has significant implications for the use of stable carbon isotope natural abundance in animal tissues or remains, in order to interpret the tropic structure and food base of past as well as present-day animal communities. The delta/sup 13/C of the marine animal tissues analyzed ranged from -20.6 to -15.8%. The macro-fauna from the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean had higher isotope values than the net plankton collected from the same area. The average increases in delta/sup 13/C per trophic level were 0.73 and 1.38% for the California coastal waters and for the eastern tropical Pacific, respectively. These isotopic increases approximate closely those previously reported to occur within single trophic level steps.

Rau, G.H.; Mearns, A.J.; Young, D.R.; Olson, R.J.; Schafer, H.A.; Kaplan, I.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und le)Chapter 3 Animal Fats and Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und le) Chapter 3 Animal Fats and Oils Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

228

Playable universal capture: compression and real-time sequencing of image-based facial animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a facial animation playback scheme based on simultaneous encoding of captured face textures and geometric positions. The high quality facial data is acquired using a more robust variant of the Universal Capture (UCap) technique that ...

George Borshukov; Jefferson Montgomery; Witek Werner

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

GMOs in animal agriculture: time to consider both costs and benefits in regulatory evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

81%), corn (35%), and canola (30%) crops grown globally areGE corn, soybean, cotton, canola, wheat, potato, alfalfa,Soybeans Maize (Corn) Cotton Canola Page 9 of 14 animal feed

Van Eenennaam, Alison L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Keeping two animal systems in one lab a frog plus fish case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For two decades, my lab has been studying development using two vertebrate animals, the frog Xenopus and the zebrafish, Danio. This has been both productive and challenging. The initial rationale for the choice was to ...

Sive, Hazel L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Eurographics/ ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation (2012) P. Kry and J. Lee (Editors)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eurographics/ ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation (2012) P. Kry and J. Lee (Editors by the surrounding air flow, and this poses real issues in determining an appropriate extrapolated velocity field. We

Bejerano, Gill

232

TBAG: a high level framework for interactive, animated 3D graphics applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a paradigm and toolkit for rapid prototyping of interactive, animated 3D graphics programs. The paradigm has its roots in declarative programming, emphasizing immutable values, first class functions, and relations, applying these concepts ... Keywords: local propagation constraints

Conal Elliott; Greg Schechter; Ricky Yeung; Salim Abi-Ezzi

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals  

SciTech Connect

Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imageable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

Gambhir; Sanjiv (Portola Valley, CA), Pritha; Ray (Mountain View, CA)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

Enhanced animation of parallel algorithms. Volume 1. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect

Algorithm animation is a visualization method used to enhance understanding of the functioning of an algorithm or program. Visualization is used for many purposes, including education, algorithm research, performance analysis, and program debugging. This research, which follows from previous work, examines algorithm animation requirements for the various visualization purposes and extends the capabilities of an existing facility, the AFIT Algorithm Animation Research Facility (AAARF). The structure of AAARF is summarised and its visualization capabilities presented, analysed and compared with other similar packages. This research focuses on the parallel data requirements of the AAARF users, and the meaningful display of large amounts of data. This paper discusses a series of refined animations suitable for a variety of purposes which are capable of conveying detailed information in a concise and timely manner and the development and implementation of a new performance animation type is presented. These animations are built upon pedagogical efforts in a classroom environment. To assist novice users in efficiently using AAARF, an expert system interface has been implemented to advise on optimizing environment configuration. Considerable effort has been devoted to porting AAARF to the X Windows environment and the lessons learned and progress made are discussed.

Lack, M.D.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Semiannual Program Review1 Use this checklist and the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, (1996 edition)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Macroenvironment YN?X Has consideration been given to the actual environment surrounding the animal as opposed

Bandettini, Peter A.

236

Ecosystem-specific selection pressures revealed through comparative population genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacterial populations harbor vast genetic diversity that is continually shaped by abiotic and biotic selective pressures, as well as by neutral processes. Individuals coexisting in the same geographically defined population ...

Coleman, Maureen L.

237

Will China's Vehicle Population Grow Even Faster than Forecasted?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daniel Sperling. 2011. Chinas Soaring Vehicle Population:the longer version, Chinas Soaring Vehicle Population:Vehicle Sales and Stock in China, Energy Policy, 43: 1729.

Wang, Yunshi; Teter, Jacob; Sperling, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Variability of Population-Weighted Seasonal Heating Degree Days  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional and national heating fuel demand is related to both weather and population density. This study analyzes the variability of population-weighted, seasonal heating degree days for the coterminous 48 states. A risk assessment of unusual ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The SignCom system for data-driven animation of interactive virtual signers: Methodology and Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we present a multichannel animation system for producing utterances signed in French Sign Language (LSF) by a virtual character. The main challenges of such a system are simultaneously capturing data for the entire body, including the ... Keywords: Communicative gestures, data-driven animation, multichannel animation, multimedia generation, multimodal corpora, signed language gestures

Sylvie Gibet; Nicolas Courty; Kyle Duarte; Thibaut Le Naour

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

How Do Recent Population Trends Matter to Climate Change?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. By ensuring couples are able to determine the size of their families, poverty and the depletion of natural change, as one of the root causes of greenhouse gas emissions, how population dynamics affect climate of total population size, research shows that changes in population composition (i.e. age, urban

Colorado at Boulder, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Identifying phylogeographic patterns and population history in Mediterranean rock ferns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Q-matrix plots of K=2 through K=5 for 53 sampled populations All populations N>15 -30000 -25000 -20000 -15000 -10000 -5000 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 K L n P ( D ) 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 D e l t a K Populations n>15 excluding Valencia -14600...

Hunt, Harriet

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

242

Treatment of bovine cancer-eye (and other animal tumors) with heat  

SciTech Connect

Hyperthermia appears to be an excellent technique for the treatment of a variety of animal tumors. While this report has emphasized the application of hyperthermia to bovine cancer-eye, there cannot be serious doubt about the potential for wider applications of the technique. We have collaborated with the Animal Resource Facility at the University of New Mexico in the successful treatment of a variety of tumors in small animals which would not be a particular interest to stockmen, but the program included the successful treatment of a number of sarcoids in horses. This investigation involving heat effects on sarcoids will continue, but early results appear to be promising. Other veterinarians are using the commercial hyperthermia instruments to treat a variety of small-animal tumors; these practitioners are enthusiastic about the results but no data have been published to date. We have treated an equine lid tumor with good results, and others are pursuing investigations in this area. Use of commercial hyperthermia instruments for treatment of any condition other than bovine cancer-eye or similar small tumors on animals cannot be justified. Like other therapeutic techniques, hyperthermia must be applied to appropriate cases and retreatment will be necessary in some instances. (ERB)

Doss, J.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The distribution of stellar population age in galactic bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent analysis of stellar populations in barred galaxies have focused on the spatial distribution of stellar population ages and metallicities. However, barred galaxies are complex objects where dynamical instabilities play a leading role in shaping any spatial distribution. The age distribution of stellar populations should thus be analyzed from the two points of view of stellar population evolution and dynamical secular evolution. Chemodynamical simulations of single barred galaxies with simple but realistic star formation and feedback recipes are used to produce face-on mass-weighted maps of stellar population ages. Luminosity-weighted maps in V-band are also displayed after calibrating the simulation with mass-to-light ratios provided by a synthesis population model. It is shown that inside a stellar bar two persistent diametrically opposed regions display a mean age lower than the surrounding average. These two low-age regions are due to the accumulation of young stellar populations trapped on elliptica...

Wozniak, H

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Animations, Videos, and Other Flashy Shiny Things from EERE | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Animations, Videos, and Other Flashy Shiny Things from EERE Animations, Videos, and Other Flashy Shiny Things from EERE Animations, Videos, and Other Flashy Shiny Things from EERE May 19, 2009 - 12:21pm Addthis Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory While it doesn't fit quite perfectly into the little niche of "energy-saving things you can do at home," I found myself thinking while I stared at EERE's new Multimedia Site this week. I started thinking about how there were a lot of really simple, really cute files here that explained how renewable energy and energy efficient technologies worked, and all in a way that anyone could understand. And I thought, well, wouldn't this be helpful to show around? So I guess my post this week will be educational. If nothing else, the Multimedia site has some fun stuff that you can click around and play with,

245

Desferal (DFO) induced Ga-67 washout from normal tissue, tumor and abscess in experimental animals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the experimental animal, desferal (DFO) given intravenously washes out Ga-67 from all tissues. This effect is not uniform: blood activity is reduced very markedly, while liver activity is less affected. Maximal effect of DFO occurs if given close to the Ga-67 injection. When the time interval between the two is increased, the absolute amount of Ga-67 excreted in the urine in excess of the spontaneous excretion is reduced. Administration of DFO does not effect Ga-67 gastrointestinal excretion. In three animal tumor models (EMT-6 sarcoma in Balb/c mice, spontaneous adenocarcinoma in mice, and spontaneous adenocarcinoma in the rabbit) and in sterile abscess-bearing rats, the administration of DFO 24 hrs after Ga-67-citrate improves significantly the target-to-nontarget ratio. Animals given 50 mg/kg DFO I.V. after Ga-67 citrate showed a significant reduction in the whole-body activity as seen in a one-week follow up.

Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Atkins, H.L.; Brill, A.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Animate Characters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The world of everyday interactions is filled with characters, real or fictitious, and human knowledge of how to make these interactions satisfying and productive relies upon an understanding of character. As agents become more intelligent and more ubiquitous, ... Keywords: actors, believable agent, digital storytelling, human-computer interaction, intelligent agents, lifelike characters, virtual theater

Barbara Hayes-Roth; Patrick Doyle

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Animal Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... treated for nausea and other gas-related symptoms. ... lucrative export commodity after oil.2 The ... World Extra-Fine Cotton Outlook," paper presented to ...

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Animal Tails  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and orangutan. Manx cats from the Isle of Man, and the Schipperke -- a Belgian breed of dog -- have no tails at all. Although they live in trees, like monkeys, the sloths of...

249

Optimization of a rapid microbiological method for the assessment of lysine bioavailability of animal feed proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Achieving nutritional requirements can be a difficult hics. task with the wide variety of protein sources utilized in the feed industry. Assessing the biological availability of amino acids in protein sources rapidly is essential to satisfy dietary requirements and for least cost feed formulation. Of the amino acids, lysine is of key importance due to it being first or second limiting in poultry diets. Therefore, a deficiency or absence of lysine can halt protein synthesis in the animal hindering proper growth and maintenance. The standard method to quantitate the biological availability of lysine is to perform animal growth or digestibility assays, but such assays do not provide a cost effective, timely and reliable determination of lysine availability. Microbiological assays are a rapid and cost effective alternative to animal bioassays. Auxotrophic mutants of Escherichia coli have been shown to be an accurate indicator of amino acid availability in various protein sources when compared to animal and chemical data. The objective of this research is to develop a more rapid in vitro amino acid bioassay for lysine utilizing an E. coli lysine auxotroph that is comparable to conventional in vitro assays for lysine bioavailability. This involves (1) developing a standard medium for lysine assessment of protein sources that will eliminate background microform from protein sources (2) developing a standardized enzyme digest step that can be used on a wide variety of protein sources and (3) developing a luminescent lysine auxotroph strain of E. coli for more rapid lysine assessment. Completion of these objectives will allow the rapid determination of lysine availability and potentially replace animal bioassays resulting in improvements in nutritional quality and cost effectiveness of diets for animal consumption.

Erickson, Anne Marie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Special population planner, version 4.0.  

SciTech Connect

Emergencies happen every day. Many are caused by storms or auto accidents and can be planned for, if not predicted. Emergencies resulting from natural hazards often affect a large number of people, and planning for them can be difficult, since knowledge of the needs of the people involved is generally unavailable. Emergencies resulting from accidents at industrial and military facilities can also be large scale in nature if people must be evacuated or sheltered in place. Federal planning for large scale emergencies is the responsibility of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which provides assistance to various emergency management agencies at the national, state and local level. More information about FEMA is available at http://www.fema.gov/. The purpose of the Special Population Planner (SPP) is to help emergency planners address the needs of persons with special needs. The exact definition of 'special population' is a policy decision. Policymakers have included a variety of groups in this term, such as persons with disabilities, those who do not have vehicles with which to evacuate, children who are unattended at times (latchkey children), and many others. The SPP was developed initially for the Alabama Emergency Management Agency as part of its Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), which aids emergency planning and preparedness in communities surrounding military installations across the United States where chemical weapons are stored pending their destruction under federal law. Like that specialized application, this open-source version contains a set of specialized Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to facilitate emergency planning on behalf of persons with special needs, regardless of how the term is defined. While the original SPP system was developed for emergency planning relating to chemical hazards, it can be applied to other threats as well. It is apparent from Hurricane Katrina and other natural and man-made disasters that many of the problems posed by emergency planning for a chemical weapons agent release are shared by other hazards as well. The notion that emergency planning shares common functions underlies the decision by FEMA to include the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) in its 'all-hazards' planning approach. The CSEPP's official planning guidance operationalizes this approach by suggesting that state and local CSEPP emergency plans 'should be appended to the existing all-hazards emergency plan.' The SPP is programmed as a set of tools within an ESRI ArcMap 9.1 project. ArcMap is a component of both ESRI ArcGIS 9.1 and ESRI ArcView 9.1, and it provides a rich GIS user interface for viewing spatial and tabular data, analyzing it, and producing output reports and maps. This GIS interface has been augmented with the SPP tools for a user interface that provides custom functionality for emergency planning. The system as released also includes some hypothetical example records for special needs populations, facilities, resources, control points and sirens sufficient for showing how the system would work with real information. A GIS database is included with some publicly available example layers. The SPP is designed to support emergency planners as they address emergency management issues, and includes capabilities that support the collection and importing of data, the review of data in a spatial context, and GIS tools for emergency planning. The SPP system allows for the identification and categorization of response zones to allow for multiple levels of preparedness. An Immediate Response Zone (IRZ) might be designated as the area 0 to 10 miles from a facility where the response would be the most urgent. SPP can support more than one set of planning zones to accommodate different types of emergencies or the different jurisdictions of emergency response organizations. These areas can be delineated by any number of criteria that make sense for the area. An area like New Orleans might designate response zones based on the depth above/below s

Kuiper, J.; Tanzman, E.; Metz, W.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

251

Biomarkers of Exposure to Foodborne and Environmental Carcinogens: Enterosorbent Intervention in a High Risk Population  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need to assess human exposures to foodborne and environmental carcinogens, particularly in populations at high risk for cancer and disease, has led to the development of chemical-specific biomarkers. Sensitive biomarkers for aflatoxin and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been useful in providing information on population exposure and reducing associated public health impacts. Aflatoxins are fungal metabolites found in a variety of foods. Among these toxins, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most predominant and hepatocarcinogenic. Acutely, AFB1 can cause disease and death, necessitating safe and effective intervention strategies. Inclusion of NovaSil (NS) clay in the diet represents a practical, sustainable approach. NS has been shown to prevent aflatoxicosis in multiple animal species by binding aflatoxins in the gastrointestinal tract, reducing toxin bioavailability. Co-exposure to PAHs, hazardous environmental contaminants, has been shown to increase the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Therefore, objectives of this research were to utilize biomarkers to assess aflatoxin and PAH exposures in susceptible populations in Ghana and the U.S. and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of NS intervention in Ghana (a population at risk for aflatoxicosis). After 3-month intervention with 3.0g NS/day, median aflatoxin M1 (an AFB1 metabolite) was significantly reduced (up to 58 percent) compared to the placebo group. Furthermore, no significant differences were found in levels of nutrient minerals between NS and placebo groups at baseline and 3-months suggesting NS can be used to effectively sorb AFB1 without affecting serum concentrations of important minerals. PAH biomarker results showed participants in Ghana were significantly exposed to high levels of PAHs based on the presence of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) in the majority of urines (98.9 percent). NS treatment had no effect on 1-OHP levels, further confirming the preferential binding of aflatoxins by NS. U.S. population data from a Hispanic community in Texas with an elevated incidence of HCC demonstrated a lower percentage and level of aflatoxin and PAH biomarkers. Aflatoxin M1 excretion, however, was associated with increased consumption of certain foods prone to aflatoxin contamination; thus, some individuals may be more vulnerable to exposure and associated interactions that increase the risk for HCC (e.g., PAHs or hepatitis infection).

Johnson, Natalie Malek

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The elusive minimum viable population size for white sturgeon  

SciTech Connect

Biological conservation of sturgeon populations is a concern for many species. Those responsible for managing the white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and similar species are interested in identifying extinction thresholds to avoid. Two thresholds that exist in theory are the minimum viable population size (MVP) and minimum amount of suitable habitat. In this paper, we present both model and empirical estimates of these thresholds. We modified a population viability analysis (PVA) model for white sturgeon to include two new Allee mechanisms. Despite this, PVA-based MVP estimates were unrealistically low compared with empirical estimates unless opportunities for spawning were assumed to be less frequent. PVA results revealed a trade-off between MVP and habitat thresholds; smaller populations persisted in longer river segments and vice versa. Our empirical analyses suggested (1) a MVP range based on population trends from 1,194 to 27,700 individuals, and (2) a MVP estimate of 4,000 individuals based on recruitment. Long-term historical population surveys are needed for more populations to pinpoint an MVP based on trends, whereas the available data were sufficient to estimate MVP based on recruitment. Beyond the MVP, we developed a hierarchical model for population status based on empirical data. Metapopulation support was the most important predictor of population health, followed by the length of free-flowing habitat, with habitat thresholds at 26 and 150 km. Together, these results suggest that habitat and connectivity are important determinants of population status that likely influence the site-specific MVP thresholds.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Lepla, Ken B. [Idaho Power Company; Van Winkle, Webb [Van Windle Environmental Consulting; James, Mr Brad [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; McAdam, Dr Steve [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Cooperative spin decoherence and population transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ensemble of multilevel atoms is a good candidate for a quantum information storage device. The information is encrypted in the collective ground state atomic coherence, which, in the absence of external excitation, is decoupled from the vacuum and therefore decoherence free. However, in the process of manipulation of atoms with light pulses (writing, reading), one inadvertently introduces a coupling to the environment, i.e. a source of decoherence. The dissipation process is often treated as an independent process for each atom in the ensemble, an approach which fails at large atomic optical depths where cooperative effects must be taken into account. In this paper, the cooperative behavior of spin decoherence and population transfer for a system of two, driven multilevel-atoms is studied. Not surprisingly, an enhancement in the decoherence rate is found, when the atoms are separated by a distance that is small compared to an optical wavelength; however, it is found that this rate increases even further for somewhat larger separations for atoms aligned along the direction of the driving field's propagation vector. A treatment of the cooperative modification of optical pumping rates and an effect of polarization swapping between atoms is also discussed, lending additional insight into the origin of the collective decay.

C. Genes; P. R. Berman

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

255

Human health issues for plutonium inhalation: Perspectives from laboratory animal studies  

SciTech Connect

Since the first production of plutonium in the 1940s, potential health effects from plutonium have been a concern for humans. The few people exposed to plutonium and the relatively small intakes that have occurred, at least in the Western world, have resulted in very little direct information from human population studies. The Manhattan Project workers have been followed for decades, and few health effects have been observed. The situation is similar for the population of workers at the Rocky Flats facility. Some information is now being released from the former Soviet Union on selected worker populations who show biological effects, primarily pulmonary fibrosis and some increase in lung cancers.

Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Guilmette, R.A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Effectiveness of Emergency Preparedness Animal Issues Education: Perceived Advantages and Obstacles of Roles Played By Texas AgriLife Extension Service Agents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As Extension begins to develop educational program delivery strategies for Emergency Preparedness and Management education, the major challenge will be to establish a culture among county agriculture and natural resources (ANR) Extension agents to integrate this educational programming into ongoing programming to ensure added value to this innovation and its unit of adoption. The attitudes and perceptions of these ANR agents in overall programming efforts will be extremely important for adoption and further dissemination of Emergency Preparedness and Management education to all clientele; therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine what Extension ANR agents perceived as advantages and obstacles associated with the organization and implementation of Emergency Preparedness and Management education and the necessity for establishing local animal issues committees. The study population was Texas AgriLife Extension Service ANR agents. The agents were from both rural and urban counties, in various stages in their careers and various stages of the organization, facilitation and implementation of Emergency Preparedness and Management education and animal issues committee establishment. An online instrument was developed based on a review of related literature. The instrument had 19 total question sets pertaining to the 4 objectives of the study and included matrix, multiple choice and yes/no questions. Questions to obtain demographic information (gender, age, Extension affiliation, years of employment with Extension, and county size) were also asked. Results indicated ANR agents felt Extension should be involved in the organization, planning and implementation of educational efforts in Emergency Preparedness and Management and also the establishment and maintenance of Animal Issues Committees. ANR agents indicated Extension?s best approach would be to help identify innovators, adopters and the resources needed for Emergency Preparedness and Management and Animal Issues Committees. The success or failure of educational programming for Emergency Management depends on the help or assistance that is provided by the key stakeholders and agencies in counties. From this study, it is apparent local stakeholder and agency involvement has been an advantage and obstacle for Texas AgriLife Extension ANR agents in the state of Texas.

Maxwell, Ricky G.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A computer program for monitoring and controlling ultrasonic anemometers for aerodynamic measurements in animal buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultrasonic anemometers (USAs) are widely implemented in animal housing to measure the air velocity in different measuring points throughout the whole barn, which ultimately leads to determine the velocity fields and the air flow patterns drawing a clear ... Keywords: Aerodynamics, Air profile, Airflow, Computer program, Precision livestock farming, Ultrasonic anemometer

M. Samer; C. Loebsin; K. von Bobrutzki; M. Fiedler; C. Ammon; W. Berg; P. Sanftleben; R. Brunsch

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal Origin, by M.E.Chevreul  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A historical perspective on the chemical nature of fats. A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal Origin, by M.E.Chevreul Food Science Methods and Analyses Food Science & Technology Methods - Analyses Books Soft Bound Books Methods 4DF959230222CE

259

OIL IN THE OPEN WATER microscopic plants and animals that form the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL IN THE OPEN WATER microscopic plants and animals that form the basis of the oceanic food web the surface, corals and other deepwater OIL AND HUMAN USE Wellhead CORALS · Coral surveys · Tissue collections · Transect surveys to detect submerged oil · Oil plume modeling · Sediment sampling AQUATIC VEGETATION

260

Macro and microclimate: from beneficial to noxious action on the animals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The object of research was to evaluate the microclimate parameters by determining the correlation between the incidence of potentially mycotoxigenic fungi strains in forages given to dairy cows, and the temperature, relative humidity and rainfall in ... Keywords: animals, factors, interaction, macroclimate, microclimate

Violeta-Elena Simion; Alexandru T. Bogdan; Viorel Andronie; Iudith Ipate; Monica Prvu; Brndu?a Covaci; Elena Mitr?nescu; Cristina Andronie

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Spatial transfer functions: a unified approach to specifying deformation in volume modeling and animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce the concept of spatial transfer functions as a unified approach to volume modeling and animation. A spatial transfer function is a function that defines the geometrical transformation of a scalar field in space, and is a generalization ...

M. Chen; D. Silver; A. S. Winter; V. Singh; N. Cornea

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Reduction of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Present in Food Animal Manures by Composting and Anaerobic Digestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Anaerobic Digestion Frederick C. Michel, Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering Zhongtang Yu, Animal concluded that both anaerobic digestion and composting--especially at elevated temperatures--are effective effectiveness of anaerobic digestion and composting at high temperatures is of interest to industry

Jones, Michelle

263

Animated Engineering Tutors: Middle School Students' Preferences and Rationales on Multiple  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dimensions Gamze Ozogul, Amy Johnson, and Martin Reisslein School of Electrical, Computer and Energy tutor such as gender, age, personality, and clothing. Results showed that for teaching engineering to their age, matching their own gender, with a fun personality, and that speaks slowly. Keywords: animated

Reisslein, Martin

264

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal OriginChapter 6 Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal Origin Chapter 6 Summary Food Science eChapters Food Science & Technology AOCS E4F93D88ED6FF2E57A2710C852F5F645 Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Summary on Sa

265

Contact model, fit process and, foot animation for the virtual simulator of the footwear comfort  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the new advances carried out for Simucal. Simucal was introduced in [13] and it is a footwear virtual simulator designed to perform studies of comfort and functionality in CAD footwear design. In this paper, a new finite element ... Keywords: Contact model, Foot animation, Shoe upper, Virtual simulation

M. J. Ruprez; C. Monserrat; S. Alemany; M. C. Juan; M. Alcaz

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Research Summary Assessing and communicating animal disease risks for countryside users  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

initially on Lyme disease, an infection caused by a spiral bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi that is found in a number of wild animal hosts and which can be transferred to humans by infected ticks. Lyme disease in Lyme disease resulting from changes in environmental factors mdevelop appropriate risk assessment

267

EXCRETION OF ALPHA-FOETOPROTEIN IN THE URINE OF PREGNANT RATS AND HEPATOMA-BEARING ANIMALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary.-Urine of normal rats, pregnant animals and animals bearing chemically induced hepatoma was tested with antisera to foetoproteins by the double immunodiffusion technique. Antigens were not detected in the urine of normal rats. Alpha-foetoprotein was demonstrated in the urine of pregnant rats and hepatomabearing animals. THREE specific embryonic proteins have been described in the rat. One antigen, the lipoprotein esterase, is present in the serum of the adult animal in minute amounts. The other two constituents, alpha-foetoprotein and alpha-M-foetoprotein, formerly termed LA antigen and alpha-2-glycoprotein, normally occur in the serum of the foetus, neonate and pregnant rat (Stanislawski-Birencwajg, 1967). Alpha-M-foetoprotein also appears in the serum of rats with acute toxic liver injury and following a variety of experimental procedures (van Gool and Ladiges, 1969; Heim and Lane, 1964). On the other hand, both foetoproteins are detected in the serum of rats with chemically induced hepatoma (Stanislawski-Birencwajg, Uriel and Grabar,. 1967). Since the alpha-foetoprotein (AFP) is present in the amniotic fluid, to which foetal urine contributes substantially (Pitkin, Reynolds and Burchell, 1968; Vernier and Smith, 1968), it is surprising that urinary excretion in the adult has received little attention (Masseyeff, 1972). In the rat, urinary excretion of non-plasma proteins, i.e. tissue antigens emanating from the accessory sex glands, kidneys, liver and testes, has been reported from

E. Okon; E. Rosenmann; T. Dishont; J. H. Boss

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

Russell, Lynn

269

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619 (9:1) OR Biohazard symbol (if untreated) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address

Firtel, Richard A.

270

Eurographics/ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation (2009) Eitan Grinspun and Jessica Hodgins (Editors)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eurographics/ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation (2009) Eitan Grinspun and Jessica Hodgins characters, even for non-experts. Categories and Subject Descriptors (according to ACM CCS): I.3.7 [Computer a rubber tube full of air. Bottom: Making an elephant sit where the original volume is integrally restored

Frey, Pascal

271

Eurographics/ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation (2004) R. Boulic, D. K. Pai (Editors)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eurographics/ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation (2004) R. Boulic, D. K. Pai (Editors the appearance of one continuous surface. At the fluid-air boundary, we integrate bubbles whenever level air that has become trapped within the fluid surface. In addition, we detect empty pockets within

House, Donald H.

272

Eurographics/ ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation (2008) M. Gross and D. James (Editors)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eurographics/ ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation (2008) M. Gross and D. James (Editors projection of Batty et al. [BBB07]. Categories and Subject Descriptors (according to ACM CCS): I.3, at the interface between air and liquid a host of complex and distinctive effects can arise. When viscous fluid

Grinspun, Eitan

273

USA National Phenology Network: Plant and Animal Life-Cycle Data Related to Climate Change  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Phenology refers to recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, such as leafing and flowering, maturation of agricultural plants, emergence of insects, and migration of birds. It is also the study of these recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, especially their timing and relationships with weather and climate. Phenology affects nearly all aspects of the environment, including the abundance and diversity of organisms, their interactions with one another, their functions in food webs, and their seasonable behavior, and global-scale cycles of water, carbon, and other chemical elements. Phenology records can help us understand plant and animal responses to climate change; it is a key indicator. The USA-NPN brings together citizen scientists, government agencies, non-profit groups, educators, and students of all ages to monitor the impacts of climate change on plants and animals in the United States. The network harnesses the power of people and the Internet to collect and share information, providing researchers with far more data than they could collect alone.[Extracts copied from the USA-NPN home page and from http://www.usanpn.org/about].

274

The influence of animal mobility on the assumption of uniform distances in aerial line transect surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for estimating animal density from aerial surveys. Analysis of line transect distance data usually relies test evidence for non- uniformity using double-observer distance data from two aerial surveys of five in Queensland. Key words: aerial surveys, double platform distance sampling, independent observers, responsive

Buckland, Steve

275

The design and evaluation of a mobile sensor/actuator network for autonomous animal control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates a mobile, wireless sensor/actuator network application for use in the cattle breeding industry. Our goal is to prevent fighting between bulls in on-farm breeding paddocks by autonomously applying appropriate stimuli when one bull ... Keywords: application, autonomous animal control, sensor/actuator networks

Tim Wark; Chris Crossman; Wen Hu; Ying Guo; Philip Valencia; Pavan Sikka; Peter Corke; Caroline Lee; John Henshall; Kishore Prayaga; Julian O'Grady; Matt Reed; Andrew Fisher

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Commissioning an animal preference chamber for behavioral studies with laying hens exposed to atmospheric ammonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An environmental preference chamber (EPC) with four double-tiered compartments (C1-C4), each capable of being controlled to distinct ammonia (NH"3) concentrations and temperature, was designed, fabricated and commissioned. Preference chambers are commonly ... Keywords: Ambient conditions, Animal welfare, Automatic control, Cross-contamination

G. T. Sales, A. R. Green, R. S. Gates

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Understanding Motion Capture for Computer Animation, Second Edition, 2nd edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power of todays motion capture technology has taken animated characters and special effects to amazing new levels of reality. And with the release of blockbusters like Avatar and Tin-Tin, audiences continually expect more from each new release. ...

Alberto Menache

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Parallel subdivision surface rendering and animation on the cell BE processor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subdivision Surfaces provide a compact way to describe a smooth surface using a mesh model. They are widely used in 3D animation and nearly all modern modeling programs support them. In this work we describe a complete parallel pipeline for real-time ...

R. Grottesi; S. Morigi; M. Ruggiero; L. Benini

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Connectivity mechanisms in a population complex of coastal cod.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis I have studied connectivity processes affecting the population structure of coastal cod on the Norwegian Skagerrak coast. I have focused on three (more)

Espeland, Sigurd Heiberg

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Chemical Enrichment History of the Magellanic Clouds Field Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the results of our project devoted to study the chemical enrichment history of the field population in the Magellanic Clouds using Ca II triplet spectroscopy.

R. Carrera; C. Gallart; A. Aparicio; E. Costa; E. Hardy; R. A. Mendez; N. E. D. Noel; R. Zinn

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Independent Scientific Advisory Board Human Population Impacts on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................................................................................................23 Chemical Effects ......................................................................................................................................52 Acquisition and Conversion of Water Rights that is expected to continue. Population growth is a primary reason for the conversion through increases in demand

282

Selective population of spin--orbit levels in the autoionization ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective population of spin-orbit levels in the autoionization of a polyatomic ... individual spin-orbit components of the X 2111, ionic ground state fol ...

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

283

Population shifts across U.S. regions affect overall heating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... The share of the U.S. population living in the coldest regions, ...

284

Urban aerosols harbor diverse and dynamic bacterial populations  

Urban aerosols harbor diverse and dynamic bacterial populations Eoin L. Brodie, Todd Z. DeSantis, Jordan P. Moberg Parker, Ingrid X. Zubietta, Yvette M. Piceno, and ...

285

Sensing animal group behavior and bio-clutter in the ocean over continental shelf scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish populations often comprise the largest biomass in a productive marine ecosystem. They typically play an essential role in inter-trophic energy transport, and serve as a mainstay for human consumption comprising roughly ...

Srinivasan, Jagannathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A study of biogas digesters as an animal waste management tool on livestock farming systems in Fiji.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ever since 1976, livestock farmers in Fiji have been intrigued about biogas digesters as an animal waste management measure, but the concept has never evolved (more)

Tukana, Andrew

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Computer Aided Composition System with Interactive Selective Population Climbing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we are developing the computer aided composition system. This system aids a person, which knows cellphone or background music of home page or software. This system is implemented with the interactive selective population climbing. We suppose ... Keywords: computer aided composition system, interactive selective population climbing, composing model

Hiroshi Hasui

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Ectropy of diversity measures for populations in Euclidean space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measures to evaluate the diversity of a set of points (population) in Euclidean space play an important role in a variety of areas of science and engineering. Well-known measures are often used without a clear insight into their quality and many of them ... Keywords: Discrepancy, Ectropy, Klee's measure, Minimum spanning tree, Population diversity measure, Singular values

Bakir Lacevic; Edoardo Amaldi

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Optimizing Epochal Evolutionary Search: Population-Size Dependent Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epochal dynamics, in which long periods of stasis in an evolving population are punctuated by a sudden burst of change, is a common behavior in both natural and artificial evolutionary processes. We analyze the population dynamics for a class of fitness ... Keywords: error threshold, evolutionary search, genetic algorithm, marginal stability, optimization, statistical dynamics

Erik Van Nimwegen; James P. Crutchfield

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Quasi-random initial population for genetic algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selection of the initial population in a population-based heuristic optimizationmethod is important, since it affects the search for several iterations and often has an influence on the final solution. If no a priori information about the optima ... Keywords: Genetic algorithms, Global continuous optimization, Quasi-random sequences, Random numbers

H. Maaranen; K. Miettinen; M. M. Mkel

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Numerical calculation of the moments of the population balance equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combined CFD-PBM (population balance models) are computationally intensive, so a possibility is to calculate only a few moments of the probability density function (PDF) of the PBM minimizing the computational costs. However, this formulation results ... Keywords: least squares method, population balance equation, quadrature approximation

C. A. Dorao; H. A. Jakobsen

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

PARTICLE TRACKING ANALYSIS & ANIMATIONS DEPICTING MOVEMENT OF THE CARBON TETRACHLORIDE PLUME REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the hydraulic particle tracking animation files is to show where carbon tetrachloride that reached groundwater from the known discharge facilities would have been likely to travel fin the groundwater, and from where carbon tetrachloride presently observed in the aquifer likely would have started. These analyses support the 200-PW-1 Operable Unit activity to identify sources of carbon tetrachloride currently observed in groundwater or locations where carbon tetrachloride may have entered the groundwater. The animation files show travel paths (both forward and backward in time) for hypothetical particles of carbon tetrachloride carried in the groundwater. The travel paths represent the movement of the carbon tetrachloride at the average groundwater velocity. The particles only represent an estimation of where the carbon tetrachloride would be expected to be (or have come from) and do not indicate or imply what the concentration in the groundwater would be.

MCMAHON, W.J.; ROHAY, V.J.

2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

293

6.19 MicroPET Enhances Studies of Small Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 6/1/2011 8 6/1/2011 6.19 MicroPET Enhances Studies of Small Animals Positron emission tomography (PET), a tool for imaging the chemistry and biology of the living human body by monitoring ingested tracer molecules, is now a standard method for studying the metabolism of the brain, the heart, and cancer. PET is based on pioneering advances by the Office of Science and predecessor agencies in particle accelerators, biological radiotracer molecules, photodetectors, and high-speed computers. Recently, PET technology was reengineered by scientists at the University of California-Los Angeles to make a miniaturized version for imaging small animals. Developed with Office of Science support, MicroPET is a noninvasive system that eliminates the need for biopsies

294

Biomethylation of inorganic arsenic by the rat and some laboratory animals  

SciTech Connect

This article concerns the distribution (in the liver, kidney and blood) and excretion (in the urine, feces and bile) of arsenic metabolites such as dimethylated, monomethylated and inorganic arsenic in rats following a single oral and intravenous (iv) administration of arsenic acid. This paper also describes studies on the species difference in the arsenic methylation between the rats and some other laboratory animals as mice, hamsters, rabbits and cats.

Odanaka, Y.; Matano, O.; Goto, S.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Animation de mod`eles UML -Application dans le contexte des Smartgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Animation de mod`eles UML - Application dans le contexte des Smartgrids Rachida Seghiri T'arriv´ee des Smartgrids dans le domaine ´electrique apporte de profonds changements au sein des Syst`emes d, nous ´etayons cet ´etat de l'art par la simulation d'un cas m´etier illustratif des Smartgrids en

296

Animal feed compositions containing phytase derived from transgenic alfalfa and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A value-added composition of matter containing plant matter from transgenic alfalfa which expresses exogenous phytase activity is disclosed. The phytase activity is a gene product of an exogenous gene encoding for phytase which has been stably incorporated into the genome of alfalfa plants. The transgenic alfalfa expresses phytase activity in nutritionally-significant amounts, thereby enabling its use in animal feeds to eliminate the need for phosphorous supplementation of livestock, poultry, and fish feed rations.

Austin-Phillips, Sandra (Madison, WI); Koegel, Richard G. (Madison, WI); Straub, Richard J. (Brooklyn, WI); Cook, Mark (Madison, WI)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Animal feed compositions containing phytase derived from transgenic alfalfa and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A value-added composition of matter containing plant matter from transgenic alfalfa which expresses exogenous phytase activity is disclosed. The phytase activity is a gene product of an exogenous gene encoding for phytase which has been stably incorporated into the genome of alfalfa plants. The transgenic alfalfa expresses phytase activity in nutritionally-significant amounts, thereby enabling its use in animal feeds to eliminate the need for phosphorous supplementation of livestock, poultry, and fish feed rations.

Austin-Phillips, Sandra (Madison, WI); Koegel, Richard G. (Madison, WI); Straub, Richard J. (Brooklyn, WI); Cook, Mark (Madison, WI)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Magnetite-Based Biological Effects in Animals: Biophysical, Contamination, and Sensory Aspects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of its mission to understand potential effects of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) on human health, EPRI conducts research on biophysical mechanisms of interaction. This report provides evidence supporting the existence of a magnetic field sensory system in animals based on the magnetic iron compound, magnetite. The investigators also identify iron particle contamination as a potentially important uncontrolled factor in current in vitro EMF biological experiments.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

doi:10.1093/nar/gki931 Farm animal genomics and informatics: an update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Farm animal genomics is of interest to a wide audience of researchers because of the utility derived from understanding how genomics and proteomics function in various organisms. Applications such as xenotransplantation, increased livestock productivity, bioengineering new materials, products and even fabrics are several reasons for thriving farm animal genome activity. Currently mined in rapidly growing data warehouses, completed genomes of chicken, fish and cows are available but are largely stored in decentralized data repositories. In this paper, we provide an informatics primer on farm animal bioinformatics and genome project resources which drive attention to the most recent advances in the field. We hope to provide individuals in biotechnology and in the farming industry with information on resources and updates concerning farm animal genome projects. PRELUDE The omics and bioinformatics Genomics is the scientific study of structure, function and interrelationships of both individual genes and the genome in its entirety (1). The field has evolved from identifying short nucleotide strings of DNA to the sequencing of an organisms complete genome. Current progress in genomics research has facilitated comprehensive mapping of the building blocks of biology (2). Ultimately, researchers hope to gain mastery over the fundamental description of cellular function at the DNA level (3). This would encompass gene regulation, in which proteins often regulate their own production or that of other proteins in a complex web of interactions. Databases can be developed to provide solutions to problems that people encounter when dealing with massive amounts of data. However, the abundance and growing complexity of the data tools and resources required for analysis are overwhelming

Ahmed Fadiel; Ifeanyi Anidi; Kenneth D. Eichenbaum

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Literature Review and Assessment of Plant and Animal Transfer Factors Used in Performance Assessment Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A literature review and assessment was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to update information on plant and animal radionuclide transfer factors used in performance-assessment modeling. A group of 15 radionuclides was included in this review and assessment. The review is composed of four main sections, not including the Introduction. Section 2.0 provides a review of the critically important issue of physicochemical speciation and geochemistry of the radionuclides in natural soil-water systems as it relates to the bioavailability of the radionuclides. Section 3.0 provides an updated review of the parameters of importance in the uptake of radionuclides by plants, including root uptake via the soil-groundwater system and foliar uptake due to overhead irrigation. Section 3.0 also provides a compilation of concentration ratios (CRs) for soil-to-plant uptake for the 15 selected radionuclides. Section 4.0 provides an updated review on radionuclide uptake data for animal products related to absorption, homeostatic control, approach to equilibration, chemical and physical form, diet, and age. Compiled transfer coefficients are provided for cows milk, sheeps milk, goats milk, beef, goat meat, pork, poultry, and eggs. Section 5.0 discusses the use of transfer coefficients in soil, plant, and animal modeling using regulatory models for evaluating radioactive waste disposal or decommissioned sites. Each section makes specific suggestions for future research in its area.

Robertson, David E.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Sasser, Lyle B.

2003-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Animal Spirits: How Human Psychology Drives the Economy, and Why it Matters for Global Capitalism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In his lecture, Shiller will discuss the premise of his 2009 book, coauthored with the Nobel Prize-winning economist George A. Akerlof. Winner of the getAbstract International Book Award and the 2009 TIAA-CREF Paul A. Samuelson Award for Outstanding Scholarly Writing on Lifelong Financial Security, the book, which has the same title as Shiller's lecture, discusses how "animal spirits," or human emotions such as confidence, fear, and a concern for fairness, drive financial events, including today's global financial crisis. John Maynard Keynes coined the phrase "animal spirits" to describe the changing psychology that led to the Great Depression and the recovery from it. Like Keynes, Shiller and Akerlof believe that government intervention is necessary to overcome the adverse effects on the economy brought about by unruly and irrational human emotions. In his talk, Shiller will explain how "animal spirits" lead to adverse economic effects, and he will outline his insights on how the global economy can recover from its recent setbacks.

Shiller, Robert J. (Yale)

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

302

SECPOP90: Sector population, land fraction, and economic estimation program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1973 Mr. W. Athey of the Environmental Protection Agency wrote a computer program called SECPOP which calculated population estimates. Since that time, two things have changed which suggested the need for updating the original program - more recent population censuses and the widespread use of personal computers (PCs). The revised computer program uses the 1990 and 1992 Population Census information and runs on current PCs as {open_quotes}SECPOP90.{close_quotes} SECPOP90 consists of two parts: site and regional. The site provides population and economic data estimates for any location within the continental United States. Siting analysis is relatively fast running. The regional portion assesses site availability for different siting policy decisions; i.e., the impact of available sites given specific population density criteria within the continental United States. Regional analysis is slow. This report compares the SECPOP90 population estimates and the nuclear power reactor licensee-provided information. Although the source, and therefore the accuracy, of the licensee information is unknown, this comparison suggests SECPOP90 makes reasonable estimates. Given the total uncertainty in any current calculation of severe accidents, including the potential offsite consequences, the uncertainty within SECPOP90 population estimates is expected to be insignificant. 12 refs., 55 figs., 7 tabs.

Humphreys, S.L.; Rollstin, J.A.; Ridgely, J.N.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Virtual People: Capturing Human Models to Populate Virtual Worlds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a new technique is introduced for automatically building recognisable moving 3D models of individual people Realistic modelling of people is essential for advanced multimedia, augmented reality and immersive virtual reality. Current systems ... Keywords: Avatar, Virtual Human, Whole-body Modelling, Humanoid Animation, Virtual Reality, VRML, Vision Techniques, 3D Reconstruction

Adrian Hilton; Daniel Beresford; Thomas Gentils; Raymond Smith; Wei Sun

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Optimal control of population transfer in Markovian open quantum systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has long been interest to control the transfer of population between specified quantum states. Recent work has optimized the control law for closed system population transfer by using a gradient ascent pulse engineer- ing algorithm [1]. Here, a spin-boson model consisting of two-level atoms which interact with the dissipative environment, is investigated. With opti- mal control, the quantum system can invert the populations of the quantum logic states. The temperature plays an important role in controlling popula- tion transfer. At low temperatures the control has active performance, while at high temperatures it has less erect. We also analyze the decoherence be- havior of open quantum systems with optimal population transfer control, and we find that these controls can prolong the coherence time. We hope that active optimal control can help quantum solid-state-based engineering.

Wei Cui; Zairong Xi; Yu Pan

2010-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

305

Optimal control of population transfer in Markovian open quantum systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has long been interest to control the transfer of population between specified quantum states. Recent work has optimized the control law for closed system population transfer by using a gradient ascent pulse engineer- ing algorithm [1]. Here, a spin-boson model consisting of two-level atoms which interact with the dissipative environment, is investigated. With opti- mal control, the quantum system can invert the populations of the quantum logic states. The temperature plays an important role in controlling popula- tion transfer. At low temperatures the control has active performance, while at high temperatures it has less erect. We also analyze the decoherence be- havior of open quantum systems with optimal population transfer control, and we find that these controls can prolong the coherence time. We hope that active optimal control can help quantum solid-state-based engineering.

Cuia, Wei; Pan, Yu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Natural balance of graminicolous aphids in Pakistan. Survey of populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural balance of graminicolous aphids in Pakistan. Survey of populations Sulaiman HAMID Sind Sugar Industry Research Institute, 14-A, Latifabad III, Hyderabad Sind, Pakistan SUMMARY Aphids attacking gramineous crops were studied in seven climatically and ecologically different regions of Pakistan

Recanati, Catherine

307

Observation of inverted population levels in the FM-1 Spherator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inversions in the populations of excited levels in hydrogen and HeII were observed in the FM-1 Spherator. The inversion increases strongly as the ratio of the decay time of the electron temperature to the decay time of the electron density was decreased. Time dependent numerical calculations of the populations were in good agreement with the experimental measurements. More general calculations for high Z hydrogen-like ions are discussed.

Suckewer, S.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Okabayashi, M.; Schmidt, J. A.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Population analysis relative to geothermal energy development, Imperial County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The historical and current population characteristics of Imperial County, California, are examined. These include vital rates, urbanization, town sizes, labor force composition, income, utility usage, and ethnic composition. Inferences are drawn on some of the important social and economic processes. Multivariate statistical analysis is used to study present relationships between variables. Population projections for the County were performed under historical, standard, and geothermal projection assumptions. The transferability of methods and results to other geothermal regions anticipating energy development is shown. (MHR)

Pick, J.B.; Jung, T.H.; Butler, E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Genetic analysis in the Collaborative Cross breeding population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Genetic reference populations in model organisms are critical resources for systems genetic analysis of disease related phenotypes. The breeding history of these inbred panels may influence detectable allelic and phenotypic diversity. The existing panel of common inbred strains reflects historical selection biases, and existing recombinant inbred panels have low allelic diversity. All such populations may be subject to consequences of inbreeding depression. The Collaborative Cross (CC) is a mouse reference population with high allelic diversity that is being constructed using a randomized breeding design that systematically outcrosses eight founder strains, followed by inbreeding to obtain new recombinant inbred strains. Five of the eight founders are common laboratory strains, and three are wild-derived. Since its inception, the partially inbred CC has been characterized for physiological, morphological, and behavioral traits. The construction of this population provided a unique opportunity to observe phenotypic variation as new allelic combinations arose through intercrossing and inbreeding to create new stable genetic combinations. Processes including inbreeding depression and its impact on allelic and phenotypic diversity were assessed. Phenotypic variation in the CC breeding population exceeds that of existing mouse genetic reference populations due to both high founder genetic diversity and novel epistatic combinations. However, some focal evidence of allele purging was detected including a suggestive QTL for litter size in a location of changing allele frequency. Despite these inescapable pressures, high diversity and precision for genetic mapping remain. These results demonstrate the potential of the CC population once completed and highlight implications for development of related populations. Supplementary material consists of Supplementary Table 1 Phenotypic means, variances, ranges and heritabilities for all traits and generations, Supplementary Table 2, all phenotypic values, Supplementary Table 3, multiple QTL mapping.

Philip, Vivek [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sokoloff, Greta [ORNL; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl [Jackson Laboratory, The, Bar Harbor, ME; Striz, Martin [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Branstetter, Lisa R [ORNL; Beckmann, Melissa [ORNL; Spence, Jason S [ORNL; Jackson, Barbara L [ORNL; Galloway, Leslie D [ORNL; Barker, Gene [ORNL; Wymore, Ann M [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hunsicker, Patricia R [ORNL; Durtschi, David W [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Shaw, Ginger S [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Shinpock, Sarah G [ORNL; Manly, Kenneth F [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Miller, Darla R [ORNL; Donahue, Kevin [University at Buffalo, NY; Culiat, Cymbeline T [ORNL; Churchill, Gary A [Jackson Laboratory, The, Bar Harbor, ME; Lariviere, William R [University of Pittsburgh; Palmer, Abraham [University of Chicago; O'Hara, Bruce [University of Kentucky; Voy, Brynn H [ORNL; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Deposition translocation, and effects of transuranic particles inhaled by experimental animals  

SciTech Connect

Inhalation exposure constitutes the most likely route of entrance for transuranics into the body. Cancer is the most likely consequence of exposure, but several thousand workers have been exposed during the last 30 yrs without, so far, evidence of exposure-related effects. Several soluble and insoluble transuranic compounds have been studied in rodents and dogs, either alone or combined with exposure to other materials (e.g., PuO/sub 2/--UO/sub 2/ fuel and Na). These studies have provided a wide variety of spatial and temporal dose distribution patterns in the lung. The distribution and total initial deposition in the respiratory tract is a function of the physical characteristics of the inhaled aerosols (size distribution, shape, hygroscopicity) and of the morphology and physiology of the animal. Translocation rates, organ and tissue distribution and excretion in urine and feces, are a function of the physicochemical characteristics of the deposited material (solubility, specific activity, chemical compound, etc.). Differences in rate of translocation of the solubilized material, primarily to the liver and bone, determines the radiation dose to the various tissues involved. Insoluble particles of plutonium dioxide are transferred to the thoracic lymph nodes, which may be functionally destroyed as a consequence. Radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis are the main causes of death in animals with cumulative radiation doses to the lung of a few thousand rads. The most significant long-term effect of inhaled transuranic compounds in animals is the development of lung and bone tumors. The main type of lung tumor in both dog and rat is the bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (adenocarcinoma). However, tumor type is a function of radiation dose and dose-distribution at high doses. Bone ranks next to lung as the tissue developing the most tumors following inhalation of transuranics.

Craig, D.K.; Ballou, J.E.; Dagle, G.E.; Mahlum, D.D.; Park, J.F.; Sanders, C.L.; Sikov, M.R.; Stuart, B.O.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

An economic exploration of prevention versus response in animal related bioterrorism decision making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Animal disease outbreaks either through deliberate terroristic act or accidental introductions present a serious economic problem. This work concentrates on the economics of choosing strategies to mitigate possible agricultural terrorism and accidental introduction events largely in the animal disease management setting. General economic issues and the economic literature related to agricultural terrorism broadly and animal disease concerns specifically are reviewed. Basic economic aspects, such as the economic consequences of outbreaks, costs and benefits of various mitigation strategies, and stochastic characteristics of the problem are discussed. A conceptual economic model is formulated to depict the animal disease outbreak related decision making process. The key element of this framework is the choice between ex ante versus ex post mitigation strategies. The decision of investing in preventative and/or responsive strategies prior to the occurrence of an event versus relying on response and recovery actions after an outbreak event needs careful consideration. Comparative statics investigations reveal that factors that affect this decision are event probability, and severity, as well as costs, benefits, and effectiveness of various mitigation strategies. A relatively simplified empirical case study is done analyzing the economic tradeoffs between and optimum levels of ex ante detection, as a form of prevention, and ex post slaughter, as a form of response. The setting chosen involves Foot and Mouth Disease management. Empirical investigation is done on the conditions under which it is economically more advantageous to invest in ex ante detection as opposed to relying just on ex post response. Results show that investment in ex ante activities becomes more advantageous as the probability and severity of an agricultural terrorism event increases, response effectiveness decreases, and costs of surveillance decrease. Also spread rate is found to play a key role in determining optimal combination of ex ante and ex post strategies with more done ex ante the faster the disease spread. Finally, an economic framework is posed for future work given availability of a more detailed epidemiologic model. Access to such a model will allow for incorporation of wider spectrum of strategies including numerous possibilities for prevention, detection, response and market recovery facilitation. The framework allows more localized options, multiple possible events and incorporation of risk aversion among other features.

Elbakidze, Levan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Nuclear Astrophysics Animations from the Nuclear Astrophysics Group at Clemson University  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The animations are organized into three sections. The r-Process Movies demonstrate r-Process network calculations from the paper "Neutrino Capture and the R-Process" Meyer, McLaughlin, and Fuller, Phys. Rev. C, 58, 3696-3710 (1998). The Alpha-Rich Freezeout Movies are related to the reference: Standard alpha-rich freezeout calculation from The, Clayton, Jin, and Meyer 1998, Astrophysical Journal, "Reaction Rates Governing the Synthesis of 44Ti" At the current writing, the category for Low Metallicity s-Process Movies has only one item called n, p, 13C, 14N, 54Fe, and 88Sr Time evolution in convective zone.

Meyer, Bradley; The, Lih-Sin

313

Eavesdroppers : how scientists are learning to listen in on the animal kingdom : four stories on wildlife and sound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Typically, if scientists want to study animals in the wild they rely on field observations by eye. If they want to track those species to know where they are, where they are going, and how they behave, then researchers may ...

Quill, Elizabeth H. (Elizabeth Helene)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal OriginChapter 4 Investigation of Various Fats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal Origin Chapter 4 Investigation of Various Fats Food Science eChapters Food Science & Technology Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Investigation of Various Fats from ...

315

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 4 Biodiesel: An Alternative Diesel Fuel from Vegetable Oils or Animal Fats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 4 Biodiesel: An Alternative Diesel Fuel from Vegetable Oils or Animal Fats Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Biodiesel: An Alternative Di

316

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 11 CLA in Functional Food: Enrichment of Animal Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 11 CLA in Functional Food: Enrichment of Animal Products Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Downloadable pdf of Cha

317

Movement is a pervasive feature of microbial and animal biology, from bacteria moving over tiny distances to whales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Henry and Jed, 2003). Machines built by humans to create motion also vary broadly in size and usage animals; piston engines; electric motors; jets) comprises motors that cycle rapidly, with significant

Marden, James

318

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 5 Detecting Animal Products in Feeds and Feed Ingredients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 5 Detecting Animal Products in Feeds and Feed Ingredients Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter

319

Visualization and animation as a technique to assist in the construction of high assurance software  

SciTech Connect

The software construction process consists of a mixture of informal and formal steps. By their very nature, informal steps cannot be formally verified. Empirical evidence suggests that a majority of software errors originate in the informal steps of the software development process. For this reason, when constructing high assurance software, it is essential that a significant effort be made to increase one`s confidence (i.e., to validate) that the informal steps have been made correctly. Visualization and animation can be used to provide an `intuitive proof` that the informal steps in the software construction process are correct. In addition, the formal portion of software construction often permits/demands artistic (informal) decisions to be made (e.g., design decisions). Such decisions often have unexpected/unforeseen consequences that are only discovered later in the development process. Visualization and animation techniques can be brought to bear on this aspect of the software construction process by providing a better intuitive understanding of the impact of the informal decisions that are made in program development. This increases the likelihood that undesirable decisions can be avoided or at least detected earlier in the development process.

Winter, V.L.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Development of animation and simulation module for evaluation of Worker's dose  

SciTech Connect

A study to visualize the radioactivity distribution in a dismantling facility that was contaminated by the radiation from the exposure room at KRR 2(Korean Research Reactor TRIGA MARK III) was carried out to improve worker safety and decommissioning productivity. As a basic study to minimize a radiation exposure, the worker exposure dose was calculated using the MCNP-4C (Monte Carlo N-Particle-4C). Secondly, an animation and simulation module was implemented to simulate a worker's real-time dose. The results show that various kinds of dismantling activities can be simulated while simultaneously viewing the exposure dose in a real-time according to the selected scenario for the animation. Current work is focus on exploring the evaluation of a worker's dose in a virtual dismantling area by using computer graphics. Future work will seek an optimization of the major parameters that directly affect a personnel exposure dose rate. This will enable a worker who is engaged in a hazardous area to attain an improve safety by decreasing exposure when applied as a useful tool to dismantle nuclear facilities. (authors)

Park, H.S.; Kim, G.H.; Lee, K.W.; Jung, C.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, S.I. [Chungnam National Univ., Dept. of Computer Science, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Atmospheric Data, Images, and Animations from Lidar Instruments used by the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Space Science and Engineering Center is a research and development center affiliated with the University of Wisconsin-Madisons Graduate School. Its primary focus is on geophysical research and technology to enhance understanding of the atmosphere of Earth, the other planets in the Solar System, and the cosmos. SSEC develops new observing tools for spacecraft, aircraft, and ground-based platforms, and models atmospheric phenomena. The Center receives, manages and distributes huge amounts of geophysical data and develops software to visualize and manipulate these data for use by researchers and operational meteorologists all over the world.[Taken from About SSEC at http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/overview/] A huge collection of data products, images, and animations comes to the SSEC from the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group. Contents of this collection include: An archive of thousands of Lidar images acquired before 2004 Arctic HSRL, MMCR, PAERI, MWR, Radiosonde, and CRAS forecast data Data after May 1, 2004 MPEG animations and Lidar Multiple Scattering Models

322

Twenty-year review of medical findings in a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout  

SciTech Connect

A summary is presented of results of medical examinations of inhabitants of the Marshall Islands during the 20-year period following the exposure of Rongelap people to radioactive fallout in 1954. The initial effect observed was $beta$ burns of the skin of some individuals. Few significant findings were observed during the subsequent 9-year period, although an increase in miscarriages and stillbirths among the exposed women was noted. In 1963 some thyroid abnormalities and growth retardation of some children were noted. (177 references). (CH)

Conard, R.A.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

DFCI Gene Index Project: Interactive Data Maps for Plant, Animal, Protist, and Fungi Organisims from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Gene Indices are organized into four categories: Animals, Plants, Protist, and Fungi. As of June, 2008, there were 41 animal databases, 45 plant databases, and a total of 35 for the other two categories.

324

CA manager framework: creating customised workflows for ontology population and semantic annotation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the Content Augmentation Manager Framework for creating various adapted workflows for ontology population and semantic annotation based on Semantic Web recommendations and UIMA precepts. This framework supports ontology population from text ... Keywords: ontology population, semantic annotation

Danica Damljanovic; Florence Amardeilh; Kalina Bontcheva

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Population genomics: Whole-genome analysis of polymorphism and divergence in Drosophila simulans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLoS BIOLOGY Population Genomics: Whole-Genome Analysis ofwww.plosbiology.org Population Genomics of D. simulans Table11 | e310 Population Genomics of D. simulans Table S15. GO

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results Title Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Redding, Laurel E., Michael D. Sohn, Thomas E. McKone, Shu-Li Wang, Dennis P. H. Hsieh, and Raymond S. H. Yang Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 116 Issue 12 Pagination 1629-1634 Keywords bayesian inference, body burden, environmental chemistry, exposure & risk group, human milk biomonitoring, indoor environment department, lactational transfer, pcb 153, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling, pollutant fate and transport modeling, poly-chlorinated biphenyls, reverse dosimetry

327

All-optical reversible logic gate via adiabatic population transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Toffoli gate is an essential logic element, which permits implementation of a reversible processor. It is of relevance both for classical as well as quantum logics. We propose and theoretically study all-optical implementations of three-bit and four-bit Toffoli gates by application of adiabatic population transfer techniques. For a three-bit Toffoli gate we use variants of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) processes in a $\\Lambda$-type level scheme, driven by two laser pulses at sufficiently large detunings. For the implementation of a four-bit Toffoli gate, we apply reversible adiabatic population transfer in five-level quantum systems, interacting with three laser pulses. We demonstrate correct all-optical implementation of the truth table of three-bit and four-bit Toffoli gates. Moreover, we derive conditions for adiabatic evolution of the population dynamics and robust operation of the gates.

G. Grigoryan; V. Chaltykyan; E. Gazazyan; O. Tikhova; T. Halfmann

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

328

Session: What do we know about cumulative or population impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of a panel discussion followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The panelists were Paul Kerlinger, Curry and Kerlinger, LLC, Al Manville, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bill Kendall, US Geological Service. The panel addressed the potential cumulative impacts of wind turbines on bird and bat populations over time. Panel members gave brief presentations that touched on what is currently known, what laws apply, and the usefulness of population modeling. Topics addressed included which sources of modeling should be included in cumulative impacts, comparison of impacts from different modes of energy generation, as well as what research is still needed regarding cumulative impacts of wind energy development on bird and bat populations.

Kerlinger, Paul; Manville, Al; Kendall, Bill

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

"Table HC15.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Lighting Usage...

330

Population shifts across U.S. regions affect overall heating and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Since the nation's founding, the population of the United States has migrated westward. The advent of air conditioning nearly a century ago contributed to population ...

331

Population and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeing the forest for the trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DB, Kremer A: Forest tree genomics: Growing resources andPopulation and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeingPopulation and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeing

Eckert, Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Table D1. Population, U.S. Gross Domestic Product, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table D1. Population, U.S. Gross Domestic Product, and Implicit Price Deflator, 1949-2011: Year: Population: U.S. Gross Domestic Product: United States 1

333

Diechmann U: Methodologies to Improve Global Population Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses some of the technical issues involved in the development of a georeferenced population database, including urban extents, currently being developed by CIESIN and partner organizations, using ArcGIS. The database will be made available as three separate data products: i) human settlements database (points), ii) urban extents (polygons) derived from satellite imagery and additional geographic data sources (such as DCW), and iii) urban-rural surface (grid). To produce the urban-rural surfaces, we developed a mass-conserving algorithm that reallocates people into urban areas, within each administrative unit, providing a more accurate representation of the distribution of human population. 1.

Francesca Pozzi; Deborah Balk; Gregory Yetman; Andy Nelson; Uwe Deichmann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Optimum usage and economic feasibility of animal manure-based biomass in combustion systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Manure-based biomass (MBB) has the potential to be a source of green energy at large coal-fired power plants and on smaller-scale combustion systems at or near confined animal feeding operations. Although MBB is a low quality fuel with an inferior heat value compared to coal and other fossil fuels, the concentration of it at large animal feeding operations can make it a viable source of fuel. Mathematical models were developed to portray the economics of co-firing and reburning coal with MBB. A base case run of the co-fire model in which a 95:5 blend of coal to low-ash MBB was burned at an existing 300-MWe coal-fired power plant was found to have an overall net present cost of $22.6 million. The most significant cost that hindered the profitability of the co-fire project was the cost of operating gas boilers for biomass dryers that were required to reduce the MBB's moisture content before transportation and combustion. However, a higher dollar value on avoided nonrenewable CO2 emissions could overrule exorbitant costs of drying and transporting the MBB to power plants. A CO2 value of $17/metric ton was found to be enough for the MBB co-fire project to reach an economic break-even point. Reburning coal with MBB to reduce NOx emissions can theoretically be more profitable than a co-fire project, due to the value of avoided NOx emissions. However, the issue of finding enough suitable low-ash biomass becomes problematic for reburn systems since the reburn fuel must supply 10 to 25% of the power plant?s heat rate in order to achieve the desired NOx level. A NOx emission value over $2500/metric ton would justify installing a MBB reburn system. A base case run of a mathematical model describing a small-scale, on-the-farm MBB combustion system that can completely incinerate high-moisture (over 90%) manure biomass was developed and completed. If all of the energy or steam produced by the MBB combustion system were to bring revenue to the animal feeding operation either by avoided fueling costs or by sales, the conceptualized MBB combustion system has the potential to be a profitable venture.

Carlin, Nicholas T.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

THE BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION: EPIDEMIOLOGICAL SURVEYS AND LABORATORY ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS. IMPLICATIONS FOR RISK EVALUATION AND DECISION PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki [ 2populations. Atomic-bomb data for Hiroshima show that thestudy. Hiroshima and Nagassaki Atomic Bomb Survivors. Eds.

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

DOE Solar Decathlon: The Ohio State University: Living Among the Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

House I among the trees at the Columbus Zoo. Enlarge image House I among the trees at the Columbus Zoo. Enlarge image Ohio State's Solar House I now resides at the Columbus Zoo. To honor the agricultural heritage of the state, the house uses local materials, including the reclaimed barn wood on the façade. (Courtesy of Dave Nedrow) Who: The Ohio State University What: Solar House I Where: Columbus Zoo 4850 West Powell Road Powell, OH 43065 Map This House Public tours: The exhibit is open during the Columbus Zoo's regular hours of operation through January 2011. For more information, call 1-800-MONKEYS. Solar Decathlon 2009 The Ohio State University: Living Among the Animals After the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2009, The Ohio State University's Solar House I was relocated and rebuilt at the Columbus Zoo in

337

A checklist of plant and animal species at Los Alamos National Laboratory and surrounding areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past and current members of the Biology Team (BT) of the Ecology Group have completed biological assessments (BAs) for all of the land that comprises Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within these assessments are lists of plant and animal species with the potential to exist on LANL lands and the surrounding areas. To compile these lists, BT members examined earlier published and unpublished reports, surveys, and data bases that pertained to the biota of this area or to areas that are similar. The species lists that are contained herein are compilations of the lists from these BAs, other lists that were a part of the initial research for the performance of these BAs, and more recent surveys.

Hinojosa, H. [comp.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

A method to detect transfected chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression in intact animals  

SciTech Connect

A rapid procedure is described for assaying chloramphenicol acetyltransferase enzyme activity in intact animals following transfection of the RSV CAT plasmid into mouse bone marrow cells by electroporation. The reconstituted mice were injected with ({sup 14}C)chloramphenicol and ethyl acetate extracts of 24-h urine samples were analyzed by TLC autoradiography for the excretion of {sup 14}C-labeled metabolites. CAT expression in vivo can be detected by the presence of acetylated {sup 14}C-labeled metabolites in the urine within 1 week after bone marrow transplantation and, under the conditions described, these metabolites can be detected for at least 3 months. CAT expression in intact mice as monitored by the urine assay correlates with the CAT expression in the hematopoietic tissues assayed in vitro. This method offers a quick mode of screening for introduced CAT gene expression in vivo without sacrificing the mice.

Narayanan, R.; Jastreboff, M.M.; Chiu, Chang Fang; Ito, Etsuro; Bertino, J.R. (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Food web complexity and chaotic population Gregor F. Fussmann1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT Food web complexity and chaotic population dynamics Gregor F. Fussmann1 * and Gerd Heber2 1 their complexity increases. We determined the dynamical stability of a universe of mathematical, nonlinear food web, chaotic dynamics increases with the number of trophic levels in a food web but decreases with the degree

Fussman, Gregor

340

Distribution et association des inversions chromosomiques dans trois populations naturelles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, one on each of the major autosome arms, are cosmopolitan. The Tunisian popu- lation shows the greatest distribution of cosmopolitan inversions between individuals of the French population is observed in the Tunisian lines. Linkage disequilibrium exists between pair of cosmopolitan inversions of the #12;second

Recanati, Catherine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SOME EFFECTS OF DREDGING ON POPULATIONS OF MACROBENTHIC ORGANISMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

populations were reduced, but there was no evidence of mass mortality. Recovery of biomass in the channel) and Reish (1959) established that 1.5 mm and 1.4 mm mesh sieves recovered 90% of the biomass from. The data were expressed as number of organ- isms/wet weight/dry weight (biomass) per m2 of substratum

342

Population Files for use with CAP88 at Los Alamos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CAP88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988) is a computer model developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency to assess the potential dose from radionuclide emissions to air and to demonstrate compliance with the Clean Air Act. It has options to calculate either individual doses, in units of mrem, or a collective dose, also called population dose, in units of person-rem. To calculate the collective dose, CAP88 uses a population file such as LANL.pop, that lists the number of people in each sector (N, NNE, NE, etc.) as a function of distance (1 to 2 km, etc.) out to a maximum radius of 80 km. Early population files are described in the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Environmental Reports for 1985 (page 14) and subsequent years. LA-13469-MS describes a population file based on the 1990 census. These files have been updated several times, most recently in 2006 for CAP88 version 3. The 2006 version used the US census for 2000. The present paper describes the 2012 updates, using the 2010 census.

McNaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brock, Burgandy R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

343

Electron Subband Population and Mobility in Asymmetric Coupled Quantum Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electron subband energy and population engineering by inserting a thin AlGaAs barrier inside a GaAs quantum well (QW) is considered. The specific voltage across the coupled QW's which arises due to the asymmetric deformation of electron wave function ... Keywords: electron-phonon scattering in a quantum well, photovoltaic effect

Juras Pozela; Karolis Pozela; Vida Juciene And Audrius Namajunas

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

RESEARCH ARTICLE Modeling population connectivity by ocean currents,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this connectivity between distant populations is key to their effective conservation and management. For many marine between distant patches of suitable habitat. Recent work has focused on the biophysics of marine larval illustrate how this connectivity can be analyzed using graph theory--an effective approach for exploring

Queensland, University of

345

Aeration Due to Breaking Waves. Part I: Bubble Populations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The population of bubbles produced by breaking waves in (10 m) winds of up to 12 m s?1 is analyzed using calibrated images from a vertical pencil-beam sonar system placed on the seabed near the Dutch coast. The structure in the images is ...

A. Graham; D. K. Woolf; A. J. Hall

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Binary populations and stellar dynamics in young clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We first summarize work that has been done on the effects of binaries on theoretical population synthesis of stars and stellar phenomena. Next, we highlight the influence of stellar dynamics in young clusters by discussing a few candidate UFOs (unconventionally formed objects) like intermediate mass black holes, Eta Carinae, Zeta Puppis, Gamma Velorum and WR 140.

D. Vanbeveren; H. Belkus; J. Van Bever; N. Mennekens

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

347

Binary populations and stellar dynamics in young clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We first summarize work that has been done on the effects of binaries on theoretical population synthesis of stars and stellar phenomena. Next, we highlight the influence of stellar dynamics in young clusters by discussing a few candidate UFOs (unconventionally formed objects) like intermediate mass black holes, Eta Carinae, Zeta Puppis, Gamma Velorum and WR 140.

Vanbeveren, D; Van Bever, J; Mennekens, N

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Molecular pulses: Population inversion with positively chirped short pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular pulses: Population inversion with positively chirped short pulses Jianshu Cao of molecular systems can be achieved with intense positively chirped broadband laser pulses. To provide and a four-level model is designed to demonstrate for molecular systems the correlation between the sign

Cao, Jianshu

349

Periodic solution of single population models on time scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using the calculus on time scales, we study and establish criterion for the existence of periodic solutions of some scalar dynamical equations on time scales. The existence of periodic solutions for some concrete well-known single population models ... Keywords: Coincidence degree theory, Logistic equations, Periodic solutions, Time scales

Jimin Zhang; Meng Fan; Huaiping Zhu

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Modelling life cycle and population dynamics of Nostocales (cyanobacteria)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyanobacteria of the order Nostocales found in lakes in temperate regions are generally assumed to benefit from climate change. To predict their future development under varying environmental conditions, we developed a mathematical model that simulates ... Keywords: Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, Hasse diagram, Life cycle, Nostocales, Population dynamics, Shallow lake

K. D. Jhnk; R. Brggemann; J. Rcker; B. Luther; U. Simon; B. Nixdorf; C. Wiedner

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2000 annual report covers the fourth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2000 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 53,277 hours of setline effort and 630 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2000. A total of 538 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 25 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 32.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 48 cm to 271 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 103 cm to 227 cm and averaged 163 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber open population estimator, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,725 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,668-5,783. A total of 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 54.7 km (34 miles) downstream to 78.8 km (49 miles) upstream; however, 43.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 31 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 138 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. A total of 34 white sturgeon eggs were recovered: 27 in the Snake River, and seven in the Salmon River.

Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fishereis Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Analyses of Lettuce Drop Incidence and Population Structure of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and S. minor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on canola. Phytopathology 82:875-sclerotiorum populations from canola (17), cabbage (7), and

Subbarao, K V

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Analyses of lettuce drop incidence and population structure of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and S-minor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on canola. Phytopathology 82:875-sclerotiorum populations from canola (17), cabbage (7), and

Wu, B M; Subbarao, Krishna V

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY USING BIOMASS FROM DAIRY AND BEEF ANIMAL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT The Texas Panhandle is regarded as the ??Cattle Feeding Capital of the World?, producing 42% of the fed beef cattle in the United States within a 200-mile radius of Amarillo generating more than 5 million tons of feedlot manure /year. Apart from feedlots, the Bosque River Region in Erath County, just north of Waco, Texas with about 110,000 dairy cattle in over 250 dairies, produces 1.8 million tons of manure biomass (excreted plus bedding) per year. While the feedlot manure has been used extensively for irrigated and dry land crop production, most dairies, as well as other concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO??s), the dairy farms utilize large lagoon areas to store wet animal biomass. Water runoff from these lagoons has been held responsible for the increased concentration of phosphorus and other contaminates in the Bosque River which drains into Lake Waco??the primary source of potable water for Waco??s 108,500 people. The concentrated animal feeding operations may lead to land, water, and air pollution if waste handling systems and storage and treatment structures are not properly managed. Manure-based biomass (MBB) has the potential to be a source of green energy at large coal-fired power plants and on smaller-scale combustion systems at or near confined animal feeding operations. Although MBB particularly cattle biomass (CB) is a low quality fuel with an inferior heat value compared to coal and other fossil fuels, the concentration of it at large animal feeding operations can make it a viable source of fuel. The overall objective of this interdisciplinary proposal is to develop environmentally benign technologies to convert low-value inventories of dairy and beef cattle biomass into renewable energy. Current research expands the suite of technologies by which cattle biomass (CB: manure, and premature mortalities) could serve as a renewable alternative to fossil fuel. The work falls into two broad categories of research and development. Category 1 ?? Renewable Energy Conversion. This category addressed mostly in volume I involves developing. Thermo-chemical conversion technologies including cofiring with coal, reburn to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO, N2O, NOx, etc.) and Hg emissions and gasification to produce low-BTU gas for on-site power production in order to extract energy from waste streams or renewable resources. Category 2 ?? Biomass Resource Technology. This category, addressed mostly in Volume II, deals with the efficient and cost-effective use of CB as a renewable energy source (e.g. through and via aqueous-phase, anaerobic digestion or biological gasification). The investigators formed an industrial advisory panel consisting fuel producers (feedlots and dairy farms) and fuel users (utilities), periodically met with them, and presented the research results; apart from serving as dissemination forum, the PIs used their critique to red-direct the research within the scope of the tasks. The final report for the 5 to 7 year project performed by an interdisciplinary team of 9 professors is arranged in three volumes: Vol. I (edited by Kalyan Annamalai) addressing thermo-chemical conversion and direct combustion under Category 1 and Vol. II and Vol. III ( edited by J M Sweeten) addressing biomass resource Technology under Category 2. Various tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume I were performed by the Department of Mechanical Engineering (a part of TEES; see Volume I), while other tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume II and IIII were conducted by Texas AgriLife Research at Amarillo; the TAMU Biological & Agricultural Engineering Department (BAEN) College Station; and West Texas A&M University (WTAMU) (Volumes II and III). The three volume report covers the following results: fuel properties of low ash and high ash CB (particularly DB) and MB (mortality biomass and coals, non-intrusive visible infrared (NVIR) spectroscopy techniques for ash determination, dairy energy use surveys at 14 dairies in Texas and Califor

John M. Sweeten, Kalyan Annamalai Brent Auvermann Saqib Mukhtar Sergio C. Capareda Cady Engler Wyatte Harman J.N. Reddy, Robert DeOtte David B. Parker Dr. B.A. Stewart

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

355

RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY USING BIOMASS FROM DAIRY AND BEEF ANIMAL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

The Texas Panhandle is regarded as the 'Cattle Feeding Capital of the World', producing 42% of the fed beef cattle in the United States within a 200-mile radius of Amarillo generating more than 5 million tons of feedlot manure/year. Apart from feedlots, the Bosque River Region in Erath County, just north of Waco, Texas with about 110,000 dairy cattle in over 250 dairies, produces 1.8 million tons of manure biomass (excreted plus bedding) per year. While the feedlot manure has been used extensively for irrigated and dry land crop production, most dairies, as well as other concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO's), the dairy farms utilize large lagoon areas to store wet animal biomass. Water runoff from these lagoons has been held responsible for the increased concentration of phosphorus and other contaminates in the Bosque River which drains into Lake Waco - the primary source of potable water for Waco's 108,500 people. The concentrated animal feeding operations may lead to land, water, and air pollution if waste handling systems and storage and treatment structures are not properly managed. Manure-based biomass (MBB) has the potential to be a source of green energy at large coal-fired power plants and on smaller-scale combustion systems at or near confined animal feeding operations. Although MBB particularly cattle biomass (CB) is a low quality fuel with an inferior heat value compared to coal and other fossil fuels, the concentration of it at large animal feeding operations can make it a viable source of fuel. The overall objective of this interdisciplinary proposal is to develop environmentally benign technologies to convert low-value inventories of dairy and beef cattle biomass into renewable energy. Current research expands the suite of technologies by which cattle biomass (CB: manure, and premature mortalities) could serve as a renewable alternative to fossil fuel. The work falls into two broad categories of research and development. Category 1 - Renewable Energy Conversion. This category addressed mostly in volume I involves developing. Thermo-chemical conversion technologies including cofiring with coal, reburn to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO, N2O, NOx, etc.) and Hg emissions and gasification to produce low-BTU gas for on-site power production in order to extract energy from waste streams or renewable resources. Category 2 - Biomass Resource Technology. This category, addressed mostly in Volume II, deals with the efficient and cost-effective use of CB as a renewable energy source (e.g. through and via aqueous-phase, anaerobic digestion or biological gasification). The investigators formed an industrial advisory panel consisting fuel producers (feedlots and dairy farms) and fuel users (utilities), periodically met with them, and presented the research results; apart from serving as dissemination forum, the PIs used their critique to red-direct the research within the scope of the tasks. The final report for the 5 to 7 year project performed by an interdisciplinary team of 9 professors is arranged in three volumes: Vol. I (edited by Kalyan Annamalai) addressing thermo-chemical conversion and direct combustion under Category 1 and Vol. II and Vol. III ( edited by J M Sweeten) addressing biomass resource Technology under Category 2. Various tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume I were performed by the Department of Mechanical Engineering (a part of TEES; see Volume I), while other tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume II and IIII were conducted by Texas AgriLife Research at Amarillo; the TAMU Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department (BAEN) College Station; and West Texas A and M University (WTAMU) (Volumes II and III). The three volume report covers the following results: fuel properties of low ash and high ash CB (particularly DB) and MB (mortality biomass) and coals, non-intrusive visible infrared (NVIR) spectroscopy techniques for ash determination, dairy energy use surveys at 14 dairies in Texas and California, cofiring of low quality CB with high quality coal, emission results and ash fouling beh

Kalyan Annamalai, John M. Sweeten, Brent W. Auvermann, Saqib Mukhtar, Sergio Caperada Cady R. Engler, Wyatte Harman Reddy JN Robert Deotte

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

356

RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY USING BIOMASS FROM DAIRY AND BEEF ANIMAL PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Texas Panhandle is regarded as the â??Cattle Feeding Capital of the Worldâ?, producing 42% of the fed beef cattle in the United States within a 200-mile radius of Amarillo generating more than 5 million tons of feedlot manure /year. Apart from feedlots, the Bosque River Region in Erath County, just north of Waco, Texas with about 110,000 dairy cattle in over 250 dairies, produces 1.8 million tons of manure biomass (excreted plus bedding) per year. While the feedlot manure has been used extensively for irrigated and dry land crop production, most dairies, as well as other concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOâ??s), the dairy farms utilize large lagoon areas to store wet animal biomass. Water runoff from these lagoons has been held responsible for the increased concentration of phosphorus and other contaminates in the Bosque River which drains into Lake Wacoâ??the primary source of potable water for Wacoâ??s 108,500 people. The concentrated animal feeding operations may lead to land, water, and air pollution if waste handling systems and storage and treatment structures are not properly managed. Manure-based biomass (MBB) has the potential to be a source of green energy at large coal-fired power plants and on smaller-scale combustion systems at or near confined animal feeding operations. Although MBB particularly cattle biomass (CB) is a low quality fuel with an inferior heat value compared to coal and other fossil fuels, the concentration of it at large animal feeding operations can make it a viable source of fuel. The overall objective of this interdisciplinary proposal is to develop environmentally benign technologies to convert low-value inventories of dairy and beef cattle biomass into renewable energy. Current research expands the suite of technologies by which cattle biomass (CB: manure, and premature mortalities) could serve as a renewable alternative to fossil fuel. The work falls into two broad categories of research and development. Category 1 â?? Renewable Energy Conversion. This category addressed mostly in volume I involves developing. Thermo-chemical conversion technologies including cofiring with coal, reburn to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO, N2O, NOx, etc.) and Hg emissions and gasification to produce low-BTU gas for on-site power production in order to extract energy from waste streams or renewable resources. Category 2 â?? Biomass Resource Technology. This category, addressed mostly in Volume II, deals with the efficient and cost-effective use of CB as a renewable energy source (e.g. through and via aqueous-phase, anaerobic digestion or biological gasification). The investigators formed an industrial advisory panel consisting fuel producers (feedlots and dairy farms) and fuel users (utilities), periodically met with them, and presented the research results; apart from serving as dissemination forum, the PIs used their critique to red-direct the research within the scope of the tasks. The final report for the 5 to 7 year project performed by an interdisciplinary team of 9 professors is arranged in three volumes: Vol. I (edited by Kalyan Annamalai) addressing thermo-chemical conversion and direct combustion under Category 1 and Vol. II and Vol. III ( edited by J M Sweeten) addressing biomass resource Technology under Category 2. Various tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume I were performed by the Department of Mechanical Engineering (a part of TEES; see Volume I), while other tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume II and IIII were conducted by Texas AgriLife Research at Amarillo; the TAMU Biological & Agricultural Engineering Department (BAEN) College Station; and West Texas A&M University (WTAMU) (Volumes II and III). The three volume report covers the following results: fuel properties of low ash and high ash CB (particularly DB) and MB (mortality biomass and coals, non-intrusive visible infrared (NVIR) spectroscopy techniques for ash determination, dairy energy use surveys a

John M. Sweeten, Kalyan Annamalai Brent Auvermann Saqib Mukhtar Sergio C. Capareda Cady Engler Wyatte Harman J.N. Reddy, Robert DeOtte David B. Parker Dr. B.A. Stewart

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

357

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Residential Air Quality Policies Speaker(s): Jennifer Logue Date: November 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Brett Singer People spend the majority of their time in residences and the health burden of indoor air is significant. However, the definitions of "acceptable" and "good" indoor air quality (IAQ), and the most effective, energy efficient methods for achieving various levels of IAQ are still matters of research and debate. Current ventilation standards focus on minimum requirements for overall and mechanically provided ventilation rates, and vented combustion equipment, and require only the installation of kitchen and bath exhaust fans for source control. These standards generally are

358

Waveform correlation methods for identifying populations of calibration events  

SciTech Connect

An approach for systematically screening large volumes of continuous data for repetitive events identified as mining explosions on basis of temporal and amplitude population characteristics. The method extends event clustering through waveform correlation with a new source-region-specific detector. The new signal subspace detector generalizes the matched filter and can be used to increase the number of events associated with a given cluster, thereby increasing the reliability of diagnostic cluster population characteristics. The method can be applied to obtain bootstrap ground truth explosion waveforms for testing discriminants, where actual ground truth is absent. The same events, if associated with to a particular mine, may help calibrate velocity models. The method may also assist earthquake hazard risk assessment by providing what amounts to blasting logs for identified mines. The cluster event lists can be reconciled against earthquake catalogs to screen explosions, otherwise hard to identify from the catalogs.

Harris, D.B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Military use of depleted uranium assessment of prolonged population exposure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is an exposure assessment for a population living in an area contaminated by use of depleted uranium (DU) weapons. RESRAD 5.91 code is used to evaluate the average effective dose delivered from 1, 10, 20 cm depths of contaminated soil, in a residential farmer scenario. Critical pathway and group are identified in soil inhalation or ingestion and children playing with the soil, respectively. From available information on DU released on targeted sites, both critical and average exposure can leave to toxicological hazards; annual dose limit for population can be exceeded on short-term period (years) for soil inhalation. As a consequence, in targeted sites cleaning up must be planned on the basis of measured concentration, when available, while special cautions have to be adopted altogether to reduce unaware exposures, taking into account the amount of the avertable dose.

Giannardi, C

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Dental radiography exposure of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki populations  

SciTech Connect

Dental radiography doses in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were estimated on the basis of survey data from dental hospitals and clinics in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and doses were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters and a phantom. Doses to organs, including the lens, pituitary fossa, thyroid gland, and skin were calculated from data obtained during a 2-week survey in both cities. The mean caput doses were calculated from the data indicating frequency per year and were tabulated by organs, age, teeth examined, type of examination, population, sex, and city. No significant difference was observed by age, population, sex, or city. Currently the doses incurred during dental radiography may not be sufficiently high to cause bias in the assessments for late radiation effects among atomic-bomb survivors. However, the mean caput thyroid doses of 62 mrad and 67 mrad in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively, cannot be ignored from the standpoint of their potential in contributing to radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

Antoku, S.; Hoshi, M.; Russell, W.J.; Kihara, T.; Sawada, S.; Takeshita, K.; Otake, M.; Yoshinaga, H.; Beach, D.R.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Population exposure from the fuel cycle: Review and future direction  

SciTech Connect

The legacy of radiation exposures confronting man arises from two historical sources of energy, the sun and radioactive decay. Contemporary man continues to be dependent on these two energy sources, which include the nuclear fuel cycle. Radiation exposures from all energy sources should be examined, with particular emphasis on the nuclear fuel cycle, incidents such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. In addition to risk estimation, concepts such as de minimis, life shortening as a measure of risk, and competing risks as projected into the future must be considered in placing radiation exposures in perspective. The utility of these concepts is in characterizing population exposures for decision makers in a manner that the public may judge acceptable. All these viewpoints are essential in the evaluation of population exposure from the nuclear fuel cycle.

Richmond, C.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Hierarchical population model with a carrying capacity distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A time- and space-discrete model for the growth of a rapidly saturating local biological population $N(x,t)$ is derived from a hierarchical random deposition process previously studied in statistical physics. Two biologically relevant parameters, the probabilities of birth, $B$, and of death, $D$, determine the carrying capacity $K$. Due to the randomness the population depends strongly on position, $x$, and there is a distribution of carrying capacities, $\\Pi (K)$. This distribution has self-similar character owing to the imposed hierarchy. The most probable carrying capacity and its probability are studied as a function of $B$ and $D$. The effective growth rate decreases with time, roughly as in a Verhulst process. The model is possibly applicable, for example, to bacteria forming a "towering pillar" biofilm. The bacteria divide on randomly distributed nutrient-rich regions and are exposed to random local bactericidal agent (antibiotic spray). A gradual overall temperature change away from optimal growth co...

Indekeu, J O

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Can Population III Stars at High Redshifts produce GRB's?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma ray bursts are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe, consisting of flashes of gamma rays that last from seconds to hours. There have been attempts to observe gamma ray bursts, for example, from population III stars of about 500 solar mass at high redshifts. Here we argue that collapse of such high mass stars does not lead to gamma ray burst as their core collapse temperatures are not sufficient to produce gamma rays, leading to GRBs.

C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

364

Improving the assessment of instream flow needs for fish populations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Instream flow requirements are one of the most frequent and most costly environmental issues that must be addressed in developing hydroelectric projects. Existing assessment methods for determining instream flow requirements have been criticized for not including all the biological response mechanisms that regulate fishery resources. A new project has been initiated to study the biological responses of fish populations to altered stream flows and to develop improved ways of managing instream flows. 21 refs., 3 figs.

Sale, M.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Otto, R.G. (Otto (R.G.) and Associates, Arlington, VA (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Effect of geometric and motion tracking error for awake small animal SPECT  

SciTech Connect

A series of simulation studies were performed to evaluate the effects of geometric and motion tracking errors on reconstruction image quality for a single pinhole collimator awake animal imaging SPECT system. List-mode SPECT data generated using a custom Monte Carlo program that incorporated experimental mouse motion data were reconstructed by MLEM with Siddon's ray tracing. To better understand the impact of motion tracking and system geometric parameter errors on reconstructed system data, an offset of up to 1 mm or degree was separately applied to each for evaluation. In the absence of motion tracking or system geometric error, the applied motion compensation algorithm successfully reconstructed volumes without any degradation or distortion. Presented results reveal that motion tracking errors propagate through the SPECT reconstruction process. However, it is confirmed that the impact of tracking errors in the currently employed motion tracking system, is minimal because of their accuracy. The results also reveal the direct and indirect impact of geometric errors to motion compensated reconstruction quality and that a wrong assumption of pinhole transaxial position produces the most amount of distortion of all the investigated errors. Finally, system geometric errors are shown to have a greater impact on reconstruction quality than equivalent tracking errors.

S.J. Lee, J.S. Baba, J. S. Goddard, A. Stolin, J. McKisson, A.G. Weisenberger, M.F. Smith

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope  

SciTech Connect

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

Grenier, Isabelle (University Paris Diderot and CEA Saclay, France)

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Stellar Population in LLAGN.I: Ground-based observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridge): We present a spectroscopic study of the stellar populations of Low Luminosity AGN (LLAGN). Our main goal is to determine whether the stars who live in the innermost (100 pc-scale) regions of these galaxies are in some way related to the emission line properties, which would imply a link between the stellar population and the ionization mechanism. High signal to noise, ground based long-slit spectra in the 3500--5500 A interval were collected for 60 galaxies.Our main findings are: (1) Few LLAGN have a detectable young (weak [OI] emission, but rare (10 %) in LLAGN with stronger [OI]. This is intriguing since LLAGN with weak [OI] have been previously hypothesized to be ``transition objects'' in which both an AGN and young stars contribute to the emission-line excitation. Massive stars, if present, are completely outshone by intermediate age and old stars in the optical. This happens in at least a couple of objects where independent UV spectroscopy detects young starbursts not seen in the optical. (4) Objects with predominantly old stars span the whole range of [OI]/Halpha values, but (5) sources with significant young and/or intermediate age populations are nearly all (90%) weak [OI] emitters.

Roberto Cid Fernandes; Rosa M. Gonzalez Delgado; Henrique Schmitt; Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann; Lucimara P. Martins; Enrique Perez; Timothy Heckman; Claus Leitherer; Daniel Schaerer

2004-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

368

Population variation in the life history traits and thermal responses of Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Studies of the phenotypes of animals at different parts of their geographic range often reveal striking variability. It is of considerable fundamental and applied interest (more)

Perutz, Marion

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations (1994)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents Documents Federal Register Vol. 59, No. 32 Wednesday, February 16, 1994 Title 3- The President Executive Order 12898 of February 11, 1994 Federal Actions To Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1-1.Implementation. 1-101. Agency Responsibilities. To the greatest extent practicable and per- mitted by law, and consistent with the principles set forth in the report on the National Performance Review, each Federal agency shall make achiev- ing environmental justice part of its mission by identifying and addressing, as appropriate, disproportionately high and adverse human health or environ-

370

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal Origin Chapter 3 Methods to Prepare the Fatty Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal Origin Chapter 3 Methods to Prepare the Fatty Materials Food Science eChapters Food Science & Technology AOCS B0D4209841831A6CC426132C3332EE5C Press Downloadable pdf...

371

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 9 Animal Feeding Strategies for Conjugated Linoleic Acid Enrichment of Milk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 9 Animal Feeding Strategies for Conjugated Linoleic Acid Enrichment of Milk Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry 735D98CA0ABF7C8A10664FCCD

372

The Biodiesel Handbook, 2nd EditionChapter 10 Other Alternative Diesel Fuels from Vegetable Oils ande Animal Fats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Biodiesel Handbook, 2nd Edition Chapter 10 Other Alternative Diesel Fuels from Vegetable Oils ande Animal Fats Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Biofuels - Bioproducts eChapters AOCS F4C73AF32C5BD3F02A46C8467BF15904 Press

373

Consistent predictable patterns in the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of animal proteins consumed by modern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consistent predictable patterns in the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of animal proteins, IN 47907, USA 4 University of Utah, Department of Geology & Geophysics, 115 S 1460 E, Salt Lake City, UT acid hydrogen (d2 H) and oxygen (d18 O) isotope ratios is a common feature in systems where isotopic

Ehleringer, Jim

374

Eurographics/ ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation (2006) M.-P. Cani, J. O'Brien (Editors)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eurographics/ ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation (2006) M.-P. Cani, J. O'Brien (Editors. Categories and Subject Descriptors (according to ACM CCS): I.3.7 [Computer Graphics]: Three their attention to air bubbles ris- ing in liquid. [MSKG05] is the first work that did this in a variable

Sussman, Mark

375

Eurographics/ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation (2004) Posters and Demos R. Boulic, D. K. Pai (Editors)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eurographics/ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation (2004) Posters and Demos R. Boulic, D. K and modular manner. Categories and Subject Descriptors (according to ACM CCS): I.3.5 [Computer Graphics. 2. Fire Simulation The fire module is responsible for air motion, gas distribu- tion, and heat

Keyser, John

376

Understanding the biophysical mechanism(s) underlying geomagnetic field sensitivity in animals is one of the most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the biophysical mechanism(s) underlying geomagnetic field sensitivity in animals is one of the most exciting challenges in sensory biology. The use of geomagnetic cues for spatial and photosensitive pineal gland may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field (Semm et al., 1984; Demaine and Semm, 1985

Phillips, John B.

377

jSynoPSys -- A Scenario-Based Testing Tool based on the Symbolic Animation of B Machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the jSynoPSys tool that implements the concept of Scenario-Based Testing from B machines. This consists in describing execution scenarios, expressed as regular expressions over the operations of the system, coupled with intermediate ... Keywords: B machines, Test generation, constraint solving, scenario-based testing, symbolic animation

Frdric Dadeau; Rgis Tissot

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2001 annual report covers the fifth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 45,907 hours of setline effort and 186 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2001. A total of 390 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 12 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 36.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 42 cm to 307 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 66 cm to 235 cm and averaged 160 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. An additional 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 2001. The locations of 17 radio-tagged white sturgeon were monitored in 2001. The movement of these fish ranged from 38.6 km (24 miles) downstream to 54.7 km (34 miles) upstream; however, 62.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 309 aged white sturgeon. The results suggest fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. A total of 14 white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River in 2001.

Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 1999 annual report covers the third year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 1999 white sturgeon were captured, marked and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. A total of 33,943 hours of setline effort and 2,112 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1999. A total of 289 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 29 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 11.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 27 cm to 261 cm and averaged 110 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 98 cm to 244 cm and averaged 183.5 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon < 60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 1,823 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,052-4,221. A total of 15 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 6.4 km (4 miles) downstream to 13.7 km (8.5 miles) upstream; however, 83.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 kilometers (0.5 miles). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 29 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir were slightly larger than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 49 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests the fish are currently growing faster than fish historicly inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. Five white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River.

Tuell, Michael A.; Everett, Scott R. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Evaluate Potenial Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This report presents a summary of results from the 1997-2002 Phase II data collection and represents the end of phase II. From 1997 to 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon. A total of 1,785 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 77 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 25.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. Relative density of white sturgeon was highest in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River, with reduced densities of fish in Lower Granite Reservoir, and low densities the Salmon River. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir, the free-flowing Snake River and the Salmon River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. Total annual mortality rate was estimated to be 0.14 (95% confidence interval of 0.12 to 0.17). A total of 35 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 1999-2002. The movement of these fish ranged from 53 km (33 miles) downstream to 77 km (48 miles) upstream; however, 38.8 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. The results suggest fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate egg mats documented white sturgeon spawning in four consecutive years. A total of 49 white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River from 1999-2002, and seven from the Salmon River during 2000.

Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A.; Hesse, Jay A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Energy policy: Comparative effects on minority population groups  

SciTech Connect

For a number of years, analyses of minority household energy demand have been supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Economic Impact and Diversity (formerly the Office of Minority Economic Impact). The intention of these analyses has been to characterize patterns of energy demand by various demographic, regional and socioeconomic groups and to develop analytical tools to assess the distributive impact of energy prices and policy on these groups. The model supports strategic objectives outlined by the Department of Energy to explicitly recognize and promote equity in state public utility commission decisions and to assess the potential impact of federal and state energy policy on demographically diverse groups as reported in the Department`s Annual Energy Outlook and the upcoming National Energy Policy Plan. The legislation mandating the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity had been premised on the assumption that patterns of energy demand for minority households are different from the population as a whole. Determining the validity of this premise and its potential economic impact on different population groups has been a major objective of these analyses. Consequently, the recripriocal impacts of energy policy on demographic groups and energy consumption and expenditure dynamics on policy formulation and strategy is a central objective of these studies. Residential energy demand research has been substantial in the past twenty years. Insightful and useful research has been done in this area. However, none of this research has addressed the potential differences in the residential energy demand structure among various population groups. Recent work does compare energy and electricity demand elasticities for non-Latino Whites, with the demand elasticities for Latinos and Blacks. This research is particularly important for examination of questions related to the economic welfare implications of national energy policy.

Poyer, D.A.; Henderson, L.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Energy Distributions and the Formation Times of Spheroidal Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review recent progress in exploring the formation times of spheroidal stellar populations (elliptical galaxies and large spiral bulges) using spectrophotometric techniques. A quickly growing body of evidence shows that although massive spheroids can form at early times, there are strong environmental dependencies, and major transitions in star formation histories and even morphologies are detectable to surprisingly small redshifts (z ~ 0.2). These features are consistent with neither the strict monolithic collapse nor hierarchical merging scenarios. Restframe UV observations are a promising means of improving our understanding of spheroid evolution.

Robert W. O'Connell

1999-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

383

Population viability analysis of the Endangered shortnose sturgeon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study used population viability analysis (PVA) to partition the influences of potential threats to the endangered shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum). A workshop brought together experts to help identify potential threats including groundwater withdrawal, poor water quality, saltwater intrusion, mercury effects, harvest as by-catch, and sedimentation of spawning habitat. During the course of the project, we eliminated some threats and added new ones. Groundwater withdrawal was dismissed after a study failed to identify connection with groundwater and the majority of pumping is from a confined aquifer. We also eliminated activities on Fort Stewart as influences on spawning habitat because any successful spawning must occur upstream of Fort Stewart. We added climate change to the list of threats based on our assessment of temperature effects and expectations of sea-level rise. Our study highlighted the role of populations in nearby rivers in providing metapopulation support, raising the concern that the population in the Ogeechee River acts as a demographic sink. As part of this study, we carried out a field sampling study to analyze effects of training activities on headwater streams. We developed a new methodology for sampling design as part of this effort and used a mixed-modeling approach to identify relationships between land cover-land use, including those associated with military training activity and water quality. We found that tank training was associated with higher suspended sediment and equipment training was associated with higher organic carbon) and water quality. We detected effects of training on suspended sediment and organic carbon. We also carried out a field sampling effort in the Canoochee and Ogeechee Rivers. In the Ogeechee River, we found that dissolved oxygen in 40% of measurements during summer were below 4 mg L-1. To evaluate mercury as a potential threat, we developed a mercury uptake model and analyzed mercury levels in amphipod prey and sturgeon eggs. These did not exceed EPA guidelines. Finally, we developed a PVA model that including linkages between shortnose sturgeon growth, reproduction, and survival and each remaining threat; All three had significant influences. Preliminary simulations suggest that elevated temperatures under future climate will extirpate this population and add support to the hypothesis that this species requires access to spawning habitat far upstream to persist.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Peterson, Douglas L. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

On the Absence of Population Bias in the Tornado Climatology of Southwestern Ontario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rural population densities and tornado incidence (confirmed and probable categories) are compared for noncoastal regions in the southwestern Ontario peninsula. No apparent relationship is found between rural population density and F0F4 ...

Patrick King

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A HMM-based hierarchical framework for long-term population projection of small areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Population Projection is the numerical outcome of a specific set of assumptions about future population changes. It is indispensable to the planning of sites as almost all successive planning activities such as the identification of land and housing ...

Bin Jiang; Huidong Jin; Nianjun Liu; Mike Quirk; Ben Searle

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

IMPROVED BIOREFINERY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL, CHEMICALS, ANIMAL FEED AND BIOMATERIALS FROM SUGAR CANE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Audubon Sugar Institute (ASI) of Louisiana State Universitys Agricultural Center (LSU AgCenter) and MBI International (MBI) sought to develop technologies that will lead to the development of a sugar-cane biorefinery, capable of supplying fuel ethanol from bagasse. Technology development focused on the conversion of bagasse, cane-leaf matter (CLM) and molasses into high value-added products that included ethanol, specialty chemicals, biomaterials and animal feed; i.e. a sugar cane-based biorefinery. The key to lignocellulosic biomass utilization is an economically feasible method (pretreatment) for separating the cellulose and the hemicellulose from the physical protection provided by lignin. An effective pretreatment disrupts physical barriers, cellulose crystallinity, and the association of lignin and hemicellulose with cellulose so that hydrolytic enzymes can access the biomass macrostructure (Teymouri et al. 2004, Laureano-Perez, 2005). We chose to focus on alkaline pretreatment methods for, and in particular, the Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) process owned by MBI. During the first two years of this program a laboratory process was established for the pretreatment of bagasse and CLM using the AFEX process. There was significant improvement of both rate and yield of glucose and xylose upon enzymatic hydrolysis of AFEX-treated bagasse and CLM compared with untreated material. Because of reactor size limitation, several other alkaline pretreatment methods were also co-investigated. They included, dilute ammonia, lime and hydroxy-hypochlorite treatments. Scale-up focused on using a dilute ammonia process as a substitute for AFEX, allowing development at a larger scale. The pretreatment of bagasse by an ammonia process, followed by saccharification and fermentation produced ethanol from bagasse. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) allowed two operations in the same vessel. The addition of sugarcane molasses to the hydrolysate/fermentation process yielded improvements beyond what was expected solely from the addition of sugar. In order to expand the economic potential for building a biorefinery, the conversion of enzyme hydrolysates of AFEX-treated bagasse to succinic acid was also investigated. This program established a solid basis for pre-treatment of bagasse in a manner that is feasible for producing ethanol at raw sugar mills.

Dr. Donal F. Day

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

387

Homogeneity of Powassan virus populations in naturally infected Ixodes scapularis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Powassan virus (POWV, Flaviviridae: Flavivirus) is the sole North American member of the tick-borne encephalitis complex and consists of two distinct lineages that are maintained in ecologically discrete enzootic transmission cycles. The underlying genetic mechanisms that lead to niche partitioning in arboviruses are poorly understood. Therefore, intra- and interhost genetic diversity was analyzed to determine if POWV exists as a quasispecies in nature and quantify selective pressures within and between hosts. In contrast to previous reports for West Nile virus (WNV), significant intrahost genetic diversity was not observed. However, pN (0.238) and d{sub N}/d{sub S} ratios (0.092) for interhost diversity were similar to those of WNV. Combined, these data suggest that purifying selection and/or population bottlenecks constrain quasispecies diversity within ticks. These same selective and stochastic mechanisms appear to drive minor sequence changes between ticks. Moreover, Powassan virus populations seem not to be structured as quasispecies in naturally infected adult deer ticks.

Brackney, Doug E.; Brown, Ivy K.; Nofchissey, Robert A.; Fitzpatrick, Kelly A. [University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Ebel, Gregory D., E-mail: gebel@salud.unm.ed [University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

388

GIS and plume dispersion modeling for population exposure assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of Pollutant Plume Dispersion Models is widespread in the evaluation of point sources of air pollution. These models provide valuable insight into the concentration and dispersion of hazardous materials throughout the atmosphere. Traditional methods of dispersion modeling for the permitting of new sources and the monitoring of existing sources have allowed much room for error in terms of the effect of the pollutants on nearby populations (Hardikar, 1995). The capabilities of GIS technology offer an improved method of conducting air quality modeling for permitting, remediation studies, and environmental monitoring. GIS has the ability to develop and manage a comprehensive database of model output, map layers, and demographic data that can prove extremely valuable in the modeling process. This data can serve to extend the capabilities of air pollution dispersion modeling from mere estimation of concentrations to comprehensive exposure assessment of neighboring populations (Lowry, et al. 1995, Maslia, et al. 1994). A study of the Monticello power plant in northeast Texas was conducted using the SCREEN3 mathematical plume dispersion model, US Census Bureau demographic data, and a GIS to examine the effects of the plant output on the people living in the seven county area surrounding the plant.

Archer, Jeffrey Keith

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Radiation protection training for diverse general employee populations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation protection training for the general employee at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has undergone a great deal of restructuring in the last two years. The number of personnel totally dedicated to nuclear facilities is less than a fifth of our employees and the percentage of contracted employees who are dedicated radiation workers is much smaller. However, the aging of our facilities and increasing emphasis on environmental control means that everyone needs to understand the basics of radiation protection. In accordance with changing DOE guidelines and internal ORNL policies, greater emphasis has been placed on keeping training focused on current issues, training the total workforce, and requiring some type of testing or feedback mechanism. This report describes efforts to instill respect, but not fear, of radiation in the work environment. Flexible tools are being developed to meet this objective for several diverse general employee populations. Continuing efforts include consideration of computer-based training for retraining, developing additional modules for specialized groups and jobs, and testing/documentation appropriate to each population segment. 6 refs.

Copenhaver, E.D.; Houser, B.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Yunnan-III models for Evolutionary population synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We build the Yunnan-III evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models by using the MESA stellar evolution code, BaSeL stellar spectra library and the initial mass functions (IMFs) of Kroupa and Salpeter, and present colours and integrated spectral energy distributions (ISEDs) of solar-metallicity stellar populations (SPs) in the range of 1Myr-15 Gyr. The main characteristic of the Yunnan-III EPS models is the usage of a set of self-consistent solar-metallicity stellar evolutionary tracks (the masses of stars are from 0.1 to 100Msun). This set of tracks is obtained by using the state-of-the-art MESA code. MESA code can evolve stellar models through thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase for low- and intermediate-mass stars. By comparisons, we confirm that the inclusion of TP-AGB stars make the V-K, V-J and V-R colours of SPs redder and the infrared flux larger at ages log(t/yr)>7.6 (the differences reach the maximum at log(t/yr)~8.6, ~0.5-0.2mag for colours, ~2 times for K-band flux). The st...

Zhang, F; Han, Z; Zhuang, Y; Kang, X

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Genetic variants associated with fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in an ethnically diverse population: results from the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USA. 19 Office of Population Genomics, National Human GenomeArchitecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study.Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

2001 New York State NHTS: Travel Patterns of Special Populations  

SciTech Connect

Policymakers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and accommodate future demands; to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-alleviating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. Longer-distance travel was collected in 1977 and 1995. The 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) collected both daily and longer-distance trips in one survey. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel was not part of the survey. New York State participated in the 2001 NHTS by procuring additional 12,000 sample households. These additional sample households allowed New York State to address transportation planning issues pertinent to geographic areas that are significantly smaller than what the national NHTS data allowed. The final sample size for New York State was 13,423 usable households. In this report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identifies and analyzes differences, if any, in travel patterns that are attributable to demographic characteristics (e.g., gender, age, race and ethnicity), household characteristics (e.g., low income households, zero and one car households), modal characteristics and geographic location. Travel patterns of those who work at home are examined and compared to those of conventional workers, as well as those who do not work. Focus is given to trip frequency, travel by time of day, trip purpose, and mode choice. For example, included in this analysis is the mobility of the elderly population in New York State. The American society is undergoing a major demographic transformation that is resulting in a greater percentage of older individuals in the population. In addition to demographic changes, recent travel surveys show that an increasing number of older individuals are licensed to drive and that they drive more than their same age cohort did a decade ago. Cohort differences in driving are particularly apparent - not only are more of today's elderly population licensed to drive than their age cohort two decades ago, they also drive more. Equally important are the increase in immigration and in racial and cultural diversity. This report also discusses vehicle availability, socioeconomic characteristics, travel trends (e.g., miles travelled, distance driven, commute patterns), and the transportation accessibility of these populations. Specifically, this report addresses in detail the travel behavior of the following special populations: (1) the elderly, defined as those who were 65 years old or older, (2) low-income households, (3) ethnic groups and immigrants, and (4) those who worked at home.

Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The impacts of population change on carbon emissions in China during 1978-2008  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the impacts of population size, population structure, and consumption level on carbon emissions in China from 1978 to 2008. To this end, we expanded the stochastic impacts by regression on population, affluence, and technology model and used the ridge regression method, which overcomes the negative influences of multicollinearity among independent variables under acceptable bias. Results reveal that changes in consumption level and population structure were the major impact factors, not changes in population size. Consumption level and carbon emissions were highly correlated. In terms of population structure, urbanization, population age, and household size had distinct effects on carbon emissions. Urbanization increased carbon emissions, while the effect of age acted primarily through the expansion of the labor force and consequent overall economic growth. Shrinking household size increased residential consumption, resulting in higher carbon emissions. Households, rather than individuals, are a more reasonable explanation for the demographic impact on carbon emissions. Potential social policies for low carbon development are also discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the impacts of population change on carbon emissions in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We expand the STIRPAT model by containing population structure factors in the model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The population structure includes age structure, urbanization level, and household size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ridge regression method is used to estimate the model with multicollinearity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The population structure plays a more important role compared with the population size.

Zhu Qin, E-mail: zhuqin@fudan.edu.cn; Peng Xizhe, E-mail: xzpeng@fudan.edu.cn

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Statistical Journal of the United Nations ECE 23 (2006) 110 1 New forecast: Population decline postponed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical Journal of the United Nations ECE 23 (2006) 1­10 1 IOS Press New forecast: Population, Finland fStatistics Norway, Oslo, Norway Abstract. We present results of a probabilistic forecast for the population in 18 European countries, to 2050. Other forecasts have recently predicted a falling population

Løw, Erik

395

Farm scale electrical power production from animal waste. Volume I. Final report, 30 June 1981-30 December 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 1 1/2 (dry) tons per day biodigester cogeneration plant has been designed and constructed. This project is part of a federal program to promote energy conservation and the use of non-conventional energy resources. The main purpose of the project is to demonstrate that a dairy farm can generate its own power and supply excess power to a local utility. Such a facility can produce significant energy savings to livestock farms and small communities by allowing them to get energy from raw animal and human waste. Also, an odorless by-product is produced that is nearly pathogenically free and has the possibility of several end uses such as: fertilizer and soil conditioner, protein-rich animal refeed, livestock bedding material, and aquatic food for fish farming. 53 references, 18 figures, 4 tables.

Carpenter, P.A.

1984-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

The Effects of 3D Animated Movies and Interactive Applications on the Development of Visual Perception in 60-72-Months-Old Children  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated whether the visual perception of 60-to 72-month-old kindergarteners attending a special program that included three-dimensional 3D stereoscopic animated movies and interactive applications differed from that of children who attended ... Keywords: 3D Stereoscopic, Animated Movies, Interactive Applications, Preschool Children, Visual perception

Seil Ycelyi?it, Neriman Aral

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Animating Faces Using Appearance Models B. Theobald1, I. Matthews2, N. Wilkinson1, J.F. Cohn2,3, S. Boker4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) can be rendered in real-time, and 6) can generate animated sequences directly from motion captured, subcutaneous fat, and skin. The problem is compounded by the fact that we are all expert at detecting unexpected results when the model is animated. 3) To prevent artifacts in the rendered mesh care is required

Theobald, Barry-John

398

Investigation of independence in inter-animal tumor-type occurrences within the NTP rodent-bioassay database  

SciTech Connect

Statistically significant elevation in tumor incidence at multiple histologically distinct sites is occasionally observed among rodent bioassays of chemically induced carcinogenesis. If such data are to be relied on (as they have, e.g., by the US EPA) for quantitative cancer potency assessment, their proper analysis requires a knowledge of the extent to which multiple tumor-type occurrences are independent or uncorrelated within individual bioassay animals. Although difficult to assess in a statistically rigorous fashion, a few significant associations among tumor-type occurrences in rodent bioassays have been reported. However, no comprehensive studies of animal-specific tumor-type occurrences at death or sacrifice have been conducted using the extensive set of available NTP rodent-bioassay data, on which most cancer-potency assessment for environmental chemicals is currently based. This report presents the results of such an analysis conducted on behalf of the National Research Council`s Committee on Risk Assessment for Hazardous Air Pollutants. Tumor-type associations among individual animals were examined for {approximately}2500 to 3000 control and {approximately}200 to 600 treated animals using pathology data from 62 B6C3F1 mouse studies and 61 F/344N rat studies obtained from a readily available subset of the NTP carcinogenesis bioassay database. No evidence was found for any large correlation in either the onset probability or the prevalence-at-death or sacrifice of any tumor-type pair investigated in control and treated rats and niece, although a few of the small correlations present were statistically significant. Tumor-type occurrences were in most cases nearly independent, and departures from independence, where they did occur, were small. This finding is qualified in that tumor-type onset correlations were measured only indirectly, given the limited nature of the data analyzed.

Bogen, K.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Seilkop, S. [Analytical Sciences, Inc., Durham, NC (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Long-term biobarriers to plant and animal intrusions of uranium tailings. [24% trifluralin, 18% carbon black, and 58% polymer  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of physical and chemical barriers designed to prevent plant and animal breachment of uranium mill tailings containment systems for an extended period of time. A polymeric carrier/biocide delivery system was developed and tested in the laboratory, greenhouse and field. A continuous flow technique was established to determine the release rates of the biocides from the PCD systems; polymeric carrier specifications were established. Studies were conducted to determine effective biocide concentrations required to produce a phytotoxic response and the relative rates of phytotoxin degradation resulting from chemical and biological breakdown in soils. The final PCD system developed was a pelletized system containing 24% trifluralin, 18% carbon black and 58% polymer. Pellets were placed in the soil at the Grand Junction U-tailings site at one in. and two in. intervals. Data obtained in the field determined that the pellets released enough herbicide to the soil layer to stop root elongation past the barrier. Physical barriers to subsurface movement of burrowing animals were investigated. Small crushed stone (1 to 1 1/2 in. diameter) placed over asphalt emulsion and multilayer soil seals proved effective as barriers to a small mammal (ground squirrels) but were not of sufficient size to stop a larger animal (the prairie dog). No penetrations were made through the asphalt emulsion or the clay layer of the multilayer soil seals by either of the two mammals tested. A literature survey was prepared and published on the burrowing habits of the animals that may be found at U-tailings sites.

Cline, J.F.; Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Skiens, W.E.; Gano, K.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Imaging of cardiac perfusion of free-breathing small animals using dynamic phase-correlated micro-CT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose:Mouse models of cardiac diseases have proven to be a valuable tool in preclinical research. The high cardiac and respiratory rates of free breathing mice prohibit conventional in vivo cardiac perfusion studies using computed tomography even if gating methods are applied. This makes a sacrification of the animals unavoidable and only allows for the application of ex vivo methods. Methods: To overcome this issue the authors propose a low dose scan protocol and an associated reconstruction algorithm that allows for in vivo imaging of cardiac perfusion and associated processes that are retrospectively synchronized to the respiratory and cardiac motion of the animal. The scan protocol consists of repetitive injections of contrast media within several consecutive scans while the ECG, respiratory motion, and timestamp of contrast injection are recorded and synchronized to the acquired projections. The iterative reconstruction algorithm employs a six-dimensional edge-preserving filter to provide low-noise, motion artifact-free images of the animal examined using the authors' low dose scan protocol. Results: The reconstructions obtained show that the complete temporal bolus evolution can be visualized and quantified in any desired combination of cardiac and respiratory phase including reperfusion phases. The proposed reconstruction method thereby keeps the administered radiation dose at a minimum and thus reduces metabolic inference to the animal allowing for longitudinal studies. Conclusions: The authors' low dose scan protocol and phase-correlated dynamic reconstruction algorithm allow for an easy and effective way to visualize phase-correlated perfusion processes in routine laboratory studies using free-breathing mice.

Sawall, Stefan; Kuntz, Jan; Socher, Michaela; Knaup, Michael; Hess, Andreas; Bartling, Soenke; Kachelriess, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Animal Laboratory Services Core Facility, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A Population Study of Golden Eagles in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: Population Trend Analysis, 1994-1997  

SciTech Connect

The wind industry has annually reported 28-43 turbine blade strike casualties of golden eagles in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, and many more carcasses have doubtless gone unnoticed. Because this species is especially sensitive to adult survival rate changes, we focused upon estimating the demographic trend of the population. In aerial surveys, we monitored survival within a sample of 179 radio-tagged eagles over a four-year period. We also obtained data on territory occupancy and reproduction of about 65 eagle pairs residing in the area. Of 61 recorded deaths of radio-tagged eagles during the four-year investigation, 23 (38%) were caused by wind turbine blade strikes. Additional fatalities were unrecorded because blade strikes sometimes destroy radio transmitters. Annual survival was estimated at 0.7867 (SE=0.0263) for non-territorial eagles and 0.8964 (SE=0.0371) for territorial ones. Annual reproduction was 0.64 (SE=0.08) young per territorial pair (0.25 per female). These parameters were used to estimate population growth rates under different modeling frameworks. At present, there are indications that a reserve of non-breeding adults still exists, i.e., there is an annual territorial reoccupancy rate of 100% and a low incidence (3%) of subadults as members of breeding pairs.

Predatory Bird Research Group, Long Marine Laboratory

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

402

ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Testing Beryllium Vendor Populations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Beryllium Testing Vendor Populations When former employees at 25 closed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) beryllium vendor companies needed an entity to provide medical screening and tests related to their beryllium exposure, the agency chose the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) to manage the program. ORISE administers a brief health questionnaire and a blood test known as the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) to determine if a worker has been sensitized to the light metal or if he or she needs to be evaluated further for chronic beryllium disease (CBD). If a worker has at least one abnormal BeLPT, he or she is referred for further evaluation through the Energy Employees Occupational Illness

403

Practical Methods for Locating Abandoned Wells in Populated Areas  

SciTech Connect

An estimated 12 million wells have been drilled during the 150 years of oil and gas production in the United States. Many old oil and gas fields are now populated areas where the presence of improperly plugged wells may constitute a hazard to residents. Natural gas emissions from wells have forced people from their houses and businesses and have caused explosions that injured or killed people and destroyed property. To mitigate this hazard, wells must be located and properly plugged, a task made more difficult by the presence of houses, businesses, and associated utilities. This paper describes well finding methods conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) that were effective at two small towns in Wyoming and in a suburb of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Lynn, R.J.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Nevada Test Site tortoise population monitoring study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Tortoise Population Monitoring Study was initiated to determine and monitor the density of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site. Quadrat sampling was conducted following methodology described in the Draft Desert Tortoise Recovery Plan (FWS, 1993). So few tortoises were found that densities could not be calculated. Based on estimates of capture probabilities and densities from other studies, it was determined that 1-km{sup 2} (0.4 mi{sup 2}) plots did not contain enough tortoises for estimating densities with the Recovery Plan methods. It was recommended that additional surveys on the Nevada Test Site using those methods not be conducted. Any future efforts to monitor desert tortoise densities should start by identifying other possible methods, determining their relative power to detect changes, and estimating their cost.

Mueller, J.M.; Zander, K.K.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Over-populated gauge fields on the lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study nonequilibrium dynamics of SU(2) pure gauge theory starting from initial over-population, where intense classical gauge fields are characterized by a single momentum scale Q_s. Classical-statistical lattice simulations indicate a quick evolution towards an approximate scaling behavior with exponent 3/2 at intermediate times. Remarkably, the value for the scaling exponent may be understood as arising from the leading O(g^2) contribution in the presence of a time-dependent background field. The phenomenon is associated to weak wave turbulence describing an energy cascade towards higher momenta. This particular aspect is very similar to what is observed for scalar theories, where an effective cubic interaction arises because of the presence of a time-dependent Bose condensate.

J. Berges; S. Schlichting; D. Sexty

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

406

Effects of alpha populations on tokamak ballooning stability  

SciTech Connect

Fusion product alpha populations can significantly influence tokamak stability due to coupling between the trapped alpha precessional drift and the kinetic ballooning mode frequency. This effect is of particular importance in parameter regimes where the alpha pressure gradient begins to constitute a sizable fraction of the thermal plasma pressure gradient. Careful, quantitative evaluations of these effects are necessary in burning plasma devices such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the Joint European Torus, and we have continued systematic development of such a kinetic stability model. In this model we have considered a range of different forms for the alpha distribution function and the tokamak equilibrium. Both Maxwellian and slowing-down models have been used for the alpha energy dependence while deeply trapped and, more recently, isotropic pitch angle dependence have been examined.

Spong, D.A.; Sigmar, D.J.; Tsang, K.T.; Ramos, J.J.; Hastings, D.E.; Cooper, W.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Bayesian Modeling of Population Variability -- Practical Guidance and Pitfalls  

SciTech Connect

With the advent of easy-to-use open-source software for Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation, hierarchical Bayesian analysis is gaining in popularity. This paper presents practical guidance for hierarchical Bayes analysis of typical problems in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The guidance is related to choosing parameterizations that accelerate convergence of the MCMC sampling and to illustrating the potential sensitivity of the results to the functional form chosen for the first-stage prior. This latter issue has significant ramifications because the mean of the average population variability curve (PVC) from hierarchical Bayes (or the mean of the point estimate distribution from empirical Bayes) can be very sensitive to this choice in cases where variability is large. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the issues discussed.

Dana L. Kelly; Corwin L. Atwood

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

TWO POPULATIONS OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

Super star clusters-extremely massive clusters found predominately in starburst environments-are essential building blocks in the formation of galaxies and thought to dominate star formation in the high-redshift universe. However, the transformation from molecular gas into these ultracompact star clusters is not well understood. To study this process, we used the Submillimeter Array and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer to obtain high angular resolution ({approx}1.''5 or 160 pc) images of the Antennae overlap region in CO(2-1) to search for the molecular progenitors of the super star clusters. We resolve the molecular gas distribution into a large number of clouds, extending the differential cloud mass function down to a 5{sigma} completeness limit of 3.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. We identify a distinct break in the mass function around log M{sub mol}/M{sub Sun} Almost-Equal-To 6.5, which separates the molecular clouds into two distinct populations. The smaller, less massive clouds reside in more quiescent areas in the region, while the larger, more massive clouds cluster around regions of intense star formation. A broken power-law fit to the mass function yields slopes of {alpha} = -1.39 {+-} 0.10 and {alpha} = -1.44 {+-} 0.14 for the low- and high-mass cloud population, well matched to the mass function found for super star clusters in the Antennae galaxies. We find large velocity gradients and velocity dispersions at the locations of intense star formation, suggestive of compressive shocks. It is likely that these environmental factors contribute to the formation of the observed massive molecular clouds and super star clusters in the Antennae galaxies.

Wei, Lisa H.; Keto, Eric [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

409

Essays on Modeling the Economic Impacts of a Foreign Animal Disease on the United States Agricultural Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foreign animal disease can cause serious damage to the United States (US) agricultural sector and foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), in particular, poses a serious threat. FMD causes death and reduced fecundity in infected animals, as well as significant economic consequences. FMD damages can likely be reduced through implementing pre-planned response strategies. Empirical studies have evaluated the economic consequences of alternative strategies, but typically employ simplified models. This dissertation seeks to improve US preparedness for avoiding and/or responding to an animal disease outbreak by addressing three issues related to strategy assessment in the context of FMD: integrated multi region economic and epidemic evaluation, inclusion of risk, and information uncertainty. An integrated economic/epidemic evaluation is done to examine the impact of various control strategies. This is done by combining a stochastic, spatial FMD simulation model with a national level, regionally disaggregated agricultural sector mathematical programming economic model. In the analysis, strategies are examined in the context of California's dairy industry. Alternative vaccination, disease detection and movement restriction strategies are considered as are trade restrictions. The results reported include epidemic impacts, national economic impacts, prices, regional producer impacts, and disease control costs under the alternative strategies. Results suggest that, including trade restrictions, the median national loss from the disease outbreak is as much as $17 billion when feed can enter the movement restriction zone. Early detection reduces the median loss and the standard deviation of losses. Vaccination does not reduce the median disease loss, but does have a smaller standard deviation of loss which would indicate it is a risk reducing strategy. Risk in foreign animal disease outbreaks is present from several sources; however, studies comparing alternative control strategies assume risk neutrality. In reality, there will be a desire to minimize the national loss as well as minimize the chance of an extreme outcome from the disease (i.e. risk aversion). We perform analysis on FMD control strategies using breakeven risk aversion coefficients in the context of an outbreak in the Texas High Plains. Results suggest that vaccination while not reducing average losses is a risk reducing strategy. Another issue related to risk and uncertainty is the response of consumers and domestic markets to the presence of FMD. Using a highly publicized possible FMD outbreak in Kansas that did not turn out to be true, we examine the role of information uncertainty in futures market response. Results suggest that livestock futures markets respond to adverse information even when that information is untrue. Furthermore, the existence of herding behavior and potential for momentum trading exaggerate the impact of information uncertainty related to animal disease.

Hagerman, Amy Deann

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and 2898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations To focus Federal attention on the environmental and human health conditions in minority communities and low-income communities with the goal of achieving environmental justice. That order is also intended to promote nondiscrimination in Federal programs substantially affecting human health and the environment, and to provide minority communities and low-income communities access to public information on, and an opportunity for public participation in, matters relating to human health or the environment. EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations More Documents & Publications

411

Uncloaking a cryptic, threatened rail with molecular markers: origins, connectivity and demography of a recently-discovered population  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composition of Black Rails from the East Coast wasStrong isolation among rail populations was apparent fromof endangered clapper rail (Rallus longirostris) populations

Girard, Philippe; Takekawa, John Y.; Beissinger, Steven R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Nuisance Source Population Modeling for Radiation Detection System Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A major challenge facing the prospective deployment of radiation detection systems for homeland security applications is the discrimination of radiological or nuclear 'threat sources' from radioactive, but benign, 'nuisance sources'. Common examples of such nuisance sources include naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), medical patients who have received radioactive drugs for either diagnostics or treatment, and industrial sources. A sensitive detector that cannot distinguish between 'threat' and 'benign' classes will generate false positives which, if sufficiently frequent, will preclude it from being operationally deployed. In this report, we describe a first-principles physics-based modeling approach that is used to approximate the physical properties and corresponding gamma ray spectral signatures of real nuisance sources. Specific models are proposed for the three nuisance source classes - NORM, medical and industrial. The models can be validated against measured data - that is, energy spectra generated with the model can be compared to actual nuisance source data. We show by example how this is done for NORM and medical sources, using data sets obtained from spectroscopic detector deployments for cargo container screening and urban area traffic screening, respectively. In addition to capturing the range of radioactive signatures of individual nuisance sources, a nuisance source population model must generate sources with a frequency of occurrence consistent with that found in actual movement of goods and people. Measured radiation detection data can indicate these frequencies, but, at present, such data are available only for a very limited set of locations and time periods. In this report, we make more general estimates of frequencies for NORM and medical sources using a range of data sources such as shipping manifests and medical treatment statistics. We also identify potential data sources for industrial source frequencies, but leave the task of estimating these frequencies for future work. Modeling of nuisance source populations is only useful if it helps in understanding detector system performance in real operational environments. Examples of previous studies in which nuisance source models played a key role are briefly discussed. These include screening of in-bound urban traffic and monitoring of shipping containers in transit to U.S. ports.

Sokkappa, P; Lange, D; Nelson, K; Wheeler, R

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

413

Dworshak Reservoir Kokanee Population Monitoring, Annual Report 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Onsite testing of strobe lights was conducted to determine if they repelled kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka away from the turbine intakes at Dworshak Dam. We tested a set of nine strobe lights flashing at a rate of 360 flashes/min placed near the intake of a 90 mW turbine. A split-beam echo sounder was used to determine the effect of strobe light operation on fish density (thought to be mostly kokanee) in front of the turbine intakes. On five nights between December 2001 and January 2002, fish density averaged 110 fish/ha when no lights were flashing. Mean density dropped to 13 fish/ha when the strobe lights were turned on during five additional nights of sampling. This 88% decline in density was significant at the P = 0.009 level of significance based on a paired Student's t test. There appeared to be no tendency for fish to habituate to the lights during the night. Test results indicate that a single set of nine lights may be sufficient to repel kokanee from a turbine intake during the night. We also used split-beam hydroacoustics to monitor the kokanee population in Dworshak Reservoir during 2001. Estimated abundance of kokanee has continued to increase since the spring of 1996 when high entrainment losses occurred. Based on hydroacoustic surveys, we estimated 3,276,000 kokanee in Dworshak Reservoir in early July 2001. This included 2,069,000 age-0 kokanee (90% CI {+-} 16.4%), 801,000 age-1 kokanee (90% CI {+-} 17.8%), and 406,000 age-2 kokanee (90% CI {+-} 20.5%). Entrainment sampling was also conducted with split-beam hydroacoustics a minimum of one continuous 24 h period per month. The highest entrainment rates occurred at night with lower discharges and shallower intake depths. Fish movement patterns suggested that they swam 'at will' in front of the intakes and may have chosen to move into the turbine intakes. Based on monthly hydroacoustic sampling in the forebay, we found that kokanee density was low in July and August during a period of high discharge. However, kokanee density was high in late winter when discharge was also high, thus increasing the likelihood of entrainment. Counts of spawning kokanee in four tributary streams used as an index reached 6,079 fish. This spawner count appeared unusually low considering the high population estimate of kokanee in the reservoir and data collected in previous years.

Maiolie, Melo; Stark, Eric

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

DFCI Gene Index Project: Genomic Databases for Plants, Animals, Protist, and Fungi from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The DFCI Gene Index Project creates databases for specific organisms. The goal for these databases is to provide an analysis of publicly available Expressed Sequence Transcripts (ESTs). ESTs are fragments of genes that were, at some time, copied from DNA to RNA. and gene sequence data to identify transcrips. The databases are in zipped files and free for download. The website also provides software and tools for use with the data, along with instructions from the website on how to link to background resources. The Gene Indices are organized into four categories: Animals, Plants, Protist, and Fungi.

415

Adaptive Evolution and Effective Population Size in Wild House Mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of the proportion of amino acid substitutions that have been fixed by selection (a) vary widely among taxa, ranging from zero in humans to over 50 % in Drosophila. This wide range may reflect differences in the efficacy of selection due to differences in the effective population size (Ne). However, most comparisons have been made among distantly related organisms that differ not only in Ne but also in many other aspects of their biology. Here, we estimate a in three closely related lineages of house mice that have a similar ecology but differ widely in Ne: Mus musculus musculus (Ne; 25,000120,000), M. m. domesticus (Ne; 58,000200,000), and M. m. castaneus (Ne; 200,000733,000). Mice were genotyped using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism array, and the proportions of replacement and silent mutations within subspecies were compared with those fixed between each subspecies and an outgroup, Mus spretus. There was significant evidence of positive selection in M. m. castaneus, the lineage with the largest Ne, with a estimated to be approximately 40%. In contrast, estimates of a for M. m. domesticus (a 5 13%) and for M. m. musculus (a 5 12 %) were much smaller. Interestingly, the higher estimate of a for M. m. castaneus appears to reflect not only more adaptive fixations but also more effective purifying selection. These results support the hypothesis that differences in Ne contribute to differences among species in the efficacy of selection.

Megan Phifer-rixey; Francxois Bonhomme; Pierre Boursot; Gary A. Churchill; Jaroslav Pilek; Priscilla K. Tucker; Michael W. Nachman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Study of atomic physics and population inversions with plasma focus  

SciTech Connect

The plasma focus can be used to generate high temperature and high density plasmas. Neon-like plasmas have previously been studied in Z-pinches and laser produced plasmas as sources for XUV and x-ray lasers. The plasma focus provides a simple and inexpensive source for studying atomic physics of highly ionized atoms. A detailed understanding of atomic physics at high temperatures, densities, and megagauss magnetic fields is necessary for possible x-ray laser designs. Methods that are generally used for obtaining population inversions include collisional ionization of the inner shells of multi-electron atoms and ions, photoexcitation, and electron collisional excitation of ions, collisional combination of ions, and atom-ion resonant charge exchange. We will discuss some possible experiments to help understand the atomic physics under the above condition. Some ideas and calculations will be given to show the feasibility of doing atomic physics relating to x-ray lasers with a plasma focus. 13 refs., 2 figs.

Oona, H.; Hodgdon, M.L.; Rickel, D.G.; Freeman, B.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Experimental Designs for Testing Differences in Survival Among Salmonid Populations.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP) is a supplementation plan for enhancing salmon runs in the Yakima River basin. It is presumed that inadequate spawning and rearing habitat are limiting factors to population abundance of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawyacha). Therefore, the supplementation effort for spring chinook salmon is focused on introducing hatchery-raised smolts into the basin to compensate for the lack of spawning habitat. However, based on empirical evidence in the Yakima basin, hatchery-reared salmon have survived poorly compared to wild salmon. Therefore, the YFP has proposed to alter the optimal conventional treatment (OCT), which is the state-of-the-art hatchery rearing method, to a new innovative treatment (NIT). The NIT is intended to produce hatchery fish that mimic wild fish and thereby to enhance their survival over that of OCT fish. A limited application of the NIT (LNIT) has also been proposed to reduce the cost of applying the new treatment, yet retain the benefits of increased survival. This research was conducted to test whether the uncertainty using the experimental design was within the limits specified by the Planning Status Report (PSR).

Hoffman, Annette; Busack, Craig; Knudsen, Craig

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #445: November 27, 2006 U.S. Population  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: November 27, 5: November 27, 2006 U.S. Population Growth and Light Vehicle Sales to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #445: November 27, 2006 U.S. Population Growth and Light Vehicle Sales on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #445: November 27, 2006 U.S. Population Growth and Light Vehicle Sales on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #445: November 27, 2006 U.S. Population Growth and Light Vehicle Sales on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #445: November 27, 2006 U.S. Population Growth and Light Vehicle Sales on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #445: November 27, 2006 U.S. Population Growth and Light Vehicle Sales on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #445:

419

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal OriginChapter 2 Chevreul-discovered Fatty Acids and their Salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal Origin Chapter 2 Chevreul-discovered Fatty Acids and their Salts Food Science eChapters Food Science & Technology Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2 Chevreul-discovered

420

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 9 besity Effect and Prevention of Insulin Resistance by a Long-Term Consumption of Dietary Diacylglycerol in Experimental Animal Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 9 besity Effect and Prevention of Insulin Resistance by a Long-Term Consumption of Dietary Diacylglycerol in Experimental Animal Models Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food S

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal OriginChapter 1 Definitions of Concepts and Description of the Elemental Analysis of Organic Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Chemical Study of Oils and Fats of Animal Origin Chapter 1 Definitions of Concepts and Description of the Elemental Analysis of Organic Compounds Food Science eChapters Food Science & Technology Press Downloadable pdf...

422

Single Cell Oils: Microbial and Algal Oils, 2nd EditionChapter 18 Applications of Single Cell Oils for Animal Nutrition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single Cell Oils: Microbial and Algal Oils, 2nd Edition Chapter 18 Applications of Single Cell Oils for Animal Nutrition Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Biofuels - Bioproducts eChapters Press Downloadable pdf ...

423

Transgenic plants and animals: Altered organisms from recombinant DNA technology. July 1982-July 1989 (Citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Report for July 1982-July 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning the development and use of transgenic plants and animals. Topics include methods of induction of new genes and transgenetic expression in the organism, development of animal models of human diseases, and design of insect tolerant plants. Examples of transgenic organisms include mice, fish, chicken, pigs, rye, maize, tobacco, tomatoes, lettuce, and cotton. This information is of value for the increased production of food from animals by producing animal carcasses with reduced fat content. The information is also valuable for production of herbicide tolerant, virus resistant, and insect resistant crop plants, as well as the rapid production of transgenic plants with flowers and seeds. (Contains 383 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

REVIEW doi:10.1111/j.1365-2052.2004.01229.x Myostatin and its implications on animal breeding: a review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of mutations render the gene inactive, and therefore, unable to regulate muscle fibre deposition-muscled animals also have less bone, less fat and more muscle, with a higher proportion of ?expensive? cuts

Liberles, David

425

Global Population Genetics and Evolution of Invasive Biotypes in the Whitefly Complex Bemisia tabaci  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

population history with DIY ABC: a user-friendly approach topopulation history with DIY ABC: a user-friendly approach to

Hadjistylli, Margarita

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

POPDOSE-SR: A Routine Release Atmospheric Population Dose Model Used at SRS  

SciTech Connect

POPDOSE-SR is used to calculate dose to the surrounding Savannah River Site (SRS) population following routine releases of atmospheric radioactivity.

Simpkins, A.A.

2001-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

427

Dynamic energy budgets and bioaccumulation : a model for marine mammals and marine mammal populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy intake of individuals affects growth of organisms and, therefore, populations. Persistent lipophilic toxicants acquired with the energy can bioaccumulate and harm individuals. Marine mammals are particularly vulnerable ...

Klanj?ek, Tin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Threatened Atlantic Elkhorn Coral, Acropora palmata: Population Dynamics and Their Policy Implications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the years 2030 and 2100. 125! ixthe foreseeable future (until 2030) and beyond (until 2100),in population size by 2030. The most striking difference we

Vardi, Tali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The threatened Atlantic elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata : population dynamics and their policy implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the years 2030 and 2100. 125! ixthe foreseeable future (until 2030) and beyond (until 2100),in population size by 2030. The most striking difference we

Vardi, Tali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Testing the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use for a Disabled Population.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research examines the factors that determine physician use in a physically disabled and the mentally disabled population using Andersen's Behavioral Model of Utilization. It (more)

Greene, Angela Marie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Table HC5-7a. Appliances by Four Most Populated States, Million U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table HC5-7a. Appliances by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total

432

GENII dose calculations for offsite maximum individual and populations from Plutonium Finishing Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Document describes the potential dose consequences to the offsite maximum individual and population for ground and stack level releases at the offsite receptors from the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

Nguyen, L.V.

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

433

Marine Animal Alert System -- Task 2.1.5.3: Development of Monitoring Technologies -- FY 2011 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

The Marine Animal Alert System (MAAS) in development by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is focused on providing elements of compliance monitoring to support deployment of marine hydrokinetic energy devices. An initial focus is prototype tidal turbines to be deployed in Puget Sound in Washington State. The MAAS will help manage the risk of injury or mortality to marine animals from blade strike or contact with tidal turbines. In particular, development has focused on detection, classification, and localization of listed Southern Resident killer whales within 200 m of prototype turbines using both active and passive acoustic approaches. At the close of FY 2011, a passive acoustic system consisting of a pair of four-element star arrays and parallel processing of eight channels of acoustic receptions has been designed and built. Field tests of the prototype system are scheduled for the fourth quarter of calendar year 2011. Field deployment and testing of the passive acoustic prototype is scheduled for the first quarter of FY 2012. The design of an active acoustic system that could be built using commercially available off-the-shelf components from active acoustic system vendors is also in the final stages of design and specification.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Myers, Joshua R.; Matzner, Shari; Copping, Andrea E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

434

BARS REJUVENATING BULGES? EVIDENCE FROM STELLAR POPULATION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

We obtained stellar ages and metallicities via spectrum fitting for a sample of 575 bulges with spectra available from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The structural properties of the galaxies have been studied in detail in 2009 by Gadotti and the sample contains 251 bulges in galaxies with bars. Using the whole sample, where galaxy stellar mass distributions for barred and unbarred galaxies are similar, we find that bulges in barred and unbarred galaxies occupy similar loci in the age versus metallicity plane. However, the distribution of bulge ages in barred galaxies shows an excess of populations younger than {approx}4 Gyr, when compared to bulges in unbarred galaxies. Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics confirm that the age distributions are different with a significance of 99.94%. If we select sub-samples for which the bulge stellar mass distributions are similar for barred and unbarred galaxies, this excess vanishes for galaxies with bulge mass log M < 10.1 M{sub Sun }, while for more massive galaxies we find a bimodal bulge age distribution for barred galaxies only, corresponding to two normal distributions with mean ages of 10.4 and 4.7 Gyr. We also find twice as much active galactic nuclei among barred galaxies, as compared to unbarred galaxies, for low-mass bulges. By combining a large sample of high-quality data with sophisticated image and spectral analysis, we are able to find evidence that the presence of bars affects the mean stellar ages of bulges. This lends strong support to models in which bars trigger star formation activity in the centers of galaxies.

Coelho, P. [Nucleo de Astrofisica Teorica, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, R. Galvao Bueno 868, Liberdade 01506-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gadotti, D. A., E-mail: paula.coelho@cruzeirodosul.edu.br, E-mail: dgadotti@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

435

The journey of light : a rehabilitation center of inhabited light, NYC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary intention of this thesis is to explore the tectonic qualities of light throughCthe design of a building. In addition to addressing some of the more general questions concerning light raised in the design process, ...

Louie, John Lai Yen

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Waste Water Treatment Plant [The Inhabited Landscape: An Exhibition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

copper finial made by the architects. The finial was made toterrace level plan Architect's Statement As Cold Spring

Architects, Centerbrook

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Hanford Area 1990 population and 50-year projections. [Appendix contains computer programming for population projections and graphs showing them by grid areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complex and comprehensive safety analysis activities carried out at Hanford for nonreactor nuclear facilities require data from a number of scientific and engineering disciplines. The types of data that are required include data pertaining to current population and population projections. The types of data found in this document include 1990 census totals for residential population within a 50-mile radius of the 100-N, 200, 300, and 400 Area meteorological towers. This document also contains 50-year projections for residential populations within a 50-mile radius of these four meteorological towers. The analysis of population projections indicates that residential population within a 50-mile radius of the four meteorological towers in question will continue to grow through 2040, although at a slower rate each decade. In all cases, the highest growth is projected for the decade ending in the year 2000. The annual growth rate for this period is projected to be 0.646, 0.633, 0.543, and 0.570 in the 100-N, 200, 300, and 400 Areas, respectively. By 2040, these growth rates are projected to drop to 0.082, 0.068, 0.078, 0.078, respectively. 4 refs., 1 figs., 4 tabs.

Beck, D.M.; Scott, M.J.; Shindle, S.F.; Napier, B.A.; Thurman, A.G.; Batishko, N.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Davis, M.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Pittenger, D.B. (Demographics Lab., Olympia, WA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Cultural Dasymetric Population Mapping with Historical GIS: A Case Study from the Southern Appalachians  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been a recent flurry of interest in dasymetric population mapping. However, the ancillary coverages that underlie current dasymetric methods are unconnected to cultural context. The resulting regions may indicate density patterns, but not necessarily ... Keywords: Agricultural Geography, Appalachia, Dasymetric, Historical GIS, Population Mapping, Rural Geography, West Virginia

George Towers

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

The Ramsey model with logistic population growth and Benthamite felicity function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the effects of a Benthamite formulation for the utility function into the Ramsey model with logistic population growth, introduced by Brida and Accinelli (2007). Within this framework, we demonstrate the economy to be described by ... Keywords: Benthamite, Ramsey, logistic population

Massimiliano Ferrara; Luca Guerrini

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Review: Multi-agent modeling and simulation of an Aedes aegypti mosquito population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work deals with the simulation of a mosquito Aedes aegypti population. The mosquito population was modeled using an individual-based approach. The model consists of agents representing A. aegypti mosquitoes, human beings, some mammals and ... Keywords: Aedes aegypti mosquito, Agent-based model, BG-Sentinel, Ecological model, Individual-based model, Multi-agent simulation

Sandro Jernimo de Almeida; Ricardo Poley Martins Ferreira; lvaro E. Eiras; Robin P. Obermayr; Martin Geier

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Expressing effects-based outcomes from patterns of emergent population behaviors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are basic social and cultural structures and processes that influence effects-based outcomes. When populations experience a miss-match of sociocultural factors that influence expectations and intentions, this can trigger an affective reaction ... Keywords: group dynamics, population modeling, sociocultural factors, stratagemical behavior patterns

Colleen L. Phillips; Norman D. Geddes

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack of sufficient per capita available freshwater. Water stress can result from overuse of available freshwater resources or from a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases ... Keywords: Climate change impacts, Population growth, Resource scarcity, Water availability

Esther S. Parish; Evan Kodra; Karsten Steinhaeuser; Auroop R. Ganguly

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Asymptotic distribution of Wishart matrix for block-wise dispersion of population eigenvalues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the asymptotic distribution of Wishart matrix and its application to the estimation of the population matrix parameter when the population eigenvalues are block-wise infinitely dispersed. We show that the appropriately normalized ... Keywords: Stein's loss, 62C20, 62H10, Asymptotic risk, Covariance matrix, Quadratic loss, Wishart distribution

Yo Sheena; Akimichi Takemura

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

AN ENERGETICS MODEL FOR THE EXPLOITED YELLOWFIN TUNA, THUNNUS ALBACARES, POPULATION IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN ENERGETICS MODEL FOR THE EXPLOITED YELLOWFIN TUNA, THUNNUS ALBACARES, POPULATION IN THE EASTERN yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares, population in the eastern Pacific Ocean is developed. Hydrodynamic to swimming as a function oflength for tunas. Growth and maintenance energetics are estimated and incorporated

445

Population Structure and Gene Flow of the Yellow Anaconda (Eunectes notaeus) in Northern Argentina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population Structure and Gene Flow of the Yellow Anaconda (Eunectes notaeus) in Northern Argentina States of America Abstract Yellow anacondas (Eunectes notaeus) are large, semiaquatic boid snakes found anaconda population structure (IBD), and important for gene flow, although genetic distances were

Shaffer, H. Bradley

446

How do Recent Population Trends Matter to Climate Leiwen Jiang Karen Hardee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). For instance, a study of the energy consumption from 1970 to 1990 in developed countries shows that, using that population growth parallels increases in economic growth, energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions change and population growth jointly determine energy consumption and carbon emissions (Ehrlich

447

Population, affluence, and environmental impact across development: Evidence from panel cointegration modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes urban population's and affluence's (GDP per capita's) influence on environmental impact in developed and developing countries by taking as its starting point the STIRPAT framework. In addition to considering environmental impacts ... Keywords: Environment and development, Environmental/Carbon Kuznets Curve, FMOLS panel cointegration, GHG emissions, IPAT, Population and environment, STIRPAT

Brantley Liddle

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

"The Map of the Mexican's Genome": overlapping national identity, and population genomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the intersections between national identity and the production of medical/population genomics in Mexico. The ongoing efforts to construct a Haplotype Map of Mexican genetic diversity offers a unique opportunity to illustrate and analyze ... Keywords: Ethnography, Haplotypes, Mestizo identity, Nationalism, Population genomics

Ernesto Schwartz-Marn; Irma Silva-Zolezzi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Estimates of Duck Breeding Populations in the Nebraska Sandhills Using Double Observer Methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of breeding duck populations in the Nebraska Sandhills. Aerial transect surveys were conducted using be considered for adjusting duck counts that cannot be corrected using additional aerial or ground surveys. Key words.--Aerial survey, Anas, detection probabilities, double observer, Nebraska, population

Powell, Larkin A.

450

Applications of carbon-13 and sodium-23 NMR in the study of plants, animal, and human cells  

SciTech Connect

Carbon-13 and sodium-23 NMR have been applied to the study of a variety of plant, animal and human cell types. Sodium NMR, in combination with dysprosium shift reagents, has been used to monitor sodium transport kinetics in salt-adapted, and non-adapted cells of P. milliaceum and whole D. spicata plants. The sodium content of human erythrocytes and leukemic macrophages was measured. Carbon-13 NMR was used to determine the structure and metabolism of rat epididymal fat pad adipocytes in real time. Insulin and isoproterenol-stimulated triacylglycerol turnover could be monitored in fat cell suspensions. (1-/sup 13/C) glucose was used as a substrate to demonstrate futile metabolic cycling from glucose to glycerol during lypolysis. Cell wall polysaccharide synthesis was followed in suspensions of P. milliaceum cells using (1-/sup 13/C) glucose as a precursor. These results illustrate the wide range of living systems which are amenable to study with NMR. 14 refs., 21 figs.

Sillerud, L.O.; Heyser, J.W.; Han, C.H.; Bitensky, M.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Predicting the impacts of climate change on animal distributions: the importance of local adaptation and species' traits  

SciTech Connect

The geographic range limits of many species are strongly affected by climate and are expected to change under global warming. For species that are able to track changing climate over broad geographic areas, we expect to see shifts in species distributions toward the poles and away from the equator. A number of ecological and evolutionary factors, however, could restrict this shifting or redistribution under climate change. These factors include restricted habitat availability, restricted capacity for or barriers to movement, or reduced abundance of colonists due the perturbation effect of climate change. This research project examined the last of these constraints - that climate change could perturb local conditions to which populations are adapted, reducing the likelihood that a species will shift its distribution by diminishing the number of potential colonists. In the most extreme cases, species ranges could collapse over a broad geographic area with no poleward migration and an increased risk of species extinction. Changes in individual species ranges are the processes that drive larger phenomena such as changes in land cover, ecosystem type, and even changes in carbon cycling. For example, consider the poleward range shift and population outbreaks of the mountain pine beetle that has decimated millions of acres of Douglas fir trees in the western US and Canada. Standing dead trees cause forest fires and release vast quantities of carbon to the atmosphere. The beetle likely shifted its range because it is not locally adapted across its range, and it appears to be limited by winter low temperatures that have steadily increased in the last decades. To understand range and abundance changes like the pine beetle, we must reveal the extent of adaptive variation across species ranges - and the physiological basis of that adaptation - to know if other species will change as readily as the pine beetle. Ecologists tend to assume that range shifts are the dominant response of species to climate change, but our experiments suggest that other processes may act in some species that reduce the likelihood of geographic range change. In the first part of our DOE grant (ending 2008) we argued that the process of local adaptation of populations within a species range, followed by climatic changes that occur too quickly for adaptive evolution, is an underappreciated mechanism by which climate change could affect biodiversity. When this process acts, species ranges may not shift readily toward the poles, slowing the rate of species and biome change. To test this claim, we performed an experiment comparing core and peripheral populations in a series of field observations, translocation experiments, and genetic analyses. The papers in Appendix A were generated from 2005-2008 funding. In the second part of the DOE grant (ending 2011) we studied which traits promote population differentiation and local adaptation by building genomic resources for our study species and using these resources to reveal differences in gene expression in peripheral and core populations. The papers in Appendix B were generated from 2008-2011 funding. This work was pursued with two butterfly species that have contrasting life history traits (body size and resource specialization) and occupy a common ecosystem and a latitudinal range. These species enabled us to test the following hypotheses using a single phylogenetic group.

HELLMANN, J. J.; LOBO, N. F.

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

452

Dedicated breast CT: Fibroglandular volume measurements in a diagnostic population  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the mean and range of volumetric glandular fraction (VGF) of the breast in a diagnostic population using a high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT system. This information is important for Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients and for investigating the dependence of VGF on breast dimensions, race, and pathology. Methods: Image data from a clinical trial investigating the role of dedicated breast CT that enrolled 150 women were retrospectively analyzed to determine the VGF. The study was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by the institutional human subjects review boards and written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. All participants in the study were assigned BI-RADS{sup Registered-Sign} 4 or 5 as per the American College of Radiology assessment categories after standard diagnostic work-up and underwent dedicated breast CT exam prior to biopsy. A Gaussian-kernel based fuzzy c-means algorithm was used to partition the breast CT images into adipose and fibroglandular tissue after segmenting the skin. Upon determination of the accuracy of the algorithm with a phantom, it was applied to 137 breast CT volumes from 136 women. VGF was determined for each breast and the mean and range were determined. Pathology results with classification as benign, malignant, and hyperplasia were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distributions of VGF varied with pathology. Results: The algorithm was accurate to within {+-}1.9% in determining the volume of an irregular shaped phantom. The study mean ({+-} inter-breast SD) for the VGF was 0.172 {+-} 0.142 (range: 0.012-0.719). VGF was found to be negatively correlated with age, breast dimensions (chest-wall to nipple length, pectoralis to nipple length, and effective diameter at chest-wall), and total breast volume, and positively correlated with fibroglandular volume. Based on pathology, pairwise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there was no significant difference in distributions of VGF without adjustment for age between malignant and nonmalignant breasts (p= 0.41). Pairwise comparisons of the distributions of VGF in increasing order of mammographic breast density indicated all comparisons were statistically significant (p < 0.002). Conclusions: This study used a different clinical prototype breast CT system than that in previous studies to image subjects from a different geographical region, and used a different algorithm for analysis of image data. The mean VGF estimated from this study is within the range reported in previous studies, indicating that the choice of 50% glandular weight fraction to represent an average breast for Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients in mammography needs revising. In the study, the distributions of VGF did not differ significantly with pathology.

Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Spatial Estimation of Populations at Risk from Radiological Dispersion Device Terrorism Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delineation of the location and size of the population potentially at risk of exposure to ionizing radiation is one of the key analytical challenges in estimating accurately the severity of the potential health effects associated with a radiological terrorism incident. Regardless of spatial scale, the geographical units for which population data commonly are collected rarely coincide with the geographical scale necessary for effective incident management and medical response. This paper identifies major government and commercial open sources of U.S. population data and presents a GIS-based approach for allocating publicly available population data, including age distributions, to geographical units appropriate for planning and implementing incident management and medical response strategies. In summary: The gravity model offers a straight-forward, empirical tool for estimating population flows, especially when geographical areas are relatively well-defined in terms of accessibility and spatial separation. This is particularly important for several reasons. First, the spatial scale for the area impacted by a RDD terrorism event is unlikely to match fully the spatial scale of available population data. That is, the plume spread typically will not uniformly overlay the impacted area. Second, the number of people within the impacted area varies as a function whether an attack occurs during the day or night. For example, the population of a central business district or industrial area typically is larger during the day while predominately residential areas have larger night time populations. As a result, interpolation techniques that link population data to geographical units and allocate those data based on time-frame at a spatial scale that is relevant to enhancing preparedness and response. The gravity model's main advantage is that it efficiently allocates readily available, open source population data to geographical units appropriate for planning and implementing incident management and medical monitoring strategies. The importance of being able to link population estimates to geographic areas during the course of an RDD incident can be understood intuitively: - The spatial distribution of actual total dose equivalents of ionizing radiation is likely to vary due to changes in meteorological parameters as an event evolves over time; - The size of the geographical area affected also is likely to vary as a function of the actual release scenario; - The ability to identify the location and size of the populations that may be exposed to doses of ionizing radiation is critical to carrying out appropriate treatment and post-event medical monitoring; - Once a spatial interaction model has been validated for a city or a region, it can then be used for simulation and prediction purposes to assess the possible human health consequences of different release scenarios. (authors)

Regens, J.L.; Gunter, J.T. [Center for Biosecurity Research, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Animating the Adi Ganga  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thesis is about a fascinating channel flowing in southern Kolkota. The channel is heavily polluted inspite of being considered sacred in the City's memory. The thesis tries to understand and interrogate the residual ...

Kapoor, Priyanka (Priyanka Anil)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Eyes of Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"simple" eyes for close vision. Birds have the keenest eyes and those of the hawks, eagles and vultures can see small objects at incredible distances. By their eyes ye shall...

456

Courses on animal behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nikko Tindbergen and Konrad Lorent. Tindbergen wrote a delightful book called "The Herring Gull's World" (1960) Doubleday publishers. One of them wrote "King Solomon's Ring",...

457

Color blind animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

not color blind. I believe that all the primates also see color as well as dogs, cats, some birds, fish, and insects. --- jade Apes and monkeys see color. So do bees, in a...

458

Assessing and communicating animal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

framework of risk communication. The initial focus will be on Lyme disease (also known as Lyme borreliosis), an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. Lyme disease is found in a number Protection Agency (Lyme Borreliosis Unit) and a number of other RELU projects. Further information

459

Crowd and group animation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A continuous challenge for special effects in movies is the production of realistic virtual crowds, in terms of rendering and behavior. This course will present state-of-the-art techniques and methods. The course will explain in details the different ...

Daniel Thalmann; Christophe Hery; Seth Lippman; Hiromi Ono; Stephen Regelous; Douglas Sutton

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Bksy Audiometry in Animals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the audiological use of the Bksy audiometer is predominantly based on hearing thresholds for continuous and pulsed tones

K. Lowy; J. Webster; R. Spragg

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Plants & Animals Biotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of stories in archives: 93,129 Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily's archives for related news] injection) Info for Physicians Only Lantus.com/HCP Search ScienceDaily Find with keyword(s): Search Number & Reviews | Contribute News | Advertise With Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use Copyright © 1995

Rogers, John A.

462

CMLSnap: Animated Reaction Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CMLSnap software can be downloaded from http://wwmm.ch.cam.ac.uk/moin/CMLSnap. It is based on the JUMBO toolkit for CML 7 which is OpenSource but here bundled as a single jar file for convenience The CMLSnap distribution contains about 10 multistep...

Holliday, Gemma L; Mitchell, John B O; Murray-Rust, Peter

2004-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

463

Plants Poisonous to Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with large coarse fronds is found in open woods and abandoned fields, especially upon sandy and gravelly soils. It is poisonous to cattle and horses that browse it when pastures...

464

Assembly and Testing of an On-Farm Manure to Energy Conversion BMP for Animal Waste Pollution Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerous gasification experiments were conducted and proved that with proper moisture content (usually near 10%) animal manure can be gasified using the TAMU fluidized bed gasifier. In summary the following has been established. The heating value of dairy manure on a dry basis was found to be 15.93 + 0.26 MJ/kg (6,863 + 112 Btu/lb), typical of most agricultural biomass. The heating value was around 14.09 MJ/kg (6,070 Btu/lb), on an as received basis (around 13% moisture). The heating value of synthesis gas from gasification of animal manure was estimated to be around 4.2 MJ/m3 (113 Btu/ft3). This value is very similar to most synthesis gas from agricultural residues. Synthesis gas production per unit weight of manure was estimated to be 2.11 m3/kg. The gas production energy efficiency was estimated to be around 55.6% (i.e. 55.6% of the energy was contained in the synthesis gas). Char production was on the average around 20% of the feed input. The average heating value of manure char was around 19 MJ/kg (8,816 Btu/lb). Thus, the char energy conversion efficiency was approximately 24% (i.e. 24% of the energy was still contained in the char). Twenty percent (20%) of the energy from the biomass was used during the gasification to maintain the temperature of the reactor. Gasification is a continuous, endothermic process and thus, no external fuel is needed other than that used during startup. Natural gas was used during start-up and would last around 30 minutes. After the initial heating of the reactor, part of the biomass materials were used to maintain the operating temperature and the natural gas fuel source was shut off. The chemical formula for dairy manure during combustion is shown below. This formula was used only for stoichiometric calculation purposes only. Eutectic point analysis of the manure ash showed that the inorganic ash components will start to melt at around 600C (1112F). This was established using compressive strength as an indicator of fusion reactions. When used for power generation, it was expected to generate at least 25 kW of electrical power output for a 30 cm diameter pilot facility (i.e. at 1.6 tonnes/day (1.8 tons/day)) of feed input. The assumed conversion efficiency was roughly 15% (from synthesis gas to electrical power in a natural gas-type engine-generator).

Engler, Cady; Capereda, Sergio; Mukhtar, Saqib

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 141-C Large Animal Barn and Biology Laboratory (Hog Barn), Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-027  

SciTech Connect

The 141-C waste site is a former large animal barn and biology laboratory within the 100-F Area experimental animal farm. Strontium-90, arsenic, and multiple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were detected within residual demolition debris at concentrations exceeding cleanup criteria. The site has been remediated by removing approximately 900 bank cubic meters of soil and debris within the former building footprint to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

R. A. Carlson

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

466

Fuel gas production from animal waste: Phase I. Quarterly progress report (2nd), September 1, 1976--December 1, 1976. Dynatech report No. 1556  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this second quarter, meetings were held with contractors on the ERDA Fuel Gas from Animal Waste Program to discuss project planning and review. Site visits were made to groups involved in anaerobic digestion. An engineering and economic analysis of a process for the anaerobic digestion of animal residue was completed; the results can be used for the design of a pilot plant unit. A comprehensive engineering report of this analysis was completed, and a first draft was submitted to ERDA. Several proposals were received from ERDA and reviewed.

Ashare, E.; Wentworth, R.L.; Wise, D.L.; Augenstein, D.C.

1976-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

467

Precipitation Trends and Water Consumption Related to Population in the Southwestern United States, 193083  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possible effects of climatic fluctuations on renewable water supplies in the western United States was examined, especially as it is impacted by the growth of population and water consumption in recent decades.

Henry F. Diaz; Ronald L. Holle; Joe W. Thorn Jr.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The Large-Scale Environments of the Global Populations of Mesoscale Convective Complexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean genesis environment was constructed for each of five mesoscale convective complex (MCC) population centers around the world: Africa, Australia, China, South America, and the United States. It is found that the environments are very ...

Arlene G. Laing; J. Michael Fritsch

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Population Characteristics, Development Processes and Structure of Radar Echoes in South Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radar data from the Florida Area Cumulus Experiment were used to study the ensemble characteristics of echo populations and also the structure of echo systems and their phenomenological growth and development process. The diurnal development of ...

Ral E. Lpez; David O. Blanchard; Daniel Rosenfeld; William L. Hiscox; Marjorie J. Casey

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Modeling and responding to pandemic influenza : importance of population distributional attributes and non-pharmaceutical interventions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After reviewing prevalent approaches to the modeling pandemic influenza transmission, we present a simple distributional model that captures the most significant population attributes that alter the dynamics of the outbreak. ...

Nigmatulina, Karima Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Global Population Distribution and Urban Land Use in Geophysical Parameter Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial distribution of human population on the land surface is a fundamental determinant of land-use impacts on Earth's ecosystems. Census enumerations and satellite-detected night lights provide two complementary, but distinct, ...

Christopher Small

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Efficacy, national/international practices and motivational factors of lifelong driver education for the aging population  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a society facing a significant increase in its aging population, older driver education/training is emerging as a potential solution to help seniors drive more safely, thus maintaining their mobility and quality of life. ...

Israels, Richard (Richard Steven)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Aggregation of U.S. Population Centers Using Climate Parameters Related to Building Energy Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for aggregating population centers into groups based on selected climate parameters is presented. Climate information on the 125 largest Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSAs) in the United States is used to assign each SMSA ...

Brandt Andersson; William L. Carroll; Marlo R. Martin

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Fish population and behavior revealed by instantaneous continental-shelf scale imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of a technique to instantaneously image and continuously monitor the abundance, spatial distribution, and behavior of fish populations over thousands of square kilometers using Ocean Acoustic Waveguide ...

Symonds, Deanelle T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Applying the multivariate time-rescaling theorem to neural population models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical models of neural activity are integral to modern neuroscience. Recently interest has grown in modeling the spiking activity of populations of simultaneously recorded neurons to study the effects of correlations ...

Gerhard, Felipe

476

The Decreasing Population Bias in Tornado Reports across the Central Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tornadohazard assessment is hampered by a population bias in the available data. Here, the authors demonstrate a way to statistically quantify this bias using the ratio of city to country report densities. The expected report densities come from ...

James B. Elsner; Laura E. Michaels; Kelsey N. Scheitlin; Ian J. Elsner

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Perceiving Ethnic Differences: Consensus Analysis and Personhood in Welsh-American Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Iowa and the other on the Vermont/New York border, variedValley on the New York/Vermont border, and the other thein Iowa. The New York/Vermont populations came from North

Caulkins, D. Douglas; Offer-Westort, Molly; Trosset, Carol

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Empower Women, Save the Planet? Science, Strategy, and Population-Environment Advocacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by a stronger donor-led emphasis on funding demographic andSilicon Valley led to reductions in funding for integratedgenerally reduced funding for population work have led many

Sasser, Jade

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Properties of Tropical Cloud Ensembles Estimated Using a Cloud Model and an Observed Updraft Population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple cloud model is developed which is designed for both diagnostic studies and mesoscale cumulus parameterization experiments. The cloud model is combined with an observed population of tropical convective updrafts and used to examine the ...

William M. Frank; Charles Cohen

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Natural balance of graminicolous aphids in Pakistan II. Aphids populations on maize  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural balance of graminicolous aphids in Pakistan II. Aphids populations on maize Sulaiman HAMID Sind Sugar Industry Research Institute, 14/A, Latifabad III, Hyderabad Sind, Pakistan SUMMARY Maize in Pakistan is attacked by Myzus obtusirostris David, Narayanan & Rajasingh, Rhopalosiphum

Recanati, Catherine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "animal populations inhabited" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Black Carbon Aerosol Concentration in Five Cities and Its Scaling with City Population  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A question of importance for urban planning and attainment of air quality standards is how pollutant concentrations scale with city population. This study uses measurements of light absorption and light scattering coefficients as proxies for primary (i.e.,...

G. Paredes-Miranda; W. P. Arnott; H. Moosmller; M. C. Green; M. Gyawali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Population- and genome-specific patterns of linkage disequilibrium and SNP variation in spring and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the lines from the CIM- MYT population and nearly allpopulations except for the CIM- MYT population, which hadthe sample of U.S. and CIM- MYT wheat cultivars. Therefore,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Population Size Does Not Predict Artifact Complexity: Analysis of Data from Tasmania, Arctic Hunter-Gatherers, and Oceania Fishing Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A, Wachtmeister C-A (2008) Why does human culture increasePOPULATION SIZE DOES NOT PREDICT ARTIFACT COMPLEXITY:interac- tion population and does a task requiring his or

Read, Dwight

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Intergenerational Transmission of Womens Educational Attainment in South Korea: An Application of Multi-group Population Projection Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Park Sangtae, and Eun Ki-Soo. eds. Population in Korea.Korea National Statistical Office. (in Korean) Keyfitz,Ki-Soo. eds. Population in Korea. Korea National Statistical

Kye, Bongoh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

A multi-region nonlinear age-size structured fish population model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to present a generic multi-region nonlinear age-size structured fish population model, and to assess its mathematical well-posedness. An initial-boundary-value problem is formulated. Existence and uniqueness of a positive weak solution is proved. Eventually, a comparison result is derived: the population of all regions decreases as the mortality rate increases in at least one region.

Faugeras, Blaise

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Effects of hunting and season of fire on wild turkey populations in South Carolina.  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses impacts to wild turkey populations from hunting and prescribed fire. The objectives of the study were as follows: (1) To compare survival rates and causes of mortality of wild turkey gobblers between hunted and unhunted populations; (2) To determine the effects of dormant versus growing season prescribed burns on nesting success, survival and habitat use of wild turkey hens; (3) To determine the effects of dormant versus growing season prescribed burns on the availability of wild turkey plant foods.

Moore, William, F.; Kilgo, John, C.; Guynn, David, C.; Davis, James, R.

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

487

Location of odor sources and the affected population in Imperial County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is divided into four sections. The first two sections contain general background information on Imperial County. The third section is a general discussion of odor sources in Imperial County, and the fourth maps the specific odor sources, the expected areas of perception, and the affected populations. this mapping is done for the Imperial Valley and each of the four Imperial County KGRA's (Known Geothermal Resource Areas) where odor from the development of the geothermal energy may affect population.